Science.gov

Sample records for pulsars supernova remnants

  1. Pulsar-supernova remnant associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1994-04-01

    Pulsars and supernova remnants (SNRs) are both believed to be formed in the supernova explosions of massive stars. Therefore one might expect to see associations between the two classes of object. In fact, up until a couple of years ago, there was only a handful of believable associations and even now there are only nine or ten. It is relatively easy to explain why such a small fraction of the 600 or so known pulsars are associated with supernova remnants. The average pulsar lifetime is of the order of 106 years, whereas the average supernova remnant is detectable for about 104 years. Therefore, one would expect only about one percent of pulsars to be still associated, as is observed. It is somewhat more difficult to explain why so few of the 150 known supernova remnants have associated pulsars. The main factor is that supernova remnants are seen throughout the Galaxy whereas most pulsars are detectable only relatively close to the Sun, within a few kiloparsec. Another factor is that pulsar emission is beamed, so even if a pulsar exists in a relatively nearby supernova remnant, it may be undetectable. The most believable of the suggested associations are listed. Associations which are possible but by no means certain are indicated by question mark. For the more certain associations, the pulsar position is within the SNR boundaries (an exception is 'The Duck', where the pulsar is at the tip of the 'beak'), the distance estimates for the pulsar and SNR are compatible, and the age estimates are likewise compatible. References to most of these associations may be found in the pulsar catalog of Taylor, Manchester and Lyne (1993, Astrophys. J. Suppl., 88, 529). Recent references not included in the catalog are for PSR B1706-44 (McAdam, Osborne and Parkinson, 1993, Nature, 361, 516) and PSR B2334+61 (Kulkarni et al., 1993, Nature, 362, 135).

  2. Free at Last: AN Energetic Pulsar Escapes its Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, Fernando

    2002-09-01

    PSR J1016-5857 is a young and energetic pulsar located just outside the supernova remnant (SNR) G284.3-1.8. The morphology of the system argues that the pulsar has a high space velocity, and has caught up with and now overtaken its associated SNR. We have identified an EINSTEIN source, which in the above hypothesis is likely to be a cometary nebula powered by the pulsar. We here propose a short CHANDRA observation of this X-ray source to determine whether it is indeed associated with the pulsar. With the resulting morphological data, we can confirm or refute the pulsar/SNR association, and can probe the pulsar's spin history and interaction with its environment.

  3. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

  4. Non-cosmological FRBs from young supernova remnant pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Liam; Sievers, Jonathan; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new extra but non-cosmological explanation for fast radio bursts (FRBs) based on very young pulsars in supernova remnants. Within a few hundred years of a core-collapse supernova, the ejecta is confined within ˜1 pc, providing a high enough column density of free electrons for the observed 375-1600 pc cm-3 of dispersion measure (DM). By extrapolating a Crab-like pulsar to its infancy in an environment like that of SN 1987A, we hypothesize such an object could emit supergiant pulses sporadically which would be bright enough to be seen at a few hundred megaparsecs. We hypothesize that such supergiant pulses would preferentially occur early in the pulsar's life when the free electron density is still high, which is why we do not see large numbers of moderate DM FRBs (≲300 pc cm-3). In this scenario, Faraday rotation at the source gives rotation measures (RMs) much larger than the expected cosmological contribution. If the emission were pulsar-like, then the polarization vector could swing over the duration of the burst, which is not expected from non-rotating objects. In this model, the scattering, large DM, and commensurate RM all come from one place which is not the case for the cosmological interpretation. The model also provides testable predictions of the flux distribution and repeat rate of FRBs, and could be furthermore verified by spatial coincidence with optical supernovae of the past several decades and cross-correlation with nearby galaxy maps.

  5. Radio-Quiet Pulsars and Point Sources in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David

    2002-04-01

    Since Baade and Zwicky made their prescient remark identifying the central blue star in the Crab Nebula as a neutron star, this pulsar's period has increased by 0.9 msec, turning 10^48 ergs of rotational kinetic energy into a relativistic wind that has been deposited in its surroundings. This makes the compact remnant of the supernova of 1054 AD highly conspicuous. It also makes this remnant highly anomalous. Nowhere else in the Galaxy does such a luminous young pulsar exists, despite the fact that at least half a dozen core-collapse supernovae have occurred since the Crab's birth. Indeed, the newly discovered central object in Cas A is four orders of magnitude less luminous in the X-ray band. While the Chandra and XMM-Newton Observatories are discovering an increasing number of Crab-like synchrotron nebulae (albeit, far less luminous than the prototype), they are also revealing X-ray point sources inside supernova remnants that lack detectable radio pulses and show no evidence of a relativistic outflow to power a surrounding nebula. I will provide an inventory of these objects, discuss whether or not truly radio-silent young neutron stars exist, and speculate on the emission mechanisms and power sources which make such objects shine. I will conclude with a commentary on the implications of this population for the distributions of pulsar birth parameters such as spin period, magnetic field strength, and space velocity, as well as offer a glimpse of what future observations might reveal about the demographics of core-collapse remnants.

  6. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  7. Comparing supernova remnants around strongly magnetized and canonical pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Rea, N.; Torres, D. F.; Papitto, A.

    2014-11-01

    The origin of the strong magnetic fields measured in magnetars is one of the main uncertainties in the neutron star field. On the other hand, the recent discovery of a large number of such strongly magnetized neutron stars is calling for more investigation on their formation. The first proposed model for the formation of such strong magnetic fields in magnetars was through alpha-dynamo effects on the rapidly rotating core of a massive star. Other scenarios involve highly magnetic massive progenitors that conserve their strong magnetic moment into the core after the explosion, or a common envelope phase of a massive binary system. In this work, we do a complete re-analysis of the archival X-ray emission of the supernova remnants (SNRs) surrounding magnetars, and compare our results with all other bright X-ray emitting SNRs, which are associated with compact central objects (which are proposed to have magnetar-like B-fields buried in the crust by strong accretion soon after their formation), high-B pulsars and normal pulsars. We find that emission lines in SNRs hosting highly magnetic neutron stars do not differ significantly in elements or ionization state from those observed in other SNRs, neither averaging on the whole remnants, nor studying different parts of their total spatial extent. Furthermore, we find no significant evidence that the total X-ray luminosities of SNRs hosting magnetars, are on average larger than that of typical young X-ray SNRs. Although biased by a small number of objects, we found that for a similar age, there is the same percentage of magnetars showing a detectable SNR than for the normal pulsar population.

  8. Numerical simulations of composite supernova remnants for small σ pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorster, M. J.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; de Jager, O. C.; Djannati-Ataï, A.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Composite supernova remnants consist of a pulsar wind nebula located inside a shell-type remnant. The presence of a shell has implications on the evolution of the nebula, although the converse is generally not true. Aims: The purpose of this paper is two-fold. The first aim is to determine the effect of the pulsar's initial luminosity and spin-down rate, the supernova ejecta mass, and density of the interstellar medium on the evolution of a spherically-symmetric, composite supernova remnant expanding into a homogeneous medium. The second aim is to investigate the evolution of the magnetic field in the pulsar wind nebula when the the composite remnant expands into a non-uniform interstellar medium. Methods: The Euler conservation equations for inviscid flow, together with the magnetohydrodynamic induction law in the kinematic limit, are solved numerically for a number of scenarios where the ratio of magnetic to particle energy is σ < 0.01. The simulations in the first part of the paper is solved in a one-dimensional configuration. In the second part of the paper, the effect of an inhomogeneous medium on the evolution is studied using a two-dimensional, axisymmetric configuration. Results: It is found that the initial spin-down luminosity and density of the interstellar medium has the largest influence on the evolution of the pulsar wind nebula. The spin-down time-scale of the pulsar only becomes important when this value is smaller than the time needed for the reverse shock of the shell remnant to reach the outer boundary of the nebula. For a remnant evolving in a non-uniform medium, the magnetic field along the boundary of the nebula will evolve to a value that is larger than the magnetic field in the interior. If the inhomogeneity of the interstellar medium is enhanced, while the spin-down luminosity is decreased, it is further found that a magnetic "cloud" is formed in a region that is spatially separated from the position of the pulsar.

  9. Observations of supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John W.; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    In the past few years, gamma-ray astronomy has entered a golden age thanks to two major breakthroughs: Cherenkov telescopes on the ground and the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite. The sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) detected at gamma-ray energies is now much larger: it goes from evolved supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds up to young shell-type supernova remnants and historical supernova remnants. Studies of SNRs are of great interest, as these analyses are directly linked to the long standing issue of the origin of the Galactic cosmic rays. In this context, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) need also to be considered since they evolve in conjunction with SNRs. As a result, they frequently complicate interpretation of the gamma-ray emission seen from SNRs and they could also contribute directly to the local cosmic ray spectrum, particularly the leptonic component. This paper reviews the current results and thinking on SNRs and PWNe and their connection to cosmic ray production. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Chandra Detection of a Pulsar Wind Nebula Associated With Supernova Remnant 3C 396

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olbert, C. M.; Keohane, J. W.; Arnaud, K. A.; Dyer, K. K.; Reynolds, S. P.; Safi-Harb, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a 100 ks observation of the Galactic supernova remnant 3C396 (G39.2-0.3) with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory that we compare to a 20cm map of the remnant from the Very Large Array. In the Chandra images, a nonthermal nebula containing an embedded pointlike source is apparent near the center of the remnant which we interpret as a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula surrounding a yet undetected pulsar. From the 2-10 keV spectrum for the nebula (N(sub H) = 5.3 plus or minus 0.9 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, GAMMA =1.5 plus or minus 0.3) we derive an unabsorbed x-ray flux of S(sub z)=1.62 x 10(exp -12) erg per square centimeter per second, and from this we estimate the spin-down power of the neutron star to be E(sup dot) = 7.2 x 10(exp 36) ergs per second. The central nebula is morphologically complex, showing bent, extended structure. The radio and X-ray shells of the remnant correlate poorly on large scales, particularly on the eastern half of the remnant, which appears very faint in X-ray images. At both radio and X-ray wavelengths the western half of the remnant is substantially brighter than the east.

  11. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-09-10

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼10{sup 10-11} G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large.

  12. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant Associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    I am pleased to be able to report significant progress in my research relevant to my LTSA grant. This progress I believe is demonstrated by a long list of publications in 2002, as detailed below. I summarize the research results my collaborators and I obtained in 2002. First, my group announced the major discovery of soft-gamma-repeater-like X-ray bursts from the anomalous X-ray pulsars lE-1048.1$-$5937 and lE-2259+586, using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. This result provides an elegant and long-sought-after confirmation that this class of objects and the soft gamma repeaters share a common nature, namely that they are magnetars. Magnetars are a novel manifestation of young neutron stars, quite different from conventional Crab-like radio pulsars. This discovery was made as part of our regular monitoring program, among the goals of which was to detect such outbursts.

  13. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars. PMID:18927355

  14. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  15. AN EXTREME PULSAR TAIL PROTRUDING FROM THE FRYING PAN SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Bouchard, A.; Bucciantini, N.; Gaensler, B. M.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.

    2012-02-10

    The Frying Pan (G315.9-0.0) is a radio supernova remnant with a peculiar linear feature (G315.78-0.23) extending 10' radially outward from the rim of the shell. We present radio imaging and polarization observations obtained from the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, confirming G315.78-0.23 as a bow-shock pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the young pulsar J1437-5959. This is one of the longest pulsar tails observed in radio and it has a physical extent over 20 pc. We found a bow-shock standoff distance of 0.002 pc, smallest among similar systems, suggesting a large pulsar velocity over 1000 km s{sup -1} and a high Mach number {approx}200. The magnetic field geometry inferred from radio polarimetry shows a good alignment with the tail orientation, which could be a result of high flow speed. There are also hints that the postshock wind has a low magnetization and is dominated by electrons and positrons in energy. This study shows that PWNe can offer a powerful probe of their local environment, particularly for the case of a bow shock where the parent supernova shell is also detected.

  16. Joint USSR-Australia Shklovskii Memorial Symposium on Supernova Remnants and Pulsars, Pushchino, USSR, June 8-11, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on SNRs and pulsars are presented. The topics discussed include: synthesis surveys of southern SNRs, structure and source of radio emission in old SNRs, daily observations of three period jumps of the Vela pulsar, two types of pulsar, 843 MHz observations of Cir X-1 and G321.9-0.3, radio emission model of a 'typical' pulsar, relationship between supernova type and their remnants, atlas of SNR magnetic fields, and models for the emission line spectra of oxygen-rich SNRs. Also addressed are: nonstationary phenomena in the radiation of young SNRs, SNR morphology, biannular structure in SNRs, problems of estimating distances to pulsars, spatial distribution of pulsars and SNRs, correlation properties of a short-scale microstructure of pulsar radio emission within a 100 kHz bandwidth, SNRs with jets, and decametric emission by pulsars.

  17. Supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decourchelle, A.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants result from the explosion of a star and keep trace, in their young ejecta-dominated phase, both of the explosion mechanism and to a lesser extent of the nature of the progenitor. They inject a large amount of energy into their surroundings, which impacts significantly the interstellar medium and to a larger extent the working of the galaxy by distributing heavy elements, heating to tens of million degrees large fractions of gas, accelerating high-energy particles, generating turbulence and amplification of the magnetic field. I will review the observational results on supernova remnants and their related scientific issues before suggesting directions for future ambitious XMM-Newton observations.

  18. Non-thermal emission in astrophysical environments: From pulsars to supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomiashvili, David

    The study of electromagnetic radiation from distant astrophysical objects provides essential data in understanding physics of these sources. In particular, non-thermal radiation provides great insight into the properties of local environments, particle populations, and emission mechanisms, knowledge which otherwise would remain untapped. Throughout the projects conducted for this dissertation, we modeled certain aspects of observed non-thermal emission from three classes of sources: radio pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. Orbital variation in the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B can be used to probe the details of the magnetospheric structure of pulsar B. Strongly magnetized wind from pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B in a way similar to the solar wind's distortion of the Earth's magnetosphere. Using the two complimentary models of pulsar B's magnetosphere, adapted from the Earth's magnetosphere models by Dungey and Tsyganenko, we determine the precise location of the coherent radio emission generation region in pulsar B's magnetosphere. This analysis is complemented by modeling the observed evolution of the pulse profiles of B due to geodetic precession. The emission region is located at about 3750 stellar radii and has a horseshoe-like shape centered on the polar magnetic field lines. The best fit angular parameters of the emission region indicate that radio emission is generated on the field lines which, according to the theoretical models, originate close to the poles and carry the maximum current. When considered together, not only do the results of the two models converge, they can explain why the modulation of B's radio emission at A's period is observed only within a certain orbital phase region. We discuss the implications of these results for pulsar magnetospheric models and mechanisms of coherent radio emission generation. We also developed a spatially-resolved, analytic model for the high-energy non

  19. Mapping supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae across decades of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John W.

    2016-04-01

    Ground- and space-based gamma ray observatories of the past decade have given us a new understanding of particle accelerators in our galaxy. The improved spatial resolution and sensitivity of recent gamma-ray surveys of the Galactic plane have resolved confusion of sources identified numerous sources to study the physics of particle acceleration and the diffusion of energetic particles into the galaxy. Here I highlight some recent studies of Galactic accelerators from GeV to TeV energies, that allow us to disentangle hadronic from leptonic emission, constrain cosmic ray diffusion, and measure the conditions of particle acceleration. Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae are found to be the two most common Galactic sources identified in very high energy gamma rays, and the future capabilities of CTA promise a dramatic increase in our knowledge of these classes which are currently limited to only a few of the most well-studied cases.

  20. Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The observation of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma rays is an excellent tool to study the most energetic and violent environments in the Galaxy. This energy range is only accessible with ground-based instruments such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) that reconstruct the energy and direction of the primary gamma ray by observing the Cherenkov light from the induced extended air showers in Earths atmosphere. The main goals of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are the identification of individual sources of cosmic rays (CRs), such as supernova remnants (SNRs), and the study of other extreme astrophysical objects at the highest energies, such as gamma-ray binaries and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). One of the main challenges is the discrimination between leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray production channels. To that end, the gamma-ray signal from each individual source needs to be brought into context with the multi-wavelength environment of the astrophysical object in question, particularly with observations tracing the density of the surrounding interstellar medium, or synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons. In this review presented at the European Cosmic Ray Symposium 2014 (ECRS2014), the most recent developments in the field of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are highlighted, with particular emphasis on SNRs and PWNe.

  1. Anti-magnetars: Revealing the Pulsar Properties of Central Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthelf, Eric

    This proposal is to fund the analysis of large data sets that we were awarded in XMM- Newton AO9 to search for the pulsation periods and measure the spin-down rates of Central Compact Objects (CCOs) in supernova remnants (SNRs). These observations include a Large Program (350 ks) to search for the pulsar in Cas A, and a multi-epoch timing program (200 ks total) to measure the spin-down rate and dipole magnetic field strength of the newly discovered 0.112 s PSR J0821-4300 in Puppis A. These observations are motivated by growing evidence that the class of CCOs, which are detected only in X-rays and are the least conspicuous of young neutron stars, are characterized by weak dipole magnetic fields and relatively long initial spin periods. As such, they may comprise a large fraction of neutron star births. From upper limits that we established on their spin-down rates, as well as one measurement of P-dot in a CCO, we developed the "anti-magnetar" model, which describes CCOs as pulsars with even weaker magnetic fields (B_s = 1.e10-1.e11 G) than ordinary young pulsars. The approved observations will provide strong confirmation of this model if the expected slow spin-down rate of PSR J0821-4300 is measured, and if similar spin properties are discovered from the Cas A CCO. The remaining mystery of CCOs is what maintains their small, hot regions of surface thermal X-ray emission. Spin-down power is insufficient; otherwise, only the effects of strong (B_s > 1.e13 G) magnetic fields are thought able to enforce nonuniform surface temperature, in apparent contradiction to the anti-magnetar hypothesis. We will apply a detailed ray-tracing code to model the energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectra of PSR J0821-430 and other CCOs in order to determine the geometry of their surface hot spots with respect to the rotation axis and viewing direction. Evidence for cyclotron resonance lines in the spectra will also be modeled as a function of rotation phase, which will

  2. The Duck Redux: An Improved Proper-Motion Upper Limit for the Pulsar B1757-24 near the Supernova Remnant G5.4-1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, J. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Chatterjee, S.; van der Swaluw, E.; Camilo, F.; Stappers, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    ``The Duck'' is a complicated nonthermal radio system, consisting of the energetic radio pulsar B1757-24, its surrounding pulsar wind nebula G5.27-0.90, and the adjacent supernova remnant (SNR) G5.4-1.2. PSR B1757-24 was originally claimed to be a young (~15,000 yr) and extreme-velocity (>~1500 km s-1) pulsar, which had penetrated and emerged from the shell of the associated SNR G5.4-1.2 but recent upper limits on the pulsar's motion have raised serious difficulties with this interpretation. We here present 8.5 GHz interferometric observations of the nebula G5.27-0.90 over a 12 yr baseline, doubling the time span of previous measurements. These data correspondingly allow us to halve the previous upper limit on the nebula's westward motion to 14 mas yr-1 (5 σ), allowing a substantive reevaluation of this puzzling object. We rule out the possibility that the pulsar and SNR were formed from a common supernova explosion ~15,000 yr ago, as implied by the pulsar's characteristic age, but conclude that an old (>~70,000 yr) pulsar/SNR association, or a situation in which the pulsar and SNR are physically unrelated, are both still viable explanations.

  3. Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebula in the Supernova Remnant IC443: Preliminary Observations from the Chandra Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyibi, E. A.

    2009-10-01

    Preliminary observations of the Chandra data were made in order to study the Pulsar Wind Nebula in the Supernova Remnant IC443. The Chandra X-ray observatory short observation on IC443 was centred on 13 chip ACIS. The CIAO analytical programme was used for the data analysis. The data were separated into point source, with an energy range of 2.1 to 10.0 keV, and diffuse source with energy less than 2.1 Kev. The resulting spectra were fitted to a power law. The observed density numbers and the normalised counts of both the point source and the diffuse source were used to describe the X-ray source. Afin d'étudier la "Pulsar wind Nebula" dans le reste de la Supernova IC 443, nous avons mené une exploitation préliminaire des observations provenant du satellite spatiale Chandra. L'observation brêve de IC 443, par Chandra fut centrée sur les composantes du spectromètre identifiées par la séquence 13. Le programme informatique CIAO fut utilisé pour l'analyse des données. Les données furent groupées en sources ponctuelles, chacune ayant des énergies allant de 2.1 a 10.0 kev ; et en sources diffuses chacune avec des énergies de moins de 2.1 kev. Les spectres obtenus furent interpolés à l'aide de fonction puissance. La densité de flux ainsi que le décompte des particules induites au détecteur par le rayonnement provenant des sources ponctuelles et diffuses furent utilisés pour décrire la source de rayon-X.

  4. Observation of Crab-Like Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to observe the supernova remnants 3C58 and G21.5-0.9 and to search for pulsed emission. If a pulsar were to be found, the period derivative and inferred magnetic field would have extreme values if pulsar evolution had followed the standard model. If this is not the case, the standard model must be revised. We also sought to obtain very accurate measurement of the synchrotron emission spectrum of each remnant.

  5. The Young Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G11.2-0.3: An Asymmetric Circumstellar Medium and a Variable Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Moseby, A.; Reynolds, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    G11.2-0.3 is a young supernova remnant (SNR) that has been suggested to be associated with a historical supernova of 386 AD. In addition to a bright radio and X-ray shell, it contains a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and a 65 ms pulsar. We present first results from new deep (about 400 ks in duration) Chandra observations from 2013 May and September. Ahead of the main shell, there are a number of outlying X-ray protrusions surrounded by bow shocks, presumably produced by dense ejecta knots. Pronounced spectral variations are seen in thermal X-ray spectra of the main shell, indicating the presence of shocks with a wide range in shock speeds and large spatial variations in intervening absorption. A band of soft X-ray emission is clearly seen at the remnant's center. We interpret this band as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the strongly asymmetric wind produced by a red supergiant SN progenitor shortly before its explosion. We study interstellar absorption in the central region of the remnant, finding high absorption everywhere. This rules out the association of G11.2-0.3 with SN 386. The PWN is dominated by a bright "jet" whose spatial morphology is markedly different between our May and September observations.

  6. Discovery of a Be/X-ray pulsar binary and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Brunet, V.; Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a new Be/X-ray pulsar binary located in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The strong pulsed X-ray source was discovered with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. The X-ray pulse period of 1062 s is consistently determined from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, revealing one of the slowest rotating X-ray pulsars known in the SMC. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source is the emission-line star 2dFS 3831. Its B0-0.5(III)e+ spectral type is determined from VLT-FLAMES and 2dF optical spectroscopy, establishing the system as a Be/X-ray binary (Be-XRB). The hard X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a power law with additional thermal and blackbody components, the latter reminiscent of persistent Be-XRBs. This system is the first evidence of a recent supernova in the low-density surroundings of NGC 602. We detect a shell nebula around 2dFS 3831 in Hα and [O III] images and conclude that it is most likely a supernova remnant. If it is linked to the supernova explosion that created this new X-ray pulsar, its kinematic age of (2-4) × 104 yr provides a constraint on the age of the pulsar.

  7. Timing Behavior of the Magnetically Active Rotation-Powered Pulsar in the Supernova Remnant Kesteven 75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingstone, Margaret A.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    We report a large spin-up glitch in PSR J1846-0258 which coincided with the onset of magnetar-like behavior on 2006 May 31. We show that the pulsar experienced an unusually large glitch recovery, with a recovery fraction of Q = 5.9+/-0.3, resulting in a net decrease of the pulse frequency. Such a glitch recovery has never before been observed in a rotation-powered pulsar, however, similar but smaller glitch over-recovery has been recently reported in the magnetar AXP 4U 0142+61 and may have occurred in the SGR 1900+14. We discuss the implications of the unusual timing behavior in PSR J1846-0258 on its status as the first identified magnetically active rotation-powered pulsar.

  8. Chandra Detection of the High Magnetic Field Radio Pulsar J1119-6127in the Supernova Remnant G292.2-0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marjorie; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2003-07-01

    We report the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer detection of the X-ray counterpart of the high magnetic field, ~1600 yr old, 407 ms radio pulsar J1119-6127 associated with the supernova remnant G292.2-0.5. The powerful imaging capability of Chandra also unveiled, for the first time, a faint 3''×6'' pulsar wind nebula (PWN) at energies above ~1.2 keV. The X-ray emission from the pulsar and its associated nebula is well described by an absorbed power law model with a photon index Γ=2.2+0.6-0.3. The corresponding 0.5-10 keV unabsorbed X-ray luminosity is (5.5+10-3.3)×1032 ergs s-1 (at 6 kpc). When compared to two other pulsars with similar spin and magnetic properties, J1119-6127 stands out as being the least efficient at turning rotational kinetic energy into X-ray emission. This study shows that high magnetic field radio pulsars can be significant X-ray emitters, and Chandra is needed to study the emission properties of the pulsars and associated faint PWNs.

  9. Discovery of Radio Pulsations from the X-ray Pulsar JO205+6449 in Supernova Remnant 3C58 with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camilo, F.; Stairs, I. H.; Lorimer, D. R.; Backer, D. C.; Ransom, S. M.; Klein, B.; Wielebinski, R.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery with the 100m Green Bank Telescope of 65 ms radio pulsations from the X-ray pulsar J0205+6449 at the center of supernova remnant 3C58, making this possibly the youngest radio pulsar known. From our observations at frequencies of 820 and 1375 MHz, the free electron column density to USSR J0205+6449 is found to be 140.7 +/- 0.3/cc pc. The barycentric pulsar period P and P(dot) determined from a phase-coherent timing solution are consistent with the values previously measured from X-ray observations. The averaged radio profile of USSR J0205+6449 consists of one sharp pulse of width = 3 ms = 0.05 P. The pulsar is an exceedingly weak radio source, with pulse-averaged flux density in the 1400 MHz band of approximately 45 micro-Jy and a spectral index of approximately -2.1. Its radio luminosity of approximately 0.5 may kpc(exp 2) at 1400 MHz is lower than that of approximately 99% of known pulsar and is the lowest among known young pulsars.

  10. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  11. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ho, W. C. G.; Weltevrede, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Shannon, R.; Gonzalez, M. E.

    2012-12-10

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  12. Late-Time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P.; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock(RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center of the remnant. We present hydrodynamical simulations of G327.1-1.1 that show that its morphology and evolution can be described by a approx. 17,000 yr old composite SNR that expanded into a density gradient with an orientation perpendicular to the pulsar's motion. We also show that the RSPWN interaction scenario can reproduce the broadband spectrum of the PWN from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The analysis and modeling presented in this work have important implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  13. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  14. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  15. Chandra and XMM-Newton Studies of the Supernova Remnant G292.2-0.5 Associated with the Pulsar J1119-6127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Harsha S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Gonzalez, Marjorie E.

    2012-08-01

    We present the first detailed imaging and spatially resolved spectroscopic study of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G292.2-0.5, associated with the high-magnetic field radio pulsar (PSR) J1119-6127, using Chandra and XMM-Newton. The high-resolution X-ray images reveal a partially limb-brightened morphology in the west, with diffuse emission concentrated toward the interior of the remnant unlike the complete shell-like morphology observed at radio wavelengths. The spectra of most of the diffuse emission regions within the remnant are best described by a two-component thermal+non-thermal model. The thermal component is described by a plane-parallel, non-equilibrium ionization plasma model with a temperature kT ranging from 1.3+0.3 -0.2 keV in the western side of the remnant to 2.3+2.9 -0.5 keV in the east, a column density increasing from 1.0+0.1 -0.6 × 1022 cm-2 in the west to 1.8+0.2 -0.4 × 1022 cm-2 in the east, and a low ionization timescale ranging from (5.7+0.8 -0.7) × 109 cm-3 s in the SNR interior to (3.6+0.7 -0.6) × 1010 cm-3 s in the western side—suggestive of expansion of a young remnant in a low-density medium. The spatial and spectral differences across the SNR are consistent with the presence of a dark cloud in the eastern part of the SNR, absorbing the soft X-ray emission, as also revealed by the optical image of that region. The spectra from some of the regions also show slightly enhanced metal abundances from Ne, Mg, and Si, hinting at the first evidence for ejecta heated by the reverse shock. Comparing our inferred metal abundances to core-collapse nucleosynthesis models yields, we estimate a high progenitor mass of ~30 M ⊙ suggesting a Type Ib/c supernova. We confirm the presence of non-thermal X-ray emission from regions close to the pulsar, with the emission characterized by a power-law model with a hard photon index similar to that seen in the compact pulsar wind nebula. We estimate an SNR age range between 4.2 kyr (free expansion

  16. The slow X-ray pulsar SXP 1062 and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C.; Gallagher, J. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2013-03-01

    SXP 1062 is an exceptional case of a young neutron star in a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary associated with a supernova remnant. A unique combination of measured spin period, its derivative, luminosity and young age makes this source a key probe for the physics of accretion and neutron star evolution. Theoretical models proposed to explain the properties of SXP 1062 shall be tested with new data.

  17. A search for stellar remnants of supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, R. A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Winkler, P. F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The slitless spectra of the stars in the central regions of six galactic supernova remnants Cas A, Kepler, Tycho, SN 1006, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop were obtained with the prime focus transmission gratings at the 4M telescopes on Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. It was found that no stellar remnant with an unusually blue or peculiar spectrum is present in any of the remnants down to the limit of m sub pg of 18.5. Except for the Cygnus Loop, the area searched in each remnant is large enough that objects with transverse velocities of 1000 km/s would be well within the field. The results are also compared with a computation of emission from gas near a neutron star and with the unpulsed emission from the Crab pulsar; in both cases upper limits were set which place constraints on a possible condensed stellar remnant.

  18. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  19. Multi-frequency observations of SNR J0453-6829 in the LMC. A composite supernova remnant with a pulsar wind nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Filipović, M. D.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Crawford, E. J.; Points, S. D.; Pietsch, W.; De Horta, A. Y.; Tothill, N.; Payne, J. L.; Sasaki, M.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is rich in supernova remnants (SNRs), which can be investigated in detail with radio, optical, and X-ray observations. SNR J0453-6829 is an X-ray and radio-bright remnant in the LMC, within which previous studies revealed the presence of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), making it one of the most interesting SNRs in the Local Group of galaxies. Aims: We study the emission of SNR J0453-6829 to improve our understanding of its morphology, spectrum, and thus the emission mechanisms in the shell and the PWN of the remnant. Methods: We obtained new radio data with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and analysed archival XMM-Newton observations of SNR J0453-6829. We studied the morphology of SNR J0453-6829 from radio, optical, and X-ray images and investigated the energy spectra in the different parts of the remnant. Results: Our radio results confirm that this LMC SNR hosts a typical PWN. The prominent central core of the PWN exhibits a radio spectral index αCore of -0.04 ± 0.04, while in the rest of the SNR shell the spectral slope is somewhat steeper with αShell = -0.43 ± 0.01. We detect regions with a mean polarisation of P ≅ (12 ± 4)% at 6 cm and (9 ± 2)% at 3 cm. The full remnant is of roughly circular shape with dimensions of (31 ± 1) pc × (29 ± 1) pc. The spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC and RGS spectra allowed us to derive physical parameters for the SNR. Somewhat depending on the spectral model, we obtain for the remnant a shock temperature of around 0.2 keV and estimate the dynamical age to 12 000-15 000 years. Using a Sedov model we further derive an electron density in the X-ray emitting material of 1.56 cm-3, typical for LMC remnants, a large swept-up mass of 830 M⊙, and an explosion energy of 7.6 × 1050 erg. These parameters indicate a well evolved SNR with an X-ray spectrum dominated by emission from the swept-up material.

  20. Discovery of a 105-ms X-ray Pulsar in Kesteven-79: On the Nature of Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Seward, F. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of 105-ms X-ray pulsations from the compact central object (CCO) in the supernova remnant \\snr\\ using data acquired with the {\\it Newton X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission). Using two observations of the pulsar taken 6-days apart we derive an upper limit on its spin-down rate of $\\dot P < 9 \\times 10"{-14}$-s-${-l)$,a nd find no evidence for binary orbital motion. The implied energy loss rate is $\\dot E < 3 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-s$A{-1)$, polar magnetic field strength is $B-{\\rm p) < 3 \\times 10A{12)$-G, and spin-down age is $\\tau > 18.5$-kyr. The latter exceeds the remnant's estimated age, suggesting that the pulsar was born spinning near its current period. The X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ is best characterized as a blackbody of temperature $kT {BB) =, 0.43\\pm0.02$ keV, radius $R-{BB) \\approx 1.3$-km, and $I{\\rm bol) = 5.2 \\times 10A{33)$ ergs-sSA{-1)$ at $d = 7.1$-kpc. The sinusoidal light curve is modulated with a pulsed fraction of $>45\\%$, suggestive of a small hot spot on the surface of the rotating neutron star. The lack of a discernible pulsar wind nebula is consistent with an interpretation of \\psr\\ as a rotation-powered pulsar whose spin-down luminosity falls below the empirical threshold for generating bright wind nebulae, $\\dot E-{\\rm c) = 4 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-sSA{-I)$. The age discrepancy suggests that its $\\dot E$ has always been below $\\dot E c$, perhaps a distinguishing property of the CCOs. Alternatively, the X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ suggests a low-luminosity AXP, but the weak inferred $B-{\\rm p)$ field is incompatible with a magnetar theory of its X-ray luminosity. The ordinary spin parameters discovered from \\psr\\ highlight the inability of existing theories to explain the high luminosities and temperatures of CCO thermal X-ray spectra.

  1. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  2. Discovery of a Young, Energetic Pulsar Near the Supernova Remnant G290.1-0.8 and the Gamma-Ray Source 2EG J1103-6106

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, V. M.; Bailes, M.; Manchester, R. N.; Stappers, B. W.; Sandhu, J.; Navarro, J.; D'Amico, N.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the discovery and follow-up timing observations of a 63-ms radio pulsar, PSR J1105-6107. We show that the pulsar is young, having a characteristic age of only 63kyr. We consider its possible association with the nearby remnant G290.1-0.8 (MSH 11-61A) but uncertainties in the distances and ages preclude a firm conclusion.

  3. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): AN EVOLVED PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, H.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R. E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2013-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by {approx}100'' and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source-the putative pulsar-at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for {approx}250''. The spectra of the point source, compact nebula, and extended diffuse nebula are all well described by a power-law model with a photon index of 1.1 (0.7-1.6), 1.2 (0.9-1.4), and 1.7 (1.5-1.8), respectively, for a column density N{sub H} = 1.38 (1.21-1.57) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (90% confidence). The total X-ray luminosity of the source is {approx}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} at an assumed distance of 6.1 kpc, with {approx}2% and 6% contribution from the point source and compact nebula, respectively. The observed properties suggest that CTB 87 is an evolved ({approx}5-28 kyr) PWN, with the extended radio emission likely a ''relic'' PWN, as in Vela-X and G327.1-1.1. To date, however, there is no evidence for thermal X-ray emission from this SNR, and the SNR shell is still missing, suggesting expansion into a low-density medium (n{sub 0} < 0.2 D{sup -1/2}{sub 6.1} cm{sup -3}), likely caused by a stellar wind bubble blown by the

  4. Observing Supernovae and Supernova Remnants with JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable near- and mid-infrared studies of supernovae (SN) and supernova remnants (SNR) in the Milky Way and galaxies throughout the local universe and to high redshift. JWST's instrumentation provides imaging, coronography, and spectroscopy (R<3000) over the wavelength range 1-29 microns. The unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution will enable spectroscopic study of new and recent supernovae, including molecule and dust formation, in galaxies at least out to 30 Mpc, and imaging to much greater distances. The Target of Opportunity response time can be as short as 48 hours, enabling quick follow-up observations of important SN events. JWST will be ideal for the study of Galactic and Magellanic Clouds supernova remnants, particularly young remnants with hot dust. Its high angular resolution (0.07" at 2 microns, 0.7" at 20 microns) will allow direct comparison between the IR, optical, and X-ray morphologies, identifying sites of dust emission in both the ejecta and the shocked ISM unresolved by previous IR telescopes. There is a rich spectrum of atomic lines (H, He I, [Si I], [Fe II], [Ni I-III], [Co II-III], [S III-IV], [Ar II-III], [Ne II, III, V], [O IV]) and molecules (CO, SiO, H2) of importance for SN and SNR studies. JWST is a large aperture (6.5m), cryogenic, infrared-optimized space observatory under construction by NASA, ESA, and CSA for launch in 2018. The JWST observatory will be placed in an Earth-Sun L2 orbit by an Ariane 5 launch vehicle provided by ESA. The observatory is designed for a 5-year prime science mission, with consumables for 10 years of science operations. The first call for proposals for JWST observations will be released in 2017.

  5. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  6. Supernovae, young remnants, and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshner, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical abundance data from extragalactic supernovae and from supernova remnants (SNR) less than 1000 yrs old are employed to show that nuclear burning beyond helium synthesis actually occurs. Supernova (SN) are classified into types I or II, having no hydrogen lines or featuring hydrogen lines, respectively. The SN I's have been observed as having a preponderance of Fe lines, and emitting from a source at around 12,000 K with a center continuum of approximately 10 AU. Decay chains which could account for detected luminosities and spectra are presented, noting a good fit of Fe II spectrum with observed SN spectra. SNR pass through younger and older stages, going from the outpouring of material to diffusion in the interstellar medium. Expanding flocculi from young SNR show oxygen abundances as well as lines from sulfur, calcium, and argon, with a corresponding necessity of an explosive source of 15 solar masses.

  7. When will a pulsar in supernova 1987a be seen?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis; Kennel, C. F.; Fowler, William A.

    1987-01-01

    The means by which a pulsar might be detected in the remnant of supernova 1987a in the Large Magellanic Cloud is examined. One possibility is that the slower-than-radioactive decay typically seen in the type II light curves is itself the sign of powering by the underlying pulsar, with the decline representing not the spinning down of the pulsar but rather the declining nebular opacity that would allow increasing amounts of the energy to escape as gamma rays. The test of this hypothesis (if the supernova conforms to type II expectations) would be to look for the 'missing' energy in the form of those gamma rays that escape from the remnant instead of powering it.

  8. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  9. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  10. A Compact Central Object in the Supernova Remnant Kesteven 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, F. D.; Slane, P. O.; Smith, R. K.; Sun, M.

    2003-02-01

    A Chandra X-ray observation has detected an unresolved source at the center of the supernova remnant Kes 79. The best single-model fit to the source spectrum is a blackbody with an X-ray luminosity of LX(0.3-8.0keV)=7×1033 ergs s-1. There is no evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula. There are no cataloged counterparts at other wavelengths, but the absorption is high. The source properties are similar to the central source in Cas A even though the Kes 79 remnant is considerably older.

  11. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  12. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, Anna; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Dinçel, Baha

    2016-07-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 % of the massive stars are a part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  13. THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY: THE FASTEST ROTATING O-TYPE STAR AND SHORTEST PERIOD LMC PULSAR-REMNANTS OF A SUPERNOVA DISRUPTED BINARY?

    SciTech Connect

    Dufton, P. L.; Dunstall, P. R.; Fraser, M.; Evans, C. J.; Brott, I.; Cantiello, M.; Langer, N.; De Koter, A.; Sana, H.; De Mink, S. E.; Henault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D.; Howarth, I. D.; Lennon, D. J.; Markova, N.

    2011-12-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500 km s{sup -1} and probably as large as 600 km s{sup -1}; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40 km s{sup -1} from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pc from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion, respectively.

  14. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  15. Observations of young core collapse supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziamtzis, Anestis

    Studies of young remnants offer an opportunity to test theoretical models of stellar evolution, explosion models and nucleosynthesis, as well as our understanding of the compact objects in the centre of the exploded stars. The first part of the thesis involves observations of the Crab nebula. We have used photometric and spectroscopic observations to search for a faint halo around the visible nebula, that could carry the missing mass and kinetic energy of the nebula. No halo was found. In the photometric data due to psf contamination, and in the spectroscopic no fast velocity components were present. We have also used optical and IR photometry to check for variation in the emissivity and dynamic structure of the Crab pulsar wind nebula (PWN), to try to understand the nature of plerionic PWNe. There, we measured flux variations up to 20% in the IR and also shifting of the wisps with velocities up to 0.2c. We also showed that the nearby red knot moves in tandem with the Crab pulsar. The second part of the thesis, deals with photometric & spectroscopic observations of SN 1987A in the LMC. The aim of the project was to monitor the evolution of the outer rings (ORs) of SN 1987A. The fading of the ORs is consistent with recombination and cooling after the initial flash ionization by the supernova. From the spectroscopic data we measured the density and temperature in the ORs where we found temperatures of ~ 12,000 K for the [N II] gas, and ~ 25,000 K for the [O III]. Finally, from the [O II], and [S II] ratios we estimated electron densities of ~ 1,000 cm-3 and ~ 2,500 cm-3, respectively. From the evolution of Hα, we argue that the highest density in the ORs could be 5,000 cm-3.

  16. Progenitor's Signatures in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The remnants of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can provide important clues about their progenitor histories. We discuss two well-observed supernova remnants (SNRs) that are believed to have resulted from SNe Ia, and use various tools to shed light on the possible progenitor histories. We find that Kepler's SNR is consistent with a symbiotic binary progenitor consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB star. Our hydrosimulations can reproduce the observed kinematic and morphological properties. For Tycho's remnant we use the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and kinematics to show that the ejecta has likely interacted with dense circumstellar gas.

  17. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer

  18. Optical supernova remnant observations from Skinakas Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatakis, F.; Papamastorakis, J.; Ventura, J.; Boumis, P.

    High energy studies of supernova remnants provide direct insight into major properties of these objects. Morphological and spectral studies of remnants in X-rays allow us to estimate parameters like the age of the remnant, the explosion energy and the ambient interstellar density. Optical studies of supernova remnants focus on the interaction of the primary blast wave with dense "clouds" found in the insterstellar medium. Optical observations of individual remnants performed at Skinakas Observatory in Crete, Greece consist of flux calibrated wide field CCD images taken with the 0.3 m telescope and absolute flux calibrated long-slit spectra obtained with the 1.3 m telescope. The site conditions and the unique capabilities of a small telescope equipped with a CCD camera allowed us to perform high quality deep observations leading to the discovery of optical emission from several remnants for the first time. We present results on the known supernova remnants G65.3+5.7, G82.2+5.3, G114.3+0.3 as well as current results on previously unknown filamentary structures and probable candidate remnants. Typical densities of the interstellar "clouds" are of the order of a few atoms per cm3 , and the shock velocities are found in the range of 90-140 km s-1 . The optical spectra further suggest the presence of moderate magnetic fields of several μG.

  19. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer

  20. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter. PMID:19792708

  1. Optical supernova remnant observations from Skinakas Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatakis, F.; Papamastorakis, J.; Ventura, J.; Boumis, P.

    High energy studies of supernova remnants provide direct insight into major properties of these objects. Morphological and spectral studies of remnants in X-rays allow us to estimate parameters like the age of the remnant, the explosion energy and the ambient interstellar density. Optical studies of supernova remnants focus on the interaction of the primary blast wave with dense "clouds" found in the interstellar medium. Optical observations of individual remnants performed at Skinakas Observatory in Crete, Greece consist of flux calibrated wide field CCD images taken with the 0.3 m telescope and absolute flux calibrated long-slit spectra obtained with the 1.3 m telescope. The site conditions and the unique capabilities of a small telescope equipped with a CCD camera allowed us to perform high quality deep observations leading to the discovery of optical emission from several remnants for the first time. We present results on the known supernova remnants G73.9+0.9, G82.2+5.3 as well as current results on previously unknown filamentary structures. Typical densities of the interstellar "clouds" are of the order of a few atoms per cm 3, and the shock velocities are found in the range of 90-140 km s -1. The optical spectra further suggest the presence of moderate magnetic fields.

  2. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solinger, A.; Buff, J.; Rappaport, S.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the 'adiabatic' assumption in supernova-remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast-wave model.

  3. Evolution of multiple supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Nath, Biman B.; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Heating of the interstellar medium (ISM) by multiple supernova (SN) explosions is at the heart of producing galaxy-scale outflows in starburst galaxies. Standard models of outflows assume a high efficiency of SNe in heating the gas to X-ray emitting temperatures and filling the central region of starburst with hot gas, in order to launch vigorous outflows. We use hydrodynamical simulations to study the efficiency of multiple SNe in heating the ISM and filling the volume with gas of high temperatures. We argue that it is important for SN remnants to have a large filling factor and a large heating efficiency. For this, they have to be clustered in space and time, and keep exploding until the hot gas percolates through the whole region, in order to compensate for the radiative loss. In the case of a limited number of SNe, we find that although the filling factor can be large, the heating efficiency declines after reaching a large value. In the case of a continuous series of SNe, the hot gas (T ≥ 3 × 106 K) can percolate through the whole region after the total volume filling factor reaches a threshold of ˜0.3. The efficiency of heating the gas to X-ray temperatures can be ≥0.1 after this percolation epoch, which occurs after a period of ≈10 Myr for a typical starburst SN rate density of νSN ≈ 10-9 pc-3 yr-1 and gas density of n ≈ 10 cm-3 in starburst nuclei regions. This matches the recent observations of a time delay of similar order between the onset of star formation and galactic outflows. The efficiency to heat gas up to X-ray temperatures (≥106.5 K) roughly scales as ν _SN^{0.2} n^{-0.6}. For a typical SN rate density and gas density in starburst nuclei, the heating efficiency is ˜0.15, also consistent with previous interpretations from X-ray observations. We discuss the implications of our results with regard to observational diagnostics of ionic ratios and emission measures in starburst nuclei regions.

  4. X-ray imaging - Supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to imaging observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) obtained during the first year of the Einstein Observatory's operation. Inferences are drawn regarding models for stellar explosions, remnant evolution, neutron star formation and the interstellar medium. Because the X-ray emission traces the expanding shock boundary and dominates the radiative energy losses of an SNR over much of its lifetime, it can provide data on the possible collapsed remnants of the explosion, such as neutron stars and/or black holes. X-ray emission also allows a supernova shock to be used as a probe of interstellar medium structure. The imaging instrument aboard the Einstein satellite has been used to observe over 30 known Galactic remnants, and a similar number of objects in other galaxies, in the 0.15-4.5 keV band.

  5. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  6. New supernova remnant results from radio surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    Our knowledge of the Galactic supernova remnant population is woefully incomplete A total of 231 remnants appear in the latest catalog Green 2004 whereas we expect the total population to be between 500 and 1000 Helfand et al 1989 The current discovery rate of new remnants has averaged about four per year over the past two decades In recent years a number of new Galactic plane radio surveys have been undertaken which offer the possibility of significantly increasing this discovery rate For example the VLA MAGPIS survey Helfand et al 2006 has identified fifty new remnant candidates in a 27-degree swath of Galactic longitude Unsurprisingly this high-resolution survey finds many more small-diameter remnants than past single-dish observations increasing by seven-fold the number of remnants with diameters less than 5 arcmin in this region of the Galaxy Brogan et al report 90 cm observations in this region identifying up to 35 new remnants I will review all published results on new radio remnants highlighting the impact of these discoveries on our understanding of the remnant population and noting the value of observations from the mid-infrared to TeV gamma rays in defining the Galaxy s remnant population This work is supported in part by grant AST 05-07598 from the National Science Foundation

  7. Imagery and spectroscopy of supernova remnants and H-2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities relating to supernova remnants were summarized. The topics reviewed include: progenitor stars of supernova remnants, UV/optical/radio/X-ray imagery of selected regions in the Cygnus Loop, UV/optical spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop spur, and extragalactic supernova remnant spectra.

  8. The Cygnus Loop: An Older Supernova Remnant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, William

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Cygnus Loop, one of brightest and most easily studied of the older "remnant nebulae" of supernova outbursts. Discusses some of the historical events surrounding the discovery and measurement of the Cygnus Loop and makes some projections on its future. (TW)

  9. The Rediscovery of the Antlia Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Alexander; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin; Haffner, L. Matthew; Hill, Alex S.; Barger, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    While undertaking a survey of velocity-resolved diffuse optical emission from the [S II] 6716 A line with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper, we have rediscovered the Antlia Supernova remnant, a 26 degree diameter remmant near the Gum Nebula that was originally detected in SHASSA (Southern H-alpha Sky Survey Atlas) by P. McCullough in 2002. The original discovery showed this remnant was associated with ¼ keV X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, and argued that Antlia was potentially the closest remnant to the Sun. We will present an analysis of the H-alpha and [S II] lines in this direction: the ratio of these lines indicate the shell is consistent with being a supernova remnant and the velocities allow us to constrain its age. We discuss this remnant in the context of the evolution of the entire Gum Nebula region, noting that its proximity and age make it possible to search for geochemical evidence of this remnant on Earth. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  10. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  11. "Suzaku Highlight Results on Supernova Remnants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Highlights of the early Suzaku (formerly Astro-E2) observations of supernova remnants are presented. Suzaku offers unique capabilities for the study of supernova remnants. The unprecedented combination of imaging and spectral resolution below 1 keV in the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) makes possible mapping of C, N and O abundances in Galactic remnants of all ages. The first detection of carbon lines in the Cygnus Loop and mapping of the O VII to O VIII ratio in SN 1006 demonstrate this capability. The XIS sensitivity to soft, low surface brightness emission is exemplified by spectroscopy in the 0.3-1.0 keV band of the North Polar Spur and other Galactic ISM structures. Such observations make possible inferences about plasma conditions and abundances. The sensitivity above 6 keV via a combination of the XIS (below 10 keV) and the Hard X-ray Detector (above 10 keV) allows broad band (2-40 keV) spectroscopy and mapping of extended remnants with hard emission components. These components are generally associated with sites of particle acceleration, and measuring their spectral shape potentially provides information about the TeV electron population and its acceleration and energy loss mechanisms. Examples of such remnants observed by Suzaku are the non-thermal emission dominated remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and RX J0852.0-4622, for which flux beyond 30 keV has been detected. The status of the mission and prospects for future groundbreaking observations of supernova remnants will be discussed.

  12. A Multiwavelength Study of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Robert

    The remnant of the supernova of 1572 A.D., now known as Tycho's Supernova Remnant (SNR), is one of the most well studied SNRs in existence, having been observed with telescopes from radio waves to gamma-rays. We propose a multi-wavelength study of this remnant, with particular focus on archival data in the infrared from Spitzer, WISE, and Herschel, and in gamma-rays from Fermi. The IR data is of extremely high-quality, and will allow us to answer or further constrain several mysteries regarding Tycho, known to be the remnant of a Type Ia supernova. Is the remnant a source of particle acceleration producing cosmic-rays in excess of 10^15 ev? What is the source of the gamma-ray emission seen at both GeV and TeV energies? What is the nature of the medium surrounding the remnant, into which it is currently expanding at over 4000 km/s? Has any dust formed in the iron-rich ejected material from the supernova? The answers to all of these questions will require a multi-wavelength approach, and we will supplement the IR and gamma-ray data here with archival X-ray data from both Chandra and XMM- Newton. In young SNRs like Tycho, IR and X-ray emission is inherently connected, since the hot ions and electrons that give rise to the thermal X-ray emission also heat (and destroy) dust grains in the post-shock gas. Infrared spectroscopy is a highly sensitive function of gas density, and provides a more powerful diagnostic tool for this parameter than X-rays alone do. This post-shock density is a crucial parameter for both particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission models, and the IR data will allow us to measure this density at any point in the remnant. We will explore the relationship between dust and gas in the immediate post-shock region. Because the blast wave is encountering the ambient Galactic ISM, this will provide strong constraints on the dust composition and dust-to-gas mass ratio in the general ISM. At all wavelengths, Tycho is a wealth of information, and by

  13. Pulsar recoil by large-scale anisotropies in supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Scheck, L; Plewa, T; Janka, H-Th; Kifonidis, K; Müller, E

    2004-01-01

    Assuming that the neutrino luminosity from the neutron star core is sufficiently high to drive supernova explosions by the neutrino-heating mechanism, we show that low-mode (l=1,2) convection can develop from random seed perturbations behind the shock. A slow onset of the explosion is crucial, requiring the core luminosity to vary slowly with time, in contrast to the burstlike exponential decay assumed in previous work. Gravitational and hydrodynamic forces by the globally asymmetric supernova ejecta were found to accelerate the remnant neutron star on a time scale of more than a second to velocities above 500 km s(-1), in agreement with observed pulsar proper motions. PMID:14753979

  14. Temperature relaxation in supernova remnants, revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, H.

    1984-01-01

    Some supernova remnants are expanding into a partially neutral medium. The neutral atoms which are engulfed by the fast blast shock are collisionally ionized to eject low-energy secondary electrons. Calculations are conducted of the temperature relaxation through Coulomb collisions among the secondary electrons, the shocked electrons, and the ions, assuming that the three species have Maxwellian velocity distributions. The results are applied to a self-similar blast wave. If the efficiency of collisionless electron heating at the shock front is high in young remnants such as Tycho, the secondary electrons may be much cooler than both the shocked electrons and the ions. In this case, the emergent X-ray continuum spectrum will have a two-temperature, or a power-law, appearance. This effect may have been observed in the bright rim of the remnant of SN 1006.

  15. Spectral Mapping of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen; Blair, William; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox; Sankrit, Ravi; Williams, Brian

    2008-03-01

    We propose to leverage our extensive previous multi-wavelength investigations of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN 1604) by obtaining IRS spectral maps of this premier example of a 'massive Type Ia' remnant. Of particular interest is the dense circumstellar medium (CSM) evidently surrounding Kepler. This material is best investigated in infrared, where shock-heated dust reveals the thermal-gas density and possible composition clues such as the 10-micron silicate feature. Full LL coverage (14-38 um) will permit detailed mapping of continuum shape changes with spatial position that are only hinted at from our previous MIPS 24 and 70 um imaging. SL mapping of selected regions will permit detailed studies of changes in the silicate feature with position, suggested by two slit positions in earlier observations. Combined with our deep Chandra observation (750 ks), these data will permit a detailed study of dust destruction in fast shocks. Kepler also shows regions near the remnant edge dominated by synchrotron X-ray emission, indicating electron acceleration to energies of order 100 TeV. However, the dominance of synchrotron continuum means that properties of the thermal medium, important for understanding shock-acceleration physics, cannot be diagnosed with X-rays. Our IRS spectra should allow such diagnosis. Kepler's unique position among Type Ia supernova remnants makes it a critical target for the understanding of the Type Ia phenomenon.

  16. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SNe). We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (i) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳10-100 yr. In the rapidly rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (ii) Secondly, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (iii) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (≲10-100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (iv) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  17. Shocked Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Unusually strong high-excitation C I has been detected in eleven lines of sight through the Vela supernova remnant by means of UV absorption-line studies of IUE data. Most of these lines of sight lie near the western edge of the X-ray bright region of the supernova remnant in a spatially distinct band approximately 1deg by 4deg oriented approximately north/south. The high-excitation C I (denoted C I*) is interpreted as evidence of a complex of shocked dense clouds inside the supernova remnant, due to the high pressures indicated in this region. To further analyze the properties of this region of C I*, we present new HIRES-processed IRAS data of the entire Vela SNR. A temperature map calculated from the HIRES IRAS data, based on a two-component dust model, reveals the signature of hot dust at several locations in the SNR. The hot dust is anti-correlated spatially with X-ray emission as revealed by ROSAT, as would be expected for a dusty medium interacting with a shock wave. The regions of hot dust are strongly correlated with optical filaments, supporting a scenario of dense clouds interior to the SNR that have been shocked and are now cooling behind the supernova blast wave. With few exceptions, the lines of sight to the strong C I* pass through regions of hot dust and optical filaments. Possible mechanisms for the production of the anomalously large columns of C I and C I* are discussed. Dense clouds on the back western hemisphere of the remnant may explain the relatively low X-ray emission in the western portion of the Vela supernova remnant due to the slower forward shock velocity in regions where the shock has encountered the dense clouds. An alternate explanation for the presence of neutral, excited state, and ionized species along the same line of sight may be a magnetic precusor that heats and compresses the gas ahead of the shock.

  18. SN 1054: A pulsar-powered supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei; Huang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The famous ancient supernova SN 1054 could have been too bright to be explained in the “standard” radioactive-powered supernova scenario. As an alternative attempt, we demonstrate that the spin-down of the newly born Crab pulsar could provide a sufficient energy supply to make SN 1054 visible at daytime for 23 days and at night for 653 days, where a one-zone semi-analytical model is employed. Our results indicate that SN 1054 could be a “normal” cousin of magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. Therefore, SN 1054-like supernovae could be a probe to uncover the properties of newly born neutron stars, which provide initial conditions for studies on neutron star evolutions.

  19. The NuSTAR Program for Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grefenstette, Brian; An, H.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W. W.; Freyer, C.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Humensky, B.; Jakobsen, S.; Kaspi, V.; Kitaguchi, T.; Lopez, L. A.; Madsen, K.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Nynka, M.; Pivovaroff, M.; Reynolds, S. P.; Stern, D.; Westergaard, N. J.; Wik, D. R.; Zhang, W.; Zoglauer, A.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), successfully launched in June 2012, is the first telescope to bring the the hard X-ray (3 to 79 keV) sky into focus. One of NuSTAR's prime science goals is to study the morphology of the previously unresolved hard X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs). Spatial and spectral characterization of the hard X-ray synchrotron emission is essential to understanding the physics of particle acceleration in SNR and has implications for origin of galactic cosmic rays. Young (< 1 kyr) remnants may also show emission from decay products of Ti-44, which has great importance in understanding supernova explosion mechanisms. In this poster we present NuSTAR plans for observing SNRs as well as early results from SNRs observed in the first six months since launch, including preliminary results for Cassiopeia A. Discussions of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and G21.5-0.9 are presented in a companion posters by K. Madsen and M. Nynka, respectively.

  20. New identifications of extended GeV gamma rays from Supernova Remnants with Fermi-LAT Pass 8 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John; Caragiulo, Micaela; Condon, Benjamin; Giordano, Francesco; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Identifying gamma-ray emission from supernova remnants is crucial to test the paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Despite the excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, it remains difficult to clearly identify cosmic ray sources buried within the diffuse Galactic background and possibly confused with other gamma-ray sources, such as pulsars. The LAT collaboration has developed a new Pass 8 event reconstruction with improved spatial resolution and acceptance that permits the first detection of extended emission in GeV gamma rays from several supernova remnants. These include the young TeV shell-type remnant RCW 86, and older supernova remnants that are interacting with molecular clouds, such as CTB 37A. The improvements with Pass 8 promise to rapidly grow the population of gamma-ray supernova remnants identified through their spatial extension.

  1. G65.2+5.7: A Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant with a Cool Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the G65.2+5.7 supernova remnant (also known as G65.3+5.7). Little material obscures this remnant and so it was well observed, even at the softest end of ROSATs bandpass (approx. 0.11 to 0.28 keV). These soft X-ray images reveal the remnant s centrally-filled morphology which, in combination with existing radio frequency observations, places G65.2+5.7 in the thermal composite (mixed morphology) class of supernova remnants. Not only might G65.2+5.7 be the oldest known thermal composite supernova remnant, but owing to its optically revealed cool, dense shell, this remnant supports the proposal that thermal composite supernova remnants lack X-ray bright shells because they have evolved beyond the adiabatic phase. These observations also reveal a slightly extended point source centered on RA = l9(sup h) 36(sup m) 46(sup s). dec = 30 deg.40 min.07 sec.and extending 6.5 arc min in radius in the band 67 map. The source of this emission has yet to be discovered, as there is no known pulsar at this location.

  2. The Hubble Heritage Image of the Crab Nebula Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, W. P.; English, J.; Bond, H. E.; Christian, C. A.; Frattare, L.; Hamilton, F.; Levay, Z.; Noll, K. S.

    2000-05-01

    The Hubble Heritage Project has the aim of providing the public with pictorially striking images of celestial objects obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Here we present a 5-color Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image of the Crab Nebula, a ~950 year old supernova remnant located 6500 light-years distant in the constellation Taurus. The images were obtained in 1995 January and April, and the science investigation reporting results was published by Blair, W. P., et al. (1997, ApJS, 109, 473--480). Over 10 hours of exposure time through 5 separate optical continuum band and emission-line filters were used to study size scales and ionization structures of the filaments and newly synthesized dust within the expanding ejecta. The Heritage version of these data shows several important aspects of the Crab Nebula all in one spectacular image. The continuum image shows stars, including the enigmatic pulsar (the collapsed core of the original star) and the ghostly diffuse synchrotron nebula energized by the pulsar. The synchrotron nebula in turn heats and ionizes the surrounding clumpy filaments of gas and dust visible in the emission line images. These filaments are the supernova ejecta that were expelled during the explosion and are now expanding outward from the pulsar at high speed. The different colors in the picture show optical emission lines of hydrogen (orange), nitrogen (red), sulfur (pink) and oxygen (bluish-green). The subtle changes in color from one filament to the next arise because of varying temperatures and densities of the gas, and variable chemical abundances of the ``star stuff," or the doppler shifting of emission into or out of the various narrow filter bandpasses. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers GO-07632.01-96A and GO-5354.04-93A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  3. Vivid View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This composite image of the Tycho supernova remnant combines infrared and X-ray observations obtained with NASA's Spitzer and Chandra space observatories, respectively, and the Calar Alto observatory, Spain. It shows the scene more than four centuries after the brilliant star explosion witnessed by Tycho Brahe and other astronomers of that era.

    The explosion has left a blazing hot cloud of expanding debris (green and yellow). The location of the blast's outer shock wave can be seen as a blue sphere of ultra-energetic electrons. Newly synthesized dust in the ejected material and heated pre-existing dust from the area around the supernova radiate at infrared wavelengths of 24 microns (red). Foreground and background stars in the image are white.

  4. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  5. An optical and near infrared search for a pulsar in Supernova 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Sasseen, T.P.

    1990-12-01

    We describe a search for an optical pulsar in the remnant of Supernova 1987A. We have performed over one hundred separate observations of the supernova, covering wavelengths from 3500 angstroms to 1.8 microns, with sensitivity to pulsations as faint as magnitude 22.7. As of September 26, 1990, we have not seen evidence for pulsations due to a pulsar in the supernova. We discuss the implications of this result on predictions of pulsar optical luminosity. We have constructed for the search two photodiode detectors and a data system. We describe their design, calibration and performance. These detectors have allowed us to increase our sensitivity as much as a factor of 5 over standard photomultiplier tubes, and extend this search to near infrared wavelengths. 59 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  7. The Origin of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Badenes, Carles; Park, Sangwook; Laming, J. Martin

    2012-09-01

    It is now well established that Kepler's supernova remnant (SNR) is the result of a Type Ia explosion. With an age of 407 yr and an angular diameter of ~4', Kepler is estimated to be between 3.0 and 7.0 kpc distant. Unlike other Galactic Type Ia SNRs such as Tycho and SN 1006, and SNR 0509-67.5 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Kepler shows evidence for a strong circumstellar interaction. A bowshock structure in the north is thought to originate from the motion of a mass-losing system through the interstellar medium prior to the supernova. We present results of hydrodynamical and spectral modeling aimed at constraining the circumstellar environment of the system and the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion. Using models that contain either 0.3 M ⊙ (subenergetic) or 1.0 M ⊙ (energetic) of 56Ni, we simulate the interaction between supernova Ia ejecta and various circumstellar density models. Based on dynamical considerations alone, we find that the subenergetic models favor a distance to the SNR of <6.4 kpc, while the model that produces 1 M ⊙ of 56Ni requires a distance to the SNR of >7 kpc. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with an explosion that produced ~1 M ⊙ of 56Ni, ruling out the subenergetic models, and suggesting that Kepler's SNR was an SN 1991T-like event. Additionally, the X-ray spectrum rules out a pure r -2 wind profile expected from isotropic mass loss up to the time of the supernova. Introducing a small cavity around the progenitor system results in modeled X-ray spectra that are consistent with the observed spectrum. If a wind-shaped circumstellar environment is necessary to explain the dynamics and X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in Kepler's SNR, then we require that the distance to the remnant be greater than 7 kpc.

  8. Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant (Crab Nebula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estakhr, Ahmad Reza

    2015-04-01

    Supernova remnant (at early phase) is a high temperature fluid of gas and dust. after the explosion of a star in a supernova, the viscousity of supernova remnant changes with temperature. as supernova expand by time its temperature decreases and the viscousity increases, (or alternatively, the fluidity of supernova remnant tends to decreases) and leb to resistance phase of supernova remnant fluid to flow. Uμ = γ (c , u (r-> , t)) denotes four-velocity vector field of supernova. Jμ = ρUμ denotes four-current density of supernova fluid of gas and dust. Estakhr's Material-Geodesic equation is developed analogy of Navier Stokes equation and Einstein Geodesic equation to describe Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant (Crab Nebula): DJμ/Dτ =dJμ/Dτ + ΓαβμJαUβ =JνΩμν +∂νTμν + ΓαβμJαUβ Covariant formulation of Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant, describe the motion of fluid substances of supernova.

  9. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and super-luminous supernovae. We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly-rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (i) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳ 10 - 100 yr. In the rapidly-rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (ii) Second, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (iii) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (˜10 - 100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (iv) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  10. HESS upper limits for Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Boisson, C.; Bolz, O.; Borrel, V.; Braun, I.; Brion, E.; Brucker, J.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Carrigan, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chounet, L.-M.; Clapson, A. C.; Coignet, G.; Cornils, R.; Costamante, L.; Dalton, M.; Degrange, B.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubus, G.; Dyks, J.; Egberts, K.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Feinstein, F.; Fiasson, A.; Förster, A.; Fontaine, G.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Hauser, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Jung, I.; Katarzyński, K.; Kendziorra, E.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khélifi, B.; Keogh, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Lamanna, G.; Latham, I. J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Martin, J. M.; Martineau-Huynh, O.; Marcowith, A.; Masterson, C.; Maurin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Moderski, R.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; Olive, J.-P.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Ostrowski, M.; Panter, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Renaud, M.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Ruppel, J.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schöck, F. M.; Schröder, R.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sol, H.; Spangler, D.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Superina, G.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Vincent, P.; Vivier, M.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: Observations of Kepler's supernova remnant (G4.5+6.8) with the HESS telescope array in 2004 and 2005 with a total live time of 13 h are presented. Methods: Stereoscopic imaging of Cherenkov radiation from extensive air showers is used to reconstruct the energy and direction of the incident gamma rays. Results: No evidence for a very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma-ray signal from the direction of the remnant is found. An upper limit (99% confidence level) on the energy flux in the range 230 GeV{-}12.8 TeV of 8.6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 is obtained. Conclusions: In the context of an existing theoretical model for the remnant, the lack of a detectable gamma-ray flux implies a distance of at least 6.4 kpc. A corresponding upper limit for the density of the ambient matter of 0.7 cm-3 is derived. With this distance limit, and assuming a spectral index Γ = 2, the total energy in accelerated protons is limited to Ep < 8.6 × 1049 erg. In the synchrotron/inverse Compton framework, extrapolating the power law measured by RXTE between 10 and 20 keV down in energy, the predicted gamma-ray flux from inverse Compton scattering is below the measured upper limit for magnetic field values greater than 52 μ G.

  11. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  12. Supernova remnants in the GC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvarov, Abdul

    2016-07-01

    Along with the central Black hole the processes of active star formation play very important role in the energetics of the Galactic center region. The SNe and their remnants (SNRs) are the main ingredients of the processes of star formation. SNRs are also the sources of electromagnetic radiation of all wavelengths from the optical to hard gamma rays. In the presented work we consider the physics of supernova remnants evolving in extreme environmental conditions which are typical for the region of the Galactic center. Because of the high density and strong inhomogeneity of the surrounding medium these objects remain practically invisible at almost all wavelengths. We model evolution of SNR taking into account the pressure of the surrounding medium and the gravitational field of the matter (stars, compact clouds, dark matter) inside the remnant. As it is well established, considerable portion of the kinetic energy of the SNR can be converted into the cosmic ray particles by diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. Therefore the effect of particle acceleration is also included in the model (with the effectiveness of acceleration as a free parameter). Using the observed radiation fluxes at different wavelengths we attempt to obtain limits on the parameters of the model of the Galactic Center, namely, the frequency of star birth, the average density of the matter and radiation field, etc.

  13. The First Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, we demonstrate the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  14. Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chandra X-Ray Data (blue) Chandra X-Ray Data (green)Hubble Telescope (visible-light)Spitzer Telescope (infrared)

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe the expanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14 light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of the supernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the exploded star, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gas and dust.

    Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in the panel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining them with Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more complete picture of the supernova remnant.

    Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behind the shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look like rippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

    The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that have been heated by the

  15. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña na-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Ro´ska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  16. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3–25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10‑25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10‑7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10‑5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  17. A Newly Discovered Supernova Remnant and MSH 11-62 and 3C58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2000-01-01

    CTA 1 is a center-filled supernova remnant (SNR) whose morphology and spectrum indicate the presence of a central pulsar, a synchrotron nebula, and a thermal component associated with the expansion of the blast wave into the interstellar medium. The centrally bright emission surrounds the position of a faint point source of X-rays observed with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC). Here we report on Advanced Spacecraft for Cosmology Astrophysics (ASCA) observations that confirm the nonthermal nature of the diffuse emission from the central regions of the remnant. We also present evidence for weak thermal emission that appears to increase in strength toward the outer boundary of the SNR. Thus, CTA 1 appears to be an X-ray composite remnant. Both the aftermath of the explosive supernova event and the energetic compact core are observable.

  18. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    1997-01-01

    CTA 1 is a center-filled supernova remnant (SNR) whose morphology and spectrum indicate the presence of a central pulsar, a synchrotron nebula, and a thermal component associated with the expansion of the blast wave into the interstellar medium. The centrally bright emission surrounds the position of a faint point source of x-rays observed with the ROSAT PSPC. Here we report on ASCA observations that confirm the nonthermal nature of the diffuse emission from the central regions of the remnant. We also present evidence for weak thermal emission that appears to increase in strength toward the outer boundary of the SNR. Thus, CTA 1 appears to be an x-ray composite remnant. Both the aftermath of the explosive supernova event and the energetic compact core are observable.

  19. New supernova remnant candidates in M 31.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Prins, S.; van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Supper, R.; Hasinger, G.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1995-12-01

    We have performed a CCD Hα, [SII], V survey of ~1.0 square degree of the disk of M 31 to search for new supernova remnant (SNR) candidates. We have identified candidates based on a combination of criteria: optical line-flux ratios, the presence or absence of ionizing blue stars, and optical morphology. We have identified a total of 178 candidate SNRs, divided into three confidence categories: 13 with the highest confidence, 54 with moderate confidence, and 111 with the lowest confidence. We have also identified 14 large structures with the characteristics of the superbubbles seen in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds. Of our 178 candidates, 15 have been identified in previous searches (Braun & Walterbos 1993; Blair et al. 1981; D'Odorico et al. 1980). We present finding charts of all candidate SNRs and the superbubbles we have noted. We also present a detailed discussion of SNR searches in the Local Group.

  20. Detecting supernova remnants in external galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.; Dodorico, S.

    1985-01-01

    Identification of supernova remnants (SNR) in external galaxies through the combined use of radio, optical and X-ray surveys is discussed. Some 24 likely distant galaxy SNR have been found in the past six years, though confirmation is often difficult. Radio surveys of other galaxies are restricted by background object contamination in the field, and confirmation of these candidates requires other techniques. Optical measurement of the ratio of the forbidden SII doublet at .6717 and .6731 microns to H-alpha, followed by spectroscopic or radio confirmation, has successfully identified SNR in the LMC and other galaxies, though few in number. Most of the SNR in the Magellanic Clouds have been detected as X-ray emitters, but towards M31 there are no coincidences between the lists of optical SNR and X-ray sources. An increase in SNR identifications should result from use of the Space Telescope and continued use of the VLA.

  1. Radio flux variation of young supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.P.; Bubukin, I.T.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    The 31.5-cm radio flux density of Cas A, the Crab Nebula, and the remnant of the 1572 supernova relative to that of the radio galaxies Cyg A and Vir A was measured in 1981. Comparison with similar observations in 1964 and 1972 shows that over the past decade the decline of the Cas A flux has slowed by a factor 2.2 and now amounts to (0.413 +- 0.08)%/yr. The Crab flux was (3.5 +- 1.0)% weaker in 1981 than in 1964 and 1972; it probably dropped abruptly between 1972 and 1977. For the 1572 SNR the annual mean decline over the 17-yr period is (0.5 +- 0.15)%/yr.

  2. Interstellar scattering of compact radio sources near supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Mutel, R. L.; Benson, J. M.; Cordes, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A multifrequency VLBI search for interstellar scattering of extragalactic radio sources near supernova remnants is reported. VLBI observations at 610, 1663, and 4991 MHz were made of compact sources near the supernova remnants CTA 1, G33.6 + 0.1, G74.9 + 1.2, and HB 21, and 610 MHz observations were also made of a source near HB 9. These observations were motivated by the possibility of enhanced cosmic ray-induced turbulence in front of supernova remnants, as expected in 'diffusive' theories of shock wave acceleration. Angular broadening is definitely seen in the case of the source 2013 + 370, which lies within 4 arcmin of the supernova remnant G74.9 + 1.2. Present observations cannot unambiguously attribute the scattering material to the supernova remnant, as the line of sight also passes through the Cygnus OB1 association. The source 1849 + 005 appears to be highly scattered, as fringes were not detected even on short baselines at 5 GHz. This result may be due to the low galactic longitude of this source rather than its proximity to the supernova remnant G 33.6 + 0.1. Broadening was not detected for sources whose lines of sight pass close to the supernova remnants HB 9, HB 21, and CTA 1.

  3. ASCA observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant sample: Typing supernovae from their remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.; Hayashi, Ichizo; Helfand, David; Hwang, Una; Itoh, Masayuki; Kirshner, Robert; Koyama, Katsuji; Markert, Thomas; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Woo, Jonathan

    1995-01-01

    We present our first results from a study of the supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from ASCA. The three remnants we have analyzed to date, 0509-67.5, 0519-69.0, and N103B, are among the smallest, and presumably also the youngest, in the Cloud. The X-ray spectra of these SNRs show strong K alpha emission lines of silicon, sulfur, argon, and calcium with no evidence for corresponding lines of oxygen, neon, or magnesium. The dominant feature in the spectra is a broad blend of emission lines around 1 keV which we attribute to L-shell emission lines of iron. Model calculations (Nomoto, Thielemann, & Yokoi 1984) show that the major products of nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae (SNs) are the elements from silicon to iron, as observed here. The calculated nucleosynthetic yields from Type Ib and II SNs are shown to be qualitatively inconsistent with the data. We conclude that the SNs which produced these remnants were of Type Ia. This finding also confirms earlier suggestions that the class of Balmer-dominated remnants arise from Type Ia SN explosions. Based on these early results from the LMC SNR sample, we find that roughly one-half of the SNRs produced in the LMC within the last approximately 1500 yr came from Type Ia SNs.

  4. The evolution of supernova remnants in different galactic environments, and its effects on supernova statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Sofia, S.; Bruhweiler, F.; Gull, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Examination of the interaction between supernova (SN) ejecta and the various environments in which the explosive event might occur shows that only a small fraction of the many SNs produce observable supernova remnants (SNRs). This fraction, which is found to depend weakly upon the lower mass limit of the SN progenitors, and more strongly on the specfic characteristics of the associated interstellar medium, decreases from approximately 15 percent near the galctic center to 10 percent at Rgal approximately 10 kpc and drops nearly to zero for Rgal 15 kpc. Generally, whether a SNR is detectable is determined by the density of the ambient interstellar medium in which it is embeeede. The presence of large, low density cavities arpund stellar associations due to the combined effects of stellar winds and supernova shells strongly suggests that a large portion of the detectable SNRs have runway stars as their progenitors. These results explain the differences between the substantially larger SN rates in the galaxy derived both from pulsar statistics and from observations of SN events in external galaxies, when compared to the substantially smaller SN rates derived form galactic SNR statistics.

  5. An X-ray View of the Zoo of Compact Objects and Associated Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse explosions of massive stars leave behind some of the most exotic compact objects in the Universe. These include: rotation-powered pulsars like the Crab, powering pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) observed across the electromagnetic spectrum; highly magnetized neutron stars ("magnetars") shining or bursting at high-energies; and X-ray emitting “Central Compact Objects” (CCOs) with intrinsic properties and emission mechanism that remain largely unknown. I will highlight this observed diversity of compact stellar remnants from an X-ray perspective, and address the connection between their properties and those of their hosting supernova remnants (SNRs). In particular I will highlight topics related to their formation and evolution, including: 1) which supernovae make magnetars and the shell-less PWNe?, 2) what can we learn from the apparent age discrepancy between SNRs and their associated pulsars? I will conclude with prospects for observations of SNRs with the upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray mission. The unprecedented spectral resolution on board of ASTRO-H’s micro-calorimeter will particularly open a new discovery window for supernova progenitors' science.

  6. Modelling the interaction of thermonuclear supernova remnants with circumstellar structures: the case of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The well-established Type Ia remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572) reveals discrepant ambient medium-density estimates based on either the measured dynamics or the X-ray emission properties. This discrepancy can potentially be solved by assuming that the supernova remnant (SNR) shock initially moved through a stellar wind bubble, but is currently evolving in the uniform interstellar medium with a relatively low density. We investigate this scenario by combining hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-loss phase and the SNR evolution with a coupled X-ray emission model, which includes non-equilibrium ionization. For the explosion models we use the well-known W7 deflagration model and the delayed detonation model that was previously shown to provide good fits to the X-ray emission of Tycho's SNR. Our simulations confirm that a uniform ambient density cannot simultaneously reproduce the dynamical and X-ray emission properties of Tycho. In contrast, models that considered that the remnant was evolving in a dense, but small, wind bubble reproduce reasonably well both the measured X-ray emission spectrum and the expansion parameter of Tycho's SNR. Finally, we discuss possible mass-loss scenarios in the context of single- and double-degenerate models which possibly could form such a small dense wind bubble.

  7. Locating the Periodic Transient GRO J1849-03; Gamma-Ray Luminous Supernovae Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We obtained one 50 ks observation of the Monoceros supernova remnant under this proposal. This supernova remnant was selected because it overlaps the error box of a gamma-ray source. Much to our surprise, we discovered a hard x-ray point source instead of the diffuse hard x-ray emission we expected from the supernova remnant. A paper on the discovery of the hard x-ray source and on follow-up optical observations identifying a likely Bestar companion was published in the Astrophysical Journal. Subsequently, a reanalysis of the same data yielded the detection of pulsations from the x-ray source. These results were also published in the Astrophysical Journal. Subsequent x-ray observations, which we performed under later proposals, have shown that the x-ray pulsar has a characteristic spin-down age of less than 1400 years in a binary system. The system is likely the first discovered very young, highly-energetic, rotation-powered pulsar in a binary system and offers an exciting opportunity to study the infancy and early evolution of neutron-star binaries.

  8. Shock Destruction of Dust in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J.

    2009-07-01

    In this AR-Theory program, we propose to carry out a series of investigations of grain injection, transport, and destruction using hydrodynamical models of reverse-shocked SN ejecta. In a young supernova remnant {SNR} such as Cas A or SN 1987A the outer blast wave strikes surrounding circumstellar matter, and reverse shocks propagate inward toward the interior debris, which may contain large amounts of newly formed dust. Our major theoretical goals are to determine how much dust is destroyed in shocked SNR ejecta, as they are decelerated by the reverse shocks, and to study how these ejecta are lighted up in optical, X-ray, andIR line emission. Numerical codes will be used to study grain destruction in metal-enriched ejecta and to interpret the morphologies, proper motions, and emissivities of these fast-moving ejecta, observed by Hubble in many young SNRs. We intend to undertake the following tasks: {1} Compile the latest gas-grain data {sputtering yields vs projectile energy for H, He, and heavy ions}; {2} Incorporate gas-grain and grain-grain interactions with radiative cooling rates {X-ray, optical, IR line emission} of sputtered atoms and ions; {3} Compute adaptive-mesh hydrodynamical models of ejecta-shock interactions; {4} Use these ejecta models to compute grain destruction, grain heating, plasma cooling, and spectral diagnostics in metal-enriched environments; {5} Apply our results to specific SNRs {Cas A, SN 1987A, G292, etc} to interpret ejecta morphologies, proper motions, and emissivities; {6} assess the net efficiency of supernova dust injection.

  9. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF TWO CANDIDATE SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kargaltsev, O.; Schmitt, B. M.; Pavlov, G. G.; Misanovic, Z.

    2012-01-20

    Candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) G23.5+0.1 and G25.5+0.0 were observed by XMM-Newton in the course of a snapshot survey of plerionic and composite SNRs in the Galactic plane. In the field of G23.5+0.1, we detected an extended source, {approx}3' in diameter, which we tentatively interpret as a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of the middle-aged radio pulsar B1830-08 (J1833-0827; P = 85.3 ms, {tau} = 147 kyr, E-dot = 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, d = 5.7 kpc), with the PWN luminosity L{sub 0.2-10keV} Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} Almost-Equal-To 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} E-dot . The pulsar is not resolved in the EPIC images. Our analysis suggests an association between PSR B1830-08 and the surrounding diffuse radio emission. If the radio emission is due to the SNR, then the pulsar must be significantly younger than its characteristic age. Alternatively, the radio emission may come from a relic PWN. The field also contains SGR 1833-0832 and another middle-aged pulsar B1829-08 (J1832-0827; P = 647 ms, {tau} = 161 kyr, E-dot = 9.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}, d = 4.7 kpc), none of which are detected in our observation. In the field of G25.5+0.0, which contains the extended TeV source HESS J1837-069, we detected the recently discovered young high-energy pulsar J1838-0655 (P = 70.5 ms, {tau} = 23 kyr, E-dot = 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) embedded in a PWN with extent of 1.'3. The unabsorbed pulsar + PWN luminosity is L{sub 2-11keV} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} E-dot at an assumed distance of 7 kpc. We also detected another PWN candidate (AX J1837.3-0652) with an extent of 2' and unabsorbed luminosity L{sub 2-10keV} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at d = 7 kpc. The third X-ray source, located within the extent of the HESS J1837-069, has a peculiar extended radio

  10. New Candidate Supernova Remnants in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. F.; Schmitt, M. D.; Winkler, P. F.

    1995-05-01

    We have used pure emission-line images (deep CCD images from which a continuum image has been subtracted; see Winkler & Williams, companion paper) to search for supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in M31. The ratio of \\sii\\ lambda \\ 6724\\ to \\ha\\ is used to distinguish SNRs from \\hii\\ regions, a technique that has been used effectively in other galaxies as well as in earlier photographic surveys of M31 (D'Odorico et al 1980, A&A Supp 40, 67; Blair et al 1981, Ap J 247, 879). The extensive cooling zone typically found behind SNR shocks emits strongly in \\sii, while in photoionized material such as \\hii\\ regions most of the S is twice ionized and hence \\sii\\ is weak. SNRs almost always have \\sii/\\ha\\ ratios > 0.4\\ vs values < 0.2\\ for \\hii\\ regions. Using this criterion, we have identified 105 nebulae in M31 which are strong SNR candidates, of which 13 were previously identified by D'Odorico et al and/or Blair et al. While this number probably represents a small minorit y of the SNRs which are actually present in M31, confirmation of a substantial fraction of these would increase the population of known remnants in M31 several-fold and would make it the galaxy with the largest sample of known optical SNRs, including our own. For the cumulative number of SNRs as a function of diameter we find N(remnants that is inevitable with our coarse scale, 2'' pixel(-1) \\ with an effective resolution of only ~ 5arcsec , equivalent to 18 pc at the distance of M31. We can, however, rule out N(

  11. MODIFIED EQUIPARTITION CALCULATION FOR SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Arbutina, B.; Urosevic, D.; Andjelic, M. M.; Pavlovic, M. Z.; Vukotic, B.

    2012-02-10

    Determination of the magnetic field strength in the interstellar medium is one of the more complex tasks of contemporary astrophysics. We can only estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field strength by using a few very limited methods. Besides the Zeeman effect and Faraday rotation, the equipartition or minimum-energy calculation is a widespread method for estimating magnetic field strength and energy contained in the magnetic field and cosmic-ray particles by using only the radio synchrotron emission. Despite its approximate character, it remains a useful tool, especially when there are no other data about the magnetic field in a source. In this paper, we give a modified calculation that we think is more appropriate for estimating magnetic field strengths and energetics in supernova remnants (SNRs). We present calculated estimates of the magnetic field strengths for all Galactic SNRs for which the necessary observational data are available. The Web application for calculation of the magnetic field strengths of SNRs is available at http://poincare.matf.bg.ac.rs/{approx}arbo/eqp/.

  12. Discovery of optical candidate supernova remnants in Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikakos, J.; Boumis, P.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Goudis, C. D.

    2012-08-01

    During an [O III] survey of planetary nebulae, we identified a region in Sagittarius containing several candidate supernova remants (SNRs) and obtained deep optical narrow-band images and spectra to explore their nature. We obtained images of the area of interest by acquiring observations in the emission lines of Hα + [N II], [S II] and [O III]. The resulting mosaic covers an area of 1.4° × 1.0°, where both filamentary and diffuse emission was discovered, suggesting that there is more than one SNR in the area. Deep long-slit spectra were also taken of eight different regions. Both the flux-calibrated images and the spectra show that the emission from the filamentary structures originates from shock-heated gas, while the photo-ionization mechanism is responsible for the diffuse emission. Part of the optical emission is found to be correlated with the radio at 4850 MHz suggesting that they are related, while the infrared emission found in the area at 12 μm and 22 μm marginally correlates with the optical. The presence of the [O III] emission line in one of the candidate SNRs implies that the shock velocities in the interstellar "clouds" are between 120 km s-1 and 200 km s-1, while its absence in the other candidate SNRs indicates that the shock velocities there are slower. For all candidate remnants, the [S II] λλ 6716/6731 ratio indicates that the electron densities are below 240 cm-3, while the Hα emission is measured to be between 0.6 and 41 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. The existence of eight pulsars within 1.5° of the center of the candidate SNRs also implies that there are many SNRs in the area as well as that the detected optical emission could be part of a number of supernovae explosions.

  13. Electron acceleration by young supernova remnant blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Some general considerations regarding relativistic particle acceleration by young supernova remnants are reviewed. Recent radio observations of supernova remnants apparently locate the bounding shock and exhibit large electron density gradients which verify the presence of strong particle scattering. The radio 'rim' in Tycho's remnant has been found to contain a predominantly radial magnetic field. This may be attributable to an instability of the shock surface and a progress report on an investigation of the stability of strong shocks in partially ionized media is presented.

  14. 3D Simulations of Supernovae into the Young Remnant Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, Carola I.; Young, P. A.; Fryer, C.; Rockefeller, G.; Park, S.

    2013-01-01

    The explosion of massive stars as core-collapse supernovae is an inherently three dimensional phenomenon. Observations of the young, ejecta dominated remnants of those explosions unambiguously demonstrate that asymmetry on large and small scales is the rule, rather than the exception. Numerical models of supernova remnants connect the observed remnants to models of the exploding stellar system and thus facilitate both improved interpretations of the observations as well as improve our understanding of the explosion mechanism. We present first 3D simulations of core- collapse supernovae evolving into supernova remnants calculated with SNSPH. The calculations were started from 1D collapsed models of 2 progenitor stars of different types, and follow the explosion from revival of the shock wave to shock break out in 3D. Two different interstellar media, a cold neutral medium and a dense molecular cloud, as well as a red supergiant stellar wind profile, were added to the explosion calculations shortly before shock breakout, so that the blast wave stays in the simulation. With this setup we can follow the dispersal of the nucleosynthesis products from the explosion into the Sedov stage of the supernova remnant evolution starting from realistic initial conditions for the supernova ejecta. We will present a first investigation in the mixing between stellar and interstellar matter as the supernova evolves into the young supernova remnant phase, and contrasts differences that are observed between the scenarios that are investigated. One of the goals is to distinguish between features that arose in instabilities during the explosion from those that were created in the interaction with the surrounding medium.

  15. Gamma-Ray Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, James

    2000-04-01

    Despite the growing evidence for shock acceleration of electrons in supernova remnants (SNR), there is still no direct evidence pointing unambiguously to SNR as sources of cosmic-ray nuclei. Observations of nonthermal synchrotron emission in the limbs of a number of shell-type SNR (SN1006, Tycho, Cas A, IC443, RCW86, and Kepler) provide convincing evidence for acceleration of electrons to energies greater than 10 TeV (Allen 1999). The CANGAROO group has now reported significant VHE gamma-ray emission from SN1006 (Tanimori et al. 1998) and RXJ1713-3946, and the HEGRA group has reported preliminary evidence for TeV emission from Cas A (Pülhofer et al. 1999); all of these measurements are consistent with the expected level of inverse-Compton emission in these objects. Following the predictions of an observable π^0-decay signal from nearby SNRs (e.g., Drury, Aharonian and Volk 1994) the discovery of >100 MeV emission from the direction of a number of SNR by the EGRET experiment (Esposito et al. 1996) and possible evidence for a π^0 component (Gaisser, Protheroe and Stanev 1996) led to some initial optimism that evidence for a SNR origin of cosmic-ray nuclei had been obtained. However, 200 GeV to 100 TeV measurements revealed no significant emission implying either a significantly steeper source spectrum than the canonical ~ E-2.1, a spectral cutoff below the knee energy in these sources, or that a re-interpretation of the EGRET results was required. I will discuss these results, as well as the considerable promise of future gamma-ray experiments to determine the sources of galactic cosmic-ray nuclei and to provide quantitative information about the acceleration mechanisms.

  16. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the 'knee' energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the 'knee' energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  17. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the "knee" energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the "knee" energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  18. Transport of magnetic turbulence in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brose, R.; Telezhinsky, I.; Pohl, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Supernova remnants are known as sources of Galactic cosmic rays for their nonthermal emission of radio waves, X-rays, and gamma rays. However, the observed soft broken power-law spectra are hard to reproduce within standard acceleration theory based on the assumption of Bohm diffusion and steady-state calculations. Aims: We point out that a time-dependent treatment of the acceleration process together with a self-consistent treatment of the scattering turbulence amplification is necessary. Methods: We numerically solve the coupled system of transport equations for cosmic rays and isotropic Alfvénic turbulence. The equations are coupled through the growth rate of turbulence determined by the cosmic-ray gradient and the spatial diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays determined by the energy density of the turbulence. The system is solved on a comoving expanding grid extending upstream for dozens of shock radii, allowing for the self-consistent study of cosmic-ray diffusion in the vicinity of their acceleration site. The transport equation for cosmic rays is solved in a test-particle approach. Results: We demonstrate that the system is typically not in a steady state. In fact, even after several thousand years of evolution, no equilibrium situation is reached. The resulting time-dependent particle spectra strongly differ from those derived assuming a steady state and Bohm diffusion. Our results indicate that proper accounting for the evolution of the scattering turbulence and hence the particle diffusion coefficient is crucial for the formation of the observed soft spectra. In any case, the need to continuously develop magnetic turbulence upstream of the shock introduces nonlinearity in addition to that imposed by cosmic-ray feedback.

  19. The prevalence of supernova remnants among unidentified Galactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Velusamy, T.; Becker, R. H.; Lockman, Felix J.

    1989-01-01

    Nine Galactic radio sources were mapped to identify new Crab-like and composite supernova remnants. The sources were selected on the basis of existing stringent upper limits on their hydrogen recombination line fluxes. One new Cracb-like remnant, one new composite remnant, at least one, and probably two, new shell-like remnants, and a compact H II region were found, along with the expected collection of extragalactic objects. The results suggest that there are several hundred SNRs in the Galaxy which are detectable with current instruments, but which have yet to be identified.

  20. A BROADBAND STUDY OF THE EMISSION FROM THE COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 11-62

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Foight, Dillon; and others

    2012-04-20

    MSH 11-62 (G291.0-0.1) is a composite supernova remnant for which radio and X-ray observations have identified the remnant shell as well as its central pulsar wind nebula. The observations suggest a relatively young system expanding into a low-density region. Here, we present a study of MSH 11-62 using observations with the Chandra, XMM -Newton, and Fermi observatories, along with radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We identify a compact X-ray source that appears to be the putative pulsar that powers the nebula, and show that the X-ray spectrum of the nebula bears the signature of synchrotron losses as particles diffuse into the outer nebula. Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, we identify {gamma}-ray emission originating from MSH 11-62. With density constraints from the new X-ray measurements of the remnant, we model the evolution of the composite system in order to constrain the properties of the underlying pulsar and the origin of the {gamma}-ray emission.

  1. A Broadband Study of the Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 11-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick; Hughes, John P.; Temim, Tea; Rousseau, Romain; Castro, Daniel; Foight, Dillon; Gaensler, B. M.; Funk, Stefan; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Moffett, David A.

    2012-01-01

    MSH 11-62 (G29U)-Q.1) is a composite supernova remnant for which radio and X-ray observations have identified the remnant shell as well as its central pulsar wind nebula. The observations suggest a relatively young system expanding into a low-density region. Here, we present a study of MSH ll-62 using observations with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Fermi observatories, along with radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We identify a compact X-ray source that appears to be the putative pulsar that powers the nebula, and show that the X-ray spectrum of the nebula bears the signature of synchrotron losses as particles diffuse into the outer nebula. Using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, we identify gamma-ray emission originating from MSH 11-62. With density constraints from the new X-ray measurements of the remnant, we model the evolution of the composite system in order to constrain the properties of the underlying pulsar and the origin of the gamma-ray emission.

  2. A HIRES analysis of the FIR emission of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1994-01-01

    The high resolution (HiRes) algorithm has been used to analyze the far infrared emission of shocked gas and dust in supernova remnants. In the case of supernova remnant IC 443, we find a very good match between the resolved features in the deconvolved images and the emissions of shocked gas mapped in other wavelengths (lines of H2, CO, HCO+, and HI). Dust emission is also found to be surrounding hot bubbles of supernova remnants which are seen in soft X-ray maps. Optical spectroscopy on the emission of the shocked gas suggests a close correlation between the FIR color and local shock speed, which is a strong function of the ambient (preshock) gas density. These provide a potentially effective way to identify regions of strong shock interaction, and thus facilitate studies of kinematics and energetics in the interstellar medium.

  3. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S. L.; McCollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.; Chevalier, R.

    1986-12-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  4. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Mccollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.

    1986-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  5. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-24

    An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

  6. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  7. Historical Supernova Explosions in Our Galaxy and Their Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David A.

    Supernova explosions mark the end points of stellar evolution, releasing large amounts of material and energy into the interstellar medium. In our Galaxy the expected rate of supernovae is about 1 in every 50 years or so, although it is only the relatively nearby ones that are expected to be visible optically, due to obscuration. Over the last two thousand years or so there are historical records of nine Galactic supernovae. The majority of these records are from East Asia (i.e. China, Japan and Korea), although the most recent historical supernovae have European records, and there are a variety of Arabic records also available for some events. Here I review these records of the historical supernovae, and the modern observations of the supernova remnants that they have produced.

  8. X-ray Observations of the Tycho Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John P.

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation I summarize some key new findings from recent Chandra and XMM-Newton data on the remnant of the supernova (SN) observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572, which is widely believed to have been of Type Ia origin. Studies of the Tycho supernova remnant (SNR) at the current epoch address aspects of SN Ia physics, the evolution of young SNRs, and cosmic ray acceleration at high Mach-number shocks.Research on the Tycho SNR at Rutgers has been supported by Chandra grants GO3-4066X and AR5-6010X.

  9. Energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is increasing with time

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, using the Zeldovich integral relations, that the energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is strongly growing with time, approximately as t1/3. This growth can be attributed to the exothermic reactions going inside the remnant. The use of the assumption of the adiabaticity of the motion inside of the shock front, and no losses or gain of energy at the front, seems therefore unjustified. PMID:18202174

  10. ROSAT PSPC and HRI Observations of Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The supernova remnant G292.0+1.8 was observed by the ROSAT PSPC for 18 ksec as part of this grant. Considerable effort was put into the analysis of the PSPC spectra. The major work went into nonequilibrium ionization joint spectral fits with the Einstein SSS and EXOSAT ME data which indicated that the two spatial regions of this remnant (a central bar and a plateau region covering a larger extent) had similar abundances, but different excitation conditions (temperature and ionization state), an important conclusion, if true. Unfortunately as this work was being finished, new ASCA data revealed the presence of a previously unknown, spectrally hard X-ray source near the center of the remnant which contaminated the SSS and ME data and as a consequence made our detailed spectral analysis done up until then un-publishable. We searched for evidence of this hard source in the PSPC data both spectrally and using timing searches (for a pulsar), but found nothing significant. ROSAT HRI data were also obtained on this remnant. These data were compared to the Einstein HRI data to search for evidence of spectral variations with position and possible expansion of the X-ray remnant. One feature in the remnant appears to have changed in brightness although it is not clear what is the cause of the change. No evidence for the hard ASCA source was apparent in the HRI data.

  11. GSH 90-28-17: a possible old supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Zhu, M.

    2014-02-01

    GSH 90-28-17 is a high-latitude Galactic H I supershell, identified in the H I supershell catalogues with a velocity vlsr ˜ -17 km s-1. We used the new Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array (GALFA) H I survey data, which have much higher resolution and sensitivity than was previously available, to re-examine the properties of the supershell. We derived a new distance of 400 pc for GSH 90-28-17 and suggested that it is related to the Lac OB1 association. The radius of GSH 90-28-17 is 66.0 ± 3.5 pc. The H I mass of the shell is (3.1 ± 0.1) × 104 M⊙. It has an age of ˜4.5 Myr and a total kinetic energy of (8.2 ± 0.3) × 1048 erg. We extracted radio continuum data for the GSH 90-28-17 region from the 408-MHz All-Sky Survey and Bonn 1420-MHz survey and filtered the diffuse background Galactic emission. A radio loop-like ridge is found to be associated with the H I shell at both frequencies and shows a non-thermal origin, with a temperature-temperature (TT)-plot index of α = -1.35 ± 0.69. In addition, the pulsar J2307+2225, with a similar distance, is found in the shell region. We conclude that GSH 90-28-17 is probably an old, type II supernova remnant in the solar neighbourhood.

  12. The Crab Nebula and related supernova remnants; Proceedings of the Workshop, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, October 11, 12, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafatos, M. C.; Henry, R. B. C.

    Papers are presented on the Crab Nebula's composition, helium distribution, outer structure and jet, and evolution. Attention is given to line emission from supernova remnants and charge transfer reactions, a magnetohydrodynamic model of the Crab Nebula and its radiation, inferences made using data on the pulsed flux from the crab pulsar, a new interpretation of the crab pulsar X-ray interpulse radiation, and evolutionary models of the Crab Nebula's progenitor. Other topics include the evolution of the centimeter flux of 3C58 and the Crab Nebula, a search for a shock wave around the Crab Nebula, high resolution radio studies of the Crab Nebula, supernova shell structure, and the nature of the remnant 0540-693 and its implications for the study of crablike remnants. Papers are also presented on X-ray observations of: Crab-like remnants, the Crab Nebula, the Vela X region, W28, and 3C400.2. Other papers include the 50 millisecond pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud and the X-ray pulse emission mechanism, optical emission from the plerionic core of CTB 80, and one-arcminute resolution observations of W50.

  13. The Crab Nebula and related supernova remnants; Proceedings of the Workshop, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, October 11, 12, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M. C. (Editor); Henry, R. B. C. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented on the Crab Nebula's composition, helium distribution, outer structure and jet, and evolution. Attention is given to line emission from supernova remnants and charge transfer reactions, a magnetohydrodynamic model of the Crab Nebula and its radiation, inferences made using data on the pulsed flux from the crab pulsar, a new interpretation of the crab pulsar X-ray interpulse radiation, and evolutionary models of the Crab Nebula's progenitor. Other topics include the evolution of the centimeter flux of 3C58 and the Crab Nebula, a search for a shock wave around the Crab Nebula, high resolution radio studies of the Crab Nebula, supernova shell structure, and the nature of the remnant 0540-693 and its implications for the study of crablike remnants. Papers are also presented on X-ray observations of: Crab-like remnants, the Crab Nebula, the Vela X region, W28, and 3C400.2. Other papers include the 50 millisecond pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud and the X-ray pulse emission mechanism, optical emission from the plerionic core of CTB 80, and one-arcminute resolution observations of W50.

  14. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Gusdorf, A.

    2015-07-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 M⊙ generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the centre of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 M⊙ progenitor moving with velocity 20 km s-1 and to our initially 40 M⊙ progenitor. These remnants generate mixing of ISM gas, stellar wind and supernova ejecta that is particularly important upstream from the centre of the explosion. Their light curves are dominated by emission from optically thin cooling and by X-ray emission of the shocked ISM gas. We find that these remnants are likely to be observed in the [O III] λ 5007 spectral line emission or in the soft energy-band of X-rays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of observed Galactic supernova remnants such as 3C 391 and the Cygnus Loop.

  15. TYPING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING X-RAY LINE EMISSION MORPHOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L. A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Badenes, C.; Huppenkothen, D.; Jeltema, T. E.

    2009-11-20

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in 17 Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse supernovae explosions are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  16. High-energy Emission from the Composite Supernova Remnant MSH 15-56

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Plucinsky, Paul; Gelfand, Joseph; Dickel, John R.

    2013-01-01

    MSH 1556 (G326.3-1.8) is a composite supernova remnant (SNR) that consists of an SNR shell and a displaced pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the radio. We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the remnant that reveal a compact source at the tip of the radio PWN and complex structures that provide evidence for mixing of the supernova (SN) ejecta with PWN material following a reverse shock interaction. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a non-thermal power-law model whose photon index steepens with distance from the presumed pulsar, and a thermal component with an average temperature of 0.55 keV. The enhanced abundances of silicon and sulfur in some regions, and the similar temperature and ionization timescale, suggest that much of the X-ray emission can be attributed to SN ejecta that have either been heated by the reverse shock or swept up by the PWN. We find one region with a lower temperature of 0.3 keV that appears to be in ionization equilibrium.Assuming the Sedov model, we derive a number of SNR properties, including an age of 16,500 yr. Modeling of the gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi shows that the emission may originate from the reverse shock-crushed PWN.

  17. Hot interstellar tunnels. 1: Simulation of interacting supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. W.

    1976-01-01

    The theory required to build a numerical simulation of interacting supernova remnants is developed. The hot cavities within a population of remnants will become connected, with varying ease and speed, for a variety of assumed conditions in the outer shells of old remnants. Apparently neither radiative cooling nor thermal conduction in a large-scale galactic magnetic field can destroy hot cavity regions, if they grow, faster than they are reheated by supernova shock waves, but interstellar mass motions disrupt the contiguity of extensive cavities necessary for the dispersal of these shocks over a wide volume. Monte Carlo simulations show that a quasi-equilibrium is reached in the test space within 10 million yrs of the first supernova and is characterized by an average cavity filling fraction of the interstellar volume. Aspects of this equilibrium are discussed for a range of supernova rates. Two predictions are not confirmed within this range: critical growth of hot regions to encompass the entire medium, and the efficient quenching of a remnant's expansion by interaction with other cavities.

  18. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research. PMID:20404206

  19. Hydrodynamic instabilities in supernova remnants - Self-similar driven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Blondin, John M.; Emmering, Robert T.

    1992-01-01

    An initial study aimed at elucidating the multidimensional aspects of the hydrodynamic instabilities in supernova remnants is presented. Self-similar solutions are found to exist for the interaction of a steep power-law density profile expanding into a relatively flat stationary power-law density profile. Consideration of the pressure and entropy profiles in the shocked 1D flows shows that the flows are subject to convective instability, by a local criterion. The growth rate for the instability becomes very large near the contact discontinuity between the two shocked regions. A linear analysis of the complete self-similar solutions shows that the solutions are unstable above a critical wavenumber and that the growth rate is greatest at the position of the contact discontinuity. The X-ray image of the remnant of SN 1572 (Tycho) shows emission from clumps of supernova ejecta, which is good evidence for instabilities in this remnant.

  20. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ∼ 0.55 and ∼0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  1. Properties of Optically Selected Supernova Remnant Candidates in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ~ 0.55 and ~0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L X (and L 20 cm) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  2. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at Halpha, [O I] 6300, and [O III] 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was not observed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M(sun), and the presence of broad Halpha in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 VLA radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise time since the explosion.We acknowledge STScI grants under the umbrella program ID GO-12513 to Johns Hopkins University, STScI, and Middlebury College. PFW acknowledges additional support from the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0908566.

  3. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  4. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon Gamma Ray Observatory at Outback) experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  5. Circumstellar Dust in the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Blair, W. P.; Borkowski, K. J.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Reynolds, S. P.; Sankrit, R.

    2012-01-01

    Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the remains of the supernova of 1604, is widely believed to be the result of a Type Ia supernova, and shows IR, optical, and X-ray evidence for an interaction of the blast wave with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM). We present low-resolution 7.5-38 μm IR spectra of selected regions within the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Spectra of those regions where the blast wave is encountering circumstellar material show strong features at 10 and 18 μm. These spectral features are most consistent with various silicate particles, likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution. While it is possible that some features may arise from freshly formed ejecta dust, morphological evidence suggests that it is more likely that they originate from dust in the CSM. We isolate the dust grain absorption efficiencies for several regions in Kepler and compare them to laboratory data for dust particles of various compositions. The hottest dust in the remnant originates in the regions of dense, radiatively shocked clumps of gas, identified in optical images. Models of collisionally heated dust show that such shocks are capable of heating grains to temperatures of > 150 K. We confirm the finding that Kepler's SNR is still interacting with CSM in at least part of the remnant after 400 years. The significant quantities of silicate dust are consistent with a relatively massive progenitor.

  6. Are young supernova remnants interacting with circumstellar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, R.A.

    1982-08-15

    The young remnants of galactic Type I supernovae (SN 1006, SN 1572, and SN 1604) appear to be interacting with moderately dense gas (n/sub O/> or =0.1 cm/sup -3/). If the gas in the ambient interstellar medium, the observations suggest that gas of this density is fairly pervasive. If the gas is circumstellar, there are important implications for the progenitors of Type I supernovae. A plausible density distribution for circumstellar gas is rhoinfinityr/sup -2/. The expansion of a supernova into such a medium is examined and is compared with expansion into a uniform medium. The two cases can be distinguished on the basis of their density profiles and their rates of expansion. Currently available data factor the hypothesis of expansion in a uniform medium for all three Type I remnants; the evidence is the strongest for SN 1572 and the weakest for SN 1604. Further X-ray and radio observations of the galactic remnants and of extragalactic Type I supernovae should serve to test this hypothesis.

  7. A 3D numerical model for Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Roy, J. C.; Esquivel, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Reynoso, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    We present new 3D numerical simulations for Kepler's supernova remnant. In this work we revisit the possibility that the asymmetric shape of the remnant in X-rays is the product of a Type Ia supernova explosion which occurs inside the wind bubble previously created by an AGB companion star. Due to the large peculiar velocity of the system, the interaction of the strong AGB wind with the interstellar medium results in a bow shock structure. In this new model we propose that the AGB wind is anisotropic, with properties such as mass-loss rate and density having a latitude dependence, and that the orientation of the polar axis of the AGB star is not aligned with the direction of motion. The ejecta from the Type Ia supernova explosion is modelled using a power-law density profile, and we let the remnant evolve for 400 yr. We computed synthetic X-ray maps from the numerical results. We find that the estimated size and peculiar X-ray morphology of Kepler's supernova remnant are well reproduced by considering an AGB mass-loss rate of 10-5 M⊙ yr-1, a wind terminal velocity of 10 km s-1, an ambient medium density of 10-3 cm-3 and an explosion energy of 7 × 1050 erg. The obtained total X-ray luminosity of the remnant in this model reaches 6 × 1050 erg, which is within a factor of 2 of the observed value, and the time evolution of the luminosity shows a rate of decrease in recent decades of ˜2.4 per cent yr-1 that is consistent with the observations.

  8. Featured Image: A Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    This is a three-color X-ray image taken by Chandra of the supernova remnant RCW 103. This supernova remnant is an unusual system: its young, but unlike other remnants of its age, metal-rich ejecta hadnt previously been discovered in it. In this paper, Kari Frank (Pennsylvania State University) and collaborators analyze the three deepest Chandra observations of RCW 103 and find the first evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. Their analyses also help to constrain the identity of the mysterious compact stellar object powering the remnant. In this image, red = 0.30.85 keV, green = 0.851.70 keV, and blue = 1.73.0 keV; click on the image for the full view. For more information and the original image, see the paper here:Kari A. Frank et al 2015 ApJ 810 113 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/113.

  9. A comparison of models for supernova remnants including cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Drury, L. O'C.

    1992-11-01

    A simplified model which can follow the dynamical evolution of a supernova remnant including the acceleration of cosmic rays without carrying out full numerical simulations has been proposed by Drury, Markiewicz, & Voelk in 1989. To explore the accuracy and the merits of using such a model, we have recalculated with the simplified code the evolution of the supernova remnants considered in Jones & Kang, in which more detailed and accurate numerical simulations were done using a full hydrodynamic code based on the two-fluid approximation. For the total energy transferred to cosmic rays the two codes are in good agreement, the acceleration efficiency being the same within a factor of 2 or so. The dependence of the results of the two codes on the closure parameters for the two-fluid approximation is also qualitatively similar. The agreement is somewhat degraded in those cases where the shock is smoothed out by the cosmic rays.

  10. DENSE IRON EJECTA AND CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G11.2-0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Koo, Bon-Chul; Seok, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Matthews, Keith; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2009-09-20

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of dense ({approx}>10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) iron ejecta in the young core-collapse supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. Five ejecta knots projected to be close to its center show a large dispersion in their Doppler shifts: two knots in the east are blueshifted by more than 1000 km s{sup -1}, while three western knots have relatively small blueshifts of 20-60 km s{sup -1}. This velocity discrepancy may indicate that the western knots have been significantly decelerated or that there exists a systematic velocity difference among the knots. One ejecta filament in the northwestern boundary, on the other hand, is redshifted by {approx}>200 km s{sup -1}, while opposite filament in the southeastern boundary shows a negligible radial motion. Some of the knots and filaments have secondary velocity components, and one knot shows a bow shock-like feature in the velocity structure. The iron ejecta appear to be devoid of strong emission from other heavy elements, such as S, which may attest to the alpha-rich freezeout process in the explosive nucleosynthesis of the core-collapse supernova explosion close to its center. The prominent bipolar distribution of the Fe ejecta in the northwestern and southeastern direction, along with the elongation of the central pulsar wind nebula in the perpendicular direction, is consistent with the interpretation that the supernova exploded primarily along the northwestern and southeastern direction.

  11. Observations of nine supernova remnants at 10.6 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Kundu, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Intensity contour and polarization observation maps of nine supernova remnants at a microwave frequency are presented and discussed. The data provided are the highest-frequency (10.6 GHz) measurements to date for several of these sources and should therefore be useful in determining their spectra. Polarization ranges from 2 or 3% to as high as 40-50%. Integrated fluxes for the sources vary from about 3 to more than 25.

  12. Are supernovae radio sources - A search for radio emission from young supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.; Marscher, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    A search has been conducted for radio emission at 11 and 3.7 cm from 46 recent supernovae having accurately determined positions and ages of a few months to 79 years. None of these supernovae was detected at a flux density greater than 5-10 mJy. These negative results cannot be explained by internal absorption and are thus due to intrinsically weak synchrotron emission in young supernova remnants. There are two possibilities: either (1) relativistic particles are accelerated not by the supernova outburst but by processes occurring much later (at least about 75 years) in the remnant or (2) the magnetic field in the young remnants evolves very slowly, in proportion to the inverse square root of time, so that its value in the remnants observed was no more than about 0.002 gauss. The constraints the observations place on these possibilities and on the energy in cosmic rays in young remnants are discussed. Gamma-ray observations at times of no more than about 1 year following an outburst will allow one to discriminate between the two alternative explanations of the radio results.

  13. Observations of TeV Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, James H.

    1994-12-01

    Measurements of the gamma ray flux from a number of supernova remnants (SNRs) at energies above 250 GeV have been made with the Whipple Imaging air \\v Cerenkov detector. Observation of the gamma ray emission of SNRs at energies above 1 GeV should provide a sensitive test of shock acceleration models of particle acceleration in SNRs. Gamma-ray luminosities of supernova remnants are well constrained by the observed supernova rate and the cosmic ray flux if supernovae are indeed the source of cosmic rays. Drury et al. (Astron. Astrophys. 287, 959 (1994)) predict that the luminosity of nearby Sedov-phase SNRs should be observable by the Whipple telescope. In this model, diffusive shock acceleration produces energetic charged particles which interact with the ambient medium forming gamma rays. There is an indication that a number of unidentified EGRET sources may correspond to supernova remnants (G. Kanbach, private communication), although at these energies (>100 MeV) the diffuse background is somewhat uncertain. Measurements of the gamma-ray flux with the Whipple instrument have a similar sensitivity to the EGRET detector for a source spectral index of 2.15, and less sensitivity to diffuse background. A number of observations of SNRs including: Tycho, W66, IC443, and others have been made. Currently for Tycho an upper limit of 9times 10(-12) cm(-2) sec(-1) is obtained. The status of these observations will be presented, and it will be shown that these measurements combined with the EGRET observations are beginning to provide a useful constraint on models of cosmic ray origin. Gamma-ray observations may also be used to constrain models of particle acceleration in SNRs exhibiting pulser-powered synchrotron nebula (plerions). The status of observations of this class of objects, including the Crab nebula, will also be presented. Supported in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  14. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  15. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of young supernova remnants observed with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stage, M. D.; Allen, G. E.; Houck, J. C.

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detectors on Chandra have captured the highest resolution X-ray images of several supernova remnants. These images of the shocks, filaments and interactions of the supernova shell with the interstellar medium (or in some cases central objects) are spectacular not only for the incredible imaging clarity they provide, but perhaps more so for the integrated spectral information they contain. Yet the volume of this spatial and spectral data--reaching a new extreme with the megasecond observation of Cassiopeia A this spring--can provide a challenge for analysis. Using a suite of software tools developed for use with the ISIS spectral fitting package, and utilzing distributed processing, we have mapped the variation of spectral line and continnum features throughout the Cassiopeia A and other supernova remnants. We present maps of the elemental distribution, distribution of thermal and non-thermal emission, and plasma temperatures for tens of thousands of individual regions in the remnants. These maps include the results of an analysis of the new megasecond observation of Cas A.

  16. Chandra's View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image reveals, in detail, the turbulent debris created by a supernova explosion that was observed by the Danish Astronomer Tycho Brahe in the year 1572. The colors show different x-ray energies, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and high energies, respectively. Most likely caused by the destruction of a white dwarf star, a shock wave produced by the expanding debris is outlined by the sharp blue circular arcs of 20 million degree Celsius gas seen on the outer rim. The stellar debris, visible only by x-ray, has a temperature of about 10 million degrees, and shows up as mottled yellow, green, and red fingers of gas.

  17. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact

  18. The Kinematics of Kepler's Supernova Remnant as Revealed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-01

    I have determined the expansion of the supernova remnant of SN 1604 (Kepler's supernova) based on archival Chandra ACIS-S observations made in 2000 and 2006. The measurements were done in several distinct energy bands, and were made for the remnant as a whole, and for six individual sectors. The average expansion parameter indicates that the remnant expands on average as r propto t0.5, but there are significant differences in different parts of the remnant: the bright northwestern part expands as r propto t0.35, whereas the rest of the remnant's expansion shows an expansion r propto t0.6. The latter is consistent with an explosion in which the outer part of the ejecta has a negative power law slope for density (ρ propto v-n) of n = 7, or with an exponential density profile [ρ propto exp (- v/ve) ]. The expansion parameter in the southern region, in conjunction with the shock radius, indicates a rather low value (<5 × 1050 erg) for the explosion energy of SN 1604 for a distance of 4 kpc. A higher explosion energy is consistent with the results if the distance is larger. The filament in the eastern part of the remnant, which is dominated by X-ray synchrotron radiation, seems to mark a region with a fast shock speed r propto t0.7, corresponding to a shock velocity of v = 4200 km s-1, for a distance to SN 1604 of 4 kpc. This is consistent with the idea that X-ray synchrotron emission requires shock velocities in excess of ~2000 km s-1. The X-ray-based expansion measurements reported are consistent with results based on optical and radio measurements but disagree with previous X-ray measurements based on ROSAT and Einstein observations.

  19. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at Hα, [O I] λλ6300, 6363, and [O III] λλ4959, 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as "late time supernovae". Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was missed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M ⊙, and the presence of broad Hα in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 Very Large Array radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise age. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract # NAS83060, with data obtained through program GO1-12115.

  20. A multi-wavelength look at the young plerionic supernova remnant 0540-69.3

    SciTech Connect

    Brantseg, T.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Grieves, N.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipovic, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the plerionic supernova remnant 0540-69.3 in the LMC in X-ray, radio, optical, and infrared. We find that the shell of 0540-69.3 is characterized in the X-ray by thermal nonequilibrium plasma with depleted Mg and Si abundances and a temperature of kT ∼ 0.7 keV. This thermal emission is superimposed with synchrotron emission in several regions. Based on X-ray spectra and on morphological considerations in all surveyed wavebands, we conclude that the shell is expanding into a clumpy and highly inhomogeneous medium. In one region of the shell we find an overabundance of Ne, suggesting the presence of ejecta near the edge of the remnant. We also see evidence for reheating of material via a reverse shock originating from the interaction of the supernova blast wave with a particularly dense cloud in the surrounding medium. Finally, we perform the first detailed study of the 'halo' region extending 1.2-2.2 pc from the central pulsar. We detect the presence of thermal and nonthermal spectral components but do not find evidence for mixing or ejecta. We conclude that the thermal component is not a counterpart to similar optical and infrared halos and that it is most likely due to the projection of shell material along the line of sight.

  1. A Multi-wavelength Look at the Young Plerionic Supernova Remnant 0540-69.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantseg, T.; McEntaffer, R. L.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipovic, M.; Grieves, N.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the plerionic supernova remnant 0540-69.3 in the LMC in X-ray, radio, optical, and infrared. We find that the shell of 0540-69.3 is characterized in the X-ray by thermal nonequilibrium plasma with depleted Mg and Si abundances and a temperature of kT ~ 0.7 keV. This thermal emission is superimposed with synchrotron emission in several regions. Based on X-ray spectra and on morphological considerations in all surveyed wavebands, we conclude that the shell is expanding into a clumpy and highly inhomogeneous medium. In one region of the shell we find an overabundance of Ne, suggesting the presence of ejecta near the edge of the remnant. We also see evidence for reheating of material via a reverse shock originating from the interaction of the supernova blast wave with a particularly dense cloud in the surrounding medium. Finally, we perform the first detailed study of the "halo" region extending 1.2-2.2 pc from the central pulsar. We detect the presence of thermal and nonthermal spectral components but do not find evidence for mixing or ejecta. We conclude that the thermal component is not a counterpart to similar optical and infrared halos and that it is most likely due to the projection of shell material along the line of sight.

  2. A high sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bleach, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A high sensitivity scan of the galactic plane was performed to search for 2-20 keV X-rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 deg and 31 deg longitude, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants, are reported on. Upper limits are presented for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned in this survey.

  3. A high-sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    A high-sensitivity scan of the galactic plane from 70 to 30 deg was performed to search for 2-20-keV X rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 and 31 deg longitude are presented, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants. Upper limits are given for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned.

  4. Fermi-LAT observations of supernova remnants Kesteven 79

    SciTech Connect

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 79 (Kes 79). We analyzed approximately 52 months of data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Kes 79 is thought to be interacting with adjacent molecular clouds, based on the presence of strong {sup 12}CO J = 1 → 0 and HCO{sup +} J = 1 → 0 emission and the detection of 1720 MHz line emission toward the east of the remnant. Acceleration of cosmic rays is expected to occur at SNR shocks, and SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds provide a good testing ground for detecting and analyzing the production of γ-rays from the decay of π{sup 0} into two γ-ray photons. This analysis investigates γ-ray emission coincident with Kes 79, which has a detection significance of ∼7σ. Additionally, we present an investigation of the spatial and spectral characteristics of Kes 79 using multiple archival XMM-Newton observations of this remnant. We determine the global X-ray properties of Kes 79 and estimate the ambient density across the remnant. We also performed a similar analysis for Galactic SNR Kesteven 78 (Kes 78), but due to large uncertainties in the γ-ray background model, no conclusion can be made about an excess of GeV γ-ray associated with the remnant.

  5. The Fascinating High-Energy World of Neutron Stars and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar

    2006-06-01

    The past few years have witnessed a fast growth in the high-energy astrophysics community in Canada, thanks to new opportunities including the University Faculty Award (UFA) program introduced by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) to appoint promising female researchers to faculty positions in science and engineering. As a UFA fellow at the University of Manitoba, I have had the unique opportunity to contribute to the launch of a new astronomy program in the department of Physics (renamed to Physics and Astronomy). My research focuses on observational studies of neutron stars, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. The study of these exotic objects helps address the physics of the extreme and probe some of the most energetic events in the Universe. I will highlight exciting discoveries in this field and some of the questions to be addressed with current and future high-energy missions.

  6. Observation of Nonthermal Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC443 with RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, S. J.; Keohane, J. W.; Reimer, O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present analysis of X-ray spectra from the supernova remnant IC443 obtained using the PCA on RXTE. The spectra in the 3 - 20 keV band are well fit by a two-component model consisting of thermal and nonthermal components. We compare these results with recent results of other X-ray missions and discuss the need for a cut-off in the nonthermal spectrum. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggest that much of the nonthermal emission from IC443 can be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula. We present the results of our search for periodic emission in the RXTE PCA data. We then discuss the origin o f the nonthermal component and its possible association with the unidentified EGRET source.

  7. Uncovering The Properties of Young Neutron Stars and Their Surrounding Supernova A Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    star formed in the explosion that produced the remnant. There is no evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula. The source properties are similar to the central source in Cas A even though the Kes 79 remnant is considerably older. The results have been published in the Astrophysical Journal (Seward, Slane, Smith, and Sun 2003, ApJ, 584,414). Chandra Survey for Compact Objects in Supernova Remnants: We have formed a collaboration to carry out an extensive search for young neutron stars in nearby supernova remnants. Using X-ray observations from an approved Chandra Large Project, as well as from additional approved XMM observations, we are investigating a volume-limited sample of SNRs for which there is currently no evidence of associated neutron stars. We have obtained extensive optical and 1R data to complement the project, and analysis of these data is currently underway.

  8. Molecular environment of the supernova remnant IC 443: Discovery of the molecular shells surrounding the remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yang; Fang, Min; Yang, Ji; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Yang

    2014-06-20

    We have carried out {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O observations toward the mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443. The observations cover a 1.°5 × 1.°5 area and allow us to investigate the overall molecular environment of the remnant. Some northern and northeastern partial shell structure of CO gas is around the remnant. One of the partial shells, about 5' extending beyond the northeastern border of the remnant's bright radio shell, seems to just confine the faint radio halo. On the other hand, some faint CO clumps can be discerned along the eastern boundary of the faint remnant's radio halo. Connecting the eastern CO clumps, the northeastern partial shell structures, and the northern CO partial shell, we can see that a half molecular ring structure appears to surround the remnant. The LSR velocity of the half-ring structure is in the range of –5 km s{sup –1} to –2 km s{sup –1}, which is consistent with that of the –4 km s{sup –1} molecular clouds. We suggest that the half-ring structure of the CO emission at V {sub LSR} ∼ –4 km s{sup –1} is associated with the SNR. The structures are possibly swept up by the stellar winds of SNR IC 443's massive progenitor. Based on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and the Two Micron All Sky Survey near-IR database, 62 young stellar object (YSO) candidates are selected within the radio halo of the remnant. These YSO candidates concentrated along the boundary of the remnant's bright radio shell are likely to be triggered by the stellar winds from the massive progenitor of SNR IC 443.

  9. X-Ray Measured Dynamics of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr-1 (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = tm ) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr-1 (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of [approx]0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr-1 and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of [less, similar]0.2 cm-3.

  10. G11.2-0.3: The Young Remnant of a Stripped-envelope Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Roberts, Mallory S. E.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of a 400 ks Chandra observation of the young shell supernova remnant (SNR) G11.2-0.3, containing a pulsar and pulsar-wind nebula (PWN). We measure a mean expansion rate for the shell since 2000 of 0.0277 ± 0.0018% yr-1, implying an age between 1400 and 2400 yr, and making G11.2-0.3 one of the youngest core-collapse SNRs in the Galaxy. However, we find very high absorption (AV ˜ 16m ± 2m), confirming near-IR determinations and ruling out a claimed association with the possible historical SN of 386 CE. The PWN shows strong jets and a faint torus within a larger, more diffuse region of radio emission and nonthermal X-rays. Central soft thermal X-ray emission is anticorrelated with the PWN; that, and more detailed morphological evidence, indicates that the reverse shock has already reheated all ejecta and compressed the PWN. The pulsar characteristic energy-loss timescale is well in excess of the remnant age, and we suggest that the bright jets have been produced since the recompression. The relatively pronounced shell and diffuse hard X-ray emission in the interior, enhanced at the inner edge of the shell, indicate that the immediate circumstellar medium into which G11.2-0.3 is expanding was quite anisotropic. We propose a possible origin for G11.2-0.3 in a stripped-envelope progenitor that had lost almost all its envelope mass, in an anisotropic wind or due to binary interaction, leaving a compact core whose fast winds swept previously lost mass into a dense irregular shell, and which exploded as a SN cIIb or Ibc.

  11. Three-Dimensional Kinematics of Core-Collapse Supernova Remnants approaching Middle Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Garber, J. H.; Plunkett, A. L. D.; Twelker, K.; Long, K. S.

    2010-03-01

    The Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) Puppis A and G292.0+1.8 have long been known to have optical knots composed almost entirely of heavy elements (especially oxygen) with Doppler velocities 1000 km/s or higher--fragments from the progenitor core that were launched in the explosion and have only recently been excited. Both harbor young pulsars near their centers. These SNRs are similar to Cas A but larger, with less extreme velocities, and thus are presumably older. Using CCD images from epochs 1986-2008, we have measured proper motions for over 60 knots in each of these SNRs, and in both cases we find motions proportional to displacement from an expansion center, indicating free expansion. The expansion rates for both SNRs give kinematic ages 3000 yr--almost 10 times the age of Cas A. We have also obtained spectra from many of these and other knots, and have combined the radial and transverse velocities to give the first 3-dimensional models for the ejecta distribution. For G292 the ejecta are concentrated primarily in broad bi-conical jets, oriented roughly N-S in the plane of the sky. Based on its position, the pulsar should be moving nearly perpendicular to the jet axis. Puppis A shows a more complicated structure; many of its knots have strong [N II] and/or [S II] lines in addition to those from O, and with similar high velocities. The fast knots are concentrated in three complexes, all in the NE quadrant of the remnant, while the pulsar has been measured as recoiling at high velocity toward the SW. We will discuss these results and their possible implications for understanding core-collapse SNe. Supported in part by NSF grant AST-0908566.

  12. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  13. A High-Resolution X-ray Atlas of Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. M.; Chu, Y.-H.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; Smith, R. C.; Tavarez, M.

    1998-12-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) presents a unique opportunity to study a large and varied sample of supernova remnants (SNRs), at a common distance ( ~ 50 kpc) and with little interstellar obscuration. These factors allow us to avoid the uncertainties in distances and absorptions that plague the study of Galactic SNRs. Reasonable resolutions can be achieved for LMC SNRs with current instruments in the X-ray, optical, and radio regimes; thus, they can be studied at a level of detail unrivaled by most extragalactic remnants. LMC remnants cover the range of evolutionary stages, from the newly forming SNR of SN 1987A, to the largest remnant yet known (SNR 0450-709, 104x75 pc). They arise from both Type I and Type II progenitors, and expand into environments ranging from a stellar-wind bubble to an HII complex. This extensive sample allows us to examine SNRs both individually and as a group. We can study specific processes such as the collision of two SNRs (DEML316), SNR breakouts (N11L, N86), the expansion of an SNR in a cloudy medium (N63A), Crab-type SNRs (N158A, N157B), and unusual SNR structures (Honeycomb SNR). More importantly, we can identify common features between SNRs and correlate these with their evolutionary states and environments. In this poster we present a high-resolution atlas of the X-ray emission from LMC SNRs, and use the X-ray morphologies to examine SNR conditions and structures. We find five types of SNRs in the LMC. While the Peaked Emission SNRs are dominated by a pulsar-powered nebula, and the Irregular SNRs by the details of their environments, the remaining three categories (Shell, Diffuse Face, and Centrally Peaked) seem to represent an evolutionary trend, as shown by their correlation with remnant sizes. We will discuss the intriguing implications of our findings for SNR development and interactions with the interstellar medium.

  14. Asymmetries in the Expansion and Emission from Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigh, Carlos D.; Velázquez, Pablo F.; Gómez, Daniel O.; Reynoso, Estela M.; Esquivel, Alejandro; Matias Schneiter, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical simulations of asymmetric young supernova remnants (SNRs) carried out with the hydrodynamical code YGUAZÚ, aiming to quantitatively assess the role of different factors that may give origin to such asymmetries in their expansion. In particular, we are interested in modeling the morphology of Tycho's SNR to address whether the companion star of a Type Ia supernova progenitor has played a role in the subsequent evolution of the remnant. With the results from the numerical simulations, we can not only study the morphology of the SNR but also compute the emission of the remnant in different spectral bands. In particular, we simulate X-ray maps, which can be directly compared to recent and previous observations of Tycho's SNR. Our results suggest that the most likely explanation for Tycho's morphology is that after the supernova (SN) explosion the shock front stripped the envelope of its companion. We represent this effect by adding a conical region with an enhanced density into the initial sphere immediately after the explosion. Assuming that Tycho's companion was a massive red giant star, we explore different values of the angle of aperture and mass excess of the conical region. A good agreement with observational data was found for the model with a mass excess of 0.3 M sun and an aperture of 90°. After the collision with the SN shock wave, the companion would become an He-rich star. This scenario would gain observational support if a star with these characteristics is found in the vicinity of the center of the SN explosion.

  15. Heating of the interstellar medium by supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Models for the mechanisms active during supernova (SN) heating of surrounding regions are examined. SNs heat both the matrix material and material in the nearby interstellar medium, and also accelerate cosmic rays with shock waves. Fountain and wind models vary according to the SN power and mass acquisition rate. Additionally, a warm intercloud medium may be fed by returning fountain material and stellar mass loss. The thermal wind temperature varies with the number of solar massess heated, although remnants have been observed to vanish in the LMC when more than 100 solar masses were heated. The possibility that the solar system is inside a remnant that produces the observed soft X-ray background is considered.

  16. Radio structure of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.; Van Breugel, W. J. M.; Strom, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The radio emission from the remnant of Tycho's supernova of 1572 arises in a nearly circular, clumpy shell. A very distinct, thin bright rim just outside the main shell can be seen around most of the periphery of the remnant. The outer edge of radio emission, usually defined by this bright rim, coincides perfectly with the outer X-ray boundary. Most of the emission is polarized by a modest amount, with the outer rim particularly prominent. Observations at several wavelengths are used to map out the rotation measure at high angular resolution, and determine the intrinsic magnetic field direction. The magnetic field shows a somewhat cellular pattern but with a net radial orientation and a generally fairly low degree of polarization.

  17. Radio structure of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572)

    SciTech Connect

    Dickel, J.R.; Van breugel, W.J.M.; Strom, R.G. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy, Dwingeloo )

    1991-06-01

    The radio emission from the remnant of Tycho's supernova of 1572 arises in a nearly circular, clumpy shell. A very distinct, thin bright rim just outside the main shell can be seen around most of the periphery of the remnant. The outer edge of radio emission, usually defined by this bright rim, coincides perfectly with the outer X-ray boundary. Most of the emission is polarized by a modest amount, with the outer rim particularly prominent. Observations at several wavelengths are used to map out the rotation measure at high angular resolution, and determine the intrinsic magnetic field direction. The magnetic field shows a somewhat cellular pattern but with a net radial orientation and a generally fairly low degree of polarization. 44 refs.

  18. Gamma-Ray Emission From Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Blandford, Roger D.; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-10-27

    It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found 'GeV-bright' supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of {pi}{sup 0}-mesons produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

  19. New Candidates for Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    We propose observations of five new candidates for X-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which were detected in ROSAT data and classified as SNR candidates based on their X-ray, radio, and optical properties. Five sources have already been observed (AO9 and AO12, Prop. IDs 65188 and 72044; AO11, VLP-LMC survey) and confirm the reliability of our candidate selection. The high sensitivity of XMM-Newton will allow us to detect SNRs that are X-ray faint due to their age or ambient medium, and complete the sample of known SNRs to lower fluxes. We will thus be able to perform statistical studies by, e.g., constructing a more complete X-ray luminosity function of SNRs in the LMC and will obtain information about typical abundances, densities, and initial supernova energies.

  20. Approximate supernova remnant dynamics with cosmic ray production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voelk, H. J.; Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Supernova explosions are the most violent and energetic events in the galaxy and have long been considered probably sources of Cosmic Rays. Recent shock acceleration models treating the Cosmic Rays (CR's) as test particles nb a prescribed Supernova Remnant (SNR) evolution, indeed indicate an approximate power law momentum distribution f sub source (p) approximation p(-a) for the particles ultimately injected into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). This spectrum extends almost to the momentum p = 1 million GeV/c, where the break in the observed spectrum occurs. The calculated power law index approximately less than 4.2 agrees with that inferred for the galactic CR sources. The absolute CR intensity can however not be well determined in such a test particle approximation.

  1. EVOLUTION OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAYS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ryoko; Bamba, Aya; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ishida, Manabu; Kohri, Kazunori

    2012-02-20

    A systematic study of the synchrotron X-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) has been conducted. We selected a total of 12 SNRs whose synchrotron X-ray spectral parameters are available in the literature with reasonable accuracy and studied how their luminosities change as a function of radius. It is found that the synchrotron X-ray luminosity tends to drop especially when the SNRs become larger than {approx}5 pc, despite large scatter. This may be explained by the change of spectral shape caused by the decrease of the synchrotron roll-off energy. A simple evolutionary model of the X-ray luminosity is proposed and is found to reproduce the observed data approximately, with reasonable model parameters. According to the model, the total energy of accelerated electrons is estimated to be 10{sup 47-48} erg, which is well below the supernova explosion energy. The maximum energies of accelerated electrons and protons are also discussed.

  2. SPECTRUM OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS ACCELERATED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2010-07-20

    The spectra of high-energy protons and nuclei accelerated by supernova remnant (SNR) shocks are calculated, taking into account magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift both upstream and downstream of the shock for different types of SNRs during their evolution. The maximum energy of accelerated particles may reach 5 x 10{sup 18} eV for Fe ions in Type IIb SNRs. The calculated energy spectrum of cosmic rays after propagation through the Galaxy is in good agreement with the spectrum measured at the Earth.

  3. Neutron stars, fast pulsars, supernovae and the equation of state of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glendening, N.K.

    1989-06-01

    We discuss the prospects for obtaining constraints on the equation of state from astrophysical sources. Neutron star masses although few are known at present, provide a very direct constraint in as much as the connection to the equation of state involves only the assumption that Einstein's general theory of relativity is correct at the macroscopic scale. If the millisecond pulses briefly observed in the remnant of SN1987A can be attributed to uniform rotation of a pulsar, then a very severe constraint is placed on the equation of state. The theory again is very secure. The precise nature of the constraint is not yet understood, but it appears that the equation of state must be neither too soft nor stiff, and it may be that there is information not only on the stiffness of the equation of state but on its shape. Supernovae simulations involve such a plethora of physical processes including those involved in the evolution of the precollapse configuration, not all of them known or understood, that they provide no constraint at the present time. Not even the broad category of mechanism for the explosion is agreed upon (prompt shock, delayed shock, or nuclear explosion). In connection with very fast pulsars, we include some speculations on pure quark matter stars, and on possible scenarios for understanding the disappearance of the fast pulsar in SN1987A. 47 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A Detailed X-Ray Investigation of PSR J2021+4026 and the γ-Cygni Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, C. Y.; Seo, K. A.; Lin, L. C. C.; Huang, R. H. H.; Hu, C. P.; Wu, J. H. K.; Trepl, L.; Takata, J.; Wang, Y.; Chou, Y.; Cheng, K. S.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the field around the radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar, PSR J2021+4026, with a ~140 ks XMM-Newton observation and ~56 ks archival Chandra data. Through analyzing the pulsed spectrum, we show that the X-ray pulsation is purely thermal in nature, which suggests that the pulsation originated from a hot polar cap with T ~ 3 × 106 K on the surface of a rotating neutron star. On the other hand, the power-law (PL) component that dominates the pulsar emission in the hard band is originated from off-pulse phases, which possibly comes from a pulsar wind nebula. In re-analyzing the Chandra data, we have confirmed the presence of a bow-shock nebula that extends from the pulsar to the west by ~10 arcsec. The orientation of this nebular feature suggests that the pulsar is probably moving eastward, which is consistent with the speculated proper motion by extrapolating from the nominal geometrical center of the supernova remnant (SNR) G78.2+2.1 to the current pulsar position. For G78.2+2.1, our deep XMM-Newton observation also enables a study of the central region and part of the southeastern region with superior photon statistics. The column absorption derived for the SNR is comparable to that for PSR J2021+4026, which supports their association. The remnant emission in both of the examined regions is in a non-equilibrium ionization state. Also, the elapsed time of both regions after shock-heating is apparently shorter than the Sedov age of G78.2+2.1. This might suggest that the reverse shock has reached the center not long ago. Apart from PSR J2021+4026 and G78.2+2.1, we have also serendipitously detected an X-ray flash-like event, XMM J202154.7+402855, from this XMM-Newton observation.

  5. Planck intermediate results. XXXI. Microwave survey of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Maino, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Rho, J.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism for microwave emission. In only one case, IC 443, is there high-frequency emission clearly from dust associated with the supernova remnant. In all cases, the low-frequency emission is from synchrotron radiation. As predicted for a population of relativistic particles with energy distribution that extends continuously to high energies, a single power law is evident for many sources, including the Crab and PKS 1209-51/52. A decrease in flux density relative to the extrapolation of radio emission is evident in several sources. Their spectral energy distributions can be approximated as broken power laws, Sν ∝ ν-α, with the spectral index, α, increasing by 0.5-1 above a break frequency in the range 10-60 GHz. The break could be due to synchrotron losses.

  6. Model images of radio halos around supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    I present model calculations of profiles and two-dimensional images of the radio synchrotron emission of young supernova remnants, concentrating on observable effects of relativistic eletrons diffusing upstream of the shock wave. If the preshock electron scattering mean free path is sufficiently long, observable synchrotron halos outside the bulk of the radio emission can potentially result; their absence can constrain the mean free path from above. If scattering is primarily due, as expected, to Alfven waves with amplitude detla(B), the halo is expected to extend a distance of order r(sub g)c(delta(B)/B)(exp 2)/v(sub s) beyond the shock, where r(sub g) is the gyroradius of the electrons emitting at the observed frequency, B is the upstream magnetic field strength, v(sub s) is the shock velocity, and the amplitude delta(B) refers to wave with wavelength comparable to r(sub g), of order 10(exp 13) cm for typical supernova-remnant parameters. However, the detailed geometry of the halo varies with the assumptions about particle acceleration in the shock wave. I present an atlas of model profiles and images as a function of preshock diffusion length, of aspect angle between the magnetic field and the line of sight, and of other relevant parameters.

  7. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  8. Shocks in Dense Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant: FUSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have obtained 8 LWRS FUSE spectra to study a recently identified interaction of the Vela supernova remnant with a dense cloud region along its western edge. The goal is to quantify the temperature, ionization, density, and abundance characteristics associated with this shock/dense cloud interface by means of UV absorption line studies. Our detection of high-velocity absorption line C I at +90 to +130 km/s with IUE toward a narrow region interior to the Vela SNR strongly suggests the Vela supernova remnant is interacting with a dense ISM or molecular cloud. The shock/dense cloud interface is suggested by (1) the rarity of detection of high-velocity C I seen in IUE spectra, (2) its very limited spatial distribution in the remnant, and (3) a marked decrease in X-ray emission in the region immediately west of the position of these stars where one also finds a 100 micron emission ridge in IRAS images. We have investigated the shock physics and general properties of this interaction region through a focussed UV absorption line study using FUSE spectra. We have FUSE data on OVI absorption lines observed toward 8 stars behind the Vela supernova remnant (SNR). We compare the OVI observations with IUE observations of CIV absorption toward the same stars. Most of the stars, which are all B stars, have complex continua making the extraction of absorption lines difficult. Three of the stars, HD 72088, HD 72089 and HD 72350, however, are rapid rotators (v sin i less than 100 km/s) making the derivation of absorption column densities much easier. We have measured OVI and CIV column densities for the "main component" (i.e. the low velocity component) for these stars. In addition, by removing the H2 line at 1032.35A (121.6 km/s relative to OVI), we find high velocity components of OVI at approximately 150 km/s that we attribute to the shock in the Vela SNR. The column density ratios and magnitudes are compared to both steady shock models and results of hydrodynamical SNR

  9. A 3-dimensional Analysis of the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isensee, Karl

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the nearby supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). Easily resolvable supernova remnants such as Cas A provide a unique opportunity to test supernova explosion models. Additionally, we can observe key processes in the interstellar medium as the ejecta from the initial explosion encounter Cas A's powerful shocks. In order to accomplish these science goals, we used the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph to create a high resolution spectral map of select regions of Cas A, allowing us to make a Doppler reconstruction of its 3-dimensional structure structure. In the center of the remnant, we find relatively pristine ejecta that have not yet reached Cas A's reverse shock or interacted with the circumstellar environment. We observe O, Si, and S emission. These ejecta can form both sheet-like structures as well as filaments. Si and O, which come from different nucleosynthetic layers of the star, are observed to be coincident in some regions, and separated by >500 km s -1 in others. Observed ejecta traveling toward us are, on average, ˜800 km s -1 slower than the material traveling away from us. We compare our observations to recent supernova explosion models and find that no single model can simultaneously reproduce all the observed features. However, models of different supernova explosions can collectively produce the observed geometries and structures of the emission interior to Cas A's reverse shock. We use the results from the models to address the conditions during the supernova explosion, concentrating on asymmetries in the shock structure. We also predict that the back surface of Cassiopeia A will begin brightening in ∼30 years, and the front surface in ˜100 years. We then used similar observations from 3 regions on Cas A's reverse shock in order to create more 3-dimensional maps. In these regions, we observe supernova ejecta both immediately before and during the shock-ejecta interaction. We determine that the

  10. Image of the Vela Supernova Remnant Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Like the Crab Nebula, the Vela Supernova Remnant has a radio pulsar at its center. In this image taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory, the pulsar appears as a point source surrounded by weak and diffused emissions of x-rays. HEAO-2's computer processing system was able to record and display the total number of x-ray photons (a tiny bundle of radiant energy used as the fundamental unit of electromagnetic radiation) on a scale along the margin of the picture. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  11. Dense Iron Ejecta and Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion in the Young Supernova Remnant G11.2-0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Matthews, Keith; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Seok, Ji Yeon; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2009-09-01

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of dense (gsim103 cm-3) iron ejecta in the young core-collapse supernova remnant G11.2-0.3. Five ejecta knots projected to be close to its center show a large dispersion in their Doppler shifts: two knots in the east are blueshifted by more than 1000 km s-1, while three western knots have relatively small blueshifts of 20-60 km s-1. This velocity discrepancy may indicate that the western knots have been significantly decelerated or that there exists a systematic velocity difference among the knots. One ejecta filament in the northwestern boundary, on the other hand, is redshifted by gsim200 km s-1, while opposite filament in the southeastern boundary shows a negligible radial motion. Some of the knots and filaments have secondary velocity components, and one knot shows a bow shock-like feature in the velocity structure. The iron ejecta appear to be devoid of strong emission from other heavy elements, such as S, which may attest to the α-rich freezeout process in the explosive nucleosynthesis of the core-collapse supernova explosion close to its center. The prominent bipolar distribution of the Fe ejecta in the northwestern and southeastern direction, along with the elongation of the central pulsar wind nebula in the perpendicular direction, is consistent with the interpretation that the supernova exploded primarily along the northwestern and southeastern direction. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  12. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. I: spectrum and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the spectrum and chemical composition of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. In particular, at high energies we assume that D(E)∝E{sup δ}, with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars, with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. We find that the stochastic fluctuations induced by the spatial and temporal distribution of supernovae, together with the effect of spallation of nuclei, lead to mild but sensible violations of the simple, leaky-box-inspired rule that the spectrum observed at Earth is N(E)∝E{sup −α} with α = γ+δ, where γ is the slope of the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the sources. Spallation of nuclei, even with the small rates appropriate for He, may account for small differences in spectral slopes between different nuclei, possibly providing an explanation for the recent CREAM observations. For δ = 1/3 we find that the slope of the proton and helium spectra are ∼ 2.67 and ∼ 2.6 respectively (with fluctuations depending on the realization of source distribution) at energies around ∼ 1 TeV (to be compared with the measured values of 2.66±0.02 and 2.58±0.02). For δ = 0.6 the hardening of the He spectra is not observed. The stochastic effects discussed above cannot be found in ordinary propagation calculations, such as GALPROP, where these effects and the point like nature of the sources are not taken into account. We also comment on the effect of time dependence of the escape of cosmic rays from supernova remnants, and of a possible clustering of the sources in superbubbles. In a second paper we will discuss the

  13. X-RAY EJECTA KINEMATICS OF THE GALACTIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.0+1.8

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Dewey, Daniel; Hughes, John P.; Mori, Koji; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-02-10

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of –2300 ≲ v{sub r}  ≲ 1400 km s{sup –1}. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ∼90'' (corresponding to ∼3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ∼4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 10{sup 51} erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be ≲8 M {sub ☉}, and we propose an upper limit of ≲35 M {sub ☉} on the progenitor's mass.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Image, Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were created by the universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before the United States celebrated its birth with a bang. The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s. This HST image of Cas A shows for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago. This photo shows the upper rim of the super nova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system. The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur. The images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in January 2000 and January 2002. Image Credit: NASA and HST team (Stoics/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Darmouth) and J. Morse ( Univ. of Colorado).

  15. Dynamical Evolution of Supernova Remnants Breaking Through Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Wankee; Kim, Jongsoo; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-04-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code tep{har83}. We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the outermost dense shell of the remnant is divided into several layers. The divided layers are subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and fragmented. On the other hand, if an SNR breaks through an MC after the remnant enters the snowplow phase, the radiative shell is not divided to layers. We also compare the predictions of previous analytic solutions for the expansion of SNRs in stratified media with our one-dimensional simulations. Moreover, we produce synthetic X-ray surface brightness in order to research the center-bright X-ray morphology shown in thermal composite SNRs. In the late stages, a breakout SNR shows the center-bright X-ray morphology inside an MC in our results. We apply our model to the observational results of the X-ray morphology of the thermal composite SNR 3C 391.

  16. Tycho: ambient medium structure by analysis of the supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshley, V.; Dubner, G.; Kuzyo, T.; Miceli, M.; Orlando, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Petruk, O.

    2016-06-01

    The radio (VLA) and X-ray (Chandra) maps of the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN1572) are used to study the interstellar medium (ISM) density and magnetic field gradients in the ambient medium surrounding the remnant. The analysis uses also the GeV gamma-ray spectrum derived from the recent Fermi data, the radio fluxes from different radio instruments, X-ray spectrum from Suzaku and TeV gamma-ray spectrum from VERITAS. The inferred orientation of ISM density gradient is verified by comparing it to the VLA maps of interstellar medium surrounding the remnant, while the revealed orientation of the magnetic field gradient is checked by measurements of the magnetic field strength in a number of local regions around the shock. The two approaches are applied in order to estimate the magnetic field strength, involving analysis of the temporal variations of the X-ray synchrotron radiation from the shock and modeling the radial X-ray external shock profiles. As a result we reveal that the magnetic field gradient in vicinity of Tycho is almost parallel to the Galactic plane while the interstellar plasma density gradient is almost perpendicular to it. One should note that different approaches adopted in this study lead to fully compatible results.

  17. Supernova remnant evolution in non-uniform media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. E. S.; de Jager, O. C.

    In this work numerical simulations showing the time evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) in an uniform and non-uniform intersteller medium (ISM) are presented. For this we use a hydrodynamic model including a kinematic calculation of the interstellar magnetic field. Important parameters include the ejecta mass and energy of the remnant, as well as interstellar medium density and adiabatic index. By varying these we constructed an analytical expression giving the return time of the reverse shock to the origin. We also computed the evolution of the remnant in non-uniform media. As the SNR evolves from one into another medium of higher density a reflection shock is created which is driven back toward the center. As the reflection shock moves inward it also drags some of the compressed ISM field lines with it and heats the inside of the SNR. When a SNR explodes in a medium with a high density and the blast waves propagate into a medium with a lower density a cavity is being blown away changing the geometry of the high density region. Also, once the forward shock moves into the medium of less density, a second reverse shock will start to form in this region.

  18. IKT 16: a composite supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, R. A.; Filipović, M. D.; Ballet, J.; Haberl, F.; Crawford, E. J.; Payne, J. L.; Sturm, R.; Pietsch, W.; Mereghetti, S.; Ehle, M.; Tiengo, A.; Coe, M. J.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Buckley, D. A. H.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: IKT 16 is an X-ray and radio-faint supernova remnant (SNR) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). A previous X-ray study of this SNR found a hard X-ray source near its centre. Using all available archival and proprietary XMM-Newton data, alongside new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and optical observations at Hα and forbidden [SII] and [OIII] lines, we aim to constrain the properties of the SNR and discover the nature of the hard source within. Methods: We combine XMM-Newton datasets to produce the highest quality X-ray image of IKT 16 to date. We use this, in combination with radio and optical images, to conduct a multi-wavelength morphological analysis of the remnant. We extract separate spectra from the SNR and the bright source near its centre, and conduct spectral fitting of both regions. Results: We find IKT 16 to have a radius of 37 ± 3 pc, with the bright source located 8 ± 2 pc from the centre. This is the largest known SNR in the SMC. The large size of the remnant suggests it is likely in the Sedov-adiabatic phase of evolution. Using a Sedov model to fit the SNR spectrum, we find an electron temperature kT of 1.03 ± 0.12 keV and an age of ≈14700 yr. The absorption found requires the remnant to be located deep within the SMC. The bright source is fit with a power law with index Γ = 1.58 ± 0.07, and is associated with diffuse radio emission extending towards the centre of the SNR. We argue that this source is likely to be the neutron star remnant of the supernova explosion, and infer its transverse kick velocity to be 580 ± 100 km s-1. The X-ray and radio properties of this source strongly favour a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) origin. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  19. Supernovae. The bubble-like interior of the core-collapse supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A

    2015-01-30

    The death of massive stars is believed to involve aspheric explosions initiated by the collapse of an iron core. The specifics of these catastrophic explosions remain uncertain, due partly to limited observational constraints on asymmetries deep inside the star. Here we present near-infrared observations of the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, descendant of a type IIb core-collapse explosion, and a three-dimensional map of its interior unshocked ejecta. The remnant's interior has a bubble-like morphology that smoothly connects to and helps explain the multiringed structures seen in the remnant's bright reverse-shocked main shell of expanding debris. This internal structure may originate from turbulent mixing processes that encouraged outwardly expanding plumes of radioactive (56)Ni-rich ejecta. If this is true, substantial amounts of its decay product, (56)Fe, may still reside in these interior cavities. PMID:25635094

  20. A Chandra ACIS Study of 30 Doradus. I. Superbubbles and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Brandl, Bernhard R.; Chu, You-Hua; Garmire, Gordon P.; Pavlov, George G.

    2006-04-01

    We present an X-ray tour of diffuse emission in the 30 Doradus star-forming complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud using high spatial resolution X-ray images and spatially resolved spectra obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The dominant X-ray feature of the 30 Doradus nebula is the intricate network of diffuse emission generated by interacting stellar winds and supernovae working together to create vast superbubbles filled with hot plasma. We construct maps of the region showing variations in plasma temperature (T=3-9 million degrees), absorption [NH=(1-6)×1021 cm-2], and absorption-corrected X-ray surface brightness [SX=(3-126)×1031 ergs s-1 pc-2]. Enhanced images reveal the pulsar wind nebula in the composite supernova remnant N157B, and the Chandra data show spectral evolution from nonthermal synchrotron emission in the N157B core to a thermal plasma in its outer regions. In a companion paper we show that R136, the central massive star cluster, is resolved at the arcsecond level into almost 100 X-ray sources. Through X-ray studies of 30 Doradus the complete life cycle of such a massive stellar cluster can be revealed.

  1. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J.; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Manchester, Richard N.; Baes, Maarten; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Lakićević, Maša; Marcaide, Jon M.; Meixner, Margaret; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, Sangwook; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (λ 3.2 mm to 450 μm), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup –0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ∼ 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields –0.4 ≲ α ≲ –0.1 across the western regions, with α ∼ 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  2. Nature Versus Nurture: Do Asymmetries in Supernova Remnant Ejecta Reflect the Explosion or the Environment of the Progenitor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) have statistically more spherical and mirror-symmetric X-ray line and continuum emission than core-collapse (CC) SNRs. The ability to type SNRs based on thermal X-ray emission morphology alone could reflect either the distinct explosion mechanisms or the different circumstellar environments of Type Ia and CC SNRs. In this talk, we present new results exploring this "nature" versus "nurture" conundrum. To test if asymmetries arise from explosions, we examine whether pulsar kick velocities are correlated with ejecta (a)symmetries (as measured using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT images). We also study Type Ia and CC SNRs in a variety of conditions to search for trends in (a)symmetries with environmental factors (e.g., star-formation activity). Collectively, this work provides new insights into the nature of SN explosions and the dynamical evolution of their remnants.

  3. A NEW X-RAY VIEW OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G272.2-3.2 AND ITS ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    McEntaffer, R. L.; Grieves, N.; DeRoo, C.; Brantseg, T.

    2013-09-10

    We present an analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory data detailing a Galactic supernova remnant, G272.2-3.2. A clear shell of emission is resolved as a series of filaments and knots around the entire rim of the remnant. Spectral analysis of these features show that they are consistent with shock heating of interstellar material in a clumpy medium. We contrast these X-ray images with 22 {mu}m Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to verify this interaction. Spatially separated from the shell we see a central diffuse region dominated by harder, hotter emission. Spatial spectroscopy shows a clear enhancement of metals consistent with a Type Ia explosion, namely S, Si, and Fe. We find no clear evidence for a compact object or pulsar wind nebula and argue for a Type Ia origin. Consideration of the ionization timescales suggest an age of 11,000 yr for G272.2-3.2.

  4. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.; Patnaude, Daniel; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Williams, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained new HST/WFC3 images of Kepler's supernova remnant in H-alpha (F656N) and [N II] (F658N) emission line filters. The bright radiative shocks in dense clumps are detected in both filters, while non-radiative shocks are seen as faint filaments only in the H-alpha image. Most of these Balmer filaments lie around the periphery of the remnant where the blast wave encounters partially neutral interstellar gas. We compare the new images with HST/ACS images taken nearly 10 years previously, and find that these filaments tracing the forward shock have moved 0.6"-0.9" between the two epochs. Assuming a distance of 4 kpc to the remnant, these proper motions correspond to shock velocities of 1160-1740 km/s, which are consistent with the published values, 1550-2000 km/s (e.g. Blair et al. 1991, ApJ 366, 484). We also find a few Balmer filaments with highly non-radial proper motions. In one particularly interesting case in the projected interior of the remnant, SE of the center, the shock appears to have wrapped around a sharp density enhancement and moved about 0.3" in the period between the observations.The images allow us to study the evolution of the shock around an ejecta knot, which is punching through the remnant boundary in the northwest. The forward shock, visible as an arcuate Balmer filament, has moved about 1". At the trailing edges, the system of radiative knots formed by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have undergone significant changes - some knots have disappeared, new ones have appeared, and many have changed in brightness. Elsewhere in the remnant we find changes in the relative intensities of many small, bright knots over the 10 year baseline, indicating the short radiative lifetimes of these features.This work has been supported in part by grant HST-GO-12885 to the Universities Space Research Association.

  5. Asymmetric Circumstellar Matter in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, S. P.; Blondin, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are not well understood, but are likely to be of diverse origin, including single- and double-degenerate binary systems. Among single-degenerate progenitors, substantial amounts of circumstellar material (CSM) are expelled prior to the SN explosions by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companions to the accreting white dwarfs. A subsequent collision of SN ejecta with the dense AGB wind has been detected among several distant SNe such as SN 2002ic, SN 2008J, and more recently PTF11kx. Dense CSM ejected by an AGB companion is present in the remnant of Kepler's SN of 1604, a Type Ia event. Observations of distant SNe hint at strongly asymmetric CSM distributions. A recent study of the CSM in Kepler's SNR by Burkey et al. indicates a large (factor of 10) density contrast between the dense, disk-like equatorial outflow and the more tenuous AGB wind above the orbital plane. A significant fraction of mature Type Ia SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows the presence of dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors that cannot be explained by standard models of Type Ia explosions in a uniform ambient interstellar medium. We explore the hypothesis that these remnants originated in Type Ia explosions with strongly asymmetric CSM distributions such as found in Kepler's SNR. We present results of 2-D hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of SN ejecta with asymmetric, disk-like AGB winds throughout the whole adiabatic stage of SNR evolution. Dense, asymmetric, and highly-ionized Fe-rich ejecta are indeed present in the simulated remnants, while the blast wave assumes a spherical shape shortly after passage through the ambient CSM. We also present simulated X-ray images and spectra and compare them with X-ray observations of selected remnants in the LMC. These remnants include DEM L238 and L249, recently observed by Suzaku, whose X-ray emission is strongly dominated by dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors. We contrast these

  6. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE VISHNIAC INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michaut, C.; Cavet, C.; Bouquet, S. E.; Roy, F.; Nguyen, H. C.

    2012-11-10

    The Vishniac instability is thought to explain the complex structure of radiative supernova remnants in their Pressure-Driven Thin Shell (PDTS) phase after a blast wave (BW) has propagated from a central explosion. In this paper, the propagation of the BW and the evolution of the PDTS stage are studied numerically with the two-dimensional (2D) code HYDRO-MUSCL for a finite-thickness shell expanding in the interstellar medium (ISM). Special attention is paid to the adiabatic index, {gamma}, and three distinct values are taken for the cavity ({gamma}{sub 1}), the shell ({gamma}{sub 2}), and the ISM ({gamma}{sub 3}) with the condition {gamma}{sub 2} < {gamma}{sub 1}, {gamma}{sub 3}. This low value of {gamma}{sub 2} accounts for the high density in the shell achieved by a strong radiative cooling. Once the spherical background flow is obtained, the evolution of a 2D-axisymmetric perturbation is computed from the linear to the nonlinear regime. The overstable mechanism, previously demonstrated theoretically by E. T. Vishniac in 1983, is recovered numerically in the linear stage and is expected to produce and enhance anisotropies and clumps on the shock front, leading to the disruption of the shell in the nonlinear phase. The period of the increasing oscillations and the growth rate of the instability are derived from several points of view (the position of the perturbed shock front, mass fluxes along the shell, and density maps), and the most unstable mode differing from the value given by Vishniac is computed. In addition, the influence of several parameters (the Mach number, amplitude and wavelength of the perturbation, and adiabatic index) is examined and for wavelengths that are large enough compared to the shell thickness, the same conclusion arises: in the late stage of the evolution of the radiative supernova remnant, the instability is dampened and the angular initial deformation of the shock front is smoothed while the mass density becomes uniform with the

  7. Expansion of the Optical Remnant from Tycho’s Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putko, Joseph; Winkler, P. Frank; Blair, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is the expanding remnant from SN 1572, the penultimate Galactic supernova to have been recorded by contemporary observers. Its optical light is almost exclusively faint hydrogen Balmer emission around the periphery of the SNR, produced where fast nonradiative shocks encounter partly neutral preshock interstellar material. A variety of filaments, presumably thin sheets oriented tangentially, surround about one-third of the radio/X-ray shell. We have used CCD images, taken from KPNO over seven epochs from 1986 to 2009, to give the first optical expansion measurement of Tycho's SNR of the CCD era. Thirty filaments were identified and measured; the majority of them are at or near the remnant's outer rim and have proper motions from 0.19‧‧ ± 0.01‧‧ yr-1 to 0.26‧‧ ± 0.02‧‧ yr-1. The associated expansion indices, defined as the ratio of the current expansion rate to the historical mean, range from 0.35 ± 0.03 to 0.52 ± 0.05. Our measurements are consistent with those from the classic study by Kamper & van den Bergh (1978, ApJ, 224, 851) for the same filaments, but the CCD measurements have higher precision, and we have measured several additional fainter filaments. For direct comparison with X-ray and radio measurements, we selected the subset of optical filaments lying exactly at the outer rim, as identified in Chandra and VLA images. Considering only these filaments, virtually all have expansion indices greater than 0.40, the Sedov value. In addition to the rim filaments, there are several seen in the interior (in projection) that have smaller proper motions; these may have been decelerated, and/or they could be directed non-tangentially. Our final epoch of images, taken from the 3.5m WIYN telescope in 2009, reveals previously undetected extremely faint optical emission surrounding well over half of the remnant shell. This newly detected faint emission agrees well with the limb as defined in X-ray and radio images

  8. NON-MAXWELLIAN Halpha PROFILES IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Winkler, P. Frank; Blair, William P.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Park, Sangwook E-mail: winkler@middlebury.ed E-mail: lee.j.joon@gmail.co

    2010-04-01

    The broad components of the Halpha lines in most non-radiative shocks can be fit with single-Gaussian components. We have obtained a high-quality spectrum of a position in Tycho's supernova remnant with the MMT and Blue Channel Spectrograph which shows, for the first time, that a single Gaussian does not provide an acceptable fit. This implies that a single temperature Maxwellian particle velocity distribution cannot produce the emission. Possible alternative explanations are explored, including multiple shocks along the line of sight, a pickup ion contribution, a non-thermal tail (Kappa distribution), emission from a precursor in a cosmic ray modified shock, or turbulence. An Hubble Space Telescope image shows a bright knot that might account for a low temperature contribution, and all the possibilities probably contribute at some level. We discuss the implications of each explanation for the shock parameters and physics of collisionless shocks, but cannot conclusively rule out any of them.

  9. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  10. Spitzer Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Onaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used for observations of the Kepler supernova remnant, with all four instrument modules targeted on the bright infrared knot located at 17h30m35.80s,-21d28m54.0s (J2000). The low spectral resolution modules data show a dust continuum spectrum consistent with dust grains heated by high-energy electrons, while the high resolution modules data show atomic emission line ratios consistent with excitation by a high velocity shock of greater than 100 kilometers per second and electron densities of approximately 1,000 per centimeter. The abundance ratios for the six detected elements show signs of heavy-element enhancement. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  11. SN1987A: The Birth of a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This grant was intended to support the development of theoretical models needed to interpret and understand the observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray telescope of the rapidly developing remnant of Supernova 1987A. In addition, we carried out a few investigations of related topics. The project was spectacularly successful. The models that we developed provide the definitive framework for predicting and interpreting this phenomenon. Following is a list of publications based on our work. Some of these papers include results of both theoretical modeling supported by this project and also analysis of data supported by the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We first list papers published in refereed journals, then conference proceedings and book chapters, and also an educational web site.

  12. High-Resolution Polarimetry of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.; Mufson, S. L.; Dickel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Reported here are high-resolution 6 cm measurements of the adolescent supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 69 made with the hybrid BnC configuration of the Very Large Array. Several three-field mosaics of the polarized and total intensity have been used to study this SNR. These investigations lead to a coherent picture of this region. The expanding shock defines an outer rim of high total intensity, suggesting the front is running into large dense clouds with random magnetic field directions. The SNR consists of predominantly of two types of regions, those with high total and relatively weak polarized emission and those with relatively weak total and strong polarized emission. This morphology can be generally explained by the number of clouds with organized magnetic field along the line of sight. Within this SNR there are regions where the field is varying from radial to tangential. As the SN shock encounters clouds, magnetic fields within clouds will strongly affect cloud dynamics.

  13. Radio observations of supernova remnants and the surrounding molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the main source of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The strong SNR shocks provide ideal acceleration sites for particles of at least ˜ 1014 eV/nucleon. Radio continuum studies of SNRs carried out with good sensitivity and high angular resolution convey information about three main aspects of the SNRs: morphology, polarization and spectrum. Based on this information it is possible to localize sites of higher compression and particle acceleration as well as the orientation and degree of order of the magnetic fields, and in some cases even its intensity. All this information, when complemented with the study of the distribution and kinematics of the surrounding interstellar gas, results in a very useful dataset to investigate the role of SNRs as cosmic ray accelerators. In this presentation, I analyze the radio observations of SNRs and surrounding molecular clouds, showing the contribution of these studies to the understanding of the role of SNRs as factories of CRs.

  14. Type Ia supernova remnants: shaping by iron bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsebrenko, Danny; Soker, Noam

    2015-10-01

    Using 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations of Type Ia supernova remnants (SNR Ia) we show that iron clumps few times denser than the rest of the SN ejecta might form protrusions in an otherwise spherical SNR. Such protrusions exist in some SNR Ia, e.g. SNR 1885 and Tycho. Iron clumps are expected to form in the deflagration to detonation explosion model. In SNR Ia where there are two opposite protrusions, termed `ears', such as Kepler's SNR and SNR G1.9+0.3, our scenario implies that the dense clumps, or iron bullets, were formed along an axis. Such a preferred axis can result from a rotating white dwarf progenitor. If our claim holds, this offers an important clue to the SN Ia explosion scenario.

  15. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  16. Phosphorus in the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Moon, Dae-Sik; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Raymond, John C

    2013-12-13

    Phosphorus ((31)P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here, we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ((56)Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. PMID:24337291

  17. The Likely Fermi Detection of the Supernova Remnant SN 1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Yang

    2016-05-01

    We report the likely detection of γ-ray emission from the northeast shell region of the historical supernova remnant (SNR) SN 1006. Having analyzed seven years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Pass 8 data for the region of SN 1006, we found a GeV gamma-ray source detected with ∼ 4σ significance. Both the position and spectrum of the source match those of HESS J1504‑418, respectively, which is TeV emission from SN 1006. Considering the source as the GeV γ-ray counterpart to SN 1006, the broadband spectral energy distribution is found to be approximately consistent with the leptonic scenario that has been proposed for the TeV emission from the SNR. Our result has likely confirmed the previous study of the SNRs with TeV shell-like morphology: SN 1006 is one of them sharing very similar peak luminosity and spectral shape.

  18. What Are the Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, James

    2002-04-01

    Recent Chandra observations of the compact central objects in supernova remnants have shown puzzling results that do not seem to be consistent with either black holes or neutron stars. (See e.g. Pavlov, Sanwal, Garmire and Zavlin, astro-ph-0112322.) In particular, the inferred effective emitting surface is too small to be the entire surface of a neutron star, but too bright to be a black hole. We discuss the possibility that these compact objects might be red holes instead of black holes or neutron stars. Red holes, which occur in alternate theories of gravity, naturally predict both the greater brightness of the emissions and the smaller effective size of the emitting surface from a collapsed object of the appropriate mass.

  19. Shock Velocity Variations in Supernova Remnant Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. P.; Carroll, J. J., III; Smith, T. B.; Reisig, H. N.; Glendinning, S. G.; Estabrook, K.; Remington, B. A.; Wallace, R.; McCray, R.

    1998-11-01

    We are studying the hydrodynamic behavior of a laboratory system that is a good scaled model of young supernova remnants. The hydrodynamic effects are driven by a supersonic flow, produced by the Nova laser. It does this by driving a strong shock, produced by x-ray ablation, out the back of a plastic slab. The ejecta expand, accelerate, cool, and then impact a low-density foam. There the ejecta stagnate and form a reverse shock while driving a strong shock forward through the foam. We observe this hydrodynamic assembly by x-ray radiography. The shock velocities in one case agree with those found by a computer simulation, while in another case they do not. We will report our investigation of this discrepancy. (Work supported by the US Department of Energy under LLNL LDRD-ER Grant No. 97-ERD-022 and by the University of Michigan.)

  20. Supernova remnants, planetary nebulae and the distance to NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Mutchler, Max; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard E.; MacKenty, John; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael; Frogel, Jay A.; O'Connell, Robert; Hall, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Walker, Alistair R.; Silk, Joe; Sirianni, Marco; Trauger, John; Windhorst, Rogier; Young, Erick

    2010-11-01

    We present narrow band, continuum subtracted H α, [S ii], H β, [O iii] and [O ii] data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4214. From these images, we identify seventeen new planetary nebula candidates, and seven supernova remnant candidates. We use the observed emission line luminosity function of the planetary nebulae to establish a new velocity-independent distance to NGC 4214. We conclude that the PNLF technique gives a reddening independent distance to NGC 4214 of 3.19±0.36 Mpc, and that our current best-estimate of the distance to this galaxy ids 2.98±0.13 Mpc.

  1. The Extraordinary Supernova Remnant in NGC 4449 Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Fesen, Robert A.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Winkler, P. Frank

    2015-01-01

    NGC 4449, a Magellanic-type irregular galaxy at a distance of about 4 Mpc, contains the most luminous known supernova remnant (SNR) in both X-ray and optical bands. Its optical spectrum is characterized by broad lines from O, Ne, S, Ar, and Ca, and its size and expansion velocity (6000 km/s) suggest that the unobserved SN exploded about 65 years ago. The remnant¹s extraordinary brightness can be attributed to the interaction of supernova ejecta with unusually dense and extensive circumstellar material. We will present new Chandra imaging, together with UV/Optical spectra of the SNR from HST/STIS and the MMT. The X-ray luminosity of the SNR is less than when it was detected with Einstein in 1980, but the luminosity and X-ray spectral shape have remained relatively constant over the last 10 years. In the FUV, the HST spectra show for the first time broad line emission from C IV 1550 Å, as well as Si IV + O IV at 1400 Å and O III] at 1660 Å. The new NUV and optical spectra are fairly similar to earlier HST/FOS spectra and to ground-based spectra we have obtained over the last decade. Here we describe these new observations, and our attempts to understand the nature of the progenitor of the SNR.We acknowledge support for this effort from NASA through grant GO-12462 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc, under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and through Chandra Award Number GO9-0075, issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, under NASA contract NAS8-03060.

  2. Supernova Remnants in the Most Fertile Galaxy: NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.

    2014-08-01

    As the host to more recorded supernovae (nine in the past century) than any other galaxy, ngal is a unique venue for studying young (and old) supernova remnants (SNRs). Using deep emission-line images of ngal we obtained from WIYN, we have identified 148 new emission nebulae through their high S II:Hα ratios, indicating that they are strong SNR candidates. This is over 5 times as many as have previously been identified; yet of the 175 total objects, only 6 have been spectroscopically confirmed. We propose multislit spectroscopy from GMOS-N to study the majority of those with no spectra to date. Some 26 are essentially unresolved in our images (diameters ≲ 1 arcsec=27 pc at ngal) and hence probably are relatively young. Several are also coincident with soft X-ray sources (a further indicator of youthful vigor) and have strong O III emission. Some may be rare, ejecta- dominated core-collapse SNRs akin to Cas A, where ``fresh" nucleosynthesis products can be seen. Only spectroscopy, to look for broad emission lines from fast-moving ejecta, can confirm this. We will include spectra of two of the nine recorded SNe in ngal-the first late-time spectrum of SN 2004et, and the first of SN 1980K with high signal-to-noise-adding to the extremely small number of spectra for SNRs only a few decades old. Finally we will use the H II:Hα ratio in a large number of ISM-dominated SNRs to map the N abundance and its gradient across the disk of ngal, and we will use archival HST images to identify the stellar environments that produced the SNe whose remnants we see today.

  3. Forward Shock Proper Motions of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Uchida, H.; Kimura, M.

    2008-12-01

    The X-ray structure of Kepler's supernova remnant shows a rounded shape delineated by forward shocks. We measure proper motions of the forward shocks on overall rims of the remnant, by using archival Chandra data taken in two epochs with time difference of 6.09 yr. The proper motions of the forward shocks on the northern rim are measured to be 0.076'' (±0.032'' ±0.016'') to 0.11'' (±0.014'' ±0.016'') yr-1, while those on the rest of the rims are measured to be 0.15'' (±0.017'' ±0.016'') to 0.30'' (±0.048'' ±0.016'') yr-1 here the first-term errors are statistical uncertainties and the second-term errors are systematic uncertainties. Combining the best-estimated shock velocity of 1660 +/- 120 km s-1 measured for Balmer-dominated filaments in the northern and central portions of the remnant (Sankrit et al. 2005) with the proper motions derived for the forward shocks on the northern rim, we estimate a distance of 3.3+1.6-0.4 kpc to the remnant. We measure the expansion indices, m (defined as R propto tm), to be 0.47-0.82 for most of the rims. These values are consistent with those expected in Type Ia SN explosion models, in which the ejecta and the circumstellar medium have power-law density profiles whose indices are 5-7 and 0-2, respectively. In addition, we should note the slower expansion on the northern rim than that on the southern rim. This is likely caused by the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium; the density of the circumstellar medium is higher in the north than that in the south of the remnant. The newly estimated geometric center, around which we believe the explosion point exists, is located at ~5'' offset to the north of the radio center.

  4. An origin for pulsar kicks in supernova hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Hayes, John

    1996-04-01

    It is now believed that pulsars comprise the fastest population of stars in the galaxy. With inferred mean, root-mean-square, and maximum 3-D pulsar speeds of ~300-500 km/s, ~500 km/s, and ~2000 km/s, respectively, the question of the origin of such singular proper motions becomes acute. What mechanism can account for speeds that range from zero to twice the galactic escape velocity? We speculate that a major vector component of a neutron star's proper motion comes from the hydrodynamic recoil of the nascent neutron star during the supernova explosion in which it is born. Recently, theorists have shown that asymmetries and instabilities are a natural aspect of supernova dynamics. In this paper, we highlight two phenomena: 1) the ``Brownian-like'' stochastic motion of the core in response to the convective ``boiling'' of the mantle of the protoneutron star during the post-bounce, pre-explosion accretion phase, and 2) the asymmetrical bounce and explosion of an aspherically collapsing Chandrasekhar core. In principle, either phenomenon can leave the young neutron star with a speed of hundreds of kilometers per second. However, neither has yet been adequately simulated or explored. The two-dimensional radiation/hydrodynamic calculations we present here provide only crude estimates of the potential impulses due to mass motions and neutrino emissions. A comprehensive and credible investigation will require fully three-dimensional numerical simulations not yet possible. Nevertheless, we have in the asymmetric hydrodynamics of supernovae a natural means of imparting respectable kicks to neutron stars at birth, though speeds approaching 1000 km/s are still problematic.

  5. Search for surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu E-mail: taam@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  6. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calculations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the cas) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechanism.

  7. IS THERE A HIDDEN HOLE IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Senz, D.; Badenes, C.; Serichol, N. E-mail: carles@astro.tau.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we report on the bulk features of the hole carved by the companion star in the material ejected during a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion. In particular we are interested in the long-term evolution of the hole as well as in its fingerprint in the geometry of the supernova remnant (SNR) after several centuries of evolution, which is a hot topic in current SN Ia studies. We use an axisymmetric smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to characterize the geometric properties of the SNR resulting from the interaction of this ejected material with the ambient medium. Our aim is to use SNR observations to constrain the single degenerate scenario for SN Ia progenitors. Our simulations show that the hole will remain open during centuries, although its partial or total closure at later times due to hydrodynamic instabilities is not excluded. Close to the edge of the hole, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows faster, leading to plumes that approach the edge of the forward shock. We also discuss other geometrical properties of the simulations, like the evolution of the contact discontinuity.

  8. Search for Surviving Companions in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E.

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  9. ROSAT HRI observations of Magellanic Cloud supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of deep ROSAT high resolution imager (HRI) observations of two oxygen-rich supernova remnants (SNR's) in the Magellanic Clouds is described. For N132D, I exploit the limited spectral information provided by the HRI to investigate arcsecond scale spectral variations. I find that there is a region of harder X-ray emission near the southern limb and regions of softer emission near the center and northwestern limb. The remnant is believed to be interacting with a molecular cloud and the harder emission to the south is explained as a result of increased absorption along the line-of-sight there. I argue that the softer emission comes from X-ray emitting material with an enhanced abundance of oxygen. For the second SNR, E0102.2 72.2, the spatial structure is investigated in detail using two-dimensional image fitting techniques. Evidence is found for a ring-like and a spherically symmetric shell-like component both of which were modeled as homogeneous regions. In addition, a significant fraction of the observed flux (approximately 11 percent) must come from a resolved clumped component. A comparison with optical and radio imagery is made to provide a physical basis for the components identified in the X-ray analysis. The mass of X-ray emitting gas in the remnant is estimated and a value of approximately 75 M(solar mass) was determined. The dominant uncertainty on this quantity is the extent of unresolved clumping in the X-ray gas. Such clumping would tend to reduce the mass estimate by f(exp 1/2), where f is the mean volume filling factor of the gas.

  10. PHYSICAL STRUCTURE AND NATURE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN M101

    SciTech Connect

    Franchetti, Nicholas A.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua; Dunne, Bryan C.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Grimes, Caleb K.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Aldridge, Tabitha M. E-mail: gruendl@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: bdunne@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: ckgrim01@moreheadstate.edu E-mail: rchen@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2012-04-15

    Supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in the giant spiral galaxy M101 have been previously identified from ground-based H{alpha} and [S II] images. We have used archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) H{alpha} and broadband images as well as stellar photometry of 55 SNR candidates to examine their physical structure, interstellar environment, and underlying stellar population. We have also obtained high-dispersion echelle spectra to search for shocked high-velocity gas in 18 SNR candidates, and identified X-ray counterparts to SNR candidates using data from archival observations made by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Twenty-one of these 55 SNR candidates studied have X-ray counterparts, although one of them is a known ultraluminous X-ray source. The multi-wavelength information has been used to assess the nature of each SNR candidate. We find that within this limited sample, {approx}16% are likely remnants of Type Ia SNe and {approx}45% are remnants of core-collapse SNe. In addition, about {approx}36% are large candidates which we suggest are either superbubbles or OB/H II complexes. Existing radio observations are not sensitive enough to detect the non-thermal emission from these SNR candidates. Several radio sources are coincident with X-ray sources, but they are associated with either giant H II regions in M101 or background galaxies. The archival HST H{alpha} images do not cover the entire galaxy and thus prevents a complete study of M101. Furthermore, the lack of HST [S II] images precludes searches for small SNR candidates which could not be identified by ground-based observations. Such high-resolution images are needed in order to obtain a complete census of SNRs in M101 for a comprehensive investigation of the distribution, population, and rates of SNe in this galaxy.

  11. Gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants: Hadronic or leptonic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabici, Stefano; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The debate on the nature of the gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants is still open. Ascribing such emission to hadronic rather than leptonic processes would provide an evidence for the acceleration of protons and nuclei, and this fact would fit with the very popular (but not proven) paradigm that supernova remnants are the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Here, we discuss this issue with a particular focus on the best studied gamma-ray-bright supernova remnant: RX J1713.7-3946.

  12. G29.7-0.3: another supernova remnant with an identity crisis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Helfand, D. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    New radio and X-ray observations of the galactic supernova remnant G29.7-0.3 show that it is composed of two spectrally distinct components: a steep-spectrum, incomplete shell 3 arcmin in extent enclosing a flat-spectrum, X-ray emitting region 30 arcsec across. Thus, G29.7-0.3 joins the ranks of supernova remnants which exhibit a combination of Crab-like and shell remnant attributes. The Crab-like core has the highest ratio of X-ray radio luminosity of all the Crab-like remnants observed to date, suggesting that it is an extremely young object.

  13. SPIN TILTS IN THE DOUBLE PULSAR REVEAL SUPERNOVA SPIN ANGULAR-MOMENTUM PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Will M.; Kremer, Kyle; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Lyutikov, Maxim E-mail: kylekremer2012@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: lyutikov@purdue.edu

    2011-12-01

    The system PSR J0737-3039 is the only binary pulsar known to consist of two radio pulsars (PSR J0737-3039 A and PSR J0737-3039 B). This unique configuration allows measurements of spin orientation for both pulsars: pulsar A's spin is tilted from the orbital angular momentum by no more than 14 deg at 95% confidence; pulsar B's by 130 {+-} 1 deg at 99.7% confidence. This spin-spin misalignment requires that the origin of most of B's present-day spin is connected to the supernova that formed pulsar B. Under the simplified assumption of a single, instantaneous kick during the supernova, the spin could be thought of as originating from the off-center nature of the kick, causing pulsar B to tumble to its misaligned state. With this assumption, and using current constraints on the kick magnitude, we find that pulsar B's instantaneous kick must have been displaced from the center of mass of the exploding star by at least 1 km and probably 5-10 km. Regardless of the details of the kick mechanism and the process that produced pulsar B's current spin, the measured spin-spin misalignment in the double pulsar system provides an empirical, direct constraint on the angular momentum production in this supernova. This constraint can be used to guide core-collapse simulations and the quest for understanding the spins and kicks of compact objects.

  14. Fermi-LAT Observation of Supernova Remnant S147

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Ballet, J.; Hanabata, Y.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2012-08-17

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around SNR S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with prominent H{alpha} filaments of S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. Reacceleration of pre-existing CRs and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the required energy density of high-energy protons.

  15. Dust in a Type Ia Supernova Progenitor: Spitzer Spectroscopy of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the relatively poorly-understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 micron IR spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 micron, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength IRS and IRAC data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally-heated dust emission from fast shocks (> 1000 km/s) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are approx 80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km/s) into moderate density material (n(sub o) approx 50-100 / cubic cm) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  16. Rapid photometry of supernova 1987A: a 2.14 ms pulsar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleditch, John; Kristian, Jerome A.; Kunkel, William E.; Hill, Kym M.; Watson, Robert D.; Lucinio, Richard; Imamura, James N.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Shearer, Andrew; Butler, Raymond; Redfern, Michael; Danks, Anthony C.

    2000-08-01

    We have monitored Supernova 1987A in optical/near-infrared bands using various high-speed photometers from a few weeks following its birth until early 1996 in order to search for a pulsar remnant. While we have found no clear evidence of any pulsar of constant intensity and stable timing, we have found emission with a complex period modulation near the frequency of 467.5 Hz - a 2.14 ms pulsar candidate. We first detected this signal in data taken on the remnant at the Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) 2.5-m Dupont telescope during 14-16 Feb. 1992 UT. We detected further signals near the 2.14 ms period on numerous occasions over the next four years in data taken with a variety of telescopes, data systems and detectors, at a number of ground- and space-based observatories. In particular, an effort during mid-1993 to monitor this signal with the U. of Tasmania 1-m telescope, when SN1987A was inaccessible to nearly all other observing sites due to high airmass, clearly detected the 2.14 ms signal in the first three nights' observations. The sequence of detections of this signal from Feb. `92 through August `93, prior to its apparent subsequent fading, is highly improbable (<10 -10 for any noise source). In addition, the frequency of the signals followed a consistent and predictable spin-down (˜2-3×10 -10 Hz/s) over the several year timespan (`92-`96). We also find evidence in data, again taken by more than one telescope and recording system, for modulation of the 2.14 ms period with a ˜1,000 s period which complicates its detection. The 1,000 s modulation was clearly detected in the first two observations with the U. Tas. 1-m during mid-1993. The characteristics of the 2.14 ms signature and its ˜1,000 s modulation are consistent with precession and spindown via gravitational radiation of a neutron star with an effective non-axisymmetric oblateness of ˜10 -6. The implied luminosity of the gravitational radiation exceeds the spindown luminosity of the Crab Nebula

  17. Studying Young and Old Supernova Remnants with the Upcoming ASTRO-H X-ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar; Hughes, John P.; Long, Knox; Bamba, Aya; Aharonian, Felix; Foster, Adam; Funk, Stefan; Hiraga, Junko; Ishida, Manabu; Katsuda, Satoru; Koyama, Katsuji; Leutenegger, Maurice; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Mori, Koji; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takashi; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Petre, Robert; Sawada, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamauchi, Shigeo; ASTRO-H Science Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming X-ray mission ASTRO-H will open a new discovery window to the high-energy Universe thanks to the unprecedented high-resolution spectroscopy (~7eV) to be achieved with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) combined with its broadband coverage (0.5-600 keV) with the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) and the Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD). Supernova remnants (SNRs) are a prime science focus for ASTRO-H, particularly with the SXS providing accurate plasma diagnostics of line-rich spectra expected from the youngest, ejecta-dominated, SNRs to the oldest SNRs impacted by their interaction with the Interstellar Medium (ISM). We here highlight the SNR science topics and program that the ASTRO-H team considers of highest priority and impact. For the younger SNRs, the primary science goals are (1) using abundance measurements to unveil SNR progenitors, (2) using spatial and velocity distribution of the ejecta to understand supernova explosion mechanisms, and (3) revealing the link between the thermal plasma state of SNRs and the efficiency of their particle acceleration. For the older SNRs where thermal emission is dominated or heavily impacted by the ISM, the primary goals are (1) constraining metal abundances and physical processes in the mature limb-brightened SNRs, and (2) understanding the puzzling nature of the `mixed-morphology' SNRs and the physics of recombining plasma. For the pulsar-powered nebulae, also known as Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) or plerions with many still lacking thermal X-ray emission from their supernova shells, ASTRO-H will shed light on their progenitors and environment. The hard X-ray coverage on board ASTRO-H will further allow a study of their broadband spectra (for the brightest objects), beyond NuSTAR's range, filling the gap between the soft X-ray regime (with current X-ray missions) and the gamma-ray regime (with Fermi in the GeV and H.E.S.S. in the TeV), allowing the search for spectral breaks in the hard X-ray band.

  18. Distribution of novae and supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, S.

    1988-12-01

    Novae in the LMC appear to be distributred like an old disk population. The fact that no concentration of novae is seen within the Bar of the Large Cloud suggests that this feature is of relatively recent origin. Supernova remnants are seen to exhibit concentrations in the 30 Dor region, in the Bar of the Large Cloud, and in Constellation III. This distribution supports the idea that most of the supernova remnants in the LMC had young massive progenitors. 11 references.

  19. Multi-messenger Tests for Fast-spinning Newborn Pulsars Embedded in Stripped-envelope Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Murase, Kohta; Bartos, Imre; Kiuchi, Kenta; Margutti, Raffaella

    2016-02-01

    Fast-spinning strongly magnetized newborn neutron stars (NSs), including nascent magnetars, are popularly implemented as the engine of luminous stellar explosions. Here, we consider the scenario that they power various stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe), not only superluminous SNe Ic but also broad-line (BL) SNe Ibc and possibly some ordinary SNe Ibc. This scenario is also motivated by the hypothesis that Galactic magnetars largely originate from fast-spinning NSs as remnants of SE SNe. By consistently modeling the energy injection from magnetized wind and {}56{Ni} decay, we show that proto-NSs with ≳ 10 {ms} rotation and a poloidal magnetic field of {B}{{dip}}≳ 5× {10}14 {{G}} can be harbored in ordinary SNe Ibc. On the other hand, millisecond proto-NSs can solely power BL SNe Ibc if they are born with {B}{{dip}}≳ 5× {10}14 {{G}} and superluminous SNe Ic with {B}{{dip}}≳ {10}13 {{G}}. Then, we study how multi-messenger emission can be used to discriminate such pulsar-driven SN models from other competitive scenarios. First, high-energy X-ray and gamma-ray emission from embryonic pulsar wind nebulae can probe the underlying newborn pulsar. Follow-up observations of SE SNe using NuSTAR ∼ 50{--}100 {days} after the explosion are strongly encouraged for nearby objects. We also discuss possible effects of gravitational waves (GWs) on the spin-down of proto-NSs. If millisecond proto-NSs with {B}{{dip}}\\lt {{a}} {few}× {10}13 {{G}} emit GWs through, e.g., non-axisymmetric rotation deformed by the inner toroidal fields of {B}{{t}}≳ {10}16 {{G}}, the GW signal can be detectable from ordinary SNe Ibc in the Virgo cluster by Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, and KAGRA.

  20. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jonghee; Hwang, Una

    2013-01-01

    The ejecta of the Cas A supernova remnant has a complex morphology, consisting of dense fast-moving line emitting knots and diffuse X-ray emitting regions that have encountered the reverse shock, as well as more slowly expanding, unshocked regions of the ejecta. Using the Spitzer 5-35 micron IRS data cube, and Herschel 70, 100, and 160 micron PACS data, we decompose the infrared emission from the remnant into distinct spectral components associated with the different regions of the ejecta. Such decomposition allows the association of different dust species with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories, and determination of the dust heating mechanisms. Our decomposition identified three characteristic dust spectra. The first, most luminous one, exhibits strong emission features at approx. 9 and 21 micron, and a weaker 12 micron feature, and is closely associated with the ejecta knots that have strong [Ar II] 6.99 micron and [Ar III] 8.99 micron emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low MgO-to-SiO2 ratios. A second, very different dust spectrum that has no indication of any silicate features, is best fit by Al2O3 dust and is found in association with ejecta having strong [Ne II] 12.8 micron and [Ne III] 15.6 micron emission lines. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that best matched by magnesium silicates with relatively high MgO-to-SiO2 ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray emitting shocked ejecta and the shocked interstellar/circumstellar material. All three spectral components include an additional featureless cold dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with [Si II] 34.8 micron emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. The dust mass giving rise to the warm dust component is about approx. 0.1solar M. However, most of the dust mass

  1. An Optical Search For Supernova Remnants in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonick, D. M.; Fesen, R. A.; Blair, W. P.; Long, K. S.

    1994-12-01

    Imaging with narrow-band Hα , [S II], and red continuum filters has been used to distinguish supernova remnant (SNR) candidates from photoionized nebulae in seven nearby spiral galaxies: NGC 2403, NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 5194 (M51), NGC 5204, NGC 5457 (M101), NGC 5585, and NGC 6946. Nebulae which show [S II]/Hα > 0.45, indicating shock-heated emission, are identified as SNR candidates. The number of SNRs found in each galaxy using this technique is 3 in NGC 5204, 5 in NGC 5585, 30 in NGC 2403, 32 in M81, 35 in NGC 6946, and 112 in M101. Spectra of some of the emission nebulae have also been obtained, and were used to confirm SNR identifications. Because of its comparatively high radial velocity, M51 could not be examined adequately with our filter set; however, one bright SNR was found and spectroscopically confirmed. In NGC 2403, we obtained spectra on remnant candidates 1 and 2 of D'Odorico et al. (1980, A&AS, 40, 67), and confirmed them to be SNRs. We also detect the optical SNR identified by Blair & Fesen (1994, ApJ, 424, L103) in NGC 6946, and find an optical SNR counterpart to the X-ray source S2 identified by Schlegel (1994, ApJ, 424, L99). Sizes of observed SNRs range from unresolved (< 50 pc) to over 300x150 pc for one object in NGC 5585. Although our search technique limits our detection of SNRs embedded in bright H II regions, in the galaxies with clearly defined spiral arms (i.e NGC 6946, M81, M101), most SNRs appear to trace the spiral arms. Analysis of luminosity functions, diameters, abundances, and distributions of the samples of SNRs will also be discussed.

  2. Supernova remnant W49B and its environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Zuo, P. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2014-10-01

    We study gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) W49B and its environment using recent radio and infrared data. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low resolution data of W49B shows shocked excitation lines of H{sub 2} (0,0) S(0)-S(7) from the SNR-molecular cloud interaction. The H{sub 2} gas is composed of two components with temperatures of ∼260 K and ∼1060 K, respectively. Various spectral lines from atomic and ionic particles are detected toward W49B. We suggest that the ionic phase has an electron density of ∼500 cm{sup –3} and a temperature of ∼10{sup 4} K by the spectral line diagnoses. The mid- and far-infrared data from MSX, Spitzer, and Herschel reveal a 151 ± 20 K hot dust component with a mass of 7.5 ± 6.6 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} and a 45 ± 4 K warm dust component with a mass of 6.4 ± 3.2 M {sub ☉}. The hot dust is likely from materials swept up by the shock of W49B. The warm dust may possibly originate from the evaporation of clouds interacting with W49B. We build the H I absorption spectra of W49B and four nearby H II regions (W49A, G42.90+0.58, G42.43-0.26, and G43.19-0.53) and study the relation between W49B and the surrounding molecular clouds by employing the 2.12 μm infrared and CO data. We therefore obtain a kinematic distance of ∼10 kpc for W49B and suggest that the remnant is likely associated with the CO cloud at about 40 km s{sup –1}.

  3. New Candidate Supernova Remnants in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Lewinter, R.

    1992-12-01

    We have surveyed six 30(') times 30(') fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the Curtis Schmidt telescope at CTIO with a Thomson CCD, to search for previously undetected supernova remnants (SNRs). Narrow-band images are obtained in lines of [S II] (lambda lambda \\ 6716,31), Hα , and a nearby continuum band. The ratio of [S II]/Hα \\ emission discriminates well between shock-heated material charcteristic of SNRs and photo-ionized material such as H II regions. This technique has proved highly effective in surveys of other galaxies (e.g. Long et al., Ap J Supp, 72, 61). Deep emission-line images and a continuum band closely matched in wavelength enable us to subtract virtually the entire stellar contribution and thus achieve high sensitivity to faint, diffuse emission. We have identified 13 objects, all of which have [S II]/Hα \\ ratios > 0.4\\ and a full or partial shell-like morphology, making them extremely strong SNR candidates. Several other diffuse objects have high [S II]/Hα \\ ratios, and many of these may also be SNRs. Compared with the 12 previously known remnants of Mathewson et al., (Ap J Supp 51, 345; 55, 189), the new candidates are generally larger and have lower surface brightness. An investigation of the cumulative number vs diameter relation for our larger sample indicates a slope significantly steeper than the value near unity originally found by Mathewson et al., and is more consistent with standard models for SNR evolution. Selection effects may well have led to an excess of small, bright objects in the earlier samples. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-9114935 and by the W.M. Keck Foundation through the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium.

  4. Supernova remnant evolution in uniform and non-uniform media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. E. S.; de Jager, O. C.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:In this work numerical simulations showing the time evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) in uniform and non-uniform interstellar medium (ISM) are presented. Methods: We use a hydrodynamic model including a kinematic calculation of the interstellar magnetic field. Important parameters influencing SNR evolution include the ejecta mass and energy of the remnant, as well as the ISM density and adiabatic index. Results: By varying these parameters we constructed an analytical expression giving the return time of the SNR reverse shock to the origin, in terms of these parameters. We also found that the reverse shock spends half of its time moving outward and the other half returning to the origin. Also computed is SNR evolution in non-uniform media where the blast wave moves from one medium into either a less or more dense medium. As the SNR moves into a medium of higher density a reflection wave is created at the interface between the two media which is driven back toward the center. This drives mass via a nonspherical flow away from the discontinuity. As this wave moves inward it also drags some of the ISM field lines (if the field is parallel with the interface) with it and heats the inside of the SNR resulting in larger temperatures in this region. When a SNR explodes in a medium with a high density and the blast wave propagates into a medium with a lower density, a cavity is being blown away changing the geometry of the high density region. Also, once the forward shock moves into the medium of less density a second reverse shock will start to evolve in this region.

  5. The Impact of a Supernova Remnant on Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2016-06-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond bursts of radio radiation whose progenitors, so far, remain mysterious. Nevertheless, the timescales and energetics of these events have lead to many theories associating FRBs with young neutron stars (NSs). Motivated by this, I explore the interaction of FRBs with young supernova remnants (SNRs), and I discuss the potential observational consequences and constraints of such a scenario. As the supernova (SN) ejecta plows into the interstellar medium (ISM), a reverse shock is generated that passes back through the material and ionizes it. This leads to a dispersion measure (DM) associated with the SNR as well as a time derivative for DM. The times when DM is high are generally overshadowed by free–free absorption, which, depending on the mass of the ejecta and the density of the ISM, may be probed at frequencies of 400 {{MHz}}–1.4 {{GHz}} on timescales of ∼100–500 years after the SN. Magnetic fields generated at the reverse shock may be high enough to explain Faraday rotation that has been measured for one FRB. If FRBs are powered by the spin energy of a young NS (rather than by magnetic energy), the NS must have a magnetic field ≲ {10}11{--}{10}12 {{G}} to ensure that it does not spin down too quickly while the SNR is still optically thick at radio frequencies. In the future, once there are distance measurements to FRBs and their energetics are better understood, the spin of the NS can also be constrained.

  6. Constraining the Cosmic-ray Acceleration Efficiency in the Supernova Remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Adam Michael; Federman, Steven R.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Caprioli, Damiano; Wallerstein, George

    2015-08-01

    Supernova remnants are widely believed to be the sources responsible for the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays. Over the last several years, observations made with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed that cosmic-ray nuclei are indeed accelerated in some supernova remnants, including IC 443, which is a prototype for supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds. However, the details concerning the particle acceleration processes in middle aged remnants are not fully understood, in part because the basic model parameters are not always well constrained. Here, we present preliminary results of a Hubble Space Telescope investigation into the physical conditions in diffuse molecular gas interacting with IC 443. We examine high-resolution FUV spectra of two stars, one that probes the interior region of the supernova remnant, and the other located just outside the visible edge of IC 443. With this arrangement, we are able to evaluate the densities and temperatures in neutral gas clumps positioned both ahead of and behind the supernova shock front. From these measurements, we obtain estimates for the post-shock temperature and the shock velocity in the interclump medium. We discuss the efficacy of these results for constraining both the age of IC 443, and also the cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency. Finally, we report the first detection of boron in a supernova remnant, and discuss the usefulness of the B/O ratio in constraining the cosmic-ray content of the gas interacting with IC 443.

  7. Supernova remnant masers: Shock interactions with molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John William

    Maser emission from the 1720-MHz transition of hydroxyl(OH) has identified shock interactions in 10% of all supernova remnants(SNRs). Such maser-emitting SNRs are also bright in molecular line emission. Though somewhat rare, SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds are an important class in which to study cosmic ray acceleration, SNR evolution, and effects on the energetics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. To study molecular shocks via a multiwavelength approach, the VLA, GBT, Spitzer Space Telescope have been used in the following ways: (i) With the GBT widespread OH(1720 MHz) emission and absorption in other OH lines is observed across the interaction site. Observations of all four ground-state transitions at 1720, 1667/5 and 1612 MHz allows us to model OH excitation, yielding the temperature, density and OH abundance in the post-shock gas. Maser emission is found to have a higher flux density with the GBT than with high-resolution VLA observations for 10 of 15 observed remnants, suggesting maser emission is present on large spatial scales. (ii) Sensitive VLA observations of select SNRs (W44, IC 443, Kes 69, 3C 391, G357.7+0.3) reveal the nature of enhanced 1720 MHz emission. Numerous weak compact masers as well as diffuse extended emission are detected tracing the shock-front. Zeeman splitting of masers permits the post-shock magnetic field strength and the line of sight field direction to be directly measured. (iii) Rotational lines of molecular hydrogen are detected at the position of several masers with Spitzer IRS spectroscopy between 5 and 35 mm. Excitation of the hydrogen lines requires the passage of a C-type shock through dense molecular gas, in agreement with the conditions derived from OH excitation. The presence of bright ionic lines requires multiple shocks present at the interaction site. (iv) A new survey for SNR-masers has identified four new interacting SNRs within 10 degrees of the Galactic Center. Maser-emitting SNRs are found to

  8. An Optical Search For Supernova Remnants in NGC 2403

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonick, David M.; Fesen, Robert A.; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.

    1997-12-01

    We present the results of an optical search for supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Scd galaxy NGC 2403 using image and spectral observations of a ~8' × 8' field covering nearly all of this galaxy. Our SNR identification technique consisted of constructing continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] λλ6716, 6731 images, obtaining spectra of a few [S II]-bright emission nebulae found in these images, and then using the [S II]/Hα ratios obtained from these spectra to correct the image [S II]/Hα ratios. Thirty-five emission nebulae with [S II]/Hα >= 0.45 were identified as SNRs and have diameters of 20-200 pc, reddening-corrected Hα intensities of 2.2 × 10-15 to 1.4 × 10-13 ergs cm-2 s-1, [S II]/Hα ratios of 0.45-1.11, and a variety of optical morphologies (shell, arc, and filled). Spectra of 15 of these remnants were obtained and are presented. The two NGC 2403 SNRs previously identified by D'Odorico, Dopita, & Benvenuti were among the 35 SNRs detected. Our final NGC 2403 SNR sample appears biased against detecting large, faint remnants, and no SNRs were detected inside bright H II regions. An examination of the [S II]/Hα values for all the nebulae measured in NGC 2403 shows no sharp dividing line between SNRs and H II regions, similar to what was found in M31, NGC 300, and NGC 7793 (Walterbos & Braun; Blair & Long). We estimate roughly that there are about 4 times more SNRs in NGC 2403 than we detected, which, assuming the observable lifetime of a SNR is ~20,000 yr, yields a crude rate of 1 SN in 150 yr. Analysis of the 15 SNR spectra show a detectable nitrogen gradient, a larger scatter in oxygen abundances than in nitrogen, and a lower mean oxygen abundance than from published H II region data, all of which have been seen in previous SNR studies of other galaxies. Based in part on research done at the Michigan-Dartmouth-M.I.T. (MDM) Observatory, operated by the University of Michigan, Dartmouth College, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  9. An Optical Survey of Supernova Remnants in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.

    2004-11-01

    Observations of the face-on spiral galaxy M83 (NGC 5236) performed at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile have yielded a catalog of optical supernova remnant (SNR) candidates. These observations were performed with the 4 m Blanco telescope and a prime focus CCD imaging system using narrowband interference filters centered on the light of [S II], Hα, [O III], and red and blue continuum bands. Based on strong relative [S II]:Hα emission, 71 emission nebulae have been identified as SNR candidates. Positions and Hα fluxes of the candidates are presented. Follow-up spectra of 25 of the SNR candidates, also performed at CTIO, have confirmed many of the SNR identifications, although the spectra of a few objects are discrepant, perhaps because of inaccurate aperture placement. In addition, the low mean excitation of M83 H II regions has allowed a separate search for young oxygen-dominated (core collapse) SNRs similar to Cas A in our Galaxy, using [O III]:Hα. This search found a number of the same objects as the [S II]:Hα search, indicating that many of these SNRs have shock velocities in excess of 100 km s-1. However, no bona fide young core-collapse SNRs were detected with this technique, with the possible exception of the independent recovery of SN 1957D, which had been seen previously. We have also attempted to identify optical counterparts for the six historical supernovae that have occurred in M83. Except for SN 1957D, none of the historical supernovae have been detected by this survey. We compare our SNR candidate list against the Chandra X-ray source list of Soria and Wu and identify 15 X-ray sources as likely SNRs, based on positional coincidence within 1". The sources identified have hardness ratios that are soft compared to the general X-ray source population in M83. Based on observations made with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena, Chile.

  10. A Search for Ultra--High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Five Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. E.; Berley, D.; Biller, S.; Burman, R. L.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chang, C. Y.; Chen, M. L.; Chumney, P.; Coyne, D.; Dion, C. L.; Dorfan, D.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Goodman, J. A.; Haines, T. J.; Hoffman, C. M.; Kelley, L.; Klein, S.; Schmidt, D. M.; Schnee, R.; Shoup, A.; Sinnis, C.; Stark, M. J.; Williams, D. A.; Wu, J.-P.; Yang, T.; Yodh, G. B.

    1995-07-01

    The majority of the cosmic rays in our Galaxy with energies in the range of ~1010--1014 eV are thought to be accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs). Measurements of SNR gamma-ray spectra in this energy region could support or contradict this concept. The Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) collaboration has reported six sources of gamma rays above 108 eV whose coordinates are coincident with SNRs. Five of these sources are within the field of view of the CYGNUS extensive air shower detector. A search of the CYGNUS data set reveals no evidence of gamma-ray emission at energies ~1014 eV for these five SNRs. The flux upper limits from the CYGNUS data are compared to the lower energy fluxes measured with the EGRET detector using Drury, Aharonian, & Volk's recent model of gamma-ray production in the shocks of SNRs. The results suggest one or more of the following: (1) the gamma-ray spectra for these five SNRs soften by about 1014 eV, (2) the integral gamma-ray spectra of the SNRs are steeper than about E-1.3, or (3) most of the gamma rays detected with the EGRET instrument for each SNR are not produced in the SNR's shock but are produced at some other site (such as a pulsar).