Science.gov

Sample records for pulsars supernova remnants

  1. Puzzling Pulsars and Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    D. R. Lorimer; R. Ramachandran

    1999-11-02

    The fact that the majority of the youngest radio pulsars are surrounded by expanding supernova remnants is strong evidence that neutron stars are produced in the supernovae of massive stars. In many cases, the pulsar appears significantly offset from the geometric centre of the supernova remnant, indicating that the neutron star has moved away from the site of the explosion with a substantial space velocity since birth. Here we show that the these offsets show an overwhelming preference for one sign in terms of Galactic longitude, a result that has important implications for the number of genuine associations. The origin of this statistically significant effect may lie in a differential Galactic rotational velocity between stars and gas in the interstellar medium.

  2. Pulsar wind nebulae in supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    E. van der Swaluw; A. Achterberg; Y. A. Gallant; G. Tóth

    2000-12-20

    A spherically symmetric model is presented for the interaction of a pulsar wind with the associated supernova remnant. This results in a pulsar wind nebula whose evolution is coupled to the evolution of the surrounding supernova remnant. This evolution can be divided in three stages. The first stage is characterised by a supersonic expansion of the pulsar wind nebula into the freely expanding ejecta of the progenitor star. In the next stage the pulsar wind nebula is not steady; the pulsar wind nebula oscillates between contraction and expansion due to interaction with the reverse shock of the supernova remnant: reverberations which propagate forward and backward in the remnant. After the reverberations of the reverse shock have almost completely vanished and the supernova remnant has relaxed to a Sedov solution, the expansion of the pulsar wind nebula proceeds subsonically. In this paper we present results from hydrodynamical simulations of a pulsar wind nebula through all these stages in its evolution. The simulations were carried out with the Versatile Advection Code.

  3. Pulsar Evolution within a Composite Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John M.; Slane, Patrick O.; Temim, Tea

    2014-08-01

    Supernova remnants have been observed expanding into a non-uniform density ISM. Such expansion creates asymmetry within the remnant, and we attempt to understand how this asymmetric expansion propagates through a system containing an active pulsar wind nebula. We are particularly interested in applying computational methods to such systems in order to recreate and understand the dynamics driving the formation of observed SNRs and their PWNe. We present here a two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulation of a SNR expanding into a uniform density gradient. The remnant contains an active PWN with a translational velocity of approximately 300 km/s which is expanding into freely expanding, unshocked supernova ejecta. We consider, in particular, the reverse-shock interaction state in which the wind nebula is crushed by the asymmetric reverse shock, and investigate the morphology and mixing of thermal and relativistic gas in the context of observed systems including G327.1-1.1.

  4. Pulsar Activity and the Morphology of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, V.; Srinivasan, G.

    1980-09-01

    We use the recently introduced concept of a "window" of magnetic field strengths in which pulsars can be active to explain the variation in morphology of supernova remnants. The striking difference between shell-type and filled-type remnants is attributed to differences in the magnetic field strengths of the neutron stars left by the respective supernovae. Field strengths of a value permitting pulsar activity result in particle production and Crab-like centrally concentrated remnants. Other field values lead to strong magnetic dipole radiation and consequent shell formation (e.g. Cas A). Several apparent inconsistencies concerning pulsar-supernova associations appear to find a logical explanation on the basis of this hypothesis.

  5. Are Pulsar Velocities Correlated with Supernova Remnant Ejecta Asymmetries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2012-05-01

    Proper motion studies have demonstrated that pulsars move with velocities much greater than those of their massive progenitors. These velocities span a distribution, with a mean of 380 km/s, and some pulsars are observed to have speeds up to two thousand km/s. These high speeds may arise from "kicks" imparted by asymmetric supernova explosions. To explore this scenario, we investigate whether ejecta asymmetries in supernova remnants (SNRs) are correlated with the inferred velocities of their central pulsars/neutron stars. In particular, we measure the asymmetry of ten SNRs in archival X-ray images using a multipole expansion technique, and we compare the results to pulsar/neutron star velocities from the literature. We find evidence that the SNRs with the fastest moving pulsars have the most mirror asymmetric ejecta, suggesting that pulsar kicks are indeed the result of asymmetry in the explosion mechanism.

  6. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

  7. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  8. Non-Cosmological FRB's from Young Supernova Remnant Pulsars

    E-print Network

    Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new extragalactic but non-cosmological explanation for FRB's based on very young pulsars in supernova remnants. Within a few hundred years of a core-collapse supernova the ejecta is confined within $\\sim$1 pc, providing a high enough column density of free electrons for the observed 500-1500 pc/cm$^3$. By extrapolating a Crab-like pulsar to its infancy in an environment like that of SN 1987A, we hypothesize such an object could emit supergiant pulses sporadically which would be bright enough to be seen at a few hundred megaparsecs. In this scenario Faraday rotation at the source gives RM's much larger than the expected cosmological contribution. If the emission were pulsar-like, then the polarization vector could swing over the duration of the burst, which is not expected from non-rotating objects. In this model, the scattering, large DM, and commensurate RM all come from one place which is not the case for the cosmological interpretation. The model also provides testable predictions of the flux ...

  9. HAWC Observation of Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-print Network

    Hui, C M

    2015-01-01

    The majority of Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources are pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs), and the most common association for unidentified sources is PWN. Many of these sources were discovered in TeV by imaging air Cherenkov telescopes using overlapping pointed observations over sections of the Galactic plane. The HAWC observatory is a survey type instrument in the Northern hemisphere with an energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV. Preliminary analysis of data recorded with the partially completed HAWC array taken since 2013 shows extended detections that are coincident with known TeV SNRs and PWNe. The full array became operational in early 2015 and has been steadily surveying the Northern sky since. I will discuss detections in HAWC data taken since 2013 associated with PWNe and SNRs.

  10. The properties of the progenitor, neutron star, and pulsar wind in the supernova remnant Kes 75

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, J. D.; Slane, P. O.; Temim, T.

    2014-03-01

    By studying composite supernova remnants (SNRs), remnants which contain a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), it is possible to estimate physical properties of the progenitor explosion, central neutron star, and its pulsar wind that are difficult to measure directly. This is best done by fitting the dynamical and broadband spectral properties of a PWN with an evolutionary model for a PWN inside an SNR. We apply such a model to the composite SNR Kes 75, whose associated pulsar PSR J1846-0258 is thought to have an extremely strong surface magnetic field. If ˜ 3 M_? of mass was ejected in the supernova, our model suggests a normal or slightly subenergetic supernova in a low density environment. Additionally, for the measured pre-outburst braking index of p=2.65, our model prefers an age of {˜ 430} years and an initial spin period P_0 ˜ 0.2 s. Lastly, the magnetization of the pulsar wind and energy spectrum of particles injected at the termination shock are similar to those observed from other PWNe powered by less magnetized neutron stars. While further study is needed to verify these results, they are nominally inconsistent with strong neutron star magnetic fields resulting from very fast initial rotation.

  11. Observations of supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae at gamma-ray energies

    E-print Network

    Hewitt, John W

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age thanks to two major breakthroughs: Cherenkov telescopes on the ground and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite. The sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) detected at gamma-ray energies is now much larger: it goes from evolved supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds up to young shell-type supernova remnants and historical supernova remnants. Studies of SNRs are of great interest, as these analyses are directly linked to the long standing issue of the origin of the Galactic cosmic rays. In this context, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) need also to be considered since they evolve in conjunction with SNRs. As a result, they frequently complicate interpretation of the gamma-ray emission seen from SNRs and they could also contribute directly to the local cosmic ray spectrum, particularly the leptonic component. This paper reviews the current results and thinking on SNRs and PWNe and their connection to cosmic ray product...

  12. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (?100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (?10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ?10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  13. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant Associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    I am pleased to be able to report significant progress in my research relevant to my LTSA grant. This progress I believe is demonstrated by a long list of publications in 2002, as detailed below. I summarize the research results my collaborators and I obtained in 2002. First, my group announced the major discovery of soft-gamma-repeater-like X-ray bursts from the anomalous X-ray pulsars lE-1048.1$-$5937 and lE-2259+586, using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. This result provides an elegant and long-sought-after confirmation that this class of objects and the soft gamma repeaters share a common nature, namely that they are magnetars. Magnetars are a novel manifestation of young neutron stars, quite different from conventional Crab-like radio pulsars. This discovery was made as part of our regular monitoring program, among the goals of which was to detect such outbursts.

  14. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  15. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars. PMID:18927355

  16. AN EXTREME PULSAR TAIL PROTRUDING FROM THE FRYING PAN SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Bouchard, A.; Bucciantini, N.; Gaensler, B. M.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.

    2012-02-10

    The Frying Pan (G315.9-0.0) is a radio supernova remnant with a peculiar linear feature (G315.78-0.23) extending 10' radially outward from the rim of the shell. We present radio imaging and polarization observations obtained from the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, confirming G315.78-0.23 as a bow-shock pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the young pulsar J1437-5959. This is one of the longest pulsar tails observed in radio and it has a physical extent over 20 pc. We found a bow-shock standoff distance of 0.002 pc, smallest among similar systems, suggesting a large pulsar velocity over 1000 km s{sup -1} and a high Mach number {approx}200. The magnetic field geometry inferred from radio polarimetry shows a good alignment with the tail orientation, which could be a result of high flow speed. There are also hints that the postshock wind has a low magnetization and is dominated by electrons and positrons in energy. This study shows that PWNe can offer a powerful probe of their local environment, particularly for the case of a bow shock where the parent supernova shell is also detected.

  17. A DYNAMICAL MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF A PULSAR WIND NEBULA INSIDE A NONRADIATIVE SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, Joseph D.; Zhang Weiqun; Slane, Patrick O.

    2009-10-01

    A pulsar wind nebula (PWN) inside a supernova remnant provides a unique insight into the properties of the central neutron star, the relativistic wind powered by its loss of rotational energy, its progenitor supernova, and the surrounding environment. In this paper, we present a new semianalytic model for the evolution of such a PWN throughout its lifetime. This model couples the dynamical and radiative evolution of the PWNe, and predicts both the dynamical (e.g., radius and expansion velocity) and radiative (radio to TeV gamma-ray spectrum) properties of the PWN during this period. As a result, it is well suited for using the observed properties of a PWN to constrain the physical characteristics of the neutron star, pulsar wind, progenitor supernova, and surrounding environment. We also discuss the expected evolution for a particular set of these parameters, and show that it reproduces the large spectral break inferred from the radio and X-ray spectrum of many young PWNe, and the low break frequency, low radio luminosity, high TeV gamma-ray luminosity, and high magnetization observed for several older PWNe. The predicted spectrum of this PWN also contains spectral features which appear during different evolutionary phases detectable with new radio and gamma-ray observing facilities such as the Extended Very Large Array and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Finally, this model has implications for determining if PWNe can inject a sufficient number of energetic electrons and positrons into their surroundings to explain the recent measurements of the cosmic-ray positron fraction by PAMELA and the cosmic-ray lepton spectrum by ATIC and HESS.

  18. Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The observation of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma rays is an excellent tool to study the most energetic and violent environments in the Galaxy. This energy range is only accessible with ground-based instruments such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) that reconstruct the energy and direction of the primary gamma ray by observing the Cherenkov light from the induced extended air showers in Earths atmosphere. The main goals of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are the identification of individual sources of cosmic rays (CRs), such as supernova remnants (SNRs), and the study of other extreme astrophysical objects at the highest energies, such as gamma-ray binaries and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). One of the main challenges is the discrimination between leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray production channels. To that end, the gamma-ray signal from each individual source needs to be brought into context with the multi-wavelength environment of the astrophysical object in question, particularly with observations tracing the density of the surrounding interstellar medium, or synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons. In this review presented at the European Cosmic Ray Symposium 2014 (ECRS2014), the most recent developments in the field of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are highlighted, with particular emphasis on SNRs and PWNe.

  19. Progress on multi-waveband observations of supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    Xuejuan Yang; Fangjun Lu; Wenwu Tian

    2008-10-23

    The development of observational techniques has inriched our knowledge of supernova remnants. In this paper, we review the main progresses in the last decade, including new discoveries of supernova remnants and the associated (rare type of) pulsars, nucleosynthesis, the interaction between supernova remnants and molecular clouds, dust in the supernova remnants, shock physics, and cosmic ray accelerations.

  20. NuSTAR Observations of Supernova Remnants and Pulsar-Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen; Zoglauer, A.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Grefenstette, Brian; Madsen, Kristin; Nynka, Melania

    NuSTAR is the first astronomical X-ray observatory able to image hard X-rays up to 78 keV. For the NuSTAR team, I report early results on the two youngest Galactic shell supernova remnants, Cas A and G1.9+0.3, and on two pulsar-wind nebulae: the Crab Nebula and G21.5-0.9. For Cas A, we show the spatial distribution of synchrotron continuum, visible up to 30 keV, and of (44) Ti, detected in the 68 and 78 keV nuclear de-excitation lines of its daughter (44) Sc. G1.9+0.3 is dominated by synchrotron continuum; we show images and spectra above 10 keV. (44) Ti has not yet been detected; the current upper limits are still somewhat above the amount inferred from Chandra observations of the 4.1 keV (44) Sc electron-capture line. Both PWNe shrink with increasing photon energy, presumably due to synchrotron burnoff, at rates which can be explained by simple models of electron advection in the nebular outflows. The Crab Nebula shrinks at different rates in different directions, most rapidly to the NW. The rates in the other directions are consistent with predictions by Kennel & Coroniti (1984). We detect slight spectral steepening in both the nebular (unpulsed) and pulsed spectrum. The pulsed spectrum steepens by 0.1 - 0.3 in the power-law index Gamma (varying with pulse phase), with an average value of Delta Gamma ˜ 0.3. The unpulsed (nebular) spectrum also steepens, by about 0.25 above ˜ 9} keV. Prior observations showed a hint of this steepening. In G21.5-0.9, NuSTAR detects emission both from the bright PWN itself and from the shell above 10 keV, confirming that some shell emission is synchrotron. We find a small steepening in the spectrum, well described by a power-law steepening by about 0.2 above 9 keV. The PWN radius is observed to shrink as E(-0.21) . A simple advection model can reproduce both the integrated spectrum from radio to X-rays, which steepens by 0.9 at at sub-mm wavelengths, and this shrinkage rate, but requires either magnetic-field amplification or mass loading of the outflow, for instance by evaporation of thermal material.

  1. A THOROUGH INVESTIGATION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB109 AND ITS PULSAR AXP J2301+5852

    SciTech Connect

    Kothes, R.; Foster, T. E-mail: fostert@brandonu.ca

    2012-02-10

    CTB109 is one of only three Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) known to harbor an anomalous X-ray pulsar or magnetar. That makes this SNR an object of great importance and a prime target for high-energy astrophysics studies. Those studies rely heavily on the assumed distance to CTB109. There have been three major distance determinations over the last decade, all of which report completely different results. While chaotic distance determinations in the literature are not uncommon for SNRs as a class of object, the wild discrepancy in the distance to CTB109 makes it especially important to revisit and firmly resolve once and for all. In this Letter we bring to bear all available observational information and present a synthesis of evidence that consistently locates CTB109 within or close to the Perseus arm spiral shock, at a distance of 3.2 {+-} 0.2 kpc.

  2. The Duck Redux: An Improved Proper Motion Upper Limit for the Pulsar B1757-24 Near the Supernova Remnant G5.4-1.2

    E-print Network

    J. A. Blazek; B. M. Gaensler; S. Chatterjee; E. van der Swaluw; F. Camilo; B. W. Stappers

    2006-07-26

    "The Duck" is a complicated non-thermal radio system, consisting of the energetic radio pulsar B1757-24, its surrounding pulsar wind nebula G5.27-0.90 and the adjacent supernova remnant (SNR) G5.4-1.2. PSR B1757-24 was originally claimed to be a young (~15 000 yr) and extreme velocity (>~1500 km/s) pulsar which had penetrated and emerged from the shell of the associated SNR G5.4-1.2, but recent upper limits on the pulsar's motion have raised serious difficulties with this interpretation. We here present 8.5 GHz interferometric observations of the nebula G5.27-0.90 over a 12-year baseline, doubling the time-span of previous measurements. These data correspondingly allow us to halve the previous upper limit on the nebula's westward motion to 14 milliarcseconds/yr (5-sigma), allowing a substantive reevaluation of this puzzling object. We rule out the possibility that the pulsar and SNR were formed from a common supernova explosion ~15 000 yrs ago as implied by the pulsar's characteristic age, but conclude that an old (>~70 000 yr) pulsar / SNR association, or a situation in which the pulsar and SNR are physically unrelated, are both still viable explanations.

  3. Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebula in the Supernova Remnant IC443: Preliminary Observations from the Chandra Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyibi, E. A.

    2009-10-01

    Preliminary observations of the Chandra data were made in order to study the Pulsar Wind Nebula in the Supernova Remnant IC443. The Chandra X-ray observatory short observation on IC443 was centred on 13 chip ACIS. The CIAO analytical programme was used for the data analysis. The data were separated into point source, with an energy range of 2.1 to 10.0 keV, and diffuse source with energy less than 2.1 Kev. The resulting spectra were fitted to a power law. The observed density numbers and the normalised counts of both the point source and the diffuse source were used to describe the X-ray source. Afin d'étudier la "Pulsar wind Nebula" dans le reste de la Supernova IC 443, nous avons mené une exploitation préliminaire des observations provenant du satellite spatiale Chandra. L'observation brêve de IC 443, par Chandra fut centrée sur les composantes du spectromètre identifiées par la séquence 13. Le programme informatique CIAO fut utilisé pour l'analyse des données. Les données furent groupées en sources ponctuelles, chacune ayant des énergies allant de 2.1 a 10.0 kev ; et en sources diffuses chacune avec des énergies de moins de 2.1 kev. Les spectres obtenus furent interpolés à l'aide de fonction puissance. La densité de flux ainsi que le décompte des particules induites au détecteur par le rayonnement provenant des sources ponctuelles et diffuses furent utilisés pour décrire la source de rayon-X.

  4. Neutron Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick; Kaluzienski, Lou (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant provided funds for a conference entitled 'Neutron Stars in Supernova Remnants' held in Boston on 14-17 August 2001, in part to support invited speakers and students attending the meeting. The conference was completed on the specified dates and was a considerable success, attracting over 100 scientists from around the world. The conference included talks and papers on the most recent work in this field, including results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, XMM-Newton, the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey, the Very Large Array, and many other facilities. Theoretical work based on the latest results was also highlighted. The Proceedings of the conference have now been published as 'Neutron Stars in Supernova Remnants'. In addition, a large fraction of the papers from the conference have been submitted to astro-ph, and the volume in indexed through the Astronomical Data System.

  5. An association between a long-period pulsar and an old supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Predehl, P.; Hasinger, G.; Aschenbach, B.

    1993-01-01

    A possible association between pulsar 2334 + 61, with a relatively long period of 0.5 s, and G114.3 + 0.3, a fairly old SNR is reported. The flat spectral index of -0.36 +/- 0.03 and large fractional polariazation suggest that the radio emission is powered by the pulsar. If so, the pulsar must have been born with a relatively short period of less than 100 ms. As the SNR is not particularly unusual morphologically, there might be many more such SNRs containing pulsars that are not beamed towards us.

  6. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  7. The Young Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G11.2-0.3: An Asymmetric Circumstellar Medium and a Variable Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Moseby, A.; Reynolds, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    G11.2-0.3 is a young supernova remnant (SNR) that has been suggested to be associated with a historical supernova of 386 AD. In addition to a bright radio and X-ray shell, it contains a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and a 65 ms pulsar. We present first results from new deep (about 400 ks in duration) Chandra observations from 2013 May and September. Ahead of the main shell, there are a number of outlying X-ray protrusions surrounded by bow shocks, presumably produced by dense ejecta knots. Pronounced spectral variations are seen in thermal X-ray spectra of the main shell, indicating the presence of shocks with a wide range in shock speeds and large spatial variations in intervening absorption. A band of soft X-ray emission is clearly seen at the remnant's center. We interpret this band as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the strongly asymmetric wind produced by a red supergiant SN progenitor shortly before its explosion. We study interstellar absorption in the central region of the remnant, finding high absorption everywhere. This rules out the association of G11.2-0.3 with SN 386. The PWN is dominated by a bright "jet" whose spatial morphology is markedly different between our May and September observations.

  8. Discovery of a Be/X-ray pulsar binary and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Brunet, V.; Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a new Be/X-ray pulsar binary located in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The strong pulsed X-ray source was discovered with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. The X-ray pulse period of 1062 s is consistently determined from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, revealing one of the slowest rotating X-ray pulsars known in the SMC. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source is the emission-line star 2dFS 3831. Its B0-0.5(III)e+ spectral type is determined from VLT-FLAMES and 2dF optical spectroscopy, establishing the system as a Be/X-ray binary (Be-XRB). The hard X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a power law with additional thermal and blackbody components, the latter reminiscent of persistent Be-XRBs. This system is the first evidence of a recent supernova in the low-density surroundings of NGC 602. We detect a shell nebula around 2dFS 3831 in H? and [O III] images and conclude that it is most likely a supernova remnant. If it is linked to the supernova explosion that created this new X-ray pulsar, its kinematic age of (2-4) × 104 yr provides a constraint on the age of the pulsar.

  9. Pulsar Wind Nebulae and Their Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Roger A. Chevalier

    2003-10-24

    Young supernova remnants that contain pulsar wind nebulae provide diagnostics for both the inner part of the supernova and the interaction with the surrounding medium, providing an opportunity to relate these objects to supernova types. Among observed young nebulae, there is evidence for a range of supernova types, including Type IIP (Crab Nebula and SN 1054) and Type IIb/IIn/IIL (G292.0+1.8).

  10. The Duck Redux: An Improved Proper Motion Upper Limit for the Pulsar B1757-24 Near the Supernova Remnant G5.4-1.2

    E-print Network

    Blazek, J A; Chatterjee, S; Van der Swaluw, E; Camilo, F; Stappers, B W

    2005-01-01

    "The Duck" is a complicated non-thermal radio system, consisting of the energetic radio pulsar B1757-24, its surrounding pulsar wind nebula G5.27-0.90 and the adjacent supernova remnant (SNR) G5.4-1.2. PSR B1757-24 was originally claimed to be a young (~15 000 yr) and extreme velocity (>~1500 km/s) pulsar which had penetrated and emerged from the shell of the associated SNR G5.4-1.2, but recent upper limits on the pulsar's motion have raised serious difficulties with this interpretation. We here present 8.5 GHz interferometric observations of the nebula G5.27-0.90 over a 12-year baseline, doubling the time-span of previous measurements. These data correspondingly allow us to halve the previous upper limit on the nebula's westward motion to 14 milliarcseconds/year (5-sigma), allowing a substantive reevaluation of this puzzling object. We rule out the possibility that the slow motion of the pulsar can be explained in the context of a highly off-center supernova explosion, but conclude that an old (>~70 000 yr) ...

  11. Discovery of a young, 267 millisecond pulsar in the supernova remnant W44

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolszczan, A.; Cordes, J. M.; Dewey, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the discovery of a 267 msec pulsar, PSR 1853 + 01, in the SNR W44 (G34.7 - 0.4), located south of the W44, well within its radio shell and at the outher edge of the X-ray emission region which fills the SNR interior. The PSR 1853 + 01 is separated only 20 arcmin from the PSR 1854 + 00 pulsar discovered by Mohanty (1983). Results of timing observatons of PSR 1853 + 01 are presented, and a possible relationship between the two objects is examined. It is suggested that the two pulsars may have a common origin in a binary system disrupted by the explosion that produced W44.

  12. Discovery of Radio Pulsations from the X-ray Pulsar JO205+6449 in Supernova Remnant 3C58 with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camilo, F.; Stairs, I. H.; Lorimer, D. R.; Backer, D. C.; Ransom, S. M.; Klein, B.; Wielebinski, R.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery with the 100m Green Bank Telescope of 65 ms radio pulsations from the X-ray pulsar J0205+6449 at the center of supernova remnant 3C58, making this possibly the youngest radio pulsar known. From our observations at frequencies of 820 and 1375 MHz, the free electron column density to USSR J0205+6449 is found to be 140.7 +/- 0.3/cc pc. The barycentric pulsar period P and P(dot) determined from a phase-coherent timing solution are consistent with the values previously measured from X-ray observations. The averaged radio profile of USSR J0205+6449 consists of one sharp pulse of width = 3 ms = 0.05 P. The pulsar is an exceedingly weak radio source, with pulse-averaged flux density in the 1400 MHz band of approximately 45 micro-Jy and a spectral index of approximately -2.1. Its radio luminosity of approximately 0.5 may kpc(exp 2) at 1400 MHz is lower than that of approximately 99% of known pulsar and is the lowest among known young pulsars.

  13. High resolution radio study of the Pulsar Wind Nebula within the Supernova Remnant G0.9+0.1

    E-print Network

    Gloria Dubner; Elsa Giacani; Anne Decourchelle

    2008-06-17

    We have conducted a radio study at 3.6, 6 and 20 cm using ATCA and VLA and reprocessed XMM-Newton and Chandra data of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the supernova remnant (SNR) G0.9+0.1. The new observations revealed that the morphology and symmetry suggested by Chandra observations (torus and jet-like features) are basically preserved in the radio range in spite of the rich structure observed in the radio emission of this PWN, including several arcs, bright knots, extensions and filaments. The reprocessed X-ray images show for the first time that the X-ray plasma fills almost the same volume as the radio PWN. Notably the X-ray maximum does not coincide with the radio maximum and the neutron star candidate CXOU J174722.8-280915 lies within a small depression in the radio emission. From the new radio data we have refined the flux density estimates, obtaining S(PWN) ~ 1.57 Jy, almost constant between 3.6 and 20 cm. For the whole SNR (compact core and shell), a flux density S(at 20 cm)= 11.5 Jy was estimated. Based on the new and the existing 90 cm flux density estimates, we derived alpha(PWN)=-0.18+/-0.04 and alpha(shell)=-0.68+/- 0.07. From the combination of the radio data with X-ray data, a spectral break is found near nu ~ 2.4 x 10^(12) Hz. The total radio PWN luminosity is L(radio)=1.2 x 10^(35) erg s^(-1) when a distance of 8.5 kpc is adopted. By assuming equipartition between particle and magnetic energies, we estimate a nebular magnetic field B = 56 muG. The associated particle energy turns out to be U(part)=5 x 10^(47) erg and the magnetic energy U(mag)=2 x 10^(47) erg. Based on an empirical relation between X-ray luminosity and pulsar energy loss rate, and the comparison with the calculated total energy, a lower limit of 1100 yr is derived for the age of this PWN.

  14. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  15. Late-Time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P.; Bucciantini, Niccoló

    2015-07-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology: a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for a mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock (RS), whichcan occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and/or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center of the remnant. We present hydrodynamical simulations of G327.1-1.1 that show that its morphology and evolution can be described by a ?17,000-year-old composite SNR that expanded into a density gradient with an orientation perpendicular to the pulsar’s motion. We also show that the RS/PWN interaction scenario can reproduce the broadband spectrum of the PWN from radio to ?-ray wavelengths. The analysis and modeling presented in this work have important implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  16. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ho, W. C. G.; Weltevrede, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Shannon, R.; Gonzalez, M. E.

    2012-12-10

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  17. Late-Time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P.; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock(RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center of the remnant. We present hydrodynamical simulations of G327.1-1.1 that show that its morphology and evolution can be described by a approx. 17,000 yr old composite SNR that expanded into a density gradient with an orientation perpendicular to the pulsar's motion. We also show that the RSPWN interaction scenario can reproduce the broadband spectrum of the PWN from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The analysis and modeling presented in this work have important implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  18. The slow X-ray pulsar SXP 1062 and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C.; Gallagher, J. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2013-03-01

    SXP 1062 is an exceptional case of a young neutron star in a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary associated with a supernova remnant. A unique combination of measured spin period, its derivative, luminosity and young age makes this source a key probe for the physics of accretion and neutron star evolution. Theoretical models proposed to explain the properties of SXP 1062 shall be tested with new data.

  19. Late-time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    E-print Network

    Temim, Tea; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock (RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and/or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center ...

  20. Discovery of an X-ray Synchrotron Nebula Associated with the Radio Pulsar PSR B1853+01 in the Supernova Remnant W44

    E-print Network

    Ilana M. Harrus; John P. Hughes; David J. Helfand

    1996-04-19

    We report the detection using ASCA data of a hard X-ray source in the vicinity of the radio pulsar PSR B1853+01 which is located within the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. PSR B1853+01, a 267ms pulsar, has to date only been detected in the radio band. Previous observations at soft X-ray energies (e.g., with ROSAT HRI) have failed to detect any significant X-ray emission (pulsed or unpulsed) from the pulsar. Over the 0.5--4.0keV band, the ASCA data show soft thermal emission from W44 with a morphology very similar to that observed earlier by Einstein and ROSAT. In the high energy band (4.0--9.5 keV), the SNR is, for the most part, invisible, although a source coincident with the position of PSR B1853+01 is evident. The observed ASCA spectra, extracted from a region around the PSR position, are consistent with a power-law origin (photon index =~2.3) for the X-ray emission from this source at a flux level (flux density ~~0.5 10^-6 Jy at 1 keV) consistent with previous upper limits. Timing analysis of the hard X-ray source failed to detect pulsations at the pulsar's period. We conclude that the new hard source in W44 represents an X-ray synchrotron nebula associated with PSR B1853+01.

  1. Spectral modeling of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, C. J.; Eriksen, K. A.; Colgan, J.; Zhang, H. L.; Hughes, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We report on recent efforts to generate high quality, self-consistent atomic physics models for L-shell ion stages for iron and the use of these data in collisional-radiative modeling of X-ray spectra of supernova remnants. As a specific example, we present comparisons between observed and theoretical X-ray spectra produced by Tycho's supernova remnant.

  2. Multi-frequency observations of SNR J0453-6829 in the LMC; A composite supernova remnant with a pulsar wind nebula

    E-print Network

    Haberl, F; Bozzetto, L M; Crawford, E J; Points, S D; Pietsch, W; De Horta, A Y; Tothill, N; Payne, J L; Sasaki, M

    2012-01-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is rich in supernova remnants (SNRs) which can be investigated in detail with radio, optical and X-ray observations. SNR J0453-6829 is an X-ray and radio-bright remnant in the LMC, within which previous studies revealed the presence of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), making it one of the most interesting SNRs in the Local Group of galaxies. We study the emission of SNR J0453-6829 to improve our understanding of its morphology, spectrum, and thus the emission mechanisms in the shell and the PWN of the remnant. We obtained new radio data with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and analysed archival XMM-Newton observations of SNR J0453-6829. We studied the morphology of SNR J0453-6829 from radio, optical and X-ray images and investigated the energy spectra in the different parts of the remnant. Our radio results confirm that this LMC SNR hosts a typical PWN. The prominent central core of the PWN exhibits a radio spectral index alpha_Core of -0.04+/-0.04, while in the rest of the S...

  3. X-ray Observations of the Supernova Remnant CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): An Evolved Pulsar Wind Nebula

    E-print Network

    Matheson, H; Kothes, R

    2013-01-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by ~100" and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source - the putative pulsar - at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for ~250" The spectra of t...

  4. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  5. DISCOVERY OF A HIGHLY ENERGETIC PULSAR ASSOCIATED WITH IGR J14003-6326 IN THE YOUNG UNCATALOGED GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G310.6-1.6

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, M.; Marandon, V.; Terrier, R.; Mattana, F.; Lebrun, F.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Rodriguez, J.; Manchester, R. N.

    2010-06-10

    We report the discovery of 31.18 ms pulsations from the INTEGRAL source IGR J14003-6326 using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). This pulsar is most likely associated with the bright Chandra X-ray point source lying at the center of G310.6-1.6, a previously unrecognized Galactic composite supernova remnant (SNR) with a bright central non-thermal radio and X-ray nebula, taken to be the pulsar wind nebula (PWN). PSR J1400-6325 is amongst the most energetic rotation-powered pulsars in the Galaxy, with a spin-down luminosity of E-dot = 5.1x10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. In the rotating dipole model, the surface dipole magnetic field strength is B{sub s} = 1.1 x 10{sup 12} G and the characteristic age {tau}{sub c{identical_to}}P/2 P-dot = 12.7 kyr. The high spin-down power is consistent with the hard spectral indices of the pulsar and the nebula of 1.22 {+-} 0.15 and 1.83 {+-} 0.08, respectively, and a 2-10 keV flux ratio F {sub PWN}/F {sub PSR} {approx} 8. Follow-up Parkes observations resulted in the detection of radio emission at 10 and 20 cm from PSR J1400-6325 at a dispersion measure of {approx}560 cm{sup -3} pc, which implies a relatively large distance of 10 {+-} 3 kpc. However, the resulting location off the Galactic plane of {approx}280 pc would be much larger than the typical thickness of the molecular disk, and we argue that G310.6-1.6 lies at a distance of {approx}7 kpc. There is no gamma-ray counterpart to the nebula or pulsar in the Fermi data published so far. A multi-wavelength study of this new composite SNR, from radio to very high-energy gamma rays, suggests a young ({approx}<10{sup 3} yr) system formed by a sub-energetic ({approx}<10{sup 50} erg), low ejecta mass (M {sub ej} {approx} 3 M {sub sun}) supernova explosion that occurred in a low-density environment (n {sub 0{approx}} 0.01 cm{sup -3}).

  6. Axially symmetric relativistic MHD simulations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae in Supernova Remnants - On the origin of torus and jet-like features

    E-print Network

    L. Del Zanna; E. Amato; N. Bucciantini

    2004-04-19

    The structure and the evolution of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) are studied by means of two-dimensional axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. After the first imaging of the Crab Nebula with Chandra, a growing number of objects has been found to show in the X-rays spatial features such as rings and jets, that clearly cannot be accounted for within the standard framework of one-dimensional semi-analytical models. The most promising explanation suggested so far is based on the combined effects of the latitude dependence of the pulsar wind energy flux, shaping the wind termination shock and naturally providing a higher equatorial emission, and of the wind magnetization, likely responsible for the jet collimation by hoop stresses downstream of the shock. This scenario is investigated here by following the evolution of a PWN interacting with the confining Supernova Remnant (SNR), from the free expansion to the beginning of the reverberation phase. Our results confirm the oblate shape of the wind termination shock and the formation of a polar jet with supersonic velocities (v~0.5-0.7 c) for high enough values of the equatorial wind magnetization parameter (sigma~0.01).

  7. Discovery of a 105-ms X-ray Pulsar in Kesteven-79: On the Nature of Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Seward, F. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of 105-ms X-ray pulsations from the compact central object (CCO) in the supernova remnant \\snr\\ using data acquired with the {\\it Newton X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission). Using two observations of the pulsar taken 6-days apart we derive an upper limit on its spin-down rate of $\\dot P < 9 \\times 10"{-14}$-s-${-l)$,a nd find no evidence for binary orbital motion. The implied energy loss rate is $\\dot E < 3 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-s$A{-1)$, polar magnetic field strength is $B-{\\rm p) < 3 \\times 10A{12)$-G, and spin-down age is $\\tau > 18.5$-kyr. The latter exceeds the remnant's estimated age, suggesting that the pulsar was born spinning near its current period. The X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ is best characterized as a blackbody of temperature $kT {BB) =, 0.43\\pm0.02$ keV, radius $R-{BB) \\approx 1.3$-km, and $I{\\rm bol) = 5.2 \\times 10A{33)$ ergs-sSA{-1)$ at $d = 7.1$-kpc. The sinusoidal light curve is modulated with a pulsed fraction of $>45\\%$, suggestive of a small hot spot on the surface of the rotating neutron star. The lack of a discernible pulsar wind nebula is consistent with an interpretation of \\psr\\ as a rotation-powered pulsar whose spin-down luminosity falls below the empirical threshold for generating bright wind nebulae, $\\dot E-{\\rm c) = 4 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-sSA{-I)$. The age discrepancy suggests that its $\\dot E$ has always been below $\\dot E c$, perhaps a distinguishing property of the CCOs. Alternatively, the X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ suggests a low-luminosity AXP, but the weak inferred $B-{\\rm p)$ field is incompatible with a magnetar theory of its X-ray luminosity. The ordinary spin parameters discovered from \\psr\\ highlight the inability of existing theories to explain the high luminosities and temperatures of CCO thermal X-ray spectra.

  8. On understanding the lives of dead stars : Supernova Remnant N103B, radio pulsar B1951+32, and the Rabbit

    E-print Network

    Migliazzo, Joshua Marc, 1977-

    2003-01-01

    Using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer, we observed the young Supernova Remnant N103B in the Large Magellanic Cloud as part of the Guaranteed Time Observation program. N103B has a small overall ...

  9. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar in the same area of the sky. Past attempts to identify the pulsar with G11.2-0.3, and hence the ancient Chinese observations, have been controversial. The location of the pulsar at the center of the remnant provides new evidence that it is associated with the remnant. Since pulsars are known to move rapidly away from where they are formed, a pulsar near the center of the remnant implies the system must be very young, since not enough time has elapsed for the pulsar to travel far from its birthplace. "We believe that the pulsar and the supernova remnant G11.2-0.3 are both likely to be left over from the explosion seen by the Chinese observers over 1600 years ago," said Roberts. "While this is exciting by itself, it also raises new questions about what we know about pulsars especially during their infancies." These questions follow from a discrepancy that arose when the ASCA team applied the present spin rate to current models to determine the pulsar’s estimated lifetime and compare it to the age of G11.2-0.3. The result was an age of roughly 24,000 years - far predating the birth year of 386 AD. To explain this contradiction, the Chandra team argues that this pulsar may have had approximately the same spin rate today as it did at its birth, as had been suggested by the ASCA data. If this is true, then it could have important implications for the conventional wisdom regarding pulsars, which, may be born spinning more slowly than has been thought. "We now have strong evidence that the standard age estimate for this pulsar is probably wrong, and it is much younger than previously believed," said Kaspi. "This, in turn, suggests that other standard pulsar age estimates may be wrong as well, and this has important implications for the population as a whole." In addition to these results, the Chandra observations of G11.2-0.3 have, for the first time, revealed the bizarre appearance of the pulsar wind nebula (also known as "plerions") at the center of the supernova remnant. Its rough cig

  10. TWO MAGNETAR CANDIDATES IN HESS SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V. E-mail: eric@astro.columbia.ed

    2010-02-20

    We identify two candidate magnetars in archival X-ray observations of HESS-detected shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs). X-ray point sources in CTB 37B coincident with HESS J1713 - 381 and in G353.6 - 0.7 coincident with HESS J1731 - 347 both have anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) like spectra, much softer than those of ordinary, rotation-powered pulsars, and no optical/IR counterparts. The spectrum of CXOU J171405.7 - 381031 in CTB 37B has a hard excess above 6 keV, which may be similar to such components seen in some AXPs. A new Chandra observation of this object reveals a highly significant pulsed signal at P = 3.82 s with pulsed fraction f{sub p} = 0.31. Analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the second candidate, XMMU J173203.3 - 344518 in G353.6 - 0.7, yields only marginal evidence for a 1 s period. If it is not a magnetar, then it could be a weakly magnetized central compact object. Considering that these HESS sources previously attributed to the SNR shells are possibly centrally peaked, we hypothesize that their pulsars may contribute to diffuse TeV emission. These identifications potentially double the number of magnetar/SNR associations in the Galaxy and can be used to investigate the energetics and asymmetries of the supernovae that give rise to magnetars.

  11. X-Ray Observations of the Supernova Remnant CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): An Evolved Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, H.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R.

    2013-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by ~100'' and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source—the putative pulsar—at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for ~250''. The spectra of the point source, compact nebula, and extended diffuse nebula are all well described by a power-law model with a photon index of 1.1 (0.7-1.6), 1.2 (0.9-1.4), and 1.7 (1.5-1.8), respectively, for a column density N H = 1.38 (1.21-1.57) × 1022 cm-2 (90% confidence). The total X-ray luminosity of the source is ~1.6 × 1034 erg s-1 at an assumed distance of 6.1 kpc, with ~2% and 6% contribution from the point source and compact nebula, respectively. The observed properties suggest that CTB 87 is an evolved (~5-28 kyr) PWN, with the extended radio emission likely a "relic" PWN, as in Vela-X and G327.1-1.1. To date, however, there is no evidence for thermal X-ray emission from this SNR, and the SNR shell is still missing, suggesting expansion into a low-density medium (n_0 < 0.2 D^{-1/2}_{6.1} cm-3), likely caused by a stellar wind bubble blown by the progenitor star.

  12. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): AN EVOLVED PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, H.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R. E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2013-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by {approx}100'' and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source-the putative pulsar-at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for {approx}250''. The spectra of the point source, compact nebula, and extended diffuse nebula are all well described by a power-law model with a photon index of 1.1 (0.7-1.6), 1.2 (0.9-1.4), and 1.7 (1.5-1.8), respectively, for a column density N{sub H} = 1.38 (1.21-1.57) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (90% confidence). The total X-ray luminosity of the source is {approx}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} at an assumed distance of 6.1 kpc, with {approx}2% and 6% contribution from the point source and compact nebula, respectively. The observed properties suggest that CTB 87 is an evolved ({approx}5-28 kyr) PWN, with the extended radio emission likely a ''relic'' PWN, as in Vela-X and G327.1-1.1. To date, however, there is no evidence for thermal X-ray emission from this SNR, and the SNR shell is still missing, suggesting expansion into a low-density medium (n{sub 0} < 0.2 D{sup -1/2}{sub 6.1} cm{sup -3}), likely caused by a stellar wind bubble blown by the progenitor star.

  13. Observing Supernovae and Supernova Remnants with JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable near- and mid-infrared studies of supernovae (SN) and supernova remnants (SNR) in the Milky Way and galaxies throughout the local universe and to high redshift. JWST's instrumentation provides imaging, coronography, and spectroscopy (R<3000) over the wavelength range 1-29 microns. The unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution will enable spectroscopic study of new and recent supernovae, including molecule and dust formation, in galaxies at least out to 30 Mpc, and imaging to much greater distances. The Target of Opportunity response time can be as short as 48 hours, enabling quick follow-up observations of important SN events. JWST will be ideal for the study of Galactic and Magellanic Clouds supernova remnants, particularly young remnants with hot dust. Its high angular resolution (0.07" at 2 microns, 0.7" at 20 microns) will allow direct comparison between the IR, optical, and X-ray morphologies, identifying sites of dust emission in both the ejecta and the shocked ISM unresolved by previous IR telescopes. There is a rich spectrum of atomic lines (H, He I, [Si I], [Fe II], [Ni I-III], [Co II-III], [S III-IV], [Ar II-III], [Ne II, III, V], [O IV]) and molecules (CO, SiO, H2) of importance for SN and SNR studies. JWST is a large aperture (6.5m), cryogenic, infrared-optimized space observatory under construction by NASA, ESA, and CSA for launch in 2018. The JWST observatory will be placed in an Earth-Sun L2 orbit by an Ariane 5 launch vehicle provided by ESA. The observatory is designed for a 5-year prime science mission, with consumables for 10 years of science operations. The first call for proposals for JWST observations will be released in 2017.

  14. Supernovae, young remnants, and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshner, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical abundance data from extragalactic supernovae and from supernova remnants (SNR) less than 1000 yrs old are employed to show that nuclear burning beyond helium synthesis actually occurs. Supernova (SN) are classified into types I or II, having no hydrogen lines or featuring hydrogen lines, respectively. The SN I's have been observed as having a preponderance of Fe lines, and emitting from a source at around 12,000 K with a center continuum of approximately 10 AU. Decay chains which could account for detected luminosities and spectra are presented, noting a good fit of Fe II spectrum with observed SN spectra. SNR pass through younger and older stages, going from the outpouring of material to diffusion in the interstellar medium. Expanding flocculi from young SNR show oxygen abundances as well as lines from sulfur, calcium, and argon, with a corresponding necessity of an explosive source of 15 solar masses.

  15. Modelling of the radio emission from the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushch, I.; Hnatyk, B.

    2014-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are widely considered to be sites of Galactic cosmic ray (CR) acceleration. Vela is one of the Galactic composite SNRs closest to Earth accompanied by the Vela pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN) Vela X. The Vela SNR is one of the most studied remnants and it benefits from precise estimates of various physical parameters such as distance and age. Therefore, it is a perfect object for a detailed study of physical processes in SNRs. The Vela SNR expands into the highly inhomogeneous cloudy interstellar medium (ISM) and its dynamics are determined by the heating and evaporation of ISM clouds. It features an asymmetrical X-ray morphology, which is explained by the expansion into two media with different densities. This could occur if the progenitor of the Vela SNR exploded close to the edge of the stellar wind bubble of the nearby Wolf-Rayet star ?2 Velorum causing one part of the remnant to expand into the bubble. The interaction of the ejecta and the main shock of the remnant with ISM clouds causes formation of secondary shocks at which additional particle acceleration takes place. This may lead to the almost uniform distribution of relativistic particles inside the remnant. We calculate the synchrotron radio emission within the framework of the new hydrodynamical model that assumes the supernova explosion at the edge of the stellar wind bubble. The simulated radio emission agrees well with both the total radio flux from the remnant and the complicated radio morphology of the source.

  16. Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, P.

    2011-06-01

    We review the main observational and theoretical facts about acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays in supernova remnants, discussing the arguments in favor and against a connection between cosmic rays and supernova remnants, the so-called supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Recent developments in the modeling of the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration are discussed, with emphasis on the role of 1) magnetic field amplification, 2) acceleration of nuclei heavier than hydrogen, 3) presence of neutrals in the circumstellar environment. The status of the supernova-cosmic ray connection in the time of Fermi-LAT and Cherenkov telescopes is also discussed.

  17. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  18. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  19. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 15-56

    E-print Network

    Temim, Tea

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3–1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that ...

  20. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  1. When will a pulsar in supernova 1987a be seen?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis; Kennel, C. F.; Fowler, William A.

    1987-01-01

    The means by which a pulsar might be detected in the remnant of supernova 1987a in the Large Magellanic Cloud is examined. One possibility is that the slower-than-radioactive decay typically seen in the type II light curves is itself the sign of powering by the underlying pulsar, with the decline representing not the spinning down of the pulsar but rather the declining nebular opacity that would allow increasing amounts of the energy to escape as gamma rays. The test of this hypothesis (if the supernova conforms to type II expectations) would be to look for the 'missing' energy in the form of those gamma rays that escape from the remnant instead of powering it.

  2. When will a pulsar in supernova 1987a be seen?

    PubMed

    Michel, F C; Kennel, C F; Fowler, W A

    1987-11-13

    The means by which a pulsar might be detected in the remnant of supernova 1987a in the Large Magelanic Cloud is examined. One possibility is that the slower-than-radioactive decay typically seen in the type II light curves is itself the sign of powering by the underlying pulsar, with the decline representing not the spinning down of the pulsar but rather the declining nebular opacity that would allow increasing amounts of the energy to escape as gamma rays. The test of this hypothesis (if the supernova conforms to type II expectations) would be to look for the "missing" energy in the form of those gamma rays that escape from the remnant instead of powering it. PMID:17829358

  3. Cosmic ray production in Historical Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Y Sinitsyna, V.

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of observations of two types of Galactic supernova remnants with the SHALON mirror Cherenkov telescope of Tien-Shan high-mountain Observatory: the shell-type supernova remnants Tycho, Cas A and IC 443; plerions Crab Nebula, 3c58(SN1181) and Geminga (probably plerion). The experimental data have confirmed the prediction of the theory about the hadronic generation mechanism of very high energy (800 GeV - 100 TeV) gamma-rays in Tycho's supernova remnant. The data obtained suggest that the very high energy gamma-ray emission in the objects being discussed is different in origin.

  4. The Remnants of Intergalactic Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Dan Maoz; Eli Waxman; Abraham Loeb

    2005-06-30

    Intergalactic type-Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) have been discovered recently in rich galaxy clusters, likely the descendants of an intergalactic stellar population found in recent years through a variety of tracers. We estimate the observational signatures of the associated SN remnants (SNRs) in the unusual intracluster medium (ICM) environment. If SNe-Ia still have a circumstellar medium (CSM) at the time of explosion, then their remnants are visible in the optical for ~100-1000 years, with properties similar to young galactic SNRs. In contrast with galactic SNRs, in which the ejecta from the explosion interacts with the ISM, intracluster SNRs become undetectable in the optical once their ejecta passes beyond the CSM and enters the hot and tenuous ICM. If SNe-Ia have a CSM, there should be ~150 young SNRs in the Virgo cluster, with L(H-alpha)~10^{35} erg/s and angular size ~0.1''. We investigate the possibility that members of this SNR population may have recently been detected, but incorrectly identified as intergalactic HII regions. Alternatively, if optical intergalactic SNRs do not exist in Virgo, this will be evidence that SNe-Ia are devoid of a CSM, with implications for progenitor scenarios. Regardless of the presence of a CSM, about 10 older radio SNRs per square degree should be detectable in Virgo, with fluxes of ~0.1 mJy at 1 GHz. Their angular sizes, morphologies, and lack of optical association with distant galaxies can distinguish them from the much more numerous background population. Their detection would provide a measurement of the intracluster SN rate. Observations toward the site of SN1980I, a possibly intergalactic Virgo SN-Ia, can test the existence of a CSM by comparison to our early-time predictions for intergalactic SNR development.

  5. THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY: THE FASTEST ROTATING O-TYPE STAR AND SHORTEST PERIOD LMC PULSAR-REMNANTS OF A SUPERNOVA DISRUPTED BINARY?

    SciTech Connect

    Dufton, P. L.; Dunstall, P. R.; Fraser, M.; Evans, C. J.; Brott, I.; Cantiello, M.; Langer, N.; De Koter, A.; Sana, H.; De Mink, S. E.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D.; Howarth, I. D.; Lennon, D. J.; Markova, N.

    2011-12-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500 km s{sup -1} and probably as large as 600 km s{sup -1}; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40 km s{sup -1} from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pc from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion, respectively.

  6. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these structures, but their orientation and position with resp

  7. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter. PMID:19792708

  8. X-ray imaging - Supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to imaging observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) obtained during the first year of the Einstein Observatory's operation. Inferences are drawn regarding models for stellar explosions, remnant evolution, neutron star formation and the interstellar medium. Because the X-ray emission traces the expanding shock boundary and dominates the radiative energy losses of an SNR over much of its lifetime, it can provide data on the possible collapsed remnants of the explosion, such as neutron stars and/or black holes. X-ray emission also allows a supernova shock to be used as a probe of interstellar medium structure. The imaging instrument aboard the Einstein satellite has been used to observe over 30 known Galactic remnants, and a similar number of objects in other galaxies, in the 0.15-4.5 keV band.

  9. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  10. Evolution of multiple supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Nath, Biman B.; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Heating of the interstellar medium (ISM) by multiple supernova (SN) explosions is at the heart of producing galaxy-scale outflows in starburst galaxies. Standard models of outflows assume a high efficiency of SNe in heating the gas to X-ray emitting temperatures and filling the central region of starburst with hot gas, in order to launch vigorous outflows. We use hydrodynamical simulations to study the efficiency of multiple SNe in heating the ISM and filling the volume with gas of high temperatures. We argue that it is important for SN remnants to have a large filling factor and a large heating efficiency. For this, they have to be clustered in space and time, and keep exploding until the hot gas percolates through the whole region, in order to compensate for the radiative loss. In the case of a limited number of SNe, we find that although the filling factor can be large, the heating efficiency declines after reaching a large value. In the case of a continuous series of SNe, the hot gas (T ? 3 × 106 K) can percolate through the whole region after the total volume filling factor reaches a threshold of ˜0.3. The efficiency of heating the gas to X-ray temperatures can be ?0.1 after this percolation epoch, which occurs after a period of ?10 Myr for a typical starburst SN rate density of ?SN ? 10-9 pc-3 yr-1 and gas density of n ? 10 cm-3 in starburst nuclei regions. This matches the recent observations of a time delay of similar order between the onset of star formation and galactic outflows. The efficiency to heat gas up to X-ray temperatures (?106.5 K) roughly scales as ? _SN^{0.2} n^{-0.6}. For a typical SN rate density and gas density in starburst nuclei, the heating efficiency is ˜0.15, also consistent with previous interpretations from X-ray observations. We discuss the implications of our results with regard to observational diagnostics of ionic ratios and emission measures in starburst nuclei regions.

  11. HI Study of Southern Galactic Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    Bon-Chul Koo; Ji-hyun Kang; Naomi McClure-Griffiths

    2003-11-06

    We briefly summarize the survey of HI 21 cm emission lines to search for shocked atomic gas associated with Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) in the southern sky. For G347.3-0.5, we discuss the distance to the SNR and the implications of the HI results.

  12. The Cygnus Loop: An Older Supernova Remnant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, William

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Cygnus Loop, one of brightest and most easily studied of the older "remnant nebulae" of supernova outbursts. Discusses some of the historical events surrounding the discovery and measurement of the Cygnus Loop and makes some projections on its future. (TW)

  13. Autopsy of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting ejecta in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) are discussed. The reconstructions encompass the remnant's faint outlying ejecta knots, including the exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of debris often referred to as `jets'. The bulk of Cas A's ejecta are arranged in several circular rings with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). We suggest that similar large-scale ejecta rings may be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may explain lumpy emission line profile substructure sometimes observed in spectra of extragalactic core-collapse supernovae years after explosion. A likely origin for these large ejecta rings is post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material to form bubble-like structures.

  14. X-ray Observations of Vela Supernova Remnant Ejecta Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetz, Terrance J.

    2012-05-01

    As one of the nearest SNRs, the Vela Supernova Remnant (SNR) subtends more than 8 degrees on the sky, making it ideal for spatially resolved spectral studies. Its environment is complex, and the remnant shows marked variations: the remnant is bright, soft, and sharply defined to the east and north, but much fainter and less well ordered in the west and south. Age estimates for the associated pulsar range from $\\sim11400$ years to as much as 18000 years, making the the SNR a moderately old remnant. The remnant shows curious protrusions beyond the projected rim (Aschenbach et al. 1995, Nature 373, 587). Many have subsequently been investigated in X-rays and in each case, enhanced abundances have been detected, confirming that these fragments include ejecta. Here, we present analyses of several ejecta fragments based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton X-ray observations. This work was supported by NASA grants NNX06AE40G, NNX07AF67G, NNX08AZ74G, and by NASA contract NAS8-03060.

  15. Separated before birth: pulsars B2020+28 and B2021+51 as the remnants of runaway stars

    E-print Network

    V. V. Gvaramadze

    2007-05-29

    Astrometric data on the pulsars B2020+28 and B2021+51 suggest that they originated within several parsecs of each other in the direction of the Cyg OB2 association. It was proposed that the pulsars share their origin in a common massive binary and were separated at the birth of the second pulsar following the asymmetric supernova explosion. We consider a different scenario for the origin of the pulsar pair based on a possibility that the pulsars were separated before their birth and that they are the remnants of runaway stars ejected (with velocities similar to those of the pulsars) from the core of Cyg OB2 due to strong three- or four-body dynamical encounters. Our scenario does not require any asymmetry in supernova explosions.

  16. G65.2+5.7: A Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant with a Cool Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the G65.2+5.7 supernova remnant (also known as G65.3+5.7). Little material obscures this remnant and so it was well observed, even at the softest end of ROSATs bandpass (approx. 0.11 to 0.28 keV). These soft X-ray images reveal the remnant s centrally-filled morphology which, in combination with existing radio frequency observations, places G65.2+5.7 in the thermal composite (mixed morphology) class of supernova remnants. Not only might G65.2+5.7 be the oldest known thermal composite supernova remnant, but owing to its optically revealed cool, dense shell, this remnant supports the proposal that thermal composite supernova remnants lack X-ray bright shells because they have evolved beyond the adiabatic phase. These observations also reveal a slightly extended point source centered on RA = l9(sup h) 36(sup m) 46(sup s). dec = 30 deg.40 min.07 sec.and extending 6.5 arc min in radius in the band 67 map. The source of this emission has yet to be discovered, as there is no known pulsar at this location.

  17. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  18. Vivid View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This composite image of the Tycho supernova remnant combines infrared and X-ray observations obtained with NASA's Spitzer and Chandra space observatories, respectively, and the Calar Alto observatory, Spain. It shows the scene more than four centuries after the brilliant star explosion witnessed by Tycho Brahe and other astronomers of that era.

    The explosion has left a blazing hot cloud of expanding debris (green and yellow). The location of the blast's outer shock wave can be seen as a blue sphere of ultra-energetic electrons. Newly synthesized dust in the ejected material and heated pre-existing dust from the area around the supernova radiate at infrared wavelengths of 24 microns (red). Foreground and background stars in the image are white.

  19. Radioactivity and electron acceleration in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Zirakashvili, V. N.; Aharonian, F. A.

    2011-10-15

    We argue that the decays of radioactive nuclei related to {sup 44}Ti and {sup 56}Ni ejected during supernova explosions can provide a vast pool of mildly relativistic positrons and electrons which are further accelerated to ultrarelativistic energies by reverse and forward shocks. This interesting link between two independent processes - the radioactivity and the particle acceleration - can be a clue for solution of the well known theoretical problem of electron injection in supernova remnants. In the case of the brightest radio source Cas A, we demonstrate that the radioactivity can supply adequate number of energetic electrons and positrons for interpretation of observational data provided that they are stochastically preaccelerated in the upstream regions of the forward and reverse shocks.

  20. Pulsar recoil by large-scale anisotropies in supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Scheck, L; Plewa, T; Janka, H-Th; Kifonidis, K; Müller, E

    2004-01-01

    Assuming that the neutrino luminosity from the neutron star core is sufficiently high to drive supernova explosions by the neutrino-heating mechanism, we show that low-mode (l=1,2) convection can develop from random seed perturbations behind the shock. A slow onset of the explosion is crucial, requiring the core luminosity to vary slowly with time, in contrast to the burstlike exponential decay assumed in previous work. Gravitational and hydrodynamic forces by the globally asymmetric supernova ejecta were found to accelerate the remnant neutron star on a time scale of more than a second to velocities above 500 km s(-1), in agreement with observed pulsar proper motions. PMID:14753979

  1. Tachyonic Cherenkov radiation from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2015-12-01

    The subexponential decay observed in the ?-ray spectral maps of supernova remnants is explained in terms of tachyonic Cherenkov emission from a relativistic electron population. The tachyonic radiation densities of an electronic spinor current are derived, the total density as well as the transversal and longitudinal polarization components, taking account of electron recoil. Tachyonic flux quantization subject to dispersive and dissipative permeabilities is discussed, the matrix elements of the transversal and longitudinal Poynting vectors of the Maxwell-Proca field are obtained, Cherenkov emission angles and radiation conditions are derived. The spectral energy flux of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma is calculated, a tachyonic Cherenkov fit to the high-energy (1 GeV to 30 TeV) ?-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula is performed, and estimates of the linear polarization degree are given. The spectral tail shows subexponential Weibull decay, which can be modeled with a frequency-dependent tachyon mass in the dispersion relations. Tachyonic flux densities interpolate between exponential and power-law spectral decay, which is further illustrated by Cherenkov fits to the ?-ray spectra of the supernova remnants IC 443 and W44. Subexponential spectral decay is manifested in double-logarithmic spectral maps as curved Weibull or straight power-law slope.

  2. Excess gamma rays from the Loop I supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, C. L.; Mayer, C. J.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for an excess of cosmic ray intensity within the Loop I supernova remnant based on an interpretation of the observed distribution of gamma-rays across the remnant and the column densities of the associated gas. A strong case can thus be made for the bulk of the cosmic radiation (E , 10 to the 11th power eV) being produced in the Galactic supernova remnants.

  3. HESS upper limits for Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Boisson, C.; Bolz, O.; Borrel, V.; Braun, I.; Brion, E.; Brucker, J.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Carrigan, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Cornils, R.; Costamante, L.; Dalton, M.; Degrange, B.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Feinstein, F.; Fiasson, A.; Förster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Hauser, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jung, I.; Katarzy?ski, K.; Kendziorra, E.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khélifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Lamanna, G.; Latham, I. J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Martin, J. M.; Martineau-Huynh, O.; Marcowith, A.; Masterson, C.; Maurin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-P.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Renaud, M.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruppel, J.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schröder, R.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sol, H.; Spangler, D.; Stawarz, ?.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Superina, G.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: Observations of Kepler's supernova remnant (G4.5+6.8) with the HESS telescope array in 2004 and 2005 with a total live time of 13 h are presented. Methods: Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov radiation from extensive air showers is used to reconstruct the energy and direction of the incident gamma rays. Results: No evidence for a very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray signal from the direction of the remnant is found. An upper limit (99% confidence level) on the energy flux in the range 230 GeV{-}12.8 TeV of 8.6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 is obtained. Conclusions: In the context of an existing theoretical model for the remnant, the lack of a detectable gamma-ray flux implies a distance of at least 6.4 kpc. A corresponding upper limit for the density of the ambient matter of 0.7 cm-3 is derived. With this distance limit, and assuming a spectral index ? = 2, the total energy in accelerated protons is limited to Ep < 8.6 × 1049 erg. In the synchrotron/inverse Compton framework, extrapolating the power law measured by RXTE between 10 and 20 keV down in energy, the predicted gamma-ray flux from inverse Compton scattering is below the measured upper limit for magnetic field values greater than 52 ? G.

  4. Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chandra X-Ray Data (blue) Chandra X-Ray Data (green)Hubble Telescope (visible-light)Spitzer Telescope (infrared)

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe the expanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14 light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of the supernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the exploded star, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gas and dust.

    Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in the panel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining them with Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more complete picture of the supernova remnant.

    Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behind the shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look like rippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

    The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that have been heated by the supernova shock wave. The dust re-radiates the shock wave's energy as infrared light. The Spitzer data are brightest in the regions surrounding those seen in detail by the Hubble telescope.

    The Chandra X-ray data show regions of very hot gas, and extremely high-energy particles. The hottest gas (higher-energy X-rays, colored blue) is located primarily in the regions directly behind the shock front. These regions also show up in the Hubble observations, and also align with the faint rim of glowing material seen in the Spitzer data. The X-rays from the region on the lower left (colored blue) may be dominated by extremely high-energy electrons that were produced by the shock wave and are radiating at radio through X-ray wavelengths as they spiral in the intensified magnetic field behind the shock front. Cooler X-ray gas (lower-energy X-rays, colored green) resides in a thick interior shell and marks the location of heated material expelled from the exploded star.

    Kepler's supernova, the last such object seen to explode in our Milky Way galaxy, resides about 13,000 light-years away in the constellation Ophiuchus.

    The Chandra observations were taken in June 2000, the Hubble in August 2003; and the Spitzer in August 2004.

  5. Searches for continuous gravitational waves from nine young supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; V. Adya; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. S. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; F. Baldaccini; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; S. Barclay; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; J. Bartlett; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; Th. S. Bauer; C. Baune; V. Bavigadda; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; M. Benacquista; J. Bergman; G. Bergmann; C. P. L. Berry; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; S. Bhagwat; R. Bhandare; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; C. Biwer; M. A. Bizouard; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; C. D. Blair; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; P. Bojtos; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; N. M. Brown; S. Buchman; A. Buikema; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; M. Cho; J. H. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio, Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. J. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; J. Cripe; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; C. Cutler; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; L. Dartez; V. Dattilo; I. Dave; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. De Laurentis; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; G. Dojcinoski; V. Dolique; E. Dominguez; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; M. Ducrot; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. -B. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; X. Fan; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; M. Fays; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; E. C. Ferreira; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; S. Fuentes-Tapia; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. R. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; A. Gatto; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; B. Gendre; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. J. Guido; X. Guo; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; J. Hacker; E. D. Hall; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; M. D. Hannam; J. Hanson; T. Hardwick; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; S. Hee; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; G. Heinzel; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; D. Hofman; S. E. Hollitt; K. Holt; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Houston; E. J. Howell; Y. M. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; A. Idrisy; N. Indik; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; G. Islas; J. C. Isler; T. Isogai; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; S. Jawahar; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman

    2014-12-18

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves in data from the sixth LIGO science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of ten. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering F-statistic. We found no credible gravitational-wave signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as $4\\times10^{-25}$ on intrinsic strain, $2\\times10^{-7}$ on fiducial ellipticity, and $4\\times10^{-5}$ on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  6. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3–25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10?25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10?7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10?5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  7. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    1997-01-01

    CTA 1 is a center-filled supernova remnant (SNR) whose morphology and spectrum indicate the presence of a central pulsar, a synchrotron nebula, and a thermal component associated with the expansion of the blast wave into the interstellar medium. The centrally bright emission surrounds the position of a faint point source of x-rays observed with the ROSAT PSPC. Here we report on ASCA observations that confirm the nonthermal nature of the diffuse emission from the central regions of the remnant. We also present evidence for weak thermal emission that appears to increase in strength toward the outer boundary of the SNR. Thus, CTA 1 appears to be an x-ray composite remnant. Both the aftermath of the explosive supernova event and the energetic compact core are observable.

  8. A Newly Discovered Supernova Remnant and MSH 11-62 and 3C58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2000-01-01

    CTA 1 is a center-filled supernova remnant (SNR) whose morphology and spectrum indicate the presence of a central pulsar, a synchrotron nebula, and a thermal component associated with the expansion of the blast wave into the interstellar medium. The centrally bright emission surrounds the position of a faint point source of X-rays observed with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). Here we report on Advanced Spacecraft for Cosmology Astrophysics (ASCA) observations that confirm the nonthermal nature of the diffuse emission from the central regions of the remnant. We also present evidence for weak thermal emission that appears to increase in strength toward the outer boundary of the SNR. Thus, CTA 1 appears to be an X-ray composite remnant. Both the aftermath of the explosive supernova event and the energetic compact core are observable.

  9. ASCA observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant sample: Typing supernovae from their remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.; Hayashi, Ichizo; Helfand, David; Hwang, Una; Itoh, Masayuki; Kirshner, Robert; Koyama, Katsuji; Markert, Thomas; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Woo, Jonathan

    1995-01-01

    We present our first results from a study of the supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from ASCA. The three remnants we have analyzed to date, 0509-67.5, 0519-69.0, and N103B, are among the smallest, and presumably also the youngest, in the Cloud. The X-ray spectra of these SNRs show strong K alpha emission lines of silicon, sulfur, argon, and calcium with no evidence for corresponding lines of oxygen, neon, or magnesium. The dominant feature in the spectra is a broad blend of emission lines around 1 keV which we attribute to L-shell emission lines of iron. Model calculations (Nomoto, Thielemann, & Yokoi 1984) show that the major products of nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae (SNs) are the elements from silicon to iron, as observed here. The calculated nucleosynthetic yields from Type Ib and II SNs are shown to be qualitatively inconsistent with the data. We conclude that the SNs which produced these remnants were of Type Ia. This finding also confirms earlier suggestions that the class of Balmer-dominated remnants arise from Type Ia SN explosions. Based on these early results from the LMC SNR sample, we find that roughly one-half of the SNRs produced in the LMC within the last approximately 1500 yr came from Type Ia SNs.

  10. Supernova remnants with magnetars: Clues to magnetar formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    In this paper I discuss the lack of observational evidence that magnetars are formed as rapidly rotating neutron stars. Supernova remnants containing magnetars do not show the excess of kinetic energy expected for such a formation scenario, nor is there any evidence for a relic pulsar wind nebula. However, it could be that magnetars are formed with somewhat slower rotation periods, or that not all excess rotational energy was used to boost the explosion energy, for example as a result of gravitational radiation. Another observational tests for the rapid initial period hypothesis is to look for statistical evidence that about 1% of the observed supernovae have an additional 1040 1044 erg/s excess energy during the first year, caused by the spin down luminosity of a magnetar. An alternative scenario for the high magnetic fields of magnetars is the fossil field hypothesis, in which the magnetic field is inherited from the progenitor star. Direct observational tests for this hypothesis are harder to formulate, unless the neutron star formed in the SN1987A explosion emerges as a slowly rotating magnetar. Finally, I point out the possible connection between the jets in Cas A and its X-ray point source: the jets in Cas A may indicate that the explosion was accompanied by an X-ray flash, probably powered by a rapidly rotating compact object. However, the point source in Cas A does not seem to be a rapidly rotating neutron star. This suggests that Cas A contains a neutron star that has slowed down considerably in 330 yr, requiring a dipole magnetic field of B > 5 × 1013 G. The present day lack of evidence for a relic radio pulsar wind nebula may be used to infer an even higher magnetic field of 1015 G.

  11. SN 1054: A pulsar-powered supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei; Huang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The famous ancient supernova SN 1054 could have been too bright to be explained in the “standard” radioactive-powered supernova scenario. As an alternative attempt, we demonstrate that the spin-down of the newly born Crab pulsar could provide a sufficient energy supply to make SN 1054 visible at daytime for 23 days and at night for 653 days, where a one-zone semi-analytical model is employed. Our results indicate that SN 1054 could be a “normal” cousin of magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. Therefore, SN 1054-like supernovae could be a probe to uncover the properties of newly born neutron stars, which provide initial conditions for studies on neutron star evolutions.

  12. Generation of Cosmic rays in Historical Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of observations of two types of Galactic supernova remnants with the SHALON mirror Cherenkov telescope of Tien-Shan high-mountain Observatory: the shell-type supernova remnants Tycho, Cas A and IC 443; plerions Crab Nebula, 3c58(SN1181) and Geminga (probably plerion). The experimental data have confirmed the prediction of the theory about the hadronic generation mechanism of very high energy (800 GeV - 100 TeV) gamma-rays in Tycho's supernova remnant. The data obtainedsuggest that the very high energy gamma-ray emission in the objects being discussedis different in origin.

  13. Cosmic ray acceleration in young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schure, K. M.; Bell, A. R.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the appearance of magnetic field amplification resulting from a cosmic ray escape current in the context of supernova remnant shock waves. The current is inversely proportional to the maximum energy of cosmic rays, and is a strong function of the shock velocity. Depending on the evolution of the shock wave, which is drastically different for different circumstellar environments, the maximum energy of cosmic rays as required to generate enough current to trigger the non-resonant hybrid instability that confines the cosmic rays follows a different evolution and reaches different values. We find that the best candidates to accelerate cosmic rays to ˜ few PeV energies are young remnants in a dense environment, such as a red supergiant wind, as may be applicable to Cassiopeia A. We also find that for a typical background magnetic field strength of 5 ?G the instability is quenched in about 1000 years, making SN1006 just at the border of candidates for cosmic ray acceleration to high energies.

  14. An optical and near infrared search for a pulsar in Supernova 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Sasseen, T.P.

    1990-12-01

    We describe a search for an optical pulsar in the remnant of Supernova 1987A. We have performed over one hundred separate observations of the supernova, covering wavelengths from 3500 angstroms to 1.8 microns, with sensitivity to pulsations as faint as magnitude 22.7. As of September 26, 1990, we have not seen evidence for pulsations due to a pulsar in the supernova. We discuss the implications of this result on predictions of pulsar optical luminosity. We have constructed for the search two photodiode detectors and a data system. We describe their design, calibration and performance. These detectors have allowed us to increase our sensitivity as much as a factor of 5 over standard photomultiplier tubes, and extend this search to near infrared wavelengths. 59 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  15. SPITZER SPECTRAL MAPPING OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT CASSIOPEIA A

    E-print Network

    Smith, J. D. T.

    We present the global distribution of fine-structure infrared line emission in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared spectrograph. We identify emission from ejecta materials ...

  16. Modelling the interaction of thermonuclear supernova remnants with circumstellar structures: the case of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The well-established Type Ia remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572) reveals discrepant ambient medium-density estimates based on either the measured dynamics or the X-ray emission properties. This discrepancy can potentially be solved by assuming that the supernova remnant (SNR) shock initially moved through a stellar wind bubble, but is currently evolving in the uniform interstellar medium with a relatively low density. We investigate this scenario by combining hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-loss phase and the SNR evolution with a coupled X-ray emission model, which includes non-equilibrium ionization. For the explosion models we use the well-known W7 deflagration model and the delayed detonation model that was previously shown to provide good fits to the X-ray emission of Tycho's SNR. Our simulations confirm that a uniform ambient density cannot simultaneously reproduce the dynamical and X-ray emission properties of Tycho. In contrast, models that considered that the remnant was evolving in a dense, but small, wind bubble reproduce reasonably well both the measured X-ray emission spectrum and the expansion parameter of Tycho's SNR. Finally, we discuss possible mass-loss scenarios in the context of single- and double-degenerate models which possibly could form such a small dense wind bubble.

  17. The evolution of supernova remnants in different galactic environments, and its effects on supernova statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Sofia, S.; Bruhweiler, F.; Gull, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Examination of the interaction between supernova (SN) ejecta and the various environments in which the explosive event might occur shows that only a small fraction of the many SNs produce observable supernova remnants (SNRs). This fraction, which is found to depend weakly upon the lower mass limit of the SN progenitors, and more strongly on the specfic characteristics of the associated interstellar medium, decreases from approximately 15 percent near the galctic center to 10 percent at Rgal approximately 10 kpc and drops nearly to zero for Rgal 15 kpc. Generally, whether a SNR is detectable is determined by the density of the ambient interstellar medium in which it is embeeede. The presence of large, low density cavities arpund stellar associations due to the combined effects of stellar winds and supernova shells strongly suggests that a large portion of the detectable SNRs have runway stars as their progenitors. These results explain the differences between the substantially larger SN rates in the galaxy derived both from pulsar statistics and from observations of SN events in external galaxies, when compared to the substantially smaller SN rates derived form galactic SNR statistics.

  18. An X-ray View of the Zoo of Compact Objects and Associated Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse explosions of massive stars leave behind some of the most exotic compact objects in the Universe. These include: rotation-powered pulsars like the Crab, powering pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) observed across the electromagnetic spectrum; highly magnetized neutron stars ("magnetars") shining or bursting at high-energies; and X-ray emitting “Central Compact Objects” (CCOs) with intrinsic properties and emission mechanism that remain largely unknown. I will highlight this observed diversity of compact stellar remnants from an X-ray perspective, and address the connection between their properties and those of their hosting supernova remnants (SNRs). In particular I will highlight topics related to their formation and evolution, including: 1) which supernovae make magnetars and the shell-less PWNe?, 2) what can we learn from the apparent age discrepancy between SNRs and their associated pulsars? I will conclude with prospects for observations of SNRs with the upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray mission. The unprecedented spectral resolution on board of ASTRO-H’s micro-calorimeter will particularly open a new discovery window for supernova progenitors' science.

  19. Locating the Periodic Transient GRO J1849-03; Gamma-Ray Luminous Supernovae Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We obtained one 50 ks observation of the Monoceros supernova remnant under this proposal. This supernova remnant was selected because it overlaps the error box of a gamma-ray source. Much to our surprise, we discovered a hard x-ray point source instead of the diffuse hard x-ray emission we expected from the supernova remnant. A paper on the discovery of the hard x-ray source and on follow-up optical observations identifying a likely Bestar companion was published in the Astrophysical Journal. Subsequently, a reanalysis of the same data yielded the detection of pulsations from the x-ray source. These results were also published in the Astrophysical Journal. Subsequent x-ray observations, which we performed under later proposals, have shown that the x-ray pulsar has a characteristic spin-down age of less than 1400 years in a binary system. The system is likely the first discovered very young, highly-energetic, rotation-powered pulsar in a binary system and offers an exciting opportunity to study the infancy and early evolution of neutron-star binaries.

  20. Laser Experiments to Simulate Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    1999-11-01

    We have used the Nova laser, and plan to use the Omega laser, to perform experimental simulations of some very young supernova remnants, on space and time scales over which their structure can be approximated as planar. Our special focus has been the remnant forming from SN1987A, in which the stellar ejecta have begun a dramatic collision with a circumstellar ring. In the supernova, the blast wave launches ejecta outward from the star. In the experiments (R.P. Drake, et al., Ap. J. Lett. 500, L157 (1998).) an ablation-driven, strong shock launches ejecta outward from a layer of plastic into vacuum. In both cases: (a) the ejecta expand and cool to produce a low-pressure but high-Mach-number plasma flow; (b) the ejecta drive a strong forward shock into the nearby matter; (c) a reverse shock forms where these ejecta stagnate against the moving interface with this matter; (d) the interface between the ejecta and this matter is unstable to the Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability. A careful theoretical analysis(D.D. Ryutov, et al., ApJ 518, 821 (1999).) has established that the experiment is a well-scaled hydrodynamic model of SN1987A. Using x-ray backlighting, we have measured the motion of the forward shock and of the stagnated ejecta(R.P. Drake, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2068 (1998). ) and also the growth of the RT instability. Simulations of the resulting turbulence with the laboratory code, CALE , and with the astrophysics code, VH-1, and related simulations of turbulence in SNRs with PROMETHEUS(J. Kane, et al., Ap. J. 511, 335 (1999).) will be discussed. These systems are examples of flow-driven hydrodynamics, which abounds in nature but has been studied little in the laboratory. 1.R.P. Drake, et al., Ap. J. Lett. 500, L157 (1998). 2. D.D. Ryutov, et al., ApJ 518, 821 (1999). 3. R.P. Drake, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2068 (1998). 4. J. Kane, et al., Ap. J. 511, 335 (1999).

  1. MODIFIED EQUIPARTITION CALCULATION FOR SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Arbutina, B.; Urosevic, D.; Andjelic, M. M.; Pavlovic, M. Z.; Vukotic, B.

    2012-02-10

    Determination of the magnetic field strength in the interstellar medium is one of the more complex tasks of contemporary astrophysics. We can only estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field strength by using a few very limited methods. Besides the Zeeman effect and Faraday rotation, the equipartition or minimum-energy calculation is a widespread method for estimating magnetic field strength and energy contained in the magnetic field and cosmic-ray particles by using only the radio synchrotron emission. Despite its approximate character, it remains a useful tool, especially when there are no other data about the magnetic field in a source. In this paper, we give a modified calculation that we think is more appropriate for estimating magnetic field strengths and energetics in supernova remnants (SNRs). We present calculated estimates of the magnetic field strengths for all Galactic SNRs for which the necessary observational data are available. The Web application for calculation of the magnetic field strengths of SNRs is available at http://poincare.matf.bg.ac.rs/{approx}arbo/eqp/.

  2. Nonthermal Radiation from Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    Edmon, Paul P; Jones, T W; Ma, Renyi

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of expected continuum emissions from Sedov-Taylor phase Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs), using the energy spectra of cosmic ray (CR) electrons and protons from nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) simulations. A new, general-purpose radiative process code, Cosmicp, was employed to calculate the radiation expected from CR electrons and protons and their secondary products. These radio, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are generally consistent with current observations of Type Ia SNRs. The emissions from electrons in these models dominate the radio through X-ray bands. For warm ISM cases (n_{ISM}=0.3 cm^{-3}), thermal bremsstrahlung becomes the dominant component in the UV to X-rays at late times. Decays of \\pi^0 s from p-p collisions mostly dominate the gamma-ray range, although for a hot, low density ISM case (n_{ISM}=0.003 cm^{-3}), the pion decay contribution is reduced sufficiently to reveal the inverse Compton contribution to TeV gamma-rays. In addition, we present simple sc...

  3. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF TWO CANDIDATE SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kargaltsev, O.; Schmitt, B. M.; Pavlov, G. G.; Misanovic, Z.

    2012-01-20

    Candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) G23.5+0.1 and G25.5+0.0 were observed by XMM-Newton in the course of a snapshot survey of plerionic and composite SNRs in the Galactic plane. In the field of G23.5+0.1, we detected an extended source, {approx}3' in diameter, which we tentatively interpret as a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of the middle-aged radio pulsar B1830-08 (J1833-0827; P = 85.3 ms, {tau} = 147 kyr, E-dot = 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, d = 5.7 kpc), with the PWN luminosity L{sub 0.2-10keV} Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} Almost-Equal-To 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} E-dot . The pulsar is not resolved in the EPIC images. Our analysis suggests an association between PSR B1830-08 and the surrounding diffuse radio emission. If the radio emission is due to the SNR, then the pulsar must be significantly younger than its characteristic age. Alternatively, the radio emission may come from a relic PWN. The field also contains SGR 1833-0832 and another middle-aged pulsar B1829-08 (J1832-0827; P = 647 ms, {tau} = 161 kyr, E-dot = 9.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}, d = 4.7 kpc), none of which are detected in our observation. In the field of G25.5+0.0, which contains the extended TeV source HESS J1837-069, we detected the recently discovered young high-energy pulsar J1838-0655 (P = 70.5 ms, {tau} = 23 kyr, E-dot = 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) embedded in a PWN with extent of 1.'3. The unabsorbed pulsar + PWN luminosity is L{sub 2-11keV} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} E-dot at an assumed distance of 7 kpc. We also detected another PWN candidate (AX J1837.3-0652) with an extent of 2' and unabsorbed luminosity L{sub 2-10keV} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at d = 7 kpc. The third X-ray source, located within the extent of the HESS J1837-069, has a peculiar extended radio counterpart, possibly a radio galaxy with a double nucleus or a microquasar. We did not find any evidence of the SNR emission in the G25.5+0.0 field. We provide detailed multiwavelength analysis and identifications of other field sources and discuss robustness of the G25.5+0.0 and G23.5+0.1 classifications as SNRs.

  4. Discovery of optical candidate supernova remnants in Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikakos, J.; Boumis, P.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Goudis, C. D.

    2012-08-01

    During an [O III] survey of planetary nebulae, we identified a region in Sagittarius containing several candidate supernova remants (SNRs) and obtained deep optical narrow-band images and spectra to explore their nature. We obtained images of the area of interest by acquiring observations in the emission lines of H? + [N II], [S II] and [O III]. The resulting mosaic covers an area of 1.4° × 1.0°, where both filamentary and diffuse emission was discovered, suggesting that there is more than one SNR in the area. Deep long-slit spectra were also taken of eight different regions. Both the flux-calibrated images and the spectra show that the emission from the filamentary structures originates from shock-heated gas, while the photo-ionization mechanism is responsible for the diffuse emission. Part of the optical emission is found to be correlated with the radio at 4850 MHz suggesting that they are related, while the infrared emission found in the area at 12 ?m and 22 ?m marginally correlates with the optical. The presence of the [O III] emission line in one of the candidate SNRs implies that the shock velocities in the interstellar "clouds" are between 120 km s-1 and 200 km s-1, while its absence in the other candidate SNRs indicates that the shock velocities there are slower. For all candidate remnants, the [S II] ?? 6716/6731 ratio indicates that the electron densities are below 240 cm-3, while the H? emission is measured to be between 0.6 and 41 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. The existence of eight pulsars within 1.5° of the center of the candidate SNRs also implies that there are many SNRs in the area as well as that the detected optical emission could be part of a number of supernovae explosions.

  5. The radio remnant of Supernova 1987A at high frequencies and high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, G.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Potter, T. M.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    As the remnant of Supernova (SN) 1987A has been getting brighter over time, new observations at high frequencies have allowed imaging of the radio emission at unprecedented detail. We present a new radio image at 44 GHz of the supernova remnant (SNR), derived from observations performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in 2011. The diffraction-limited image has a resolution of 349×225 mas, which is the highest achieved to date in high-dynamic range images of the SNR. We also present a new image at 18 GHz, also derived from ATCA observations performed in 2011, which is super-resolved to 0''.25. The new 44 and 18 GHz images yield the first high-resolution spectral index map of the remnant. The comparison of the 44 GHz image with contemporaneous X-ray and H? observations allows further investigations of the nature of the remnant asymmetry and sheds more light into the progenitor hypotheses and SN explosion. In light of simple free-free absorption models, we discuss the likelihood of detecting at 44 GHz the possible emission originating from a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or a compact source in the centre of the remnant.

  6. RXTE Observation of the Tycho Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    The, Lih-Sin

    1998-01-01

    SN1006 [4] and Cas A [1, 9] supernova remnants have been shown convincingly to have a hard X-ray power-law continuum. This continuum is thought to be the synchrotron radiation from accelerated electrons of approx. 100 TeV at the shock fronts. Our goal of AO2 RXTE observation is to detect the hard X-ray continuum and to determine the nature of the continuum from Tycho SNR. A detection of a power-law continuum from Tycho SNR can strongly argue for SNRs are the source of cosmic rays with the first order Fermi acceleration as the energizing process. We report the results of our AO2 RXTE 1 x 10(exp 5) sec observation of Tycho SNR. We detect two components of the X-ray spectrum from Tycho SNR both at better than 3 omega confidence. The best two component models are: bremsstrahlung (kT=2.67 +/- 0.13 keV) + bremsstrahlung (kT=7.07 +/- 2.21/1.72 keV) or bremsstrahlung (kT=2.36 +/- 0.21/0.57 keV) + power-law (gamma=2.58 +/- 0.12/0.09 ). This result is an improvement compaxed with the previous most sensitive X-ray measurements by Ginga which shows Tycho's observed X-ray continuum requires a two-component model to yield acceptable fits with the hard component parameters being highly uncertain. Our RXTE measurements constrain all parameter within 3o, ranges. However, we cannot yet distinguish between thermal and nonthermal models for the hard component. In the followings, we describe what we accomplished in the period covered by the grant proposal.

  7. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the 'knee' energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the 'knee' energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  8. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the "knee" energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the "knee" energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  9. CHANDRA ACIS Spectroscopy of N157B -- A Young Composite Supernova Remnant in a Superbubble

    E-print Network

    Yang Chen; Q. Daniel Wang; Eric V. Gotthelf; Bing Jiang; You-Hua Chu; Robert Gruendl

    2006-09-06

    We present Chandra ACIS observations of N157B, a young supernova remnant located in the 30 Doradus star-formation region of the LMC. This remnant contains the most energetic pulsar known (PSR J0537-6910), which is surrounded by a bright nonthermal nebula that likely represents a toroidal pulsar wind terminal shock observed edge-on. We confirm the non-thermal nature of the comet-shaped X-ray emission feature and show that the spectral steepening of this feature away from the pulsar is quantitatively consistent with synchrotron cooling of shocked pulsar wind particles flowing downstream at a bulk velocity close to the speed of light. Around the cometary nebula we unambiguously detect a thermal component, which accounts for about 1/3 of the total 0.5 - 10 keV flux from the remnant. This thermal component is distributed among various clumps of metal-enriched plasma embedded in the low surface brightness X-ray-emitting diffuse gas. The relative metal enrichment pattern suggests that the mass of the supernova progenitor is >~ 20M_sun. A comparison of the X-ray data with HST optical images suggests that the explosion site is close to a dense cloud, against which a reflection shock is launched. The interaction between this reflection shock and the nebula has likely produced both its cometary shape and the surrounding thermal emission enhancement. SNR N157B is apparently expanding into the hot low-density interior of a surrounding superbubble formed by the young OB association LH99, as revealed by Spitzer mid-infrared images. This scenario naturally explains the exceptionally large sizes of both the thermal and nonthermal components as well as the lack of an outer shell of the SNR. These results provide a rare glimpse into the SNR structure and evolution in a region of recent star-formation.

  10. A BROADBAND STUDY OF THE EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 11-62

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Foight, Dillon; and others

    2012-04-20

    MSH 11-62 (G291.0-0.1) is a composite supernova remnant for which radio and X-ray observations have identified the remnant shell as well as its central pulsar wind nebula. The observations suggest a relatively young system expanding into a low-density region. Here, we present a study of MSH 11-62 using observations with the Chandra, XMM -Newton, and Fermi observatories, along with radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We identify a compact X-ray source that appears to be the putative pulsar that powers the nebula, and show that the X-ray spectrum of the nebula bears the signature of synchrotron losses as particles diffuse into the outer nebula. Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, we identify {gamma}-ray emission originating from MSH 11-62. With density constraints from the new X-ray measurements of the remnant, we model the evolution of the composite system in order to constrain the properties of the underlying pulsar and the origin of the {gamma}-ray emission.

  11. A Broadband Study of the Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 11-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick; Hughes, John P.; Temim, Tea; Rousseau, Romain; Castro, Daniel; Foight, Dillon; Gaensler, B. M.; Funk, Stefan; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Moffett, David A.

    2012-01-01

    MSH 11-62 (G29U)-Q.1) is a composite supernova remnant for which radio and X-ray observations have identified the remnant shell as well as its central pulsar wind nebula. The observations suggest a relatively young system expanding into a low-density region. Here, we present a study of MSH ll-62 using observations with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Fermi observatories, along with radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We identify a compact X-ray source that appears to be the putative pulsar that powers the nebula, and show that the X-ray spectrum of the nebula bears the signature of synchrotron losses as particles diffuse into the outer nebula. Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, we identify gamma-ray emission originating from MSH 11-62. With density constraints from the new X-ray measurements of the remnant, we model the evolution of the composite system in order to constrain the properties of the underlying pulsar and the origin of the gamma-ray emission.

  12. Possible optical counterparts to the X-ray point source in the supernova remnant CTB 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, W. P.; Schild, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A three color CCD image of the central region of the supernova remnant CTB 80 is presented, along with astrometry and photometry of many stars in the field. The color image does not show evidence of heavy or variable dust absorption in the surrounding region. Using an Einstein High Resolution Imager position for the central X-ray point source, two possible optical counterparts have been identified at magnitudes V = 19.9 and V = 20.9. Comparison of the intrinsic colors and magnitudes of these candidates are made to the optical properties of Crab and Vela pulsars, and they are found to be viable candidates.

  13. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-24

    An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY IMAGING OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murray, S. S.; Slane, P. O.; Park, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Manchester, R. N.

    2009-11-20

    We report observations of the remnant of supernova 1987A with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. A direct image from the HRC resolves the annular structure of the X-ray remnant, confirming the morphology previously inferred by deconvolution of lower resolution data from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Detailed spatial modeling shows that a thin ring plus a thin shell gives statistically the best description of the overall remnant structure, and suggests an outer radius of 0.''96 +- 0.''05 +- 0.''03 for the X-ray-emitting region, with the two uncertainties corresponding to the statistical and systematic errors, respectively. This is very similar to the radius determined by a similar modeling technique for the radio shell at a comparable epoch, in contrast to previous claims that the remnant is 10%-15% smaller at X-rays than in the radio band. The HRC observations put a flux limit of 0.010 counts s{sup -1} (99% confidence level, 0.08-10 keV range) on any compact source at the remnant center. Assuming the same foreground neutral hydrogen column density as toward the remnant, this allows us to rule out an unobscured neutron star with surface temperature T {sup i}nfinity > 2.5 MK observed at infinity, a bright pulsar wind nebula or a magnetar.

  15. Energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is increasing with time

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, using the Zeldovich integral relations, that the energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is strongly growing with time, approximately as t1/3. This growth can be attributed to the exothermic reactions going inside the remnant. The use of the assumption of the adiabaticity of the motion inside of the shock front, and no losses or gain of energy at the front, seems therefore unjustified. PMID:18202174

  16. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a minimum mass for core collapse between 7.0 and 7.8 M{sub Sun }.

  17. The supernova remnant 3C 397: distance and evolutionary state.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Ranasinghe, Sujith

    2016-01-01

    3C 397 (G1.1-0.3) is a bright supernova remnant recently identified as a Type Ia. We use neutral hydrogen absorption to derive a new distance to 3C 397. The distance allows determination of shock radius and density of the X-ray emitting gas. The harder component X-rays come from the bulk of the gas with low density, and the softer component X-rays come from high density gas with very little volume. Generalized supernova remnant models are then applied to show that 3C 397 is considerably younger (age about 1500 years) than previously thought.

  18. X-ray Observations of the Tycho Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John P.

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation I summarize some key new findings from recent Chandra and XMM-Newton data on the remnant of the supernova (SN) observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572, which is widely believed to have been of Type Ia origin. Studies of the Tycho supernova remnant (SNR) at the current epoch address aspects of SN Ia physics, the evolution of young SNRs, and cosmic ray acceleration at high Mach-number shocks.Research on the Tycho SNR at Rutgers has been supported by Chandra grants GO3-4066X and AR5-6010X.

  19. CO J=2-1 Observations toward the Supernova Remnant G54.1+0.3

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jung-Won; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    We present 12CO J = 2-1 line observations of G54.1+0.3, a composite supernova remnant with a mid-infrared (MIR) loop surrounding the central pulsar wind nebula (PWN). We mapped an area of 12' x 9' around the PWN and its associated MIR loop. We confirm two velocity components that had been proposed to be possibly interacting with the PWN/MIR-loop; the +53 km/s cloud that appears in contact with the eastern boundary of the PWN and the +23 km/s cloud that has CO emission coincident with the MIR loop. We have not found a direct evidence for the interaction in either of these clouds. Instead, we detected an 5'-long arc-like cloud at +15-+23 km/s with a systematic velocity gradient of ~3 km/s/arcmin and broad-line emitting CO gas having widths (FWHM) of <7 km/s in the western interior of the supernova remnant. We discuss their association with the supernova remnant.

  20. GSH 90-28-17: a possible old supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Zhu, M.

    2014-02-01

    GSH 90-28-17 is a high-latitude Galactic H I supershell, identified in the H I supershell catalogues with a velocity vlsr ˜ -17 km s-1. We used the new Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array (GALFA) H I survey data, which have much higher resolution and sensitivity than was previously available, to re-examine the properties of the supershell. We derived a new distance of 400 pc for GSH 90-28-17 and suggested that it is related to the Lac OB1 association. The radius of GSH 90-28-17 is 66.0 ± 3.5 pc. The H I mass of the shell is (3.1 ± 0.1) × 104 M?. It has an age of ˜4.5 Myr and a total kinetic energy of (8.2 ± 0.3) × 1048 erg. We extracted radio continuum data for the GSH 90-28-17 region from the 408-MHz All-Sky Survey and Bonn 1420-MHz survey and filtered the diffuse background Galactic emission. A radio loop-like ridge is found to be associated with the H I shell at both frequencies and shows a non-thermal origin, with a temperature-temperature (TT)-plot index of ? = -1.35 ± 0.69. In addition, the pulsar J2307+2225, with a similar distance, is found in the shell region. We conclude that GSH 90-28-17 is probably an old, type II supernova remnant in the solar neighbourhood.

  1. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Gusdorf, A.

    2015-07-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 M? generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the centre of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 M? progenitor moving with velocity 20 km s-1 and to our initially 40 M? progenitor. These remnants generate mixing of ISM gas, stellar wind and supernova ejecta that is particularly important upstream from the centre of the explosion. Their light curves are dominated by emission from optically thin cooling and by X-ray emission of the shocked ISM gas. We find that these remnants are likely to be observed in the [O III] ? 5007 spectral line emission or in the soft energy-band of X-rays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of observed Galactic supernova remnants such as 3C 391 and the Cygnus Loop.

  2. The Crab Nebula and related supernova remnants; Proceedings of the Workshop, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, October 11, 12, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M. C. (editor); Henry, R. B. C. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented on the Crab Nebula's composition, helium distribution, outer structure and jet, and evolution. Attention is given to line emission from supernova remnants and charge transfer reactions, a magnetohydrodynamic model of the Crab Nebula and its radiation, inferences made using data on the pulsed flux from the crab pulsar, a new interpretation of the crab pulsar X-ray interpulse radiation, and evolutionary models of the Crab Nebula's progenitor. Other topics include the evolution of the centimeter flux of 3C58 and the Crab Nebula, a search for a shock wave around the Crab Nebula, high resolution radio studies of the Crab Nebula, supernova shell structure, and the nature of the remnant 0540-693 and its implications for the study of crablike remnants. Papers are also presented on X-ray observations of: Crab-like remnants, the Crab Nebula, the Vela X region, W28, and 3C400.2. Other papers include the 50 millisecond pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud and the X-ray pulse emission mechanism, optical emission from the plerionic core of CTB 80, and one-arcminute resolution observations of W50.

  3. Simulations of Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnants With Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    E-print Network

    David A. Tilley; Dinshaw S. Balsara; J. Christopher Howk

    2006-04-21

    We explore the role of anisotropic thermal conduction on the evolution of supernova remnants through interstellar media with a range of densities via numerical simulations. We find that a remnant expanding in a dense environment can produce centre-bright hard x-ray emission within 20 kyr, and centre-bright soft x-ray emission within 60 kyr of the supernova event. In a more tenuous environment, the appearance of a centre-bright structure in hard x-rays is delayed until about 60 kyr. The soft x-ray emission from such a remnant may not become centre bright during its observable lifetime. This can explain the observations that show that mixed-morphology supernova remnants preferentially occur close to denser, molecular environments. Remnants expanding into denser environments tend to be smaller, making it easier for thermal conduction to make larger changes in the temperatures of their hot gas bubbles. We show that the lower temperatures make it very favorable to use high-stage ions as diagnostics of the hot gas bubbles in SNRs. In particular, the distribution of O VIII transitions from shell-bright at early epochs to centre-bright at later epochs in the evolution of an SNR expanding in a dense ISM when the physics of thermal conduction is included.

  4. Hot interstellar tunnels. 1: Simulation of interacting supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. W.

    1976-01-01

    The theory required to build a numerical simulation of interacting supernova remnants is developed. The hot cavities within a population of remnants will become connected, with varying ease and speed, for a variety of assumed conditions in the outer shells of old remnants. Apparently neither radiative cooling nor thermal conduction in a large-scale galactic magnetic field can destroy hot cavity regions, if they grow, faster than they are reheated by supernova shock waves, but interstellar mass motions disrupt the contiguity of extensive cavities necessary for the dispersal of these shocks over a wide volume. Monte Carlo simulations show that a quasi-equilibrium is reached in the test space within 10 million yrs of the first supernova and is characterized by an average cavity filling fraction of the interstellar volume. Aspects of this equilibrium are discussed for a range of supernova rates. Two predictions are not confirmed within this range: critical growth of hot regions to encompass the entire medium, and the efficient quenching of a remnant's expansion by interaction with other cavities.

  5. Supernova Remnants in the Magellanic Clouds. V. The Complex Interior Structure of the N206 SNR

    E-print Network

    R. M. Williams; Y. -H. Chu; J. R. Dickel; R. A. Gruendl; F. D. Seward; M. A. Guerrero; G. Hobbs

    2005-04-27

    The N206 supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) has long been considered a prototypical "mixed morphology" SNR. Recent observations, however, have added a new twist to this familiar plot: an elongated, radially-oriented radio feature seen in projection against the SNR face. Utilizing the high resolution and sensitivity available with the Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra, and XMM-Newton, we have obtained optical emission-line images and spatially resolved X-ray spectral maps for this intriguing SNR. Our findings present the SNR itself as a remnant in the mid to late stages of its evolution. X-ray emission associated with the radio "linear feature" strongly suggests it to be a pulsar-wind nebula (PWN). A small X-ray knot is discovered at the outer tip of this feature. The feature's elongated morphology and the surrounding wedge-shaped X-ray enhancement strongly suggest a bow-shock PWN structure.

  6. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/H? and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted H? and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, ? = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/H?) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/H? ? 0.55 and ?0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  7. High-Energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    E-print Network

    Temim, Tea; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R

    2013-01-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of...

  8. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 15-56

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Castro, Daniel; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-05-01

    MSH 15-56 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium. Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the {gamma}-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  9. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-01-01

    MSH 1556 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium.Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  10. Excited-state OH Masers and Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    Ylva M. Pihlström; Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman; Laura K. Zschaechner; Philip B. Lockett; Moshe Elitzur

    2007-12-29

    The collisionally pumped, ground-state 1720 MHz maser line of OH is widely recognized as a tracer for shocked regions and observed in star forming regions and supernova remnants. Whereas some lines of excited states of OH have been detected and studied in star forming regions, the subject of excited-state OH in supernova remnants -- where high collision rates are to be expected -- is only recently being addressed. Modeling of collisional excitation of OH demonstrates that 1720, 4765 and 6049 MHz masers can occur under similar conditions in regions of shocked gas. In particular, the 6049 and 4765 MHz masers become more significant at increased OH column densities where the 1720 MHz masers begin to be quenched. In supernova remnants, the detection of excited-state OH line maser emission could therefore serve as a probe of regions of higher column densities. Using the Very Large Array, we searched for excited-state OH in the 4.7, 7.8, 8.2 and 23.8 GHz lines in four well studied supernova remnants with strong 1720 MHz maser emission (SgrAEast, W28, W44 and IC443). No detections were made, at typical detection limits of around 10 mJy/beam. The search for the 6 GHz lines were done using Effelsberg since the VLA receivers did not cover those frequencies, and are reported on in an accompanying letter (Fish, Sjouwerman & Pihlstrom 2007). We also cross-correlated the positions of known supernova remnants with the positions of 1612 MHz maser emission obtained from blind surveys. No probable associations were found, perhaps except in the SgrAEast region. The lack of detections of excited-state OH indicates that the OH column densities suffice for 1720 MHz inversion but not for inversion of excited-state transitions, consistent with the expected results for C-type shocks.

  11. Supernova Remnants in the Magellanic Clouds. VI. The DEML316 Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    R. M. Williams; Y. -H. Chu

    2005-09-22

    The DEML316 system contains two shells, both with the characteristic signatures of supernova remnants (SNRs). We analyze Chandra and XMM-Newton data for DEML316, investigating its spatial and spectral X-ray features. Our Chandra observations resolve the structure of the northeastern SNR (Shell A) as a bright inner ring and a set of "arcs" surrounded by fainter diffuse emission. The spectrum is well fit by a thermal plasma model with temperature ~1.4 keV; we do not find significant spectral differences for different regions of this SNR. The southwestern SNR (Shell B) exhibits an irregular X-ray outline, with a brighter interior ring of emission including a bright knot of emission. Overall the emission of the SNR is well described by a thermal plasma of temperature ~0.6 keV. The Bright Knot, however, is spectrally distinct from the rest of the SNR, requiring the addition of a high-energy spectral component consistent with a power-law spectrum of photon index 1.6--1.8. We confirm the findings of Nishiuchi et al. (2001) that the spectra of these shells are notably different, with Shell A requiring a high iron abundance for a good spectral fit, implying a Type Ia origin. We further explicitly compare abundance ratios to model predictions for Type Ia and Type II supernovae. The low ratios for Shell A (O/Fe of 1.5 and Ne/Fe of 0.2) and the high ratios for Shell B (O/Fe of 30--130 and Ne/Fe of 8--16) are consistent with Type Ia and Type II origins, respectively. The difference between the SNR progenitor types casts some doubt on the suggestion that these SNRs are interacting with one another.

  12. Imaging the Crab Nebula-Like Supernova Remnant 3C 58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert

    2009-07-01

    The Galactic supernova remnant 3C 58 shares several important properties with the Crab Nebula. It possesses a young, rapidly spinning pulsar and an associated compact optical/IR synchrotron wind nebula. This makes 3C 58, along with the Crab and PSR B0540-69 in the LMC, only the third such PWN detected in the optical and IR. Also like the Crab, 3C58 has been associated with a historically reported `guest star', in this case, the apparent SN of 1181 CE. Its optical nebulosity contains an unusually large fraction of shocked circumstellar material, with the remnant's high-velocity, N-rich ejecta knots exhibiting a strong bi-polar expansion asymmetry. Despite having a relatively extensive optical nebula, it is the only young and nearby Galactic SNR that has not yet been imaged by HST. However, some recent deep, high-resolution Gemini images show a surprising amount of fine-scale filament detail, revealing some peculiar optical emission morphologies. Here we propose a WFC3 imaging survey of 3C 58 in order to investigate: 1} the optical luminosity and emission efficiency of the remnant's young, 65.7 ms pulsar PSR J0205+6449 thereby providing a rare testing of pulsar emission models, 2} the effect of the remnant's expanding synchrotron nebula on the formation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in its optical filaments like that observed so far only in the Crab through HST imaging, and 3} the fine-scale structure of 3C 58's slow moving circumstellar and high-velocity SN ejecta and the morphological and distribution differences between them.

  13. An X-ray study of the supernova remnant G18.95-1.1

    E-print Network

    Ilana M. Harrus; Patrick O. Slane; John P. Hughes; Paul P. Plucinsky

    2003-11-17

    We present an analysis of data from both the Rontgen Satellite (ROSAT), and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) of the supernova remnant (SNR) G18.95-1.1. We find that the X-ray emission from G18.95-1.1 is predominantly thermal, heavily absorbed and can be best described by an NEI (nonequilibrium ionization) model with a temperature around 0.9keV, and an ionization timescale of 1.1x10^10 /cm3/s. We find only marginal evidence for non-solar abundances. Comparisons between 21 cm HI absorption data and derived parameters from our spectral analysis strongly suggest a relatively near-by remnant (a distance of about 2kpc). Above 4keV, we identify a small region of emission located at the tip of the central, flat spectrum bar-like feature in the radio image. We examine two possibilities for this emission region: a temperature variation within the remnant or a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The current data do not allow us to distinguish between these possible explanations. In the scenario where this high-energy emission region corresponds to a PWN, our analysis suggests a rotational loss rate for the unseen pulsar of about 7x10^35 erg/s and a ratio Lr/Lx about 3.6 for the entire PWN, slightly above the maximum ratio (3.4 for Vela) measured in known PWN.

  14. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: a different view of supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-04-20

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research. PMID:20404206

  15. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research. PMID:20404206

  16. Simulating Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Supernova Remnants I : Numerics and the Evolution of Remnants

    E-print Network

    D. S. Balsara; D. A. Tilley; J. C. Howk

    2007-11-14

    Anisotropic thermal conduction plays an important role in various astrophysical systems. One of the most stringent tests of thermal conduction can be found in supernova remnants. In this paper we study anisotropic thermal conduction and examine the physical nature of the flux of thermal conduction in the classical and saturated limits. We also present a temporally second-order accurate implicit-explicit scheme for the time-update of thermal conduction terms within a numerical MHD scheme. Several simulations of supernova remnants are presented for a range of ISM parameters. The role of thermal conduction in such remnants has been studied. We find that thermal conduction produces cooler temperatures and higher densities in the hot gas bubbles that form in the remnants. The effect of thermal conduction in changing the thermal characteristics of the hot gas bubble increases as the remnant propagates through denser ISMs. Remnants evolving in denser ISMs are shown to make a faster transition to a centre-bright x-ray morphology, with the trend emerging earlier in hard x-rays than in the soft x-rays.

  17. The Formation and Evolution of Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall

    Supernovae inject metals at high velocities into the interstellar medium (ISM), leading to shocks, plasma heating, and dust destruction and creation in addition to host of other processes. Supernova remnants (SNR) themselves are generally categorized as shell-type, center-filled, or ``mixed morphology.'' These categories, which encapsulate both the structure and evolution of the remnant, seem to depend critically on the precursor star and the surrounding ISM. Mixed morphology remnants, in particular, show a radio shell with a central region that emits primarily thermal X-rays. Observations show that these SNR are typically found near or in molecular clouds and, since they usually contain compact objects, arise from high-mass precursors. However, our theoretical understanding of these remnants lags far behind our observational data. There are at least four distinct models for their appearance, usually explaining observations from one or at most a few of the remnants, but there is no general solution. However, there has been a recent breakthrough in mixed morphology remnants. Suzaku observations of three remnants show that a significant fraction of the thermal X-rays are from a non-equilibrium recombining plasma, a surprising result since SNR are expected to generate ionizing, not recombining, plasmas. This new discovery should severely constrains theoretical predictions. We propose a combined semi-analytic and computational approach to understanding how these remnants develop and evolve. A number of observational studies have already cataloged the emission characteristics and sizes of these remnants. Our study will therefore begin with an exploration of simple 1-D spherically symmetric hydrodynamic plasma models that can generate the observed emission in X-ray and other bandpasses as well as the approximate size of a range of mixed morphology remnants. We will expand these studies using both 2-D and 3-D magnetohydrodynamic explosion models combined with a non-equilibrium plasma code to calculate the thermal X-ray emission. These models will be able to capture the turbulence and ejecta mixing that must happen in these remnants that cannot be simulated in 1-D. We will then determine the emission as a function of position in various bandpasses for our models with a range of initial conditions. This will allow us to determining which observables are the key to understanding the origin and evolution of mixed morphology remnants, and their overall impact on the ISM and the Galaxy. This work will address NASA's Strategic Subgoal 3D, to discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe, and search for Earth-like planets.

  18. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  19. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon Gamma Ray Observatory at Outback) experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  20. A 3D numerical model for Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Roy, J. C.; Esquivel, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Reynoso, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    We present new 3D numerical simulations for Kepler's supernova remnant. In this work we revisit the possibility that the asymmetric shape of the remnant in X-rays is the product of a Type Ia supernova explosion which occurs inside the wind bubble previously created by an AGB companion star. Due to the large peculiar velocity of the system, the interaction of the strong AGB wind with the interstellar medium results in a bow shock structure. In this new model we propose that the AGB wind is anisotropic, with properties such as mass-loss rate and density having a latitude dependence, and that the orientation of the polar axis of the AGB star is not aligned with the direction of motion. The ejecta from the Type Ia supernova explosion is modelled using a power-law density profile, and we let the remnant evolve for 400 yr. We computed synthetic X-ray maps from the numerical results. We find that the estimated size and peculiar X-ray morphology of Kepler's supernova remnant are well reproduced by considering an AGB mass-loss rate of 10-5 M? yr-1, a wind terminal velocity of 10 km s-1, an ambient medium density of 10-3 cm-3 and an explosion energy of 7 × 1050 erg. The obtained total X-ray luminosity of the remnant in this model reaches 6 × 1050 erg, which is within a factor of 2 of the observed value, and the time evolution of the luminosity shows a rate of decrease in recent decades of ˜2.4 per cent yr-1 that is consistent with the observations.

  1. Featured Image: A Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    This is a three-color X-ray image taken by Chandra of the supernova remnant RCW 103. This supernova remnant is an unusual system: its young, but unlike other remnants of its age, metal-rich ejecta hadnt previously been discovered in it. In this paper, Kari Frank (Pennsylvania State University) and collaborators analyze the three deepest Chandra observations of RCW 103 and find the first evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. Their analyses also help to constrain the identity of the mysterious compact stellar object powering the remnant. In this image, red = 0.30.85 keV, green = 0.851.70 keV, and blue = 1.73.0 keV; click on the image for the full view. For more information and the original image, see the paper here:Kari A. Frank et al 2015 ApJ 810 113 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/113.

  2. Featured Image: A Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    This is a three-color X-ray image taken by Chandra of the supernova remnant RCW 103. This supernova remnant is an unusual system: its young, but unlike other remnants of its age, metal-rich ejecta hadnt previously been discovered in it. In this paper, Kari Frank (Pennsylvania State University) and collaborators analyze the three deepest Chandra observations of RCW 103 and find the first evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. Their analyses also help to constrain the identity of the mysterious compact stellar object powering the remnant. In this image, red = 0.30.85 keV, green = 0.851.70 keV, and blue = 1.73.0 keV; click on the image for the full view. For more information and the original image, see the paper here:Kari A. Frank et al 2015 ApJ 810 113 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/113.

  3. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at H?, [O I] ??6300, 6363, and [O III] ??4959, 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as "late time supernovae". Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was missed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M ?, and the presence of broad H? in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 Very Large Array radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise age. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract # NAS83060, with data obtained through program GO1-12115.

  4. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at Halpha, [O I] 6300, and [O III] 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was not observed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M(sun), and the presence of broad Halpha in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 VLA radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise time since the explosion.We acknowledge STScI grants under the umbrella program ID GO-12513 to Johns Hopkins University, STScI, and Middlebury College. PFW acknowledges additional support from the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0908566.

  5. A mechanism for strong shock electron heating in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that collisionless shock waves propagating away from a supernova may be directly responsible for the 10 keV X-ray emission seen in supernova remnants. A sequence of plasma instabilities (Buneman and ion acoustic) between the reflected and/or transmitted ions and the background electrons at the foot of the shock front can give rise to rapid anomalous heating of electrons. Hybrid simulations of a perpendicular collisionless shock are presented to demonstrate that this heating can arise within a self-consistently computed shock structure.

  6. Galactic Propagation of Cosmic Rays from Individual Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nierstenhöfer, Nils; Graeser, Philipp; Schuppan, Florian; Tjus, Julia

    2015-08-01

    It is widely believed that supernova remnants are the best candidate sources for the observed cosmic ray flux up to the knee, i.e. up to ?PeV energies. Indeed, the gamma-ray spectra of some supernova remnants can be well explained by assuming the decay of neutral pions which are created in hadronic interactions. Therefore, fitting the corresponding gamma spectra allows us to derive the spectra of cosmic rays at the source which are locally injected into our Galaxy. Using these spectra as a starting point, we propagate the cosmic rays through the Galaxy using the publicly available GALPROP code. Here, we will present first results on the contribution of those SNRs to the total cosmic ray flux and discuss implications.

  7. Energetic particles in supernova remnants: Results from VHE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly-expanding ejecta in supernova remnants drive fast shocks in the surrounding medium. These shocks heat the ambient gas and create conditions suitable for the acceleration of charged particles to energies exceeding hundreds of TeV. These particles are believedto form the primary component of Galactic cosmic rays. The details of the acceleration process, including the need for amplified magnetic fields, the evidence for the presence of energetic hadrons, the process of particle escape, and the contributions from compressed and re-accelerated ambient cosmic rays are complex. Measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum are required to fully constrain the process, and observations of VHE gamma-rays from supernova remnants are particularly crucial. Here I will summarize current results from studies of particle acceleration in SNRs, with particular emphasis on the crucial constraints provided by the VHE observations.

  8. Decapitating the Duck: The (non)association of PSR B1757-24 and supernova remnant G5.4-1.2

    E-print Network

    S. E. Thorsett; W. F. Brisken; W. M. Goss

    2002-06-03

    We have made the first direct interferometric proper motion measurements of the radio pulsar B1757-24, which sits at the tip of the "beak" of the putative "Duck" supernova remnant. The peculiar morphology of this radio complex has been used to argue alternately that the pulsar's space motion was either surprisingly high or surprisingly low. In fact, we show that the pulsar's motion is so small that it and its associated nonthermal nebula G5.27-0.9 (the "head") are almost certainly unrelated to the much larger G5.4-1.2 (the "wings").

  9. Decapitating the Duck The (non)association of PSR B1757-24 and supernova remnant G5.4-1.2

    E-print Network

    Thorsett, S E; Goss, W M

    2002-01-01

    We have made the first direct interferometric proper motion measurements of the radio pulsar B1757-24, which sits at the tip of the "beak" of the putative "Duck" supernova remnant. The peculiar morphology of this radio complex has been used to argue alternately that the pulsar's space motion was either surprisingly high or surprisingly low. In fact, we show that the pulsar's motion is so small that it and its associated nonthermal nebula G5.27-0.9 (the "head") are almost certainly unrelated to the much larger G5.4-1.2 (the "wings").

  10. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV ?-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ?5.1?. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, ? ? 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy ?-rays. The very hard GeV ?-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the ?-rays. The ?-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  11. The Kinematics of Kepler's Supernova Remnant as Revealed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-01

    I have determined the expansion of the supernova remnant of SN 1604 (Kepler's supernova) based on archival Chandra ACIS-S observations made in 2000 and 2006. The measurements were done in several distinct energy bands, and were made for the remnant as a whole, and for six individual sectors. The average expansion parameter indicates that the remnant expands on average as r~t0.5, but there are significant differences in different parts of the remnant: the bright northwestern part expands as r~t0.35, whereas the rest of the remnant's expansion shows an expansion r~t0.6. The latter is consistent with an explosion in which the outer part of the ejecta has a negative power law slope for density (?~v-n) of n=7, or with an exponential density profile [?~exp(-v/ve)]. The expansion parameter in the southern region, in conjunction with the shock radius, indicates a rather low value (<5×1050 erg) for the explosion energy of SN 1604 for a distance of 4 kpc. A higher explosion energy is consistent with the results if the distance is larger. The filament in the eastern part of the remnant, which is dominated by X-ray synchrotron radiation, seems to mark a region with a fast shock speed r~t0.7, corresponding to a shock velocity of v=4200 km s-1, for a distance to SN 1604 of 4 kpc. This is consistent with the idea that X-ray synchrotron emission requires shock velocities in excess of ~2000 km s-1. The X-ray-based expansion measurements reported are consistent with results based on optical and radio measurements but disagree with previous X-ray measurements based on ROSAT and Einstein observations.

  12. The Kinematics of Kepler's Supernova Remnant as revealed by Chandra

    E-print Network

    J. Vink

    2008-08-11

    I determine the expansion of the supernova remnant of SN1604 (Kepler's supernova) based on archival Chandra ACIS-S observations made in 2000 and 2006. The measurements were done in several distinct energy bands, and were made for the remnant as a whole, and for six individual sectors. The average expansion parameter indicates that the remnant expands as $r \\propto t^{0.5}$, but there are significant differences in different parts of the remnant: the bright northwestern part expands as $r \\propto t^{0.35}$, whereas the rest of the remnant's expansion shows an expansion $r \\propto t^{0.6}$. The latter is consistent with an explosion in which the outer part of the ejecta has a negative power law slope for density ($\\rho \\propto v^{-n}$) of $n=7$, or with an exponential density profile($\\rho \\propto \\exp(-v/v_e)$). The expansion parameter in the southern region, in conjunction with the shock radius, indicate a rather low value (<5E50 erg) for the explosion energy of SN1604 for a distance of 4 kpc. An higher explosion energy is consistent with the results, if the distance is larger. The filament in the eastern part of the remnant, which is dominated by X-ray synchrotron radiation seems to mark a region with a fast shock speed $r \\propto t^{0.7}$, corresponding to a shock velocity of v= 4200 km/s, for a distance to SN1604 of 4 kpc. This is consistent with the idea that X-ray synchrotron emission requires shock velocities in excess of ~2000 km/s. The X-ray based expansion measurements reported are consistent with results based on optical and radio measurements, but disagree with previous X-ray measurements based on ROSAT and Einstein observations.

  13. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact chemical composition of this nuclear- processed material, and thereby test theories of stellar evolution. The image shows a region of the remnant 50 light-years across. The supernova explosion should have been visible from Earth's southern hemisphere around 1,000 B.C., but there are no known historical records that chronicle what would have appeared as a 'new star' in the heavens. This 'true color' picture was made by superposing images taken on 9-10 August 1994 in three of the strongest optical emission lines: singly ionized sulfur (red), doubly ionized oxygen (green), and singly ionized oxygen (blue). Photo credit: Jon A. Morse (STScI) and NASA Investigating team: William P. Blair (PI; JHU), Michael A. Dopita (MSSSO), Robert P. Kirshner (Harvard), Knox S. Long (STScI), Jon A. Morse (STScI), John C. Raymond (SAO), Ralph S. Sutherland (UC-Boulder), and P. Frank Winkler (Middlebury). Image files in GIF and JPEG format may be accessed via anonymous ftp from oposite.stsci.edu in /pubinfo: GIF: /pubinfo/GIF/N132D.GIF JPEG: /pubinfo/JPEG/N132D.jpg The same images are available via World Wide Web from links in URL http://www.stsci.edu/public.html.

  14. DENSE IRON EJECTA AND CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G11.2-0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Koo, Bon-Chul; Seok, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Matthews, Keith; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2009-09-20

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of dense ({approx}>10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) iron ejecta in the young core-collapse supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. Five ejecta knots projected to be close to its center show a large dispersion in their Doppler shifts: two knots in the east are blueshifted by more than 1000 km s{sup -1}, while three western knots have relatively small blueshifts of 20-60 km s{sup -1}. This velocity discrepancy may indicate that the western knots have been significantly decelerated or that there exists a systematic velocity difference among the knots. One ejecta filament in the northwestern boundary, on the other hand, is redshifted by {approx}>200 km s{sup -1}, while opposite filament in the southeastern boundary shows a negligible radial motion. Some of the knots and filaments have secondary velocity components, and one knot shows a bow shock-like feature in the velocity structure. The iron ejecta appear to be devoid of strong emission from other heavy elements, such as S, which may attest to the alpha-rich freezeout process in the explosive nucleosynthesis of the core-collapse supernova explosion close to its center. The prominent bipolar distribution of the Fe ejecta in the northwestern and southeastern direction, along with the elongation of the central pulsar wind nebula in the perpendicular direction, is consistent with the interpretation that the supernova exploded primarily along the northwestern and southeastern direction.

  15. Chandra's View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image reveals, in detail, the turbulent debris created by a supernova explosion that was observed by the Danish Astronomer Tycho Brahe in the year 1572. The colors show different x-ray energies, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and high energies, respectively. Most likely caused by the destruction of a white dwarf star, a shock wave produced by the expanding debris is outlined by the sharp blue circular arcs of 20 million degree Celsius gas seen on the outer rim. The stellar debris, visible only by x-ray, has a temperature of about 10 million degrees, and shows up as mottled yellow, green, and red fingers of gas.

  16. A high sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bleach, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A high sensitivity scan of the galactic plane was performed to search for 2-20 keV X-rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 deg and 31 deg longitude, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants, are reported on. Upper limits are presented for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned in this survey.

  17. Molecular environment of the supernova remnant IC 443: Discovery of the molecular shells surrounding the remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yang; Fang, Min; Yang, Ji; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang

    2014-06-20

    We have carried out {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O observations toward the mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443. The observations cover a 1.°5 × 1.°5 area and allow us to investigate the overall molecular environment of the remnant. Some northern and northeastern partial shell structure of CO gas is around the remnant. One of the partial shells, about 5' extending beyond the northeastern border of the remnant's bright radio shell, seems to just confine the faint radio halo. On the other hand, some faint CO clumps can be discerned along the eastern boundary of the faint remnant's radio halo. Connecting the eastern CO clumps, the northeastern partial shell structures, and the northern CO partial shell, we can see that a half molecular ring structure appears to surround the remnant. The LSR velocity of the half-ring structure is in the range of –5 km s{sup –1} to –2 km s{sup –1}, which is consistent with that of the –4 km s{sup –1} molecular clouds. We suggest that the half-ring structure of the CO emission at V {sub LSR} ? –4 km s{sup –1} is associated with the SNR. The structures are possibly swept up by the stellar winds of SNR IC 443's massive progenitor. Based on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and the Two Micron All Sky Survey near-IR database, 62 young stellar object (YSO) candidates are selected within the radio halo of the remnant. These YSO candidates concentrated along the boundary of the remnant's bright radio shell are likely to be triggered by the stellar winds from the massive progenitor of SNR IC 443.

  18. UV Lightbulbs behind Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2009-08-01

    Much of the ejecta in young SNRs is normally invisible because it has not been shocked, and is therefore cold, producing no optical or X- ray emission. For a complete inventory of the SN ejecta, one needs to somehow probe this cold material, and we seek to do so through UV absorption spectroscopy. The COS spectrograph, soon to be installed on HST, will be an ideal instrument for this purpose, provided suitable UV sources, ``lightbulbs," can be identified behind SNRs. Here we propose to identify UV lightbulbs behind the Tycho (SN 1572) and 3C58 (SN 1181) remnants by obtaining accurate spectral types, and therefore distances, for stars bright enough to observe in the UV with HST/COS. Distance is all that we need to find, because the UV brightness of candidate stars (or other objects) has already been measured by the optical monitor on XMM. Through spectroscopy from the 2.1m we will obtain spectra to identify the best candidate lightbulbs from 60 objects (selected from several hundred) that appear within the (projected) area of Tycho and 3C58. If we are successful, this study will not only lead to a better understanding of two important SNRs, but also to an efficient method for probing ejecta in other Galactic SNRs.

  19. THE MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF JET-DRIVEN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: THE CASE OF W49B

    E-print Network

    González-Casanova, Diego F.

    The circumstellar medium (CSM) of a massive star is modified by its winds before a supernova (SN) explosion occurs, and thus the evolution of the resulting supernova remnant (SNR) is influenced by both the geometry of the ...

  20. Discriminating the progenitor type of supernova remnants with Iron K-shell emission

    E-print Network

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) retain crucial information about both their parent explosion and circumstellar material left behind by their progenitor. However, the complexity of the interaction between supernova ejecta and ...

  1. CONSTRAINING EXPLOSION TYPE OF YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING 24 ?m EMISSION MORPHOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Peters, Charee L.

    Determination of the explosion type of supernova remnants (SNRs) can be challenging, as SNRs are hundreds to thousands of years old and supernovae are classified based on spectral properties days after explosion. Previous ...

  2. Observation of Extended VHE Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC 443 with VERITAS

    E-print Network

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Bautista, M; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Colin, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dwarkadas, V V; Ergin, T; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Valcarcel, L; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence that the very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission coincident with the supernova remnant IC 443 is extended. IC 443 contains one of the best-studied sites of supernova remnant/molecular cloud interaction and the pulsar wind nebula CXOU J061705.3+222127, both of which are important targets for VHE observations. VERITAS observed IC 443 for 37.9 hours during 2007 and detected emission above 300 GeV with an excess of 247 events, resulting in a significance of 8.3 standard deviations (sigma) before trials and 7.5 sigma after trials in a point-source search. The emission is centered at 06 16 51 +22 30 11 (J2000) +- 0.03_stat +- 0.08_sys degrees, with an intrinsic extension of 0.16 +- 0.03_stat +- 0.04_sys degrees. The VHE spectrum is well fit by a power law (dN/dE = N_0 * (E/TeV)^-Gamma) with a photon index of 2.99 +- 0.38_stat +- 0.3_sys and an integral flux above 300 GeV of (4.63 +- 0.90_stat +- 0.93_sys) * 10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1. These results are discussed in the context of existing ...

  3. A multi-wavelength look at the young plerionic supernova remnant 0540-69.3

    SciTech Connect

    Brantseg, T.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Grieves, N.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipovic, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the plerionic supernova remnant 0540-69.3 in the LMC in X-ray, radio, optical, and infrared. We find that the shell of 0540-69.3 is characterized in the X-ray by thermal nonequilibrium plasma with depleted Mg and Si abundances and a temperature of kT ? 0.7 keV. This thermal emission is superimposed with synchrotron emission in several regions. Based on X-ray spectra and on morphological considerations in all surveyed wavebands, we conclude that the shell is expanding into a clumpy and highly inhomogeneous medium. In one region of the shell we find an overabundance of Ne, suggesting the presence of ejecta near the edge of the remnant. We also see evidence for reheating of material via a reverse shock originating from the interaction of the supernova blast wave with a particularly dense cloud in the surrounding medium. Finally, we perform the first detailed study of the 'halo' region extending 1.2-2.2 pc from the central pulsar. We detect the presence of thermal and nonthermal spectral components but do not find evidence for mixing or ejecta. We conclude that the thermal component is not a counterpart to similar optical and infrared halos and that it is most likely due to the projection of shell material along the line of sight.

  4. What We Can Learn From Supernova Remnant Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwood, Benjamin; Murphy, Jeremiah; Diaz, Mariangelly

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature regarding size distributions of supernova remnants generally discuss a uniform distribution for the radius, occasionally considering a Gaussian alternative. We indeed show that these distributions are consistent with log-normal, which can be considered a natural consequence of the Central Limit Theorem and Sedov expansion. Modeling explosion energy, remnant age, and ambient density as independent, random distributions, we show, using simple Monte Carlo simulations, that the size distribution is indistinguishable from log-normal when the SNR sample size is of order three hundred. This implies that these SNR distributions provide only information on the mean and variance, yielding additional information only when the sample size grows large. We then proceed to Bayesian statistical inference to characterize the information provided by the size distributions. In particular, we use the mean and variance of sizes and explosion energies to subsequently estimate the mean and variance of the ambient medium surrounding SNR progenitors. This in turn allows us to characterize potential bias in studies involving samples of supernova remnants.

  5. Observation of Nonthermal Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC443 with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, S. J.; Keohane, J. W.; Reimer, O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present analysis of X-ray spectra from the supernova remnant IC443 obtained using the PCA on RXTE. The spectra in the 3 - 20 keV band are well fit by a two-component model consisting of thermal and nonthermal components. We compare these results with recent results of other X-ray missions and discuss the need for a cut-off in the nonthermal spectrum. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggest that much of the nonthermal emission from IC443 can be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula. We present the results of our search for periodic emission in the RXTE PCA data. We then discuss the origin o f the nonthermal component and its possible association with the unidentified EGRET source.

  6. Modeling supernova remnants: effects of diffusive cosmic-ray acceleration on the evolution, application to observations

    E-print Network

    Kosenko, D; Vink, J

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical models for supernova remnant evolution, using a new version of the hydrodynamical code SUPREMNA. We added cosmic ray diffusion equation to the code scheme, employing two-fluid approximation. We investigate the dynamics of the simulated supernova remnants with different values of cosmic ray acceleration efficiency and diffusion coefficient. We compare the numerical models with observational data of Tycho's and SN1006 supernova remnants. We find models which reproduce the observed locations of the blast wave, contact discontinuity, and reverse shock for the both remnants, thus allowing us to estimate the contribution of cosmic ray particles into total pressure and cosmic-ray energy losses in these supernova remnants. We derive that the energy losses due to cosmic rays escape in Tycho's supernova remnant are 10-20% of the kinetic energy flux and 20-50% in SN1006.

  7. Constraining the Progenitor Masses of Core Collapse Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Rodríguez, Mariangelly; Murphy, Jeremiah Wayne; Elwood, Benjamin; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rubin, David

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the progenitor mass distribution of supernova explosions is an important observational constraint of stellar evolution theory. Recently, a novel approach was proposed to significantly increase the number of progenitor masses: characterize the progenitor mass of supernova remnants (SNRs) by age-dating the local stellar population. Preliminary statistical analyses suggested that there is a lack of SNRs around the most massive of massive stars. This suggested that there is a maximum mass for core collapse supernova explosions, or there is a bias against finding SNRs associated with the most massive stars. We test for a bias by considering the distribution of SNRs sizes using a Monte Carlo simulation. We find that the distribution of remnants sizes is the same for low mass progenitors and high mass progenitors. This implies that there is no bias against finding SNRs around the most massive progenitors. Our next step is to apply Bayesian statistical inference and obtain the joint probability for all the parameters involved in the statistical distribution model: the minimum mass, maximum mass, and slope of the mass distribution.

  8. Hot interstellar tunnels. I - Simulation of interacting supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    It has been suggested that intersecting supernova remnants (SNRs) contribute to the production of gas at about 1 million K which is apparently observed in the interstellar medium. This suggestion is evaluated through a fairly detailed numerical simulation that is used to investigate the large-scale three-dimensional behavior of a test section of the gaseous galactic disk under the influence of evolving and interacting SNRs. Models for a noninteracting 'isolated' SNR and the ambient medium are discussed, pairs of interacting remnants are examined along with the mechanism by which their central cavities can become connected, and the evolution of larger aggregates of SNRs is analyzed. Results are presented for a sequence of simulations having the same values of supernova blast energy, ambient ion density, and isolated SNR lifetime, but different supernova rates per unit volume. These results show that SNR intersections can quickly generate large volumes, or 'tunnels', of very hot gas from a cold starting medium under conservative and reasonable assumptions, the most important of which are that SNRs can be treated as spheres and mass motions can be treated implicitly.

  9. Uncovering The Properties of Young Neutron Stars and Their Surrounding Supernova A Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In the third year of this program, the following studies have been undertaken in support of this effort: G292.0+1.8: In our previous work on this SNR, we discovered a young neutron star and its associated pulsar wind nebula. Radio observations by Camilo et al. (2002) have identified a young 136 ms pulsar in the direction of G292.0+1.8. We have used Chandra HRC observations of the central source to identify X-ray pulsations at the same period, thus establishing the neutron star as the radio pulsar counterpart. We have also set limits on the cooling of this young neutron star based on the unpulsed component of the X-ray emission. We find that the limit falls slightly below standard cooling models in which the modified Urca process is responsible for the bulk of the interior neutrino emission. A paper summarizing these results is currently being circulated amongst co-authors for review prior to publication. 3c 58: Our Chandra observations of this Crab-like SNR revealed the presence of a young, rapidly rotating pulsar as well as a central compact nebula which we interpret as a toroidal structure associated with the pulsar wind termination shock. Our modeling of this structure has allowed us to establish a temperature upper limit for the neutron star which falls well below predictions from standard cooling models, and implies the presence of exotic particles (such as pion condensates) or other processes that increase the neutrino production rate in the interior. A paper summarizing this work has been published in the Astrophysical Journal (Slane, Helfand, & Murray 2002, ApJ, 571, L45), and the results were the subject of a NASA Space Science Update (4/10/2002) which led to extensive media coverage. Based upon our initial observations, we submitted a successful Chandra Large Project proposal for a 350 ks observation of this young neutron star and its wind nebula. Kes 79: Our Chandra observations of this SNR reveal a compact central source which appears to be the neutron star formed in the explosion that produced the remnant. There is no evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula. The source properties are similar to the central source in Cas A even though the Kes 79 remnant is considerably older. The results have been published in the Astrophysical Journal (Seward, Slane, Smith, and Sun 2003, ApJ, 584,414). Chandra Survey for Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants: We have formed a collaboration to carry out an extensive search for young neutron stars in nearby supernova remnants. Using X-ray observations from an approved Chandra Large Project, as well as from additional approved XMM observations, we are investigating a volume-limited sample of SNRs for which there is currently no evidence of associated neutron stars. We have obtained extensive optical and 1R data to complement the project, and analysis of these data is currently underway.

  10. Supernova 1987A: a Template to Link Supernovae to Their Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Bocchino, F.

    2015-09-01

    The emission of supernova remnants (SNRs) reflects the properties of both the progenitor supernovae (SNe) and the surrounding environment. The complex morphology of the remnants, however, hampers the disentanglement of the two contributions. Here, we aim at identifying the imprint of SN 1987A on the X-ray emission of its remnant and at constraining the structure of the environment surrounding the SN. We performed high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations describing SN 1987A soon after the core-collapse and the following three-dimensional expansion of its remnant between days 1 and 15,000 after the SN. We demonstrated that the physical model reproducing the main observables of SN 1987A during the first 250 days of evolution also reproduces the X-ray emission of the subsequent expanding remnant, thus bridging the gap between SNe and SNRs. By comparing model results with observations, we constrained the explosion energy in the range 1.2-1.4 × 1051 erg and the envelope mass in the range 15-17 M?. We found that the shape of X-ray lightcurves and spectra at early epochs (<15 years) reflects the structure of outer ejecta: our model reproduces the observations if the outermost ejecta have a post-explosion radial profile of density approximated by a power law with index ? = -8. At later epochs, the shapes of X-ray lightcurves and spectra reflect the density structure of the nebula around SN 1987A. This enabled us to ascertain the origin of the multi-thermal X-ray emission, disentangle the imprint of the SN on the remnant emission from the effects of the remnant interaction with the environment, and constrain the pre-supernova structure of the nebula.

  11. Constraints on the distribution of supernova remnants with Galactocentric radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Galaxy are an important source of energy injection into the interstellar medium, and also of cosmic rays. Currently there are 294 known SNRs in the Galaxy, and their distribution with Galactocentric radius is of interest for various studies. Here I discuss some of the statistics of Galactic SNRs, including the observational selection effects that apply, and difficulties in obtaining distances for individual remnants from the `?-D' relation. Comparison of the observed Galactic longitude distribution of a sample of bright Galactic SNRs - which are not strongly affected by selection effects - with those expected from models is used to constrain the Galactic distribution of SNRs. The best-fitting power-law/exponential model is more concentrated towards the Galactic Centre than the widely used distribution obtained by Case & Bhattacharya.

  12. New Limits on Enhanced Turbulence at Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L.; Spangler, S.

    2004-12-01

    Theories of cosmic ray acceleration by supernova remnants predict the existence of regions of intense magnetohydrodynamic turbulence upstream and downstream of the shock wave. Such regions are observed in the case of shock waves in the interplanetary medium, and the interplanetary turbulence possesses substantial density fluctuations. In the interplanetary medium, such turbulent regions produce enhanced radio propagation effects such as scintillations and angular broadening. In this paper, we report a search for enhanced angular broadening of the radio sources J0547+273 and J0128+631, observed through the supernova remnants S147 and G127.1+0.5, respectively. The observations were made with the Very Long Baseline Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in the Fall of 2002. Observations were made at wavelengths of 6, 13, 18, and 21 cm. These multifrequency observations allow the scattered and intrinsic structures of these sources to be distinguished. For both sources, angular broadening attributable to interstellar turbulence was measured. The scattering sizes correspond to 1 GHz angular diameters (FWHM) of 8.9 milliarcseconds (mas) for J0128+631 and 6.4 mas for J0547+273, with uncertainties of about 1 mas for both sources. The expected ``incidental'' angular broadening due to the interstellar medium along these lines of sight was estimated from an updated version of the model of Lazio and Cordes (ApJ 479, 238, 1998). The incidental angular size estimates are 9.5 mas and 6.5-7.0 mas for J0128+631 and J0547+273, respectively. We therefore find no evidence for an enhancement of scattering, and thus intense turbulence, associated with either supernova remnant. Quantitative limits on the properties of waves and turbulence will be presented. This work was supported by grant ATM03-54782 from the Division of Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation.

  13. Deep optical observations of the central X-ray source in the Puppis A supernova remnant

    E-print Network

    Mignani, R P; Mereghetti, S; Caraveo, P A

    2009-01-01

    X-ray observations reveiled a group of radio-silent isolated neutron stars (INSs) at the centre of young supernova remnants (SNRs), dubbed central compact objects or CCOs, with properties different from those of classical rotation-powered pulsars. In at least three cases, evidence points towards CCOs being low-magnetized INSs, born with slow rotation periods, and possibly accreting from a debris disc of material formed out of the supernova event. Understanding the origin of the diversity of the CCOs can shed light on supernova explosion and neutron star formation models. Optical/infrared (IR) observations are crucial to test different CCO interpretations. The aim of our work is to perform a deep optical investigation of the CCO RX J0822.0-4300 in the Puppis A SNR, one of the most poorly understood in the CCO family. By using as a reference the Chandra X-ray coordinates of RX J0822.0-4300, we performed deep optical observations in the B, V and I bands with the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We found no candidate ...

  14. Kinematics of Supernova Remnants: Status of X-Ray Observations

    E-print Network

    Dewey, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A supernova (SN) explosion drives stellar debris into the circumstellar material (CSM) filling a region on a scale of parsecs with X-ray emitting plasma. The velocities involved in supernova remnants (SNRs), thousands of km/s, can be directly measured with medium and high-resolution X-ray spectrometers and add an important dimension to our understanding of the last stages of the progenitor, the explosion mechanism, and the physics of strong shocks. After touching on the ingredients of SNR kinematics, I present a summary of the still-growing measurement results from SNR X-ray observations. Given the advances in 2D/3D hydrodynamics, data analysis techniques, and especially X-ray instrumentation, it is clear that our view of SNRs will continue to deepen in the decades ahead.

  15. Biermann Mechanism in Primordial Supernova Remnant and Seed Fields

    E-print Network

    Hidekazu Hanayama; Keitaro Takahashi; Kei Kotake; Masamune Oguri; Kiyotomo Ichiki; Hiroshi Ohno

    2006-01-24

    We have studied the generation of magnetic fields by the Biermann mechanism in the pair-instability supernovae explosions of the first stars. The Biermann mechanism produces magnetic fields in the shocked region between the bubble and interstellar medium (ISM), even if magnetic fields are absent initially. We have performed a series of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the Biermann term and estimate the amplitude and total energy of the produced magnetic fields. We find that magnetic fields with amplitude $10^{-14}-10^{-17}$ G are generated inside the bubble, though the amount of magnetic fields generated depend on specific values of initial conditions. This corresponds to magnetic fields of $10^{28}-10^{31}$ ergs per each supernova remnant, which is strong enough to be the seed magnetic field for a galactic and/or interstellar dynamo.

  16. Gamma-ray Emission from Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found "GeV-bright" supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

  17. Gamma-Ray Emission From Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Blandford, Roger D.; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki; ,

    2010-10-27

    It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found 'GeV-bright' supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of {pi}{sup 0}-mesons produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

  18. Reverse-Shock in Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F. J.; Ge, M. Y.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, S. N.; Long, X.; Aschenbach, B.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) is usually dominated by the emission lines of the supernova ejecta, which are widely believed to be crossed and thus heated by the inward-propagating reverse shock (RS). Previous works using X-ray imaging data have shown that the ejecta are heated by the RS by locating the peak emission region of the most recently ionized matter, which is found to be well separated toward the inside from the outermost boundary. Here we report the discovery of a systematic increase of the Sulfur (S) to Silicon (Si) K? line flux ratio with radius in Tycho’s SNR. This allows us, for the first time, to present continuous radial profiles of the ionization age and, furthermore, the elapsed ionization time since the onset of the ionization, which gives the history of the propagation of the ionization front into the SNR ejecta.

  19. High-velocity iron absorption lines in supernova remnant 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.-C.; Leventhal, M.; Sarazin, C. L.; Gull, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    The very strong, broad absorption lines of a sdOB star continuum shown in the International Ultraviolet Explorer spectrum of the Schweizer-Middleditch star projected near the center of supernova remnant SNR 1006 are investigated. It is found that strong Fe(+) resonance absorption lines are present whose centers show zero radial velocity while their profiles are broadened by approximately 5000-6000 km/s. Also identified are redshifted Si(+), Si(2+), and Si(3+) lines at velocities of approximately 5000 km/s. Results show that the absorptions must occur in the ejecta of the supernova. The strength and symmetric width of the Fe(+) line indicates that the bulk of the ejecta is iron, in agreement with the current theory for the origin of Type I supernova. It is suggested that the previous failure to detect strong Fe emission lines in the X-ray spectra of this and other young Type I SNRs may be a result of the ejecta not having had time to interact significantly with the ambient medium. In addition, the presence of redshifted adsorption lines due to supernova ejecta in its spectrum shows that this star is located behind the SNR and is not physically associated with it.

  20. Forward Shock Proper Motions of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Uchida, H.; Kimura, M.

    2008-12-01

    The X-ray structure of Kepler's supernova remnant shows a rounded shape delineated by forward shocks. We measure proper motions of the forward shocks on overall rims of the remnant, by using archival Chandra data taken in two epochs with time difference of 6.09 yr. The proper motions of the forward shocks on the northern rim are measured to be 0.076" (+/-0.032" +/-0.016") to 0.11" (+/-0.014" +/-0.016") yr-1, while those on the rest of the rims are measured to be 0.15" (+/-0.017" +/-0.016") to 0.30" (+/-0.048" +/-0.016") yr-1 here the first-term errors are statistical uncertainties and the second-term errors are systematic uncertainties. Combining the best-estimated shock velocity of 1660+/-120 km s-1 measured for Balmer-dominated filaments in the northern and central portions of the remnant (Sankrit et al. 2005) with the proper motions derived for the forward shocks on the northern rim, we estimate a distance of 3.3+1.6-0.4 kpc to the remnant. We measure the expansion indices, m (defined as R~tm), to be 0.47-0.82 for most of the rims. These values are consistent with those expected in Type Ia SN explosion models, in which the ejecta and the circumstellar medium have power-law density profiles whose indices are 5-7 and 0-2, respectively. In addition, we should note the slower expansion on the northern rim than that on the southern rim. This is likely caused by the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium; the density of the circumstellar medium is higher in the north than that in the south of the remnant. The newly estimated geometric center, around which we believe the explosion point exists, is located at ~5" offset to the north of the radio center.

  1. MHD interaction of pulsar wind nebulae with SNRs and with the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Swaluw, E.

    In the late 1960s the discovery of the Crab pulsar in its associated supernova remnant, launched a new field in supernova remnant research: the study of pulsar-driven or plerionic supernova remnants. In these type of remnants, the relativistic wind emitted by the pulsar, blows a pulsar wind nebula into the interior of its supernova remnant. Now, more then forty years after the discovery of the Crab pulsar, there are more then fifty plerionic supernova remnants known, due to the ever-increasing capacity of observational facilities. These observational studies reveal a Zoo of complex morphologies over a wide range of frequencies, indicating the significance of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula with its surrounding supernova remnant. A pulsar which gained a kick velocity at birth, will ultimately break outside of its remnant, after which the pulsar wind nebula interacts directly with the interstellar medium. In general these pulsar wind nebulae are bounded by a bow shock, due to the supersonic motion of the pulsar. There are a few examples known of these pulsar-powered bow shocks, a number which is slowly increasing. I will review our current understanding of the different evolutionary stages of a pulsar wind nebula as it is interacting with its associated supernova remnant. Therefore, I will discuss both analytical and more recent numerical (M)HD models. The four main stages of a pulsar wind nebula are: the supersonic expansion stage, the reverse shock interaction stage, the subsonic expansion stage and ultimately the stage when the head of the bubble is bounded by a bow shock, due to the supersonic motion of the pulsar. Ultimately this pulsar wind nebula bow shock will break through its associated remnant, after which the pulsar-powered bow shock will interact directly with the interstellar medium. I will discuss recent numerical models from these type of pulsar wind nebulae and their morphology.

  2. Model images of radio halos around supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    I present model calculations of profiles and two-dimensional images of the radio synchrotron emission of young supernova remnants, concentrating on observable effects of relativistic eletrons diffusing upstream of the shock wave. If the preshock electron scattering mean free path is sufficiently long, observable synchrotron halos outside the bulk of the radio emission can potentially result; their absence can constrain the mean free path from above. If scattering is primarily due, as expected, to Alfven waves with amplitude detla(B), the halo is expected to extend a distance of order r(sub g)c(delta(B)/B)(exp 2)/v(sub s) beyond the shock, where r(sub g) is the gyroradius of the electrons emitting at the observed frequency, B is the upstream magnetic field strength, v(sub s) is the shock velocity, and the amplitude delta(B) refers to wave with wavelength comparable to r(sub g), of order 10(exp 13) cm for typical supernova-remnant parameters. However, the detailed geometry of the halo varies with the assumptions about particle acceleration in the shock wave. I present an atlas of model profiles and images as a function of preshock diffusion length, of aspect angle between the magnetic field and the line of sight, and of other relevant parameters.

  3. Dynamical Evolution of Supernova Remnants Breaking Through Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Wankee; Kim, Jongsoo; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-04-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code tep{har83}. We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the outermost dense shell of the remnant is divided into several layers. The divided layers are subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and fragmented. On the other hand, if an SNR breaks through an MC after the remnant enters the snowplow phase, the radiative shell is not divided to layers. We also compare the predictions of previous analytic solutions for the expansion of SNRs in stratified media with our one-dimensional simulations. Moreover, we produce synthetic X-ray surface brightness in order to research the center-bright X-ray morphology shown in thermal composite SNRs. In the late stages, a breakout SNR shows the center-bright X-ray morphology inside an MC in our results. We apply our model to the observational results of the X-ray morphology of the thermal composite SNR 3C 391.

  4. The 1st Fermi Lat Supernova Remnant Catalog

    E-print Network

    Acero, Fabio; Ajello, Marco; Baldini, Luca; Ballet, Jean; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, Roger; Bloom, E D; Bonino, Raffaella; Bottacini, Eugenio; Bregeon, J; Bruel, Philippe; Buehler, Rolf; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, Rob A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, Micaela; Caraveo, Patrizia A; Casandjian, Jean Marc; Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Cecchi, Claudia; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, Stefano; Claus, R; Cohen, J M; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, L R; Condon, B; Conrad, Jan; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Angelis, A; Palma, F; Desiante, Rachele; Digel, S W; Venere, L; Drell, Persis S; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, Anna; Fukazawa, Prof Yasushi; Funk, Prof Stefan; Fusco, P; Gargano, Fabio; Gasparrini, Dario; Giglietto, Nicola; Giommi, Paolo; Giordano, Francesco; Giroletti, Marcello; Glanzman, Tom; Godfrey, Gary; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M -H; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, Sylvain; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Horan, Deirdre; Hou, X; Iafrate, Giulia; Jogler, Tobias; J'ohannesson, G; Johnson, Anthony S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, Hideaki; Kataoka, Prof Jun; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kerr, Matthew; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, Prof Dale; Kuss, M; Laffon, Helene; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, Luca; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, Francesco; Loparco, Francesco; Lovellette, Michael N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Magill, J; Maldera, S; Marelli, Martino; Mayer, Michael; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, Peter F; Mitthumsiri, Warit; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Moiseev, Alexander A; Monzani, Maria Elena; Moretti, E; Morselli, Aldo; Moskalenko, Igor V; Murgia, Prof Simona; Nemmen, Prof Rodrigo; Nuss, Eric; Ohsugi, Takashi; Omodei, Nicola; Orienti, Monica; Orlando, Elena; Ormes, Jonathan F; Paneque, David; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Prof Vahe'; Piron, Frederic; Pivato, Giovanna; Porter, Troy; Rain`o, S; Rando, Riccardo; Razzano, Massimiliano; Razzaque, Soebur; Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Prof Olaf; Renaud, Matthieu; Reposeur, Thierry; Rousseau, Mr Romain; Parkinson, P M; Schmid, J; Schulz, A; Sgr`o, C; Siskind, Eric J; Spada, Francesca; Spandre, Gloria; Spinelli, Paolo; Strong, Andrew W; Suson, Daniel; Tajima, Hiro; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Tanaka, T; Thayer, Jana B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, Omar; Torres, Prof Diego F; Tosti, Gino; Troja, Eleonora; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Vianello, G; Wells, B; Wood, Kent; Wood, M; Yassine, Manal; Zimmer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavele...

  5. X-Ray Ejecta Kinematics of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-01

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of -2300 lsim vr lsim 1400 km s-1. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ~90'' (corresponding to ~3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ~4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 1051 erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be lsim8 M ?, and we propose an upper limit of lsim35 M ? on the progenitor's mass.

  6. The Extraordinary Supernova Remnant in NGC 4449 Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Winkler, P. Frank

    2015-01-01

    NGC 4449, a Magellanic-type irregular galaxy at a distance of about 4 Mpc, contains the most luminous known supernova remnant (SNR) in both X-ray and optical bands. Its optical spectrum is characterized by broad lines from O, Ne, S, Ar, and Ca, and its size and expansion velocity (6000 km/s) suggest that the unobserved SN exploded about 65 years ago. The remnant¹s extraordinary brightness can be attributed to the interaction of supernova ejecta with unusually dense and extensive circumstellar material. We will present new Chandra imaging, together with UV/Optical spectra of the SNR from HST/STIS and the MMT. The X-ray luminosity of the SNR is less than when it was detected with Einstein in 1980, but the luminosity and X-ray spectral shape have remained relatively constant over the last 10 years. In the FUV, the HST spectra show for the first time broad line emission from C IV 1550 Å, as well as Si IV + O IV at 1400 Å and O III] at 1660 Å. The new NUV and optical spectra are fairly similar to earlier HST/FOS spectra and to ground-based spectra we have obtained over the last decade. Here we describe these new observations, and our attempts to understand the nature of the progenitor of the SNR.We acknowledge support for this effort from NASA through grant GO-12462 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc, under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and through Chandra Award Number GO9-0075, issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, under NASA contract NAS8-03060.

  7. A Detailed X-Ray Investigation of PSR J2021+4026 and the ?-Cygni Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, C. Y.; Seo, K. A.; Lin, L. C. C.; Huang, R. H. H.; Hu, C. P.; Wu, J. H. K.; Trepl, L.; Takata, J.; Wang, Y.; Chou, Y.; Cheng, K. S.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the field around the radio-quiet ?-ray pulsar, PSR J2021+4026, with a ~140 ks XMM-Newton observation and ~56 ks archival Chandra data. Through analyzing the pulsed spectrum, we show that the X-ray pulsation is purely thermal in nature, which suggests that the pulsation originated from a hot polar cap with T ~ 3 × 106 K on the surface of a rotating neutron star. On the other hand, the power-law (PL) component that dominates the pulsar emission in the hard band is originated from off-pulse phases, which possibly comes from a pulsar wind nebula. In re-analyzing the Chandra data, we have confirmed the presence of a bow-shock nebula that extends from the pulsar to the west by ~10 arcsec. The orientation of this nebular feature suggests that the pulsar is probably moving eastward, which is consistent with the speculated proper motion by extrapolating from the nominal geometrical center of the supernova remnant (SNR) G78.2+2.1 to the current pulsar position. For G78.2+2.1, our deep XMM-Newton observation also enables a study of the central region and part of the southeastern region with superior photon statistics. The column absorption derived for the SNR is comparable to that for PSR J2021+4026, which supports their association. The remnant emission in both of the examined regions is in a non-equilibrium ionization state. Also, the elapsed time of both regions after shock-heating is apparently shorter than the Sedov age of G78.2+2.1. This might suggest that the reverse shock has reached the center not long ago. Apart from PSR J2021+4026 and G78.2+2.1, we have also serendipitously detected an X-ray flash-like event, XMM J202154.7+402855, from this XMM-Newton observation.

  8. The fate of supernova remnants near quiescent supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldi, A.; Rossi, E. M.; Piran, T.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting observational evidence that most galactic nuclei host both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and young populations of stars. With an abundance of massive stars, core-collapse supernovae are expected in SMBH spheres of influence. We develop a novel numerical method, based on the Kompaneets approximation, to trace supernova remnant (SNR) evolution in these hostile environments, where radial gas gradients and SMBH tides are present. We trace the adiabatic evolution of the SNR shock until 50 per cent of the remnant is either in the radiative phase or is slowed down below the SMBH Keplerian velocity and is sheared apart. In this way, we obtain shapes and lifetimes of SNRs as a function of the explosion distance from the SMBH, the gas density profile and the SMBH mass. As an application, we focus here exclusively on quiescent SMBHs, because their light may not hamper detections of SNRs and because we can take advantage of the unsurpassed detailed observations of our Galactic Centre. Assuming that properties such as gas and stellar content scale appropriately with the SMBH mass, we study SNR evolution around other quiescent SMBHs. We find that, for SMBH masses over ˜107 M?, tidal disruption of SNRs can occur at less than 104 yr, leading to a shortened X-ray emitting adiabatic phase, and to no radiative phase. On the other hand, only modest disruption is expected in our Galactic Centre for SNRs in their X-ray stage. This is in accordance with estimates of the lifetime of the Sgr A East SNR, which leads us to expect one supernova per 104 yr in the sphere of influence of Sgr A*.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Image, Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were created by the universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before the United States celebrated its birth with a bang. The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s. This HST image of Cas A shows for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago. This photo shows the upper rim of the super nova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system. The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur. The images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in January 2000 and January 2002. Image Credit: NASA and HST team (Stoics/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Darmouth) and J. Morse ( Univ. of Colorado).

  10. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. I: spectrum and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the spectrum and chemical composition of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. In particular, at high energies we assume that D(E)?E{sup ?}, with ? = 1/3 and ? = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars, with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. We find that the stochastic fluctuations induced by the spatial and temporal distribution of supernovae, together with the effect of spallation of nuclei, lead to mild but sensible violations of the simple, leaky-box-inspired rule that the spectrum observed at Earth is N(E)?E{sup ??} with ? = ?+?, where ? is the slope of the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the sources. Spallation of nuclei, even with the small rates appropriate for He, may account for small differences in spectral slopes between different nuclei, possibly providing an explanation for the recent CREAM observations. For ? = 1/3 we find that the slope of the proton and helium spectra are ? 2.67 and ? 2.6 respectively (with fluctuations depending on the realization of source distribution) at energies around ? 1 TeV (to be compared with the measured values of 2.66±0.02 and 2.58±0.02). For ? = 0.6 the hardening of the He spectra is not observed. The stochastic effects discussed above cannot be found in ordinary propagation calculations, such as GALPROP, where these effects and the point like nature of the sources are not taken into account. We also comment on the effect of time dependence of the escape of cosmic rays from supernova remnants, and of a possible clustering of the sources in superbubbles. In a second paper we will discuss the implications of these different scenarios for the anisotropy of cosmic rays.

  11. Supernovae. The bubble-like interior of the core-collapse supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A

    2015-01-30

    The death of massive stars is believed to involve aspheric explosions initiated by the collapse of an iron core. The specifics of these catastrophic explosions remain uncertain, due partly to limited observational constraints on asymmetries deep inside the star. Here we present near-infrared observations of the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, descendant of a type IIb core-collapse explosion, and a three-dimensional map of its interior unshocked ejecta. The remnant's interior has a bubble-like morphology that smoothly connects to and helps explain the multiringed structures seen in the remnant's bright reverse-shocked main shell of expanding debris. This internal structure may originate from turbulent mixing processes that encouraged outwardly expanding plumes of radioactive (56)Ni-rich ejecta. If this is true, substantial amounts of its decay product, (56)Fe, may still reside in these interior cavities. PMID:25635094

  12. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  13. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.; Patnaude, Daniel; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Williams, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained new HST/WFC3 images of Kepler's supernova remnant in H-alpha (F656N) and [N II] (F658N) emission line filters. The bright radiative shocks in dense clumps are detected in both filters, while non-radiative shocks are seen as faint filaments only in the H-alpha image. Most of these Balmer filaments lie around the periphery of the remnant where the blast wave encounters partially neutral interstellar gas. We compare the new images with HST/ACS images taken nearly 10 years previously, and find that these filaments tracing the forward shock have moved 0.6"-0.9" between the two epochs. Assuming a distance of 4 kpc to the remnant, these proper motions correspond to shock velocities of 1160-1740 km/s, which are consistent with the published values, 1550-2000 km/s (e.g. Blair et al. 1991, ApJ 366, 484). We also find a few Balmer filaments with highly non-radial proper motions. In one particularly interesting case in the projected interior of the remnant, SE of the center, the shock appears to have wrapped around a sharp density enhancement and moved about 0.3" in the period between the observations.The images allow us to study the evolution of the shock around an ejecta knot, which is punching through the remnant boundary in the northwest. The forward shock, visible as an arcuate Balmer filament, has moved about 1". At the trailing edges, the system of radiative knots formed by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have undergone significant changes - some knots have disappeared, new ones have appeared, and many have changed in brightness. Elsewhere in the remnant we find changes in the relative intensities of many small, bright knots over the 10 year baseline, indicating the short radiative lifetimes of these features.This work has been supported in part by grant HST-GO-12885 to the Universities Space Research Association.

  14. The Evolution of Relativistic Electron Populations in Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Martha Carol

    1993-01-01

    Observational data regarding the acceleration of relativistic particles in shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented. As synchrotron spectral indices directly reflect the energy spectra of radiating particle populations, we have mapped the spatial distribution of spectral index in several shell SNRs. In particular, we address the question of whether bright, compact radio features in SNRs should be should be interpreted as sites of active particle acceleration, in analogy with studies of extragalactic radio jets. We concentrate primarily on the SNR Cassiopeia A and begin by constructing a dynamical picture describing the current evolutionary state of emission structures on both small and large spatial scales. To this end, the proper motions and brightness evolution of both the bulk radio ring and a sample of 304 compact radio features have been accurately determined from high-quality interferometric observations of the remnant at lambdalambda 6 and 20 cm, spanning a total time baseline of 12 years. We find that the expansion timescales derived for sets of compact features varies azimuthally and radially within the remnant and differs for subsets of knots segregated by brightness. These measurements suggest that, in Cas A, the deceleration of ejecta and radio emissivity are strongly coupled. This is in agreement with numerical models of supersonic gaseous projectiles which show that the deceleration of a clumpy ejectum is accompanied by the onset of dynamical instabilities which serve to amplify the local magnetic field, thereby enhancing synchrotron emissivity. We find that the spectral indices of compact radio features in Cas A are uncorrelated with any dynamically important quantities (e.g., knot brightness, rate of brightness change, degree of deceleration). Spectral index shows a significant correlation only with the knots' (projected) radial positions within the remnant. This suggests that these radio-bright features are not themselves accelerating the relativistic electrons which illuminate them. Comparisons with spectral variations found in Galactic remnants G39.2 -0.3, G41.1-0.3, Kepler's SNR and with other previously published remnant studies are made.

  15. A New X-Ray View of the Supernova Remnant G272.2-3.2 and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, R. L.; Grieves, N.; DeRoo, C.; Brantseg, T.

    2013-09-01

    We present an analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory data detailing a Galactic supernova remnant, G272.2-3.2. A clear shell of emission is resolved as a series of filaments and knots around the entire rim of the remnant. Spectral analysis of these features show that they are consistent with shock heating of interstellar material in a clumpy medium. We contrast these X-ray images with 22 ?m Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to verify this interaction. Spatially separated from the shell we see a central diffuse region dominated by harder, hotter emission. Spatial spectroscopy shows a clear enhancement of metals consistent with a Type Ia explosion, namely S, Si, and Fe. We find no clear evidence for a compact object or pulsar wind nebula and argue for a Type Ia origin. Consideration of the ionization timescales suggest an age of 11,000 yr for G272.2-3.2.

  16. Nature Versus Nurture: Do Asymmetries in Supernova Remnant Ejecta Reflect the Explosion or the Environment of the Progenitor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) have statistically more spherical and mirror-symmetric X-ray line and continuum emission than core-collapse (CC) SNRs. The ability to type SNRs based on thermal X-ray emission morphology alone could reflect either the distinct explosion mechanisms or the different circumstellar environments of Type Ia and CC SNRs. In this talk, we present new results exploring this "nature" versus "nurture" conundrum. To test if asymmetries arise from explosions, we examine whether pulsar kick velocities are correlated with ejecta (a)symmetries (as measured using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT images). We also study Type Ia and CC SNRs in a variety of conditions to search for trends in (a)symmetries with environmental factors (e.g., star-formation activity). Collectively, this work provides new insights into the nature of SN explosions and the dynamical evolution of their remnants.

  17. A NEW X-RAY VIEW OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G272.2-3.2 AND ITS ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    McEntaffer, R. L.; Grieves, N.; DeRoo, C.; Brantseg, T.

    2013-09-10

    We present an analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory data detailing a Galactic supernova remnant, G272.2-3.2. A clear shell of emission is resolved as a series of filaments and knots around the entire rim of the remnant. Spectral analysis of these features show that they are consistent with shock heating of interstellar material in a clumpy medium. We contrast these X-ray images with 22 {mu}m Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to verify this interaction. Spatially separated from the shell we see a central diffuse region dominated by harder, hotter emission. Spatial spectroscopy shows a clear enhancement of metals consistent with a Type Ia explosion, namely S, Si, and Fe. We find no clear evidence for a compact object or pulsar wind nebula and argue for a Type Ia origin. Consideration of the ionization timescales suggest an age of 11,000 yr for G272.2-3.2.

  18. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE VISHNIAC INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michaut, C.; Cavet, C.; Bouquet, S. E.; Roy, F.; Nguyen, H. C.

    2012-11-10

    The Vishniac instability is thought to explain the complex structure of radiative supernova remnants in their Pressure-Driven Thin Shell (PDTS) phase after a blast wave (BW) has propagated from a central explosion. In this paper, the propagation of the BW and the evolution of the PDTS stage are studied numerically with the two-dimensional (2D) code HYDRO-MUSCL for a finite-thickness shell expanding in the interstellar medium (ISM). Special attention is paid to the adiabatic index, {gamma}, and three distinct values are taken for the cavity ({gamma}{sub 1}), the shell ({gamma}{sub 2}), and the ISM ({gamma}{sub 3}) with the condition {gamma}{sub 2} < {gamma}{sub 1}, {gamma}{sub 3}. This low value of {gamma}{sub 2} accounts for the high density in the shell achieved by a strong radiative cooling. Once the spherical background flow is obtained, the evolution of a 2D-axisymmetric perturbation is computed from the linear to the nonlinear regime. The overstable mechanism, previously demonstrated theoretically by E. T. Vishniac in 1983, is recovered numerically in the linear stage and is expected to produce and enhance anisotropies and clumps on the shock front, leading to the disruption of the shell in the nonlinear phase. The period of the increasing oscillations and the growth rate of the instability are derived from several points of view (the position of the perturbed shock front, mass fluxes along the shell, and density maps), and the most unstable mode differing from the value given by Vishniac is computed. In addition, the influence of several parameters (the Mach number, amplitude and wavelength of the perturbation, and adiabatic index) is examined and for wavelengths that are large enough compared to the shell thickness, the same conclusion arises: in the late stage of the evolution of the radiative supernova remnant, the instability is dampened and the angular initial deformation of the shock front is smoothed while the mass density becomes uniform with the angle. As a result, our model shows that the supernova remnant returns to a stable evolution and the Vishniac instability does not lead to the fragmentation of the shock as predicted by the theory.

  19. Spectral and Morphological Analysis of the Remnant of Supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Barlow, Michael J.; Fransson, Claes; Manchester, Richard N.; Baes, Maarten; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Laki?evi?, Maša; Lundqvist, Peter; Marcaide, Jon M.; Martí-Vidal, Ivan; Meixner, Margaret; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, Sangwook; Sonneborn, George; Spyromilio, Jason; van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (? 3.2 mm to 450 ?m), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S ?vprop?-0.73) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ~ 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields -0.4 <~ ? <~ -0.1 across the western regions, with ? ~ 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  20. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J.; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Manchester, Richard N.; Baes, Maarten; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Laki?evi?, Maša; Marcaide, Jon M.; Meixner, Margaret; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, Sangwook; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (? 3.2 mm to 450 ?m), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ?}??{sup –0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ? 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields –0.4 ? ? ? –0.1 across the western regions, with ? ? 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  1. The Properties of the Progenitor Supernova, Pulsar Wind, and Neutron Star inside PWN G54.1+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, Joseph D.; Slane, Patrick O.; Temim, Tea

    2015-07-01

    The evolution of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) inside a supernova remnant (SNR) is sensitive to the properties of the central neutron star, pulsar wind, progenitor supernova, and interstellar medium. These properties are both difficult to measure directly and critical for understanding the formation of neutron stars and their interaction with the surrounding medium. In this paper, we determine these properties for PWN G54.1+0.3 by fitting its observed properties with a model for the dynamical and radiative evolution of a PWN inside an SNR. Our modeling suggests that the progenitor of G54.1+0.3 was an isolated ˜15-20 {M}? star which exploded inside a massive star cluster, creating a neutron star initially spinning with a period of {P}0 ˜ 30-80 ms. We also find that ?99.9% of the pulsar’s rotational energy is injected into the PWN as relativistic electrons and positrons whose energy spectrum is well characterized by a broken power law. Finally, we propose future observations which can both test the validity of this model and better determine the properties of this source—in particular, its distance and the initial spin period of the central pulsar.

  2. Oxygen emission in remnants of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe for their progenitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosenko, D.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Blinnikov, S. I.; Pakmor, R.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2015-05-01

    Recent progress in numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernova explosions brings up a unique opportunity in studying the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Coupling state-of-the-art explosion models with detailed hydrodynamical simulations of the supernova remnant evolution and the most up-to-date atomic data for X-ray emission calculations makes it possible to create realistic synthetic X-ray spectra for the supernova remnant phase. Comparing such spectra with high-quality observations of supernova remnants could allow us to constrain the explosion mechanism and the progenitor of the supernova. The present study focuses in particular on the oxygen emission line properties in young supernova remnants, since different explosion scenarios predict a different amount and distribution of this element. Analysis of the soft X-ray spectra from supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud and confrontation with remnant models for different explosion scenarios suggest that SNR 0509-67.5 could originate from a delayed detonation explosion and SNR 0519-69.0 from an oxygen-rich merger.

  3. High-Resolution Polarimetry of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.; Mufson, S. L.; Dickel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Reported here are high-resolution 6 cm measurements of the adolescent supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 69 made with the hybrid BnC configuration of the Very Large Array. Several three-field mosaics of the polarized and total intensity have been used to study this SNR. These investigations lead to a coherent picture of this region. The expanding shock defines an outer rim of high total intensity, suggesting the front is running into large dense clouds with random magnetic field directions. The SNR consists of predominantly of two types of regions, those with high total and relatively weak polarized emission and those with relatively weak total and strong polarized emission. This morphology can be generally explained by the number of clouds with organized magnetic field along the line of sight. Within this SNR there are regions where the field is varying from radial to tangential. As the SN shock encounters clouds, magnetic fields within clouds will strongly affect cloud dynamics.

  4. Type Ia Supernova Remnants: Shaping by Iron Bullets

    E-print Network

    Tsebrenko, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations of type Ia supernova remnants (SNR Ia) we show that iron clumps few times denser than the rest of the SN ejecta might form protrusions in an otherwise spherical SNR. Such protrusions exist in some SNR Ia, e.g., SNR 1885 and Tycho. Iron clumps are expected to form in the deflagration to detonation explosion model. In SNR Ia where there are two opposite protrusions, termed ears, such as Kepler's SNR and SNR G1.9+0.3, our scenario implies that the dense clumps, or iron bullets, were formed along an axis. Such a preferred axis can result from a rotating white dwarf progenitor. If our claim holds, this offers an important clue to the SN Ia explosion scenario.

  5. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  6. SN1987A: The Birth of a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This grant was intended to support the development of theoretical models needed to interpret and understand the observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray telescope of the rapidly developing remnant of Supernova 1987A. In addition, we carried out a few investigations of related topics. The project was spectacularly successful. The models that we developed provide the definitive framework for predicting and interpreting this phenomenon. Following is a list of publications based on our work. Some of these papers include results of both theoretical modeling supported by this project and also analysis of data supported by the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We first list papers published in refereed journals, then conference proceedings and book chapters, and also an educational web site.

  7. Type Ia supernova remnants: shaping by iron bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsebrenko, Danny; Soker, Noam

    2015-10-01

    Using 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations of Type Ia supernova remnants (SNR Ia) we show that iron clumps few times denser than the rest of the SN ejecta might form protrusions in an otherwise spherical SNR. Such protrusions exist in some SNR Ia, e.g. SNR 1885 and Tycho. Iron clumps are expected to form in the deflagration to detonation explosion model. In SNR Ia where there are two opposite protrusions, termed `ears', such as Kepler's SNR and SNR G1.9+0.3, our scenario implies that the dense clumps, or iron bullets, were formed along an axis. Such a preferred axis can result from a rotating white dwarf progenitor. If our claim holds, this offers an important clue to the SN Ia explosion scenario.

  8. Phosphorus in the Young Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    E-print Network

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Raymond, John C

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus ($^{31}$P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ($^{56}$Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion.

  9. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV ?1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 ?m and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  10. Phosphorus in the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Moon, Dae-Sik; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Raymond, John C

    2013-12-13

    Phosphorus ((31)P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here, we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ((56)Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. PMID:24337291

  11. UV Lightbulbs to Probe Supernova Remnants in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Smith, R. Chris

    1999-08-01

    We propose to use broad-band imaging from the CTIO 0.9-m and spectroscopy from the 1.5-m to identify stars which can serve as UV ``lightbulbs'' to probe the ``unshocked'' material in supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These observations will provide the basis for future UV observations of these stars with HST. UV absorption studies are important because they represent one of the very few ways to see undecelerated ejecta in the inner regions of young SNRs, as has been shown in the case of SN 1006. More generally, absorption studies provide information about the dynamics and ionization state of a significant constituent of the SNR, namely that portion which is not currently ``shocked''.

  12. Spitzer Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Onaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used for observations of the Kepler supernova remnant, with all four instrument modules targeted on the bright infrared knot located at 17h30m35.80s,-21d28m54.0s (J2000). The low spectral resolution modules data show a dust continuum spectrum consistent with dust grains heated by high-energy electrons, while the high resolution modules data show atomic emission line ratios consistent with excitation by a high velocity shock of greater than 100 kilometers per second and electron densities of approximately 1,000 per centimeter. The abundance ratios for the six detected elements show signs of heavy-element enhancement. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  13. Supernova Remnants in the Most Fertile Galaxy: NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.

    2014-08-01

    As the host to more recorded supernovae (nine in the past century) than any other galaxy, ngal is a unique venue for studying young (and old) supernova remnants (SNRs). Using deep emission-line images of ngal we obtained from WIYN, we have identified 148 new emission nebulae through their high S II:H? ratios, indicating that they are strong SNR candidates. This is over 5 times as many as have previously been identified; yet of the 175 total objects, only 6 have been spectroscopically confirmed. We propose multislit spectroscopy from GMOS-N to study the majority of those with no spectra to date. Some 26 are essentially unresolved in our images (diameters ? 1 arcsec=27 pc at ngal) and hence probably are relatively young. Several are also coincident with soft X-ray sources (a further indicator of youthful vigor) and have strong O III emission. Some may be rare, ejecta- dominated core-collapse SNRs akin to Cas A, where ``fresh" nucleosynthesis products can be seen. Only spectroscopy, to look for broad emission lines from fast-moving ejecta, can confirm this. We will include spectra of two of the nine recorded SNe in ngal-the first late-time spectrum of SN 2004et, and the first of SN 1980K with high signal-to-noise-adding to the extremely small number of spectra for SNRs only a few decades old. Finally we will use the H II:H? ratio in a large number of ISM-dominated SNRs to map the N abundance and its gradient across the disk of ngal, and we will use archival HST images to identify the stellar environments that produced the SNe whose remnants we see today.

  14. The Compact Central Object in the RX J0852.0-4622 Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, George G.; Sanwal, Divas; K?z?ltan, Bülent; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2001-10-01

    The central region of the recently discovered supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 was observed with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer detector aboard the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We found only one relatively bright source, about 4' north of the SNR center, with a flux of ~2×10-12 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-10 keV band. The position of this pointlike source, CXOU J085201.4-461753, rules out its association with the two bright stars in the field, HD 76060 and Wray 16-30. Observations of the field with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 0.9 m telescope show a star (R~17, B~19) at about 2.4" from the nominal X-ray position. We consider association of this star with the X-ray source unlikely and estimate a limiting magnitude of the optical counterpart as B>=22.5 and R>=21.0. Based on the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio, we argue that the X-ray source is likely the compact remnant of the supernova explosion that created the RX J0852.0-4622 SNR. The observed X-ray spectrum of the source is softer than spectra of magnetospheric radiation of rotation-powered pulsars, but it is harder than spectra of cooling neutron stars emitting thermal radiation from the entire surface, similar to the central compact source of the Cas A SNR. We suggest that CXOU J085201.4-461753 belongs to the growing family of radio-quiet compact central sources, presumably neutron stars, recently discovered in a number of SNRs.

  15. Discovery of an Apparent High Latitude Galactic Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Neustadt, Jack M. M.; Black, Christine S.; Koeppel, Ari H. D.

    2015-10-01

    Deep H? images of a faint emission complex 4.°0 × 5.°5 in angular extent and located far off the Galactic plane at l = 70.°0, b = -21.°5 reveal numerous thin filaments suggestive of a supernova remnant’s (SNR’s) shock emission. Low dispersion optical spectra covering the wavelength range 4500-7500 Å show only Balmer line emissions for one filament while three others show a Balmer dominated spectrum along with weak [N i] 5198, 5200 Å, [O i] 6300, 6364 Å, [N ii] 6583 Å, [S ii] 6716, 6731 Å, and in one case [O iii] 5007 Å line emission. Many of the brighter H? filaments are visible in near-UV GALEX images presumably due to C iii] 1909 Å line emission. ROSAT All Sky Survey images of this region show a faint crescent-shaped X-ray emission nebula coincident with the portion of the H? nebulosity closest to the Galactic plane. The presence of long, thin Balmer dominated emission filaments with associated UV emission and coincident X-ray emission suggests this nebula is a high latitude Galactic SNR despite a lack of known associated nonthermal radio emission. Relative line intensities of the optical lines in some filaments differ from commonly observed [S ii]/H? ? 0.4 radiative shocked filaments and typical Balmer filaments in SNRs. We discuss possible causes for the unusual optical SNR spectra.

  16. Gamma-rays from supernova remnants and the signatures of diffusive shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Grenier, Isabelle

    1997-01-01

    A nonlinear shock acceleration model which generates non-thermal proton distributions and includes a self-consistent determination of shock hydrodynamics, is considered. Gamma ray spectra are obtained for supernova remnants, allowing for the cessation of acceleration to high energies due to the finite ages and the sizes of the remnants. Gamma ray spectral cutoffs can be observed in the TeV range for reasonable remnant parameters and deviations from power law behavior are found at all energies from 1 MeV to cutoff. Correlated observations by the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Whipple and other instruments may provide stringent constraints to understanding supernova remnants.

  17. G29.7-0.3: another supernova remnant with an identity crisis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Helfand, D. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    New radio and X-ray observations of the galactic supernova remnant G29.7-0.3 show that it is composed of two spectrally distinct components: a steep-spectrum, incomplete shell 3 arcmin in extent enclosing a flat-spectrum, X-ray emitting region 30 arcsec across. Thus, G29.7-0.3 joins the ranks of supernova remnants which exhibit a combination of Crab-like and shell remnant attributes. The Crab-like core has the highest ratio of X-ray radio luminosity of all the Crab-like remnants observed to date, suggesting that it is an extremely young object.

  18. Search for surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu E-mail: taam@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  19. IS THERE A HIDDEN HOLE IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Senz, D.; Badenes, C.; Serichol, N. E-mail: carles@astro.tau.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we report on the bulk features of the hole carved by the companion star in the material ejected during a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion. In particular we are interested in the long-term evolution of the hole as well as in its fingerprint in the geometry of the supernova remnant (SNR) after several centuries of evolution, which is a hot topic in current SN Ia studies. We use an axisymmetric smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to characterize the geometric properties of the SNR resulting from the interaction of this ejected material with the ambient medium. Our aim is to use SNR observations to constrain the single degenerate scenario for SN Ia progenitors. Our simulations show that the hole will remain open during centuries, although its partial or total closure at later times due to hydrodynamic instabilities is not excluded. Close to the edge of the hole, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows faster, leading to plumes that approach the edge of the forward shock. We also discuss other geometrical properties of the simulations, like the evolution of the contact discontinuity.

  20. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays - Duration: 3 minutes, 40 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  1. Fermi-LAT Observation of Supernova Remnant S147

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Ballet, J.; Hanabata, Y.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2012-08-17

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around SNR S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with prominent H{alpha} filaments of S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. Reacceleration of pre-existing CRs and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the required energy density of high-energy protons.

  2. Distribution of novae and supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, S.

    1988-12-01

    Novae in the LMC appear to be distributred like an old disk population. The fact that no concentration of novae is seen within the Bar of the Large Cloud suggests that this feature is of relatively recent origin. Supernova remnants are seen to exhibit concentrations in the 30 Dor region, in the Bar of the Large Cloud, and in Constellation III. This distribution supports the idea that most of the supernova remnants in the LMC had young massive progenitors. 11 references.

  3. Dust in a Type Ia Supernova Progenitor: Spitzer Spectroscopy of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the relatively poorly-understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 micron IR spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 micron, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength IRS and IRAC data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally-heated dust emission from fast shocks (> 1000 km/s) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are approx 80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km/s) into moderate density material (n(sub o) approx 50-100 / cubic cm) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  4. DUST IN A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITOR: SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-08-10

    Characterization of the relatively poorly understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's supernova remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 {mu}m infrared (IR) spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 {mu}m, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally heated dust emission from fast shocks (>1000 km s{sup -1}) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are {approx}80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km s{sup -1}) into moderate density material (n{sub 0} {approx} 50-250 cm{sup -3}) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  5. Supernova remnant W49B and its environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Zuo, P. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2014-10-01

    We study gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) W49B and its environment using recent radio and infrared data. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low resolution data of W49B shows shocked excitation lines of H{sub 2} (0,0) S(0)-S(7) from the SNR-molecular cloud interaction. The H{sub 2} gas is composed of two components with temperatures of ?260 K and ?1060 K, respectively. Various spectral lines from atomic and ionic particles are detected toward W49B. We suggest that the ionic phase has an electron density of ?500 cm{sup –3} and a temperature of ?10{sup 4} K by the spectral line diagnoses. The mid- and far-infrared data from MSX, Spitzer, and Herschel reveal a 151 ± 20 K hot dust component with a mass of 7.5 ± 6.6 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ?} and a 45 ± 4 K warm dust component with a mass of 6.4 ± 3.2 M {sub ?}. The hot dust is likely from materials swept up by the shock of W49B. The warm dust may possibly originate from the evaporation of clouds interacting with W49B. We build the H I absorption spectra of W49B and four nearby H II regions (W49A, G42.90+0.58, G42.43-0.26, and G43.19-0.53) and study the relation between W49B and the surrounding molecular clouds by employing the 2.12 ?m infrared and CO data. We therefore obtain a kinematic distance of ?10 kpc for W49B and suggest that the remnant is likely associated with the CO cloud at about 40 km s{sup –1}.

  6. SUPERNOVA REMNANT KES 17: AN EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATOR INSIDE A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    E-print Network

    Gelfand, Joseph D.

    The supernova remnant Kes 17 (SNR G304.6+0.1) is one of a few but growing number of remnants detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we analyze recent radio, X-ray, and ?-ray observations of this object, ...

  7. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jonghee; Hwang, Una

    2013-01-01

    The ejecta of the Cas A supernova remnant has a complex morphology, consisting of dense fast-moving line emitting knots and diffuse X-ray emitting regions that have encountered the reverse shock, as well as more slowly expanding, unshocked regions of the ejecta. Using the Spitzer 5-35 micron IRS data cube, and Herschel 70, 100, and 160 micron PACS data, we decompose the infrared emission from the remnant into distinct spectral components associated with the different regions of the ejecta. Such decomposition allows the association of different dust species with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories, and determination of the dust heating mechanisms. Our decomposition identified three characteristic dust spectra. The first, most luminous one, exhibits strong emission features at approx. 9 and 21 micron, and a weaker 12 micron feature, and is closely associated with the ejecta knots that have strong [Ar II] 6.99 micron and [Ar III] 8.99 micron emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low MgO-to-SiO2 ratios. A second, very different dust spectrum that has no indication of any silicate features, is best fit by Al2O3 dust and is found in association with ejecta having strong [Ne II] 12.8 micron and [Ne III] 15.6 micron emission lines. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that best matched by magnesium silicates with relatively high MgO-to-SiO2 ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray emitting shocked ejecta and the shocked interstellar/circumstellar material. All three spectral components include an additional featureless cold dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with [Si II] 34.8 micron emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. The dust mass giving rise to the warm dust component is about approx. 0.1solar M. However, most of the dust mass is associated with the unidentified cold dust component. Its mass could be anywhere between 0.1 and 1 solar M, and is primarily limited by the mass of refractory elements in the ejecta. Given the large uncertainty in the dust mass, the question of whether supernovae can produce enough dust to account for ISM dust masses in the local and high-z universe remains largely unresolved.

  8. Studying Young and Old Supernova Remnants with the Upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar; Hughes, John P.; Long, Knox; Bamba, Aya; Aharonian, Felix; Foster, Adam; Funk, Stefan; Hiraga, Junko; Ishida, Manabu; Katsuda, Satoru; Koyama, Katsuji; Leutenegger, Maurice; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Mori, Koji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takashi; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Petre, Robert; Sawada, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamauchi, Shigeo; ASTRO-H Science Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming X-ray mission ASTRO-H will open a new discovery window to the high-energy Universe thanks to the unprecedented high-resolution spectroscopy (~7eV) to be achieved with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) combined with its broadband coverage (0.5-600 keV) with the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) and the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD). Supernova remnants (SNRs) are a prime science focus for ASTRO-H, particularly with the SXS providing accurate plasma diagnostics of line-rich spectra expected from the youngest, ejecta-dominated, SNRs to the oldest SNRs impacted by their interaction with the Interstellar Medium (ISM). We here highlight the SNR science topics and program that the ASTRO-H team considers of highest priority and impact. For the younger SNRs, the primary science goals are (1) using abundance measurements to unveil SNR progenitors, (2) using spatial and velocity distribution of the ejecta to understand supernova explosion mechanisms, and (3) revealing the link between the thermal plasma state of SNRs and the efficiency of their particle acceleration. For the older SNRs where thermal emission is dominated or heavily impacted by the ISM, the primary goals are (1) constraining metal abundances and physical processes in the mature limb-brightened SNRs, and (2) understanding the puzzling nature of the `mixed-morphology' SNRs and the physics of recombining plasma. For the pulsar-powered nebulae, also known as Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) or plerions with many still lacking thermal X-ray emission from their supernova shells, ASTRO-H will shed light on their progenitors and environment. The hard X-ray coverage on board ASTRO-H will further allow a study of their broadband spectra (for the brightest objects), beyond NuSTAR's range, filling the gap between the soft X-ray regime (with current X-ray missions) and the gamma-ray regime (with Fermi in the GeV and H.E.S.S. in the TeV), allowing the search for spectral breaks in the hard X-ray band.

  9. Particle Spectra from Acceleration at Forward and Reverse Shocks of Young Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    Particle Spectra from Acceleration at Forward and Reverse Shocks of Young Type Ia Supernova (SNRs) by means of test-particle diffusive shock acceleration theory and 1-D hydrodynamical simulations/25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany Abstract We study cosmic-ray acceleration in young Type Ia Supernova Remnants

  10. Fermi LAT observation of supernova remnant HB9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    A 5.5-yr Fermi LAT gamma-ray observation shows significant extended emission at the position of the supernova remnant HB9 (G160.9+2.6). The significance of the detection above the background for photon energies above 0.2 GeV is 16?. The gamma-ray flux above 0.2 GeV is (2.23 ± 0.19stat) × 10-8 photons cm-2 s-1, and the corresponding luminosity above 1 GeV is 1.4 × 1033 erg s-1 (for a source distance of 1 kpc). The spectrum of the source is best described by curved power law (log-parabola, dN/dE=N_0 E^{-(? +? log(E/1 GeV))} with ? = (2.24 ± 0.09stat) and ? = 0.4 ± 0.1stat)). The gamma-ray spectrum of the source is consistent with both leptonic and hadronic models, and the relevant physical parameters in each case are derived. More studies on the ambient density in the region of HB9 should be carried out to rule out or confirm hadronic and non-thermal bremsstrahlung scenarios for the gamma-ray emission.

  11. Magnetic field decay of magnetars in supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    Gao, Z F; Wang, N; Yuan, J P

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we modify our previous research carefully, and derive a new expression of electron energy density in superhigh magnetic fields. Based on our improved model, we re-compute the electron capture rates and the magnetic fields' evolutionary timescales $t$ of magnetars. According to the calculated results, the superhigh magnetic fields may evolve on timescales $\\sim (10^{6}-10^{7})$ yrs for common magnetars, and the maximum timescale of the field decay, $t\\approx 2.9507 \\times 10^{6}$ yrs, corresponding to an initial internal magnetic field $B_{\\rm 0}= 3.0 \\times 10^ {15}$ G and an initial inner temperature $T_{\\rm 0}= 2.6 \\times 10^ {8}$ K. Motivated by the results of the neutron star-supernova remnant(SNR) association of Zhang $\\&$ Xie(2011), we calculate the maximum $B_{\\rm 0}$ of magnetar progenitors, $B_{\\rm max}\\sim (2.0\\times 10^{14}-2.93 \\times 10^{15})$ G when $T_{\\rm 0}= 2.6 \\times 10^ {8}$ K. When $T_{\\rm 0}\\sim 2.75 \\times 10^ {8}-~1.75 \\times 10^ {8}$ K, the maximum $B_{\\rm 0}$ will ...

  12. Understanding the Balmer Bubble in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Brian; Smith, C.; Points, S.; Heathcote, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopic data and analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament that is ahead of the eastern edge of the radiative shock of Bullet C in the Vela Supernova Remnant. This filament was discovered in 2002 by Carlin & Smith(2002), and was suggested to be a non-radiative shock. Images of the filament were taken using H? and R band filters on the SMARTS 0.9m telescope at CTIO. These images were then compared to images taken in 2006 using the MOSAIC II imager on the Blanco Telescope at CTIO, in an attempt to detect proper motion of the filament. Comparison over the 7 year baseline failed to show proper motion of the filament. From this result, we are able to place an upper limit of ~270 km/s on the velocity of the Balmer-dominated filament. We also obtained moderate resolution spectra of the Balmer-dominated filament and the radiative shock using the Goodman Spectrograph at SOAR Telescope. Spectroscopic analysis of the Balmer-dominated filament failed to detect a broad component of the H? emission line, which would be expected for a high velocity non-radiative shock.

  13. SLOW DIFFUSION OF COSMIC RAYS AROUND A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-04-01

    We study the escape of cosmic-ray protons accelerated at a supernova remnant (SNR). We are interested in their propagation in the interstellar medium (ISM) after they leave the shock neighborhood where they are accelerated, but when they are still near the SNR with their energy density higher than that in the average ISM. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the cosmic rays with energies of {approx}< TeV excite Alfven waves around the SNR on a scale of the SNR itself if the ISM is highly ionized. Thus, even if the cosmic rays can leave the shock, scattering by the waves prevents them from moving further away from the SNR. The cosmic rays form a slowly expanding cosmic-ray bubble, and they spend a long time around the SNR. This means that the cosmic rays cannot actually escape from the SNR until a fairly late stage of the SNR evolution. This is consistent with some results of Fermi and H.E.S.S. observations.

  14. A NEW EVOLUTIONARY PHASE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangwook; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Burrows, David N.; Racusin, Judith L.; McCray, Richard

    2011-06-01

    We have been monitoring the supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A with Chandra observations since 1999. Here we report on the latest change in the soft X-ray light curve of SNR 1987A. For the last {approx}1.5 yr (since day {approx}8000), the soft X-ray flux has significantly flattened, staying (within uncertainties) at f{sub X} {approx} 5.7 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (corresponding to L{sub X} {approx} 3.6 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) in the 0.5-2 keV band. This remarkable change in the recent soft X-ray light curve suggests that the forward shock is now interacting with a decreasing density structure, after interacting with an increasing density gradient over {approx}10 yr prior to day {approx}8000. Possibilities may include the case that the shock is now propagating beyond a density peak of the inner ring. We briefly discuss some possible implications on the nature of the progenitor and the future prospects of our Chandra monitoring observations.

  15. Spectrum of cosmic rays, produced in supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    E. G. Berezhko; H. J. Voelk

    2007-04-13

    Nonlinear kinetic theory of cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants is employed to calculate CR spectra. The magnetic field in SNRs is assumed to be significantly amplified by the efficiently accelerating nuclear CR component. It is shown that the calculated CR spectra agree in a satisfactory way with the existing measurements up to the energy $10^{17}$ eV. The power law spectrum of protons extends up to the energy $3\\times 10^{15}$ eV with a subsequent exponential cutoff. It gives a natural explanation for the observed knee in the Galactic CR spectrum. The maximum energy of the accelerated nuclei is proportional to their charge number $Z$. Therefore the break in the Galactic CR spectrum is the result of the contribution of progressively heavier species in the overall CR spectrum so that at $10^{17}$ eV the CR spectrum is dominated by iron group nuclei. It is shown that this component plus a suitably chosen extragalactic CR component can give a consistent description for the entire Galactic CR spectrum.

  16. WHAM Observations of High-latitude Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Alexander; Haffner, L. Matthew; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Sky Survey (WHAM-SS) traces numerous large-angle, diffuse regions containing filamentary and shell-like structures. The largest of these are complex supershells that harbor recent and on-going star formation, such as the Orion-Eridanus complex, the Gum Nebula, and the extended emission above and below the W3/W4/W5 star-forming regions in the Perseus Arm. Several large-diameter regions with simpler morphologies are also present, which we focus on here. While some of these structures are diffuse H II regions powered by nearby, isolated stars, others are clearly supernova remnants (SNRs) due to their association with X-ray or non-thermal radio emission. We highlight the structure, kinematics, and multi-wavelength properties of several SNRs using H? maps from the WHAM-SS and data from on-going WHAM multi-wavelength surveys. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  17. HST/ACS Narrowband Imaging of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Frattare, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Lawrence; DeLaney, Tracey; Harrus, Ilana M.; Ennis, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    We present narrowband images of the Kepler supernova remnant obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The images, with an angular resolution of 0.05" reveal the structure of the emitting gas in unprecedented detail. Radiative and nonradiative shocks are found in close proximity, unresolvable in gromd-based spectra, indicating that the pre-shock medium is highly clumped. The ionization structure, traced by differences in the [0 111] to [N 11] flux ratio, varies on subarcsecond scales. The variation is due to 110th differences in shock velocity as well as gradients in the evolutionary stage of the shocks. A prollinent complex of knots protruding beyond the boundary of the rennallt in the northwest is found to consist of bright radiative knots, collected by arcuate nonradiative filaments. Based on the coincidence of the optical emission with a bright isolated knot of X-ray emission, we infer that this feature is due to a Rayleigh-Taylor finger that formed at the contact discontinuity and overtook the primary blast wave.

  18. Cosmic ray acceleration at perpendicular shocks in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Gilles; Danos, Rebecca J.; Shalchi, Andreas; Safi-Harb, Samar; Edmon, Paul; Mendygral, Peter

    2014-09-10

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate particles up to high energies through the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Except for direct plasma simulations, all modeling efforts must rely on a given form of the diffusion coefficient, a key parameter that embodies the interactions of energetic charged particles with magnetic turbulence. The so-called Bohm limit is commonly employed. In this paper, we revisit the question of acceleration at perpendicular shocks, by employing a realistic model of perpendicular diffusion. Our coefficient reduces to a power law in momentum for low momenta (of index ?), but becomes independent of the particle momentum at high momenta (reaching a constant value ?{sub ?} above some characteristic momentum p {sub c}). We first provide simple analytical expressions of the maximum momentum that can be reached at a given time with this coefficient. Then we perform time-dependent numerical simulations to investigate the shape of the particle distribution that can be obtained when the particle pressure back-reacts on the flow. We observe that for a given index ? and injection level, the shock modifications are similar for different possible values of p {sub c}, whereas the particle spectra differ markedly. Of particular interest, low values of p {sub c} tend to remove the concavity once thought to be typical of non-linear DSA, and result in steep spectra, as required by recent high-energy observations of Galactic SNRs.

  19. The likely Fermi detection of the supernova remnant RCW 103

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Yang

    2014-02-01

    We report on the results from our ?-ray analysis of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 103 region. The data were taken with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An extended source is found at a position consistent with that of RCW 103 and its emission was only detected above 1 GeV (10? significance), with a power-law spectrum with a photon index of 2.0 ± 0.1. We obtain its 1-300 GeV spectrum and the total flux gives a luminosity of 8.3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} at a source distance of 3.3 kpc. Given the positional coincidence and property similarities of this source with other SNRs, we identify it as the likely Fermi ?-ray counterpart to RCW 103. Including radio measurements of RCW 103, the spectral energy distribution (SED) is modeled by considering emission mechanisms based on both hadronic and leptonic scenarios. We find that models in the two scenarios can reproduce the observed SED, while in the hadronic scenario the existence of SNR-molecular cloud interactions is suggested as a high density of the target protons is required.

  20. SUPERNOVA REMNANT KES 17: AN EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATOR INSIDE A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, Joseph D.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Temim, Tea; Hughes, John P.; Rakowski, Cara E-mail: cara.rakowski@gmail.com

    2013-11-10

    The supernova remnant Kes 17 (SNR G304.6+0.1) is one of a few but growing number of remnants detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we analyze recent radio, X-ray, and ?-ray observations of this object, determining that efficient cosmic ray acceleration is required to explain its broadband non-thermal spectrum. These observations also suggest that Kes 17 is expanding inside a molecular cloud, though our determination of its age depends on whether thermal conduction or clump evaporation is primarily responsible for its center-filled thermal X-ray morphology. Evidence for efficient cosmic ray acceleration in Kes 17 supports recent theoretical work concluding that the strong magnetic field, turbulence, and clumpy nature of molecular clouds enhance cosmic ray production in supernova remnants. While additional observations are needed to confirm this interpretation, further study of Kes 17 is important for understanding how cosmic rays are accelerated in supernova remnants.

  1. Supernova remnants as particle accelerators and probes of the circumstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schure, Klara M.

    2010-06-01

    Although the night sky may look static on a regular night, apart from the rising moon and the occasional shooting star, a closer look and different timescales reveal that this is certainly not the case. Similar to daily life around us, stars, galaxies and the universe have life-cycles of their own. Stars that are more massive than about eight times our Sun end their lifes as a supernova: the explosion of the star. What is left of the star is a compact core, taking the form of a neutron star or a black hole, and the expelled material, called the supernova remnant. The supernova remnant releases and creates the elements that are essential for life on Earth. This thesis discusses the evolution of supernova remnants, and their role in particle acceleration.

  2. XMM-Newton observation of the Galactic supernova remnant W51C (G49.1-0.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Manami; Heinitz, Cornelia; Warth, Gabriele; Pühlhofer, Gerd

    2014-03-01

    Context. The supernova remnant (SNR) W51C is a Galactic object located in a strongly inhomogeneous interstellar medium with signs of an interaction of the SNR blast wave with dense molecular gas. Aims: Diffuse X-ray emission from the interior of the SNR can reveal element abundances in the different emission regions and shed light on the type of supernova (SN) explosion and its progenitor. The hard X-ray emission helps to identify possible candidates for a pulsar formed in the SN explosion and for its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Methods: We have analysed X-ray data obtained with XMM-Newton. Spectral analyses in selected regions were performed. Results: Ejecta emission in the bright western part of the SNR, located next to a complex of dense molecular gas, was confirmed. The Ne and Mg abundances suggest a massive progenitor with a mass of >20 M?. Two extended regions emitting hard X-rays were identified (corresponding to the known sources [KLS2002] HX3 west and CXO J192318.5+140305 discovered with ASCA and Chandra, respectively), each of which has an additional point source inside and shows a power-law spectrum with ? ? 1.8. Based on their X-ray emission, both sources can be classified as PWN candidates. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  3. Escape of cosmic-ray electrons from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo; Kawanaka, Norita; Ioka, Kunihito

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the escape of cosmic ray (CR) electrons from a supernova remnant (SNR) to interstellar space. We show that CR electrons escape in order, from high energies to low energies, like CR nuclei. However, the escape starts later than the beginning of the Sedov phase at an SNR age of 103 to 7 × 103 yr, and the maximum energy of runaway CR electrons is below the knee at about 0.3-50 TeV because, unlike CR nuclei, CR electrons lose their energy as a result of synchrotron radiation. The highest-energy CR electrons might have already been detected by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) and MAGIC as a cut-off in the CR electron spectrum, and it will be probed by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), the Calorimeteric Electron Telescope (CALET), the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) experiments. We also calculate the spatial distribution of runaway CR electrons and their radiation spectra around SNRs. Contrary to common belief, maximum-energy photons of synchrotron radiation around 1 keV are emitted by runaway CR electrons, which have been caught up by the shock. Inverse Compton scattering by runaway CR electrons can dominate the gamma-ray emission from runaway CR nuclei via pion decay. Both are detectable by CTA and LHAASO and they can give clues to the origin of CRs and the amplification of magnetic fluctuations around the SNR. We also discuss middle-aged and/or old SNRs as unidentified very-high-energy gamma-ray sources.

  4. ON THE EXISTENCE OF 'RADIO THERMALLY ACTIVE' GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Onic, D.; Urosevic, D.; Arbutina, B.; Leahy, D.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the possibility of significant production of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation at radio continuum frequencies that could be linked to some Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). The main targets for this investigation are SNRs expanding in high-density environments. There are several indicators of radio thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from SNRs, such as a flattening at higher frequencies and thermal absorption at lower frequencies intrinsic to an SNR. In this work, we discuss the radio continuum properties of three SNRs that are the best candidates for testing our hypothesis of significant thermal emission. In the case of SNRs IC 443 and 3C 391, thermal absorption has been previously detected. For IC 443, the contribution of thermal emission at 1 GHz, from our model fit is 3%-57%. It is similar to the estimate obtained from the thermal absorption properties (10%-40% at 1 GHz). In the case of the 3C 391 the conclusions are not so clear. The results from our model fit (thermal emission contribution of 10%-25% at 1 GHz) and results obtained from the low-frequency absorption (thermal contribution of 0.15%-7% at 1 GHz) do not overlap. For the SNR 3C 396 we suggest that if previously detected thermal absorption could be intrinsic to the SNR then the thermal emission (<47% at 1 GHz from our model fit) could be significant enough to shape the radio continuum spectrum at high frequencies. Polarization observations for these SNRs can constrain the strength of a thermal component. Reliable observations at low frequencies (<100 MHz) are needed as well as more data at high radio frequencies (>1 GHz), in order to make stronger conclusions about the existence of 'radio thermally active' SNRs.

  5. Interstellar and ejecta dust in the cas a supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Una

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 ?m), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 ?m), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ?9 and 21 ?m and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is ? 0.1 M {sub ?}. The mass of warmer dust is only ?0.04 M {sub ?}.

  6. The Properties of the Progenitor Supernova, Pulsar Wind, and Neutron Star inside PWN G54.1+0.3

    E-print Network

    Gelfand, Joseph D; Temim, Tea

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) inside a supernova remnant (SNR) is sensitive to properties of the central neutron star, pulsar wind, progenitor supernova, and interstellar medium. These properties are both difficult to measure directly and critical for understanding the formation of neutron stars and their interaction with the surrounding medium. In this paper, we determine these properties for PWN G54.1+0.3 by fitting its observed properties with a model for the dynamical and radiative evolution of a PWN inside an SNR. Our modeling suggests that the progenitor of G54.1+0.3 was an isolated ~15-20 Solar Mass star which exploded inside a massive star cluster, creating a neutron star initially spinning with period ~30-80ms. We also find that >99.9% of the pulsar's rotational energy is injected into the PWN as relativistic electrons and positrons whose energy spectrum is well characterized by a broken power-law. Lastly, we propose future observations which can both test the validity of this model and...

  7. Inverse Compton Emission from Galactic Supernova Remnants: Effect of the Interstellar Radiation Field

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2006-08-01

    The evidence for particle acceleration in supernova shells comes from electrons whose synchrotron emission is observed in radio and X-rays. Recent observations by the HESS instrument reveal that supernova remnants also emit TeV {gamma}-rays; long awaited experimental evidence that supernova remnants can accelerate cosmic rays up to the ''knee'' energies. Still, uncertainty exists whether these {gamma}-rays are produced by electrons via inverse Compton scattering or by protons via {pi}{sup 0}-decay. The multi-wavelength spectra of supernova remnants can be fitted with both mechanisms, although a preference is often given to {pi}{sup 0}-decay due to the spectral shape at very high energies. A recent study of the interstellar radiation field indicates that its energy density, especially in the inner Galaxy, is higher than previously thought. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the interstellar radiation field on the inverse Compton emission of electrons accelerated in a supernova remnant located at different distances from the Galactic Centre. We show that contribution of optical and infra-red photons to the inverse Compton emission may exceed the contribution of cosmic microwave background and in some cases broaden the resulted {gamma}-ray spectrum. Additionally, we show that if a supernova remnant is located close to the Galactic Centre its {gamma}-ray spectrum will exhibit a ''universal'' cutoff at very high energies due to the Klein-Nishina effect and not due to the cut-off of the electron spectrum. As an example, we apply our calculations to the supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and G0.9+0.1 recently observed by HESS.

  8. ROSAT observations of the supernova remnant 3C 400.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saken, Jon M.; Long, K. S.; Blair, W. P.; Winkler, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have used the ROSAT point source proportional counter (PSPC) to examine the X-ray emission from 3C 400.2, a supernova remnant (SNR) which is a member of a class of remnants with limb-brightened radio and centrally condensed X-ray morphologies. The X-ray emission fills the radio shell and is characterized by an interior peak in the northwest region of the remnant. Otherwise, the surface brightness has a relatively smooth distribution. The X-ray peak is not correlated with any radio features or with the observed optical filaments. The PSPC X-ray spectrum is not well fitted by a power-law model but can be described in terms of thermal emission from a hot plasma with solar abundances. The only point source along the line of sight to the SNR is associated with a bright foreground F8 star. Thus the X-ray emission from 3C 400.2 is unlikely to be due to synchrotron radiation from an active pulsar. If the emission arises from a thermal plasma and the absorbing column along the line of sight to 3C 400.2 is 7.8 x 10(exp 21)sq cm, then the temperature of the plasma is 0.27 keV, and the 0.4-2.4 keV X-ray luminosity is 1.3 x 10(exp 36) ergs/s for an assumed distance of 6 kpc. An X-ray hardness ratio map shows a slight increase in the hardness of the emission in the regions of the remnant with a higher X-ray surface brightness. Assuming uniform absorption across the remnant, this increase implies the temperature is approximately 1.5 times greater in the high surface brightness regions of SNR. The relatively uniform spectrum and the anticorrelation between X-ray and radio features seems to rule out the possibility that 3C 400.2 is actually two overlapping or interacting SNRs. The morphology of 3C 400.2 can be explained in terms of a multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in which the primary shock is expanding into an ISM studded with dense cloudlets, if the clouds are evaporated or disrupted on a timescale which is long compared to the age of the SNR. It may also be possible to explain the emission in terms of the interaction of the SNR with a massive wind-driven shell, although the existing models for the evolution of A SNR in this environment suggest that the H-alpha luminosity should be much larger than the X-ray luminosity, which is not observed. We cannot completely rule out the possibility that 3C 400.2's appearance as a centrally peaked X-ray SNR is the result of an interaction between the remnant and a cloud along the line of sight, although this seems unlikely.

  9. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVA 1970G WITH CHANDRA: FILLING THE VOID BETWEEN SUPERNOVAE AND SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan; Kuntz, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray emission from SN 1970G in M101, 35 yr after its outburst, using deep X-ray imaging with the Chundra X-Ray Observatory. The Chandra ACIS spectrum shows that the emission is soft (52 keV) and characteristic of the reverse-shock region. The X-ray luminosity, Lo,,, = (1.1 3 0.2) x lo3# ergs s-1, is likely caused by the interaction of the supernova shock with dense circumstellar matter. If the material was deposited by the stellar wind from the progenitor, a mass-loss rate of M = (2.6 ? 0.4) x M, yr-I (v,/lO km s-I) is inferred. Utilizing the high-resolution Chandra ACIS data of SN 1970G and its environment, we reconstruct the X-ray lightcurve from previous ROSAT HRI, PSPC, and XMM-Newton EPIC observations, and find a best-fit linear rate of decline of L cc t-# with index s = 2.7 t 0.9 over a period of -20-35 yr after the outburst. As the oldest supernova detected in X-rays, SN 1970G allows, for the first time, direct observation of the transition from a supenova to its supernova remnant phase.

  10. 18. Supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays 18.1 High-energy emission from SNR

    E-print Network

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    18. Supernova remnants and the origin of cosmic rays 18.1 High-energy emission from SNR We have already mentioned supernova remnants as possible sources of cosmic rays, and indeed synchrotron emission rays, then the cosmic-ray density in and near the SNR should be very high, so one should be able to see

  11. Transition to the radiative phase in supernova remnant evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Eric Boyd

    1999-11-01

    The evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) through the transition from an adiabatic Sedov-Taylor blastwave to a radiative pressure-driven snowplow phase is studied through a series of one-, two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This transition is marked by a catastrophic collapse of the postshock gas, forming a thin, dense shell behind the forward shock. Previous studies have shown that the thin, dense shell of gas present during this transition is susceptible to both radiative and dynamical instabilities. One-dimensional HD studies indicate the presence of a radial oscillation between the forward shock and the thin shell, due to the rapid cooling of the gas in the immediate postshock region. Two-dynamical HD simulations of this transition indicate the presence of violent dynamical instabilities that alter the initially spherical morphology of the blastwave, specifically, the Pressure-driven Thin Shell Overstability (PDTSO) and the Non-linear Thin Shell Instability (NTSI). Hydrodynamical simulations, by their very nature, ignore the effects of magnetic forces on moving fluids. In general, interstellar magnetic fields will be weak enough that their effects may be safely ignored. However, the transition to the radiative phase in SNR evolution is often triggered when the blastwave interacts with dense clouds of gas in the interstellar medium (ISM). The resulting compression of the gas during the transition also compresses the magnetic fields in the cloud, possibly enhancing the field sufficiently to play a role in the further evolution of the SNR. To better understand the role of the NTSI during the transition, and to study the effects of magnetic fields on the instability itself, we performed idealized two- and three-dimensional MHD simulations. The results of the two-dimensional simulations were found to depend strongly on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field when the postshock field is dynamically significant. To accurately model the evolution of the NTSI, only three-dimensional simulations will suffice. However, the three-dimensional simulations performed were unable to run long enough to detect characteristic exponential growth of the NTSI, but initial studies indicate the presence of the instability.

  12. The laboratory simulation of unmagnetized supernova remnants Absence of a blast wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.; Pongratz, M. B.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Tan, T.-H.

    1984-01-01

    Supernova remnants are experimentally simulated by irradiating spherical targets with eight-beam carbon dioxide laser in a chamber containing finite amounts of neutral gas, the gas being ionized by radiation from the hot target. The expansion velocities of the target plasmas are approximately the same as the expansion velocities of supernova ejecta and the experiment is successfully scaled to the case of a supernova remnant in an unmagnetized, low-density, interstellar medium. No sweep-up of the ambient plasma is detected, indicating that no hydrodynamic shock wave is formed to couple the target ejecta to the ambient gas. The experiment implies that if supernova ejecta couple to the interstellar medium, magnetic-field effects may be crucial to the physical description.

  13. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 421, 12091214 (2012) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.20385.x Nearby supernova remnants and the cosmic ray spectral hardening

    E-print Network

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    2012-01-01

    supernova remnants and the cosmic ray spectral hardening at high energies Satyendra Thoudam and J¨org R. H of cosmic rays from the supernova remnants, we explain the apparent observed property that the hardening hardening does not persist beyond (20­30) TeV energies. Key words: cosmic rays ­ ISM: supernova remnants. 1

  14. Simulating Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Supernova Remnants, Implications for the Interstellar Medium

    E-print Network

    D. S. Balsara; A. J. Bendinelli; D. A. Tilley; A. R. Massari; J. C. Howk

    2007-11-14

    We present a large number of two and a half dimensional simulations of supernova remnants expanding into interstellar media having a range of densities, temperatures and magnetic field strengths. The volume of hot gas produced is strongly dependent on the inclusion of thermal conduction and magnetic fields. The four-volumes and three-areas of hot gas have been catalogued and their dependence on interstellar parameters documented. Simulated line widths of radioactive species ejected by supernovae have also been catalogued.

  15. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed study entails use of archival data, primarily from past and active X-ray observatories, to study the properties of a class of supernova remnants (SNRs) which display a centrally-bright X-ray morphology. Several models which have been proposed to explain the morphology are being investigated for comparisons with measured characteristics of several remnants: nonthermal emission from a central synchrotron nebula; thermal emission enhanced by slow evaporation of cool clouds in the hot SNR interior; and relic thermal emission from the SNR interior after the remnant has entered the radiative phase of evolution, thus causing the shell emission to cease.

  16. DEM L241, A SUPERNOVA REMNANT CONTAINING A HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, F. D.; Charles, P. A.; Foster, D. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Romero, P. S.; Edwards, Z. I.; Perry, M.; Williams, R. M.

    2012-11-10

    A Chandra observation of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant DEM L241 reveals an interior unresolved source which is probably an accretion-powered binary. The optical counterpart is an O5III(f) star making this a high-mass X-ray binary with an orbital period likely to be of the order of tens of days. Emission from the remnant interior is thermal and spectral information is used to derive density and mass of the hot material. Elongation of the remnant is unusual and possible causes of this are discussed. The precursor star probably had mass >25 M {sub Sun}.

  17. OBSERVATION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT IC 443 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2010-03-20

    We report observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 (G189.1+3.0) with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the energy band between 200 MeV and 50 GeV. IC 443 is a shell-type SNR with mixed morphology located off the outer Galactic plane where high-energy emission has been detected in the X-ray, GeV and TeV gamma-ray bands. Past observations suggest IC 443 has been interacting with surrounding interstellar matter. Proximity between dense shocked molecular clouds and GeV-TeV gamma-ray emission regions detected by EGRET, MAGIC, and VERITAS suggests an interpretation that cosmic-ray (CR) particles are accelerated by the SNR. With the high gamma-ray statistics and broad energy coverage provided by the LAT, we accurately characterize the gamma-ray emission produced by the CRs accelerated at IC 443. The emission region is extended in the energy band with theta{sub 68} = 0.{sup 0}27 +- 0.{sup 0}01(stat) +- 0.{sup 0}03(sys) for an assumed two-dimensional Gaussian profile and overlaps almost completely with the extended source region of VERITAS. Its centroid is displaced significantly from the known pulsar wind nebula (PWN) which suggests the PWN is not the major contributor in the present energy band. The observed spectrum changes its power-law slope continuously and continues smoothly to the MAGIC and VERITAS data points. The combined gamma-ray spectrum (200 MeV

  18. SUPERNOVA EJECTA IN THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Green, David A.; Petre, Robert

    2013-07-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of {approx}1900, and most likely located near the Galactic center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities {approx}>18,000 km s{sup -1} have been shocked so far in this dynamically young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed spatially resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy et al., and used a wavelet-based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs; Si and S) and iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern rim. Fe K{alpha} emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with thermal models indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern rim, IMEs are less abundant than Fe, indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including {sup 56}Ni) with velocities >18,000 km s{sup -1} were ejected by this SN. However, in the inner west rim, we find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity products of O-burning were also ejected. G1.9+0.3 appears similar to energetic Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. The pronounced asymmetry in the ejecta distribution and abundance inhomogeneities are best explained by a strongly asymmetric SN explosion, similar to those produced in some recent three-dimensional delayed-detonation Type Ia models.

  19. Supernova Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Green, David A.; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of approximately 1900, and most likely located near the Galactic Center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities (is) approximately greater than 18,000 km s-1 have been shocked so far in this dynamically young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed spatially-resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy et al., and used a wavelet based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs: Si and S) and iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern rim. Fe K alpha emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with thermal models indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern rim, IMEs are less abundant than Fe, indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including 56Ni) with velocities greater than 18,000 km s-1 were ejected by this SN. But in the inner west rim, we find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity products of O-burning were also ejected. G1.9+0.3 appears similar to energetic Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. The pronounced asymmetry in the ejecta distribution and abundance inhomogeneities are best explained by a strongly asymmetric SN explosion, similar to those produced in some recent 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia models.

  20. RADIO DETECTION OF A CANDIDATE NEUTRON STAR ASSOCIATED WITH GALACTIC CENTER SUPERNOVA REMNANT SAGITTARIUS A EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M. E-mail: morris@astro.ucla.edu

    2013-11-10

    We report the Very Large Array (VLA) detection of the radio counterpart of the X-ray object referred to as the 'Cannonball', which has been proposed to be the remnant neutron star resulting from the creation of the Galactic center supernova remnant, Sagittarius A East. The radio object was detected both in our new VLA image from observations in 2012 at 5.5 GHz and in archival VLA images from observations in 1987 at 4.75 GHz and in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 8.31 GHz. The radio morphology of this object is characterized as a compact, partially resolved point source located at the northern tip of a radio 'tongue' similar to the X-ray structure observed by Chandra. Behind the Cannonball, a radio counterpart to the X-ray plume is observed. This object consists of a broad radio plume with a size of 30''×15'', followed by a linear tail having a length of 30''. The compact head and broad plume sources appear to have relatively flat spectra (??{sup ?}) with mean values of ? = –0.44 ± 0.08 and –0.10 ± 0.02, respectively, and the linear tail shows a steep spectrum with the mean value of –1.94 ± 0.05. The total radio luminosity integrated from these components is ?8 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1}, while the emission from the head and tongue amounts for only ?1.5 × 10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1}. Based on the images obtained from the two epochs' observations at 5 GHz, we infer the proper motion of the object: ?{sub ?} = 0.001 ± 0.003 arcsec yr{sup –1} and ?{sub ?} = 0.013 ± 0.003 arcsec yr{sup –1}. With an implied velocity of 500 km s{sup –1}, a plausible model can be constructed in which a runaway neutron star surrounded by a pulsar wind nebula was created in the event that produced Sgr A East. The inferred age of this object, assuming that its origin coincides with the center of Sgr A East, is approximately 9000 yr.

  1. DISCRIMINATING THE PROGENITOR TYPE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITH IRON K-SHELL EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Petre, Robert; Enoto, Teruaki; Badenes, Carles; Nakano, Toshio; Hiraga, Junko S.; Castro, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Safi-Harb, Samar; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-04-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) retain crucial information about both their parent explosion and circumstellar material left behind by their progenitor. However, the complexity of the interaction between supernova ejecta and ambient medium often blurs this information, and it is not uncommon for the basic progenitor type (Ia or core-collapse) of well-studied remnants to remain uncertain. Here we present a powerful new observational diagnostic to discriminate between progenitor types and constrain the ambient medium density of SNRs using solely Fe K-shell X-ray emission. We analyze all extant Suzaku observations of SNRs and detect Fe K? emission from 23 young or middle-aged remnants, including five first detections (IC 443, G292.0+1.8, G337.2-0.7, N49, and N63A). The Fe K? centroids clearly separate progenitor types, with the Fe-rich ejecta in Type Ia remnants being significantly less ionized than in core-collapse SNRs. Within each progenitor group, the Fe K? luminosity and centroid are well correlated, with more luminous objects having more highly ionized Fe. Our results indicate that there is a strong connection between explosion type and ambient medium density, and suggest that Type Ia supernova progenitors do not substantially modify their surroundings at radii of up to several parsecs. We also detect a K-shell radiative recombination continuum of Fe in W49B and IC 443, implying a strong circumstellar interaction in the early evolutionary phases of these core-collapse remnants.

  2. MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 11-61A

    E-print Network

    Auchettl, Katie

    Due to its centrally bright X-ray morphology and limb brightened radio profile, MSH 11–61A (G290.1–0.8) is classified as a mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR). H i and CO observations determined that the SNR is ...

  3. FERMI -LAT OBSERVATIONS AND A BROADBAND STUDY OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB 109

    E-print Network

    Castro, Daniel

    CTB 109 (G109.1-1.0) is a Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) with a hemispherical shell morphology in X-rays and in the radio band. In this work, we report the detection of ?-ray emission coincident with CTB 109, using 37 ...

  4. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnant/molecular cloud associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabici, Stefano; Krause, Julian; Morlino, Giovanni; Nava, Lara

    2015-12-01

    The gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds associated with supernova remnants are considered one of the most promising ways to search for a solution of the problem of cosmic ray origin. Here we briefly review the status of the field, with particular emphasis on the theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the problem.

  5. Neutron stars, remnant cores following supernova explosions, are highly interesting astrophysical

    E-print Network

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    Neutron stars, remnant cores following supernova explosions, are highly interesting astrophysical environments In particular, accreting neutron stars presents a unique environment for nuclear reactions al., Phys. Rev. C 77, 045807 (2008) (4) Haensel et al., Neutron Stars 1, 2007 #12; One potential heat

  6. Cosmic-ray diffusion near the Bohm limit in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    ARTICLES Cosmic-ray diffusion near the Bohm limit in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant M. D. STAGE made it possible to image the keV-scale synchrotron emission produced by cosmic-ray electrons been the leading candidates for the acceleration of cosmic rays1,2 . Diffusive shock acceleration

  7. Cosmic-ray composition and its relation to shock acceleration by supernova remnants q

    E-print Network

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    Cosmic-ray composition and its relation to shock acceleration by supernova remnants q Jo¨rg R. Ho is given on the present status of the understanding of the origin of galactic cosmic rays. Recent measurements of charged cosmic rays and photons are reviewed. Their impact on the contemporary knowledge about

  8. Toward an Empirical Theory of Pulsar Emission. XI. Understanding the Orientations of Pulsar Radiation and Supernova “Kicks”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2015-05-01

    Two entwined problems have remained unresolved since pulsars were discovered nearly 50 yr ago: the orientation of their polarized emission relative to the emitting magnetic field and the direction of putative supernova “kicks” relative to their rotation axes. The rotational orientation of most pulsars can be inferred only from the (“fiducial”) polarization angle of their radiation, when their beam points directly at the Earth and the emitting polar fluxtube field is ? to the rotation axis. Earlier studies have been unrevealing owing to the admixture of different types of radiation (core and conal, two polarization modes), producing both ? or ? alignments. In this paper we analyze some 50 pulsars having three characteristics: core radiation beams, reliable absolute polarimetry, and accurate proper motions (PMs). The “fiducial” polarization angle of the core emission, we then find, is usually oriented ? to the PM direction on the sky. The primary core emission is polarized ? to the projected magnetic field in Vela and other pulsars where X-ray imaging reveals the orientation. This shows that the PMs usually lie ? to the rotation axes on the sky. Two key physical consequences then follow: first, to the extent that supernova “kicks” are responsible for pulsar PMs, they are mostly ? to the rotation axis; and, second, most pulsar radiation is heavily processed by the magnetospheric plasma such that the lowest altitude “parent” core emission is polarized ? to the emitting field, propagating as the extraordinary (X) mode.

  9. Direct Measurement of Neutron-Star Recoil in the Oxygen-Rich Supernova Remnant Puppis A

    E-print Network

    Winkler, P F; Petre, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A sequence of three Chandra X-ray Observatory High Resolution Camera images taken over a span of five years reveals arc-second-scale displacement of RX J0822-4300, the stellar remnant (presumably a neutron star) near the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. We measure its proper motion to be 0.159+/-0.017 arcsec/yr toward the west-southwest. At a distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to a transverse space velocity of 1500 km/s. This is the first case of a compact X-ray source with a directly measured proper motion. The space velocity is consistent with the explosion center inferred from proper motions of the oxygen-rich optical filaments, and confirms the idea that Puppis A resulted from an asymmetric explosion accompanied by a kick that imparted roughly 3*10^49 ergs of kinetic energy (some 3 percent of the supernova kinetic energy) to the stellar remnant.

  10. 3D Simulations of the Emission from Young Supernova Remnants Including Efficient Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar; Decourchelle, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Within our Galaxy, supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the major sources of cosmic rays up to the “knee” (~1 PeV). The detection of non-thermal radiation from these objects, in X-rays over the past two decades, and finally in gamma-rays over the past decade, has proved the presence of energetic particles. However important questions remain regarding the share of the hadronic and leptonic components as well as the fraction of the supernova energy channelled into these components. We will show how such questions can be addressed by means of 3D numerical simulations of SNRs that combine a hydrodynamic treatment of the shock wave with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. Performing 3D simulations of SNRs allows us to produce synthetic projected maps and spectra, that can be compared with observations (in X-rays for the thermal emission and multi-wavelength for the non-thermal emission). In particular, we will show how the presence of energetic protons can be inferred from the broadband emission of the remnant. We will contrast the properties of the remnants from the two different kinds of supernovae: thermonuclear supernovae (like Tycho) that usually occur in a mostly undisturbed medium, and core-collapse supernovae (like Cas A) that occur in a more complex medium bearing the imprint of the winds of the progenitor star.

  11. EVOLUTION OF POST-IMPACT REMNANT HELIUM STARS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITHIN THE SINGLE-DEGENERATE SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu

    2013-08-10

    The progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Based on recent hydrodynamics simulations, non-degenerate companions in the single-degenerate scenario (SDS) should survive the supernova (SN) impact. One way to distinguish between the SDS and the double-degenerate scenario is to search for the post-impact remnant stars (PIRSs) in SN Ia remnants. Using a technique that combines multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations, we have examined the post-impact evolution of helium-rich binary companions in the SDS. It is found that these helium-rich PIRSs (He PIRSs) dramatically expand and evolve to a luminous phase (L {approx} 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }) about 10 yr after an SN explosion. Subsequently, they contract and evolve to become hot blue-subdwarf-like (sdO-like) stars by releasing gravitational energy, persisting as sdO-like stars for several million years before evolving to the helium red-giant phase. We therefore predict that a luminous OB-like star should be detectable within {approx}30 yr after the SN explosion. Thereafter, it will shrink and become an sdO-like star in the central regions of SN Ia remnants within star-forming regions for SN Ia progenitors evolved via the helium-star channel in the SDS. These He PIRSs are predicted to be rapidly rotating (v{sub rot} {approx}> 50 km s{sup -1}) and to have high spatial velocities (v{sub linear} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1}). Furthermore, if SN remnants have diffused away and are not recognizable at a later stage, He PIRSs could be an additional source of single sdO stars and/or hypervelocity stars.

  12. An XMM-Newton Search for Crab-like Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Slane, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The primary goals of the study are to search for evidence of non-thermal emission that would suggest the presence of a pulsar in this compact SNR. We have performed the reduction of the EPIC data for this observation, cleaning the data to remove time intervals of enhanced particle background, and have created maps in several energy bands, and on a variety of smoothing scales. We find no evidence for emission from the SNR. Given the small angular size of the SNR, we conclude that rather than being a young remnant, it is actually fairly old, but distant. At its current stage of evolution, the remnant shell has apparently entered the radiative phase, wherein the shell temperature has cooled sufficiently to be either below X-ray-emitting temperatures or at temperatures easily absorbed the foreground interstellar material. We have thus concluded that this SNR is not a viable candidate for a young ejecta-rich or pulsar-driven SNR.

  13. High angular resolution study of the J1400-6325 pulsar wind nebula and its host remnant G310.6-1.6 with the ATCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, Aida; Voronkov, Maxim; Shibanov, Yuri; Danilenko, Andrey; Zyuzin, Dima

    2014-10-01

    The very young (<10^3 years) Crab-like pulsar J1400-6325 was only recently discovered in the radio and X-rays. It powers a bright pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and it is associated with a previously unknown supernova remnant (SNR) G310.6-1.6. In X-rays, the remnant has a circular outer shell, while the PWN, like the Crab, contains a torus and a jet. Unlike other powerful Crab-like PWN/SNR systems, this remarkable object located at 7 kpc remains unresolved in the radio. We therefore propose an ATCA observation of this system to analyse the PWN fine structure and spectrum and compare them with the X-ray data. The requested ATCA observation would also allow to reveal the fundamental spectral break which is likely present in the PWN spectrum and typical of other PWNe with similar properties. This will contribute significantly to our understanding of the particle acceleration mechanisms working at various parts of such systems.

  14. Connecting the high- and low-energy Universe: dust processing inside Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    The recent detection of large amounts of dust (> 10(7) M_?) at very high redshift (z > 6) raises a fundamental question about the origin of such dust. The main dust producers, i. e., the stars populating the Red Giant Branch and the Asymptotic Giant Branch (RGB and AGB stars) did not have time to evolve. From an evolutionary point of view, young supernovae (SNe) could represent a viable source of dust in high-redshift galaxies, however, a critical issue still needs to be addressed. While recent observations have demonstrated that supernovae are indeed efficient dust factories, at the same time SNe represent the major agent responsible for dust destruction. Supernova blast waves propagating into the interstellar medium destroy the dust residing there, while the fresh dust produced by the supernova itself is threatened by the reverse shock which propagates through the expanding ejecta towards the center of the remnant. We focus here on this second destruction mechanism, with the aim of quantifying the amount of dust able to survive the heavy processing by the reverse shock and to reach the interstellar medium. We present our results for the textbook supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). Using recent X-ray and infrared observations, we have developed a model for the evolution of the remnant and the simultaneous processing of the dust by the reverse shock, and derived the expected amount of surviving dust. In addition, we will briefly illustrate the impact of the capabilities of the Athena mission on the variety of astrophysical problems involving the processing of dust particles in extreme environments characterized by the presence of shocked X-ray emitting gas. These range from individual supernova remnants, to starburst super winds up to AGN outflows and the hot intra-cluster medium. The study of dust processing by a shocked gas truly connects the high-energy Universe with the low-energy Universe, and Athena will play a major role in it.

  15. The youngest known X-ray binary: Circinus X-1 and its natal supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, S.; Sell, P.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Brandt, W. N.; Calvelo-Santos, D. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Nowak, M. A.; Schulz, N. S.; Wijnands, R.; Van der Klis, M.

    2013-12-20

    Because supernova remnants are short-lived, studies of neutron star X-ray binaries within supernova remnants probe the earliest stages in the life of accreting neutron stars. However, such objects are exceedingly rare: none were known to exist in our Galaxy. We report the discovery of the natal supernova remnant of the accreting neutron star Circinus X-1, which places an upper limit of t < 4600 yr on its age, making it the youngest known X-ray binary and a unique tool to study accretion, neutron star evolution, and core-collapse supernovae. This discovery is based on a deep 2009 Chandra X-ray observation and new radio observations of Circinus X-1. Circinus X-1 produces type I X-ray bursts on the surface of the neutron star, indicating that the magnetic field of the neutron star is small. Thus, the young age implies either that neutron stars can be born with low magnetic fields or that they can rapidly become de-magnetized by accretion. Circinus X-1 is a microquasar, creating relativistic jets that were thought to power the arcminute-scale radio nebula surrounding the source. Instead, this nebula can now be attributed to non-thermal synchrotron emission from the forward shock of the supernova remnant. The young age is consistent with the observed rapid orbital evolution and the highly eccentric orbit of the system and offers the chance to test the physics of post-supernova orbital evolution in X-ray binaries in detail for the first time.

  16. Two-temperature models of old supernova remnants with ion and electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Wei; Cox, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects thermal conduction may have on the evolution of old supernova remnants, we present the results of 1D (spherically symmetric) numerical simulations of a remnant in a homogeneous interstellar medium for four different cases: (1) without thermal conduction; (2) with both electron and ion thermal conduction assuming equal temperatures; (3) with electron thermal conduction only, following electron and ion temperatures separately; and (4) with both electron and ion thermal conduction following separate temperatures. We followed the entire evolution until the completion of the remnant bubble collapse. Our most significant result is that in remnant evolution studies concerned principally with either the shell or bubble evolution at late times, reasonable results are obtained with single-temperature models. When the electron and ion temperatures are followed separately, however, ion thermal conduction cannot safely be ignored.

  17. Chandra Observations and Models of the Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnant W44: Global Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the Chandra observations of the archetypical mixed morphology (or thermal composite) supernova remnant, W44. As with other mixed morphology remnants, W44's projected center is bright in thermal X-rays. It has an obvious radio shell, but no discernable X-ray shell. In addition, X-ray bright knots dot W44's image. The spectral analysis of the Chandra data show that the remnant s hot, bright projected center is metal-rich and that the bright knots are regions of comparatively elevated elemental abundances. Neon is among the affected elements, suggesting that ejecta contributes to the abundance trends. Furthermore, some of the emitting iron atoms appear to be underionized with respect to the other ions, providing the first potential X-ray evidence for dust destruction in a supernova remnant. We use the Chandra data to test the following explanations for W44's X-ray bright center: 1.) entropy mixing due to bulk mixing or thermal conduction, 2.) evaporation of swept up clouds, and 3.) a metallicity gradient, possibly due to dust destruction and ejecta enrichment. In these tests, we assume that the remnant has evolved beyond the adiabatic evolutionary stage, which explains the X-ray dimness of the shell. The entropy mixed model spectrum was tested against the Chandra spectrum for the remnant's projected center and found to be a good match. The evaporating clouds model was constrained by the finding that the ionization parameters of the bright knots are similar to those of the surrounding regions. While both the entropy mixed and the evaporating clouds models are known to predict centrally bright X-ray morphologies, their predictions fall short of the observed brightness gradient. The resulting brightness gap can be largely filled in by emission from the extra metals in and near the remnant's projected center. The preponderance of evidence (including that drawn from other studies) suggests that W44's remarkable morphology can be attributed to dust destruction and ejecta enrichment within an entropy mixed, adiabatic phase supernova remnant. The Chandra data prompts a new question - by what astrophysical mechanisms are the metals distributed so inhomogeneously in the supernova remnant.

  18. Uncovering the Properties of Young Neutron Stars and their Surrounding Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Slane, Patrick O.

    2004-01-01

    This five-year grant involves the study of young neutron stars, particularly those in supernova remnants.In the fourth year of this program, the following studies have been undertaken in support of this effort: 1.CTA 1: Following up on our ROSAT and ASCA studies of this SNR, we obtained observations with the XMM-Newton observatory to investigate the central compact source and surrounding nebula. 2. 3C 58: Based upon our earlier Chandra observations, we submitted a successful Chandra Large Project proposal for a 350 ks observation of this young neutron star and its wind nebula. 3. G347.3 - - 0.5: Our Chandra observations of portions of this SNR were aimed at studying the nonthermal X-ray emission from the remnant shell. 4. Chandra Survey for Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants: We have formed a collaboration to carry out an extensive search for young neutron stars in nearby supernova remnants. Using X-ray observations from an approved Chandra Large Project, as well as from additional approved XMM observations, we are investigating a volume-limited sample of SNRs for which there is currently no evidence of associated neutron stars.

  19. INVESTIGATION OF THE PROGENITORS OF THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE ASSOCIATED WITH THE LMC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS 0505-67.9 AND 0509-68.7

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2015-01-20

    Although Type Ia supernovae have been heavily scrutinized due to their use in making cosmological distance estimates, we are still unable to definitively identify the progenitors for the entire population. While answers have been presented for certain specific systems, a complete solution remains elusive. We present observations of two supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud, SNR 0505-67.9 and SNR 0509-68.7, for which we have identified the center of the remnant and the 99.73% containment central region in which any companion star left over after the supernova must be located. Both remnants have a number of potential ex-companion stars near their centers; all possible single and double degenerate progenitor models remain viable for these two supernovae. Future observations may be able to identify the true ex-companions for both remnants.

  20. SWIFT/BAT DETECTION OF HARD X-RAYS FROM TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: EVIDENCE FOR TITANIUM-44

    SciTech Connect

    Troja, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; Hartmann, D.

    2014-12-10

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10?) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  1. Swift/BAT detection of hard X-rays from Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence for Titanium-44

    E-print Network

    Troja, E; La Parola, V; Hartmann, D; Baumgartner, W; Markwardt, C; Barthelmy, S; Cusumano, G; Gehrels, N

    2014-01-01

    We report Swift/BAT survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10 sigma) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive Titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  2. Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Supernova Remnants: Relevance to Hot Gas Filling Factors in the Magnetized ISM

    E-print Network

    David A. Tilley; Dinshaw S. Balsara

    2006-04-05

    We explore the importance of anisotropic thermal conduction in the evolution of supernova remnants via numerical simulations. The mean temperature of the bubble of hot gas is decreased by a factor of ~3 compared to simulations without thermal conduction, together with an increase in the mean density of hot gas by a similar factor. Thus, thermal conduction greatly reduces the volume of hot gas produced over the life of the remnant. This underscores the importance of thermal conduction in estimating the hot gas filling fraction and emissivities in high-stage ions in Galactic and proto-galactic ISMs.

  3. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.; Voelk, H. J.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium.

  4. X-RAY EJECTA KINEMATICS OF THE GALACTIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.0+1.8

    E-print Network

    Bhalerao, Jayant

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure ...

  5. THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT W49B LIKELY ORIGINATES FROM A JET-DRIVEN, CORE-COLLAPSE EXPLOSION

    E-print Network

    Lopez, Laura A.

    We present results from a 220 ks observation of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) W49B using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chanrda X-ray Observatory. We exploit these data to perform detailed spatially ...

  6. A CR-HYDRO-NEI MODEL OF THE STRUCTURE AND BROADBAND EMISSION FROM TYCHO’S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    E-print Network

    Slane, P.

    Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is well-established as a source of particle acceleration to very high energies. Constraints from numerous studies indicate that the observed ?-ray emission results primarily from hadronic ...

  7. Modelling of the Galactic Distribution of Titanium-44 Emitting Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Francois

    Following the lone detection of the Galactic supernova remnant Cas A by gamma-ray detectors aboard CGRO and hard X-ray detectors aboard INTEGRAL in the nuclear lines of the 44Ti decay chain, The et al, 2006, argued that these surveys should have detected several sources, given models for the yield of 44Ti and an estimate of the Galactic supernova rate. In this thesis, this result is revisited by exploring the effect of various newer yield models of Type II supernovae, which include yields that differ by approximately an order of magnitude. We also consider several estimates of the Galactic supernova rate, which also differ by an order of magnitude, and various models for the Galactic distribution of massive stars. We find that the lone detection of Cas A is in fact consistent with a large number of reasonable models. We find that in order to detect a significant number of previously unknown remnants in a survey for 44Ti and thus constrain supernova models, a sensitivity to fluxes of less than 1E-7 photon per square cm per second within an absolute Galactic latitude of less than 5 degrees is required.

  8. The Nature of the Compact X-ray Source in Supernova Remnant RCW 103

    E-print Network

    Xiang-Dong Li

    2007-08-01

    The discovery of the 6.67 hr periodicity in the X-ray source 1E 161348-5055 associated with the supernova remnant RCW 103 has raised interesting suggestions about the nature of the X-ray source. Here we argue that in either accreting neutron star or magnetar model, a supernova fallback disk may be a critical ingredient in theoretical interpretations of 1E 161348-5055. We further emphasize the effect of fallback disks on the evolution of young compact objects in various ways, and suggest that even SS 433 could also be powered by fallback disk accretion process.

  9. XMM-Newton Observations of HESSJ1813-178 Reveal a Composite Supernova Remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Moriguchi, Y.; Aharonian, F.A.; Fukui, Y.; Hofmann, W.; Horns, D.; Puehlhofer, G.; Reimer, O.; Rowell, G.; Terrier, R.; Vink, J.; Wagner, S.

    2006-11-27

    Aims--We present X-ray and {sup 12}CO(J=1-0) observations of the very-high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray source HESS J1813-178 with the aim of understanding the origin of the {gamma}-ray emission. Methods--High-angular resolution X-ray studies of the VHE {gamma}-ray emission region are performed using 18.6 ks of XMM-Newton data, taken on HESS J1813-178 in October 2005. Using this dataset we are able to undertake spectral and morphological studies of the X-ray emission object with greater precision than previous studies. NANTEN {sup 12}CO(J=1-0) data are used to search for correlations of the {gamma}-ray emission with molecular clouds which could act as target material for {gamma}-ray production in a hadronic scenario. Results--The NANTEN {sup 12}CO(J=1-0) observations show a giant molecular cloud of mass 2.5 x 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} at a distance of 4 kpc in the vicinity of HESS J1813-178. Even though there is no direct positional coincidence, this giant cloud might have influenced the evolution of the {gamma}-ray source and its surroundings. The X-ray data show a highly absorbed (n{sub H} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) non-thermal X-ray emitting object coincident with the previously known ASCA source AXJ1813-178 showing a compact core and an extended tail towards the north-east, located in the center of the radio shell-type Supernova remnant (SNR) G12.82-0.2. This central object shows morphological and spectral resemblance to a Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) and we therefore consider that this object is very likely to be a composite SNR. Nevertheless, we cannot distinguish between the scenarios in which the {gamma}-rays originate in the shell of the SNR and the one in which they originate in the central object. We discuss both scenarios in terms of a one-zone leptonic model and demonstrate, that in order to connect the core X-ray emission to the VHE {gamma}-ray emission electrons have to be accelerated to energies of at least 1 PeV. We conclude that if indeed the X-rays are connected to the VHE {gamma}-rays HESS J1813-178 has to be a Galactic Pevatron.

  10. Recombining plasma in the remnant of a core-collapsed supernova, Kes 17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washino, Ryosaku; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Kawabata Nobukawa, Kumiko; Koyama, Katsuji

    2015-10-01

    We report on Suzaku results concerning Kes 17, a Galactic mixed-morphology supernova remnant. The X-ray spectrum of the whole Kes 17 is well explained by a pure thermal plasma, in which we found Ly? of Al XIII and He? of Al XII, Ar XVII, and Ca XIX lines for the first time. The abundance pattern and the plasma mass suggest that Kes 17 is a remnant of a core-collapsed supernova of a 25-30 M? progenitor star. The X-ray spectrum of the north region is expressed by a recombining plasma. The origin would be due to the cooling of electrons by thermal conduction to molecular clouds located near the north region.

  11. Evidence for shock acceleration of high-energy electrons in the supernova remnant SN1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, K.; Petre, R.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Hwang, U.; Matsuura, M.; Ozaki, M.; Holt, S. S.

    1995-11-01

    HIGH-ENERGY cosmic rays (relativistic heavy nuclei) play an important role in heating interstellar matter in the Milky Way1,2, and they affect chemical abundances through collisions with atoms in the interstellar gas2. Although it has long been thought that these cosmic rays arise from supernovae3,4, direct evidence for such an association has been lacking. Here we report X-ray observations of the remnant of supernova 1006, made by the ASCA satellite, which indicate that emission from the edges of the remnant shell is dominated by radiation from electrons accelerated to energies of ˜ 100 TeV within the shock front. Ions in the shell are likely to have been accelerated to similar energies, thus giving rise to very-high-energy cosmic rays.

  12. X-ray emission from the supernova remnant G287.8-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The GSFC Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment on OSO-8 observed a weak galactic X-ray source near theta 2 at 288 deg, b2 at -1 deg. The spectrum for this source between 2-20 keV is well represented by a thermal spectrum of kT = 7.34(+3.6), sub -2.6 keV with an intense iron emission line centered at 6.5 + or - .2 keV. The error box of the Uhuru source 4U1043-59, the only known X-ray source in our field of view, contains the radio supernova remnant G287.8-0.5. The possible association of the X-ray source with this supernova remnant is discussed.

  13. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The analysis is confined to the test particle approximation and adiabatic losses are oversimplified, but unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum are included. Monoenergetic protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  14. Discriminating the Progenitor Type of Supernova Remnants with Iron K-Shell Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Badenes, Carles; Petre, Robert; Nakano, Toshio; Castro, Daniel; Enoto, Teruaki; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hughes, John P.; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Nobukawa, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) retain crucial information about both their parent explosion and circumstellar material left behind by their progenitor. However, the complexity of the interaction between supernova ejecta and ambient medium often blurs this information, and it is not uncommon for the basic progenitor type (Ia or core-collapse) of well-studied remnants to remain uncertain. Here we present a powerful new observational diagnostic to discriminate between progenitor types and constrain the ambient medium density of SNRs using solely Fe K-shell X-ray emission. We analyze all extant Suzaku observations of SNRs and detect Fe K-alpha emission from 23 young or middle-aged remnants, including five first detections (IC 443, G292.0+1.8, G337.2-0.7, N49, and N63A). The Fe K-alpha centroids clearly separate progenitor types, with the Fe-rich ejecta in Type Ia remnants being significantly less ionized than in core-collapse SNRs. Within each progenitor group, the Fe K-alpha luminosity and centroid are well correlated, with more luminous objects having more highly ionized Fe. Our results indicate that there is a strong connection between explosion type and ambient medium density, and suggest that Type Ia supernova progenitors do not substantially modify their surroundings at radii of up to several parsecs. We also detect a K-shell radiative recombination continuum of Fe in W49B and IC 443, implying a strong circumstellar interaction in the early evolutionary phases of these core-collapse remnants.

  15. ROSAT/ASCA observations of the mixed-morphology supernova remnant W28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rho, J.; Borkowski, K. J.

    2002-01-01

    We present three sets of ROSAT PSPC and four sets of ASCA observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) W28. The overall shape of x-ray emission in W28 is elliptical, dominated by a centrally-concentrated interior emission, sharply peaked at the center. There are also partial northeastern and southwestern shells, and both central and shell x-ray emission is highly patchy.

  16. Multi-dimensional Simulations of the Expanding Supernova Remnant of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Reville, B.; Ng, C.-Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; Wagner, A. Y.

    2014-10-01

    The expanding remnant from SN 1987A is an excellent laboratory for investigating the physics of supernovae explosions. There is still a large number of outstanding questions, such as the reason for the asymmetric radio morphology, the structure of the pre-supernova environment, and the efficiency of particle acceleration at the supernova shock. We explore these questions using three-dimensional simulations of the expanding remnant between days 820 and 10,000 after the supernova. We combine a hydrodynamical simulation with semi-analytic treatments of diffusive shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification to derive radio emission as part of an inverse problem. Simulations show that an asymmetric explosion, combined with magnetic field amplification at the expanding shock, is able to replicate the persistent one-sided radio morphology of the remnant. We use an asymmetric Truelove & McKee progenitor with an envelope mass of 10 M ? and an energy of 1.5 × 1044 J. A termination shock in the progenitor's stellar wind at a distance of 0.''43-0.''51 provides a good fit to the turn on of radio emission around day 1200. For the H II region, a minimum distance of 0.''63 ± 0.''01 and maximum particle number density of (7.11 ± 1.78) × 107 m-3 produces a good fit to the evolving average radius and velocity of the expanding shocks from day 2000 to day 7000 after explosion. The model predicts a noticeable reduction, and possibly a temporary reversal, in the asymmetric radio morphology of the remnant after day 7000, when the forward shock left the eastern lobe of the equatorial ring.

  17. In my Beginning is my End: Dust Destruction in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, E.; Dwek, E.

    It has been demonstrated by observations that young supernovae (SNe) are indeed able to efficiently synthesize dust. However, it is unclear how much of the freshly formed dust can reach the interstellar medium and contribute to the observed emission. At the same time, SNe represent the major agent responsible for dust destruction. Because SNe are possibly the only viable dust factory in the early Universe, it is extremely important to establish the fate of the newly formed dust. Our work explores the possibility that a significant fraction of any dust formed after the explosion is destroyed within the supernova remnant itself. In the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, dust emission has been observed associated with optical knots containing recently formed material. The dust present in such clumps is threatened by the reverse shock traveling through the ejecta toward the center of the remnant. The shock is able to disrupt the clumps and will inject the dust grains into a hot gas, where they will be eroded and possibly destroyed by thermal and inertial sputtering. We present a model that describes the propagation of the reverse shock into the supernova cavity and evaluates the modifications in the grain size distribution due to the encounter with the reverse shock. This is the first step required to quantify the amount of dust ultimately able to survive. Our model accounts for the variation of the physical properties of both the shock and the ejecta across the remnant. In particular, this means taking explicitly into consideration, for the first time in this kind of studies, the effect of clumping of the ejecta.

  18. Multi-dimensional simulations of the expanding supernova remnant of SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Reville, B.; Ng, C.-Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; Wagner, A. Y.

    2014-10-20

    The expanding remnant from SN 1987A is an excellent laboratory for investigating the physics of supernovae explosions. There is still a large number of outstanding questions, such as the reason for the asymmetric radio morphology, the structure of the pre-supernova environment, and the efficiency of particle acceleration at the supernova shock. We explore these questions using three-dimensional simulations of the expanding remnant between days 820 and 10,000 after the supernova. We combine a hydrodynamical simulation with semi-analytic treatments of diffusive shock acceleration and magnetic field amplification to derive radio emission as part of an inverse problem. Simulations show that an asymmetric explosion, combined with magnetic field amplification at the expanding shock, is able to replicate the persistent one-sided radio morphology of the remnant. We use an asymmetric Truelove and McKee progenitor with an envelope mass of 10 M {sub ?} and an energy of 1.5 × 10{sup 44} J. A termination shock in the progenitor's stellar wind at a distance of 0.''43-0.''51 provides a good fit to the turn on of radio emission around day 1200. For the H II region, a minimum distance of 0.''63 ± 0.''01 and maximum particle number density of (7.11 ± 1.78) × 10{sup 7} m{sup –3} produces a good fit to the evolving average radius and velocity of the expanding shocks from day 2000 to day 7000 after explosion. The model predicts a noticeable reduction, and possibly a temporary reversal, in the asymmetric radio morphology of the remnant after day 7000, when the forward shock left the eastern lobe of the equatorial ring.

  19. The Bubble-like Interior of the Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    E-print Network

    Milisavljevic, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The death of massive stars is believed to involve aspheric explosions initiated by the collapse of an iron core. The specifics of how these catastrophic explosions proceed remain uncertain due, in part, to limited observational constraints on various processes that can introduce asymmetries deep inside the star. Here we present near-infrared observations of the young Milky Way supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, descendant of a type IIb core-collapse explosion, and a three-dimensional map of its interior, unshocked ejecta. The remnant's interior has a bubble-like morphology that smoothly connects to and helps explain the multi-ringed structures seen in the remnant's bright reverse shocked main shell of expanding debris. This internal structure may have originated from turbulent mixing processes that encouraged the development of outwardly expanding plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta. If this is true, substantial amounts of its decay product, 56Fe, may still reside in these interior cavities.

  20. G306.3-0.9: A Newly Discovered Young Galactic Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Loi, Syheh T.; Murphy, Tara; Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Gueltekin, Kayhan; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie A.; Siegel, Michael H.; Gelbord, Jonathan; Kuin, Paul; Moss, Vanessa; Reeves, Sarah; Robbins, William J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Reis, Rubens C.; Petre, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray and radio observations of the new Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9, recently discovered by Swift. Chandra imaging reveals a complex morphology, dominated by a bright shock. The X-ray spectrum is broadly consistent with a young SNR in the Sedov phase, implying an age of 2500 yr for a distance of 8 kpc, plausibly identifying this as one of the 20 youngest Galactic SNRs. Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging reveals a prominent ridge of radio emission that correlates with the X-ray emission. We find a flux density of 160 mJy at 1 GHz, which is the lowest radio flux recorded for a Galactic SNR to date. The remnant is also detected at 24µm, indicating the presence of irradiated warm dust. The data reveal no compelling evidence for the presence of a compact stellar remnant.

  1. Direct Measurement of Neutron-Star Recoil in the Oxygen-Rich Supernova Remnant Puppis A

    E-print Network

    P. Frank Winkler; Robert Petre

    2007-07-31

    A sequence of three Chandra X-ray Observatory High Resolution Camera images taken over a span of five years reveals arc-second-scale displacement of RX J0822-4300, the stellar remnant (presumably a neutron star) near the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. We measure its proper motion to be 0.165+/-0.025 arcsec/yr toward the west-southwest. At a distance of 2 kpc, this corresponds to a transverse space velocity of ~1600 km/s. The space velocity is consistent with the explosion center inferred from proper motions of the oxygen-rich optical filaments, and confirms the idea that Puppis A resulted from an asymmetric explosion accompanied by a kick that imparted roughly 3*10^49 ergs of kinetic energy (some 3 percent of the kinetic energy for a typical supernova) to the stellar remnant. We discuss constraints on core-collapse supernova models that have been proposed to explain neutron star kick velocities.

  2. THE {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ISOTOPE RATIO NEAR THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT IC 443

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. J.; Ritchey, A. M.; Federman, S. R.; Lambert, D. L. E-mail: steven.federman@utoledo.edu E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-05-01

    We present an analysis of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li isotope ratios along four sight lines that probe diffuse molecular gas near the supernova remnant IC 443. Recent gamma-ray observations have revealed the presence of shock-accelerated cosmic rays interacting with the molecular cloud surrounding the remnant. Our results indicate that the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ratio is lower in regions more strongly affected by these interactions, a sign of recent Li production by cosmic rays. We find that {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li Almost-Equal-To 7 toward HD 254755, which is located just outside the visible edge of IC 443, while {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li Almost-Equal-To 3 along the line of sight to HD 43582, which probes the interior region of the supernova remnant. No evidence of {sup 7}Li synthesis by neutrino-induced spallation is found in material presumably contaminated by the ejecta of a core-collapse supernova. The lack of a neutrino signature in the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ratios near IC 443 is consistent with recent models of Galactic chemical evolution, which suggest that the {nu}-process plays only a minor role in Li production.

  3. Gamma-ray emitting supernova remnants as the origin of Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, M.; Becker Tjus, J.; Eichmann, B.; Nierstenhöfer, N.

    2015-11-01

    It is generally believed that the cosmic ray spectrum below the knee is of Galactic origin, although the exact sources making up the entire cosmic ray energy budget are still unknown. Including effects of magnetic amplification, Supernova Remnants (SNR) could be capable of accelerating cosmic rays up to a few PeV and they represent the only source class with a sufficient non-thermal energy budget to explain the cosmic ray spectrum up to the knee. Now, gamma-ray measurements of SNRs for the first time allow to derive the cosmic ray spectrum at the source, giving us a first idea of the concrete, possible individual contributions to the total cosmic ray spectrum. In this contribution, we use these features as input parameters for propagating cosmic rays from its origin to Earth using GALPROP in order to investigate if these supernova remnants reproduce the cosmic ray spectrum and if supernova remnants in general can be responsible for the observed energy budget.

  4. Radio and X-ray study of two multi-shell supernova remnants: Kes 79 and G352.7-0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacani, E.; Smith, M. J. S.; Dubner, G.; Loiseau, N.; Castelletti, G.; Paron, S.

    2009-11-01

    Aims: We investigate two multi-shell galactic supernova remnants (SNRs), Kes 79, and G352.7-0.1, to understand the causes of this morphology. Methods: The research was carried out based on new and reprocessed archival VLA observations and XMM-Newton archival data. The surrounding gas was investigated based on data extracted from the HI Canadian Galactic Plane Survey, the 13CO Galactic Ring Survey, and the HI Southern Galactic Plane Survey. Results: The present study infers that the overall morphology of both SNRs is the result of the mass-loss history of their respective progenitor stars. Kes 79 is likely to be the product of the gravitational collapse of a massive O9 star evolving near a molecular cloud and within the precursor's wind-driven bubble, while G352.7-0.1 should be the result of interactions of the SNR with an asymmetric wind from the progenitor together with projection effects. No radio point source or pulsar wind nebula was found to be associated with the X-ray pulsar CXOU J185238.6+004020 in Kes 79. The X-ray study of G352.7-0.1 found that most of the thermal X-ray radiation completely fills the interior of the remnant and originates in heated ejecta. Characteristic parameters, such as radio flux, radio spectral index, age, distance, shock velocity, initial energy, and luminosity, were estimated for both SNRs. Carrera del Investigador Científico of CONICET, Argentina.

  5. Interaction between supernova remnant G22.7–0.2 and the ambient molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yang; Yang, Ji; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang

    2014-12-01

    We have carried out {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0 and 2-1), {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0), and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) observations in the direction of the supernova remnant (SNR) G22.7–0.2. A filamentary molecular gas structure, which is likely part of a larger molecular complex with V {sub LSR} ? 75-79 km s{sup –1}, is detected and is found to surround the southern boundary of the remnant. In particular, the high-velocity wing (77-110 km s{sup –1}) in the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0 and J = 2-1) emission shows convincing evidence of the interaction between SNR G22.7–0.2 and the 75-79 km s{sup –1} molecular clouds (MCs). Spectra with redshifted profiles, a signature of shocked molecular gas, are seen in the southeastern boundary of the remnant. The association between the remnant and the 77 km s{sup –1} MCs places the remnant at the near distance of 4.4 ± 0.4 kpc, which agrees with a location on the Scutum-Crux arm. We suggest that SNR G22.7–0.2, SNR W41, and H II region G022.760-0.485 are at the same distance and are associated with GMC G23.0–0.4.

  6. HFPK 334: An unusual supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, E. J.; Filipovi?, M. D.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Brantseg, T.; Heitritter, K.; Roper, Q.; Haberl, F.; Uroševi?, D.

    2014-11-01

    We present new Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-continuum and XMM-Newton/Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the unusual supernova remnant (SNR) HFPK 334 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The remnant follows a shell-type morphology in the radio continuum and has a size of ?20 pc at the SMC distance. The X-ray morphology is similar; however, we detect a prominent point source close to the center of the SNR exhibiting a spectrum with a best-fit power law with a photon index of ? = 2.7 ± 0.5. This central point source is most likely a background object and cannot be directly associated with the remnant. The high temperature, nonequilibrium conditions in the diffuse region suggest that this gas has been recently shocked and points toward a younger SNR with an age of ? 1800 yr. With an average radio spectral index of ? = –0.59 ± 0.09, we find that an equipartition magnetic field for the remnant is ?90 ?G, a value typical of younger SNRs in low-density environments. Also, we report the detection of scattered radio polarization across the remnant at 20 cm, with a peak fractional polarization level of 25% ± 5%.

  7. Shock processing of interstellar dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the supernova remnant N132D

    E-print Network

    A. Tappe; J. Rho; W. T. Reach

    2006-09-06

    We observed the oxygen-rich Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant N132D (SNR 0525-69.6), using all instruments onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, IRS, IRAC, and MIPS (Infrared Spectrograph, Infrared Array Camera, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer). The 5-40 micron IRS spectra toward the southeastern shell of the remnant show a steeply rising continuum with [NeIII] and [OIV] as well as PAH emission. We also present the spectrum of a fast moving ejecta knot, previously detected at optical wavelengths, which is dominated by strong [NeIII] and [OIV] emission lines. We interpret the continuum as thermal emission from swept-up, shock-heated dust grains in the expanding shell of N132D, which is clearly visible in the MIPS 24 micron image. A 15-20 micron emission hump appears superposed on the dust continuum, and we attribute this to PAH C-C-C bending modes. We also detect the well-known 11.3 micron PAH C-H bending feature, and find the integrated strength of the 15-20 micron hump about a factor of seven stronger than the 11.3 micron band in the shell of the remnant. IRAC 3-9 micron images do not show clear evidence of large-scale, shell-like emission from the remnant, partly due to confusion with the ambient ISM material. However, we identified several knots of shocked interstellar gas based on their distinct infrared colors. We discuss the bright infrared continuum and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features with respect to dust processing in young supernova remnants.

  8. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  9. Failed supernovae explain the compact remnant mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2014-04-10

    One explanation for the absence of higher mass red supergiants (16.5 M {sub ?} ? M ? 25 M {sub ?}) as the progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) is that they die in failed SNe creating black holes. Simulations show that such failed SNe still eject their hydrogen envelopes in a weak transient, leaving a black hole with the mass of the star's helium core (5-8 M {sub ?}). Here we show that this naturally explains the typical masses of observed black holes and the gap between neutron star and black hole masses without any fine-tuning of stellar mass loss, binary mass transfer, or the SN mechanism, beyond having it fail in a mass range where many progenitor models have density structures that make the explosions more likely to fail. There is no difficulty including this ?20% population of failed SNe in any accounting of SN types over the progenitor mass function. And, other than patience, there is no observational barrier to either detecting these black hole formation events or limiting their rates to be well below this prediction.

  10. Four new X-ray-selected supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, P.; Haberl, F.; Kavanagh, P. J.; Points, S. D.; Dickel, J.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Sasaki, M.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Filipovi?, M. D.; Pietsch, W.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We present a detailed multi-wavelength study of four new supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The objects were identified as SNR candidates in X-ray observations performed during the survey of the LMC with XMM-Newton. Methods: Data obained with XMM-Newton are used to investigate the morphological and spectral features of the remnants in X-rays. We measure the plasma conditions, look for supernova (SN) ejecta emission, and constrain some of the SNR properties (e.g. age and ambient density). We supplement the X-ray data with optical, infrared, and radio-continuum archival observations, which allow us to understand the conditions resulting in the current appearance of the remnants. Based on the spatially-resolved star formation history (SFH) of the LMC together with the X-ray spectra, we attempt to type the supernovae that created the remnants. Results: We confirm all four objects as SNRs, to which we assign the names MCSNR J0508-6830, MCSNR J0511-6759, MCSNR J0514-6840, and MCSNR J0517-6759. In the first two remnants, an X-ray bright plasma is surrounded by very faint [S ii] emission. The emission from the central plasma is dominated by Fe L-shell lines, and the derived iron abundance is greatly in excess of solar. This establishes their type Ia (i.e. thermonuclear) SN origin. They appear to be more evolved versions of other Magellanic Cloud iron-rich SNRs which are centrally-peaked in X-rays. From the two other remnants (MCSNR J0514-6840 and MCSNR J0517-6759), we do not see ejecta emission. At all wavelengths at which they are detected, the local environment plays a key role in their observational appearance. We present evidence that MCSNR J0517-6759 is close to and interacting with a molecular cloud, suggesting a massive progenitor. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  11. Fermi-LAT and WMAP observations of the Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    E-print Network

    Hewitt, J W; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Reposeur, T; Ballet, J; Tanaka, T

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of GeV \\gamma-ray emission from the supernova remnant Puppis A with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Puppis A is among the faintest supernova remnants yet detected at GeV energies, with a luminosity of only 2.7x10^34 (D/2.2 kpc)^2 erg/s between 1 and 100 GeV. The \\gamma-ray emission from the remnant is spatially extended, with a morphology matching that of the radio and X-ray emission, and is well described by a simple power law with an index of 2.1. We attempt to model the broadband spectral energy distribution, from radio to \\gamma-rays, using standard nonthermal emission mechanisms. To constrain the relativistic electron population we use 7 years of WMAP data to extend the radio spectrum up to 93 GHz. Both leptonic and hadronic dominated models can reproduce the nonthermal spectral energy distribution, requiring a total content of cosmic ray (CR) electrons and protons accelerated in Puppis A of at least (1-5)x10^49 erg.

  12. Fermi-Lat and WMAP Observations of the Puppis a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, John William; Grondin, M. H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Reposeur, T.; Ballet, J.; Tanaka, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of GeV gamma-ray emission from the supernova remnant Puppis A with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Puppis A is among the faintest supernova remnants yet detected at GeV energies, with a luminosity of only 2.7×10(exp 34) (D/2.2 kpc)(exp 2) erg s(exp -1) between 1 and 100 GeV. The gamma-ray emission from the remnant is spatially extended, with a morphology matching that of the radio and X-ray emission, and is well described by a simple power law with an index of 2.1. We attempt to model the broadband spectral energy distribution, from radio to gamma-rays, using standard nonthermal emission mechanisms. To constrain the relativistic electron population we use 7 years of WMAP data to extend the radio spectrum up to 93 GHz. Both leptonic and hadronic dominated models can reproduce the nonthermal spectral energy distribution, requiring a total content of cosmic ray (CR) electrons and protons accelerated in Puppis A of at least WCR is approx. (1 - 5)×10 (exp 49) erg.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATION TO THE KNEE OF THE COSMIC RAY SPECTRUM IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Fesen, Robert; Ghavamian, Parviz; Moffett, David; Plucinksy, Paul P.; Slane, Patrick; Rakowski, Cara E.; Reynoso, Estela M.

    2011-02-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been assumed to be the source of cosmic rays (CRs) up to the 'knee' of the CR spectrum at 10{sup 15} eV, accelerating particles to relativistic energies in their blast waves by the process of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Since CR nuclei do not radiate efficiently, their presence must be inferred indirectly. Previous theoretical calculations and X-ray observations show that CR acceleration significantly modifies the structure of the SNR and greatly amplifies the interstellar magnetic field. We present new, deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572, henceforth Tycho), which reveal a previously unknown, strikingly ordered pattern of non-thermal high-emissivity stripes in the projected interior of the remnant, with spacing that corresponds to the gyroradii of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} eV protons. Spectroscopy of the stripes shows the plasma to be highly turbulent on the (smaller) scale of the Larmor radii of TeV energy electrons. Models of the shock amplification of magnetic fields produce structure on the scale of the gyroradius of the highest energy CRs present, but they do not predict the highly ordered pattern we observe. We interpret the stripes as evidence for acceleration of particles to near the knee of the CR spectrum in regions of enhanced magnetic turbulence, while the observed highly ordered pattern of these features provides a new challenge to models of DSA.

  14. A 3D cell-centered Lagrangian scheme applied to the simulation of 3D non-stationary Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, G.; Breil, J.; Ribeyre, X.; Le Bel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Several astronomical flows can be studied thanks to the gas dynamics equations under the Lagrangian formalism. Here we propose to study the plerion dynamic, i.e. supernova remnants blown-up by a central pulsar as well as the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) development at the inner interface of this gas shell. The scheme used is a multi-dimensional second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme. It satisfies the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL), a semi-discrete entropy inequality and it conserves globally the momentum and the total energy. The convergence of the scheme towards the analytical solution is tested for the plerion test case and in the case of an axi-symmetric perturbation. Finally, the scheme is used to study the perturbation growth on the shell inner face perturbed with spherical harmonics.

  15. Systematic search for molecular clouds near supernova remnants as sources of very-high-energy ?-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häffner, Stephanie; Stegmann, Christian; Jung-Richardt, Ira

    2015-12-01

    Supernova remnants accelerate particles up to energies of at least 100 TeV as established by observations in very-high-energy ?-ray astronomy. Molecular clouds in their vicinity provide an increased amount of target material for proton-proton interaction and subsequent neutral pion decay into ?-rays of accelerated hadrons escaping the remnant. Therefore, these molecular clouds are potential ?-ray sources. The ?-ray emission from these clouds provides a unique environment to derive information on the propagation of very-high-energy particles through the interstellar medium as well as on the acceleration of hadrons in supernova remnants. Current Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope systems are suitable to explore a large parameter space of the propagation properties depending on the age of the supernova remnant and the distance between the remnant and the nearby molecular cloud. In this paper we present our strategy and results of a systematic search for ?-ray emitting molecular clouds near supernova remnants which are potentially detectable with current experiments in the TeV energy range and explore the prospects of future experiments.

  16. The Chandra ACIS Survey of M33: X-ray, Optical, and Radio Properties of the Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Becker, Robert H.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Helfand, David J.; Hughes, John P.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Kuntz, Kip D.; McNeil, Emily K.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Saul, Destry; Tüllmann, Ralph; Williams, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    M33 contains a large number of emission nebulae identified as supernova remnants (SNRs) based on the high [S II]:H? ratios characteristic of shocked gas. Using Chandra data from the ChASeM33 survey with a 0.35-2 keV sensitivity of ~2 × 1034 erg s-1, we have detected 82 of 137 SNR candidates, yielding confirmation of (or at least strongly support for) their SNR identifications. This provides the largest sample of remnants detected at optical and X-ray wavelengths in any galaxy, including the Milky Way. A spectral analysis of the seven X-ray brightest SNRs reveals that two, G98-31 and G98-35, have spectra that appear to indicate enrichment by ejecta from core-collapse supernova explosions. In general, the X-ray-detected SNRs have soft X-ray spectra compared to the vast majority of sources detected along the line of sight to M33. It is unlikely that there are any other undiscovered thermally dominated X-ray SNRs with luminosities in excess of ~4 × 1035 erg s-1 in the portions of M33 covered by the ChASeM33 survey. We have used a combination of new and archival optical and radio observations to attempt to better understand why some objects are detected as X-ray sources and others are not. We have also developed a morphological classification scheme for the optically identified SNRs and discussed the efficacy of this scheme as a predictor of X-ray detectability. Finally, we have compared the SNRs found in M33 to those that have been observed in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. There are no close analogs of Cas A, Kepler's SNR, Tycho's SNR, or the Crab Nebula in the regions of M33 surveyed, but we have found an X-ray source with a power-law spectrum coincident with a small-diameter radio source that may be the first pulsar-wind nebula recognized in M33.

  17. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Kes 75 Supernova Remnant Shell: Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli

    2011-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of approximately 1.5 keY, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keY. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked supernova (SN) ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from SN ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of approximately 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma that also gives rise to the hot X-my emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-my emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) x solar mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative estimates of density and filling factors of the clumpy medium swept up by the SNR.

  18. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the KES 75 Supernova Remnant Shell: Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Slane, Patrick; Arendt, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of 1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keV. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked SN ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from supernova (SN) ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and ill emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma, that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) solar mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative estimates of density and filling factors of the clumpy medium swept up by the SNR.

  19. INFRARED AND X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE Kes 75 SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHELL: CHARACTERIZING THE DUST AND GAS PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Arendt, Richard G.; Slane, Patrick; Dwek, Eli

    2012-01-20

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of {approx}1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keV. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked supernova (SN) ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from SN ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of {approx}140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative estimates of density and filling factors of the clumpy medium swept up by the SNR.

  20. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: The Proper Motions of Balmer Filaments

    E-print Network

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P; Long, Knox S; Williams, Brian J; Borkowski, Kazimierz J; Patnaude, Daniel J; Reynolds, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    We report on the proper motions of Balmer-dominated filaments in Kepler's supernova remnant using high resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by about 10 years. We use the improved proper motion measurements and revised values of shock velocities to derive a distance to Kepler of 5.1 [+0.8, -0.7] kpc. The main shock around the northern rim of the remnant has a typical speed of 1690 km/s and is encountering material with densities of about 8 cm^-3. We find evidence for the variation of shock properties over small spatial scales, including differences in the driving pressures as the shock wraps around a curved cloud surface. We find that the Balmer filaments ahead of the ejecta knot on the northwest boundary of the remnant are becoming fainter and more diffuse. We also find that the Balmer filaments associated with circumstellar material in the interior regions of the remnant are due to shocks with significantly lower velocities and that the brightness variations amon...

  1. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 +- 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is alpha = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  2. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006 supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, A.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest x-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 to 10 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology.

  3. The optical structure of the central core in the peculiar supernova remnant CTB 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, R. A.; Gull, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Deep and high resolution H-alpha + forbidden N II, O III, and red continuum interference-filter images of the bright central radio core of the supernova remnant CTB 80 are presented. These photographs reveal a surprisingly filamentary structure not visible from previous imaging and indicate considerable morphological differences between forbidden O III and H-alpha + forbidden N II emission regions. The H-alpha + forbidden N II filaments appear elongated in the E-W direction like that of the radio emission plateau surrounding the central core. The forbidden O III emission is much smaller in angular size but matches well the position, shape and size of the core's 6 cm radio emission. Also detected are the two possible optical counterparts reported by Blair and Schild (1984) to the remnants' X-ray point source and it is noted that both may have coincident H-alpha + forbidden N II emission.

  4. Detection of a new, low-brightness supernova remnant possibly associated with EGRET sources

    E-print Network

    Jorge A. Combi; Gustavo E. Romero; Paula Benaglia; Justin L. Jonas

    2001-03-24

    We report on the discovery of a shell-type supernova remnant in the southern sky. It is a large (8*8), low-brightness source with a nonthermal radio spectrum, which requires background filtering to isolate it from the diffuse background emission of the Galaxy. Three 3EG gamma-ray sources are spatially correlated with the radio structure. We have made 21-cm line observations of the region and found that two of these sources are coincident with HI clouds. We propose that the gamma-ray emission is the result of hadronic interactions between high-energy protons locally accelerated at the remnant shock front and atomic nuclei in the ambient clouds.

  5. EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Ashley K.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2011-08-10

    We present a measurement of the expansion and brightening of G1.9 + 0.3, the youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), comparing Chandra X-ray images obtained in 2007 and 2009. A simple uniform-expansion model describes the data well, giving an expansion rate of 0.642% {+-} 0.049% yr{sup -1} and a flux increase of 1.7% {+-} 1.0% yr{sup -1}. Without deceleration, the remnant age would then be 156 {+-} 11 yr, consistent with earlier results. Since deceleration must have occurred, this age is an upper limit; we estimate an age of about 110 yr or an explosion date of about 1900. The flux increase is comparable to reported increases at radio wavelengths. G1.9+0.3 is the only Galactic SNR increasing in flux, with implications for the physics of electron acceleration in shock waves.

  6. Diffusive Shock Acceleration of Electrons and Radio Emission from Large Diameter Shell-Type Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    A. I. Asvarov

    2000-01-21

    In present study I examine the capability of diffusive shock acceleration mechanism to explain existing data on radio emission from evolved large diameter shell-type adiabatic supernova remnants (SNRs). Time-dependent ''onion-shell'' model for the radio emission of SNRs is developed, which is based on the assumptions: a) acceleration takes place from thermal energies and test-particle approximation is valid; b) the problem of injection is avoided by introducing, like Bell (1978), two injection parameters; c) to take into consideration very late stages of SNR evolution the analytic approximation of Cox and Andersen (1982) for the shell structure is used; c)no radiative cooling. Constructed Surface Brightness - Diameter $(\\Sigma -D)$ tracks are compared with the empirical $\\Sigma -D$ diagram. The main conclusion of the study is that the DSA mechanism is capable of explaining all the statistics of radio SNRs including very large diameter remnants and giant galactic loops.

  7. An Investigation into PAH Destruction in Nearby Supernova Remnants, North Polar Spur and Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Sarah M.; Witt, Adolf N.

    2015-01-01

    Our goal in conducting this research was to look at the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/large dust grain emission intensity ratio in nearby supernova remnants to find evidence for selective PAH destruction by hot gas and high velocity shock waves within these regions, as predicted by the models of Arendt et al. (2010) and Micelotta et al. (2010a,b). Two supernova remnants were studied- the North Polar Spur (NPS) and the Cygnus Loop. The data for PAHs were obtained from the WISE W3 12 micron all-sky map processed by Meisner & Finkbeiner (2014), and the data for the larger grains come from the IRAS 100 micron all-sky map processed by Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998). After obtaining a control PAH/large grain intensity ratio of ~2.8 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) from two high latitude clouds, MBM 30 and MBM 32, we found that the intensity ratios across the NPS and Cygnus Loop were not far off- ~2.7 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) and ~3.1 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr), respectively- showing no evidence of selective large-scale PAH destruction in supernova remnants. The individual intensities for both PAHs and large grains do decrease inside the Cygnus Loop, however, suggesting a decrease in abundances of both grain types, which could mean total dust grain destruction with the normal ratios coming from foreground and background dust located in the line of sight of the remnant. In addition, temperature and E(B-V) measurements taken from calibrated IRAS images show that while the dust column density increases in the Eastern Veil of the Cygnus Loop, the dust temperature reaches a local maximum, indicating the heating of large grains by interaction with the hot gas in the remnant. The PAH/large grain ratio in the Eastern Veil does decrease and could be indicative of currently ongoing active grain destruction there, with the PAHs being destroyed on a more rapid timescale than the large grains.We are grateful for financial support from the NSF REU Program grant to the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Toledo.

  8. Soft X-ray emission from the Lupus Loop and Sn 1006 supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.; Hearn, D. R.; Richardson, J. A.; Behnken, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray maps of the Lupus region have been obtained in a raster scan observation from SAS 3. These show the Lupus Loop to be a faint extended source of soft X-rays with a temperature about 2.5 million K. The most prominent feature of the region is the A.D. 1006 supernova remnant, which is unexpectedly bright at 0.2-1.0 keV. One speculative interpretation of the low-energy flux from SN 1006 is as blackbody radiation from a hot neutron star.

  9. Analysis of LAC Observations of Clusters of Galaxies and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J.

    1996-01-01

    The following publications are included and serve as the final report: The X-ray Spectrum of Abell 665; Clusters of Galaxies; Ginga Observation of an Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant; Ginga Observations of the Coma Cluster and Studies of the Spatial Distribution of Iron; A Measurement of the Hubble Constant from the X-ray Properties and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect of Abell 2218; Non-polytropic Model for the Coma Cluster; and Abundance Gradients in Cooling Flow Clusters: Ginga LAC (Large Area Counter) and Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) Spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199.

  10. An Absolute Flux Density Measurement of the Supernova Remnant Casseopia A at 32 GHz

    E-print Network

    Brian S. Mason; Erik M. Leitch; Steven T. Myers; John K. Cartwright; A. C. S. Readhead

    1999-08-31

    We report 32 GHz absolute flux density measurements of the supernova remnant Cas A, with an accuracy of 2.5%. The measurements were made with the 1.5-meter telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. The antenna gain had been measured by NIST in May 1990 to be $0.505 \\pm 0.007 \\frac{{\\rm mK}}{{\\rm Jy}}$. Our observations of Cas A in May 1998 yield $S_{cas,1998} = 194 \\pm 5 {\\rm Jy}$. We also report absolute flux density measurements of 3C48, 3C147, 3C286, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars.

  11. A method for computing synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from hydrodynamic simulations of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obergaulinger, M.; Chimeno, J. M.; Mimica, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Iyudin, A.

    2015-12-01

    The observational signature of supernova remnants (SNRs) is very complex, in terms of both their geometrical shape and their spectral properties, dominated by non-thermal synchrotron and inverse-Compton scattering. We propose a post-processing method to analyse the broad-band emission of SNRs based on three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. From the hydrodynamical data, we estimate the distribution of non-thermal electrons accelerated at the shock wave and follow the subsequent evolution as they lose or gain energy by adiabatic expansion or compression and emit energy by radiation. As a first test case, we use a simulation of a bipolar supernova expanding into a cloudy medium. We find that our method qualitatively reproduces the main observational features of typical SNRs and produces fluxes that agree with observations to within a factor of a few allowing for further use in more extended sets of models.

  12. Maximum Energies of Shock-Accelerated Electrons in Young Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Keohane, Jonathan W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Young supernova remnants (SNRs) are often assumed to be the source of cosmic rays up to energies approaching the slight steepening in the cosmic ray spectrum at around 1000 TeV, known as the "knee." We show that the observed X-ray emission of 14 radio-bright shell remnants, including all five historical shells, can be used to put limits on E(sub max), the energy at which the electron energy distribution must steepen from its slope at radio-emitting energies. Most of the remnants show thermal spectra, so any synchrotron component must fall below the observed X-ray fluxes. We obtain upper limits on E(sub max) by considering the most rapid physically plausible cutoff in the relativistic electron distribution, an exponential, which is as sharp or sharper than found in any more elaborate models. This maximally curved model then gives us the highest possible E(sub max) consistent with not exceeding observed X-rays. Our results are thus independent of particular models for the electron spectrum in SNRs. Assuming homogeneous emitting volumes with a constant magnetic field strength of 10 uG, no object could reach 1000 TeV, and only one, Kes 73, has an upper limit on E(sub max), above 100 TeV. All the other remnants have limits at or below 80 TeV. E(sub max) is probably set by the finite remnant lifetime rather than by synchrotron losses for remnants younger than a few thousand years, so that an observed electron steepening should be accompanied by steepening at the same energy for protons. More complicated, inhomogeneous models could allow higher values of E(sub max) in parts of the remnant, but the emission-weighted average value, that characteristic of typical electrons, should obey these limits. The young remnants are not expected to improve much over their remaining lives at producing the highest energy Galactic cosmic rays; if they cannot, this picture of cosmic-ray origin may need major alteration.

  13. LIMITS ON THE NUMBER OF GALACTIC YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS EMITTING IN THE DECAY LINES OF {sup 44}Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, François; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2013-09-20

    We revise the assumptions of the parameters involved in predicting the number of supernova remnants detectable in the nuclear lines of the decay chain of {sup 44}Ti. Specifically, we consider the distribution of the supernova progenitors, the supernova rate in the Galaxy, the ratios of supernova types, the Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, and the {sup 44}Ti yield from supernovae of different types to derive credible bounds on the expected number of detectable remnants. We find that, within 1? uncertainty, the Galaxy should contain an average of 5.1{sup +2.4}{sub -2.0} remnants detectable to a survey with a {sup 44}Ti decay line flux limit of 10{sup –5} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, with a probability of detecting a single remnant of 2.7{sup +10.0}{sub -2.4}%, and an expected number of detections between two and nine remnants, making the single detection of Cas A unlikely but consistent with our models. Our results show that the probability of detecting the brightest {sup 44}Ti flux source at the high absolute Galactic longitude of Cas A or above is ?10%. Using the detected flux of Cas A, we attempt to constrain the Galactic supernova rate and Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, but find the detection to be only weakly informative. We conclude that even future surveys having 200 times more sensitivity than state-of-the-art surveys can be guaranteed to detect only a few new remnants, with an expected number of detections between 8 and 21 at a limiting {sup 44}Ti decay flux of 10{sup –7} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}.

  14. Multi-Messenger Tests for Fast-Spinning Newborn Pulsars Embedded in Stripped-Envelope Supernovae

    E-print Network

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Bartos, Imre; Kiuchi, Kenta; Margutti, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Fast-spinning strongly-magnetized newborn neutron stars, including nascent magnetars, are popularly implemented as the engine of luminous stellar explosions. Here, we consider the scenario that they power various stripped-envelope supernovae, not only super-luminous supernovae Ic but also broad-line supernova Ibc and possibly some ordinary supernovae Ibc. This scenario is also motivated by the hypothesis that Galactic magnetars largely originate from fast-spinning neutron stars as remnants of stripped-envelope supernovae. By consistently modeling the energy injection from magnetized wind and Ni decay, we show that proto-neutron stars with >~ 10 ms rotation and B_dip >~ 5 x 10^14 G can be harbored in ordinary supernovae Ibc. On the other hand, millisecond proto-neuton stars can solely power broad-line supernovae Ibc if they are born with poloidal magnetic field of B_dip >~ 5 x 10^14 G, and superluminous supernovae Ic with B_dip >~ 10^13 G. Then, we study how multi-messenger emission can be used to discriminate...

  15. IRAS 15099-5856: REMARKABLE MID-INFRARED SOURCE WITH PROMINENT CRYSTALLINE SILICATE EMISSION EMBEDDED IN THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH15-52

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Im, Myungshin; McKee, Christopher F.; Suh, Kyung-Won; Moon, Dae-Sik; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Onaka, Takashi; Burton, Michael G.; Hiramatsu, Masaaki; Bessell, Michael S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Ezawa, Hajime; Kohno, Kotaro; Wilson, Grant; Yun, Min S.

    2011-05-01

    We report new mid-infrared (MIR) observations of the remarkable object IRAS 15099-5856 using the space telescopes AKARI and Spitzer, which demonstrate the presence of prominent crystalline silicate emission in this bright source. IRAS 15099-5856 has a complex morphology with a bright central compact source (IRS1) surrounded by knots, spurs, and several extended ({approx}4') arc-like filaments. The source is seen only at {>=}10 {mu}m. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum of IRS1 shows prominent emission features from Mg-rich crystalline silicates, strong [Ne II] 12.81 {mu}m, and several other faint ionic lines. We model the MIR spectrum as thermal emission from dust and compare with the Herbig Be star HD 100546 and the luminous blue variable R71, which show very similar MIR spectra. Molecular line observations reveal two molecular clouds around the source, but no associated dense molecular cores. We suggest that IRS1 is heated by UV radiation from the adjacent O star Muzzio 10 and that its crystalline silicates most likely originated in a mass outflow from the progenitor of the supernova remnant (SNR) MSH 15-52. IRS1, which is embedded in the SNR, could have been shielded from the SN blast wave if the progenitor was in a close binary system with Muzzio 10. If MSH 15-52 is a remnant of Type Ib/c supernova (SN Ib/c), as has been previously proposed, this would confirm the binary model for SN Ib/c. IRS1 and the associated structures may be the relics of massive star death, as shaped by the supernova explosion, the pulsar wind, and the intense ionizing radiation of the embedded O star.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of two supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletti, D.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a study of two supernova remnants belonging to the Large Magellanic Cloud, N49 and N11L, based on the spectroscopic mapping of their physical properties. Long slit spectroscopy was used to collect data from a grid of different positions covering the whole nebula by positioning the slit on different and equally spaced declinations. The data were obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope (Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope), in Chile. The spectral coverage was about 3500-8000 Å. For each object, about 50 emission lines were measured on the spectra, allowing to build maps of many interesting line intensity ratios. The maps of electron density and temperature were obtained using the [S II] ? 6717/? 6731 and [O III] (? 5007+? 4959)/? 4363 line ratio sensors, respectively. N49 presents a strong density gradient with the density varying from 600 cm^{-3} at the North-West to more than 3000 cm^{-3} at the South-East. The electron temperature distribution shows a rough spherical symmetry with the higher values found at the centre. In N11L the electron density varies from less than 100 cm^{-3} to about 400 cm^{-3}, with the higher values found on the bright filaments. These maps were used to build a picture of the structure of these two supernova remnants.

  17. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizunno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission from shocks in order to understand the observed emission from relativistic jets and supernova remnants. The investigation involves the study of collisionless shocks, where the Weibel instability is responsible for particle acceleration as well as magnetic field generation. A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code has been used to investigate the shock processes in electron-positron plasmas. The evolution of theWeibe1 instability and its associated magnetic field generation and particle acceleration are studied with two different jet velocities (0 = 2,5 - slow, fast) corresponding to either outflows in supernova remnants or relativistic jets, such as those found in AGNs and microquasars. Slow jets have intrinsically different structures in both the generated magnetic fields and the accelerated particle spectrum. In particular, the jet head has a very weak magnetic field and the ambient electrons are strongly accelerated and dragged by the jet particles. The simulation results exhibit jitter radiation from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, generated by the Weibel instability, which has different spectral properties than standard synchrotron emission in a homogeneous magnetic field.

  18. Comparison of the expected and observed supernova remnant counts with Fermi/LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Ie.; Neronov, A.; Malyshev, D.

    2015-12-01

    SNRs are commonly believed to be the accelerators of the galactic cosmic rays - mainly protons - and are expected to produce ?-rays through the inelastic proton-proton collisions. Fermi/LAT was expected to detect many of those, but only a dozen is listed in the recent Fermi/LAT 2nd Source catalogue. To test whether the observed number of SNRs is in agreement with the above assumption, we use a simplified model of an SNR and calculate the predicted amount of the observable remnants taking into account their distribution in the Galaxy and the sensitivity of Fermi/LAT. We find that the observed number of SNRs agrees with the prediction of our model if we assume a low, ? 1 cm-3, number density of the SNR's ambient medium. The result, presented here, suggests, that on average the supernova explosions happen in the under-dense regions, such as bubbles, creating by the winds of the progenitor stars. Under this natural supposition our result finds an agreement with the assumption, that the observed population of supernovae remnants is indeed responsible for the production of the galactic cosmic rays.

  19. Radioactive Scandium in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    E-print Network

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J; Green, David A; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of thermal X-ray emission from the youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, from a 237-ks Chandra observation. We detect strong K-shell lines of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. In addition, we detect a 4.1 keV line with 99.971% confidence which we attribute to 44Sc, produced by electron capture from 44Ti. Combining the data with our earlier Chandra observation allows us to detect the line in two regions independently. For a remnant age of 100 yr, our measured total line strength indicates synthesis of $(1 - 7) \\times 10^{-5}$ solar masses of 44Ti, in the range predicted for both Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae, but somewhat smaller than the $2 \\times 10^{-4}$ solar masses reported for Cas A. The line spectrum indicates supersolar abundances. The Fe emission has a width of about 26,000 km/s, consistent with an age of about 100 yr and with the inferred mean shock velocity of 14,000 km/s deduced assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc. Most thermal emission comes from regions of lower ...

  20. RADIOACTIVE SCANDIUM IN THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert

    2010-12-01

    We report the discovery of thermal X-ray emission from the youngest Galactic supernova remnant G1.9+0.3, from a 237 ks Chandra observation. We detect strong K{alpha} lines of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. In addition, we detect a 4.1 keV line with 99.971% confidence which we attribute to {sup 44}Sc, produced by electron capture from {sup 44}Ti. Combining the data with our earlier Chandra observation allows us to detect the line in two regions independently. For a remnant age of 100 yr, our measured total line strength indicates synthesis of (1-7) x 10{sup -5} M {sub sun} of {sup 44}Ti, in the range predicted for both Type Ia and core-collapse supernovae (SNe), but somewhat smaller than the 2 x 10{sup -4} M {sub sun} reported for Cas A. The line spectrum indicates supersolar abundances. The Fe emission has a width of about 28,000 km s{sup -1}, consistent with an age of {approx}100 yr and with the inferred mean shock velocity of 14,000 km s{sup -1} deduced assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc. Most thermal emission comes from regions of lower X-ray but higher radio surface brightness. Deeper observations should allow more detailed spatial mapping of {sup 44}Sc, with significant implications for models of nucleosynthesis in Type Ia SNe.

  1. AKARI AND BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF THE CASSIOPEIA A SUPERNOVA REMNANT AND SURROUNDING INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Sibthorpe, B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Griffin, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Mauskopf, P.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Halpern, M.; Marsden, G.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Klein, J.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hughes, D. H.; Jeong, W.-S.; Kaneda, H.; Koo, B.-C.; Lee, H.-G.; Martin, P. G.; Moon, D.-S.

    2010-08-20

    We use new large area far infrared maps ranging from 65 to 500 {mu}m obtained with the AKARI and the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope missions to characterize the dust emission toward the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (SNR). Using the AKARI high-resolution data we find a new 'tepid' dust grain population at a temperature of {approx}35 K and with an estimated mass of 0.06 M{sub sun}. This component is confined to the central area of the SNR and may represent newly formed dust in the unshocked supernova ejecta. While the mass of tepid dust that we measure is insufficient by itself to account for the dust observed at high redshift, it does constitute an additional dust population to contribute to those previously reported. We fit our maps at 65, 90, 140, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m to obtain maps of the column density and temperature of 'cold' dust (near 16 K) distributed throughout the region. The large column density of cold dust associated with clouds seen in molecular emission extends continuously from the surrounding interstellar medium to project on the SNR, where the foreground component of the clouds is also detectable through optical, X-ray, and molecular extinction. At the resolution available here, there is no morphological signature to isolate any cold dust associated only with the SNR from this confusing interstellar emission. Our fit also recovers the previously detected 'hot' dust in the remnant, with characteristic temperature 100 K.

  2. The End of Amnesia: Measuring the Metallicities of Type Ia SN Progenitors with Manganese Lines in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Hughes, John P.

    2009-05-01

    The Mn to Cr mass ratio in supernova ejecta has recently been proposed as a tracer of Type Ia SN progenitor metallicity. We review the advantages and problems of this observable quantity, and discuss them in the framework of the Tycho Supernova Remnant. The fluxes of the Mn and Cr K? lines in the X-ray spectra of Tycho observed by the Suzaku satellite suggests a progenitors of supersolar metallicity.

  3. Hard X-ray emission and {sup 44}Ti line features of the Tycho supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhuo E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn

    2014-07-10

    A deep hard X-ray survey of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) satellite has detected for the first time non-thermal emission up to 90 keV in the Tycho supernova (SN) remnant. Its 3-100 keV spectrum is fitted with a thermal bremsstrahlung of kT ? 0.81 ± 0.45 keV plus a power-law model of ? ? 3.01 ± 0.16. Based on diffusive shock acceleration theory, this non-thermal emission, together with radio measurements, implies that the Tycho remnant may not accelerate protons up to >PeV but to hundreds TeV. Only heavier nuclei may be accelerated to the cosmic ray spectral 'knee'. In addition, using INTEGRAL, we search for soft gamma-ray lines at 67.9 and 78.4 keV that come from the decay of radioactive {sup 44}Ti in the Tycho remnant. A bump feature in the 60-90 keV energy band, potentially associated with the {sup 44}Ti line emission, is found with a marginal significance level of ?2.6?. The corresponding 3? upper limit on the {sup 44}Ti line flux amounts to 1.5 × 10{sup –5} photon cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. Implications on the progenitor of the Tycho SN, considered to be a Type Ia SN prototype, are discussed.

  4. An Archival X-ray Study of the Large Magellanic Cloud Supernova Remnant N132D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Foster, Adam; Gaetz, Terrance; Jerius, Diab H.; Patnaude, Daniel; Edgar, Richard J.; Smith, Randall K.; Blair, William P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the archival XMM-Newton EPIC data (203ks for pn and 556/574ks for MOS1/MOS2) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS data (89ks) of the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) N132D. N132D has been classified as an ``O-rich'' remnant based on the UV and optical spectra which show emission from C, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. These spectra of the central optical knots do not show any emission from elements with Z higher than Si, yet the nucleosynthesis models predict significant quantities of these higher Z elements. Our spectral analysis of the deep XMM data clearly shows emission lines from S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, with indications of other possible features between Ca and Fe. We use a combination of the high resolution images from Chandra and the sensitive spectra from XMM to disentangle the emission from swept-up interstellar material and a possible hot ejecta component. We interpret these results in the context of a 3,000 year old remnant from a massive progenitor that has exploded into a cavity created by the progenitor.This research was supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) through grant number NNX11AD17G.

  5. AN ATTEMPT AT A UNIFIED MODEL FOR THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Qiang; Bi Xiaojun; Liu Siming

    2012-12-20

    Shocks of supernova remnants (SNRs) are important (and perhaps the dominant) agents for the production of the Galactic cosmic rays. Recent {gamma}-ray observations of several SNRs have made this case more compelling. However, these broadband high-energy measurements also reveal a variety of spectral shapes demanding more comprehensive modeling of emissions from SNRs. According to the locally observed fluxes of cosmic-ray protons and electrons, the electron-to-proton number ratio is known to be about 1%. Assuming such a ratio is universal for all SNRs and identical spectral shape for all kinds of accelerated particles, we propose a unified model that ascribes the distinct {gamma}-ray spectra of different SNRs to variations of the medium density and the spectral difference between cosmic-ray electrons and protons observed from Earth to transport effects. For low-density environments, the {gamma}-ray emission is inverse-Compton dominated. For high-density environments like systems of high-energy particles interacting with molecular clouds, the {gamma}-ray emission is {pi}{sup 0}-decay dominated. The model predicts a hadronic origin of {gamma}-ray emission from very old remnants interacting mostly with molecular clouds and a leptonic origin for intermediate-age remnants whose shocks propagate in a low-density environment created by their progenitors via, e.g., strong stellar winds. These results can be regarded as evidence in support of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  6. Energy Dependence of Synchrotron X-Ray Rims in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Ressler, Sean M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-10-01

    Several young supernova remnants (SNRs) exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's SNR in five energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths ˜1%-5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths ˜50-400 ?G assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are ˜1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields ?20 ?G, affirming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  7. A Chandra X-Ray Survey of Ejecta in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Laming, J. Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present a survey of the X-ray emitting ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant based on an extensive analysis of over 6000 spectral regions extracted on 2.5-10" angular scales using the Chandra 1 Ms observation. We interpret these results in the context of hydrodynamical models for the evolution of the remnant. The distributions of fitted temperature and ionization age are highly peaked and suggest that the ejecta were subjected to multiple secondary shocks. Based on the fitted emission measure and element abundances, and an estimate of the emitting volume, we derive masses for the X-ray emitting ejecta as well as showing the distribution of the mass of various elements over the remnant. The total shocked Fe mass appears to be roughly 0.14 Solar Mass, which accounts for nearly all of the mass expected in Fe ejecta. We find two populations of Fe ejecta, that associated with normal Si-burning and that associated with alpha-rich freeze-out, with a mass ratio of approximately 2:1. Surprisingly, essentially all of this Fe (both components) is well outside the central regions of the SNR, presumably having been ejected by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. We discuss this, and its implications for the neutron star kick.

  8. An Archival X-ray Study of the Large Magellanic Cloud Supernova Remnant N132D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Foster, Adam R.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Jerius, Diab; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Edgar, Richard J.; Smith, Randall K.; Blair, William P.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the archival XMM-Newton EPIC data (203ks for pn and 556/574ks for MOS1/MOS2) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS data (89ks) of the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) N132D. N132D has been classified as an ``O-rich'' remnant based on the UV and optical spectra which show emission from C, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. These spectra of the central optical knots do not show any emission from elements with Z higher than Si, yet the nucleosynthesis models predict significant quantities of these higher Z elements. Our spectral analysis of the deep XMM data clearly shows emission lines from S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, with indications of other possible features between Ca and Fe. We use a combination of the high resolution images from Chandra and the sensitive spectra from XMM to disentangle the emission from swept-up interstellar material and a possible hot ejecta component. We interpret these results in the context of a 3,000 year old remnant from a massive progenitor that has exploded into a cavity created by the progenitor.This research was supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program (ADAP) through grant number NNX11AD17G.

  9. 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the Galactic supernova remnant CTB 109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, J.; Sasaki, M.; Breitschwerdt, D.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Using detailed 3D hydrodynamic simulations we study the nature of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) CTB 109 (G109.1-1.0), which is well known for its semicircular shape and a bright diffuse X-ray emission feature inside the SNR. Aims: Our model has been designed to explain the observed morphology, with a special emphasis on the bright emission feature inside the SNR. Moreover, we determine the age of the remnant and compare our findings with X-ray observations. With CTB 109 we test a new method of detailed numerical simulations of diffuse young objects, using realistic initial conditions derived directly from observations. Methods: We performed numerical 3D simulations with the RAMSES code. The initial density structure has been directly taken from 12CO emission data, adding an additional dense cloud, which, when it is shocked, causes the bright emission feature. Results: From parameter studies we obtained the position (?,b) = (109.1545°,-1.0078°) for an elliptical cloud with ncloud = 25 cm-3 based on the preshock density from Chandra data and a maximum diameter of 4.54 pc, whose encounter with the supernova (SN) shock wave generates the bright X-ray emission inside the SNR. The calculated age of the remnant is about 11 000 yr according to our simulations. In addition, we can also determine the most probable site of the SN explosion. Conclusions: Hydrodynamic simulations can reproduce the morphology and the observed size of the SNR CTB 109 remarkably well. Moreover, the simulations show that it is very plausible that the bright X-ray emission inside the SNR is the result of an elliptical dense cloud shocked by the SN explosion wave. We show that numerical simulations using observational data for an initial model can produce meaningful results.

  10. A Search for Evidence of Non-Thermal Emission from the Supernova Remnants 37A/B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, R.

    2002-01-01

    The ADP grant NAG5-9211 entitled 'A Search for Evidence of Non-Thermal Emission from the Supernova Remnants 37 A/B' was not used to support an analysis of the ASCA data for these two remnants because the ASCA mission ended before the remnants were observed. The grant was used to support similar research on two remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, N132D and N 103B. An analysis of the Chandra data for these two remnants exhibits some evidence of non-thermal emission from small regions in the remnants. The X-ray spectra for these regions can not be adequately described by a single thermal X-ray emission model. However, if an X-ray synchrotron component is also included, the spectral data can be well described by the model and the values of the fit parameters are consistent with the values expected. These results were presented at the 199th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society. In summary, the grant has enabled us to strengthen the evidence that supernova remnants outside our Galaxy can also accelerate electrons to very-high energies. The results of this analysis will be published soon in the Astrophysical Journal,

  11. Deep Chandra Observations of the Composite Supernova Remnant G327.1-1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temim, Tea

    2014-11-01

    G327.1-1.1 is a composite SNR containing a symmetric radio shell and a PWN that has likely been disrupted by the reverse shock. Previous X-ray studies reveled a complex morphology; a compact core embedded in bow-shock-like structure, prong-like features extending into large arcs, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. We present deep, 350 ks Chandra observations of G327.1-1.1 that provide new information about the properties of the system, such as the spatial variations in the spectral index across the observed PWN structures, and the thermal temperature across the SNR shell. We also present preliminary HD simulations of an asymmetric PWN/SNR interaction in a system with a moving pulsar, expanding into a non-uniform ISM density, which offer new insight into the nature of the remnant.

  12. Thermal and non-thermal X-rays from the Galactic supernova remnant G348.5+0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Minami, Sari; Ota, Naomi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-02-01

    We report on Suzaku results of the two distinct regions in the Galactic supernova remnant G348.5+0.1: extended thermal X-rays ("soft diffuse") at the north-east region and non-thermal X-rays (CXOU J171419.8-383023) at the north-west region. The X-ray spectrum of the soft diffuse X-rays can be fitted with neither an ionization equilibrium nor a non-equilibrium (ionizing) plasma model, leaving saw- tooth residuals in the 1.5-3 keV energy band. The residual structures can be produced when free electrons are recombined to the K-shells of highly ionized Mg and Si ions. In fact, the X-ray spectrum is nicely fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model. We propose a scenario whereby the plasma in a nearly fully ionized state at high temperature quickly changed to a recombining phase due to selective cooling of electrons to a lower temperature of ˜ 0.5 keV. The spectrum of CXOU J171419.8-383023 is well explained by a simple power-law model with a photon index of 1.9, nearly equal to the typical value for pulsar wind nebulae. Since the distance is estimated to be the same as that of the soft diffuse radiation, we infer that both the soft diffuse X-rays and CXOU J171419.8-383023 are associated with the same object, SNR G348.5+0.1.

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of the supernova remnant HESS J1731-347

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui-zhi; Zhang, Xiao; Yuan, Qiang; Liu, Siming

    2014-07-01

    Context. HESS J1731-347 has been identified as one of the few TeV-bright shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs). These remnants are dominated by nonthermal emission, and the nature of TeV emission has been continuously debated for nearly a decade. Aims: We carry out the detailed modeling of the radio to ?-ray spectrum of HESS J1731-347 to constrain the magnetic field and energetic particles sources, which we compare with those of the other TeV-bright shell-type SNRs explored before. Methods: Four years of data from Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations for regions around this remnant are analyzed, leading to no detection correlated with the source discovered in the TeV band. The Markov chain Monte Carlo method is used to constrain parameters of one-zone models for the overall emission spectrum. Results: Based on the 99.9% upper limits of fluxes in the GeV range, one-zone hadronic models with an energetic proton spectral slope greater than 1.8 can be ruled out, which favors a leptonic origin for the ?-ray emission, making this remnant a sibling of the brightest TeV SNR RX J1713.7-3946, the Vela Junior SNR RX J0852.0-4622, and RCW 86. The best-fit leptonic model has an electron spectral slope of 1.8 and a magnetic field of ~30 ?G, which is at least a factor of 2 higher than those of RX J1713.7-3946 and RX J0852.0-4622, posing a challenge to the distance estimate and/or the energy equipartition between energetic electrons and the magnetic field of this source. A measurement of the shock speed will address this challenge and has implications on the magnetic field evolution and electron acceleration driven by shocks of SNRs.

  14. EVOLUTION OF THE RADIO REMNANT OF SUPERNOVA 1987A: MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES FROM DAY 7000

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Zanardo, G.; Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2013-11-10

    We present radio imaging observations of supernova remnant 1987A at 9 GHz, taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array over 21 years from 1992 to 2013. By employing a Fourier modeling technique to fit the visibility data, we show that the remnant structure has evolved significantly since day 7000 (mid-2006): the emission latitude has gradually decreased such that the overall geometry has become more similar to a ring structure. Around the same time, we find a decreasing trend in the east-west asymmetry of the surface emissivity. These results could reflect the increasing interaction of the forward shock with material around the circumstellar ring, and the relative weakening of the interaction with the lower-density material at higher latitudes. The morphological evolution caused an apparent break in the remnant expansion measured with a torus model, from a velocity of 4600{sup +150}{sub -}200 km s{sup –1} between day 4000 and 7000 to 2400{sup +100}{sub -200} km s{sup –1} after day 7000. However, we emphasize that there is no conclusive evidence for a physical slowing of the shock at any given latitude in the expanding remnant, and that a change of radio morphology alone appears to dominate the evolution. This is supported by our ring-only fits which show a constant expansion of 3890 ± 50 km s{sup –1} without deceleration between days 4000 and 9000. We suggest that once the emission latitude no longer decreases, the expansion velocity obtained from the torus model should return to the same value as that measured with the ring model.

  15. Spitzer observations of the type IA supernova remnant N103B: Kepler's older cousin?

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Raymond, John C.; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Sankrit, Ravi; Hendrick, Sean P.

    2014-08-01

    We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm{sup –3}, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements toward regions of higher than average density. This density is similar to that in Kepler's SNR, a Type Ia interacting with a circumstellar medium (CSM). Optical images show H? emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the '18 ?m' silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 ?m. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic asymptotic giant branch progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.

  16. Chandra and XMM-Newton study of the supernova remnant Kes 73 hosting the magnetar 1E 1841-045

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Harsha S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Slane, Patrick O.; Gotthelf, E. V. E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca E-mail: eric@astro.columbia.edu

    2014-01-20

    We present a Chandra and XMM-Newton study of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 73 hosting the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841–045. The Chandra image reveals clumpy structures across the remnant with enhanced emission along the western rim. The X-ray emission fills the radio shell and spatially correlates with the infrared image. The global X-ray spectrum is described by a two-component thermal model with a column density N {sub H} = 2.6{sub ?0.3}{sup +0.4}×10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} and a total luminosity of L{sub X} = 3.3{sub ?0.5}{sup +0.7}×10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1} (0.5-10 keV, at an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc). The soft component is characterized by a temperature kT{sub s} = 0.5{sub ?0.2}{sup +0.1} keV, a high ionization timescale, and enhanced Si and S abundances, suggesting emission that is dominated by shocked ejecta. The hard component has a temperature kT{sub h} = 1.6{sub ?0.7}{sup +0.8} keV, a relatively low ionization timescale, and mostly solar abundances suggesting emission that is dominated by interstellar/circumstellar shocked material. A spatially resolved spectroscopy study reveals no significant variations in the spectral properties. We infer an SNR age ranging between 750 yr and 2100 yr, an explosion energy of 3.0{sub ?1.8}{sup +2.8}×10{sup 50} erg and a shock velocity of (1.2 ± 0.3)×10{sup 3} km s{sup –1} (under the Sedov phase assumption). We also discuss the possible scenario for Kes 73 expanding into the late red-supergiant wind phase of its massive progenitor. Comparing the inferred metal abundances to core-collapse nucleosynthesis model yields, we estimate a progenitor mass ?20 M {sub ?}, adding a candidate to the growing list of highly magnetized neutron stars proposed to be associated with very massive progenitors.

  17. A Model Grid for the Spectral Analysis of X-ray Emission in Young Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    C. Badenes; E. Bravo; K. Borkowski

    2005-01-14

    We address a new set of models for the spectral analysis of the X-ray emission from young, ejecta-dominated Type Ia supernova remnants. These models are based on hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between Type Ia supernova explosion models and the surrounding ambient medium, coupled to self-consistent ionization and electron heating calculations in the shocked supernova ejecta, and the generation of synthetic spectra with an appropriate spectral code. The details are provided elsewhere, but in this paper we concentrate on a specific class of Type Ia explosion models (delayed detonations), commenting on the differences that arise between their synthetic X-ray spectra under a variety of conditions.

  18. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Arcsecond Imaging of the Young, Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant 1E 0102.2-7219.

    PubMed

    Gaetz; Butt; Edgar; Eriksen; Plucinsky; Schlegel; Smith

    2000-05-01

    We present observations of the young, oxygen-rich supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 taken by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory during its orbital activation and checkout phase. The boundary of the blast-wave shock is clearly seen for the first time, allowing the diameter of the remnant and the mean blast-wave velocity to be determined accurately. The prominent X-ray bright ring of material may be the result of the reverse shock encountering ejecta; the radial variation of O vii versus O viii emission indicates an ionizing shock propagating inward, possibly through a strong density gradient in the ejecta. We compare the X-ray emission with Australia Telescope Compact Array 6 cm radio observations (Amy & Ball) and with archival Hubble Space Telescope [O iii] observations. The ring of radio emission is predominantly inward of the outer blast wave, which is consistent with an interpretation of synchrotron radiation originating behind the blast wave but outward of the bright X-ray ring of emission. Many (but not all) of the prominent optical filaments are seen to correspond to X-ray bright regions. We obtain an upper limit of approximately 9x1033 ergs s-1 (3 sigma) on any potential pulsar X-ray emission from the central region. PMID:10790068

  19. Measuring Dust Production in the Small Magellanic Cloud Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant 1E 0102.2-7219

    E-print Network

    Karin M. Sandstrom; Alberto D. Bolatto; Snezana Stanimirovic; Jacco van Loon; J. D. T. Smith

    2008-10-16

    We present mid-infrared spectral mapping observations of the core-collapse supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud using the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The remnant shows emission from fine structure transitions of neon and oxygen as well as continuum emission from dust. Comparison of the mid-IR dust emission with observations at x-ray, radio and optical wavelengths shows that the dust is associated with the supernova ejecta and is thus newly formed in the remnant. The spectrum of the newly formed dust is well reproduced by a model that includes 3x10^-3 solar masses of amorphous carbon dust at 70 K and 2x10^-5 solar masses of Mg2SiO4 (forsterite) at 145 K. Our observations place a lower limit on the amount of dust in the remnant since we are not sensitive to the cold dust in the unshocked ejecta. We compare our results to observations of other core-collapse supernovae and remnants, particularly Cas A where very similar spectral mapping observations have been carried out. We observe a a factor of ~10 less dust in E 0102 than seen in Cas A, although the amounts of amorphous carbon and forsterite are comparable.

  20. MEASURING DUST PRODUCTION IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT 1E 0102.2-7219

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, Karin M.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Smith, J. D. T.

    2009-05-10

    We present mid-infrared spectral mapping observations of the core-collapse supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud using the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The remnant shows emission from fine structure transitions of neon and oxygen as well as continuum emission from dust. Comparison of the mid-IR dust emission with observations at X-ray, radio, and optical wavelengths shows that the dust is associated with the supernova ejecta and is thus newly formed in the remnant. The spectrum of the newly formed dust is well reproduced by a model that includes 3 x 10{sup -3} M {sub sun} of amorphous carbon dust at 70 K and 2 x 10{sup -5} M {sub sun} of Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (forsterite) at 145 K. Our observations place a lower limit on the amount of dust in the remnant since we are not sensitive to the cold dust in the unshocked ejecta. We compare our results to observations of other core-collapse supernovae and remnants, particularly Cas A where very similar spectral mapping observations have been carried out. We observe a factor of {approx}10 less dust in E 0102 than seen in Cas A, although the amounts of amorphous carbon and forsterite are comparable. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that the grain size distribution of the newly formed dust in E 0102 has been altered by the hot plasma behind the reverse shock.

  1. The many sides of RCW 86: a Type Ia supernova remnant evolving in its progenitor's wind bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broersen, Sjors; Chiotellis, Alexandros; Vink, Jacco; Bamba, Aya

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a detailed investigation of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 86 using the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. RCW 86 is the probable remnant of SN 185 A.D., a supernova that likely exploded inside a wind-blown cavity. We use the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer to derive precise temperatures and ionization ages of the plasma, which are an indication of the interaction history of the remnant with the presumed cavity. We find that the spectra are well fitted by two non-equilibrium ionization models, which enables us to constrain the properties of the ejecta and interstellar matter plasma. Furthermore, we performed a principal component analysis on EPIC MOS and pn data to find regions with particular spectral properties. We present evidence that the shocked ejecta, emitting Fe K and Si line emission, are confined to a shell of approximately 2 pc width with an oblate spheroidal morphology. Using detailed hydrodynamical simulations, we show that general dynamical and emission properties at different portions of the remnant can be well reproduced by a Type Ia supernova that exploded in a non-spherically symmetric wind-blown cavity. We also show that this cavity can be created using general wind properties for a single degenerate system. Our data and simulations provide further evidence that RCW 86 is indeed the remnant of SN 185, and is the likely result of a Type Ia explosion of single degenerate origin.

  2. The End of Amnesia: A New Method for Measuring the Metallicity of Type Ia Supernova Progenitors Using Manganese Lines in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Hughes, John P.

    2008-06-01

    We propose a new method to measure the metallicity of Type Ia supernova progenitors using Mn and Cr lines in the X-ray spectra of young supernova remnants. We show that the Mn-to-Cr mass ratio in Type Ia supernova ejecta is tightly correlated with the initial metallicity of the progenitor, as determined by the neutron excess of the white dwarf material before thermonuclear runaway. We use this correlation, together with the flux of the Cr and Mn K? X-ray lines in the Tycho supernova remnant recently detected by Suzaku, to derive a metallicity of log(Z)=-1.32+0.67-0.33 for the progenitor of this supernova, which corresponds to log(Z/Zsolar)=0.60+0.31-0.60 according to the latest determination of the solar metallicity by Asplund and coworkers. The uncertainty in the measurement is large, but metallicities much smaller than the solar value can be confidently discarded. We discuss the implications of this result for future research on Type Ia supernova progenitors.

  3. A VLA Low Frequency Survey of the Supernova Remnant Population in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, Christopher; Pritchard, T. A.; Blair, W. P.; Cowan, J. J.; Godfrey, L.; Miller-Jones, J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, K. S.; Maddox, L. A.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Soria, R.; Whitmore, B. C.; Winkler, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    We present low frequency observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83, using the C and L bands of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the more than 150 radio point sources in M83. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  4. Detection of class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser candidates in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlström, Y. M.; Mesler, R. A.; McEwen, B. C.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Frail, D. A.; Claussen, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to search for 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) lines in a sample of 21 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). Mainly the regions of the SNRs with 1720 MHz OH masers were observed. Despite the limited spatial extent covered in our search, methanol masers were detected in both G1.4–0.1 and W28. Additional masers were found in Sgr A East. More than 40 masers were found in G1.4–0.1, which we deduce are due to interactions between the SNR and at least two separate molecular clouds. The six masers in W28 are associated with the molecular cloud that is also associated with the OH maser excitation. We discuss the possibility that the methanol maser may be more numerous in SNRs than the OH maser, but harder to detect due to observational constraints.

  5. Detection of the Characteristic Pion-Decay Signature in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Cillis, A. N.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbel, S.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Simeon, P. E.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stecker, F. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2013-02-01

    Cosmic rays are particles (mostly protons) accelerated to relativistic speeds. Despite wide agreement that supernova remnants (SNRs) are the sources of galactic cosmic rays, unequivocal evidence for the acceleration of protons in these objects is still lacking. When accelerated protons encounter interstellar material, they produce neutral pions, which in turn decay into gamma rays. This offers a compelling way to detect the acceleration sites of protons. The identification of pion-decay gamma rays has been difficult because high-energy electrons also produce gamma rays via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We detected the characteristic pion-decay feature in the gamma-ray spectra of two SNRs, IC 443 and W44, with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. This detection provides direct evidence that cosmic-ray protons are accelerated in SNRs.

  6. A Survey of Hydroxyl Toward Supernova Remnants: Evidence for Extended 1720 MHz Maser Emission

    E-print Network

    J. W. Hewitt; F. Yusef-Zadeh; M. Wardle

    2008-04-01

    We present the results of GBT observations of all four ground-state hydroxyl (OH) transitions toward 15 supernova remnants (SNRs) which show OH(1720 MHz) maser emission. This species of maser is well established as an excellent tracer of an ongoing interaction between the SNR and dense molecular material. For the majority of these objects we detect significantly higher flux densities with a single dish than has been reported with interferometric observations. We infer that spatially extended, low level maser emission is a common phenomenon that traces the large-scale interaction in maser-emitting SNRs. Additionally we use a collisional pumping model to fit the physical conditions under which OH is excited behind the SNR shock front. We find the observed OH gas associated with the SNR interaction having columns less than approximately 10^17 per square cm, temperatures of 20 to 125 K, and densities 10^5 per cubic cm.

  7. DISCOVERY OF THE SMALL-DIAMETER, YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G354.4+0.0

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subhashis; Pal, Sabyasachi E-mail: sabya@csp.res.in

    2013-09-10

    We report the discovery of a shell-like structure G354.4+0.0 of size 1.'6 that shows the morphology of a shell supernova remnant (SNR). Part of the structure shows polarized emission in a NRAO VLA sky survey map. Based on 330 MHz and 1.4 GHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations and existing observations at higher frequencies, we conclude that the partial shell structure showing synchrotron emission is embedded in an extended H II region of size {approx}4'. The spectrum of the diffuse H II region turns over between 1.4 GHz and 330 MHz. The H I absorption spectrum shows this objected to be located more than 5 kpc from Sun. Based on its morphology, non-thermal polarized emission, and size, this object is one of the youngest SNRs discovered in the Galaxy with an estimated age of {approx}100-500 yr.

  8. A Preliminary Chandra X-ray Spectroscopy of the Supernova Remnant N132D

    E-print Network

    Xiao Xiao; Yang Chen

    2007-03-29

    We present the preliminary results of a Chandra X-ray study of N132D, a young shell-like supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width maps of emissions from O, Ne, Mg, Si, and S are provided. Spatially resolved spectral analysis for the small-scale regions were tentatively performed. The X-ray spectra of the interior can be described with a single-thermal model. The faint interior regions have lower density and higher temperature (above 1keV) than those of bright interior regions. The X-ray spectra along the shell can be phenomenally fitted with either a double-vpshock model or a vpshock + powerlaw model. If the non-thermal component is true, N132D would be listed as another X-ray synchrotron SNR.

  9. 44Ti radioactivity in young supernova remnants: Cas A and SN 1987A

    E-print Network

    Yuko Motizuki; Shiomi Kumagai

    2003-11-04

    We investigate radioactivity from the decay sequence of 44Ti in young supernova remnants (SNRs), Cassiopeia A (Cas A) and SN 1987A. It is shown by a linear analysis that ionization of 44Ti, a pure electron capture decay isotope, affects the radioactivity contradistinctively in these two SNRs: Ionization of 44Ti to H-like and He-like states enhances its present radioactivity in Cas A, while such high-ionization decreases its radioactivity in SN 1987A. We briefly discuss the enhancement factor of the present radioactivity of Cas A considering microscopic (atomic/nuclear) physics combined with a hydrodynamical SNR evolution model. For SN 1987A, we have obtained the initial 44Ti mass of (0.82-2.3) X 10^{-4} M_solar from our Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting fluxes of gamma and hard X-rays emerged from the 44Ti decay are given for the current and future experiments.

  10. Interstellar absorptions and shocked clouds towards supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622

    E-print Network

    Pakhomov, Yu V; Iyudin, A F

    2012-01-01

    We present results of survey of interstellar absorptions towards supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622. The distribution of KI absorbers along the distance of the background stars is indicative of a local region (d100km/s towards three stars and identify them with shocked clouds of Vela SNR. We reveal and measure acceleration of two shocked clouds at the approaching and receding sides of Vela SNR along the same sight line. The clouds acceleration, velocity, and CaII column density are used to probe cloud parameters. The total hydrogen column density of both accelerating clouds is found to be similar (~6*10^{17} cm$^{-2}$) which indicates that possibly there is a significant amount of small-size clouds in the vicinity of Vela SNR.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 3000 candidate supernova remnants (Millar+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, W. C.; White, G. L.; Filipovic, M. D.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of a study of observational and identification techniques used for surveys and spectroscopy of candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Sculptor Group galaxy NGC300. The goal of this study was to investigate the reliability of using [Sii]:H?>=0.4 in optical SNR surveys and spectra as an identifying feature of extra-galactic SNRs (egSNRs), and also to investigate the effectiveness of the observing techniques (which are hampered by seeing conditions and telescope pointing errors) using this criterion in egSNR surveys and spectrographs. This study is based on original observations of these objects and archival data obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope which contained images of some of the candidate SNRs in NGC300. We found that the reliability of spectral techniques may be questionable and very high-resolution images may be needed to confirm a valid identification of some egSNRs. (2 data files).

  12. Spitzer Observations of Dust Destruction in the Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli,; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging and spectral observations of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with the Spitzer Space Telescope confirm that its IR emission is dominated by the thermal continuum emission of swept-up interstellar dust which is collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas of the SNR. Line emission is too weak to affect the fluxes measured in broadband observations, and is poorly correlated with the IR or X-ray emission. Modeling of spectra from regions both in the SNR and in the associated ISM show that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of the ISM are destroyed within the SNR, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  13. UV Lightbulbs to Probe Supernova Remnants in the LMC and the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Smith, R. Chris

    2000-08-01

    We propose to use spectroscopy from the 1.5-m to identify background stars or QSOs which can serve as UV ``lightbulbs'' to probe the unshocked material in Galactic and LMC supernova remnants. Through previous imaging from the 0.9m, we have identified numerous candidate blue objects; we now need spectra to distinguish between likely background objects (O-B stars, QSOs, ...) and foreground ``contaminants'' such as white dwarfs. These observations will provide the basis for future UV spectra of these objects from HST. UV absorption studies can give us ``core samples'' through SNRs, as has been done for SN 1006 using the Schweizer-Middleditch star. For young SNRs this is one of very few ways to probe undecelerated ejecta. More generally, absorption studies provide information about the dynamics and ionization state of a significant constituent of the SNR: that portion which is not currently shocked.

  14. Application of a 3D, Adaptive, Parallel, MHD Code to Supernova Remnant Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominsky, P.; Drake, R. P.; Powell, K. G.

    2001-05-01

    We at Michigan have a computational model, BATS-R-US, which incorporates several modern features that make it suitable for calculations of supernova remnant evolution. In particular, it is a three-dimensional MHD model, using a method called the Multiscale Adaptive Upwind Scheme for MagnetoHydroDynamics (MAUS-MHD). It incorporates a data structure that allows for adaptive refinement of the mesh, even in massively parallel calculations. Its advanced Godunov method, a solution-adaptive, upwind, high-resolution scheme, incorporates a new, flux-based approach to the Riemann solver with improved numerical properties. This code has been successfully applied to several problems, including the simulation of comets and of planetary magnetospheres, in the 3D context of the Heliosphere. The code was developed under a NASA computational grand challenge grant to run very rapidly on parallel platforms. It is also now being used to study time-dependent systems such as the transport of particles and energy from solar coronal mass ejections to the Earth. We are in the process of modifying this code so that it can accommodate the very strong shocks present in supernova remnants. Our test case simulates the explosion of a star of 1.4 solar masses with an energy of 1 foe, in a uniform background medium. We have performed runs of 250,000 to 1 million cells on 8 nodes of an Origin 2000. These relatively coarse grids do not allow fine details of instabilities to become visible. Nevertheless, the macroscopic evolution of the shock is simulated well, with the forward and reverse shocks visible in velocity profiles. We will show our work to date. This work was supported by NASA through its GSRP program.

  15. The imprint of a symbiotic binary progenitor on the properties of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for the type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) of SN 1604, also known as Kepler's SNR. We find that its main features can be explained by a progenitor model of a symbiotic binary consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB donor star with an initial mass of 4-5 M?. The slow, nitrogen-rich wind emanating from the donor star has partially been accreted by the white dwarf, but has also created a circumstellar bubble. On the basis of observational evidence, we assume that the system moves with a velocity of 250 km s-1. Owing to the spatial velocity, the interaction between the wind and the interstellar medium has resulted in the formation of a bow shock, which can explain the presence of a one-sided, nitrogen-rich shell. We present two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of both the shell formation and the SNR evolution. The SNR simulations show good agreement with the observed kinematic and morphological properties of Kepler's SNR. In particular, the model reproduces the observed expansion parameters (m = V/(R/t)) of m ? 0.35 in the north and m ? 0.6 in the south of Kepler's SNR. We discuss the variations among our hydrodynamical simulations in light of the observations, and show that part of the blast wave may have completely traversed through the one-sided shell. The simulations suggest a distance to Kepler's SNR of 6 kpc, or otherwise imply that SN 1604 was a sub-energetic type Ia explosion. Finally, we discuss the possible implications of our model for type Ia supernovae and their remnants in general.

  16. SUBARU HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF STAR G IN THE TYCHO SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Yong, David; Asplund, M.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Frebel, Anna; Fesen, Robert A. E-mail: brian@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: anna@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2009-08-20

    It is widely believed that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) originate in binary systems where a white dwarf accretes material from a companion star until its mass approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and carbon is ignited in the white dwarf's core. This scenario predicts that the donor star should survive the supernova (SNe) explosion, providing an opportunity to understand the progenitors of SNe Ia. In this paper, we argue that rotation is a generic signature expected of most nongiant donor stars that is easily measurable. Ruiz-Lapuente et al. examined stars in the center of the remnant of SN 1572 (Tycho SN) and showed evidence that a subgiant star (Star G by their naming convention) near the remnant's center was the system's donor star. We present high-resolution (R {approx_equal} 40, 000) spectra taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph on Subaru of this candidate donor star and measure the star's radial velocity as 79 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} with respect to the local standard of rest and put an upper limit on the star's rotation of 7.5 km s{sup -1}. In addition, by comparing images that were taken in 1970 and 2004, we measure the proper motion of Star G to be {mu} {sub l} = -1.6 {+-} 2.1 mas yr{sup -1} and {mu} {sub b} = -2.7 {+-} 1.6 mas yr{sup -1}. We demonstrate that all of the measured properties of Star G presented in this paper are consistent with those of a star in the direction of Tycho SN that is not associated with the SN event. However, we discuss an unlikely, but still viable scenario for Star G to be the donor star, and suggest further observations that might be able to confirm or refute it.

  17. Electron heating, magnetic field amplification, and cosmic-ray precursor length at supernova remnant shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Laming, J. Martin; Hwang, Una; Ghavamian, Parviz; Rakowski, Cara E-mail: Una.Hwang-1@nasa.gov

    2014-07-20

    We investigate the observability, by direct and indirect means, of a shock precursor arising from magnetic field amplification by cosmic rays. We estimate the depth of such a precursor under conditions of nonresonant amplification, which can provide magnetic field strengths comparable to those inferred for supernova remnants. Magnetic field generation occurs as the streaming cosmic rays induce a plasma return current, and it may be quenched by either nonresonant or resonant channels. In the case of nonresonant saturation, the cosmic rays become magnetized and amplification saturates at higher magnetic fields. The precursor can extend out to 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} cm and is potentially detectable. If resonant saturation occurs, the cosmic rays are scattered by turbulence and the precursor length will likely be much smaller. The dependence of precursor length on shock velocity has implications for electron heating. In the case of resonant saturation, this dependence is similar to that in the more familiar resonantly generated shock precursor, which when expressed in terms of the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient kappav and shock velocity v{sub s} is kappav/v{sub s} . In the nonresonantly saturated case, the precursor length declines less quickly with increasing v{sub s} . Where precursor length proportional to 1/v{sub s} gives constant electron heating, this increased precursor length could be expected to lead to higher electron temperatures for nonresonant amplification. This should be expected at faster supernova remnant shocks than studied by previous works. Existing results and new data analysis of SN 1006 and Cas A suggest some observational support for this idea.

  18. DISCOVERY OF TeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G. E-mail: wakely@uchicago.edu

    2011-04-01

    We report the discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4, known as Tycho's SNR. Observations performed in the period 2008-2010 with the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory reveal weak emission coming from the direction of the remnant, compatible with a point source located at 00{sup h}25{sup m}27.{sup s}0, + 64{sup 0}10'50'' (J2000). The TeV photon spectrum measured by VERITAS can be described with a power law dN/dE = C(E/3.42 TeV){sup -}{Gamma} with {Gamma} = 1.95 {+-} 0.51{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub sys} and C = (1.55 {+-} 0.43{sub stat} {+-} 0.47{sub sys}) x 10{sup -14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1}. The integral flux above 1 TeV corresponds to {approx}0.9% of the steady Crab Nebula emission above the same energy, making it one of the weakest sources yet detected in TeV gamma rays. We present both leptonic and hadronic models that can describe the data. The lowest magnetic field allowed in these models is {approx}80 {mu}G, which may be interpreted as evidence for magnetic field amplification.

  19. Re-examination of the Expected Gamma-Ray Emission of Supernova Remnant SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.; Völk, H. J.

    2015-09-01

    A nonlinear kinetic theory, combining cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) with their gas dynamics, is used to re-examine the nonthermal properties of the remnant of SN 1987A for an extended evolutionary period of 5-50 year. This spherically symmetric model is approximately applied to the different features of the SNR, consisting of (i) a blue supergiant wind and bubble, and (ii) of the swept-up red supergiant (RSG) wind structures in the form of an H ii region, an equatorial ring (ER), and an hourglass region. The RSG wind involves a mass loss rate that decreases significantly with elevation above and below the equatorial plane. The model adapts recent three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Potter et al. in 2014 that use a significantlysmaller ionized mass of the ER than assumed in the earlier studies by the present authors. The SNR shock recently swept up the ER, which is the densest region in the immediate circumstellar environment. Therefore, the expected gamma-ray energy flux density at TeV energies in the current epoch has already reached its maximal value of ˜10-13 erg cm-2 s-1. This flux should decrease by a factor of about two over the next 10 years.

  20. Discovery of TeV Gamma-ray Emission from Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, J. P.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Senturk, G. Demet; Slane, P.; Smith, A. W.; Teši?, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2011-04-01

    We report the discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) G120.1+1.4, known as Tycho's SNR. Observations performed in the period 2008-2010 with the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory reveal weak emission coming from the direction of the remnant, compatible with a point source located at 00h25m27.s0, + 64°10'50'' (J2000). The TeV photon spectrum measured by VERITAS can be described with a power law dN/dE = C(E/3.42 TeV)-? with ? = 1.95 ± 0.51stat ± 0.30sys and C = (1.55 ± 0.43stat ± 0.47sys) × 10-14 cm-2 s-1 TeV-1. The integral flux above 1 TeV corresponds to ~0.9% of the steady Crab Nebula emission above the same energy, making it one of the weakest sources yet detected in TeV gamma rays. We present both leptonic and hadronic models that can describe the data. The lowest magnetic field allowed in these models is ~80 ?G, which may be interpreted as evidence for magnetic field amplification.

  1. A new look at the 'jet' in the CTB 37A/B supernova remnant complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Baum, Stefi A.

    1991-01-01

    Very Large Array observations of the unusual southern Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) complex near l = 348 deg, b = 0 deg at wavelengths of 6, 20, and 90 cm are presented. Derived continuum spectra and observed morphologies indicate that G348.5 + 0.1 (CTB 37A) does not have a 'jet' as reported by previous observers but is instead superposed on a second, previously unidentified SNR lying along the line of sight. This new SNR is designated G348.5 - 0.0 according to the usual convention. Other observers have also noted a faint, flat spectrum bridge of emission possibly connecting the G348.5 + 0.1/G348.5 - 0.0 superposition with a third nearby remnant G348.7 + 0.3 (CTB 37B). However, a connection appears unlikely, and it is suggested that the 'bridge' merely consists of faint emission which has 'leaked' from the southeastern side of G348.7 + 0.3 and has no relation to the G348.5 + 0.1/G348.5 - 0.0 superposition. These new data also reveal a remarkable region of 'blown-out' emission from the southwestern part of G348.5 + 0.1 which most likely reflects the presence of large-scale density inhomogeneities in the interstellar medium into which the SNR shell is expanding.

  2. Fermi-LAT and WMAP Observations of the Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, J. W.; Grondin, M.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Reposeur, T.; Ballet, J.; Tanaka, T.

    2012-11-01

    We report the detection of GeV ?-ray emission from the supernova remnant (SNR) Puppis A with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Puppis A is among the faintest SNRs yet detected at GeV energies, with a luminosity of only 2.7 × 1034 (D/2.2 kpc)2 erg s-1 between 1 and 100 GeV. The ?-ray emission from the remnant is spatially extended, with a morphology matching that of the radio and X-ray emission, and is well described by a simple power law with an index of 2.1. We attempt to model the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED), from radio to ?-rays, using standard nonthermal emission mechanisms. To constrain the relativistic electron population we use 7 years of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data to extend the radio spectrum up to 93 GHz. Both leptonic- and hadronic-dominated models can reproduce the nonthermal SED, requiring a total content of cosmic-ray electrons and protons accelerated in Puppis A of at least W CR ? (1-5) × 1049 erg.

  3. 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of the Galactic Supernova Remnant CTB 109

    E-print Network

    Bolte, Jan; Breitschwerdt, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Using detailed 3D hydrodynamic simulations we study the nature of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) CTB 109 (G109.1-1.0), which is well-known for its semicircular shape and a bright diffuse X-ray emission feature inside the SNR. Our model has been designed to explain the observed morphology, with a special emphasis on the bright emission feature inside the SNR. Moreover, we determine the age of the remnant and compare our findings with X-ray observations. With CTB 109 we test a new method of detailed numerical simulations of diffuse young objects, using realistic initial conditions derived directly from observations. We performed numerical 3D simulations with the RAMSES code. The initial density structure has been directly taken from $^{12}$CO emission data, adding an additional dense cloud, which, when it is shocked, causes the bright emission feature. From parameter studies we obtained the position $(\\ell , b)=(109.1545^\\circ , -1.0078^\\circ)$ for an elliptical cloud with $n_\\text{cloud}=25~\\text{cm}^{-3...

  4. Possible detection of the stellar donor or remnant for the type Iax supernova 2008ha

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bildsten, Lars; Fong, Wen-fai; Narayan, Gautham; Rest, Armin; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.

    2014-09-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are thermonuclear explosions that are related to SNe Ia, but are physically distinct. The most important differences are that SNe Iax have significantly lower luminosity (1%-50% that of typical SNe Ia), lower ejecta mass (?0.1-0.5 M {sub ?}), and may leave a bound remnant. The most extreme SN Iax is SN 2008ha, which peaked at M{sub V} = –14.2 mag, about 5 mag below that of typical SNe Ia. Here, we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of UGC 12682, the host galaxy of SN 2008ha, taken 4.1 yr after the peak brightness of SN 2008ha. In these deep, high-resolution images, we detect a source coincident (0.86 HST pixels; 0.''043; 1.1?) with the position of SN 2008ha with M {sub F814W} = –5.4 mag. We determine that this source is unlikely to be a chance coincidence, but that scenario cannot be completely ruled out. If this source is directly related to SN 2008ha, it is either the luminous bound remnant of the progenitor white dwarf (WD) or its companion star. The source is consistent with being an evolved >3 M {sub ?} initial mass star, and is significantly redder than the SN Iax 2012Z progenitor system, the first detected progenitor system for a thermonuclear SN. If this source is the companion star for SN 2008ha, there is a diversity in SN Iax progenitor systems, perhaps related to the diversity in SN Iax explosions. If the source is the bound remnant of the WD, it must have expanded significantly. Regardless of the nature of this source, we constrain the progenitor system of SN 2008ha to have an age of <80 Myr.

  5. Spitzer IRS observations of the XA region in the cygnus loop supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Bautista, Manuel; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-20

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 ?m wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s{sup –1} shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s{sup –1} that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position.

  6. ISOCAM spectro-imaging of the H2 rotational lines in the supernova remnant IC443

    E-print Network

    D. Cesarsky; P. Cox; G. Pineau des Forets; E. F. van Dishoeck; F. Boulanger; C. M. Wright

    1999-06-24

    We report spectro-imaging observations of the bright western ridge of the supernova remnant IC 443 obtained with the ISOCAM circular variable filter (CVF) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This ridge corresponds to a location where the interaction between the blast wave of the supernova and ambient molecular gas is amongst the strongest. The CVF data show that the 5 to 14 micron spectrum is dominated by the pure rotational lines of molecular hydrogen (v = 0--0, S(2) to S(8) transitions). At all positions along the ridge, the H2 rotational lines are very strong with typical line fluxes of 10^{-4} to 10^{-3} erg/sec/cm2/sr. We compare the data to a new time-dependent shock model; the rotational line fluxes in IC 443 are reproduced within factors of 2 for evolutionary times between 1,000 and 2,000 years with a shock velocity of 30 km/sec and a pre-shock density of 10^4 /cm3.

  7. Supernova Remnants Interacting with Molecular Clouds: X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick; Bykov, Andrei; Ellison, Donald C.; Dubner, Gloria; Castro, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The giant molecular clouds (MCs) found in the Milky Way and similar galaxies play a crucial role in the evolution of these systems. The supernova explosions that mark the death of massive stars in these regions often lead to interactions between the supernova remnants (SNRs) and the clouds. These interactions have a profound effect on our understanding of SNRs. Shocks in SNRs should be capable of accelerating particles to cosmic ray (CR) energies with efficiencies high enough to power Galactic CRs. X-ray and ?-ray studies have established the presence of relativistic electrons and protons in some SNRs and provided strong evidence for diffusive shock acceleration as the primary acceleration mechanism, including strongly amplified magnetic fields, temperature and ionization effects on the shock-heated plasmas, and modifications to the dynamical evolution of some systems. Because protons dominate the overall energetics of the CRs, it is crucial to understand this hadronic component even though electrons are much more efficient radiators and it can be difficult to identify the hadronic component. However, near MCs the densities are sufficiently high to allow the ?-ray emission to be dominated by protons. Thus, these interaction sites provide some of our best opportunities to constrain the overall energetics of these particle accelerators. Here we summarize some key properties of interactions between SNRs and MCs, with an emphasis on recent X-ray and ?-ray studies that are providing important constraints on our understanding of cosmic rays in our Galaxy.

  8. Dust and Molecule Formation and Processing in Supernovae and their Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Andersen, M.; Tappe, A.; Gomez, H.; Smith, M.; Bernard, J. P.; Onaka, T.; Cami, J.

    2015-03-01

    Supernovae (SNe) produce, fragment and destroy dust, molecules and nucleosynthetic elements, and reshape and modify the ISM. I will review recent infrared observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) and SNe which show that SNe are important sites of dust and molecule formation and are major dust creators in the Universe. Detection of carbon monoxide (CO) fundamental band from the young SNR Cas A indicates that astrochemical processes in SNRs interacting with molecular clouds provide astrophysical laboratories to study evolution of the ISM returning material from dense clouds into the more diffuse medium and galactic halo. Two dozen SNRs are known to be interacting with molecular clouds using H2 and millimeter observations. Recent Spitzer, Herschel and SOFIA observations along with ground-based observations have greatly advanced our understanding shock processing and astrochemistry of dust, H2, high J CO, and other neutral and ionized molecules and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Ionized molecules and warm layer of molecules that are excited by UV radiation, X-rays, or cosmic rays will be described. Finally I will discuss how astrochemical processes of dust and molecules in SNRs impact the large scale structures in the ISM.

  9. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF DUST DESTRUCTION IN THE PUPPIS A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Blair, William P.; Hwang, Una; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Petre, Robert; Rho, Jeonghee; Winkler, P. Frank

    2010-12-10

    The interaction of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with a neighboring molecular cloud provides a unique opportunity to measure the amount of grain destruction in an SNR shock. Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS imaging of the entire SNR at 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m shows an extremely good correlation with X-ray emission, indicating that the SNR's IR radiation is dominated by the thermal emission of swept-up interstellar dust, collisionally heated by the hot shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectral observations targeted both the Bright Eastern Knot (BEK) of the SNR where a small cloud has been engulfed by the supernova blast wave and outlying portions of the associated molecular cloud that are yet to be hit by the shock front. Modeling the spectra from both regions reveals the composition and the grain size distribution of the interstellar dust, both in front of and behind the SNR shock front. The comparison shows that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the interstellar medium are destroyed within the BEK, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  10. CONSTRAINING EXPLOSION TYPE OF YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING 24 {mu}m EMISSION MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Charee L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Lopez, Laura A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2013-07-10

    Determination of the explosion type of supernova remnants (SNRs) can be challenging, as SNRs are hundreds to thousands of years old and supernovae are classified based on spectral properties days after explosion. Previous studies of thermal X-ray emission from Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs have shown that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs have statistically different symmetries, and thus these sources can be typed based on their X-ray morphologies. In this Letter, we extend the same technique, a multipole expansion technique using power ratios, to infrared (IR) images of SNRs to test whether they can be typed using the symmetry of their warm dust emission as well. We analyzed archival Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer 24 {mu}m observations of the previously used X-ray sample, and we find that the two classes of SNRs separate according to their IR morphologies. The Type Ia SNRs are statistically more circular and mirror symmetric than the CC SNRs, likely due to the different circumstellar environments and explosion geometries of the progenitors. Broadly, our work indicates that the IR emission retains information of the explosive origins of the SNR and offers a new method to type SNRs based on IR morphology.

  11. Changes in the optical remnant of Kepler's supernova during the period 1942-1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bandiera, R.; Van den bergh, S. Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria )

    1991-06-01

    Images of the optical nebulosity associated with Kepler's supernova have been obtained at the Mount Wilson Observatory in 1941-1943, at the Palomar Observatory in 1950-1983, and on La Silla in 1989. These data have been used to study the luminosity evolution of individual knots and the expansion and translation of the optical remnant of Kepler's supernova of 1604. From the study of the motions of 50 long-lived knots, expansion is {minus}0.623 + or {minus} 0.045 arcsec/century, translation is 0.484 + or {minus} 0.049 arcsec/century, and expansion time scale of 32,000 + or {minus} 12,000 yr. For an assumed distance of 4.5 kpc the centroid of the nebulosity tangential velocity is 117 + or {minus} 10 km/s to the W and 105 + or {minus} 11 km/s to the N. By combining astrometric and spectroscopic information, a space velocity of 278 + or {minus} 12 km/s is estimated. This indicates that the progenitor of SN 1604 was a high-velocity object. It could have been either a Population II star or a massive high-velocity runaway star. 30 refs.

  12. MOLECULAR CLOUDS AS A PROBE OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION IN A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Tanaka, Shuta J.; Takahara, Fumio

    2009-12-20

    We study cosmic-ray acceleration in a supernova remnant (SNR) and the escape from it. We model nonthermal particle and photon spectra for the hidden SNR in the open cluster Westerlund 2, and the old-age mixed-morphology SNR W 28. We assume that the SNR shock propagates in a low-density cavity, which is created and heated through the activities of the progenitor stars and/or previous supernova explosions. We indicate that the diffusion coefficient for cosmic rays around the SNRs is less than approx1% of that away from them. We compare our predictions with the gamma-ray spectra of molecular clouds illuminated by the cosmic rays (Fermi and H.E.S.S.). We found that the spectral indices of the particles are approx2.3. This may be because the particles were accelerated at the end of the Sedov phase, and because energy-dependent escape and propagation of particles did not much affect the spectrum.

  13. Protrusions Beyond the Blast Waves of Young Type Ia Supernova Remnants: Hydrodynamic Instabilities or Ejecta Bullets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Ashton; Blondin, J. M.; Reynolds, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution imaging of two young Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs), Tycho and SN 1006, has revealed several morphological features which have resisted explanation with numerical simulations. One such feature is the presence of shocked ejecta blobs protruding beyond the mean forward shock radius. Two current theories explain the presence of such ejecta: highly dense ejecta shrapnel produced in the explosion penetrating the forward shock, or plumes generated by hydrodynamic instabilities long after the initial explosion. We investigate the shrapnel theory through hydrodynamic simulations in 2D and 3D of the evolution of dense ejecta clumps embedded in an exponential density profile, appropriate for Type Ia supernovae. We use high-resolution 2D simulations to identify relevant clump parameters which we investigate further in 3D. In contradiction to some former work, we find that sufficiently resolved clumps in 2D models shatter upon collision with the forward shock, yielding new protrusion features. In both 2D and 3D, shrapnel is capable of penetrating the forward shock, but the resultant protrusions in 3D simulations vary significantly from those in similar 2D runs, implying 2D simulations may not be an accurate method of investigating the shrapnel theory. We compare the our simulations with Chandra observations of projections seen in Tycho and SN 1006. This work was performed as part of NC State University's Undergraduate Research in Computational Astrophysics (URCA) program, an REU program supported by the National Science Foundation through award AST-1032736.

  14. THE MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF JET-DRIVEN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: THE CASE OF W49B

    SciTech Connect

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-02-01

    The circumstellar medium (CSM) of a massive star is modified by its winds before a supernova (SN) explosion occurs, and thus the evolution of the resulting supernova remnant (SNR) is influenced by both the geometry of the explosion as well as the complex structure of the CSM. Motivated by recent work suggesting the SNR W49B was a jet-driven SN expanding in a complex CSM, we explore how the dynamics and the metal distributions in a jet-driven explosion are modified by the interaction with the surrounding environment. In particular, we perform hydrodynamical calculations to study the dynamics and explosive nucleosynthesis of a jet-driven SN triggered by the collapse of a 25 M {sub ?} Wolf-Rayet star and its subsequent interaction with the CSM up to several hundred years following the explosion. We find that although the CSM has small-scale effects on the structure of the SNR, the overall morphology and abundance patterns are reflective of the initial asymmetry of the SN explosion. Thus, we predict that jet-driven SNRs, such as W49B, should be identifiable based on morphology and abundance patterns at ages up to several hundred years, even if they expand into a complex CSM environment.

  15. AKARI and BLAST Observations of the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant and Surrounding Interstellar Medium

    E-print Network

    Sibthorpe, B; Bock, J J; Chapin, E L; Devlin, M J; Dicker, S; Griffin, M; Gundersen, J O; Halpern, M; Hargrave, P C; Hughes, D H; Jeong, W -S; Kaneda, H; Klein, J; Koo, B -C; Lee, H -G; Marsden, G; Martin, P G; Mauskopf, P; Moon, D -S; Netterfield, C B; Olmi, L; Pascale, E; Patanchon, G; Rex, M; Roy, A; Scott, D; Semisch, C; Truch, M D P; Tucker, C; Tucker, G S; Viero, M P; Wiebe, D V

    2009-01-01

    We use new large area far infrared maps ranging from 65 - 500 microns obtained with the AKARI and the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) missions to characterize the dust emission toward the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (SNR). Using the AKARI high resolution data we find a new "cool" dust grain population at a temperature of ~35 K and with an estimated mass of 0.06 solar masses. We conclude that this alone is sufficient to account for the lower limit on the dust masses seen in high-redshift galaxies and, when combined with the previously reported hot and cold dust masses, makes supernovae a plausible source of the high redshift dust. We fit our maps at 65, 90, 140, 250, 350, and 500 microns to obtain maps of the column density and temperature of cold dust (near 16 K) distributed throughout the region. The large column density of cold dust associated with clouds seen in molecular emission extends continuously from the surrounding interstellar medium to project on the SNR, where the ...

  16. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON PROCESSING IN THE BLAST WAVE OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT N132D

    SciTech Connect

    Tappe, A.; Rho, J.; Micelotta, E. R.

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph 14-36 {mu}m mapping observations of the supernova remnant N132D in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study focuses on the processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that we previously identified in the southern blast wave. The mid-infrared spectra show strong continuum emission from shock-heated dust and a unique, nearly featureless plateau in the 15-20 {mu}m region, which we attribute to PAH molecules. The typical PAH emission bands observed in the surrounding interstellar medium ahead of the blast wave disappear, which indicates shock processing of PAH molecules. The PAH plateau appears most strongly at the outer edge of the blast wave and coincides with diffuse X-ray emission that precedes the brightest X-ray and optical filaments. This suggests that PAH molecules in the surrounding medium are swept up and processed in the hot gas of the blast wave shock, where they survive the harsh conditions long enough to be detected. We also observe a broad emission feature at 20 {mu}m appearing with the PAH plateau. We speculate that this feature is either due to FeO dust grains or connected to the processing of PAHs in the supernova blast wave shock.

  17. Discovery of Recombining Plasma in the Supernova Remnant 3C 391

    E-print Network

    Sato, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Odaka, Hirokazu; Nakashima, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Recent X-ray study of middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) reveals strong radiative recombination continua (RRCs) associated with overionized plasmas, of which the origin still remains uncertain. We report our discovery of an RRC in the middle-aged SNR 3C 391. If the X-ray spectrum is fitted with a two-temperature plasma model in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), residuals of Si XIV Ly alpha line at 2.006 keV, S XVI Ly alpha line at 2.623 keV and the edge of RRC of Si XIII at 2.666 keV are found. The X-ray spectrum is better described by a composite model consisting of a CIE plasma and a recombining plasma (RP). The abundance pattern suggests that the RP is associated to the ejecta from a core-collapse supernova with a progenitor star of 15 solar mass. There is no significant difference of the recombining plasma parameters between the southeast region and the northwest region surrounded by dense molecular clouds. We also find a hint of Fe I K alpha line at 6.4 keV (~2.4 sigma detection) from the sout...

  18. Spitzer Observations of Dust Destruction in the Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dweek, Eli; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hwang, Una; Long, Knox X.; Petre, Robert; Rho, Jeonghee; Winkler, P. Frank

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the Puppis A supernova remnant (SNR) with a neighboring molecular cloud provides a unique opportunity to measure the amount of grain destruction in an SNR shock. Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS imaging of the entire SNR at 24, 70, and 160 micrometers shows an extremely good correlation with X-ray emission, indicating that the SNR's IR radiation is dominated by the thermal emission of swept-up interstellar dust, collisionally heated by the hot shocked gas. Spitzer IRS spectral observations targeted both the Bright Eastern Knot (BEK) of the SNR where a small cloud has been engulfed by the supernova blast wave and outlying portions of the associated molecular cloud that are yet to be hit by the shock front. Modeling the spectra from both regions reveals the composition and the grain size distribution of the interstellar dust, both in front of and behind the SNR shock front. The comparison shows that the ubiquitous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the interstellar medium are destroyed within the BEK, along with nearly 25% of the mass of graphite and silicate dust grains.

  19. A Study of the Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission of Shell-Type Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Glenn E.

    2002-01-01

    The term of the second year of the award is the period from March 15, 2001 to March 14, 2002. As was the specified goal of the second year, we analyzed the spatial and spectral X-ray data for several young supernova remnants. I published a paper about an analysis of the ROSAT, ASCA, and RXTE data for the supernova remnant SN 1006. A copy of this paper is enclosed. As described in the paper, we believe that we accurately modeled the nonthermal X-ray emission from the remnant. The results of this analysis are used to infer properties about the cosmic rays accelerated in the remnant and to argue that the strength of the magnetic field in the remnant is considerably larger than the value of about 10 micro G reported elsewhere. The results were presented at the August 2001 International Cosmic Ray Conference in Hamburg, German),. I began analyzing new Chandra X-ray data for SN 1006. This analysis will yield the first measure of the strength of the magnetic field in the remnant for the first time. Preliminary results support our previous conclusion that the magnetic field strength in the remnant is much larger than 10 micro G. The field strength seems to be about the strength expected based on an equipartition calculation. The result supports recent models that describe the how the shock structure is influenced by the efficient acceleration of cosmic rays. This work will be presented at the April 2002 High Energy Astrophysics Division meeting in Albuquerque and published this summer. A copy of the abstract for the talk is enclosed. I began studying new Chandra X-ray data for the supernova remnant Cas A. The results of this work show that the forward shock is a region where cosmic-ray electrons are accelerated, which is consistent with theoretical expectations. The work was presented at the September 2001 Two Years of Science with Chandra symposium in Washington, DC. A copy of the poster paper is enclosed. Dr. Thomas Pannuti, whose research work is supported by the award, analyzed ROSAT, ASCA, and RXTE data for the supernova remnant G347.3-0.5. The results show for the first time that thermal X-ray emission is produced in the remnant. As expected, the thermal emission is consistent with a model in which the remnant is expanding into a very low density environment. The results also provide an accurate description of the nonthermal emission from the remnant. Dr. Pannuti presented this work at several conferences. A copy of the paper for the proceedings of the August 2001 Neutron Stars in Supernova Remnants symposium in enclosed. The work will be submitted to the Astrophysical Journal in the next few months.

  20. Detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars through blind frequency searches using the Fermi LAT.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Gwon, C; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Primack, J R; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emitting radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although there are more than 1800 known radio pulsars, until recently only seven were observed to pulse in gamma rays, and these were all discovered at other wavelengths. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) makes it possible to pinpoint neutron stars through their gamma-ray pulsations. We report the detection of 16 gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT. Most of these pulsars are coincident with previously unidentified gamma-ray sources, and many are associated with supernova remnants. Direct detection of gamma-ray pulsars enables studies of emission mechanisms, population statistics, and the energetics of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants. PMID:19574346

  1. Discovery of a pre-existing molecular filament associated with supernova remnant G127.1+0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

    2014-08-20

    We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s{sup –1} consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

  2. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    E-print Network

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K alpha triplets of He-like N, O, and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  3. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shinya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K(alpha) triplets of He-like N, O , and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  4. Multifrequency studies of bright radio supernova remnants. 2: W49B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, David A.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    We report radio observations of the supernova remnant W49B using the Very Large Array (VLA) of the NRAO at 90, 20, and 6 cm. This work continues the study of the properties of young, bright supernova remnants (SNRs) begun with 3C 391 (Moffett & Reynolds 1994). Here we present high-resolution images of total intensity, polarization, and spectral index of W49B. In large-scale morphology it is basically a box-shaped remnant expanding into an apparently inhomogeneous medium, but we also find small-scale structures, arcs and filaments, which lie interior to the outer shell in projection. The actual spatial position of the filaments is unknown, though we suspect that they are in the remnant interior rather than on the front or back face of the blast wave. In addition, their distribution in two dimensions suggests the projection of a helical structure. The shell edge, sharply rising in brightness for at least 3/4 of its circumference, still remains unresolved at our highest resolution (4 sec). This for our assumed distance of 8 kpc, the width of the region in which the emission appears is less than 0.16 pc, indicating short mean free paths for shock-accelerated electrons and high levels of MHD turbulence presumably causing the scattering. We find no polarized flux at 90 or 20 cm, with 3 sigma upper limits in polarized intensity of 36 mJy at 90 cm (45 sec resolution) and 7.2 mJy at 20 cm (5 sec resolution), or 22 micro-Jy/sq arcsec and 370 micro-jy/sq arcsec, respectively, for any emission extended on those scales. Polarized flux is present at 6 cm, but at a very low mean polarized fraction (total polarized flux divided by total flux) of 0.44% +/- 0.06%, which, as for 3C 391, is much lower than typical for bright SNRs at this frequency. The morphology in polarized intensity is poorly correlated with that in total intensity. We see excursions in the polarized fraction up to at least 10% in a few locations, but even where polarization is seen, typical levels are a few percent. Tangled or disordered magnetic fields in the emitting region of the radio shell may be responsible for depolarizing the radio synchrotron radiation, but some form of internal Faraday depolarization may also occur. We estimate the foreground Faraday rotation measure to be about -450 rad/sq m, similar to that found for 3C 391, which is also the Galactic plane and just about as distant. Spectral index images created from the total intensity images show that the spectral index across W49B is constant to within about Delta alpha approximately 0.1 in bright regions. This result weakly supports a common origin of the radio-emitting electrons, as in the blast wave, rather than in inhomogeneous turbulent regions of differing properties due to the stochastic (second-order Fermi) acceleration process. Variations at the level of Delta alpha approximately 0.1 are seen, but their significance is doubtful. New observations at 90 cm, using experimental three-dimensional imaging technology, may improve on this limit.

  5. A New $?-D$ Relation and Its Application to the Galactic Supernova Remnant Distribution

    E-print Network

    Gary L. Case; Dipen Bhattacharya

    1998-07-15

    Technological advances in radio telescopes and X-ray instruments over the last 20 years have greatly increased the number of known supernova remnants (SNRs) and led to a better determination of their properties. In particular, more SNRs now have reasonably determined distances. However, many of these distances were determined kinematically using old rotation curves (based on $R_{\\sun} = 10$ kpc and $V_{\\sun} = 250$ km/s). A more modern rotation curve (based on $R_{\\sun} = 8.5$ kpc and $V_{\\sun} = 220$ km/s) is used to verify or recalculate the distances to these remnants. We use a sample of 36 shell SNRs (37 including Cas A) with known distances to derive a new radio surface brightness-to-diameter ($\\Sigma-D$) relation. The slopes derived here ($\\beta = -2.64$ including Cas A, $\\beta = -2.38$ without Cas A) are significantly flatter than those derived in previous studies. An independent test of the accuracy of the $\\Sigma-D$ relation was performed by using the extragalactic SNRs in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The limitations of the $\\Sigma-D$ relation and the assumptions necessary for its use are discussed. A revised Galactic distribution of SNRs is presented based on the revised distances as well as those calculated from this $\\Sigma-D$ relation. A scaling method is employed to compensate for observational selection effects by computing scale factors based on individual telescope survey sensitivities, angular resolutions and sky coverage. The radial distribution of the surface density of shell SNRs, corrected for selection effects, is presented and compared to previous works.

  6. The abundances of major elements in Cas A and Tycho supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program was to map the abundances of major elements such as O, Si, S, and Fe in the supernova remnants, Tycho and Cas A. The approach was based upon using archival cosmic X-ray data from several space missions, notably, the Einstein Observatory, EXOSAT, ROSAT, BBSRT, and ASCA. Two of the missions, Einstein and ROSAT, had high resolution telescopes that provided excellent images, but no spectral information. Two missions with much poorer resolution telescopes, BBXRT and ASCA, gave good spectral information through pulse height of signals in their cooled solid state detector, but rather crude spatial information. Our goal was to extract spectral information from the combined analysis of the Einstein and ROSAT images of Cas A and Tycho and to verify or refine the spectral map by checking its agreement with the BBSRT or ASCA spectra results for larger regions. In particular, we note that the Einstein and ROSAT telescopes have different spectral responses. The Einstein bandwidth includes the 2-4 keV region which is absent from ROSAT. Hence, by forming linear combinations of the Einstein and ROSAT images, we are able to resolve the contributions of the 0.5-2 keV band from the 2-4 keV band. The former contains lines of O and Fe while the latter is dominated by Si and S. We correct for the expansion that has taken place in the remnants during the ten-year interval between the Einstein and ROSAT measurements, but we must assume that no significant spectral changes have occurred during that time. The analysis of the Tycho SNR was completed and the results have been published. A copy of the paper is included. The analysis of Cas A has proved to be more complicated. It is continuing with support from another program. Part of the problem may be due to difficulties in the aspect information which is needed to precisely register the ROSAT and Einstein images.

  7. THE MAGELLAN/IMACS CATALOG OF OPTICAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT CANDIDATES IN M83

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S. E-mail: winkler@middlebury.edu

    2012-11-15

    We present a new optical imaging survey of supernova remnants (SNRs) in M83, using data obtained with the Magellan I 6.5 m telescope and IMACS instrument under conditions of excellent seeing. Using the criterion of strong [S II] emission relative to H{alpha}, we confirm all but three of the 71 SNR candidates listed in our previous survey, and expand the SNR candidate list to 225 objects, more than tripling the earlier sample. Comparing the optical survey with a new deep X-ray survey of M83 with Chandra, we find that 61 of these SNR candidates have X-ray counterparts. We also identify an additional list of 46 [O III]-selected nebulae for follow-up as potential ejecta-dominated remnants, seven of which have associated X-ray emission that makes them strong candidates. Some of the other [O III]-bright objects could also be normal interstellar medium (ISM) dominated SNRs with shocks fast enough to doubly ionize oxygen, but with H{alpha} and [S II] emission faint enough to have been missed. A few of these objects may also be H II regions with abnormally high [O III] emission compared with the majority of M83 H II regions, compact nebulae excited by young Wolf-Rayet stars, or even background active galactic nuclei. The SNR H{alpha} luminosity function in M83 is shifted by a factor of {approx}4.5 times higher than for M33 SNRs, indicative of a higher mean ISM density in M83. We describe the search technique used to identify the SNR candidates and provide basic information and finder charts for the objects.

  8. NONUNIFORM EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr{sup –1} to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr{sup –1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr{sup –1}. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  9. Searching for Planets Around Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Did you know that the very first exoplanets ever confirmed were found around a pulsar? The precise timing measurements of pulsar PSR 1257+12 were what made the discovery of its planetary companions possible. Yet surprisingly, though weve discovered thousands of exoplanets since then, only one other planet has ever been confirmed around a pulsar. Now, a team of CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science researchers are trying to figure out why.Formation ChallengesThe lack of detected pulsar planets may simply reflect the fact that getting a pulsar-planet system is challenging! There are three main pathways:The planet formed before the host star became a pulsar which means it somehow survived its star going supernova (yikes!).The planet formed elsewhere and was captured by the pulsar.The planet formed out of the debris of the supernova explosion.The first two options, if even possible, are likely to be rare occurrences but the third option shows some promise. In this scenario, after the supernova explosion, a small fraction of the material falls back toward the stellar remnant and is recaptured, forming what is known as a supernova fallback disk. According to this model, planets could potentially form out of this disk.Disk ImplicationsLed by Matthew Kerr, the CSIRO astronomers set out to systematically look for these potential planets that might have formed in situ around pulsars. They searched a sample of 151 young, energetic pulsars, scouring seven years of pulse time-of-arrival data for periodic variation that could signal the presence of planetary companions. Their methods to mitigate pulsar timing noise and model realistic orbits allowed them to have good sensitivity to low-mass planets.The results? They found no conclusive evidence that any of these pulsars have planets.This outcome carries with it some significant implications. The pulsar sample spans 2 Myr in age, in which planets should have had enough time to form in debris disks. The fact that none were detected suggests that long-lived supernova fallback disks may actually be much rarer than thought, or they exist only in conditions that arent compatible with planet formation.So if thats the case, what about the planets found around PSR 1257+12? This pulsar may actually be somewhat unique, in that it was born with an unusually weak magnetic field. This birth defect might have allowed it to form a fallback disk and, subsequently, planets where the sample of energetic pulsars studied here could not.CitationM. Kerr et al.2015 ApJ 809 L11 doi:10.1088/2041-8205/809/1/L11

  10. Searching for Planets Around Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    Did you know that the very first exoplanets ever confirmed were found around a pulsar? The precise timing measurements of pulsar PSR 1257+12 were what made the discovery of its planetary companions possible. Yet surprisingly, though weve discovered thousands of exoplanets since then, only one other planet has ever been confirmed around a pulsar. Now, a team of CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science researchers are trying to figure out why.Formation ChallengesThe lack of detected pulsar planets may simply reflect the fact that getting a pulsar-planet system is challenging! There are three main pathways:The planet formed before the host star became a pulsar which means it somehow survived its star going supernova (yikes!).The planet formed elsewhere and was captured by the pulsar.The planet formed out of the debris of the supernova explosion.The first two options, if even possible, are likely to be rare occurrences but the third option shows some promise. In this scenario, after the supernova explosion, a small fraction of the material falls back toward the stellar remnant and is recaptured, forming what is known as a supernova fallback disk. According to this model, planets could potentially form out of this disk.Disk ImplicationsLed by Matthew Kerr, the CSIRO astronomers set out to systematically look for these potential planets that might have formed in situ around pulsars. They searched a sample of 151 young, energetic pulsars, scouring seven years of pulse time-of-arrival data for periodic variation that could signal the presence of planetary companions. Their methods to mitigate pulsar timing noise and model realistic orbits allowed them to have good sensitivity to low-mass planets.The results? They found no conclusive evidence that any of these pulsars have planets.This outcome carries with it some significant implications. The pulsar sample spans 2 Myr in age, in which planets should have had enough time to form in debris disks. The fact that none were detected suggests that long-lived supernova fallback disks may actually be much rarer than thought, or they exist only in conditions that arent compatible with planet formation.So if thats the case, what about the planets found around PSR 1257+12? This pulsar may actually be somewhat unique, in that it was born with an unusually weak magnetic field. This birth defect might have allowed it to form a fallback disk and, subsequently, planets where the sample of energetic pulsars studied here could not.CitationM. Kerr et al.2015 ApJ 809 L11 doi:10.1088/2041-8205/809/1/L11

  11. The supernova remnant W50: understanding the magnetic fields in a unique outflow-driven object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnes, J. S.; Gaensler, B. M.

    We present new radio observations of the nebula W50 (G39.7-2.0), using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Our understanding of this enigmatic object has previously been hindered by the large angular extent of the nebulae (2x1 degrees), with the Western edge dipping into the Galactic plane. Such large objects are typically poorly studied due to the considerable number of separate pointings required for full imaging. The nebula is also entirely unique in that it appears to be interacting with the central compact source and first known Galactic microquasar, SS433. Our mosaiced, spectropolarimetric ATCA observations of this field are centred at 2.1 GHz, using a large bandwidth of 2 GHz. This allows us to measure the polarised fraction, rotation measure, depolarisation, and spectral index of W50's emission, and to detect diffuse linearly polarised emission which 'lights up' the large-scale ordered magnetic fields in the object. The challenge of processing such wide-field, wide-band, spectropolarimetric observations is a significant technical issue that is currently being faced by the upcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinders and will be faced by the SKA itself. We therefore analyse the data using techniques that are fundamental to understanding cosmic magnetism - such as Rotation Measure Synthesis - and that allow us to probe Faraday rotation along the line of sight towards W50. Through these methods it is possible to distinguish between magnetic effects arising in the nebula itself, and those arising along the line of sight in intervening Faraday screens. While W50 is typically considered to be a supernova remnant, the contribution from the initial explosion that presumably preceded formation of the compact object SS433, has not previously been convincingly distinguished from the impact of the jet and wind activity of the central system. We shall discuss how we are able to put constraints on the formation of the object through our discovery of a 'ring' of ordered magnetic fields that surrounds SS433 - consistent with field compression from a shock wave, and evidence in favour of the supernova remnant hypothesis.

  12. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Green, David; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert

    2014-08-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), about 100 yr old from global expansion measurements, and most likely the result of an asymmetric Type Ia supernova explosion. We smoothed a Chandra image from a 1 Ms observation in 2011 and fit the resulting model to unsmoothed images from 2007 and 2009, allowing for expansion and image shifts. The measured expansion rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, increasing inward by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis, from 0.52% +- 0.03% per yr to 0.84% +- 0.06% per yr. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9 +0.3, and implying a significant (deceleration parameter m < 0.6) deceleration of the blast wave. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux, strongly dominated by synchrotron emission, increases at a rate of 1.9% +- 0.7% per year, in agreement with previous measurements. G1.9+0.3 is the only Galactic SNR brightening at X-ray and radio wavelengths. We identify the inner rims with the reverse shock and more slowly-expanding rims farther out with the blast wave. The large spread in expansion ages between the reverse shock and the blast wave requires abrupt density gradients in either the ejecta or the ambient medium, to suddenly decelerate the reverse shock or the blast wave. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest (factor of several) density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as found at a wind termination shock, implying a strong presupernova wind from the progenitor system. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered a larger (factor of 10 or more) density discontinuity within the SN ejecta, such as found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia SN models. Through 1D hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. The presence of strong density gradients in the outer ejecta of Type Ia SNe has significant implications for the interpretation of their early-time spectra and for understanding how white dwarfs explode.

  13. An absence of ex-companion stars in the type Ia supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    A type Ia supernova is thought to begin with the explosion of a white dwarf star. The explosion could be triggered by the merger of two white dwarfs (a `double-degenerate' origin), or by mass transfer from a companion star (the `single-degenerate' path). The identity of the progenitor is still controversial; for example, a recent argument against the single-degenerate origin has been widely rejected. One way to distinguish between the double- and single-degenerate progenitors is to look at the centre of a known type Ia supernova remnant to see whether any former companion star is present. A likely ex-companion star for the progenitor of the supernova observed by Tycho Brahe has been identified, but that claim is still controversial. Here we report that the central region of the supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5 (the site of a type Ia supernova 400 +/- 50 years ago, based on its light echo) in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains no ex-companion star to a visual magnitude limit of 26.9 (an absolute magnitude of MV = +8.4) within a region of radius 1.43 arcseconds. (This corresponds to the 3? maximum distance to which a companion could have been `kicked' by the explosion.) This lack of any ex-companion star to deep limits rules out all published single-degenerate models for this supernova. The only remaining possibility is that the progenitor of this particular type Ia supernova was a double-degenerate system.

  14. An absence of ex-companion stars in the type Ia supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Bradley E; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2012-01-12

    A type Ia supernova is thought to begin with the explosion of a white dwarf star. The explosion could be triggered by the merger of two white dwarfs (a 'double-degenerate' origin), or by mass transfer from a companion star (the 'single-degenerate' path). The identity of the progenitor is still controversial; for example, a recent argument against the single-degenerate origin has been widely rejected. One way to distinguish between the double- and single-degenerate progenitors is to look at the centre of a known type Ia supernova remnant to see whether any former companion star is present. A likely ex-companion star for the progenitor of the supernova observed by Tycho Brahe has been identified, but that claim is still controversial. Here we report that the central region of the supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5 (the site of a type Ia supernova 400?±?50 years ago, based on its light echo) in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains no ex-companion star to a visual magnitude limit of 26.9 (an absolute magnitude of M(V) = +8.4) within a region of radius 1.43 arcseconds. (This corresponds to the 3? maximum distance to which a companion could have been 'kicked' by the explosion.) This lack of any ex-companion star to deep limits rules out all published single-degenerate models for this supernova. The only remaining possibility is that the progenitor of this particular type Ia supernova was a double-degenerate system. PMID:22237107

  15. The radio expansion and brightening of the very young supernova remnant G1.9+0.3

    E-print Network

    Green, D A; Borkowski, K J; Hwang, U; Harrus, I; Petre, R

    2008-01-01

    Recent radio observations of the small Galactic supernova remnant G1.9+0.3 made at 4.86 GHz with the VLA are presented, and compared with earlier observations at 1.49 GHz which have a comparable resolution (10 x 4 arcsec^2). These show that the radio emission from this remnant has expanded significantly, by about 15 per cent over 23 years, with a current outer diameter of approximately 92 arcsec. This expansion confirms that G1.9+0.3 is the youngest Galactic remnant yet identified, only about 150 years old at most. Recent, lower resolution, 1.43-GHz observations are also discussed, and the integrated flux densities from these and the 4.86-GHz observations are compared with earlier results. This shows that the integrated flux density of G1.9+0.3 has been increasing recently.

  16. Cr-K EMISSION LINE AS A CONSTRAINT ON THE PROGENITOR PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. J.; Xiang, F. Y.; Xiao, H. P.; Zhong, J. X.; Tsunemi, H.; Lu, F. J.; Li, Aigen

    2013-03-20

    We perform a survey of the Cr, Mn, and Fe-K emission lines in young supernova remnants (SNRs) with the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku. The Cr and/or Mn emission lines are detected in 3C 397 and 0519-69.0 for the first time. We also confirm the detection of these lines in Kepler, W49B, N103B, and Cas A. We derive the line parameters (i.e., the line centroid energy, flux, and equivalent width (EW)) for these six sources and perform a correlation analysis for the line center energies of Cr, Mn, and Fe. Also included in the correlation analysis are Tycho and G344.7-0.1 for which the Cr, Mn, and Fe-K line parameters were available in the literature through Suzaku observations. We find that the line center energies of Cr correlate very well with that of Fe and that of Mn. This confirms our previous findings that Cr, Mn, and Fe are spatially co-located, share a similar ionization state, and have a common origin in the supernova nucleosynthesis. We find that the ratio of the EW of the Cr emission line to that of Fe ({gamma}{sub Cr/Fe}{identical_to}EW(Cr)/EW(Fe)) provides useful constraints on the SNR progenitors and on the SN explosion mechanisms: for SNRs with {gamma}{sub Cr/Fe} > 2%, a Type Ia origin is favored (e.g., N103B, G344.7-0.1, 3C 397, and 0519-69.0); for SNRs with {gamma}{sub Cr/Fe} < 2%, they could be of either core-collapse origin or carbon-deflagration Ia origin.

  17. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN THE POSSIBLE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT G344.7-0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Slane, P. O.; Foster, A.; Smith, R. K.; Tanaka, M.; Maeda, K.; Katsuda, S.; Yoshii, R.

    2012-04-20

    Recent studies on the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G344.7-0.1 have commonly claimed its origin to be a core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion, based on its highly asymmetric morphology and/or proximity to a star-forming region. In this paper, however, we present an X-ray spectroscopic study of this SNR using Suzaku, which is supportive of a Type Ia origin. Strong K-shell emission from lowly ionized Fe has clearly been detected, and its origin is determined, for the first time, to be the Fe-rich SN ejecta. The abundance pattern is highly consistent with that expected for a somewhat-evolved Type Ia SNR. It is suggested, therefore, that the X-ray point-like source CXOU J170357.8-414302 located at the SNR's geometrical center is not associated with the SNR but is likely to be a foreground object. Our result further indicates that G344.7-0.1 is the first possible Type Ia SNR categorized as a member of the so-called mixed-morphology class. In addition, we have detected emission from He-like Al at {approx}1.6 keV, the first clear detection of this element in the spectrum of an extended X-ray source. The possible enhancement of the Al/Mg abundance ratio from the solar value suggests that the ambient interstellar medium has a relatively high metallicity (not less than 10% of the solar value). We also report the marginal detection of Cr and Mn, although the measured fluxes of these lines have large statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  18. Kinematics of Shocked Molecular Gas Adjacent to the Supernova Remnant W44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashida, Tomoro; Oka, Tomoharu; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Aono, Kazuya; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Seta, Masumichi

    2013-09-01

    We mapped molecular gas toward the supernova remnant W44 in the HCO+ J = 1-0 line with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and in the CO J = 3-2 line with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. High-velocity emission wings were detected in both lines over the area where the radio shell of W44 overlaps with the molecular cloud in the plane of the sky. We found that the average velocity distributions of the wing emission can be fit by a uniform expansion model. The best-fit expansion velocities are 12.2 ± 0.3 km s-1 and 13.2 ± 0.2 km s-1 in HCO+ and CO, respectively. The non-wing CO J = 3-2 component is also fit by the same model with an expansion velocity of 4.7 ± 0.1 km s-1. This component might be dominated by a post-shock higher-density region where the shock velocity had slowed down. The kinetic energy of the shocked molecular gas is estimated to be (3.5 ± 1.3) × 1049 erg. Adding this and the energy of the previously identified H I shell, we conclude that (1.2 ± 0.2) × 1050 erg has been converted into gas kinetic energy from the initial baryonic energy of the W44 supernova. We also found ultra-high-velocity CO J = 3-2 wing emission with a velocity width of ~100 km s-1 at (l, b) = (+34.°73, -0.°47). The origin of this extremely high velocity wing is a mystery.

  19. NONTHERMAL RADIATION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION AND PARTICLE ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.; Edmon, Paul P. E-mail: twj@msi.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    We explore nonlinear effects of wave-particle interactions on the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in Type Ia-like supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves by implementing phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvénic drift, and particle escape in time-dependent numerical simulations of nonlinear DSA. For typical SNR parameters, the cosmic-ray (CR) protons can be accelerated to PeV energies only if the region of amplified field ahead of the shock is extensive enough to contain the diffusion lengths of the particles of interest. Even with the help of Alfvénic drift, it remains somewhat challenging to construct a nonlinear DSA model for SNRs in which of the order of 10% of the supernova explosion energy is converted into CR energy and the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of 10 or so in the shock precursor, while, at the same time, the energy spectrum of PeV protons is steeper than E {sup –2}. To explore the influence of these physical effects on observed SNR emission, we also compute the resulting radio-to-gamma-ray spectra. Nonthermal emission spectra, especially in X-ray and gamma-ray bands, depend on the time-dependent evolution of the CR injection process, MFA, and particle escape, as well as the shock dynamic evolution. This result comes from the fact that the high-energy end of the CR spectrum is composed of particles that are injected in the very early stages of the blast wave evolution. Thus, it is crucial to better understand the plasma wave-particle interactions associated with collisionless shocks in detailed modeling of nonthermal radiation from SNRs.

  20. KINEMATICS OF SHOCKED MOLECULAR GAS ADJACENT TO THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT W44

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Tomoro; Oka, Tomoharu; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Aono, Kazuya; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Seta, Masumichi

    2013-09-01

    We mapped molecular gas toward the supernova remnant W44 in the HCO{sup +} J = 1-0 line with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and in the CO J = 3-2 line with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. High-velocity emission wings were detected in both lines over the area where the radio shell of W44 overlaps with the molecular cloud in the plane of the sky. We found that the average velocity distributions of the wing emission can be fit by a uniform expansion model. The best-fit expansion velocities are 12.2 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1} and 13.2 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1} in HCO{sup +} and CO, respectively. The non-wing CO J = 3-2 component is also fit by the same model with an expansion velocity of 4.7 {+-} 0.1 km s{sup -1}. This component might be dominated by a post-shock higher-density region where the shock velocity had slowed down. The kinetic energy of the shocked molecular gas is estimated to be (3.5 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg. Adding this and the energy of the previously identified H I shell, we conclude that (1.2 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg has been converted into gas kinetic energy from the initial baryonic energy of the W44 supernova. We also found ultra-high-velocity CO J = 3-2 wing emission with a velocity width of {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at (l, b) = (+34. Degree-Sign 73, -0. Degree-Sign 47). The origin of this extremely high velocity wing is a mystery.

  1. Identification of Ambient Molecular Clouds Associated with Galactic Supernova Remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Snell, Ronald L.; Yun, Min S.; Heyer, Mark H.; Burton, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    The Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 is one of the most studied core-collapse SNRs for its interaction with molecular clouds. However, the ambient molecular clouds with which IC 443 is interacting have not been thoroughly studied and remain poorly understood. Using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14 m telescope, we obtained fully sampled maps of the ~1° × 1° region toward IC 443 in the 12CO J = 1-0 and HCO+ J = 1-0 lines. In addition to the previously known molecular clouds in the velocity range v LSR = -6 to -1 km s-1 (-3 km s-1 clouds), our observations reveal two new ambient molecular cloud components: small (~1') bright clouds in v LSR = -8 to -3 km s-1 (SCs) and diffuse clouds in v LSR = +3 to +10 km s-1 (+5 km s-1 clouds). Our data also reveal the detailed kinematics of the shocked molecular gas in IC 443 however, the focus of this paper is the physical relationship between the shocked clumps and the ambient cloud components. We find strong evidence that the SCs are associated with the shocked clumps. This is supported by the positional coincidence of the SCs with shocked clumps and other tracers of shocks. Furthermore, the kinematic features of some shocked clumps suggest that these are the ablated material from the SCs upon the impact of the SNR shock. The SCs are interpreted as dense cores of parental molecular clouds that survived the destruction by the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor star or its nearby stars. We propose that the expanding SNR shock is now impacting some of the remaining cores and the gas is being ablated and accelerated, producing the shocked molecular gas. The morphology of the +5 km s-1 clouds suggests an association with IC 443. On the other hand, the -3 km s-1 clouds show no evidence for interaction.

  2. A CR-hydro-NEI model of the structure and broadband emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, P.; Patnaude, D. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Nagataki, S.; Ellison, D. C.; Hughes, J. P.; Eriksen, K. A.; Castro, D. E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp E-mail: jph@physics.rutgers.edu E-mail: castro@mit.edu

    2014-03-01

    Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is well-established as a source of particle acceleration to very high energies. Constraints from numerous studies indicate that the observed ?-ray emission results primarily from hadronic processes, providing direct evidence of highly relativistic ions that have been accelerated by the SNR. Here we present an investigation of the dynamical and spectral evolution of Tycho's SNR by carrying out hydrodynamical simulations that include diffusive shock acceleration of particles in the amplified magnetic field at the forward shock of the SNR. Our simulations provide a consistent view of the shock positions, the nonthermal emission, the thermal X-ray emission from the forward shock, and the brightness profiles of the radio and X-ray emission. We compare these with the observed properties of Tycho to determine the density of the ambient material, the particle acceleration efficiency and maximum energy, the accelerated electron-to-proton ratio, and the properties of the shocked gas downstream of the expanding SNR shell. We find that evolution of a typical Type Ia supernova in a low ambient density (n {sub 0} ? 0.3 cm{sup –3}), with an upstream magnetic field of ?5 ?G, and with ?16% of the SNR kinetic energy being converted into relativistic electrons and ions through diffusive shock acceleration, reproduces the observed properties of Tycho. Under such a scenario, the bulk of observed ?-ray emission at high energies is produced by ?{sup 0}-decay resulting from the collisions of energetic hadrons, while inverse-Compton emission is significant at lower energies, comprising roughly half of the flux between 1 and 10 GeV.

  3. THE DOUBLE PULSAR: EVIDENCE FOR NEUTRON STAR FORMATION WITHOUT AN IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Breton, R. P.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Possenti, A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Manchester, R. N.

    2013-04-10

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4 hr orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3. Degree-Sign 2, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relatively symmetric, possibly involving electron capture onto an O-Ne-Mg core.

  4. Fermi-LAT Discovery of GeV Gamma-ray Emission from the Young Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.

    2011-08-19

    We report on the first detection of GeV high-energy gamma-ray emission from a young supernova remnant with the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. These observations reveal a source with no discernible spatial extension detected at a significance level of 12.2{sigma} above 500 MeV at a location that is consistent with the position of the remnant of the supernova explosion that occurred around 1680 in the Cassiopeia constellation - Cassiopeia A. The gamma-ray flux and spectral shape of the source are consistent with a scenario in which the gamma-ray emission originates from relativistic particles accelerated in the shell of this remnant. The total content of cosmic rays (electrons and protons) accelerated in Cas A can be estimated as W{sub CR} {approx_equal} (1-4) x 10{sup 49} erg thanks to the well-known density in the remnant assuming that the observed gamma-ray originates in the SNR shell(s). The magnetic field in the radio-emitting plasma can be robustly constrained as B {ge} 0.1 mG, providing new evidence of the magnetic field amplification at the forward shock and the strong field in the shocked ejecta.

  5. FERMI-LAT DISCOVERY OF GeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT CASSIOPEIA A

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M. E-mail: uchiyama@slac.stanford.edu

    2010-02-10

    We report on the first detection of GeV high-energy gamma-ray emission from a young supernova remnant (SNR) with the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. These observations reveal a source with no discernible spatial extension detected at a significance level of 12.2{sigma} above 500 MeV at a location that is consistent with the position of the remnant of the supernova explosion that occurred around 1680 in the Cassiopeia constellation-Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The gamma-ray flux and spectral shape of the source are consistent with a scenario in which the gamma-ray emission originates from relativistic particles accelerated in the shell of this remnant. The total content of cosmic rays (electrons and protons) accelerated in Cas A can be estimated as W {sub CR} {approx_equal} (1-4) x 10{sup 49} erg thanks to the well-known density in the remnant assuming that the observed gamma ray originates in the SNR shell(s). The magnetic field in the radio-emitting plasma can be robustly constrained as B {>=} 0.1 mG, providing new evidence of the magnetic field amplification at the forward shock and the strong field in the shocked ejecta.0.

  6. Three-dimensional simulations of the non-thermal broadband emission from young supernova remnants including efficient particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar; Decourchelle, Anne E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2014-07-01

    Supernova remnants are believed to be major contributors to Galactic cosmic rays. In this paper, we explore how the non-thermal emission from young remnants can be used to probe the production of energetic particles at the shock (both protons and electrons). Our model couples hydrodynamic simulations of a supernova remnant with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. We include two important back-reaction loops upstream of the shock: energetic particles can (1) modify the flow structure and (2) amplify the magnetic field. As the latter process is not fully understood, we use different limit cases that encompass a wide range of possibilities. We follow the history of the shock dynamics and of the particle transport downstream of the shock, which allows us to compute the non-thermal emission from the remnant at any given age. We do this in three dimensions, in order to generate projected maps that can be compared with observations. We observe that completely different recipes for the magnetic field can lead to similar modifications of the shock structure, although to very different configurations of the field and particles. We show how this affects the emission patterns in different energy bands, from radio to X-rays and ?-rays. High magnetic fields (>100 ?G) directly impact the synchrotron emission from electrons, by restricting their emission to thin rims, and indirectly impact the inverse Compton emission from electrons and also the pion decay emission from protons, mostly by shifting their cut-off energies to respectively lower and higher energies.

  7. Radio pulsar timing observations for GRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma rays probably provide the best diagnostic tool for probing the enigmatic physics of pulsar magnetospheres. At present, however, only two pulsars - the young, nearby ones in the Crab and Vela X supernova remnants - are reliably detected at gamma-ray energies. With adequate radio observations to provide independent timing information, Gamma Ray Observatory should be able to detect a number of additional pulsars, and the results will be of great benefit in testing magnetospheric theories and models. Timing observations for this purpose were started at a number of radio observatories around the world. The general procedures being used are described. A status report on the work is given.

  8. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A: II - Dust sputtering and diagnosis for dust survival in supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    Biscaro, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains formed in the Type II-b supernova by modelling the sputtering of grains located in dense ejecta clumps crossed by the reverse shock. Further sputtering in the inter-clump medium once the clumps are disrupted by the reverse shock is investigated. The dust evolution in the dense ejecta clumps of Type II-P supernovae and their remnants is also studied. We study oxygen-rich clumps that describe the ejecta oxygen core, and carbon-rich clumps that correspond to the outermost carbon-rich ejecta zone. We consider the dust components formed in the supernova, several reverse shock velocities and inter-clump gas temperatures, and derive dust grain size distributions and masses as a function of time. We find that non-thermal sputtering in clumps is important and accounts for reducing the grain population by ~ 40% to 80% in mass, depending on the clump gas over-density and the grain type and size. A Type II-b SN form...

  9. Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser conditions near supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Pihlström, Ylva M.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of 36.169 (4{sub –1}-3{sub 0} E), 44.070 (7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +}), 84.521 (5{sub –1}-4{sub 0} E), and 95.169 (8{sub 0}-7{sub 1} A {sup +}) GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser emission lines near supernova remnants (SNRs), using the MOLPOP-CEP program. The calculations show that given a sufficient methanol abundance, methanol maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at n ? 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cm{sup –3} and T > 60 K. The 36 GHz and 44 GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84 GHz and 95 GHz transitions over the majority of physical conditions. It is also shown that line ratios are an important and applicable probe of the gas conditions. The line ratio changes are largely a result of the E-type transitions becoming quenched faster at increasing densities. The modeling results are discussed using recent observations of CH{sub 3}OH and hydroxyl (OH) masers near the SNRs G1.4–0.1, W28, and Sgr A East.

  10. Suzaku study on the Ejecta of the Supernova Remnant G272.2$-$3.2

    E-print Network

    Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Koji; Katsuda, Satoru; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We report re-analyses of the Suzaku observations of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), G272.2$-$3.2, for which the previous studies were limited below 3 keV. With careful data reduction and background subtraction, we discover the K-shell lines of Ar, Ca, and Fe above 3 keV. The X-ray spectrum of G272.2$-$3.2 consists of two components, a low-temperature collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma ($kT_{\\rm e} \\sim 0.2$ keV) and a high-temperature non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma ($kT_{\\rm e} = 0.6$-$3$ keV). The CIE plasma has solar abundances over the entire area, hence it would originate from the interstellar medium. On the other hand, the abundances of the NEI plasma increase toward the inner region, suggesting the ejecta origin. The line center energy of the Fe K-shell emission ($\\sim 6.4$ keV) suggests that the ejecta are recently heated by the reverse shock, a common feature in Type Ia SNRs.

  11. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60 along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84 plus or minus 0.06% yr(exp -1) to 0.52% plus or minus 0.03 yr(exp -1). This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% plus or minus 0.4% yr(exp -1). We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor.

  12. A Systematic Survey for Broadened CO Emission Toward Galactic Supernova Remnants

    E-print Network

    Kilpatrick, Charles D; Rieke, George H

    2015-01-01

    We present molecular spectroscopy toward 50 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) taken at millimeter wavelengths in 12CO and 13CO J=2-1 with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope as part of a systematic survey for broad molecular line (BML) regions indicative of interactions with molecular clouds (MCs). These observations reveal BML regions toward nineteen SNRs, including nine newly identified BML regions associated with SNRs (G08.3-0.0, G09.9-0.8, G11.2-0.3, G12.2+0.3, G18.6-0.2, G23.6+0.3, 4C-04.71, G29.6+0.1, G32.4+0.1). The remaining ten SNRs with BML regions confirm previous evidence for MC interaction in most cases (G16.7+0.1, Kes 75, 3C 391, Kes 79, 3C 396, 3C 397, W49B, Cas A, IC 443), although we confirm that the BML region toward HB 3 is associated with the W3(OH) HII region, not the SNR. Based on the systemic velocity of each MC, molecular line diagnostics, and cloud morphology, we test whether these detections represent SNR-MC interactions. One of the targets (G54.1+0.3) had previous indication...

  13. Cooling neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant: evidence for superfluidity in the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shternin, Peter S.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Patnaude, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    According to recent results of Ho & Heinke, the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant contains a young (?330-yr-old) neutron star (NS) which has carbon atmosphere and shows notable decline of the effective surface temperature. We report a new (2010 November) Chandra observation which confirms the previously reported decline rate. The decline is naturally explained if neutrons have recently become superfluid (in triplet state) in the NS core, producing a splash of neutrino emission due to Cooper pair formation (CPF) process that currently accelerates the cooling. This scenario puts stringent constraints on poorly known properties of NS cores: on density dependence of the temperature Tcn(?) for the onset of neutron superfluidity [Tcn(?) should have a wide peak with maximum ? (7-9) × 108 K]; on the reduction factor q of CPF process by collective effects in superfluid matter (q > 0.4) and on the intensity of neutrino emission before the onset of neutron superfluidity (30-100 times weaker than the standard modified Urca process). This is serious evidence for nucleon superfluidity in NS cores that comes from observations of cooling NSs.

  14. UNRAVELING THE ORIGIN OF OVERIONIZED PLASMA IN THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT W49B

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Pearson, Sarah; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-11-10

    Recent observations have shown several supernova remnants (SNRs) have overionized plasmas, where ions are stripped of more electrons than they would be if in equilibrium with the electron temperature. Rapid electron cooling is necessary to produce this situation, yet the physical origin of that cooling remains uncertain. To assess the cooling scenario responsible for overionization, in this paper we identify and map the overionized plasma in the Galactic SNR W49B based on a 220 ks Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observation. We performed a spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis, measuring the electron temperature by modeling the continuum and comparing it to the temperature given by the flux ratio of the He-like and H-like lines of sulfur and argon. Using these results, we find that W49B is overionized in the west, with a gradient of overionization increasing from east to west. As the ejecta expansion is impeded by molecular material in the east but not in the west, our overionization maps suggest the dominant cooling mechanism is adiabatic expansion of the hot plasma.

  15. On the population of X-ray supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-print Network

    Maggi, P; Kavanagh, P J; Sasaki, M; Bozzetto, L M; Filipovi?, M D; Vasilopoulos, G; Pietsch, W; Points, S D; Chu, Y -H; Dickel, J; Ehle, M; Williams, R; Greiner, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive X-ray study of the population of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC. Using primarily XMM-Newton, we conduct a systematic spectral analysis of LMC SNRs to gain new insights on their evolution and the interplay with their host galaxy. We combine all the archival XMM observations of the LMC with those of our Very Large Programme survey. We produce X-ray images and spectra of 51 SNRs, out of a list of 59. Using a careful modeling of the background, we consistently analyse all the X-ray spectra and measure temperatures, luminosities, and chemical compositions. We investigate the spatial distribution of SNRs in the LMC and the connection with their environment, characterised by various SFHs. We tentatively type all LMC SNRs to constrain the ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC. We compare the X-ray-derived column densities to HI maps to probing the 3D structure of the LMC. This work provides the first homogeneous catalogue of X-ray spectral properties of LMC SNRs. It of...

  16. Suzaku observation of supernova remnant G332.5-5.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Wu, D.

    2015-10-01

    We analyse the Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer data of the central region of supernova remnant G332.5-5.6. The X-ray data are well described by a single non-equilibrium ionization thermal model, vnei, with an absorbing hydrogen column density of 1.4^{+0.4}_{-0.1} × 1021 cm-2. The plasma is characterized by an electron temperature of 0.49^{+0.08}_{-0.06} keV with subsolar abundances for O (0.58^{+0.06}_{-0.05} solar value) and Fe (0.72^{+0.06}_{-0.05} solar value) and slightly overabundance for Mg (1.23^{+0.14}_{-0.14} solar value). It seems that the central X-ray emission originates from a projection effect or evaporation of residual clouds inside G332.5-5.6. We estimate a distance of 3.0 ± 0.8 kpc for G332.5-5.6 based on the extinction-distance relation. G332.5-5.6 has an age of 7-9 kyr.

  17. Some properties of synchrotron radio and inverse-Compton gamma-ray images of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, O.; Beshley, V.; Bocchino, F.; Orlando, S.

    2009-05-01

    The synchrotron radio maps of supernova remnants (SNRs) in a uniform interstellar medium and interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) are analysed, allowing for different `sensitivity' of the injection efficiency to the obliquity of the shock. The very-high-energy ?-ray maps arising from inverse Compton processes are also synthesized. The properties of images in these different wavelength bands are compared, with particular emphasis on the location of the bright limbs in bilateral SNRs. Recent High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) observations of SN 1006 show that the radio and inverse Compton ?-ray limbs coincide, and we found that this may happen if (i) injection is isotropic but the variation of the maximum energy of electrons is rather fast to compensate for differences in the magnetic field, or (ii) the obliquity dependence of injection (either quasi-parallel or quasi-perpendicular) and the electron maximum energy are strong enough to dominate the magnetic field variation. In the latter case, the obliquity dependences of the injection and the maximum energy should not be opposite. We argue that the position of the limbs alone, and even their coincidence in radio, X-rays and ?-rays, as discovered by HESS in SN 1006, cannot be conclusive as regards the dependence of the electron injection efficiency, the compression/amplification of the ISMF and the electron maximum energy on the obliquity angle.

  18. A New Optical Survey of Supernova Remnant Candidates in M31

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    We present a survey of optically emitting supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 based on H$\\alpha$ and [SII] images in the Local Group Survey. Using these images, we select objects that have [SII]:H$\\alpha$ $>$ 0.4 and circular shapes. We find 76 new SNR candidates. We also inspect 234 SNR candidates presented in previous studies, finding that only 80 of them are SNR candidates according to our criteria. Combining them with the new candidates, we produce a master catalog of 156 SNR candidates in M31. We classify these SNR candidates according to two criteria: the SNR progenitor type [Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs] and the morphological type. Type Ia and CC SNR candidates make up 23% and 77%, respectively, of the total sample. Most of the CC SNR candidates are concentrated in the spiral arms, while the Type Ia SNR candidates are rather distributed over the entire galaxy, including the inner region. The CC SNR candidates are brighter in H$\\alpha$ and [SII] than the Type Ia SNR candidates. We derive a cumulativ...

  19. Suzaku study on the ejecta of the supernova remnant G272.2-3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Mori, Koji; Katsuda, Satoru; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    We report reanalyses of the Suzaku observations of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G272.2-3.2, for which previous studies were limited below 3 keV. With careful data reduction and background subtraction, we discover the K-shell lines of Ar, Ca, and Fe above 3 keV. The X-ray spectrum of G272.2-3.2 consists of two components, a low-temperature collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma (kTe ˜ 0.2 keV) and a high-temperature non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma (kTe = 0.6-3 keV). The CIE plasma has solar abundances over the entire area, hence it originates from the interstellar medium. On the other hand, the abundances of the NEI plasma increase toward the inner region, suggesting ejecta origin. The line center energy of the Fe K-shell emission (˜6.4 keV) suggests that the ejecta are recently heated by reverse shock, a common feature in Type Ia SNRs.

  20. Kinematics of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G206.9+2.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Rosado, M.; Le Coarer, E.; Bernal, A.; Gutiérrez, L.

    2014-10-01

    We studied the kinematics of the galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G206.9+2.3 (PKS 0646+06) in the [SII] &?; 6717 and 6731 Å lines, as one of the initial steps of a long-term project to determine kinematical distances to galactic SNRs with optical counterparts. We obtained the kinematic distance to this nebula by first showing that the filaments detected were in fact the optical counterpart of the radio SNR. The distance estimated here is slightly greater than that of the Monoceros Loop. We estimate that G206.9+2.3 is located about 2.2 kpc from the Sun, in a zone where several background and foreground nebulae at different velocities are seen in projection. We measured a shock velocity of 86 km s^{-1} and a linear diameter of 18 pc. Finally, we calculated the energy deposited in the interstellar medium by the SN explosion as 1.7×10^{49} ergs and concluded that the SNR is in the radiative phase of evolution with an age of 6.4×10^{4} years.

  1. On the escape and propagation of high-energy protons near young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuyuan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-01

    The escape and propagation of high-energy protons near young supernova remnants (SNRs) are investigated in the frame of non-linear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) model by using two methods. In the first method, the particle diffusion is assumed to be different inside and outside the absorbing boundary of the particles accelerated in the SNR shock, and the proton spectra at a given distance of the outer region and corresponding ?0 decay ?-ray spectra can be calculated if a molecular cloud is assumed to be at the distance. In the second method, the total spectrum of high-energy protons escaping from an absorbing boundary during the SNR evolution time is treated as injection rate of the protons and the proton spectrum is calculated in the accumulative diffusion model. Our results show that (1) the spectrum of high-energy protons escaping from a young SNR does not have a power-law form and the protons concentrate on high-energy region and (2) the escaping proton spectra and corresponding ?0 decay ?-ray spectra predicted in both methods are different, indicating that the second method overestimates the propagation effect. We may conclude that the first method is a more realistic description of the escape and propagation of high-energy protons near SNRs.

  2. N49: The First Robust Discovery of Recombining Plasma in an Extra-galactic Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2015-07-01

    Recent discoveries of recombining plasmas (RPs) in supernova remnants (SNRs) have dramatically changed our understanding of SNR evolution. To date, a dozen RP SNRs have been identified in the Galaxy. Here, we present Suzaku deep observations of four SNRs in the LMC, namely, N49, N49B, N23, and DEM L71, for accurate determination of their plasma states. Our uniform analysis reveals that of these SNRs, only N49 is in the recombining state, which is the first robust discovery of an RP from an extra-galactic SNR. Given that RPs have only been identified in core-collapse SNRs, our results strongly suggest a massive star origin for this SNR. On the other hand, no clear evidence of an RP is confirmed in N23, for which detection of recombination lines and continua was previously claimed. Comparing the physical properties of the RP SNRs identified so far, we find that all of them can be categorized into the “mixed-morphology” class, interacting with surrounding molecular clouds. This might be a key to determining the formation mechanisms of RPs.

  3. Nonthermal Radiation of Young Supernova Remnants: The Case of CAS A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirakashvili, V. N.; Aharonian, F. A.; Yang, R.; Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2014-04-01

    The processes responsible for the broadband radiation of the young supernova remnant Cas A are explored by using a new code that is designed for a detailed treatment of the diffusive shock acceleration of particles in the nonlinear regime. The model is based on spherically symmetric hydrodynamic equations complemented with transport equations for relativistic particles. Electrons, protons, and the oxygen ions accelerated by forward and reverse shocks are included in the numerical calculations. We show that the available multi-wavelength observations in the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands can be best explained by invoking particle acceleration by both forward and reversed shocks. Although the TeV gamma-ray observations can be interpreted by interactions of both accelerated electrons and protons/ions, the measurements by Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies below 1 GeV give a tentative preference to the hadronic origin of gamma-rays. Then, the acceleration efficiency in this source, despite the previous claims, should be very high; 25% of the explosion energy (or approximately 3 × 1050 erg) should already be converted to cosmic rays, mainly by the forward shock. At the same time, the model calculations do not provide extension of the maximum energy of accelerated protons beyond 100 TeV. In this model, the acceleration of electrons is dominated by the reverse shock; the required 1048 erg can be achieved under the assumption that the injection of electrons (positrons) is supported by the radioactive decay of 44Ti.

  4. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE NON-THERMAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT HESS J1731-347

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo; Puehlhofer, Gerd; Klochkov, Dmitry; Acero, Fabio; Li Zhiyuan; Horns, Dieter; Kosack, Karl

    2012-09-10

    A detailed analysis of the non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwestern and southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731-347 with Suzaku is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and lineless X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index {Gamma} of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density N{sub H} of (1.0-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the northwestern part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than the northwestern and southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the very high energy gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of the electron acceleration and the emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

  5. Evidence for elemental variation in the ejecta of the Tycho supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancura, O.; Gorenstein, P.; Hughes, John P.

    1995-01-01

    We present an X-ray study of the Tycho supernova remnant utilizing archival data from the high-resolution imagers (HRIs) on Einstein and ROSAT, the low-energy imaging telescopes (LEITs) on EXOSAT, and spectral data from the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT). We have made use of the differing HRI bandpasses to construct images of Tycho in two spectral bands, o.7-1.8 keV and 1.8-4.5 keV. We find that the two images differ, with the harder image showing enhanced emission along much of the south, west, and north periphery. There appears to be enhanced soft emission in the interior and in one particular knot of emission in the southeast. Besides continuum (which we model here as thermal bremsstrahlung emission), we believe the hard image shows primarily the distribution of high-ionization Si and S K-shell lines which lie in the 1.8-2.6 keV band, while the softer image has contributions from Si as well as Fe XVII to Fe XXIV L-shell lines in the 0.7-1.4 keV band. Guided by the results of nonequilibrium ionization modeling of the BBXRT spectral data, we interpret the observed contrast in hard and soft X-ray emission in terms of variations in abundance, ionization timescale, and temperature. The most likely explanation for the spectral differences are spatial variations of the relative abundances of Si, S, and Fe.

  6. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, H.; Tibaldo, L.; Ballet, J.; Giordano, F.; Grenier, I.A.; Porter, T.A.; Roth, M.; Tibolla, O.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yamazaki, R.; /Sagamihara, Aoyama Gakuin U.

    2011-11-08

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray measurements by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) Cygnus Loop (G74.0-8.5). We detect significant gamma-ray emission associated with the SNR in the energy band 0.2-100 GeV. The gamma-ray spectrum shows a break in the range 2-3 GeV. The gamma-ray luminosity is {approx} 1 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} between 1-100 GeV, much lower than those of other GeV-emitting SNRs. The morphology is best represented by a ring shape, with inner/outer radii 0{sup o}.7 {+-} 0{sup o}.1 and 1{sup o}.6 {+-} 0{sup o}.1. Given the association among X-ray rims, H{alpha} filaments and gamma-ray emission, we argue that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields adjacent to the shock regions. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray spectrum.

  7. SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY PROTONS AND HELIUM PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2013-01-20

    Data obtained in the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC-2), Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM), and Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiments suggest that the elemental interstellar spectra of cosmic rays below the knee at a few times 10{sup 6} GeV are not simple power laws, but that they experience hardening at a magnetic rigidity of about 240 GV. Another essential feature is the difference between proton and helium energy spectra, such that the He/p ratio increases by more than 50% in the energy range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} GV. We consider the concavity of the particle spectrum resulting from the nonlinear nature of diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible reason for the observed spectrum hardening. The increase of the helium-to-proton ratio with energy can be interpreted as a consequence of cosmic-ray acceleration by forward and reverse shocks in SNRs. The contribution of particles accelerated by reverse shocks makes the concavity of the produced overall cosmic-ray spectrum more pronounced. The spectra of protons and helium nuclei accelerated in SNRs and released into the interstellar medium are calculated. The derived steady-state interstellar spectra are in reasonably good agreement with observations.

  8. A study of iron and dust in the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokusho, Takuma; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    We performed near-infrared line mapping of the supernova remnant IC 443 with the IRSF 1.4-m telescope, using the narrow-band filters tuned for [Fe II] 1.257 ?m, [Fe II] 1.644 ?m, and Pa?. We detected the [Fe II] and Pa? emissions from a very wide area of the observed region (30? ×35?). These line intensity maps reveal a global correlation between [Fe II] and Pa?. Kokusho et al. (2013) found that the [Fe II] emission is notably strong while dust emission is faint in inner regions of IC 443. These results indicate that the abundant Fe+ is likely to be of interstellar origins through shock destruction of dust, rather than of ejecta origins. From the X-ray intensity map of the 6.7 keV Fe-K line obtained with Suzaku, we find that highly ionized He-like Fe ions exist in the inner regions of IC 443, toward which Fe+ is detected. The presence of the He-like Fe ions and the faint dust emission indicates that Fe is likely to be interacting with X-ray plasma for a time long enough to be highly ionized. We discuss the implications of the detection of the lowly ionized Fe ions in such regions for the processing and composition of dust in the interstellar environment around IC 443.

  9. Thermal and Nonthermal X-ray Emission from the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Decourchelle, Anne; Holt, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra CCD images of Tycho's supernova remnant that delineate its outer shock, seen as a thin, smooth rim along the straight northeastern edge and most of the circular western half. The images also show that the Si and S ejecta are highly clumpy, and have reached the forward shock at numerous locations. Most of the X-ray spectra that we examine along the rim show line emission from Si and S, which in some cases must come from ejecta; the continuum is well represented by either thermal or nonthermal models. In the case that the continuum is assumed to be thermal, the temperatures at the rim are all similar at about 2 keV, and the ionization ages are very low because of the overall weakness of the line emission. Assuming shock velocities inferred from radio and X-ray expansion measurements, these temperatures are substantially below those expected for equilibration of the electron and ion temperatures; electron to mean temperature ratios of approximately less than 0.1 - 0.2 indicate at most modest collisionless heating of the electrons at the shock. The nonthermal contribution to these spectra may be important, however, and may account for as many as half of the counts in the 4-6 keV energy range, based on an extrapolation of the hard X-ray spectrum above 10 keV.

  10. H I ZEEMAN EXPERIMENTS OF SHOCKED ATOMIC GAS IN TWO SUPERNOVA REMNANTS INTERACTING WITH MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Troland, Tom

    2010-07-15

    We have carried out observations of Zeeman splitting of the H I 21 cm emission line from shocked atomic gas in the supernova remnants (SNRs) IC 443 and W51C using the Arecibo telescope. The observed shocked atomic gas is expanding at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} and this is the first Zeeman experiment of such fast-moving, shocked atomic gas. The emission lines, however, are very broad and the systematic error due to baseline curvature hampers an accurate measurement of field strengths. We derive an upper limit of 100-150 {mu}G on the strength of the line-of-sight field component. These two SNRs are interacting with molecular clouds, but the derived upper limits are considerably smaller than the field strengths expected from a strongly shocked dense cloud. We discuss the implications and conclude that either the magnetic field within the telescope beam is mostly randomly oriented or the high-velocity H I emission is from a shocked interclump medium of relatively low density.

  11. Gamma-ray emitting supernova remnants as the origin of Galactic cosmic rays?

    E-print Network

    Tjus, Julia Becker; Kroll, Mike; Nierstenhöfer, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the long-standing mysteries in physics and astrophysics. Simple arguments suggest that a scenario of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way as the dominant sources for the cosmic ray population below the knee could work: in a generic calculation, it can be shown that these objects can provide the energy budget necessary to explain the observed flux of cosmic rays. However, this argument is based on the assumption that all sources behave in the same way, i.e.\\ they all have the same energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. In this paper, we investigate if a realistic population of SNRs is capable of producing the cosmic ray flux as it is observed below the knee. We use 21 SNRs that are well-studied from radio wavelengths up to gamma-ray energies. It could be shown previously (Mandelartz & Becker Tjus 2015) that the high-energy bump in the energy spectrum of these 21 sources can be dominated by hadronic emission. Here, gamma-rays are produced via $\\pi^{0}-...

  12. Interstellar absorptions and shocked clouds towards the supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V.; Chugai, N. N.; Iyudin, A. F.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a survey of interstellar absorptions towards the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622. The distribution of K I absorbers along the distance of the background stars is indicative of a local region (d < 600 pc) strongly depopulated by K I line-absorbing clouds. This fact is supported by the behaviour of the interstellar extinction. We find four high-velocity Ca II components with velocities of >100 km s-1 towards three stars and we identify these with shocked clouds of the Vela SNR. We reveal and measure the acceleration of two shocked clouds on the approaching and receding sides of the Vela SNR along the same line of sight. The acceleration, velocity and Ca II column density of the clouds are used to probe their parameters. The total hydrogen column density of both accelerating clouds is found to be similar (˜6 × 1017 cm-2), which indicates that there is possibly a significant number of small-sized clouds in the vicinity of the Vela SNR. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, 080.D-0012(A)

  13. XMMU J0541.8-6659, a new supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-print Network

    Grondin, M -H; Haberl, F; Pietsch, W; Crawford, E J; Filipovic, M D; Bozzetto, L M; Points, S; Smith, R C

    2012-01-01

    The high sensitivity of the XMM-Newton instrumentation offers the opportunity to study faint and extended sources in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies such as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in detail. The ROSAT PSPC survey of the LMC has revealed more than 700 X-ray sources, among which there are 46 supernova remnants (SNRs) and candidates. We have observed the field around one of the most promising SNR candidates in the ROSAT PSPC catalogue, labelled [HP99] 456 with XMM-Newton, to determine its nature. We investigated the XMM-Newton data along with new radio-continuum, near infrared and optical data. In particular, spectral and morphological studies of the X-ray and radio data were performed. The X-ray images obtained in different energy bands reveal two different structures. Below 1.0 keV the X-ray emission shows the shell-like morphology of an SNR with a diameter of ~73 pc, one of the largest known in the LMC. For its thermal spectrum we estimate an electron temperature of (0.49 +/- 0.12)keV assuming non...

  14. SOFT X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, Phil; McEntaffer, Randall; Cash, Webster

    2013-03-20

    We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 A bandpass with a resolution up to {approx}60 ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at {approx}22 A. Another emission feature at {approx}45 A is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

  15. THE ORIGIN OF RADIALLY ALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS IN YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Shimoda, Jiro; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-08-01

    It has been suggested by radio observations of polarized synchrotron emissions that downstream magnetic fields in some young supernova remnants (SNRs) are oriented radially. We study the magnetic field distribution of turbulent SNRs driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI)-in other words, the effect of rippled shock-by using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. We find that the induced turbulence has radially biased anisotropic velocity dispersion that leads to a selective amplification of the radial component of the magnetic field. The RMI is induced by the interaction between the shock and upstream density fluctuations. Future high-resolution polarization observations can distinguish the following candidates responsible for the upstream density fluctuations: (1) inhomogeneity caused by the cascade of large-scale turbulence in the interstellar medium, the so-called big power-law in the sky; (2) structures generated by the Drury instability in the cosmic-ray modified shock; and (3) fluctuations induced by the nonlinear feedback of the cosmic-ray streaming instability.

  16. Image of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This x-ray photograph of the Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 2/Einstein Observatory, shows that the regions with fast moving knots of material in the expanding shell are bright and clear. A faint x-ray halo, just outside the bright shell, is interpreted as a shock wave moving ahead of the expanding debris. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  17. The X-Ray Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant 1E 0102-72.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Behar, Ehud; Kahn, Steven M.; denHerder, Jan Willem; vanderHeyden, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we present the soft X-ray (5-35A) spectrum of the supernova remnant (SNR) IE 0102-72.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, acquired by the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) aboard ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory. This extended-source X-ray spectrum of unprecedented spectral resolution (lambda/Delta(lambda) approx. 300) permits, for the first time, unabiguous identification and measurement of isolated emission lines and line complexes alike. The diagnostic power of performing spectroscopy using groups of emission lines from single ions is exemplified. In particular, the bright Lyman and helium series lines for light elements (C VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, Ne X and possibly Mg XI & Mg XII) show peculiar ratios, where the values [1s - np] / [1s - (n + l)p] are systematically weaker than expected for electron impact excitation. These measured ratios resemble signatures of recombining or charge exchanging plasmas. We argue that charge exchange, given its large cross section and evidence for inhomogeneous media within the SNR, is a likely mechanism for the observed emission. Also. the well known temperature diagnostics G(T(sub e)) = (i + f)/r of helium- like triplets (O VII & Ne IX) indicate high temperatures, well above the maximum emission temperature T(sub m) for each ion, and consistent with a purely ionizing plasma. The density diagnostics R(n(sub e)) = f / i meanwhile, are consistent with the low density limit, as expected.

  18. The Nature of the Vela Supernova Remnant as Revealed by O VI and C IV Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lines, Nichols J.; Slavin, J.; Anderson, C.

    2001-01-01

    Highly ionized gas, in particular C IV and O VI, is produced in the interstellar medium in regions with hot (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) X-ray emitting gas and at the boundaries where hot gas and cooler (T approx. 10(exp 4) K) gas interact. Supernova remnant shocks produce most of the hot gas in the ISM and, if they are in the correct range of speeds, should produce observable quantities of C IV and O VI absorption. In turn, the column densities of these ions are potentially powerful diagnostics of the shock speed and interstellar environment in which the SNR is evolving. With the advent of FUSE, the power of this diagnostic technique is now available. We have FUSE data toward 8 stars behind the Vela SNR, and have developed a data reduction and analysis method that produces reasonably reliable O VI column densities, in spite of the complexities of the FUSE spectra in this region. In order to gain insight into the observational results, the Vela SNR evolution was modelled using Piecewise Parabolic Method numerical hydrodynamics code. The code is 1-D and incorporates non-equilibrium ionization, radiative cooling, thermal conduction and magnetic pressure.

  19. A GeV source in the direction of Supernova Remnant CTB 37B

    E-print Network

    Yu-Liang Xin; Yun-Feng Liang; Xiang Li; Qiang Yuan; Si-Ming Liu; Da-Ming Wei

    2015-09-29

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most attractive candidates for the acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. We report the detection of GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission with the Pass 8 events recorded by Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the vicinity of the shell type SNR CTB 37B that is likely associated with the TeV $\\gamma-$ray source HESS J1713-381. The energy spectrum of CTB 37B is consistent with a power-law with an index of $1.89\\pm0.08$ in the energy range of $0.5-500$ GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1713-381 at a few hundred GeV. No significant spatial extension and time variation are detected. The multi-wavelength data can be well fitted with either a leptonic model or a hadronic one. However, parameters of both models suggest more efficient particle acceleration than typical SNRs.

  20. A GeV source in the direction of Supernova Remnant CTB 37B

    E-print Network

    Xin, Yu-Liang; Li, Xiang; Yuan, Qiang; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most attractive candidates for the acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. We report the detection of GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission with the Pass 8 events recorded by Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the vicinity of the shell type SNR CTB 37B that is likely associated with the TeV $\\gamma-$ray source HESS J1713-381. The energy spectrum of CTB 37B is consistent with a power-law with an index of $1.89\\pm0.08$ in the energy range of $0.5-500$ GeV, and the measured flux connects smoothly with that of HESS J1713-381 at a few hundred GeV. No significant spatial extension and time variation are detected. The multi-wavelength data can be well fitted with either a leptonic model or a hadronic one. However, parameters of both models suggest more efficient particle acceleration than typical SNRs.

  1. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANT INTERACTIONS WITH MOLECULAR CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2014-04-01

    Observations of the middle-aged supernova remnants IC 443, W28, and W51C indicate that the brightnesses at GeV and TeV energies are correlated with each other and with regions of molecular clump interaction, but not with the radio synchrotron brightness. We suggest that the radio emission is primarily associated with a radiative shell in the interclump medium of a molecular cloud, while the ?-ray emission is primarily associated with the interaction of the radiative shell with molecular clumps. The shell interaction produces a high pressure region, so that the ?-ray luminosity can be approximately reproduced even if shock acceleration of particles is not efficient, provided that energetic particles are trapped in the cooling region. In this model, the spectral shape ? 2 GeV is determined by the spectrum of cosmic ray protons. Models in which diffusive shock acceleration determines the spectrum tend to underproduce TeV emission because of the limiting particle energy that is attained.

  2. HESS J1640-465 - an exceptionally luminous TeV ?-ray supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzi?ska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzy?ski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Klu?niak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Arribas, M. Paz; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reyes, R. de los; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, ?.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-04-01

    The results of follow-up observations of the TeV ?-ray source HESS J1640-465 from 2004 to 2011 with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) are reported in this work. The spectrum is well described by an exponential cut-off power law with photon index ? = 2.11 ± 0.09stat ± 0.10sys, and a cut-off energy of E_c = 6.0^{+2.0}_{-1.2} TeV. The TeV emission is significantly extended and overlaps with the northwestern part of the shell of the SNR G338.3-0.0. The new HESS results, a re-analysis of archival XMM-Newton data and multiwavelength observations suggest that a significant part of the ?-ray emission from HESS J1640-465 originates in the supernova remnant shell. In a hadronic scenario, as suggested by the smooth connection of the GeV and TeV spectra, the product of total proton energy and mean target density could be as high as WpnH ˜ 4 × 1052(d/10kpc)2 erg cm-3.

  3. GAMMA RAYS FROM THE TYCHO SUPERNOVA REMNANT: MULTI-ZONE VERSUS SINGLE-ZONE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Atoyan, Armen; Dermer, Charles D. E-mail: charles.dermer@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-04-20

    Recent Fermi and VERITAS observations of the prototypical Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) Tycho have discovered {gamma}-rays with energies E in the range 0.4 GeV {approx}< E {approx}< 10 TeV. Crucial for the theory of Galactic cosmic-ray origin is whether the {gamma}-rays from SNRs are produced by accelerated hadrons (protons and ions) or by relativistic electrons. Here we show that strong constraints on the leptonic model imposed in the framework of the commonly used single-zone model are essentially removed if the analysis of the broadband radiation spectrum of Tycho is done in the two-zone (or, in general, multi-zone) approach, which is likely to apply to every SNR. Importantly, we show that the single-zone approach may underpredict the {gamma}-ray fluxes by an order of magnitude. A hadronic model can, however, also fit the detected {gamma}-ray spectrum. The difference between {gamma}-ray fluxes of hadronic and leptonic origins becomes significant only at {approx}<300 MeV, which could be revealed by spectral measurements of Tycho and other SNRs at these energies.

  4. Radio spectral characteristics of the supernova remnant Puppis A and nearby sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynoso, E. M.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new study of the spectral index distribution of the supernova remnant (SNR) Puppis A. The nature of field compact sources is also investigated according to the measured spectral indices. This work is based on new observations of Puppis A and its surroundings performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in two configurations using the Compact Array Broad-band Backend centred at 1.75 GHz. We find that the global spectral index of Puppis A is ? = -0.563 ± 0.013. Local variations have been detected, however this global index represents well the bulk of the SNR. At the SE, we found a pattern of parallel strips with a flat spectrum compatible with small-scale filaments, although not correlated in detail. The easternmost filament agrees with the idea that the SNR shock front is interacting with an external cloud. There is no evidence of the previously suggested correlation between emissivity and spectral index. A number of compact features are proposed to be evolved clumps of ejecta based on their spectral indices, although dynamic measurements are needed to confirm this hypothesis. We estimate precise spectral indices for the five previously known field sources, two of which are found to be double (one of them, probably triple), and catalogue 40 new sources. In the light of these new determinations, the extragalactic nature previously accepted for some compact sources is now in doubt.

  5. Radio spectral characteristics of the supernova remnant Puppis A and nearby sources

    E-print Network

    Reynoso, E M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new study of the spectral index distribution of the supernova remnant (SNR) Puppis A. The nature of field compact sources is also investigated according to the measured spectral indices. This work is based on new observations of Puppis A and its surroundings performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in two configurations using the Compact Array Broad-band Backend centered at 1.75 GHz. We find that the global spectral index of Puppis A is -0.563 +/- 0.013. Local variations have been detected, however this global index represents well the bulk of the SNR. At the SE, we found a pattern of parallel strips with a flat spectrum compatible with small-scale filaments, although not correlated in detail. The easternmost filament agrees with the idea that the SN shock front is interacting with an external cloud. There is no evidence of the previously suggested correlation between emissivity and spectral index. A number of compact features are proposed to be evolved clumps of ejecta based...

  6. DUST DESTRUCTION IN A NON-RADIATIVE SHOCK IN THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2010-04-01

    We present 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The post-shock region is resolved in these images. The ratio of the 70 {mu}m to the 24 {mu}m flux rises from about 14 at a distance 0.'1 behind the shock front to about 22 in a zone 0.'75 further downstream, as grains are destroyed in the hot plasma. Models of dust emission and destruction using post-shock electron temperatures between 0.15 keV and 0.30 keV and post-shock densities, n{sub H}{approx} 2.0 cm{sup -3}, predict flux ratios that match the observations. Non-thermal sputtering (i.e., sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction under these shock conditions. From the model calculations, we infer that about 35% by mass of the grains are destroyed over a 0.14 pc region behind the shock front.

  7. COSMIC-RAY STREAMING FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Huirong; Lazarian, A.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-02-01

    High-energy gamma-ray emission has been detected recently from supernova remnants (SNRs) and their surroundings. The existence of molecular clouds near some of the SNRs suggests that the gamma rays originate predominantly from p-p interactions with cosmic rays (CRs) accelerated at a closeby SNR shock wave. Here we investigate the acceleration of CRs and the gamma-ray production in the cloud self-consistently by taking into account the interactions of the streaming instability and the background turbulence both at the shock front and in the ensuing propagation to the clouds. We focus on the later evolution of SNRs, when the conventional treatment of the streaming instability is valid but the magnetic field is enhanced due to Bell's current instability and/or the dynamo generation of magnetic field in the precursor region. We calculate the time dependence of the maximum energy of the accelerated particles. This result is then used to determine the diffusive flux of the runaway particles escaping the shock region, from which we obtain the gamma spectrum consistent with observations. Finally, we check the self-consistency of our results by comparing the required level of diffusion with the level of the streaming instability attainable in the presence of turbulence damping. The energy range of CRs subject to the streaming instability is able to produce the observed energy spectrum of gamma rays.

  8. Recombining plasma in the gamma-ray-emitting mixed-morphology supernova remnant 3C 391

    SciTech Connect

    Ergin, T.; Sezer, A.; Saha, L.; Majumdar, P.; Chatterjee, A.; Bayirli, A.; Ercan, E. N.

    2014-07-20

    A group of middle-aged mixed-morphology (MM) supernova remnants (SNRs) interacting with molecular clouds (MCs) has been discovered to be strong GeV gamma-ray emitters by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi-LAT). The recent observations of the Suzaku X-ray satellite have revealed that some of these interacting gamma-ray-emitting SNRs, such as IC443, W49B, W44, and G359.1-0.5, have overionized plasmas. 3C 391 (G31.9+0.0) is another Galactic MM SNR interacting with MCs. It was observed in GeV gamma rays by Fermi-LAT as well as in the 0.3-10.0 keV X-ray band by Suzaku. In this work, 3C 391 was detected in GeV gamma rays with a significance of ?18? and we showed that the GeV emission is point-like in nature. The GeV gamma-ray spectrum was shown to be best explained by the decay of neutral pions assuming that the protons follow a broken power-law distribution. We revealed radiative recombination structures of silicon and sulfur from 3C 391 using Suzaku data. In this paper, we discuss the possible origin of this type of radiative plasma and hadronic gamma rays.

  9. Non-thermal radiation from molecular clouds illuminated by cosmic rays from nearby supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    Stefano Gabici; Sabrina Casanova; Felix A. Aharonian

    2008-09-30

    Molecular clouds are expected to emit non-thermal radiation due to cosmic ray interactions in the dense magnetized gas. Such emission is amplified if a cloud is located close to an accelerator of cosmic rays and if cosmic rays can leave the accelerator and diffusively reach the cloud. We consider the situation in which a molecular cloud is located in the proximity of a supernova remnant which is accelerating cosmic rays and gradually releasing them into the interstellar medium. We calculate the multiwavelength spectrum from radio to gamma rays which emerges from the cloud as the result of cosmic ray interactions. The total energy output is dominated by the gamma ray emission, which can exceed the emission from other bands by an order of magnitude or more. This suggests that some of the unidentified TeV sources detected so far, with no obvious or very weak counterpart in other wavelengths, might be associated with clouds illuminated by cosmic rays coming from a nearby source.

  10. X-ray line emission from the Puppis A supernova remnant - Oxygen lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Clark, G. W.; Markert, T. H.; Petre, R.; Canizares, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Six prominent X-ray emission lines of O VII and O VIII have been detected from a portion of the Puppis A supernova remnant in observations with the Einstein Observatory Focal Plane Crystal Spectrometer. The lines are sufficiently well resolved to serve as diagnostics of the emitting plasma. From the relative intensities of the lines, it is inferred that the population of O VIII is about 1.5 times that of O VII, and that electron collisions are the dominant excitation mechanism in the plasma. A locus of allowed electron temperatures and interstellar-absorption column densities is derived: 1.5 x 10 to the 6th K, and (2-6) x 10 to the 21st per sq cm. The data are consistent with either a thin plasma source in equilibrium at a temperature of 2.2 x 10 to the 6th K with a column density of 4 x 10 to the 21st per sq cm, or with a nonequilibrium source in which the electrons have been shock-heated to a higher temperature and oxygen is underionized.

  11. High-resolution Studies of Charge Exchange in Supernova Remnants with Magellan, XMM-Newton, and Micro-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Sarah N.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Castro, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Charge exchange, the semi-resonant transfer of an electron from a neutral atom to an excited state in an energetic ion, can occur in plasmas where energetic ions are incident on a cold, at least partially neutral gas. Supernova remnants, especially in the immediate shock region, provide conditions conducive to charge exchange. The emission from post charge-exchange ions as the captured electron cascades down to the ground state, can shed light on the physical conditions of the shock and the immediate post-shock material, providing an important tool to understanding supernova explosions and their aftermath.I present a study of charge exchange in the galactic supernova remnant G296.1-0.5 in two bands: the optical and the X-ray. The optical study, performed using both imaging and spectroscopy from the IMACS instrument on the Magellan Baade Telescope at Las Companas Observatory, seeks to identify `Balmer-dominated shocks' in the remnant, which occur when charge exchange occurs between hot, post-shock protons and colder neutral hydrogen in the environment. The X-ray study probes line ratios in dispersed spectral data obtained with XMM-Newton RGS from an X-ray lobe in the NW of the remnant to hunt for signatures of charge exchange. The dispersed data are degraded by the extended nature of the source, blending many of the lines.We are working towards the future of spectroscopic studies in the X-ray for such extended sources with Micro-X: a sounding rocket-borne, high energy resolution X-ray telescope, utilizing an array of microcalorimeters to achieve high energy resolution for extended sources. I describe the design and commissioning of the payload and the steps toward launch, which is anticipated in the summer of 2015.

  12. Spatially-resolved Spectroscopy of the IC443 Pulsar Wind Nebula and Environs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, D. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zavlin, V. E.; Bucciantini, N.; Clarke, T. E.; Karovska, M.; Pavlov, G. G.; O'Dell, S. L.; vanderHorst, A J.; Yukita, M.

    2013-01-01

    Deep Chandra ACIS observations of the region around the putative pulsar, CXOU J061705.3+222117, in the supernova remnant IC443 reveal, for the first time, a ring-like morphology surrounding the pulsar and a jet-like structure oriented roughly north-south across the ring and through the pulsar location. The observations further confirm that (1) the spectrum and flux of the central object are consistent with a rotation-powered pulsar interpretation, (2) the non-thermal surrounding nebula is likely powered by the pulsar wind, and (3) the thermal-dominated spectrum at greater distances is consistent with emission from the supernova remnant. The cometary shape of the nebula, suggesting motion towards the southwest (or, equivalently, flow of ambient medium to the northeast), appears to be subsonic; there is no evidence for a strong bow shock, and the circular ring is not distorted by motion through the ambient medium.

  13. HESS J1818-154, a new composite supernova remnant discovered in TeV gamma rays and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzi?ska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzy?ski, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Klu?niak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, ?.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-02-01

    Composite supernova remnants (SNRs) constitute a small subclass of the remnants of massive stellar explosions where non-thermal radiation is observed from both the expanding shell-like shock front and from a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) located inside of the SNR. These systems represent a unique evolutionary phase of SNRs where observations in the radio, X-ray, and ?-ray regimes allow the study of the co-evolution of both these energetic phenomena. In this article, we report results from observations of the shell-type SNR G 15.4+0.1 performed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) and XMM-Newton. A compact TeV ?-ray source, HESS J1818-154, located in the center and contained within the shell of G 15.4+0.1 is detected by H.E.S.S. and featurs a spectrum best represented by a power-law model with a spectral index of -2.3 ± 0.3stat ± 0.2sys and an integral flux of F(> 0.42 TeV) = (0.9 ± 0.3stat ± 0.2sys) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1. Furthermore, a recent observation with XMM-Newton reveals extended X-ray emission strongly peaked in the center of G 15.4+0.1. The X-ray source shows indications of an energy-dependent morphology featuring a compact core at energies above 4 keV and more extended emission that fills the entire region within the SNR at lower energies. Together, the X-ray and VHE ?-ray emission provide strong evidence of a PWN located inside the shell of G 15.4+0.1 and this SNR can therefore be classified as a composite based on these observations. The radio, X-ray, and ?-ray emission from the PWN is compatible with a one-zone leptonic model that requires a low average magnetic field inside the emission region. An unambiguous counterpart to the putative pulsar, which is thought to power the PWN, has been detected neither in radio nor in X-ray observations of G 15.4+0.1.

  14. Detection of Far-Infrared Water Vapor, Hydroxyl, and Carbon Monoxide Emissions from the Supernova Remnant 3C 391

    E-print Network

    William T. Reach; Jeonghee Rho

    1998-09-01

    We report the detection of shock-excited far-infrared emission of H2O, OH, and CO from the supernova remnant 3C 391, using the ISO Long-Wavelength Spectrometer. This is the first detection of thermal H2O and OH emission from a supernova remnant. For two other remnants, W~28 and W~44, CO emission was detected but OH was only detected in absorption. The observed H2O and OH emission lines arise from levels within ~400 K of the ground state, consistent with collisional excitation in warm, dense gas created after the passage of the shock front through the dense clumps in the pre-shock cloud. The post-shock gas we observe has a density ~2x10^5 cm^{-3} and temperature 100-1000 K, and the relative abundances of CO:OH:H2O in the emitting region are 100:1:7 for a temperature of 200 K. The presence of a significant column of warm H2O suggests that the chemistry has been significantly changed by the shock. The existence of significant column densities of both OH and H2O, which is at odds with models for non-dissociative shocks into dense gas, could be due to photodissociation of H2O or a mix of fast and slow shocks through regions with different pre-shock density.

  15. APEX observations of supernova remnants. I. Non-stationary magnetohydrodynamic shocks in W44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderl, S.; Gusdorf, A.; Güsten, R.

    2014-09-01

    Context. When supernova blast waves interact with nearby molecular clouds, they send slower shocks into these clouds. The resulting interaction regions provide excellent environments for the use of MHD shock models to constrain the physical and chemical conditions in these regions. Aims: The interaction of supernova remnants (SNRs) with molecular clouds gives rise to strong molecular emission in the far-IR and sub-mm wavelength regimes. The application of MHD shock models in the interpretation of this line emission can yield valuable information on the energetic and chemical impact of SNRs. Methods: New mapping observations with the APEX telescope in 12CO (3-2), (4-3), (6-5), (7-6), and 13CO (3-2) towards two regions in the SNR W44 are presented. Integrated intensities are extracted on five different positions, corresponding to local maxima of CO emission. The integrated intensities are compared to the outputs of a grid of models, which combine an MHD shock code with a radiative transfer module based on the large velocity gradient approximation. Results: All extracted spectra show ambient and line-of-sight components as well as blue- and red-shifted wings indicating the presence of shocked gas. Basing the shock model fits only on the highest-lying transitions that unambiguously trace the shock-heated gas, we find that the observed CO line emission is compatible with non-stationary shocks and a pre-shock density of 104 cm-3. The ages of the modelled shocks scatter between values of ~1000 and ~3000 years. The shock velocities in W44F are found to lie between 20 km s-1 and 25 km s-1, while in W44E fast shocks (30-35 km s-1) as well as slower shocks (~20 km s-1) are compatible with the observed spectral line energy diagrams. The pre-shock magnetic field strength components perpendicular to the line of sight in both regions have values between 100 ?G and 200 ?G. Our best-fitting models allow us to predict the full ladder of CO transitions, the shocked gas mass in one beam as well as the momentum and energy injection. The velocity-integrated CO maps shown in Figs. 3 and 4 are available as FITS files at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/569/A81Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF AMBIENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS ASSOCIATED WITH GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT IC 443

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Snell, Ronald L.; Yun, Min S.; Heyer, Mark H.; Burton, Michael G.

    2012-04-10

    The Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 is one of the most studied core-collapse SNRs for its interaction with molecular clouds. However, the ambient molecular clouds with which IC 443 is interacting have not been thoroughly studied and remain poorly understood. Using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14 m telescope, we obtained fully sampled maps of the {approx}1 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 1 Degree-Sign region toward IC 443 in the {sup 12}CO J = 1-0 and HCO{sup +} J = 1-0 lines. In addition to the previously known molecular clouds in the velocity range v{sub LSR} = -6 to -1 km s{sup -1} (-3 km s{sup -1} clouds), our observations reveal two new ambient molecular cloud components: small ({approx}1') bright clouds in v{sub LSR} = -8 to -3 km s{sup -1} (SCs) and diffuse clouds in v{sub LSR} = +3 to +10 km s{sup -1} (+5 km s{sup -1} clouds). Our data also reveal the detailed kinematics of the shocked molecular gas in IC 443; however, the focus of this paper is the physical relationship between the shocked clumps and the ambient cloud components. We find strong evidence that the SCs are associated with the shocked clumps. This is supported by the positional coincidence of the SCs with shocked clumps and other tracers of shocks. Furthermore, the kinematic features of some shocked clumps suggest that these are the ablated material from the SCs upon the impact of the SNR shock. The SCs are interpreted as dense cores of parental molecular clouds that survived the destruction by the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor star or its nearby stars. We propose that the expanding SNR shock is now impacting some of the remaining cores and the gas is being ablated and accelerated, producing the shocked molecular gas. The morphology of the +5 km s{sup -1} clouds suggests an association with IC 443. On the other hand, the -3 km s{sup -1} clouds show no evidence for interaction.

  17. Thin shell formation in radiative shocks. 1: Supernova remnants in low-density media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Jose; Miller, Walter Warren, III; Arthur, S. J.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Terlevich, Roberto

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the onset of thin-shell formation in interstellar shocks associated with supernova explosions. We outline a simple but useful scheme that indicates the time at which thin shell formation begins for supernova remnants (SNRs) evolving in a range of interstellar environments, extending the previous analytical models to arbitrary power-law density media. The result depends on the gas cooling properties and the shock velocity and radius. This is then applied to the specific case of SNRs in low-density media. The procedure for defining the time for the onset of shell formation, t(sub sf), equates the value of the adiabat, kappa = p/rho(exp gamma), to zero using the known time dependence of the shock radius and velocity. For the case of a power-law density ambient medium of the form rho(r) = Br(exp -omega), it is found that shell formation can be prevented when the ambient density drops faster than a critical rate. For a cooling function of the form Lambda = Lambda(sub 0) tau(exp beta), with beta = -0.5 (appropriate for line cooling), shell formation never occurs for omega greater than or equal to 9/5. The shell formation time is then computed for spherical shocks in a power-law density medium. For omega = 0, the onset of shell formation is found to be at t(sub sf) approx. equal to 2.87 x 10(exp 4) E51(exp 3/14) n(sub 0 exp -4.7) yr, which agrees well with previous estimates derived by other means. We compare the analytical shell formation time with the results of detailed numerical models for omega = 0 and three different ambient densities and find good agreement. The extension of the criterion for the onset of thin shell formation using the ratio of cooling to swept-up column density is also described. This method provides a useful approximation for cases when the exact solution is not known.

  18. Discovery and Characterization of Supernova Remnants in M101 with HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Winkler, P. Frank; Kuntz, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    We have begun a program to identify and characterize the supernova remnant (SNR) population in the face-on giant spiral galaxy M101 (d=6.8 Mpc, 0.1"=3.3 pc), using Hubble Space Telescope imaging. Our Cycle 21 program leverages archival ACS/WFC deep H-alpha and continuum imaging for four fields by obtaining new WFC3 [S II] and [O III] imaging; also, one new field has been completely done with WFC3. The region covered extends to ~12 kpc, but is asymmetrical with respect to the nucleus. Of the 93 SNR candidates known from ground-based imaging, 31 are within the new WFC3 coverage and all but two are confirmed. Additionally, we have identified 23 new strong SNR candidates and another 37 second-tier candidates within the WFC3 footprint. Thus, we have likely more than doubled the number of SNR candidates in the sampled region. We measure diameters for the sample and compare to other galaxy samples such as in M83 (which has more small diameter SNRs). At least 25 of the sources appear to have X-ray counterparts in deep Chandra data. Interestingly, no strong candidates for young, ejecta-dominated (Cas A-like) SNRs have been found in the sample to date. Scaling up to the entire galaxy, there should be well over 200 detectable SNRs in M101 if a full survey was performed. We acknowledge support from STScI grant HST-GO-13361-01-A to the Johns Hopkins University.

  19. THE FERMI BUBBLES AS A SCALED-UP VERSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-09-20

    In this study, we treat Fermi bubbles as a scaled-up version of supernova remnants (SNRs). The bubbles are created through activities of the super-massive black hole (SMBH) or starbursts at the Galactic center (GC). Cosmic-rays (CRs) are accelerated at the forward shocks of the bubbles like SNRs, which means that we cannot decide whether the bubbles were created by the SMBH or starbursts from the radiation from the CRs. We follow the evolution of CR distribution by solving a diffusion-advection equation, considering the reduction of the diffusion coefficient by CR streaming. In this model, gamma rays are created through hadronic interaction between CR protons and the gas in the Galactic halo. In the GeV band, we can well reproduce the observed flat distribution of gamma-ray surface brightness because some amount of gas is left behind the shock. The edge of the bubbles is fairly sharp owing to the high gas density behind the shock and the reduction of the diffusion coefficient there. The latter also contributes the hard gamma-ray spectrum of the bubbles. We find that the CR acceleration at the shock began when the bubbles were small, and the time scale of the energy injection at the GC was much smaller than the age of the bubbles. We predict that if CRs are accelerated to the TeV regime, the apparent bubble size should be larger in the TeV band, which could be used to discriminate our hadronic model from other leptonic models. We also present neutrino fluxes.

  20. Production of Magnetic Turbulence by Cosmic Rays Drifting Upstream of Supernova Remnant Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroman, Thomas; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Nishikawa, Ken-ichi

    2008-01-01

    I will present results of our recent two- and three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations of magnetic-turbulence production by cosmic-ray ions drifting upstream of supernova remnant shocks. These studies' aim is twofold: test recent predictions of strong amplification in short wavelength, non-resonant wave modes, and study the subsequent evolution of the magnetic turbulence, including its backreaction on cosmic-ray trajectories. We confirm that the drifting cosmic rays give rise to a turbulent magnetic field, but show that an oblique filamentary mode grows more rapidly than the non-resonant parallel modes found in analytical theory. The field perturbations grow more slowly than estimated using a quasi-linear analytical approach for the parallel plane-wave mode, and saturate in amplitude at deltaB/B approximately equal to 1. The backreaction of the magnetic turbulence on the particles leads to an alignment of the bulk-flow velocities of the cosmic rays and the background medium. This is an essential characteristic of cosmic ray-modified shocks: the upstream flow speed is continuously changed by the cosmic rays. The reduction of relative drift between cosmic rays and background medium accounts for the saturation of the instability at only moderate magnetic-field amplitudes. It is possible that the prolonged magnetic field growth observed in recent MHD simulations results from a cosmic-ray current assumed to be constant and thus immune to the backreaction from the turbulent field. We speculate that the parallel plane-wave mode found in analytical treatments very quickly leads co filamentation, which we observe in our PIC modeling and is also apparent in the MHD simulations.

  1. Shocked Gas from the supernova remnant G357.7+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Hewitt, John; Reach, William T.; Bieging, John H.; Andersen, Morten; Güsten, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    We present detection of hydrogen molecular hydrogen (H2) in mid-infrared using the Spitzer IRS. The supernova remnant (SNR) G357.7+0.3 is one of relatively unknown and under-studied SNRs. We performed an IRS spectral mapping centered on the northwestern shell of G357.7+0.3. The observations covered an area of 75arcsec x 60arcsec with short-low (SL) and 170arcsec x 55arcsec with long-low (LL). All rotational H2 lines within the IRS wavelength range are detected except S(6) line. Interestingly, G357.7+0.3 shows lack of ionic lines compared with those in other SNRs observed. Only ionic line detected is [Si II] at 34.8micron. The detection of H2 line is an evidence that G357.7+0.3 is interacting with dense molecular clouds. This is the first evidence showing that G357.7+0.3 is an interacting SNR with clouds. We generated a H2 excitation diagram. A two-temperature fit yields a low temperature of 197 K with a column density 2.3E21/cm2 and and a high temperature of 663 K with a column density of 2.7E19/cm2. We preformed high-J CO and OH observations with The German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies (GREAT) on board of Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), but no lines are detected. We provide the upper limits of the lines. We also present millimeter observations of the SNR. The observations were made with the Arizona-MPIfR Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HHT), Arizona 12 Meter Telescope, and Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope. We discuss physical conditions of shocked gas in G357.7+0.3.

  2. A new optical survey of supernova remnant candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-05-10

    We present a survey of optically emitting supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 based on H? and [S II] images in the Local Group Survey. Using these images, we select objects that have [S II]:H? > 0.4 and circular shapes. We identify 156 SNR candidates, of which 76 are newly found objects. We classify these SNR candidates according to two criteria: the SNR progenitor type (Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs) and the morphological type. Type Ia and CC SNR candidates make up 23% and 77%, respectively, of the total sample. Most of the CC SNR candidates are concentrated in the spiral arms, while the Type Ia SNR candidates are rather distributed over the entire galaxy, including the inner region. The CC SNR candidates are brighter in H? and [S II] than the Type Ia SNR candidates. We derive a cumulative size distribution of the SNR candidates, finding that the distribution of the candidates with 17

  3. Freshly Formed Dust in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant as Revealed by the Spitzer Space Telescope

    E-print Network

    J. Rho; T. Kozasa; W. T. Reach; L. Rudnick; T. DeLaney; J. D. Smith; J. A. Ennis; H. Gomez; A. Tappe

    2007-09-18

    We performed Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph mapping observations covering nearly the entire extent of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (SNR), producing mid-infrared (5.5-35 micron) spectra every 5-10". Gas lines of Ar, Ne, O, Si, S and Fe, and dust continua were strong for most positions. We identify three distinct ejecta dust populations based on their continuum shapes. The dominant dust continuum shape exhibits a strong peak at 21 micron. A line-free map of 21 micron-peak dust made from the 19-23 micron range closely resembles the [Ar II], [O IV], and [Ne II] ejecta-line maps implying that dust is freshly formed in the ejecta. Spectral fitting implies the presence of SiO2, Mg protosilicates, and FeO grains in these regions. The second dust type exhibits a rising continuum up to 21 micron and then flattens thereafter. This ``weak 21 micron'' dust is likely composed of Al2O3 and C grains. The third dust continuum shape is featureless with a gently rising spectrum and is likely composed of MgSiO3 and either Al2O3 or Fe grains. Using the least massive composition for each of the three dust classes yields a total mass of 0.02 Msun. Using the most-massive composition yields a total mass of 0.054 Msun. The primary uncertainty in the total dust mass stems from the selection of the dust composition necessary for fitting the featureless dust as well as 70 micron flux. The freshly formed dust mass derived from Cas A is sufficient from SNe to explain the lower limit on the dust masses in high redshift galaxies.

  4. DUST PROCESSING IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: SPITZER MIPS SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION AND INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, M.; Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Bernard, J. P.

    2011-11-20

    We present Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) spectral energy distribution (SED) and Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of 14 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) previously identified in the GLIMPSE survey. We find evidence for SNR/molecular cloud interaction through detection of [O I] emission, ionic lines, and emission from molecular hydrogen. Through blackbody fitting of the MIPS SEDs we find the large grains to be warm, 29-66 K. The dust emission is modeled using the DUSTEM code and a three-component dust model composed of populations of big grains (BGs), very small grains (VSGs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We find the dust to be moderately heated, typically by 30-100 times the interstellar radiation field. The source of the radiation is likely hydrogen recombination, where the excitation of hydrogen occurred in the shock front. The ratio of VSGs to BGs is found for most of the molecular interacting SNRs to be higher than that found in the plane of the Milky Way, typically by a factor of 2-3. We suggest that dust shattering is responsible for the relative overabundance of small grains, in agreement with the prediction from dust destruction models. However, two of the SNRs are best fitted with a very low abundance of carbon grains to silicate grains and with a very high radiation field. A likely reason for the low abundance of small carbon grains is sputtering. We find evidence for silicate emission at 20 {mu}m in their SEDs, indicating that they are young SNRs based on the strong radiation field necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs.

  5. A survey of infrared supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Seok, Ji Yeon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Onaka, Takashi

    2013-12-20

    We present a comprehensive infrared study of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using near- to mid-infrared images taken by Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 ?m) and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS; 24 and 70 ?m) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Among the 47 bona fide LMC SNRs, 29 were detected in infrared, giving a high detection rate of 62%. All 29 SNRs show emission at 24 ?m, and 20 out of 29 show emission in one or several IRAC bands. We present their 4.5, 8, 24, and 70 ?m images and a table summarizing their Spitzer fluxes. We find that the LMC SNRs are considerably fainter than the Galactic SNRs, and that, among the LMC SNRs, Type Ia SNRs are significantly fainter than core-collapse SNRs. We conclude that the MIPS emission of essentially all SNRs originates from dust emission, whereas their IRAC emissions originate from ionic/molecular lines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission, or synchrotron emission. The infrared fluxes show correlation with radio and X-ray fluxes. For SNRs that have similar morphology in infrared and X-rays, the ratios of 24 to 70 ?m fluxes have good correlation with the electron density of hot plasma. The overall correlation is explained well by the emission from collisionally heated silicate grains of 0.1 ?m size, but for mature SNRs with relatively low gas temperatures, the smaller-sized grain population is favored more. For those that appear different between infrared and X-rays, the emission in the MIPS bands is probably from dust heated by shock radiation.

  6. Infrared Spectral Mapping of Supernova Remnants. I. N63A and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulet, Adeline; Williams, Rosa M.

    2012-12-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope spectra of the supernova remnant (SNR) N63A and its native H II region N63 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We measure nebular fine-structure lines, H2 lines, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The lines contribute half of the flux in the Spitzer 24 ?m image of N63A shocked lobes, but only <=10% elsewhere. The mid-IR flux is largely due to thermal continuum emission from dust in and around N63A plasma. Electron densities are low everywhere; the differences in mid-IR line ratios separate N63A plasma and its high-excitation surroundings from N63A low-excitation optical lobes. We compare the observed line fluxes and ratios within N63A's shocked lobes and plasma with the predictions from models for moderate and fast shocks to constrain pre-shock densities and shock velocities. N63A's photoionized lobe contains a warm photodissociation region in pressure equilibrium with optically ionized gas. We apply a physical dust model to our spectra supplemented by MIPS photometry. We derive the intensity of radiation heating the dust, the mass fraction due to PAHs, and the masses of dust within our sampled regions and of cooler grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. N63A's shocked lobes and plasma contain ~0.07 M ? of hot grains, comparable to amounts in other SNRs. Within N63A there is ~0.7 M ? of warm grains exposed to >=100 times the intensity of the local interstellar radiation field. Within the regions, 92% of the total dust mass resides in cool grains emitting <=27% of their mid-IR luminosity. In loving memory of Sylvie Caulet-Maugendre: "I used to believe in forever, but forever is too good to be true." A. A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh.

  7. Production of magnetic turbulence by cosmic rays drifting upstream of supernova remnant shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroman, Thomas; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    I will present results of our recent twoand three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations of magnetic-turbulence production by cosmic-ray ions drifting upstream of supernova remnant shocks. These studies' aim is twofold: test recent predictions of strong amplification in shortwavelength, non-resonant wave modes, and study the subsequent evolution of the magnetic turbulence, including its backreaction on cosmic-ray trajectories. We confirm that the drifting cosmic rays give rise to a turbulent magnetic field, but show that an oblique filamentary mode grows more rapidly than the non-resonant parallel modes found in analytical theory. The field perturbations grow more slowly than estimated using a quasi-linear analytical approach for the parallel plane-wave mode, and saturate in amplitude at ?B/B ˜ 1. The backreaction of the magnetic turbulence on the particles leads to an alignment of the bulk-flow velocities of the cosmic rays and the background medium. This is an essential characteristic of cosmic ray-modified shocks: the upstream flow speed is continuously changed by the cosmic rays. The reduction of relative drift between cosmic rays and background medium accounts for the saturation of the instability at only moderate magnetic-field amplitudes. It is possible that the prolonged magnetic field growth observed in recent MHD simulations results from a cosmic-ray current assumed to be constant and thus immune to the backreaction from the turbulent field. We speculate that the parallel plane-wave mode found in analytical treatments very quickly leads to filamentation, which we observe in our PIC modeling and is also apparent in the MHD simulations.

  8. Enhanced abundances in three large-diameter mixed-morphology supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    J. Lazendic; P. Slane

    2006-05-03

    We present an X-ray study of three mixed-morphology supernova remnants (SNRs), HB 21, CTB 1 and HB 3, using archival ASCA and ROSAT data. These data are complemented by archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data for CTB 1 and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory data for HB 3. The spectra from HB 21 and HB 3 are well-described with a single-temperature thermal plasma in ionization equilibrium, while a two-temperature thermal plasma is found in CTB 1. We found enhanced abundances in all three SNRs. The elemental abundance of Mg is clearly enhanced in CTB 1, while HB 21 has enhanced abundances of Si and S. The situation is not so clear in HB 3 -- the plasma in this SNR either has significantly enhanced abundances of O, Ne and Mg, or it has marginally enhanced abundances of Mg and under-abundant Fe. We discuss the plausibility of mixed-morphology SNR models for the three SNRs and the presence of enhanced abundances. We revise a list of MM SNRs and their properties, compare the three SNRs studied here with other members of this class, and discuss the presence of enhanced elemental abundances in MM SNRs. We also report the ASCA detection of a compact source in the southern part of HB 3. The source spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of ~2.7, and an unabsorbed X-ray flux of ~10^{-12} erg/cm^2/s in the 0.5--10.0 keV band. The column density towards this source differs from that towards the SNR, and it is therefore unlikely they are related.

  9. Supernova remnant candidates for the soft gamma-ray repeater 1900+14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasisht, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Frail, D. A.; Greiner, J.

    1994-01-01

    Motivated by the association of two soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) with supernova remnants (SNR) we have carried out radio, optical and X-ray studies of two cataloged SNRs in the large KONUS error box 11 deg x 8 min of SGR 1900+14. Our very large array (VLA) observations of SNR G43.9+1.6 do not reveal any obvious plerionic component. A radio flat-spectrum source, close to, but outside the error box was found. We suggest this to be a distant H II region foreground to the SNR. A sensitive VLA image at meter wavelengths show that the other SNR, G42.8+0.6, is an ordinary typical SNR with a shell morphology with no peculiarities such as a plerionic component. No ROSAT source with an apparent flux greater than or approximately 10(exp -13) ergs cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) is found within the two SNRs. Recently, Hurley et al. have reported a new very small error box close to G42.8+0.6. There is no radio feature within or close to the error box. However, a ROSAT source is found just outside this localization. We speculate that this is the quiescent X-ray counterpart of SGR 1900+14. We suggest that SGR 1900+14 is a neutron star that was born with high speed which has now overtaken the expanding shell of SNR G42.8+0.6. Owing to the low confining pressure, there has been no development of a synchrotron bubble which explains the absence of the radio plerion. In our picture, SGR 1900+14 is the oldest known SGR.

  10. Dust Processing in Supernova Remnants: Spitzer MIPS SED and IRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, John W.; Petre, Robert; Katsuda Satoru; Andersen, M.; Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Bernard, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS SED and IRS observations of 14 Galactic Supernova Remnants previously identified in the GLIMPSE survey. We find evidence for SNR/molecular cloud interaction through detection of [OI] emission, ionic lines, and emission from molecular hydrogen. Through black-body fitting of the MIPS SEDs we find the large grains to be warm, 29-66 K. The dust emission is modeled using the DUSTEM code and a three component dust model composed of populations of big grains, very small grains, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We find the dust to be moderately heated, typically by 30-100 times the interstellar radiation field. The source of the radiation is likely hydrogen recombination, where the excitation of hydrogen occurred in the shock front. The ratio of very small grains to big grains is found for most of the molecular interacting SNRs to be higher than that found in the plane of the Milky Way, typically by a factor of 2--3. We suggest that dust shattering is responsible for the relative over-abundance of small grains, in agreement with prediction from dust destruction models. However, two of the SNRs are best fit with a very low abundance of carbon grains to silicate grains and with a very high radiation field. A likely reason for the low abundance of small carbon grains is sputtering. We find evidence for silicate emission at 20 $\\mu$m in their SEDs, indicating that they are young SNRs based on the strong radiation field necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs.

  11. Nonthermal radiation of young supernova remnants: The case of Cas A

    SciTech Connect

    Zirakashvili, V. N.; Aharonian, F. A.; Yang, R.; Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; Tuffs, R. J.

    2014-04-20

    The processes responsible for the broadband radiation of the young supernova remnant Cas A are explored by using a new code that is designed for a detailed treatment of the diffusive shock acceleration of particles in the nonlinear regime. The model is based on spherically symmetric hydrodynamic equations complemented with transport equations for relativistic particles. Electrons, protons, and the oxygen ions accelerated by forward and reverse shocks are included in the numerical calculations. We show that the available multi-wavelength observations in the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands can be best explained by invoking particle acceleration by both forward and reversed shocks. Although the TeV gamma-ray observations can be interpreted by interactions of both accelerated electrons and protons/ions, the measurements by Fermi Large Area Telescope at energies below 1 GeV give a tentative preference to the hadronic origin of gamma-rays. Then, the acceleration efficiency in this source, despite the previous claims, should be very high; 25% of the explosion energy (or approximately 3 × 10{sup 50} erg) should already be converted to cosmic rays, mainly by the forward shock. At the same time, the model calculations do not provide extension of the maximum energy of accelerated protons beyond 100 TeV. In this model, the acceleration of electrons is dominated by the reverse shock; the required 10{sup 48} erg can be achieved under the assumption that the injection of electrons (positrons) is supported by the radioactive decay of {sup 44}Ti.

  12. Cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants: non-linear theory revised

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2012-07-01

    A rapidly growing amount of evidences, mostly coming from the recent gamma-ray observations of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs), is seriously challenging our understanding of how particles are accelerated at fast shocks. The cosmic-ray (CR) spectra required to account for the observed phenomenology are in fact as steep as E{sup ?2.2}–E{sup ?2.4}, i.e., steeper than the test-particle prediction of first-order Fermi acceleration, and significantly steeper than what expected in a more refined non-linear theory of diffusive shock acceleration. By accounting for the dynamical back-reaction of the non-thermal particles, such a theory in fact predicts that the more efficient the particle acceleration, the flatter the CR spectrum. In this work we put forward a self-consistent scenario in which the account for the magnetic field amplification induced by CR streaming produces the conditions for reversing such a trend, allowing — at the same time — for rather steep spectra and CR acceleration efficiencies (about 20%) consistent with the hypothesis that SNRs are the sources of Galactic CRs. In particular, we quantitatively work out the details of instantaneous and cumulative CR spectra during the evolution of a typical SNR, also stressing the implications of the observed levels of magnetization on both the expected maximum energy and the predicted CR acceleration efficiency. The latter naturally turns out to saturate around 10-30%, almost independently of the fraction of particles injected into the acceleration process as long as this fraction is larger than about 10{sup ?4}.

  13. A Survey of Infrared Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Ji Yeon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Onaka, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive infrared study of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using near- to mid-infrared images taken by Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 ?m) and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS; 24 and 70 ?m) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. Among the 47 bona fide LMC SNRs, 29 were detected in infrared, giving a high detection rate of 62%. All 29 SNRs show emission at 24 ?m, and 20 out of 29 show emission in one or several IRAC bands. We present their 4.5, 8, 24, and 70 ?m images and a table summarizing their Spitzer fluxes. We find that the LMC SNRs are considerably fainter than the Galactic SNRs, and that, among the LMC SNRs, Type Ia SNRs are significantly fainter than core-collapse SNRs. We conclude that the MIPS emission of essentially all SNRs originates from dust emission, whereas their IRAC emissions originate from ionic/molecular lines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission, or synchrotron emission. The infrared fluxes show correlation with radio and X-ray fluxes. For SNRs that have similar morphology in infrared and X-rays, the ratios of 24 to 70 ?m fluxes have good correlation with the electron density of hot plasma. The overall correlation is explained well by the emission from collisionally heated silicate grains of 0.1 ?m size, but for mature SNRs with relatively low gas temperatures, the smaller-sized grain population is favored more. For those that appear different between infrared and X-rays, the emission in the MIPS bands is probably from dust heated by shock radiation.

  14. Ionization break-out from millisecond pulsar wind nebulae: an X-ray probe of the origin of superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Vurm, Indrek; Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic spin-down of a rapidly rotating (millisecond) neutron star has been proposed as the power source of hydrogen-poor `superluminous' supernovae (SLSNe-I). However, producing an unambiguous test that can distinguish this model from alternatives, such as circumstellar interaction, has proven challenging. After the supernova explosion, the pulsar wind inflates a hot cavity behind the expanding stellar ejecta: the nascent millisecond pulsar wind nebula. Electron/positron pairs injected by the wind cool through inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron emission, producing a pair cascade and hard X-ray spectrum inside the nebula. These X-rays ionize the inner exposed side of the ejecta, driving an ionization front that propagates outwards with time. Under some conditions this front can breach the ejecta surface within months after the optical supernova peak, allowing ˜0.1-1 keV photons to escape the nebula unattenuated with a characteristic luminosity LX ˜ 1043-1045 erg s-1. This `ionization break-out' may explain the luminous X-ray emission observed from the transient SCP 06F, providing direct evidence that this SLSN was indeed engine powered. Luminous break-out requires a low ejecta mass and that the spin-down time of the pulsar be comparable to the photon diffusion time-scale at optical maximum, the latter condition being similar to that required for a supernova with a high optical fluence. These relatively special requirements may explain why most SLSNe-I are not accompanied by detectable X-ray emission. Global asymmetry of the supernova ejecta increases the likelihood of an early break-out along the direction of lowest density. Atomic states with lower threshold energies are more readily ionized at earlier times near optical maximum, allowing `UV break-out' across a wider range of pulsar and ejecta properties than X-ray break-out, possibly contributing to the blue/UV colours of SLSNe-I.

  15. Fermi LAT Discovery of Extended Gamma-Ray Emissions in the Vicinity of the HB3 Supernova Remnant

    E-print Network

    Katagiri, H; Ballet, J; Grondin, M H; Hanabata, Y; Hewitt, J W; Kubo, H; Lemoine-Goumard, M

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of extended gamma-ray emission measured by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region of the supernova remnant (SNR) HB3 (G132.7+1.3) and the W3 HII complex adjacent to the southeast of the remnant. W3 is spatially associated with bright 12CO (J=1-0) emission. The gamma-ray emission is spatially correlated with this gas and the SNR. We discuss the possibility that gamma rays originate in interactions between particles accelerated in the SNR and interstellar gas or radiation fields. The decay of neutral pions produced in nucleon-nucleon interactions between accelerated hadrons and interstellar gas provides a reasonable explanation for the gamma-ray emission. The emission from W3 is consistent with irradiation of the CO clouds by the cosmic rays accelerated in HB3.

  16. INDUCED ROTATION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR SPINS

    SciTech Connect

    Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Burrows, Adam; Nordhaus, Jason; Almgren, Ann E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu E-mail: asalmgren@lbl.gov

    2011-05-01

    It has been suggested that the observed rotation periods of radio pulsars might be induced by a non-axisymmetric spiral-mode instability in the turbulent region behind the stalled supernova bounce shock, even if the progenitor core was not initially rotating. In this paper, using the three-dimensional Adaptive Mesh Refinement code CASTRO with a realistic progenitor and equation of state and a simple neutrino heating and cooling scheme, we present a numerical study of the evolution in three dimensions of the rotational profile of a supernova core from collapse, through bounce and shock stagnation, to delayed explosion. By the end of our simulation ({approx}420 ms after core bounce), we do not witness significant spin-up of the proto-neutron star core left behind. However, we do see the development before the explosion of strong differential rotation in the turbulent gain region between the core and stalled shock. Shells in this region acquire high spin rates that reach {approx}150 Hz, but this region contains too little mass and angular momentum to translate, even if left behind, into rapid rotation for the full neutron star. We also find that much of the induced angular momentum is likely to be ejected in the explosion, and moreover that even if the optimal amount of induced angular momentum is retained in the core, the resulting spin period is likely to be quite modest. Nevertheless, induced periods of seconds are possible.

  17. INTEGRAL Studies of Nonthermal Emission From the Supernova Remnants Cassiopeia A, CTA 1, and MSH 11-61A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, S. J.; Beckmann, V.; Bykov, A.; Lebrun, F.; Terrier, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present the initial results from our study of the nonthermal continuum emission from the supernova remnants Cassiopeia A, MSB 11-61-4, a d CT-4 1. We used the INTEGRAL Core Program data to conduct this study. During the INTEGRAL mission a significant fraction of the total observing time (e.g. 35% in year one) is allocated to the Core Program and is analyzed under the auspices of the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. We report no statistically significant detections thus far but we will continue to analyze the data as more is taken. The results so far are consistent with previous measurements from e.g. RXTE and ASCA.

  18. Fermi large area telescope detection of a break in the gamma-ray spectrum of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yajie; Funk, Stefan; Lande, Joshua; Tibaldo, Luigi; Jóhannesson, Gülauger; Uchiyama, Yasunobu E-mail: funk@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: uchiyama@slac.stanford.edu

    2013-12-20

    We report on observations of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A in the energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV using 44 months of observations from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. We perform a detailed spectral analysis of this source and report on a low-energy break in the spectrum at 1.72{sub ?0.89}{sup +1.35} GeV. By comparing the results with models for the gamma-ray emission, we find that hadronic emission is preferred for the GeV energy range.

  19. INTRODUCTION -One of three known Galactic oxygen-rich core-collapse supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    Dewey, Daniel

    ] with a torus and jet [17] * Pulsar wind nebula (PWN [10]) Radio pulsar (PSR J1124-5916) and PWN [1,5] * Shock and location of the RS remain elusive: * Radio studies suggest the reverse shock (RS) has reached the PWN [5], but a large pressure difference between the PWN and shocked CSM is estimated in X-rays [16] * The origin

  20. Young Remnants of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Progenitors: A Study of SNR G1.9+0.3

    E-print Network

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Soderberg, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae, with their remarkably homogeneous light curves and spectra, have been used as standardizable candles to measure the accelerating expansion of the Universe. Yet, their progenitors remain elusive. Common explanations invoke a degenerate star (white dwarf) which explodes upon reaching close to the Chandrasekhar limit, by either steadily accreting mass from a companion star or violently merging with another degenerate star. We show that circumstellar interaction in young Galactic supernova remnants can be used to distinguish between these single and double degenerate progenitor scenarios. Here we propose a new diagnostic, the Surface Brightness Index, which can be