Science.gov

Sample records for pulsatile flow phantom

  1. Application of full field optical studies for pulsatile flow in a carotid artery phantom

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, M.; Loozen, G. B.; van der Wekken, N.; van de Belt, G.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.; Kenjeres, S.

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary comparative measurement between particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) to study pulsatile flow using ventricular assist device in a patient-specific carotid artery phantom is reported. These full-field optical techniques have both been used to study flow and extract complementary parameters. We use the high spatial resolution of PIV to generate a full velocity map of the flow field and the high temporal resolution of LASCA to extract the detailed frequency spectrum of the fluid pulses. Using this combination of techniques a complete study of complex pulsatile flow in an intricate flow network can be studied. PMID:26504652

  2. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-28

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  3. Fractality of pulsatile flow in speckle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M.; Kenjeres, S.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2016-05-01

    The scattering of coherent light from a system with underlying flow can be used to yield essential information about dynamics of the process. In the case of pulsatile flow, there is a rapid change in the properties of the speckle images. This can be studied using the standard laser speckle contrast and also the fractality of images. In this paper, we report the results of experiments performed to study pulsatile flow with speckle images, under different experimental configurations to verify the robustness of the techniques for applications. In order to study flow under various levels of complexity, the measurements were done for three in-vitro phantoms and two in-vivo situations. The pumping mechanisms were varied ranging from mechanical pumps to the human heart for the in vivo case. The speckle images were analyzed using the techniques of fractal dimension and speckle contrast analysis. The results of these techniques for the various experimental scenarios were compared. The fractal dimension is a more sensitive measure to capture the complexity of the signal though it was observed that it is also extremely sensitive to the properties of the scattering medium and cannot recover the signal for thicker diffusers in comparison to speckle contrast.

  4. Pulsatile driving of the helical flow pump.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kohei; Hosoda, Kyohei; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ariyoshi, Koki; Inoue, Yusuke; Sato, Masami; Hara, Sintaro; Lee, Xinyang; Wu, Sheng-Yuan; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Imachi, Kou; Abe, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) is newly developed blood pomp for total artificial heart (TAH). HFP can work with lower rotational speed than axial and centrifugal blood pump. It can be seen reasonable feature to generate pulsatile flow because high response performance can be realized. In this article, pulsatility of HFP was evaluated using mock circulation loop. Pulsatile flow was generated by modulating the rotational speed in various amplitude and heart rate. In the experiment, relationship between Pump flow, pump head, rotational speed amplitude, heart rate and power consumption is evaluated. As the result, complete pulsatile flow with mean flow rate of 5 L/min and mean pressure head of 100 mmHg can be obtained at ± 500 rpm with mean rotational speed of 1378 to 1398 rpm in hart rate from 60 to 120. Flow profiles which are non-pulsatile, quasi-pulsatile or complete flow can be adjusted arbitrarily. Therefore, HFP has excellent pulsatility and control flexibility of flow profile. PMID:24110290

  5. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  6. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  7. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  8. Study on the effect of steady, simple pulsatile and physiological pulsatile flows through a stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, P.; Mandal, D. K.; Manna, N. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, the comparison of steady, simple pulsatile flow and physiological pulsatile flow on flow reversal zone and hemodynamic wall parameters [wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI)] for the progression of the disease, atherosclerosis has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved by finite volume method. For the numerical analysis, Womersley number, Reynolds number and percentage of restriction are taken as 10, 100 and 50 % respectively. From this study it is revealed that the separated flow from the stenosis strongly depends on inlet flow situations, the maximum chance of deposition of plaque material due to streamline contour is higher at time step t* = 0.75 for simple pulsatile flow and at time step t* = 0 for physiological pulsatile flow and this chance is lower in case of steady flow. The effect of WSS on the disease is higher in physiological pulsatile flow compared to steady as well as simple pulsatile flow. The maximum possibility of initiation as well as progression for atherosclerosis in arterial wall due to high WSS takes place at t* = 0.25 for physiological pulsatile flow. OSI indicates same length of separation for two cases of transient flow, but the rate of cyclic departure of WSS is higher in case of physiological pulsatile flow.

  9. Pulsatile flow through idealized trabeculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Nicholas; Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Trabeculae begin to form in the human developing heart for Reynolds numbers on the order of 10. Other hearts, such as the squid heart, have trabeculae for Re on the order of 10 and larger. The effect of trabeculae on the flow in this range of Re is not well understood. In this study, computational fluid dynamics is used to quantify the effects of Reynolds number and idealized trabeculae height on the resulting flows. An adaptive and parallelized version of the immersed boundary method (IBAMR) is used to solve the fluid-structure interaction problem. We see the formation of vortices depends upon Re and trabeculae height. We then explore how the periodicity of the flow effects vortex formation and shear patterns. This is important because it is thought that these dynamic processes are important to the generation of shear at the endothelial surface layer and strains at the epithelial layer, which will aid in proper development and functionality.

  10. Pulsatile flow past an oscillating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Adnan; Seda, Robinson; Bull, Joseph L.

    2011-04-01

    A fundamental study to characterize the flow around an oscillating cylinder in a pulsatile flow environment is investigated. This work is motivated by a new proposed design of the total artificial lung (TAL), which is envisioned to provide better gas exchange. The Navier-Stokes computations in a moving frame of reference were performed to compute the dynamic flow field surrounding the cylinder. Cylinder oscillations and pulsatile free-stream velocity were represented by two sinusoidal waves with amplitudes A and B and frequencies ωc and ω, respectively. The Keulegan-Carpenter number (Kc=Uo/Dωc) was used to describe the frequency of the oscillating cylinder while the pulsatile free-stream velocity was fixed by imposing ω /Kc=1 for all cases investigated. The parameters of interest and their values were amplitude (0.5D

  11. Phantom-based ground-truth generation for cerebral vessel segmentation and pulsatile deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetelig, Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Illies, Till; Sedlacik, Jan; Kording, Fabian; Werner, René

    2016-03-01

    Hemodynamic and mechanical factors of the vascular system are assumed to play a major role in understanding, e.g., initiation, growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Among those factors, cardiac cycle-related pulsatile motion and deformation of cerebral vessels currently attract much interest. However, imaging of those effects requires high spatial and temporal resolution and remains challenging { and similarly does the analysis of the acquired images: Flow velocity changes and contrast media inflow cause vessel intensity variations in related temporally resolved computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography data over the cardiac cycle and impede application of intensity threshold-based segmentation and subsequent motion analysis. In this work, a flow phantom for generation of ground-truth images for evaluation of appropriate segmentation and motion analysis algorithms is developed. The acquired ground-truth data is used to illustrate the interplay between intensity fluctuations and (erroneous) motion quantification by standard threshold-based segmentation, and an adaptive threshold-based segmentation approach is proposed that alleviates respective issues. The results of the phantom study are further demonstrated to be transferable to patient data.

  12. Effect of pulsatile swirling flow on stenosed arterial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-09-01

    The existence of swirling flow phenomena is frequently observed in arterial vessels, but information on the fluid-dynamic roles of swirling flow is still lacking. In this study, the effects of pulsatile swirling inlet flows with various swirling intensities on the flow field in a stenosis model are experimentally investigated using a particle image velocimetry velocity field measurement technique. A pulsatile pump provides cyclic pulsating inlet flow and spiral inserts with two different helical pitches (10D and 10/3D) induce swirling flow in the stenosed channel. Results show that the pulsatile swirling flow has various beneficial effects by reducing the negative wall shear stress, the oscillatory shear index, and the flow reverse coefficient at the post-stenosis channel. Temporal variations of vorticity fields show that the short propagation length of the jet flow and the early breakout of turbulent flow are initiated as the swirling flow disturbs the symmetric development of the shear layer. In addition, the overall energy dissipation rate of the flow is suppressed by the swirling component of the flow. The results will be helpful for elucidating the hemodynamic characteristics of atherosclerosis and discovering better diagnostic procedures and clinical treatments. PMID:24984589

  13. A Novel Rotary Pulsatile Flow Pump for Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Teman, Nicholas R.; Mazur, Daniel E.; Toomasian, John; Jahangir, Emilia; Alghanem, Fares; Goudie, Marcus; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Haft, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that pulsatile blood flow is superior to continuous flow in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, adoption of pulsatile flow (PF) technology has been limited due to practically and complexity of creating a consistent physiologic pulse. A pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) was designed to address this problem. We evaluated the PRVP in an animal model, and determined its ability to generate PF during CPB. The PRVP (modified peristaltic pump, with tapering of the outlet of the pump chamber) was tested in 4 piglets (10-12kg). Cannulation was performed with right atrial and aortic cannulae, and pressure sensors were inserted into the femoral arteries. Pressure curves were obtained at different levels of flow and compared with both the animal's baseline physiologic function and a continuous flow (CF) roller pump. Pressure and flow waveforms demonstrated significant pulsatility in the PRVP setup compared to CF at all tested conditions. Measurement of hemodynamic energy data, including the percent pulsatile energy and the surplus hydraulic energy, also revealed a significant increase in pulsatility with the PRVP (p <0.001). PRVP creates physiologically significant PF, similar to the pulsatility of a native heart, and has the potential to be easily implemented in pediatric CPB. PMID:24625536

  14. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice... May 28, 1976. Any other cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator shall have an approved PMA...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice... May 28, 1976. Any other cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator shall have an approved PMA...

  16. Collapse in High-Grade Stenosis during Pulsatile Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shunichi; Tang, Dalin; Ku, David N.

    It has been hypothesized that blood flow through high grade stenotic arteries may produce conditions in which elastic flow choking may occur. The development of atherosclerotic plaque fracture may be exacerbated by the compressive stresses during collapse. This study explored the effects of pulsatile flow on stenotic flow collapse. Pulsatile flow was produced using a gear pump controlled by a digitized physiologic waveform. Upstream and downstream mean pressures and pulsatile flow rates were measured and digitized. An improved model of arterial stenosis was created using an elastomer with an incremental modulus of elasticity matched to a bovine carotid artery in the relevant range of collapse. Additionally, the model retained a very thick wall in the stenotic region similar to arterial disease. Flow choking was observed for pulsatile pressure drops close to those previously reported for steady flow. The phase difference between flow rate and pressure between upstream and downstream of the stenosis occurred by the compliance of tube and stenosis resistance. For 80% nominal stenosis by diameter and 100+/-30mmHg upstream pressure, collapse occurred for average pulsatile pressure drops of 93mmHg. Pulsatile flow experiments in this model revealed the range of conditions for the flow choking and the paradoxical collapse of the stenosis during systole with expansion during diastole. The stenosis severity was dynamic through the pulse cycle and was significantly greater under flow than the nominal severity. The results indicate that flow choking and stenotic compression may be significant in thick-walled arterial stenoses subjected to pulsatile flow.

  17. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  18. Entrainment and thrust augmentation in pulsatile ejector flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Bernal, L.; Bui, T.

    1981-01-01

    This study comprised direct thrust measurements, flow visualization by use of a spark shadowgraph technique, and mean and fluctuating velocity measurements with a pitot tube and linearized constant temperature hot-wire anemometry respectively. A gain in thrust of as much as 10 to 15% was observed for the pulsatile ejector flow as compared to the steady flow configuration. From the velocity profile measurements, it is concluded that this enhanced augmentation for pulsatile flow as compared to a nonpulsatile one was accomplished by a corresponding increased entrainment by the primary jet flow. It is also concluded that the augmentation and total entrainment by a constant area ejector critically depends upon the inlet geometry of the ejector. Experiments were performed to evaluate the influence of primary jet to ejector area ratio, ejector length, and presence of a diffuser on pulsatile ejector performance.

  19. Effects of non-pulsatile flow on thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph; Harting, Matthew; Delgado, Reynolds; Frazier, O. Howard

    2002-11-01

    Congestive heart failure afflicts 4.5 million people in the US alone, with an average 5-year mortality of more than 50%. Among the most promising treatments for this condition are VADs (ventricular assist devices). While conventional pulsatile flow VADs are large and introduce some significant complications such as thrombosis, non-pulsatile axial flow VADs have potentially significant advantages in being smaller, with smaller thrombogenic surfaces. However, the long term effects of non-pulsatile flow on the vascular system are not well understood. We have investigated the effects of pulsatility of blood flow in the stenotic human carotid artery using unsteady, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations. We have found that permanent, low shear stagnation zones can develop distal to stenoses with non-pulsatile flow, potentially leading to thrombus formation. In contrast, systolic peak flow tends to flush out such stagnation zones. These results are consistent with observed thrombus formation in two patients who underwent implantation of a Jarvik 2000 LVAD.

  20. Numerical computation of pulsatile flow through a locally constricted channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Layek, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the numerical solution of a pulsatile laminar flow through a locally constricted channel. A finite difference technique has been employed to solve the governing equations. The effects of the flow parameters such as Reynolds number, flow pulsation in terms of Strouhal number, constriction height and length on the flow behaviour have been studied. It is found that the peak value of the wall shear stress has significantly changed with the variation of Reynolds numbers and constriction heights. It is also noted that the Strouhal number and constriction length have little effect on the peak value of the wall shear stress. The flow computation reveals that the peak value of the wall shear stress at maximum flow rate time in pulsatile flow situation is much larger than that due to steady flow. The constriction and the flow pulsation produce flow disturbances at the vicinity of the constriction of the channel in the downstream direction.

  1. Comparison of continuous-flow and pulsatile-flow left ventricular assist devices: is there an advantage to pulsatility?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Allen; Williamitis, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CFVAD) are currently the most widely used type of mechanical circulatory support as bridge-to-transplant and destination therapy for end-stage congestive heart failure (HF). Compared to the first generation pulsatile-flow left ventricular assist devices (PFVADs), CFVADs have demonstrated improved reliability and durability. However, CFVADs have also been associated with certain complications thought to be linked with decreased arterial pulsatility. Previous studies comparing CFVADs and PFVADs have presented conflicting results. It is important to understand the outcome differences between CFVAD and PFVAD in order to further advance the current VAD technology. Methods In this review, we compared the outcomes of CFVADs and PFVADs and examined the need for arterial pulsatility for the future generation of mechanical circulatory support. Results CVADs offer advantages of smaller size, increased reliability and durability, and subsequent improvements in survival. However, with the increasing duration of long-term support, it appears that CFVADs may have specific complications and a lower rate of left ventricular recovery associated with diminished pulsatility, increased pressure gradients on the aortic valve and decreased compliance in smaller arterial vessels. PFVAD support or pulsatility control algorithms in CFVADs could be beneficial and potentially necessary for long term support. Conclusions Given the relative advantages and disadvantages of CFVADs and PFVADs, the ultimate solution may lie in incorporating pulsatility into current and emerging CFVADs whilst retaining their existing benefits. Future studies examining physiologic responses, end-organ function and LV remodeling at varying degrees of pulsatility and device support levels are needed. PMID:25512897

  2. Numerical modeling of pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sonu S; Frankel, Steven H

    2003-08-01

    Pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels has been numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation approach. The commercially available computational fluid dynamics code (CFD), FLUENT, has been used for these studies. Two different experiments were modeled involving pulsatile flow through axisymmetric stenoses. Four different turbulence models were employed to study their influence on the results. It was found that the low Reynolds number k-omega turbulence model was in much better agreement with previous experimental measurements than both the low and high Reynolds number versions of the RNG (renormalization-group theory) k-epsilon turbulence model and the standard k-epsilon model, with regard to predicting the mean flow distal to the stenosis including aspects of the vortex shedding process and the turbulent flow field. All models predicted a wall shear stress peak at the throat of the stenosis with minimum values observed distal to the stenosis where flow separation occurred. PMID:12968569

  3. Fiber-Based Laser Speckle Imaging for the Detection of Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Caitlin; Yang, Bruce Y.; Mayzel, Kent C.; Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Choi, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective In endodontics, a major diagnostic challenge is the accurate assessment of pulp status. In this study, we designed and characterized a fiber-based laser speckle imaging system to study pulsatile blood flow in the tooth. Study Design/Materials and Methods To take transilluminated laser speckle images of the teeth, we built a custom fiber-based probe. To assess our ability to detect changes in pulsatile flow, we performed in vitro and preliminary in vivo tests on tissue-simulating phantoms and human teeth. We imaged flow of intralipid in a glass microchannel at simulated heart rates ranging from 40 beats/minute (bpm) to 120 bpm (0.67–2.00 Hz). We also collected in vivo data from the upper front incisors of healthy subjects. From the measured raw speckle data, we calculated temporal speckle contrast versus time. With frequency-domain analysis, we identified the frequency components of the contrast waveforms. Results With our approach, we observed in vitro the presence of pulsatile flow at different simulated heart rates. We characterized simulated heart rate with an accuracy of and >98%. In the in vivo proof-of-principle experiment, we measured heart rates of 69, 90, and 57 bpm, which agreed with measurements of subject heart rate taken with a wearable, commercial pulse oximeter. Conclusions We designed, built, and tested the performance of a dental imaging probe. Data from in vitro and in vivo tests strongly suggest that this probe can detect the presence of pulsatile flow. LSI may enable endodontists to noninvasively assess pulpal vitality via direct measurement of blood flow. PMID:26202900

  4. The Dynamics of Agglomerated Ferrofluid in Steady and Pulsatile Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alicia; Stewart, Kelley; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2007-11-01

    Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT) is a promising technique to deliver medication via functionalized magnetic particles to target sites in the treatment of diseases. In this work, the physics of steady and pulsatile flows laden with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a square channel under the influence of a magnetic field induced by a 0.6 Tesla permanent magnet is studied. Herein, the dynamics of ferrofluid shedding from an initially accumulated mass in water are examined through shadowgraph imaging using two orthogonal cameras. Fundamental differences in the ferrofluid behavior occur between the steady and pulsatile flow cases, as expected. For steady flows, vortex ring shedding is visualized from the mass, and periodic shedding occurs only for moderate mass sizes where the shear forces in the flow interact with the magnetic forces. At Reynolds numbers below 500 with pulsatile flow, suction and roll up of the ferrofluid is seen during the low and moderate periods of flow, followed by the ejection of ferrofluid during high flow. These shadowgraphs illustrate the beauty and richness of ferrofluid dynamics, an understanding of which is instrumental to furthering MDT as an effective drug delivery device.

  5. Visualization of pulsatile flow for magnetic nanoparticle based therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzel, Andrew; Yecko, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Pulsatile flow of blood through branched, curved, stenosed, dilated or otherwise perturbed vessels is more complex than flow through a straight, uniform and rigid tube. In some magnetic hyperthermia and magnetic chemo-therapies, localized regions of magnetic nanoparticle laden fluid are deliberately formed in blood vessels and held in place by magnetic fields. The effect of localized magnetic fluid regions on blood flow and the effect of the pulsatile blood flow on such magnetic fluid regions are poorly understood and difficult to examine in vivo or by numerical simulation. We present a laboratory model that facilitates both dye tracer and particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) studies of pulsatile flow of water through semi-flexible tubes in the presence of localized magnetic fluid regions. Results on the visualization of flows over a range of Reynolds and Womersley numbers and for several different (water-based) ferrofluids are compared for straight and curved vessels and for different magnetic localization strategies. These results can guide the design of improved magnetic cancer therapies. Support from the William H. Sandholm Program of Cooper Union's Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Analysis and performance of subsonic ejectors for pulsatile flow applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, J.G.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    This study looks at the application of ejectors to four-stroke engines. The goal is to develop a system of exhaust gas emission control by premixing exhaust gas with fresh atmospheric air. The constraints on the system include relatively low pressure pulsatile flow of the primary gas, geometric constraints (small size), significant density differences between the two fluid streams and possible large back-pressure operating conditions. A model is applied to the ejector application to pulsatile flow based on a global control volume analysis. The model constrains the operating conditions based on conservation of mass, momentum and energy for incompressible flow conditions. The time dependent effects are modeled by including a representative inertia term in the momentum equation based on quasi-steady conditions. The results are used to illustrate the operating characteristics for a small four-stroke engine application. The sensitivity of operation to the operating and design parameters of the system are illustrated. In particular, the effects of the pulsatile flow on the operation are shown to increase the performance under certain operating conditions. The model simulation is compared to some data available in the literature.

  7. Increased erythrocyte adhesion to VCAM-1 during pulsatile flow: Application of a microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennell; Lancelot, Moira; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hines, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by microvascular occlusion mediated by adhesive interactions of sickle erythrocytes (SSRBCs) to the endothelium. Most in vitro flow adhesion assays measure SSRBC adhesion during continuous flow, although in vivo SSRBC adhesive interactions occur during pulsatile flow. Using a well-plate microfluidic flow adhesion system, we demonstrate that isolated SSRBCs adhere to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) at greater levels during pulsatile versus continuous flow. A significant increase in adhesive interactions was observed between all pulse frequencies 1 Hz to 2 Hz (60–120 beats/min) when compared to non-pulsatile flow. Adhesion of isolated SSRBCs and whole blood during pulsatile flow was unaffected by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, and exposure of SSRBCs to pulsatile flow did not affect the intrinsic adhesive properties of SSRBCs. The cell type responsible for increased adhesion of whole blood varied from patient to patient. We conclude that low flow periods of the pulse cycle allow more adhesive interactions between sickle erythrocytes and VCAM-1, and sickle erythrocyte adhesion in the context of whole blood may better reflect physiologic cellular interactions. The microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay used in this study may have applications for clinical assessment of sickle erythrocyte adhesion during pulsatile flow. PMID:24898561

  8. Estimation of pressure gradients in pulsatile flow from magnetic resonance acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Tasu, J P; Mousseaux, E; Delouche, A; Oddou, C; Jolivet, O; Bittoun, J

    2000-07-01

    A method for estimating pressure gradients from MR images is demonstrated. Making the usual assumption that the flowing medium is a Newtonian fluid, and with appropriate boundary conditions, the inertial forces (or acceleration components of the flow) are proportional to the pressure gradients. The technique shown here is based on an evaluation of the inertial forces from Fourier acceleration encoding. This method provides a direct measurement of the total acceleration defined as the sum of the velocity derivative vs. time and the convective acceleration. The technique was experimentally validated by comparing MR and manometer pressure gradient measurements obtained in a pulsatile flow phantom. The results indicate that the MR determination of pressure gradients from an acceleration measurement is feasible with a good correlation with the true measurements (r = 0.97). The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the aorta of a normal volunteer. Magn Reson Med 44:66-72, 2000. PMID:10893523

  9. Specificity of synergistic coronary flow enhancement by adenosine and pulsatile perfusion in the dog.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, P; Senzaki, H; Paolocci, N; Isoda, T; Sunagawa, G; Recchia, F A; Kass, D A

    1999-10-01

    1. Coronary flow elevation from enhanced perfusion pulsatility is synergistically amplified by adenosine. This study determined the specificity of this interaction and its potential mechanisms. 2. Mean and phasic coronary flow responses to increasing pulsatile perfusion were assessed in anaesthetized dogs, with the anterior descending coronary artery servoperfused to regulate real-time physiological flow pulsatility at constant mean pressure. Pulsatility was varied between 40 and 100 mmHg. Hearts ejected into the native aorta whilst maintaining stable loading. 3. Increasing pulsatility elevated mean coronary flow +11.5 +/- 1.7 % under basal conditions. Co-infusion of adenosine sufficient to raise baseline flow 66 % markedly amplified this pulsatile perfusion response (+82. 6 +/- 14.3 % increase in mean flow above adenosine baseline), due to a leftward shift of the adenosine-coronary flow response curve at higher pulsatility. Flow augmentation with pulsatility was not linked to higher regional oxygen consumption, supporting direct rather than metabolically driven mechanisms. 4. Neither bradykinin, acetylcholine nor verapamil reproduced the synergistic amplification of mean flow by adenosine and higher pulsatility, despite being administered at doses matching basal flow change with adenosine. 5. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) activation (pinacidil) amplified the pulse-flow response 3-fold, although this remained significantly less than with adenosine. Co-administration of the phospholipase A2 inhibitor quinacrine virtually eliminated adenosine-induced vasodilatation, yet synergistic interaction between adenosine and pulse perfusion persisted, albeit at a reduced level. 6. Thus, adenosine and perfusion pulsatility specifically interact to enhance coronary flow. This synergy is partially explained by KATP agonist action and additional non-flow-dependent mechanisms, and may be important for modulating flow reserve during exercise or other high output states where

  10. Identification of the Temperature Field in Pulsatile Impinging Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vít, Tomáš; Lédl, Vít

    2010-09-01

    The presented paper shows the possibility of using holographic interferometry and hot-wire anemometry in the research of heat transfer from impingement pulsatile flow. The intensity of heat transfer in the case of impingement flow is often measured with glue-on heat flux sensors, or by indirect methods such as naphthalene sublimation. All these methods have a response time too long for measuring instant values of the heat transfer coefficient on a surface cooled/heated by impingement pulsatile flow. This shortcoming should be overcome by using CTA glue-on probes or, preferably, by using optical methods such as holographic interferometry. It is necessary to employ a special holographic setup with double sensitivity instead of the commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of holographic interferometer in order to attain the parameters sufficient for the studied case. This setup is not light efficient like the Mach-Zehnder type but has double sensitivity. The results from the holographic interferometry experiments will be compared with the temperature field achieved by methods of hot-wire anemometry.

  11. Pulsatility flow around a single cylinder - an experimental model of flow inside an artificial lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Bull, Joseph L.

    2004-11-01

    Pulsatile flow past a single cylinder is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry. This study aims to elucidate the effects of pulstility on the velocity field, which influences the convection-dominated transport within the fluid. The artificial lung device can be connected in parallel or series with the native lungs and may potentially be used as a bridge to transplant or for pulmonary replacement. The artificial lung consists of hollow microfibers through which gas flows and blood flows around. Blood flow through the device is pulsatile because it is driven entirely by the right heart. Steady flow over bluff bodies has been investigated in many contexts, such as heat exchangers. However, few studies have been investigated the effect of pulsatility. The effects of frequency, amplitude of pulsatility, and average flow rate on the formation of vortices after a cylinder are examined. Vortices near the cylinder are found to develop at lower Reynolds number in pulsatile flow than in steady flow. This work is supported by NIH grant R01 HL69420-01.

  12. Effect of Flow Pulsatility on Modeling the Hemodynamics in the Total Cavopulmonary Connection

    PubMed Central

    khiabani, Reza H.; Restrepo, Maria; Tang, Elaine; De Zélicourt, Diane; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Total Cavopulmonary Connection is the result of a series of palliative surgical repairs performed on patients with single ventricle heart defects. The resulting anatomy has complex and unsteady hemodynamics characterized by flow mixing and flow separation. Although varying degrees of flow pulsatility have been observed in vivo, non-pulsatile (time-averaged) boundary conditions have traditionally been assumed in hemodynamic modeling, and only recently have pulsatile conditions been incorporated without completely characterizing their effect or importance. In this study, 3D numerical simulations with both pulsatile and non-pulsatile boundary conditions were performed for 24 patients with different anatomies and flow boundary conditions from Georgia Tech database. Flow structures, energy dissipation rates and pressure drops were compared under rest and simulated exercise conditions. It was found that flow pulsatility is the primary factor in determining the appropriate choice of boundary conditions, whereas the anatomic configuration and cardiac output had secondary effects. Results show that the hemodynamics can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. However, there was a minimum pulsatility threshold, identified by defining a weighted pulsatility index (wPI), above which the influence was significant. It was shown that when wPI < 30%, the relative error in hemodynamic predictions using time-averaged boundary conditions was less than 10% compared to pulsatile simulations. In addition, when wPI <50, the relative error was less than 20%. A correlation was introduced to relate wPI to the relative error in predicting the flow metrics with non-pulsatile flow conditions. PMID:22841650

  13. Three-dimensional flow separation over a surface-mounted hemisphere in pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Flow separation over a surface-mounted obstacle is prevalent in numerous applications. Previous studies of 3D separation around protuberances have been limited to steady flow. In biological and geophysical flows, pulsatile conditions are frequently encountered, yet this situation has not been extensively studied. Primarily motivated by our previous studies of the flow patterns observed in various human vocal fold pathologies such as polyps, our research aimed to fill this gap in the knowledge concerning unsteady 3D flow separation. This is achieved by characterizing velocity fields surrounding the obstacle, focused primarily on the vortical flow structures and dynamics that occur around a hemispheroid in pulsatile flow. As part of this study, two-dimensional, instantaneous and phase-averaged particle image velocimetry data in both steady and pulsatile flows are presented and compared. Coherent vortical flow structures have been identified by their swirling strength. This analysis revealed flow structures with dynamics dependent on the pulsatile forcing function. A mechanism to explain the formation and observed dynamics of these flow structures based on the self-induced velocity of vortex rings interacting with the unsteady flow is proposed.

  14. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  15. Numerical investigation of physiologically realistic pulsatile flow through arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Long, Q; Xu, X Y; Ramnarine, K V; Hoskins, P

    2001-10-01

    Numerical simulations of pulsatile blood flow in straight tube stenosis models were performed to investigate the poststenotic flow phenomena. In this study, three axisymmetrical and three asymmetrical stenosis models with area reduction of 25%, 50% and 75% were constructed. A measured human common carotid artery blood flow waveform was used as the upstream flow condition which has a mean Reynold's number of 300. All calculations were performed with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Flow features such as velocity profiles, flow separation zone (FSZ), and wall shear stress (WSS) distributions in the poststenotic region for all models are presented. The results have demonstrated that the formation and development of FSZs in the poststenotic region are very complex, especially in the flow deceleration phase. In axisymmetric stenoses the poststenotic flow is more sensitive to changes in the degree of stenosis than in asymmetric models. For severe stenoses, the stenosis influence length is shorter in asymmetrical models than in axisymmetrical cases. WSS oscillations (between positive and negative values) have been observed at various downstream locations in some models. The amplitude of the oscillation depends strongly on the axial location and the degree of stenosis. PMID:11522303

  16. Neocortical capillary flow pulsatility is not elevated in experimental communicating hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shams; McAllister, James P; Yu, Yiting; Wagshul, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    While communicating hydrocephalus (CH) is often characterized by increased pulsatile flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct, a clear-cut explanation for this phenomenon is lacking. Increased pulsatility of the entire cerebral vasculature including the cortical capillaries has been suggested as a causative mechanism. To test this theory, we used two-photon microscopy to measure flow pulsatility in neocortical capillaries 40 to 500 μm below the pial surface in adult rats with CH at 5 to 7 days (acute, n=8) and 3 to 5 weeks (chronic, n=5) after induction compared with intact controls (n=9). Averaging over all cortical depths, no increase in capillary pulsatility occurred in acute (pulsatility index (PI): 0.15±0.06) or chronic (0.14±0.05) CH animals compared with controls (0.18±0.07; P=0.07). More specifically, PI increased significantly with cortical depth in controls (r=0.35, P<0.001), but no such increase occurred in acute (r=0.06, P=0.3) or chronic (r=0.05, P=0.5) CH. Pulsatile CSF aqueductal flow, in contrast, was elevated 10- to 500-fold compared with controls. We conclude that even in the presence of markedly elevated pulsatile CSF flow in the aqueduct, there is no concurrent increase in microvascular pulsatile flow. PMID:21934694

  17. Microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow loop for hemodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T G; Hobson, R W; Pawel, H E

    1986-03-01

    Validation of spectral analytic techniques in the clinical assessment and quantitation of vascular stenoses has been aided by use of in vitro flow loops. We have used a recently developed microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow model to examine the influence of varying stenoses on Doppler-shifted peak systolic frequencies. A nonaxisymmetric, vertically oriented stenosis was produced by extrinsic compression of latex rubber tubing 12 mm in diameter, reducing the cross-sectional area (CSA) by 25, 40, 50, 60, 70, 85, and 97%. A rolling diaphragm pump, driven through a slider-crank mechanism by a microprocessor-controlled stepper motor, generated characteristic arterial pulse waves at a rate of 75 cycles per minute. Using an 8 MHz, continuous-wave, directional Doppler velocimeter, the Doppler-shifted frequencies were recorded at the stenosis. Four sets of observations were made at each of the stenoses, and the peak systolic frequency (PSF) was determined using a spectrum analyzer. The PSF in the absence of an obstructing stenosis was 2.56 +/- 0.03 (KHz +/- SEM). This increased significantly (P less than 0.05) to 4.80 +/- 0.09 when the CSA was reduced by 50%, to 5.90 +/- 0.37 when the CSA was reduced by 60% (P less than 0.05), to 8.40 +/- 0.10 when the CSA was reduced by 70% (P less than 0.05), and to 17.84 +/- 0.89 when the CSA was reduced by 85% (P less than 0.05). These data establish the utility of this pulsatile flow model, confirming the direct relationship between the Doppler-shifted PSF and the percentage reduction in CSA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3951221

  18. Fluid-structure interaction for nonlinear response of shells conveying pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    Circular cylindrical shells with flexible boundary conditions conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated. The equations of motion are obtained based on the nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory via Lagrangian approach. The flow is set in motion by a pulsatile pressure gradient. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model that contains the unsteady effects obtained from the linear potential flow theory and the pulsatile viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior. The case of shells containing quiescent fluid subjected to the action of a pulsatile transmural pressure is also addressed. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pressure are here presented via frequency-response curves and time histories. The vibrations involving both a driven mode and a companion mode, which appear due to the axial symmetry, are also investigated. This theoretical framework represents a pioneering study that could be of great interest for biomedical applications. In particular, in the future, a more refined model of the one here presented will possibly be applied to reproduce the dynamic behavior of vascular prostheses used for repairing and replacing damaged and diseased thoracic aorta in cases of aneurysm, dissection or coarctation. For this purpose, a pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is here considered by applying physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. This study provides, for the first time in literature, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model with deep insights in the nonlinear vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to pulsatile pressure and pulsatile flow.

  19. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions. PMID:24231821

  20. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25744850

  1. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. PLATELET ADHESION TO POLYURETHANE UREA UNDER PULSATILE FLOW CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Navitsky, Michael A.; Taylor, Joshua O.; Smith, Alexander B.; Slattery, Margaret J.; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Manning, Keefe B.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s−1. The aim of the current work is to determine platelet adhesion properties to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system is used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g. cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments retain the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk is rotated in platelet rich bovine plasma for two hours with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow is found to exponentially decay with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels are found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices. PMID:24721222

  3. Pulsatile Flow Across a Cylinder--An Investigation of Flow in a Total Artificial Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun

    2005-11-01

    The effect of pulsatility on flow across a single cylinder has been examined experimentally using particle image velocimetry. This work is motivated by the ongoing development of a total artificial lung (TAL), a device which would serve as a bridge to lung transplant. The prototype TAL consists of hollow microfibers through which oxygen-rich gas flows and blood flows around. Flow through the device is provided entirely by right heart and, therefore, is puslatile. The Peclet number of the flow is large and consequently the development of secondary flow affects the resulting gas exchange. The effects of frequency and average flow rate of pulsatile flow around a cylinder were investigated experimentally in a water tunnel and some of the results were compared with preliminary numerical results. Vortices developed behind the cylinder at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than steady flow. The results indicate that there are critical values of the Reynolds number between 3 to 5 and Stokes numbers of 0.22, below which vortices were not observed. The findings suggest that higher Stokes and Reynolds numbers within the device could enhance vortex formation. However, this enhanced gas exchange could be at the expense of higher device resistance and increased likelihood of blood trauma. Intelligent TAL design will require consideration of these effects. This work is supported by NIH grant HL69420.

  4. Increasing pulmonary artery pulsatile flow improves hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in piglets.

    PubMed

    Courboulin, Audrey; Kang, Chantal; Baillard, Olivier; Bonnet, Sebastien; Bonnet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease affecting distal pulmonary arteries (PA). These arteries are deformed, leading to right ventricular failure. Current treatments are limited. Physiologically, pulsatile blood flow is detrimental to the vasculature. In response to sustained pulsatile stress, vessels release nitric oxide (NO) to induce vasodilation for self-protection. Based on this observation, this study developed a protocol to assess whether an artificial pulmonary pulsatile blood flow could induce an NO-dependent decrease in pulmonary artery pressure. One group of piglets was exposed to chronic hypoxia for 3 weeks and compared to a control group of piglets. Once a week, the piglets underwent echocardiography to assess PAH severity. At the end of hypoxia exposure, the piglets were subjected to a pulsatile protocol using a pulsatile catheter. After being anesthetized and prepared for surgery, the jugular vein of the piglet was isolated and the catheter was introduced through the right atrium, the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, under radioscopic control. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was measured before (T0), immediately after (T1) and 30 min after (T2) the pulsatile protocol. It was demonstrated that this pulsatile protocol is a safe and efficient method of inducing a significant reduction in mean PAP via an NO-dependent mechanism. These data open up new avenues for the clinical management of PAH. PMID:25993379

  5. Visualization and finite element analysis of pulsatile flow in models of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Matsuzawa, T; Homma, T

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile flows in glass models simulating fusiform and lateral saccular aneurysms were investigated by a flow visualization method. When resting fluid starts to flow, the initial fluid motion is practically irrotational. After a short period of time, the flow began to separate from the proximal wall of the aneurysm. Then the separation bubble or vortex grew rapidly in size and filled the whole area of the aneurysm circumferentially. During this period of time, the center of the vortex moved from the proximal end to the distal point of the aneurysm. The transient reversal flow, for instance, which may occur at the end of the ejection period, passed between the wall of the aneurysm and the centrally located vortex. When the rate and pulsatile frequency of flow were high, the vortex broke down into highly disturbed flow (or turbulence) at the distal portion of the aneurysm. The same effect was observed when the length of the aneurysm was increased. A reduction in pulsatile amplitude made the flow pattern close to that in steady flow. A finite element analysis was made to obtain velocity and pressure fields in pulsatile flow through a tube with an axisymmetric expansion. Calculations were performed with the pulsatile flows used in the visualization experiment in order to study the effects of change in the pulsatile wave form by keeping the time-mean Reynolds number and Womersley's parameter unchanged. Calculated instantaneous patterns of velocity field and stream lines agreed well with the experimental results. The appearance and disappearance of the vortex in the dilated portion and its development resulted in complex distributions of pressure and shear fields. Locally minimum and maximum values of wall shear stress occurred at points just upstream and downstream of the distal end of the expansion when the flow rate reached its peak. PMID:2605323

  6. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  7. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghui; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  8. Pulsatile flow simulator for comparison of cardiac output measurements by electromagnetic flow meter and thermodilution.

    PubMed

    Jebson, P J; Karkow, W S

    1986-01-01

    This study examined a pulsatile flow simulator for the purpose of evaluating two measurement devices, an extracorporeal flow probe with an electromagnetic flow meter and several thermodilution catheters. We measured the performance of these devices in a range of low to high flows. Using either saline or blood as a perfusate, we obtained different results with these fluids (p less than 0.001). Each catheter behaved in a linear manner, although variation occurred among the catheters with both saline (minimum slope 1.090, maximum slope 1.190) and blood (minimum slope 1.107, maximum slope 1.154). An increase in rate and stroke volumes of the simulator did not demonstrate an identifiable trend in error. The thermodilution catheters were most accurate at 5.0 L/min irrespective of rate, stroke volume, or perfusate used. In contrast, the electromagnetic flow meter accurately represented flows across the wide range of outputs examined (2.4 to 10.7 L/min). (Slope with saline 1.091, slope with blood 1.080) Throughout the range of flow, the flow meter gave a calibration line 5% higher with blood than with saline. The results indicate that accurate measurement of pulsatile blood flow can be achieved in vitro with an electromagnetic flow meter using saline as a perfusate, provided a correction factor is determined and applied to convert values for saline to accurate values for blood. PMID:2940345

  9. 3D separation over a wall-mounted hemisphere in steady and pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Flow separation over a surface-mounted hemispheriod is prevalent in countless applications, both under steady (constant freestream velocity) and unsteady flow over the protuberance. Previous studies of 3D separation have been limited to steady inflow conditions. In biological and geophysical flows, pulsatile flow conditions are much more commonly observed, yet such conditions have not been well studied. Primarily motivated by previous studies of the flow observed in various human vocal fold pathologies, such as polyps, our research aims to fill the knowledge gap in unsteady 3D flow separation. This is achieved by characterizing surface pressure fields and velocity fields, focused primarily on the vortical flow structures and dynamics that occur around a hemispheroid protuberance under pulsatile flow conditions. Surface static pressure and two-dimensional, instantaneous and phase-averaged, particle image velocimetry data in steady and pulsatile flow are presented and compared. Coherent vortical flow structures have been identified using the λci vortex identification criterion. This analysis has revealed a novel set of flow structures dependent on the pulsatile flow forcing function. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351.

  10. Two-equation turbulence modeling of pulsatile flow in a stenosed tube.

    PubMed

    Ryval, J; Straatman, A G; Steinman, D A

    2004-10-01

    The study of pulsatile flow in stenosed vessels is of particular importance because of its significance in relation to blood flow in human pathophysiology. To date, however, there have been few comprehensive publications detailing systematic numerical simulations of turbulent pulsatile flow through stenotic tubes evaluated against comparable experiments. In this paper, two-equation turbulence modeling has been explored for sinusoidally pulsatile flow in 75% and 90% area reduction stenosed vessels, which undergoes a transition from laminar to turbulent flow as well as relaminarization. Wilcox's standard k-omega model and a transitional variant of the same model are employed for the numerical simulations. Steady flow through the stenosed tubes was considered first to establish the grid resolution and the correct inlet conditions on the basis of comprehensive comparisons of the detailed velocity and turbulence fields to experimental data. Inlet conditions based on Womersley flow were imposed at the inlet for all pulsatile cases and the results were compared to experimental data from the literature. In general, the transitional version of the k-omega model is shown to give a better overall representation of both steady and pulsatile flow. The standard model consistently over predicts turbulence at and downstream of the stenosis, which leads to premature recovery of the flow. While the transitional model often under-predicts the magnitude of the turbulence, the trends are well-described and the velocity field is superior to that predicted using the standard model. On the basis of this study, there appears to be some promise for simulating physiological pulsatile flows using a relatively simple two-equation turbulence model. PMID:15648815

  11. Flow dynamics in anatomical models of abdominal aortic aneurysms: computational analysis of pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Finol, Ender A; Amon, Cristina H

    2003-01-01

    Blood flow in human arteries is dominated by time-dependent transport phenomena. In particular, in the abdominal segment of the aorta under a patient's average resting conditions, blood exhibits laminar flow patterns that are influenced by secondary flows induced by adjacent branches and in irregular vessel geometries. The flow dynamics becomes more complex when there is a pathological condition that causes changes in the normal structural composition of the vessel wall, for example, in the presence of an aneurysm. An aneurysm is an irreversible dilation of a blood vessel accompanied by weakening of the vessel wall. This work examines the importance of hemodynamics in the characterization of pulsatile blood flow patterns in individual Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) models. These patient-specific computational models have been developed for the numerical simulation of the momentum transport equations utilizing the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the spatial and temporal discretization. We characterize pulsatile flow dynamics in AAAs for average resting conditions by means of identifying regions of disturbed flow and quantifying the disturbance by evaluating wall pressure and wall shear stresses at the aneurysm wall. PMID:14515766

  12. Alkaline phosphatase in osteoblasts is down-regulated by pulsatile fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    It is our hypothesis that interstitial fluid flow plays a role in the bone remodeling response to mechanical loading. The fluid flow-induced expression of three proteins (collagen, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase) involved in bone remodeling was investigated. Rat calvarial osteoblasts subjected to pulsatile fluid flow at an average shear stress of 5 dyne/cm2 showed decreased alkaline phosphatase (AP) mRNA expression after only 1 hour of flow. After 3 hours of flow, AP mRNA levels had decreased to 30% of stationary control levels and remained at this level for an additional 5 hours of flow. Steady flow (4 dyne/cm2 fluid shear stress), in contrast, resulted in a delayed and less dramatic decrease in AP mRNA expression to 63% of control levels after 8 hours of flow. The reduced AP mRNA expression under pulsatile flow conditions was followed by reduced AP enzyme activity after 24 hours. No changes in collagen or osteopontin mRNA expression were detected over 8 hours of pulsatile flow. This is the first time fluid flow has been shown to affect gene expression in osteoblasts.

  13. An Investigation of Pulsatile Flow Past Two Cylinders as a Model of Blood Flow in an Artificial Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-chun; Khanafer, Khalil M.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile flow across two circular cylinders with different geometric arrangements is studied experimentally using the particle image velocimetry method and numerically using the finite element method. This investigation is motivated the need to optimize gas transfer and fluid mechanical impedance for a total artificial lung, in which the right heart pumps blood across a bundle of hollow microfibers. Vortex formation was found to occur at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than in steady flow, and the vortex structure depends strongly on the geometric arrangement of the cylinders and on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers. PMID:21701672

  14. An Investigation of Pulsatile Flow Past Two Cylinders as a Model of Blood Flow in an Artificial Lung.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Khanafer, Khalil M; Bartlett, Robert H; Hirschl, Ronald B; Bull, Joseph L

    2011-07-01

    Pulsatile flow across two circular cylinders with different geometric arrangements is studied experimentally using the particle image velocimetry method and numerically using the finite element method. This investigation is motivated the need to optimize gas transfer and fluid mechanical impedance for a total artificial lung, in which the right heart pumps blood across a bundle of hollow microfibers. Vortex formation was found to occur at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than in steady flow, and the vortex structure depends strongly on the geometric arrangement of the cylinders and on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers. PMID:21701672

  15. Cyclic variations of high-frequency ultrasonic backscattering from blood under pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung

    2009-08-01

    It was shown previously that ultrasonic scattering from whole blood varies during the flow cycle under pulsatile flow both in vitro and in vivo. It has been postulated that the cyclic variations of the backscattering signal are associated with red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in flowing whole blood. To obtain a better understanding of the relationship between blood backscattering and RBC aggregation behavior for pulsatile flowing blood, the present study used high-frequency ultrasound to characterize blood properties. The backscattering signals from both whole blood and an RBC suspension at different peak flow velocities (from 10 to 30 cm/s) and hematocrits (20% and 40%) under pulsatile flow (stroke rate of 20 beats/min) were measured with 3 single-element transducers at frequencies of 10, 35, and 50 MHz in a mock flow loop. To avoid the frequency response problem of a Doppler flowmeter, the integrated backscatter (IB) and flow velocity as functions of time were calculated directly using RF signals from flowing blood. The experimental results showed that cyclic variations of the IB curve were clearly observed at a low flow velocity and a hematocrit of 40% when using 50 MHz ultrasound, and that these variations became weaker as the peak flow velocity increased. However, these cyclic variations were detected only at 10 cm/s when using 10 MHz ultrasound. These results demonstrate that a high flow velocity can stop the formation of rouleaux and that a high hematocrit can promote RBC aggregation to produce cyclic variations of the backscattering signal under pulsatile flow. In addition, slight cyclic variations of the IB curve for an RBC suspension were observed at 35 and 50 MHz. Furthermore, the peak of the IB curve from whole blood led the peak of the velocity waveform when using high-frequency ultrasound, which could be explained by the assumption that a rapid flow can promote RBC aggregation under pulsatile flow. Together, the experimental results showed that the

  16. Dynamic modeling of the outlet of a pulsatile pump incorporating a flow-dependent resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Ming; Wu, Shunjie; Liao, Huogen

    2013-08-01

    Outlet tube models incorporating a linearly flow-dependent resistance are widely used in pulsatile and rotary pump studies. The resistance is made up of a flow-proportional term and a constant term. Previous studies often focused on the steady state properties of the model. In this paper, a dynamic modeling procedure was presented. Model parameters were estimated by an unscented Kalman filter (UKF). The subspace model identification (SMI) algorithm was proposed to initialize the UKF. Model order and structure were also validated by SMI. A mock circulatory loop driven by a pneumatic pulsatile pump was developed to produce pulsatile pressure and flow. Hydraulic parameters of the outlet tube were adjusted manually by a clamp. Seven groups of steady state experiments were carried out to calibrate the flow-dependent resistance as reference values. Dynamic estimation results showed that the inertance estimates are insensitive to model structures. If the constant term was ignored, estimation errors for the flow-proportional term were limited within 16% of the reference values. Compared with the constant resistance, a time-varying one improves model accuracy in terms of root mean square error. The maximum improvement is up to 35%. However, including the constant term in the time-varying resistance will lead to serious estimation errors. PMID:23253954

  17. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  18. SU-D-18C-04: The Feasibility of Quantifying MRI Contrast Agent in Pulsatile Flowing Blood Using DCE-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    N, Gwilliam M; J, Collins D; O, Leach M; R, Orton M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of accurately quantifying the concentration of MRI contrast agent (CA) in pulsatile flowing blood by measuring its T{sub 1}, as is common for the purposes of obtaining a patientspecific arterial input function (AIF). Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) - MRI and pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling is widely used to produce measures of vascular function but accurate measurement of the AIF undermines their accuracy. A proposed solution is to measure the T{sub 1} of blood in a large vessel using the Fram double flip angle method during the passage of a bolus of CA. This work expands on previous work by assessing pulsatile flow and the changes in T{sub 1} seen with a CA bolus. Methods: A phantom was developed which used a physiological pump to pass fluid of a known T{sub 1} (812ms) through the centre of a head coil of a clinical 1.5T MRI scanner. Measurements were made using high temporal resolution sequences suitable for DCE-MRI and were used to validate a virtual phantom that simulated the expected errors due to pulsatile flow and bolus of CA concentration changes typically found in patients. Results: : Measured and virtual results showed similar trends, although there were differences that may be attributed to the virtual phantom not accurately simulating the spin history of the fluid before entering the imaging volume. The relationship between T{sub 1} measurement and flow speed was non-linear. T{sub 1} measurement is compromised by new spins flowing into the imaging volume, not being subject to enough excitations to have reached steady-state. The virtual phantom demonstrated a range of recorded T{sub 1} for various simulated T{sub 1} / flow rates. Conclusion: T{sub 1} measurement of flowing blood using standard DCE-MRI sequences is very challenging. Measurement error is non-linear with relation to instantaneous flow speed. Optimising sequence parameters and lowering baseline T{sub 1} of blood should be considered.

  19. Fluid particle motion and Lagrangian velocities for pulsatile flow through a femoral artery branch model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Crawford, D. W.; Back, L. H.; Back, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization study using selective dye injection and frame by frame analysis of a movie provided qualitative and quantitative data on the motion of marked fluid particles in a 60 degree artery branch model for simulation of physiological femoral artery flow. Physical flow features observed included jetting of the branch flow into the main lumen during the brief reverse flow period, flow separation along the main lumen wall during the near zero flow phase of diastole when the core flow was in the downstream direction, and inference of flow separation conditions along the wall opposite the branch later in systole at higher branch flow ratios. There were many similarities between dye particle motions in pulsatile flow and the comparative steady flow observations.

  20. Stiffening-Induced High Pulsatility Flow Activates Endothelial Inflammation via a TLR2/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi-Ou; Wang, Daren; Zhang, Hui; Hunter, Kendall; Hertzberg, Jean; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Tan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stiffening of large arteries is increasingly used as an independent predictor of risk and therapeutic outcome for small artery dysfunction in many diseases including pulmonary hypertension. The molecular mechanisms mediating downstream vascular cell responses to large artery stiffening remain unclear. We hypothesize that high pulsatility flow, induced by large artery stiffening, causes inflammatory responses in downstream pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) through toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways. To recapitulate the stiffening effect of large pulmonary arteries that occurs in pulmonary hypertension, ultrathin silicone tubes of variable mechanical stiffness were formulated and were placed in a flow circulatory system. These tubes modulated the simulated cardiac output into pulsatile flows with different pulsatility indices, 0.5 (normal) or 1.5 (high). PAECs placed downstream of the tubes were evaluated for their expression of proinflammatory molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and MCP-1), TLR receptors and intracellular NF-κB following flow exposure. Results showed that compared to flow with normal pulsatility, high pulsatility flow induced proinflammatory responses in PAECs, enhanced TLR2 expression but not TLR4, and caused NF-κB activation. Pharmacologic (OxPAPC) and siRNA inhibition of TLR2 attenuated high pulsatility flow-induced pro-inflammatory responses and NF-κB activation in PAECs. We also observed that PAECs isolated from small pulmonary arteries of hypertensive animals exhibiting proximal vascular stiffening demonstrated a durable ex-vivo proinflammatory phenotype (increased TLR2, TLR4 and MCP-1 expression). Intralobar PAECs isolated from vessels of IPAH patients also showed increased TLR2. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that TLR2/NF-κB signaling mediates endothelial inflammation under high pulsatility flow caused by upstream stiffening, but the role of TLR4 in flow pulsatility-mediated endothelial

  1. Detecting spatial variations of erythrocytes by ultrasound backscattering statistical parameters under pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung

    2011-05-01

    The echogenicity of whole blood is known to vary during the flow cycle under pulsatile flow both in vitro and in vivo. However, the fundamental underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. The combined effects of flow acceleration and the shear rate were recently used to explain the cyclic variations of signals backscattered from flowing blood. However, testing this hypothesis requires determination of the spatial distributions of red blood cells (RBCs) in flowing blood. Recently, the Nakagami (m) and scaling (Ω) parameters have been used, respectively, to detect the spatial distributions of RBCs and the intensity of backscattering signal from blood under steady flow. For a better understanding of the relationship between the spatial distributions of RBCs and erythrocyte aggregation under pulsatile flow condition, these ultrasound backscattering statistical parameters were used, in this study, to characterize signals backscattered from both whole blood and RBC suspensions at different peak flow velocities (from 10 to 30 cm/s) and hematocrits (20% and 40%). The experiments were carried out by a 35-MHz ultrasound transducer. The m and Ω parameters were calculated for different blood properties and conditions, and the flow velocity in the center of blood flowing through a tube was measured synchronously. In whole blood, the results demonstrated that most RBCs were aggregated progressively toward the center of tube as the flow velocity started to accelerate, and that the increase in the intensity of the backscattered signal envelope to a maximum was attributable to larger rouleaux being formed in the center of tube. This phenomenon became apparent at a lower peak flow velocity with 40% hematocrit. However, there were no cyclic and spatial variations of the backscattering signal over a pulsatile cycle in RBC suspensions. PMID:21134805

  2. Orientation-independent rapid pulsatile flow measurement using dual-angle Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lindsy M; Gu, Shi; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Doppler OCT (DOCT) can provide blood flow velocity information which is valuable for investigation of microvascular structure and function. However, DOCT is only sensitive to motion parallel with the imaging beam, so that knowledge of flow direction is needed for absolute velocity determination. Here, absolute volumetric flow is calculated by integrating velocity components perpendicular to the B-scan plane. These components are acquired using two illumination beams with a predetermined angular separation, produced by a delay encoded technique. This technology enables rapid pulsatile flow measurement from single B-scans without the need for 3-D volumetric data or knowledge of blood vessel orientation. PMID:24575344

  3. Study of laminar-turbulent flow transition under pulsatile conditions in a constricted channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Abul; Wang, Bing-Chen; Kuhn, David C. S.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, direct numerical simulation is performed to investigate a pulsatile flow in a constricted channel to gain physical insights into laminar-turbulent-laminar flow transitions. An in-house computer code is used to conduct numerical simulations based on available high-performance shared memory parallel computing facilities. The Womersley number tested is fixed to 10.5 and the Reynolds number varies from 500 to 2000. The influences of the degree of stenosis and pulsatile conditions on flow transitions and structures are investigated. In the region upstream of the stenosis, the flow pattern is primarily laminar. Immediately after the stenosis, the flow recirculates under an adverse streamwise pressure gradient, and the flow pattern transitions from laminar to turbulent. In the region far downstream of the stenosis, the flow becomes re-laminarised. The physical characteristics of the flow field have been thoroughly analysed in terms of the mean streamwise velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, viscous wall shear stresses, wall pressure and turbulence kinetic energy spectra.

  4. Numerical investigation of pulsatile flow in endovascular stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, A.; Piomelli, U.; Vlachos, P.

    2013-09-01

    The flow in a plane channel with two idealized stents (one Λ-shaped, the other X-shaped) is studied numerically. A periodic pressure gradient corresponding to one measured in the left anterior descending coronary artery was used to drive the flow. Two Reynolds numbers were examined, one (Re = 80) corresponding to resting conditions, the other (Re = 200) to exercise. The stents were implemented by an immersed boundary method. The formation and migration of vortices that had been observed experimentally was also seen here. In the previous studies, the compliance mismatch between stent and vessel was conjectured to be the reason for this phenomenon. However, in the present study we demonstrate that the vortices form despite the fact that the walls were rigid. Flow visualization and quantitative analysis lead us to conclude that this process is due to the stent wires that generate small localized recirculation regions that, when they interact with the near-wall flow reversal, result in the formation of these vortical structures. The recirculation regions grow and merge when the imposed waveform produces near-wall flow reversal, forming coherent quasi-spanwise vortices, that migrate away from the wall. The flow behavior due to the stents was compared with an unstented channel. The geometric characteristics of the Λ-stent caused less deviation of the flow from an unstented channel than the X-stent. Investigating the role of advection and diffusion indicated that at Re = 80 advection has negligible contribution in the transport mechanism. Advection plays a role in the generation of streamwise vortices created for both stents at both Reynolds numbers. The effect of these vortices on the near-wall flow behavior is more significant for the Λ-stent compared to the X-stent and at Re = 200 with respect to Re = 80. Finally, it was observed that increasing the Reynolds number leads to early vortex formation and the creation of the vortex in a stented channel is coincident with

  5. Analysis of pressure head-flow loops of pulsatile rotodynamic blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Silje E; Ochsner, Gregor; Shu, Fangjun; Amacher, Raffael; Antaki, James F; Vandenberghe, Stijn

    2014-04-01

    The clinical importance of pulsatility is a recurring topic of debate in mechanical circulatory support. Lack of pulsatility has been identified as a possible factor responsible for adverse events and has also demonstrated a role in myocardial perfusion and cardiac recovery. A commonly used method for restoring pulsatility with rotodynamic blood pumps (RBPs) is to modulate the speed profile, synchronized to the cardiac cycle. This introduces additional parameters that influence the (un)loading of the heart, including the timing (phase shift) between the native cardiac cycle and the pump pulses, and the amplitude of speed modulation. In this study, the impact of these parameters upon the heart-RBP interaction was examined in terms of the pressure head-flow (HQ) diagram. The measurements were conducted using a rotodynamic Deltastream DP2 pump in a validated hybrid mock circulation with baroreflex function. The pump was operated with a sinusoidal speed profile, synchronized to the native cardiac cycle. The simulated ventriculo-aortic cannulation showed that the level of (un)loading and the shape of the HQ loops strongly depend on the phase shift. The HQ loops displayed characteristic shapes depending on the phase shift. Increased contribution of native contraction (increased ventricular stroke work [WS ]) resulted in a broadening of the loops. It was found that the previously described linear relationship between WS and the area of the HQ loop for constant pump speeds becomes a family of linear relationships, whose slope depends on the phase shift. PMID:23889536

  6. A High Performance Pulsatile Pump for Aortic Flow Experiments in 3-Dimensional Models.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Rafeed A; Atlasman, Victor; Pathangey, Girish; Pracht, Nicholas; Adrian, Ronald J; Frakes, David H

    2016-06-01

    Aortic pathologies such as coarctation, dissection, and aneurysm represent a particularly emergent class of cardiovascular diseases. Computational simulations of aortic flows are growing increasingly important as tools for gaining understanding of these pathologies, as well as for planning their surgical repair. In vitro experiments are required to validate the simulations against real world data, and the experiments require a pulsatile flow pump system that can provide physiologic flow conditions characteristic of the aorta. We designed a newly capable piston-based pulsatile flow pump system that can generate high volume flow rates (850 mL/s), replicate physiologic waveforms, and pump high viscosity fluids against large impedances. The system is also compatible with a broad range of fluid types, and is operable in magnetic resonance imaging environments. Performance of the system was validated using image processing-based analysis of piston motion as well as particle image velocimetry. The new system represents a more capable pumping solution for aortic flow experiments than other available designs, and can be manufactured at a relatively low cost. PMID:26983961

  7. Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused with Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    The isolated, ventilated and instrumented mouse lung preparation allows steady and pulsatile pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships to be measured with independent control over pulmonary arterial flow rate, flow rate waveform, airway pressure and left atrial pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance is calculated based on multi-point, steady pressure-flow curves; pulmonary vascular impedance is calculated from pulsatile pressure-flow curves obtained at a range of frequencies. As now recognized clinically, impedance is a superior measure of right ventricular afterload than resistance because it includes the effects of vascular compliance, which are not negligible, especially in the pulmonary circulation. Three important metrics of impedance - the zero hertz impedance Z0, the characteristic impedance ZC, and the index of wave reflection RW - provide insight into distal arterial cross-sectional area available for flow, proximal arterial stiffness and the upstream-downstream impedance mismatch, respectively. All results obtained in isolated, ventilated and perfused lungs are independent of sympathetic nervous system tone, volume status and the effects of anesthesia. We have used this technique to quantify the impact of pulmonary emboli and chronic hypoxia on resistance and impedance, and to differentiate between sites of action (i.e., proximal vs. distal) of vasoactive agents and disease using the pressure dependency of ZC. Furthermore, when these techniques are used with the lungs of genetically engineered strains of mice, the effects of molecular-level defects on pulmonary vascular structure and function can be determined. PMID:21559007

  8. A nonlinear analysis of pulsatile flow in arteries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Atabek, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    An approximate numerical method for calculating flow profiles in arteries is developed. The theory takes into account the nonlinear terms of the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the nonlinear behaviour and large deformations of the arterial wall. Through the locally measured values of the pressure, pressure gradient, and pressure-radius function, the velocity distribution and wall shear at a given location along the artery can be determined. The computed results agree well with the corresponding experimental data.

  9. Time-resolved X-ray PIV measurements of hemodynamic information of real pulsatile blood flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    X-ray imaging technique has been used to visualize various bio-fluid flow phenomena as a nondestructive manner. To obtain hemodynamic information related with circulatory vascular diseases, a time-resolved X-ray PIV technique with high temporal resolution was developed. In this study, to embody actual pulsatile blood flows in a circular conduit without changes in hemorheological properties, a bypass loop is established by connecting a microtube between the jugular vein and femoral artery of a rat. Biocompatible CO2 microbubbles are used as tracer particles. After mixing with whole blood, CO2 microbubbles are injected into the bypass loop. Particle images of the pulsatile blood flows in the bypass loop are consecutively captured by the time-resolved X-ray PIV system. The velocity field information are obtained with varying flow rate and pulsataility. To verify the feasibility of the use of CO2 microbubbles under in vivo conditions, the effects of the surrounding-tissues are also investigated, because these effects are crucial for deteriorating the image contrast of CO2 microbubbles. Therefore, the velocity information of blood flows in the abdominal aorta are obtained to demonstrate the visibility and usefulness of CO2 microbubbles under ex vivo conditions. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  10. Cardiac-like flow generator for long-term imaging of endothelial cell responses to circulatory pulsatile flow at microscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaying; Cornwell, James; Zhang, Han; Lim, Tse; Resurreccion, Rena; Port, Timothy; Rosengarten, Gary; Nordon, Robert E

    2013-08-01

    In vitro models of circulatory hemodynamics are required to mimic the microcirculation for study of endothelial cell responses to pulsatile shear stress by live cell imaging. This study reports the design, fabrication and characterisation of a microfluidic device that generates cardiac-like flow in a continuous culture system with a circulatory volume of only 2-3 μL. The device mimics a single chamber heart, with the following cardiac phases: (1) closure of the ventricle inlet valve, (2) contraction of the ventricle (systole) followed by opening of the outlet valve and (3) relaxation of the ventricle (diastole) with opening of the inlet valve whilst the outlet valve remains closed. Periodic valve states and ventricular contractions were actuated by microprocessor controlled pneumatics. The time-dependent velocity-field was characterised by micro-particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV). μ-PIV observations were used to help tune electronic timing of valve states and ventricular contractions for synthesis of an arterial pulse waveform to study the effect of pulsatile shear stress on bovine artery endothelial cells (BAECs). BAECs elongated and aligned with the direction of shear stress after 48 h of exposure to a pulsatile waveform with a maximum shear stress of 0.42 Pa. The threshold for BAECs alignment and elongation under steady (non-pulsatile) flow reported by Kadohama et al. (2006) is 0.7-1.4 Pa. These cells respond to transient shear stress because the time average shear stress of the pulse waveform to generate this morphological response was only 0.09 Pa, well below the steady flow threshold. The microfluidic pulse generator can simulate circulatory hemodynamics for live cell imaging of shear-induced signalling pathways. PMID:23727941

  11. Pulsatile unsteady flow of blood through porous medium in a stenotic artery under the influence of transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Bansal, Kuldip; Bansal, Seema

    2012-09-01

    The periodic nature of the cardiac cycle induces a pulsatile, unsteady flow within the circulatory system. The pulsatile model of blood flow provides data to analyse the physiological situation in close proximity. The distribution of fatty cholesterol and artery-clogging blood clots in the lumen of the coronary artery is assumed as a porous medium. A mathematical model for pulsatile flow through an stenosed artery filled with porous medium in the presence of transverse static magnetic field has been formulated under the consideration of hematocrit dependent viscosity of blood that governed by Einstein equation. The velocity profile, volume flux, pressure gradient and wall shear stress are obtained and the effects of magnetic number, Darcy number, Womersely number are computed and represented through graphs.

  12. A computer controlled flow phantom for generation of physiological Doppler waveforms.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, P R; Anderson, T; McDicken, W N

    1989-11-01

    A flow phantom for the generation of physiological Doppler waveforms is described. The suspension of scattering particles is driven by a gear pump powered by a stepping motor. The speed of the stepping motor is controlled by a BBC microcomputer. The waveform shape is selected from a library of waveforms from disc. Use of the microcomputer allows the waveform shape and mean flow to be easily changed. Sephadex particles suspended in a solution of glycerol were used as artificial blood. Thin walled heat shrink tubing which had been moulded around metal rods was used. Distortions in the waveforms caused by reflections from the end of the tubing were largely removed by reducing the pipe diameter to half of its value for 30 cm from the end of the pipe. There was good agreement between the control waveforms and the Doppler waveforms over a wide range of waveform pulsatility. PMID:2479955

  13. The assignment of velocity profiles in finite element simulations of pulsatile flow in arteries.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, A; Boschetti, F; Inzoli, F

    1997-05-01

    In this paper we present a new method for the assignment of pulsatile velocity profiles as input boundary conditions in finite element models of arteries. The method is based on the implementation of the analytical solution for developed pulsatile flow in a rigid straight tube. The analytical solution provides the fluid dynamics of the region upstream from the fluid domain to be investigated by means of the finite element approach. In standard fluid dynamics finite element applications, the inlet developed velocity profiles are achieved assuming velocity boundary conditions to be easily implementable-such as flat or parabolic velocity profiles-applied to a straight tube of appropriate length. The tube is attached to the inflow section of the original fluid domain so that the flow can develop fully. The comparison between the analytical solution and the traditional numerical approach indicates that the analytical solution has some advantages over the numerical one. Moreover, the results suggest that subroutine employment allows a consistent reduction in solving time especially for complex fluid dynamic model, and significantly decreases the storage and memory requirements for computations. PMID:9215485

  14. Rationale, scope, and 20-year experience of vascular surgical training with lifelike pulsatile flow models.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Schmidli, Jürg; Schumacher, Hardy; Gürke, Lorenz; Klemm, Klaus; Duschek, Nikolaus; Meile, Toni; Assadian, Afshin

    2013-05-01

    Vascular surgical training currently has to cope with various challenges, including restrictions on work hours, significant reduction of open surgical training cases in many countries, an increasing diversity of open and endovascular procedures, and distinct expectations by trainees. Even more important, patients and the public no longer accept a "learning by doing" training philosophy that leaves the learning curve on the patient's side. The Vascular International (VI) Foundation and School aims to overcome these obstacles by training conventional vascular and endovascular techniques before they are applied on patients. To achieve largely realistic training conditions, lifelike pulsatile models with exchangeable synthetic arterial inlays were created to practice carotid endarterectomy and patch plasty, open abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, and peripheral bypass surgery, as well as for endovascular procedures, including endovascular aneurysm repair, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, peripheral balloon dilatation, and stenting. All models are equipped with a small pressure pump inside to create pulsatile flow conditions with variable peak pressures of ~90 mm Hg. The VI course schedule consists of a series of 2-hour modules teaching different open or endovascular procedures step-by-step in a standardized fashion. Trainees practice in pairs with continuous supervision and intensive advice provided by highly experienced vascular surgical trainers (trainer-to-trainee ratio is 1:4). Several evaluations of these courses show that tutor-assisted training on lifelike models in an educational-centered and motivated environment is associated with a significant increase of general and specific vascular surgical technical competence within a short period of time. Future studies should evaluate whether these benefits positively influence the future learning curve of vascular surgical trainees and clarify to what extent sophisticated models are useful to assess the level of

  15. Cyclic variation of ultrasonic backscattering from porcine whole blood under pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Hong

    1997-10-01

    The cyclic variation of ultrasonic backscattering from blood under pulsatile flow is believed to be related to the change of aggregation state of red cells and is only observed in whole blood. This study was to investigate the phenomenon by an invasive approach which was performed by inserting a 10 MHz catheter mounted transducer into a vessel. For ultrasonic measurement from blood, the most fundamental scheme is the hematocrit dependence. The backscatter maximum location was changed as the blood was stirred or stationary, as well as under steady laminar or turbulent flows. The same trend was also observed under pulsatile flow with 10% to 50% hematocrits in this study, as the backscattering to hematocrit curves were plotted at different times during a flow cycle. When the cyclic variation at 20 beats per minute (BPM) was interpreted in time domain, the enhanced aggregation at the beginning of shearing was observed. At 20 BPM with 40% hematocrit, the amplitude of cyclic variation was reduced when the shear rate was increased and the threshold of 150 s-1 was estimated. The results showed that there was no cyclic variation at 60 BPM. The backscattering was also plotted against the mean flow velocity, which demonstrated the hysteresis loops. The ultrasonic measurements showed that the relationship between the forward and backward paths of the loops were altered as beat rate, hematocrit, and shear rate were varied. Since the pulsatile flow was very complicated, a computational fluid dynamics package, FIDAPTM, was used to compute the shear rate based on the Power Law Model for non-Newtonian fluid viscosity. The non- Newtonian index and consistency in the model were computed from the viscosity to shear rate curves at 10% to 50% hematocrits measured by a cone-plate viscometer. For in vivo measurements, small pigs were used as models. Ultrasonic backscattering measurements were performed in the arteries and veins. The effect of stenosis was also investigated at the site

  16. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilm Formation Over A Separated Flow Region Under Steady And Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salek, M. Mehdi; Martinuzzi, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Several researchers have observed that the formation, morphology and susceptibility of bacterial biofilms are affected by the local hydrodynamic condition and, in particular, shear stresses acting on the fluid-biofilm interface. A backwards facing step (BFS) experimental model has been widely utilized as an in vitro model to examine and characterize the effect of flow separation and recirculation zones comparable to those present within various medical devices as well as those observed in vivo. The specific geometry of BFS covers a vide range of flow features observed in physiological or environmental conditions. The hypothesis of this study is that the flow behavior and structures can effectively contribute to the transport and attachment of cells and affecting the morphology of adhered colonies as well as suspended structures (i.e. biofilm streamers). Hence, the formation of the recirculation region occurring within a backward facing step (BFS) under steady and pulsatile conditions as well as three-dimensional flow structures arising close to the side walls are investigated to correlate to biofilms behavior. This hypothesis is investigated using a backward facing step incorporated into a flow cell under steady and pulsatile flow regimes to study the growth of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) UC18 as the study microorganism.

  17. Generating a Pulsatile Pulmonary Flow after Fontan Operation by Means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoreyshi, Mostafa

    2011-03-01

    This study considers blood flow in total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) morphology, which is created in Fontan surgical procedure in patients with single ventricle heart disease. Ordinary process of TCPC operation reduces pulmonary blood flow pulsatility; because of right ventricle being bypassed. This phenomenon causes a lot of side effects for patients. A cardiac surgeon has suggested that keeping main pulmonary artery (MPA) partially open, would increase pulmonary flow pulsations. MPA gets closed in ordinary TCPC operation. The purpose of current study is to verify the effects of keeping MPA partially open on pulmonary flow pulsations, by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). 3D geometry is reconstructed from CT Angiography (CTA) scan of a patient who has undergone an ordinary TCPC procedure. The stenosed MPA or pulmonary stenosis (PS) is virtually added to the original geometry. Flow field is studied in six different models in which average antegrade flow (AF) -coming through PS- increases gradually. Results show that adding AF increases flow pulsations in both pulmonary arteries. Moreover, power loss increases with respect to average AF. We conclude that adding AF is an impressive way to increase pulsations of pulmonary flow, but energy losses should be considered too.

  18. Numerical Study of Turbulent Pulsatile Blood Flow through Stenosed Artery Using Fluid-Solid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jahangiri, Mehdi; Saghafian, Mohsen; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent pulsatile blood flow through stenosed arteries considering the elastic property of the wall is investigated numerically. During the numerical model validation both standard k-ε model and RNG K-ε model are used. Compared with the RNG K-ε model, the standard K-ε model shows better agreement with previous experimental results and is better able to show the reverse flow region. Also, compared with experimental data, the results show that, up to 70% stenosis, the flow is laminar and for 80% stenosis the flow becomes turbulent. Assuming laminar or turbulent flow and also rigid or elastic walls, the results are compared with each other. The investigation of time-averaged shear stress and the oscillatory shear index for 80% stenosis show that assuming laminar flow will cause more error than assuming a rigid wall. The results also show that, in turbulent flow compared with laminar flow, the importance of assuming a flexible artery wall is more than assuming a rigid artery wall. PMID:26448782

  19. Numerical Study of Turbulent Pulsatile Blood Flow through Stenosed Artery Using Fluid-Solid Interaction.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Mehdi; Saghafian, Mohsen; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent pulsatile blood flow through stenosed arteries considering the elastic property of the wall is investigated numerically. During the numerical model validation both standard k-ε model and RNG K-ε model are used. Compared with the RNG K-ε model, the standard K-ε model shows better agreement with previous experimental results and is better able to show the reverse flow region. Also, compared with experimental data, the results show that, up to 70% stenosis, the flow is laminar and for 80% stenosis the flow becomes turbulent. Assuming laminar or turbulent flow and also rigid or elastic walls, the results are compared with each other. The investigation of time-averaged shear stress and the oscillatory shear index for 80% stenosis show that assuming laminar flow will cause more error than assuming a rigid wall. The results also show that, in turbulent flow compared with laminar flow, the importance of assuming a flexible artery wall is more than assuming a rigid artery wall. PMID:26448782

  20. Dynamical systems characterization of inertial effects of fluid flow in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggiero, Michael; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine inertial effects in a 180-degree model of curved arteries under pulsatile inflow conditions. Two-component, two-dimensional particle image velocimetery (2C-2D PIV) data were acquired upstream of and at several cross-sectional locations in the curved artery model. A blood-analog fluid comprised of 71% saturated sodium iodide solution, 28% glycerol and 1% distilled water (by volume) was subjected to multi-harmonic pulsatile inflow functions. First, signal time-lag was quantified by cross-correlating the input (voltage-time) supplied to a programmable pump and the output PIV (flow rate-time) measurements. The experiment was then treated as a linear, time-invariant system, and frequency response was estimated for phase shifts across a certain spectrum. Input-output signal dissimilarities were attributable to intrinsic inertial effects of flow. By coupling pressure-time and upstream flow rate-time measurements, the experiment was modeled using system identification methods. Results elucidate the role of inertial effects in fluid flow velocity measurements and the effect of these delays on secondary flow structure detection in a curved artery model. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  1. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was performed before and at 1, 2, and 3 hours after ECC commencement. To eliminate bias induced by hematocrit and plasma, all blood samples were adjusted to a hematocrit of 45% using baseline plasma. Blood viscoelasticity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, arterial blood gas analysis, central venous O2 saturation, and lactate were measured. Results The blood viscosity and aggregation index decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC and then remained low during ECC in both groups, but blood elasticity did not change during ECC. Blood viscosity, blood elasticity, plasma viscosity, and the aggregation index were not significantly different in the groups at any time. Hematocrit decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC in both groups due to dilution by the priming solution used. Conclusion After ECC, blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation were not different in the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups in the adult dog model. Furthermore, pulsatile flow did not have a more harmful effect on blood viscoelasticity or RBC aggregation than nonpulsatile flow. PMID:27298790

  2. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  3. On the Evolution of Pulsatile Flow Subject to a Transverse Impulse Body Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Labbio, Giuseppe; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-11-01

    In the event of an unexpected abrupt traffic stop or car accident, automotive passengers will experience an abrupt body deceleration. This may lead to tearing or dissection of the aortic wall known as Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR). BTAR is the second leading cause of death in automotive accidents and, although quite frequent, the mechanisms leading to BTAR are still not clearly identified, particularly the contribution of the flow field. As such, this work is intended to provide a fundamental framework for the investigation of the flow contribution to BTAR. In this fundamental study, pulsatile flow in a three-dimensional, straight pipe of circular cross-section is subjected to a unidirectional, transverse, impulse body force applied on a strictly bounded volume of fluid. These models were simulated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. The evolution of fluid field characteristics was investigated during and after the application of the force. The application of the force significantly modified the flow field. The force induces a transverse pressure gradient causing the development of secondary flow structures that dissipate the energy added by the acceleration. Once the force ceases to act, these structures are carried downstream and gradually dissipate their excess energy.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of a pulsatile flow in a coronary artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailon-Cuba, Jorge; Hayenga, Heather; Leonardi, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation of the blood flow in a coronary artery has been performed. A pulsatile, turbulent flow, inside a branchless, rigid cylindrical artery with non-slip conditions has been considered. The blood is assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. As a fundamental component of the coronary geometry, several cross-sectional shapes of the arterial lumen, as a function of the streamwise coordinate-z, are being included using the immersed boundary method, with a simple transversal wavy wall, as the most simple case. A preliminary set of simulations has being run, with two time varying flow rate functions. Results include flow velocities, pressure gradients and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution, and their comparison with other CFD and experimental results. In particular, WSS is important due to the significant role that it plays in the early formation of coronary artery disease (CAD). It has been found that waviness on the wall increases the instantaneous streamwise velocity, w (y) , and its fluctuations, (y) , and more drastically the WSS. The numerical simulations were performed on the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) under Grant No. CTS070066.

  5. Computational solution of the velocity and wall shear stress distribution inside a left carotid artery under pulsatile flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Nurullah; Turmuş, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is still one of the leading causes for death after heart diseases and cancer in all over the world. Strokes happen because an artery that carries blood uphill from the heart to the head is clogged. Most of the time, as with heart attacks, the problem is atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcified buildup of fatty deposits on the vessel wall. In this study, the fluid dynamic simulations were done in a left carotid bifurcation under the pulsatile flow conditions computationally. Pulsatile flow waveform is given in the paper. In vivo geometry and boundary conditions were obtained from a patient who has stenosis located at external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) of his common carotid artery (CCA). The location of critical flow fields such as low wall shear stress (WSS), stagnation regions and separation regions were detected near the highly stenosed region and at branching region.

  6. Computational study of pulsatile blood flow in prototype vessel geometries of coronary segments.

    PubMed

    Chaniotis, A K; Kaiktsis, L; Katritsis, D; Efstathopoulos, E; Pantos, I; Marmarellis, V

    2010-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of wall shear stress (WSS) in prototype vessel geometries of coronary segments are investigated via numerical simulation, and the potential association with vascular disease and specifically atherosclerosis and plaque rupture is discussed. In particular, simulation results of WSS spatio-temporal distributions are presented for pulsatile, non-Newtonian blood flow conditions for: (a) curved pipes with different curvatures, and (b) bifurcating pipes with different branching angles and flow division. The effects of non-Newtonian flow on WSS (compared to Newtonian flow) are found to be small at Reynolds numbers representative of blood flow in coronary arteries. Specific preferential sites of average low WSS (and likely atherogenesis) were found at the outer regions of the bifurcating branches just after the bifurcation, and at the outer-entry and inner-exit flow regions of the curved vessel segment. The drop in WSS was more dramatic at the bifurcating vessel sites (less than 5% of the pre-bifurcation value). These sites were also near rapid gradients of WSS changes in space and time - a fact that increases the risk of rupture of plaque likely to develop at these sites. The time variation of the WSS spatial distributions was very rapid around the start and end of the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle, when strong fluctuations of intravascular pressure were also observed. These rapid and strong changes of WSS and pressure coincide temporally with the greatest flexion and mechanical stresses induced in the vessel wall by myocardial motion (ventricular contraction). The combination of these factors may increase the risk of plaque rupture and thrombus formation at these sites. PMID:20400349

  7. Neurocognitive function in patients with ventricular assist devices: a comparison of pulsatile and continuous blood flow devices.

    PubMed

    Zimpfer, Daniel; Wieselthaler, Georg; Czerny, Martin; Fakin, Richard; Haider, Dominik; Zrunek, Philipp; Roethy, Wilfried; Schima, Heinz; Wolner, Ernst; Grimm, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The effect of successful ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation on neurocognitive function in terminal heart failure is uncertain. Additionally, the different impact of continuous versus pulsatile blood flow devices is unknown. A total of 29 patients (mean age 53 years), surviving implantation of a ventricular assist device as bridge to transplantation were prospectively followed (continuous flow: Micromed DeBakey, n = 11; pulsatile flow: Thoratec and Novacor, n = 18). Normative data were obtained in 40 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (mean age 54 years). Neurocognitive function was objectively measured by means of cognitive P300 auditory evoked potentials before operation (baseline), at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, and at the 8-week and 12-week follow-up. Before implantation of the VAD, cognitive P300 evoked potentials were impaired (prolonged) compared with age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (p < 0.001). After successful VAD implantation, P300 evoked potentials markedly improved compared with before operation (ICU discharge, p = 0.007; 8-week follow-up, p = 0.022; 12-week follow-up, p < 0.0001). Importantly, there was no difference between continuous and pulsatile VADs (before operation, p = 0.676; ICU discharge, p = 0.736; 8-week follow-up, p = 0.911 and 12-week follow-up, p = 0.397; respectively). Nevertheless, P300 peak latencies did not fully normalize at 12-week follow-up compared with healthy subjects (p = 0.012). Successful VAD implantation improves neurocognitive impairment in patients with terminal heart failure. Importantly, this effect is independent of the type of VAD (pulsatile vs. continuous blood flow). PMID:16436886

  8. Mass Transfer in a Rigid Tube With Pulsatile Flow and Constant Wall Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Moschandreou, T. E.; Ellis, C. G.; Goldman, D.

    2011-01-01

    An approximate-analytical solution method is presented for the problem of mass transfer in a rigid tube with pulsatile flow. For the case of constant wall concentration, it is shown that the generalized integral transform (GIT) method can be used to obtain a solution in terms of a perturbation expansion, where the coefficients of each term are given by a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Truncating the system at some large value of the parameter N, an approximate solution for the system is obtained for the first term in the perturbation expansion, and the GIT-based solution is verified by comparison to a numerical solution. The GIT approximate-analytical solution indicates that for small to moderate nondimensional frequencies for any distance from the inlet of the tube, there is a positive peak in the bulk concentration C1b due to pulsation, thereby, producing a higher mass transfer mixing efficiency in the tube. As we further increase the frequency, the positive peak is followed by a negative peak in the time-averaged bulk concentration and then the bulk concentration C1b oscillates and dampens to zero. Initially, for small frequencies the relative Sherwood number is negative indicating that the effect of pulsation tends to reduce mass transfer. There is a band of frequencies, where the relative Sherwood number is positive indicating that the effect of pulsation tends to increase mass transfer. The positive peak in bulk concentration corresponds to a matching of the phase of the pulsatile velocity and the concentration, respectively, where the unique maximum of both occur for certain time in the cycle. The oscillatory component of concentration is also determined radially in the tube where the concentration develops first near the wall of the tube, and the lobes of the concentration curves increase with increasing distance downstream until the concentration becomes fully developed. The GIT method proves to be a working approach to solve the first

  9. Osteoblasts respond to pulsatile fluid flow with short-term increases in PGE(2) but no change in mineralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nauman, E. A.; Satcher, R. L.; Keaveny, T. M.; Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    Although there is no consensus as to the precise nature of the mechanostimulatory signals imparted to the bone cells during remodeling, it has been postulated that deformation-induced fluid flow plays a role in the mechanotransduction pathway. In vitro, osteoblasts respond to fluid shear stress with an increase in PGE(2) production; however, the long-term effects of fluid shear stress on cell proliferation and differentiation have not been examined. The goal of this study was to apply continuous pulsatile fluid shear stresses to osteoblasts and determine whether the initial production of PGE(2) is associated with long-term biochemical changes. The acute response of bone cells to a pulsatile fluid shear stress (0.6 +/- 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) was characterized by a transient fourfold increase in PGE(2) production. After 7 days of static culture (0 dyn/cm(2)) or low (0.06 +/- 0.05 Pa, 0.3 Hz) or high (0.6 +/- 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) levels of pulsatile fluid shear stress, the bone cells responded with an 83% average increase in cell number, but no statistical difference (P > 0.53) between the groups was observed. Alkaline phosphatase activity per cell decreased in the static cultures but not in the low- or high-flow groups. Mineralization was also unaffected by the different levels of applied shear stress. Our results indicate that short-term changes in PGE(2) levels caused by pulsatile fluid flow are not associated with long-term changes in proliferation or mineralization of bone cells.

  10. Expansion of bubbles under a pulsatile flow regime in decompressed ovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Marmur, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    After decompression of ovine large blood vessels, bubbles nucleate and expand at active hydrophobic spots on their luminal aspect. These bubbles will be in the path of the blood flow within the vessel, which might replenish the supply of gas-supersaturated plasma in their vicinity and thus, in contrast with our previous estimations, enhance their growth. We used the data from our previous study on the effect of pulsatile flow in ovine blood vessels stretched on microscope slides and photographed after decompression from hyperbaric exposure. We measured the diameter of 46 bubbles in 4 samples taken from 3 blood vessels (pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and aorta) in which both a "multi-bubble active spot" (MBAS)--which produces several bubbles at a time, and at least one "single-bubble active spot" (SBAS)--which produces a single bubble at a time, were seen together. The linear expansion rate for diameter in SBAS ranged from 0.077 to 0.498 mm/min and in MBAS from 0.001 to 0.332 mm/min. There was a trend toward a reduced expansion rate for bubbles in MBAS compared with SBAS. The expansion rate for bubbles in an MBAS when it was surrounded by others was very low. Bubble growth is related to gas tension, and under a flow regime, bubbles expand from a diameter of 0.1 to 1mm in 2-24 min at a gas supersaturation of 620 kPa and lower. There are two phases of bubble development. The slow and disperse initiation of active spots (from nanobubbles to gas micronuclei) continues for more than 1h, whereas the fast increase in size (2-24 min) is governed by diffusion. Bubble-based decompression models should not artificially reduce diffusion constants, but rather take both phases of bubble development into consideration. PMID:26592146

  11. The occurrence of the Coanda effect in pulsatile flow through static models of the human vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Erath, Byron D; Plesniak, Michael W

    2006-08-01

    Pulsatile flow through a one-sided diffuser and static divergent vocal-fold models is investigated to ascertain the relevance of viscous-driven flow asymmetries in the larynx. The models were 7.5 times real size, and the flow was scaled to match Reynolds and Strouhal numbers, as well as the translaryngeal pressure drop. The Reynolds number varied from 0-2000, for flow oscillation frequencies corresponding to 100 and 150 Hz life-size. Of particular interest was the development of glottal flow skewing by attachment to the bounding walls, or Coanda effect, in a pulsatile flow field, and its impact on speech. The vocal folds form a divergent passage during phases of the phonation cycle when viscous effects such as flow separation are important. It was found that for divergence angles of less than 20 degrees, the attachment of the flow to the vocal-fold walls occurred when the acceleration of the forcing function was zero, and the flow had reached maximum velocity. For a divergence angle of 40 degrees, the fully separated central jet never attached to the vocal-fold walls. Inferences are made regarding the impact of the Coanda effect on the sound source contribution in speech. PMID:16938987

  12. Effect of acute high-intensity resistance exercise on optic nerve sheath diameter and ophthalmic artery blood flow pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, W K; Hughes, W E; Heffernan, K S

    2015-12-01

    Exertional hypertension associated with acute high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) increases both intravascular and intracranial pressure (ICP), maintaining cerebrovascular transmural pressure. Carotid intravascular pressure pulsatility remains elevated after RE. Whether ICP also remains elevated after acute RE in an attempt to maintain the vessel wall transmural pressure is unknown. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), a valid proxy of ICP, was measured in 20 participants (6 female; 24 ± 4 yr, 24.2 ± 3.9 kg m(-)(2)) at rest (baseline), following a time-control condition, and following RE (5 sets, 5 repetition maximum bench press, 5 sets 10 repetition maximum biceps curls) using ultrasound. Additionally, intracranial hemodynamic pulsatility index (PI) was assessed in the ophthalmic artery (OA) by using Doppler. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was obtained from synthesized aortic pressure waveforms obtained via a brachial oscillometric cuff and carotid pulse pressure was measured by using applanation tonometry. Aortic PWV (5.2 ± 0.5-6.0 ± 0.7 m s(-1), P < 0.05) and carotid pulse pressure (45 ± 17-59 ± 19 mm Hg, P < 0.05) were significantly elevated post RE compared with baseline. There were no significant changes in ONSD (5.09 ± 0.7-5.09 ± 0.7 mm, P > 0.05) or OA flow PI (1.35 ± 0.2-1.38 ± 0.3, P > 0.05) following acute RE. In conclusion, during recovery from acute high-intensity RE, there are increases in aortic stiffness and extracranial pressure pulsatility in the absence of changes in ICP and flow pulsatility. These findings may have implications for alterations in cerebral transmural pressure and cerebral aneurysmal wall stress following RE. PMID:25739332

  13. Pulsatile flow in the aorta of the LVAD supported heart studied using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyedi, Zahra

    Currently many patients die because of the end-stage heart failure, mainly due to the reduced number of donor heart transplant organs. Studies show that a permanent left ventricular assist device (LVAD), a battery driven pump which is surgically implanted, increased the survival rate of patients with end-stage heart failure and improved considerably their quality of life. The inlet conduit of the LVAD is attached to the left ventricle and the outflow conduit anastomosed to the ascending aorta. The purpose of LVAD support is to help a weakened heart to pump blood to the rest of the body. However LVAD can cause some alterations of the natural blood flow. When your blood comes in contact with something that isn't a natural part of your body blood clots can occur and disrupt blood flow. Aortic valve integrity is vital for optimal support of left ventricular assist LVAD. Due to the existence of high continuous transvalvular pressure on the aortic valve, the opening frequency of the valve is reduced. To prevent the development of aortic insufficiency, aortic valve closure during LVAD implantation has been performed. However, the closed aortic valve reduces wash out of the aortic root, which causes blood stagnation and potential thrombus formation. So for this reason, there is a need to minimize the risks of occurring blood clot, by having more knowledge about the flow structure in the aorta during LVAD use. The current study focuses on measuring the flow field in the aorta of the LVAD assisted heart with two different types of aortic valve (Flat and Finned) using the SDSU cardiac simulator. The pulsatile pump that mimics the natural pulsing action of the heart also added to the system. The flow field is visualized using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Furthermore, The fluid mechanics of aorta has been studied when LVAD conduit attached to two different locations (proximal and distal to the aortic valve) with pump speeds of 8,000 to 10,000 revolutions per minute (RPM

  14. Basic study of intrinsic elastography: Relationship between tissue stiffness and propagation velocity of deformation induced by pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed an estimation method for a tissue stiffness from deformations induced by arterial pulsation, and named this proposed method intrinsic elastography (IE). In IE, assuming that the velocity of the deformation propagation in tissues is closely related to the stiffness, the propagation velocity (PV) was estimated by spatial compound ultrasound imaging with a high temporal resolution of 1 ms. However, the relationship between tissue stiffness and PV has not been revealed yet. In this study, the PV of the deformation induced by the pulsatile pump was measured by IE in three different poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) phantoms of different stiffnesses. The measured PV was compared with the shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by shear wave imaging (SWI). The measured PV has trends similar to the measured SWV. These results obtained by IE in a healthy male show the possibility that the mechanical properties of living tissues could be evaluated by IE.

  15. Pulsatile ocular blood flow in asymmetric exudative age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S.; Cheng, C.; Lee, A.; Lee, F.; Chou, J. C.; Hsu, W.; Liu, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Decreased perfusion or increased vascular resistance of the choroidal vessels had been proposed as the vascular pathogenesis for age related macular degeneration (AMD). This study planned to answer the question whether pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) was different in patients with asymmetric exudative AMD between eyes with drusen, choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), or disciform scar.
METHODS—37 patients with asymmetric exudative AMD were enrolled in this observational case series study. POBF were measured in both eyes of each subject. Eyes with high myopia, anisometropia, recent laser treatment, and glaucoma were excluded.
RESULTS—After adjusting for ocular perfusion pressure, intraocular pressure, and pulse rate, multivariate regression analysis with generalised estimating equation showed POBF was significantly higher in eyes with CNV (1217 (SD 476) µl/min) than the contralateral eyes with drusen (1028 (385) µl/min) (p = 0.024). Eyes with disciform scar had lower POBF than the contralateral eyes with drusen (999 (262) µl/min and 1278 (341) µl/min, respectively, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between the POBF and the lesion size of the CNV.
CONCLUSION—The POBF in eyes with drusen was lower than their fellow eyes with CNV, but higher than their fellow eyes with disciform scar. This finding suggests that haemodynamic differences between fellow eyes in individuals are relevant to the development of CNV and the formation of disciform scar. Further studies on the follow up patients might shed light on the pathogenesis of exudative AMD.

 PMID:11734510

  16. Simultaneous assessment of red blood cell aggregation and oxygen saturation under pulsatile flow using high-frequency photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of photoacoustic (PA) imaging for assessing the correlation between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and the oxygen saturation (sO2) in a simulated pulsatile blood flow system. For the 750 and 850 nm illuminations, the PA amplitude (PAA) increased and decreased as the mean blood flow velocity decreased and increased, respectively, at all beat rates (60, 120 and 180 bpm). The sO2 also cyclically varied, in phase with the PAA for all beat rates. However, the linear correlation between the sO2 and the PAA at 850 nm was stronger than that at 750 nm. These results suggest that the sO2 can be correlated with RBC aggregation induced by decreased mean shear rate in pulsatile flow, and that the correlation is dependent on the optical wavelength. The hemodynamic properties of blood flow assessed by PA imaging may be used to provide a new biomarker for simultaneous monitoring blood viscosity related to RBC aggregation, oxygen delivery related to the sO2 and their clinical correlation. PMID:27446705

  17. Simultaneous assessment of red blood cell aggregation and oxygen saturation under pulsatile flow using high-frequency photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of photoacoustic (PA) imaging for assessing the correlation between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and the oxygen saturation (sO2) in a simulated pulsatile blood flow system. For the 750 and 850 nm illuminations, the PA amplitude (PAA) increased and decreased as the mean blood flow velocity decreased and increased, respectively, at all beat rates (60, 120 and 180 bpm). The sO2 also cyclically varied, in phase with the PAA for all beat rates. However, the linear correlation between the sO2 and the PAA at 850 nm was stronger than that at 750 nm. These results suggest that the sO2 can be correlated with RBC aggregation induced by decreased mean shear rate in pulsatile flow, and that the correlation is dependent on the optical wavelength. The hemodynamic properties of blood flow assessed by PA imaging may be used to provide a new biomarker for simultaneous monitoring blood viscosity related to RBC aggregation, oxygen delivery related to the sO2 and their clinical correlation. PMID:27446705

  18. Acute Biventricular Interaction in Pediatric Patients Implanted with Continuous Flow and Pulsatile Flow LVAD: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Di Molfetta, Arianna; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Iacobelli, Roberta; Fresiello, Libera; Pilati, Mara; Toscano, Alessandra; Filippelli, Sergio; Morelli, Stefano; Amodeo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used to bridge pediatric patients till transplantation. However, the LVADs effects on right ventricular (RV) function are controversial. This work aims at studying the ventricular interdependency in the presence of continuous (c-) and pulsatile (p-) flow LVAD in pediatric patients using a lumped parameter model including the representation of the septum. Five pediatric patients' data were used to simulate patients' baseline. The effects on LV and RV functions, energetics, preloads and afterloads of different c-LVAD speeds, p-LVAD rate, p-LVAD systole duration, p-LVAD filling and ejection pressures were simulated. c-LVAD and p-LVAD unload the LV decreasing the LV external work and improving the LV ventriculo-arterial coupling and these effects are more evident increasing the c-LVAD speed and the p-LVAD rate. Continuous-LVAD and p-LVAD decrease the RV afterload, increase the RV ejection fraction and improve the RV ventriculo-arterial coupling. The changes in RV function are inversely proportional to the degree of the interventricular septum leftward shift that increased by increasing the LVAD contribution. The study of the interventricular interaction could lead to the development of a dedicated algorithm to optimize LVAD setting in pediatric population. PMID:27258223

  19. Optical Imaging of Flow Pattern and Phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galland, Pierre A.; Liang, X.; Wang, L.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.; Breisacher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved optical imaging technique has been used to image the spatial distribution of small droplets and jet sprays in a highly scattering environment. The snake and ballistic components of the transmitted pulse are less scattered, and contain direct information about the sample to facilitate image formation as opposed to the diffusive components which are due to multiple collisions as a light pulse propagates through a scattering medium. In a time-gated imaging scheme, these early-arriving, image-bearing components of the incident pulse are selected by opening a gate for an ultrashort period of time and a shadowgram image is detected. Using a single shot cooled CCD camera system, the formation of water droplets is monitored as a function of time. Picosecond time-gated image of drop in scattering cells, spray droplets as a function of let speed and gas pressure, and model calcification samples consisted of calcium carbonate particles of irregular shapes ranging in size from 0. 1 to 1.5 mm affixed to a microscope slide have been measured. Formation produced by an impinging jet will be further monitored using a CCD with 1 kHz framing illuminated with pulsed light. The desired image resolution of the fuel droplets is on the 20 pm scale using early light through a highly scattering medium. A 10(exp -6)m displacement from a jet spray with a flow speed of 100 m/sec introduced by the ns grating pulse used in the imaging is negligible. Early ballistic/snake light imaging offers nondestructive and noninvasive method to observe the spatial distribution of hidden objects inside a highly scattering environment for space, biomedical, and materials applications. In this paper, the techniques we will present are time-resolved K-F transillumination imaging and time-gated scattered light imaging. With a large dynamic range and high resolution, time-gated early light imaging has the potential for improving rocket/aircraft design by determining jets shape and particle sizes

  20. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  1. An efficient approach to study the pulsatile blood flow in femoral and coronary arteries by Differential Quadrature Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Seiyed E.; Hatami, M.; Hatami, J.; Sahebi, S. A. R.; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, flow analysis for a non-Newtonian third grade blood in coronary and femoral arteries is simulated numerically. Blood is considered as the third grade non-Newtonian fluid under periodic body acceleration motion and pulsatile pressure gradient. Differential Quadrature Method (DQM) and Crank Nicholson Method (CNM) are used to solve the Partial Differential Equation (PDE) governing equation by which a good agreement between them was observed in the results. The influences of some physical parameters such as amplitude, lead angle and body acceleration frequency on non-dimensional velocity and profiles are considered. For instance, the results show that increasing the amplitude, Ag, and reducing the lead angle of body acceleration, ϕ, make higher velocity profiles in the center line of both arteries.

  2. Effects of frictional losses and pulsatile flow on the collapse of stenotic arteries.

    PubMed

    Downing, J M; Ku, D N

    1997-08-01

    High-grade stenosis can produce conditions in which the artery may collapse. A one-dimensional numerical model of a compliant stenosis was developed from the collapsible tube theory of Shapiro. The model extends an earlier model by including the effects of frictional losses and unsteadiness. The model was used to investigate the relative importance of several physical parameters present in the in vivo environment. The results indicated that collapse can occur within the stenosis. Frictional loss was influential in reducing the magnitude of collapse. Large separation losses could prevent collapse outright even with low downstream resistances. However, the degree of stenosis was still the primary parameter governing the onset of collapse. Pulsatile solutions demonstrated conditions that produce cyclic collapse within the stenosis. This study predicts certain physiologic conditions in which collapse of arteries may occur for high-grade stenoses. PMID:9285345

  3. Non-Newtonian perspectives on pulsatile blood-analog flows in a 180° curved artery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Stevin; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Fuchs, Laszlo; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-07-01

    Complex, unsteady fluid flow phenomena in the arteries arise due to the pulsations of the heart that intermittently pumps the blood to the extremities of the body. The many different flow waveform variations observed throughout the arterial network are a result of this process and a function of the vessel properties. Large scale secondary flow structures are generated throughout the aortic arch and larger branches of the arteries. An experimental 180° curved artery test section with physiological inflow conditions was used to validate the computational methods implemented in this study. Good agreement of the secondary flow structures is obtained between experimental and numerical studies of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid under steady-state and pulsatile, carotid artery flow rate waveforms. Multiple vortical structures, some of opposite rotational sense to Dean vortices, similar to Lyne-type vortices, were observed to form during the systolic portion of the pulse. Computational tools were used to assess the effect of blood-analog fluid rheology (i.e., Newtonian versus non-Newtonian). It is demonstrated that non-Newtonian, blood-analog fluid rheology results in shear layer instabilities that alter the formation of vortical structures during the systolic deceleration and onwards during diastole. Additional vortices not observed in the Newtonian cases appear at the inside and outside of the bend at various times during the pulsation. The influence of blood-analog shear-thinning viscosity decreases mean pressure losses in contrast to the Newtonian blood analog fluid.

  4. Pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous blood vessels using a third grade non-Newtonian fluids model.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration and a periodic pressure gradient are numerically simulated. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid. Besides the numerical solution, for small Womersley parameter (such as blood flow through arterioles and capillaries), the analytical perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear governing equations. Consequently, analytical expressions for the velocity profile, wall shear stress, and blood flow rate are obtained. Excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical predictions is evident. Also, the effects of body acceleration, magnetic field, third-grade non-Newtonian parameter, pressure gradient, and porosity on the flow behaviors are examined. Some important conclusions are that, when the Womersley parameter is low, viscous forces tend to dominate the flow, velocity profiles are parabolic in shape, and the center-line velocity oscillates in phase with the driving pressure gradient. In addition, by increasing the pressure gradient, the mean value of the velocity profile increases and the amplitude of the velocity remains constant. Also, when non-Newtonian effect increases, the amplitude of the velocity profile. PMID:26792174

  5. High-frequency photoacoustic imaging of erythrocyte aggregation and oxygen saturation: probing hemodynamic relations under pulsatile blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of high-frequency photoacoustic (PA) imaging to study the shear rate dependent relationship between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and oxygen saturation (SO2) in a simulated blood flow system. The PA signal amplitude increased during the formation of aggregates and cyclically varied at intervals corresponding to the beat rate (30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 bpm) for all optical wavelengths of illumination (750 and 850 nm).The SO2 also cyclically varied in phase with the PA signal amplitude for all beat rates. In addition, the mean blood flow velocity cyclically varied at the same interval of beat rate, and the shear rate (i.e. the radial gradient of flow velocity) also cyclically varied. On the other hand, the phase of the cyclic variation in the shear rate was reversed compared to that in the PA signal amplitude. This study indicates that RBC aggregation induced by periodic changes in the shear rate can be correlated with the SO2 under pulsatile blood flow. Furthermore, PA imaging of flowing blood may be capable of providing a new biomarker for the clinical application in terms of monitoring blood viscosity, oxygen delivery and their correlation.

  6. Flow visualization of three-dimensionality inside the 12 cc Penn State pulsatile pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Roszelle, Breigh N; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B

    2010-02-01

    In order to aid the ongoing concern of limited organ availability for pediatric heart transplants, Penn State has continued development of a pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device (PVAD). Initial studies of the PVAD observed an increase in thrombus formation due to differences in flow field physics when compared to adult sized devices, which included a higher degree of three-dimensionality. This unique flow field brings into question the use of 2D planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) as a flow visualization technique, however the small size and high curvature of the PVAD make other tools such as stereoscopic PIV impractical. In order to test the reliability of the 2D results, we perform a pseudo-3D PIV study using planes both parallel and normal to the diaphragm employing a mock circulatory loop containing a viscoelastic fluid that mimics 40% hematocrit blood. We find that while the third component of velocity is extremely helpful to a physical understanding of the flow, particularly of the diastolic jet and the development of a desired rotational pattern, the flow data taken parallel to the diaphragm is sufficient to describe the wall shear rates, a critical aspect to the study of thrombosis and design of such pumps. PMID:19936926

  7. AN INNOVATIVE, SENSORLESS, PULSATILE, CONTINUOUS-FLOW TOTAL ARTIFICIAL HEART: DEVICE DESIGN AND INITIAL IN VITRO STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Horvath, David J.; Massiello, Alex L.; Fumoto, Hideyuki; Horai, Tetsuya; Rao, Santosh; Golding, Leonard A. R.

    2009-01-01

    Background We are developing a very small, innovative, continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) that passively self-balances left and right pump flows and atrial pressures without sensors. This report details the CFTAH design concept and our initial in vitro data. Methods System performance of the CFTAH was evaluated using a mock circulatory loop to determine the range of systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances (SVR and PVR) over which the design goal of a maximum absolute atrial pressure difference of 10 mm Hg is achieved for a steady-state flow condition. Pump speed was then modulated at 2,600 ± 900 rpm to induce flow and arterial pressure pulsation to evaluate the effects of speed pulsations on the system performance. An automatic control mode was also evaluated. Results Using only passive self-regulation, pump flows were balanced and absolute atrial pressure differences were maintained below 10 mm Hg over a range of SVR (750-2,750 dyne·sec·cm-5) and PVR (135-600 dyne·sec·cm-5) values far exceeding normal levels. The magnitude of induced speed pulsatility affected relative left/right performance, allowing for an additional active control to improve balanced flow and pressure. The automatic control mode adjusted pump speed to achieve targeted pump flows based on sensorless calculations of SVR and CFTAH flow. Conclusions The initial in vitro testing of the CFTAH with a single, valveless, continuous-flow pump demonstrated its passive self-regulation of flows and atrial pressures and a new automatic control mode. PMID:19782599

  8. A fluid--structure interaction finite element analysis of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant stenotic artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathe, M.; Kamm, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    A new model is used to analyze the fully coupled problem of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant, axisymmetric stenotic artery using the finite element method. The model uses large displacement and large strain theory for the solid, and the full Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid. The effect of increasing area reduction on fluid dynamic and structural stresses is presented. Results show that pressure drop, peak wall shear stress, and maximum principal stress in the lesion all increase dramatically as the area reduction in the stenosis is increased from 51 to 89 percent. Further reductions in stenosis cross-sectional area, however, produce relatively little additional change in these parameters due to a concomitant reduction in flow rate caused by the losses in the constriction. Inner wall hoop stretch amplitude just distal to the stenosis also increases with increasing stenosis severity, as downstream pressures are reduced to a physiological minimum. The contraction of the artery distal to the stenosis generates a significant compressive stress on the downstream shoulder of the lesion. Dynamic narrowing of the stenosis is also seen, further augmenting area constriction at times of peak flow. Pressure drop results are found to compare well to an experimentally based theoretical curve, despite the assumption of laminar flow.

  9. Fluid Dynamic Characterization of a Polymeric Heart Valve Prototype (Poli-Valve) tested under Continuous and Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    De Gaetano, Francesco; Serrani, Marta; Bagnoli, Paola; Brubert, Jacob; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D.; Costantino, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Only mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses are currently commercially available. The former show longer durability but require anticoagulant therapy, the latter display better fluid dynamic behaviour but do not have adequate durability. New Polymeric Heart Valves (PHVs) could potentially combine the haemodynamic properties of biological valves with the durability of mechanical valves. This work presents a hydrodynamic evaluation of two groups of newly developed supra-annular tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valves made from styrenic block copolymers (SBC): Poli-Valves. Methods Two types of Poli-Valves made of SBC differing in polystyrene fraction content were tested under continuous and pulsatile flow conditions as prescribed by ISO 5840 Standard. An ad - hoc designed pulse duplicator allowed the valve prototypes to be tested at different flow rates and frequencies. Pressure and flow were recorded; pressure drops, effective orifice area (EOA), and regurgitant volume were computed to assess the valve’s behaviour. Results Both types Poli-Valves met the minimum requirements in terms of regurgitation and EOA as specified by ISO 5840 Standard. Results were compared with five mechanical heart valves (MHVs) and five tissue heart valves (THVs), currently available on the market. Conclusion Based on these results, polymeric heart valves based on styrenic block copolymers, as Poli-Valves are, can be considered as promising alternative for heart valve replacement in near future. PMID:26689146

  10. Application of double-layered skin phantoms for optical flow imaging during laser tattoo treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong-il; Song, Woosub; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    The feasible application of double-layered skin phantoms was evaluated to identify artificial blood flow with a Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) system for laser tattoo treatments. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used to fabricate the artificial phantoms with flow channels embedded. A double-integrating sphere system with an inverse adding-doubling method quantified both the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients for epidermis and dermis phantoms. Both OCT and caliper measurements confirmed the double-layered phantom structure (epidermis = 136 ± 17 µm vs. dermis = 3.0 ± 0.1 mm). The DOCT method demonstrated that high flow rates were associated with high image contrast, visualizing the position and the shape of the flow channel. Application of the channel-embedded skin phantoms in conjunction with DOCT can be a reliable technique to assess dynamic variations in the blood flow during and after laser tattoo treatments.

  11. Development of a xenon/computed tomography cerebral blood flow quality assurance phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Good, W.F.; Gur, D.; Herron, J.M.; Kennedy, W.H.

    1987-09-01

    A simple, easy to use, quality assurance and performance test phantom was developed for the xenon/computed tomography (CT) cerebral blood flow method. The phantom combines an inhalation system which allows for the simulation of xenon buildup or washout in the arterial blood as well as a multisection translatable cylinder in which several sections can be scanned during a preselected protocol to simulate the CT enhancement in brain tissue during a study. The phantom and scanning protocol are described and their use is demonstrated. The results compare favorably to the theoretically expected fast, intermediate, and slow flow values designed into the phantom.

  12. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yunker, Bryan E. Lanning, Craig J.; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S.; Chen, S. James

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms.

  13. Investigation of the effects of dynamic change in curvature and torsion on pulsatile flow in a helical tube.

    PubMed

    Selvarasu, N K C; Tafti, Danesh K

    2012-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death in the world, making the understanding of hemodynamics and the development of treatment options imperative. The effect of motion of the coronary artery due to the motion of the myocardium is not extensively studied. In this work, we focus our investigation on the localized hemodynamic effects of dynamic changes in curvature and torsion. It is our objective to understand and reveal the mechanism by which changes in curvature and torsion contribute towards the observed wall shear stress distribution. Such adverse hemodynamic conditions could have an effect on circumferential intimal thickening. Three-dimensional spatiotemporally resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of pulsatile flow with moving wall boundaries were carried out for a simplified coronary artery with physiologically relevant flow parameters. A model with stationary walls is used as the baseline control case. In order to study the effect of curvature and torsion variation on local hemodynamics, this baseline model is compared to models where the curvature, torsion, and both curvature and torsion change. The simulations provided detailed information regarding the secondary flow dynamics. The results suggest that changes in curvature and torsion cause critical changes in local hemodynamics, namely, altering the local pressure and velocity gradients and secondary flow patterns. The wall shear stress (WSS) varies by a maximum of 22% when the curvature changes, by 3% when the torsion changes, and by 26% when both the curvature and torsion change. The oscillatory shear stress (OSI) varies by a maximum of 24% when the curvature changes, by 4% when the torsion changes, and by 28% when both the curvature and torsion change. We demonstrate that these changes are attributed to the physical mechanism associating the secondary flow patterns to the production of vorticity (vorticity flux) due to the wall movement. The secondary flow patterns

  14. The "black hole" phenomenon in ultrasonic backscattering measurement under pulsatile flow with porcine whole blood in a rigid tube.

    PubMed

    Cao, P J; Paeng, D G; Shung, K K

    2001-01-01

    The "black hole" phenomenon was further investigated with porcine whole blood under pulsatile flow conditions in a straight rigid tube 120 cm long and of 0.95 cm diameter. A modified Aloka 280 commercial scanner with a 7.5 MHz linear array was used to collect the radio frequency (RF) signal of backscattering echoes from the blood inside the tube. The transducer was located downstream from the entrance and parallel to the longitudinal direction of the tube. The experimental results showed that higher hematocrits enhanced the black hole phenomenon, leading to a more apparent and larger diameter black hole. The black hole was not apparent at hematocrits below 23%. The highest hematocrit used in the experiment was 60%. Beat rates of 20, 40 and 60 beats per minute (bpm) were used, and the black hole became weaker in amplitude and smaller in diameter when the peak flow velocity was increased at each beat rate. These results are consistent with the suggestion in previous work that the black hole arises from insufficient aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) at the center of the tube because of the low shear rate. At 20 and 40 bpm, the peak flow velocity ranges were 10 approximately 25 cm/s and 18 approximately 27 cm/s, respectively. The black hole was very clear at the minimal peak flow velocity but almost disappeared at the maximal velocities for each beat rate. At 60 bpm, experiments were only performed at one peak flow velocity of 31 cm/s and the black hole was clear. The results showed that the black hole was more pronounced at higher beat rates when the peak velocity was the same. This phenomenon cannot be explained by previous hypotheses. Acceleration seems to be the only flow parameter that varies at different beat rates when peak velocities are the same. Therefore, the influence of acceleration on the structural organization and orientation of RBC rouleaux might be another factor involved in the formation of the black hole in addition to the shear rate. As the

  15. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  16. Numerical simulation of MHD pulsatile flow of a biofluid in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Kashif; Ahmad, Shahzad; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to numerically study the interaction of an external magnetic field with the flow of a biofluid through a Darcy-Forchhmeir porous channel, due to an oscillatory pressure gradient, in the presence of wall transpiration as well as chemical reaction considerations. We have noticed that if the Reynolds number of the wall transpiration flow is increased, the average (or maximum) velocity of the main flow direction is raised. Similar effect has also been observed for the rheological parameter and the Darcy parameter, whereas an opposite trend has been noted for both the Forchheimer quadratic drag parameter and the magnetic parameter. Further, an increase in the Reynolds number results in straightening the concentration profile, thus making it an almost linear function of the dimensionless spatial variable.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Nonlinear Pulsatile Newtonian Blood Flow through a Multiple Stenosed Artery

    PubMed Central

    Changdar, Satyasaran; De, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    An appropriate nonlinear blood flow model under the influence of periodic body acceleration through a multiple stenosed artery is investigated with the help of finite difference method. The arterial segment is simulated by a cylindrical tube filled with a viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid described by the Navier-Stokes equation. The nonlinear equation is solved numerically with the proper boundary conditions and pressure gradient that arise from the normal functioning of the heart. Results are discussed in comparison with the existing models. PMID:27347534

  18. Numerical Simulation of Nonlinear Pulsatile Newtonian Blood Flow through a Multiple Stenosed Artery.

    PubMed

    Changdar, Satyasaran; De, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    An appropriate nonlinear blood flow model under the influence of periodic body acceleration through a multiple stenosed artery is investigated with the help of finite difference method. The arterial segment is simulated by a cylindrical tube filled with a viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid described by the Navier-Stokes equation. The nonlinear equation is solved numerically with the proper boundary conditions and pressure gradient that arise from the normal functioning of the heart. Results are discussed in comparison with the existing models. PMID:27347534

  19. Fabrication of rigid and flexible refractive-index-matched flow phantoms for flow visualisation and optical flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoghegan, P. H.; Buchmann, N. A.; Spence, C. J. T.; Moore, S.; Jermy, M.

    2012-05-01

    A method for the construction of both rigid and compliant (flexible) transparent flow phantoms of biological flow structures, suitable for PIV and other optical flow methods with refractive-index-matched working fluid is described in detail. Methods for matching the in vivo compliance and elastic wave propagation wavelength are presented. The manipulation of MRI and CT scan data through an investment casting mould is described. A method for the casting of bubble-free phantoms in silicone elastomer is given. The method is applied to fabricate flexible phantoms of the carotid artery (with and without stenosis), the carotid artery bifurcation (idealised and patient-specific) and the human upper airway (nasal cavity). The fidelity of the phantoms to the original scan data is measured, and it is shown that the cross-sectional error is less than 5% for phantoms of simple shape but up to 16% for complex cross-sectional shapes such as the nasal cavity. This error is mainly due to the application of a PVA coating to the inner mould and can be reduced by shrinking the digital model. Sixteen per cent variation in area is less than the natural patient to patient variation of the physiological geometries. The compliance of the phantom walls is controlled within physiologically realistic ranges, by choice of the wall thickness, transmural pressure and Young's modulus of the elastomer. Data for the dependence of Young's modulus on curing temperature are given for Sylgard 184. Data for the temperature dependence of density, viscosity and refractive index of the refractive-index-matched working liquid (i.e. water-glycerol mixtures) are also presented.

  20. Design of a pulsatile flow facility to evaluate thrombogenic potential of implantable cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Ardana, Pablo Hidalgo; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Madhani, Shalv; Foster, Brent; Glezer, Ari; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-04-01

    Due to expensive nature of clinical trials, implantable cardiac devices should first be extensively characterized in vitro. Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs), an important class of these devices, have been shown to be associated with thromboembolic complications. Although various in vitro systems have been designed to quantify blood-cell damage and platelet activation caused by nonphysiological hemodynamic shear stresses in these PHVs, very few systems attempt to characterize both blood damage and fluid dynamics aspects of PHVs in the same test system. Various numerical modeling methodologies are also evolving to simulate the structural mechanics, fluid mechanics, and blood damage aspects of these devices. This article presents a completely hemocompatible small-volume test-platform that can be used for thrombogenicity studies and experimental fluid mechanics characterization. Using a programmable piston pump to drive freshly drawn human blood inside a cylindrical column, the presented system can simulate various physiological and pathophysiological conditions in testing PHVs. The system includes a modular device-mounting chamber, and in this presented case, a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regents® mechanical heart valve (MHV) in aortic position was used as the test device. The system was validated for its capability to quantify blood damage by measuring blood damage induced by the tester itself (using freshly drawn whole human blood). Blood damage levels were ascertained through clinically relevant assays on human blood while fluid dynamics were characterized using time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a blood-mimicking fluid. Blood damage induced by the tester itself, assessed through Thrombin-anti-Thrombin (TAT), Prothrombin factor 1.2 (PF1.2), and hemolysis (Drabkins assay), was within clinically accepted levels. The hydrodynamic performance of the tester showed consistent, repeatable physiological pressure and flow conditions. In addition, the

  1. Time-resolved OCT-μPIV: a new microscopic PIV technique for noninvasive depth-resolved pulsatile flow profile acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    In vivo acquisition of endothelial wall shear stress requires instantaneous depth-resolved whole-field pulsatile flow profile measurements in microcirculation. High-accuracy, quantitative and non- invasive velocimetry techniques are essential for emerging real-time mechano-genomic investigations. To address these research needs, a novel biological flow quantification technique, OCT-μPIV, was developed utilizing high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) integrated with microscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV). This technique offers the unique advantage of simultaneously acquiring blood flow profiles and vessel anatomy along arbitrarily oriented sagittal planes. The process is instantaneous and enables real-time 3D flow reconstruction without the need for computationally intensive image processing compared to state-of-the-art velocimetry techniques. To evaluate the line-scanning direction and speed, four sets of parametric synthetic OCT-μPIV data were generated using an in-house code. Based on this investigation, an in vitro experiment was designed at the fastest scan speed while preserving the region of interest providing the depth-resolved velocity profiles spanning across the width of a micro-fabricated channel. High-agreement with the analytical flow profiles was achieved for different flow rates and seed particle types and sizes. Finally, by employing blood cells as non-invasive seeding particles, in vivo embryonic vascular velocity profiles in multiple vessels were measured in the early chick embryo. The pulsatile flow frequency and peak velocity measurements were also acquired with OCT-μPIV, which agreed well with previous reported values. These results demonstrate the potential utility of this technique to conduct practical microfluidic and non-invasive in vivo studies for embryonic blood flows.

  2. Time-resolved OCT-μPIV: a new microscopic PIV technique for noninvasive depth-resolved pulsatile flow profile acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William; Pekkan, Kerem

    2012-12-01

    In vivo acquisition of endothelial wall shear stress requires instantaneous depth-resolved whole-field pulsatile flow profile measurements in microcirculation. High-accuracy, quantitative and non- invasive velocimetry techniques are essential for emerging real-time mechano-genomic investigations. To address these research needs, a novel biological flow quantification technique, OCT-μPIV, was developed utilizing high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) integrated with microscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV). This technique offers the unique advantage of simultaneously acquiring blood flow profiles and vessel anatomy along arbitrarily oriented sagittal planes. The process is instantaneous and enables real-time 3D flow reconstruction without the need for computationally intensive image processing compared to state-of-the-art velocimetry techniques. To evaluate the line-scanning direction and speed, four sets of parametric synthetic OCT-μPIV data were generated using an in-house code. Based on this investigation, an in vitro experiment was designed at the fastest scan speed while preserving the region of interest providing the depth-resolved velocity profiles spanning across the width of a micro-fabricated channel. High-agreement with the analytical flow profiles was achieved for different flow rates and seed particle types and sizes. Finally, by employing blood cells as non-invasive seeding particles, in vivo embryonic vascular velocity profiles in multiple vessels were measured in the early chick embryo. The pulsatile flow frequency and peak velocity measurements were also acquired with OCT-μPIV, which agreed well with previous reported values. These results demonstrate the potential utility of this technique to conduct practical microfluidic and non-invasive in vivo studies for embryonic blood flows.

  3. Safety and efficacy of the Aperio thrombectomy device when compared to the Solitaire AB/FR and the Revive devices in a pulsatile flow system

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mahdi; Spence, John Nathan; Nayak, Sanjeev; Pearce, Gillian; Tennuci, Christopher; Roffe, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: There are a limited number of studies comparing the Aperio mechanical thrombectomy device to other stent-based devices. In this paper, we compared the Aperio thrombectomy device to the Solitaire AB, FR and Revive devices in a model of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a modified pulsatile flow system. Methods: Thrombi made of lamb’s blood were placed into a pulsatile flow system perfused with Hartmann’s solution at 80 bpm with a mean pressure of 90 mm Hg. 30 experiments were run with each device. Results: Recanalization rates were similar for all three devices (90% with the Solitaire AB, FR, 80% with the Revive, and 90% with the Aperio). The mean number of attempts to retrieve the thrombus was also similar for all three devices (1.7 with the Solitaire AB, FR, 2.1 with the Revive, 1.6 with the Aperio). Clot fragmentation and embolization rates revealed no statistical significance but there was a trend towards lower embolization rates with the Aperio (23% compared to 40% with the Solitaire AB, FR and 47% with the Revive). The Aperio was the fastest to recanalize the MCA (mean of 66 seconds compared to 186 seconds for the Solitaire AB, FR and 169 seconds for the Revive). Conclusions: In this in vitro setting, the Aperio device seems to be an efficacious and safe device when compared to other similar clinically used mechanical thrombectomy devices. Larger clinical trials are warranted. PMID:23173104

  4. The pulsatile motion of a semi-infinite bubble in a channel: flow fields, and transport of an inactive surface-associated contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Maximillian E.; Williams, Harvey A. R.; Gaver, Donald P.

    2005-08-01

    We investigate a theoretical model of the pulsatile motion of a contaminant-doped semi-infinite bubble in a rectangular channel. We examine the fluid mechanical behaviour of the pulsatile bubble, and its influence on the transport of a surface-inactive contaminant (termed surfinactant). This investigation is used to develop a preliminary understanding of surfactant responses during unsteady pulmonary airway reopening. Reopening is modelled as the pulsatile motion of a semi-infinite gas bubble in a horizontal channel of width 2a filled with a Newtonian liquid of viscosity mu and constant surface tension gamma. A modified Langmuir sorption model is assumed, which allows for the creation and respreading of a surface multilayer. The bubble is forced via a time-dependent volume flux Q(t) with mean and oscillatory components (Q_{M} and Q_{omega }, respectively) at frequency omega . The flow behaviour is governed by the dimensionless parameters: Ca_{M} {=} mu Q_{M}/(2agamma ), a steady-state capillary number, which represents the ratio of viscous to surface tension forces; Ca_{Omega } {=} mu Q_{omega }/(2agamma ), an oscillatory forcing magnitude; Omega {=} omega mu a/gamma , a dimensionless frequency that represents the ratio of viscous relaxation to oscillatory-forcing timescales; and A {=} 2Ca_{Omega }/Omega , a dimensionless oscillation amplitude. Our simulations indicate that contaminant deposition and retention in the bubble cap region occurs at moderate frequencies if retrograde bubble motion develops during the oscillation cycle. However, if oscillations are too rapid the ensuing large forward tip velocities cause a net loss of contaminant from the bubble tip. Determination of an optimal oscillation range may be important in reducing ventilator-induced lung injury associated with infant and adult respiratory distress syndromes by increasing surfactant transport to regions of collapsed airways.

  5. Experimental investigation of the flow field past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in pulsatile flow within an anatomical aorta model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2011-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) has been mounted at the inlet of an anatomical model of the human aorta, and placed within a mock circulation loop that simulates physiological flow conditions. The working fluid matches the refractive index of silicone, from which the aorta model and other parts of the test section are made, and the viscosity of blood. Flow characteristics past the BMHV are measured using stereoscopic and planar particle image velocimetry and laser Doppler velocimetry. In contrast to previous experiments, in which heart valves have been tested in simplified aortic geometries, this arrangement permits the study of the dependence of flow past the valve upon recirculation in the sinuses of Valsalva, the flow rate through the coronary arteries, and the aorta curvature. The effect of valve orientation will also be investigated with the objective to determine a hemodynamically optimal configuration with potential benefits to implantation procedures. The measured viscous shear stress distribution will be analyzed towards predicting the initiation of thrombosis in patients and identifying regions of stagnation, which could facilitate thrombus attachment.

  6. Central Pulsatile Pressure and Flow Relationship in the Time and Frequency Domain to Characterise Hydraulic Input to the Brain and Cerebral Vascular Impedance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; O'Rourke, Michael F; Adji, Audrey; Avolio, Alberto P

    2016-01-01

    In the time domain, pulsatile flow and pressure can be characterised as the ratio of the late systolic boost of flow or pressure to the pulse amplitude so as to estimate the hydraulic input to the brain. While vascular impedance has been widely used to represent the load presented to the heart by the systemic circulation, it has not been applied to the cerebral circulation.We set out to study the relationship between the pressure and the flow augmentation index (AIx) in the time domain and to determine cerebral vascular impedance using aortic blood pressure and cerebral blood flow waveforms in the frequency domain. Twenty-four young subjects (aged 21-39 years) were recruited; aortic pressure was derived using SphygmoCor from radial pressure. Flow waveforms were recorded from the middle cerebral artery. In three subjects, we performed the Valsalva manoeuvre to investigate their response to physiological intervention. There was a linear relationship between flow and pressure AIx, and cerebral impedance values were similar to those estimated for low resistance vascular beds. Substantial change in pressure and flow wave contour was observed during the Valsalva manoeuvre; however, the relationship in both the time and the frequency domains were unchanged. This confirms that aortic pressure and cerebral flow waveform can be used to study cerebral impedance. PMID:27165927

  7. Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments ({sigma}/{mu} < 5% for all metrics investigated). The dynamic flow phantom was capable of producing input and output TACs using

  8. Wall-less Flow Phantom for High-Frequency Ultrasound Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, David A.; Laverick, Nicola; Anderson, Tom; Moran, Carmel M.; Hoskins, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    There are currently very few test objects suitable for high-frequency ultrasound scanners that can be rapidly manufactured, have appropriate acoustic characteristics and are suitably robust. Here we describe techniques for the creation of a wall-less flow phantom using a physically robust konjac and carrageenan-based tissue-mimicking material. Vessel dimensions equivalent to those of mouse and rat arteries were achieved with steady flow, with the vessel at a depth of 1.0 mm. We then employed the phantom to briefly investigate velocity errors using pulsed wave Doppler with a commercial preclinical ultrasound system. This phantom will provide a useful tool for testing preclinical ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:25542496

  9. Design of anthropomorphic flow phantoms based on rapid prototyping of compliant vessel geometries.

    PubMed

    Lai, Simon S M; Yiu, Billy Y S; Poon, Alexander K K; Yu, Alfred C H

    2013-09-01

    Anatomically realistic flow phantoms are essential experimental tools for vascular ultrasound. Here we describe how these flow phantoms can be efficiently developed via a rapid prototyping (RP) framework that involves direct fabrication of compliant vessel geometries. In this framework, anthropomorphic vessel models were drafted in computer-aided design software, and they were fabricated using stereolithography (one type of RP). To produce elastic vessels, a compliant photopolymer was used for stereolithography. We fabricated a series of compliant, diseased carotid bifurcation models with eccentric stenosis (50%) and plaque ulceration (types I and III), and they were used to form thin-walled flow phantoms by coupling the vessels to an agar-based tissue-mimicking material. These phantoms were found to yield Doppler spectrograms with significant spectral broadening and color flow images with mosaic patterns, as typical of disturbed flow under stenosed and ulcerated disease conditions. Also, their wall distension behavior was found to be similar to that observed in vivo, and this corresponded with the vessel wall's average elastic modulus (391 kPa), which was within the nominal range for human arteries. The vessel material's acoustic properties were found to be sub-optimal: the estimated average acoustic speed was 1801 m/s, and the attenuation coefficient was 1.58 dB/(mm·MHz(n)) with a power-law coefficient of 0.97. Such an acoustic mismatch nevertheless did not notably affect our Doppler spectrograms and color flow image results. These findings suggest that phantoms produced from our design framework have the potential to serve as ultrasound-compatible test beds that can simulate complex flow dynamics similar to those observed in real vasculature. PMID:23791354

  10. Objective pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Casas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Tinnitus is the usually unwanted perception of sound, in most cases there is no genuine physical source of sound. Less than 10% of tinnitus patients suffer from pulsatile tinnitus. Objective Pulsatile tinnitus can also be the first indication of dural arteriovenous fistula, so examination for such vascular origin must be performed. PMID:26733223

  11. 3-D phantom to simulate cerebral blood flow and metabolic images for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.J.; Cutler, P.D.; Digby, W.M.; Mazziotta, J.C. . Nuclear Medicine Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    A 3-dimensional brain phantom has been developed to simulate the activity distributions found in the human brain in the cerebral blood flow and metabolism studies currently employed in PET. The phantom has a single contiguous chamber and utilizes thin layers of lucite to provide apparent relative concentrations of 5, 1 and 0 for gray matter, white matter and ventricles, respectively, in the brain. The phantom and an ideal image set were created from the same set of data. Thus, the user has a basis for comparing measured images with an ideal image set which enables the user to make quantitative evaluation of the errors in PET studies with a data set similar to that obtained in patient studies.

  12. A dual-phantom system for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models under steady flow.

    PubMed

    Blake, James R; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2009-09-01

    A dual-phantom system is developed for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models. Pairs of phantoms with identical geometry and flow conditions are manufactured, one for ultrasound and one for particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV model is made from silicone rubber, and a new PIV fluid is made that matches the refractive index of 1.41 of silicone. Dynamic scaling was performed to correct for the increased viscosity of the PIV fluid compared with that of the ultrasound blood mimic. The degree of stenosis in the models pairs agreed to less than 1%. The velocities in the laminar flow region up to the peak velocity location agreed to within 15%, and the difference could be explained by errors in ultrasound velocity estimation. At low flow rates and in mild stenoses, good agreement was observed in the distal flow fields, excepting the maximum velocities. At high flow rates, there was considerable difference in velocities in the poststenosis flow field (maximum centreline differences of 30%), which would seem to represent real differences in hydrodynamic behavior between the two models. Sources of error included: variation of viscosity because of temperature (random error, which could account for differences of up to 7%); ultrasound velocity estimation errors (systematic errors); and geometry effects in each model, particularly because of imperfect connectors and corners (systematic errors, potentially affecting the inlet length and flow stability). The current system is best placed to investigate measurement errors in the laminar flow region rather than the poststenosis turbulent flow region. PMID:19540655

  13. Investigation of the Characteristics of HeartWare HVAD and Thoratec HeartMate II Under Steady and Pulsatile Flow Conditions.

    PubMed

    Noor, Mumin R; Ho, Chong H; Parker, Kim H; Simon, Andre R; Banner, Nicholas R; Bowles, Christopher T

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the dynamic characteristics of the Thoratec HeartMate II (HMII) and the HeartWare HVAD (HVAD) left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) under clinically representative in vitro operating conditions. The performance of the two LVADs were compared in a normothermic, human blood-filled mock circulation model under conditions of steady (nonpulsatile) flow and under simulated physiologic conditions. These experiments were repeated using 5% dextrose in order to determine its suitability as a blood analog. Under steady flow conditions, for the HMII, approximately linear inverse LVAD differential pressure (H) versus flow (Q) relationships were observed with good correspondence between the results of blood and 5% dextrose under all conditions except at a pump speed of 9000 rpm. For the HVAD, the corresponding relationships were inverse curvilinear and with good correspondence between the blood-derived and 5% dextrose-derived relationships in the flow rate range of 2-6 L/min and at pump speeds up to 3000 rpm. Under pulsatile operating conditions, for each LVAD operating at a particular pump speed, an counterclockwise loop was inscribed in the HQ domain during a simulated cardiac cycle (HQ loop); this showed that there was a variable phase relationship between LVAD differential pressure and LVAD flow. For both the HMII and HVAD, increasing pump speed was associated with a right-hand and upward shift of the HQ loop and simulation of impairment of left ventricular function was associated with a decrease in loop area. During clinical use, not only does the pressure differential across the LVAD and its flow rate vary continuously, but their phase relationship is variable. This behavior is inadequately described by the widely accepted representation of a plot of pressure differential versus flow derived under steady conditions. We conclude that the dynamic HQ loop is a more meaningful representation of clinical operating conditions than

  14. Full dimensional computer simulations to study pulsatile blood flow in vessels, aortic arch and bifurcated veins: Investigation of blood viscosity and turbulent effects.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, Renat A; Guster, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We report computational results of blood flow through a model of the human aortic arch and a vessel of actual diameter and length. A realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Calculations for bifurcation type vessels are also carried out and presented. Different mathematical methods for numerical solution of the fluid dynamics equations have been considered. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated together with turbulence effects. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of three different geometries are presented: for pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and the widely used method in the literature: a simple Newtonian approximation. A significant increase of the strain rate and, as a result, the wall shear stress distribution, is found in the region of the aortic arch. Turbulent effects are found to be important, particularly in the case of bifurcation vessels. PMID:19964834

  15. Validation of Doppler ultrasound measurements using particle, image velocimetry in a flow phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosgrove, John; Meagher, Siobhan; Hoskins, Peter; Greated, Clive; Black, Richard

    2001-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is responsible for over 50% of all deaths in the world and there is a substantial amount of evidence which suggests that abnormal vessel wall shear stress is correlated with the development of atherosclerosis. Wall shear stress is calculated from wall shear rates, the measurement of which is a technically challenging problem for ultrasound. In this study a flow phantom consisting of a meshed-gear pump and corresponding control electronics is used to generate a range of flow waveforms in a straight tube. These flows are measured using Doppler ultrasound and compared to corresponding particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements and to analytical solutions of the flow equations for a range of Wormersley parameters. Although previous studies have been undertaken calibrating Doppler ultrasound in straight tubes, they have not used PIV. This study serves as a prelude to investigations using PIV to assess the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound in phantoms with anatomically realistic geometries for which there are no analytical solutions to the flow. [Research funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council UK.

  16. Noninvasive transthoracic and transesophageal Doppler echocardiographic measurements of human coronary blood flow velocity: In vitro flow phantom validation.

    PubMed

    Greene, E R

    2010-01-01

    Coronary angiography is limited in assessing the hemodynamic significance of a coronary lesion or the state of the coronary microcirculation. Noninvasive transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) Doppler echocardiography have been used to measure coronary blood flow velocity and coronary flow reserve and thus the physiology of the coronary vasculature (normal, stable or unstable lesions). A fundamental, in vitro validation of these methods with a tissue and blood mimicking flow phantom has not been reported. Accordingly, Bland-Altman 95% confidence levels for precision (repeated measures) and accuracy (comparison with time collection) were determined for both TTE and TEE measurements of simulated coronary diastolic blood velocities in 2 mm and 4 mm vessels at the normal in vivo depths of 40 mm and 60 mm. The Doppler angle was set at 45 degrees and flow velocities were varied within a normal in vivo range of 0- 150 cm/s. Confidence levels for precisions and accuracies were similar between TTE and TEE and ranged from ± 6 cm/s to ± 13 cm/s or approximately 10-15% over the range of the measured velocities. These in vitro results in a controlled flow phantom suggest that technically adequate TTE and TEE can be used to reliably measure epicardial coronary conduit artery blood flow velocities. PMID:21096876

  17. Simultaneous estimation of bidirectional particle flow and relative flux using MUSIC-OCT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-11-01

    In an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan from a living tissue, red blood cells (RBCs) are the major source of backscattering signal from moving particles within microcirculatory system. Measuring the concentration and velocity of RBC particles allows assessment of RBC flux and flow, respectively, to assess tissue perfusion and oxygen/nutrition exchange rates within micro-structures. In this paper, we propose utilizing spectral estimation techniques to simultaneously quantify bi-directional particle flow and relative flux by spectral estimation of the received OCT signal from moving particles within capillary tubes embedded in tissue mimicking phantoms. The proposed method can be directly utilized for in vivo quantification of capillaries and microvessels. Compared to the existing methods in the literature that can either quantify flow direction or power, our proposed method allows simultaneous flow (velocity) direction and relative flux (power) estimation.

  18. Simultaneous Estimation of Bidirectional Particle Flow and Relative Flux using MUSIC-OCT: Phantom Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Siavash

    2014-01-01

    In an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan from a living tissue, red blood cells (RBCs) are the major source of backscattering signal from moving particles within microcirculatory system. Measuring the concentration and velocity of RBC particles allows assessment of RBC flux and flow, respectively, to assess tissue perfusion and oxygen/nutrition exchange rates within micro-structures. In this paper, we propose utilizing spectral estimation techniques to simultaneously quantify bi-directional particle flow and relative flux by spectral estimation of the received OCT signal from moving particles within capillary tubes embedded in tissue mimicking phantoms. The proposed method can be directly utilized for in vivo quantification of capillaries and microvessels. Compared to the existing methods in the literature that can either quantify flow direction or power, our proposed method allows simultaneous flow (velocity) direction and relative flux (power) estimation. PMID:25327449

  19. Simultaneous estimation of bidirectional particle flow and relative flux using MUSIC-OCT: phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Siavash; Wang, Ruikang K

    2014-11-21

    In an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan from a living tissue, red blood cells (RBCs) are the major source of backscattering signal from moving particles within microcirculatory system. Measuring the concentration and velocity of RBC particles allows assessment of RBC flux and flow, respectively, to assess tissue perfusion and oxygen/nutrition exchange rates within micro-structures. In this paper, we propose utilizing spectral estimation techniques to simultaneously quantify bi-directional particle flow and relative flux by spectral estimation of the received OCT signal from moving particles within capillary tubes embedded in tissue mimicking phantoms. The proposed method can be directly utilized for in vivo quantification of capillaries and microvessels. Compared to the existing methods in the literature that can either quantify flow direction or power, our proposed method allows simultaneous flow (velocity) direction and relative flux (power) estimation. PMID:25327449

  20. Mathematical modeling of fluid dynamics in pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Laganà, Katia; Fumero, Roberto

    2004-02-01

    The design criteria of an extracorporeal circuit suitable for pulsatile flow are quite different and more entangled than for steady flow. The time and costs of the design process could be reduced if mutual influences between the pulsatile pump and other extracorporeal devices were considered without experimental trial-and-error activities. With this in mind, we have developed a new lumped-parameter mathematical model of the hydraulic behavior of the arterial side of an extracorporeal circuit under pulsatile flow conditions. Generally, components feature a resistant-inertant-compliant behavior and the most relevant nonlinearities are accounted for. Parameter values were derived either by experimental tests or by analytical analysis. The pulsatile pump is modeled as a pure pulsatile flow generator. Model predictions were compared with flow rate and pressure tracings measured during hydraulic tests on two different circuits at various flow rates and pulse frequencies. The normalized root mean square error did not exceed 24% and the model accurately describes the changes that occur in the basic features of the pressure and flow wave propagating from the pulsatile pump to the arterial cannula. PMID:14961960

  1. Very different performance of the power Doppler modalities of several ultrasound machines ascertained by a microvessel flow phantom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) subclinical disease activity can be detected with ultrasound (US), especially using power Doppler US (PDUS). However, PDUS may be highly dependent on the type of machine. This could create problems both in clinical trials and in daily clinical practice. To clarify how the PDUS signal differs between machines we created a microvessel flow phantom. Methods The flow phantom contained three microvessels (150, 1000, 2000 microns). A syringe pump was used to generate flows. Five US machines were used. Settings were optimised to assess the lowest detectable flow for each US machine. Results The minimal detectable flow velocities showed very large differences between the machines. Only two of the machines may be able to detect the very low flows in the capillaries of inflamed joints. There was no clear relation with price. One of the lower-end machines actually performed best in all three vessel sizes. Conclusions We created a flow phantom to test the sensitivity of US machines to very low flows in small vessels. The sensitivity of the power Doppler modalities of 5 different machines was very different. The differences found between the machines are probably caused by fundamental differences in processing of the PD signal or internal settings inaccessible to users. Machines considered for PDUS assessment of RA patients should be tested using a flow phantom similar to ours. Within studies, only a single machine type should be used. PMID:24286540

  2. Occipital artery anastomosis to vertebral artery causing pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew David; English, Joey; Hetts, Steven W

    2014-03-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus can result from various vascular etiologies that cause transmission of pulsatile turbulent flow into the inner ear. Less commonly, non-vascular sources cause increased blood flow and transmission of sound perceived as tinnitus. Thorough clinical examination leads to appropriate imaging evaluation and therapeutic planning. Most pulsatile tinnitus results from expected mechanisms, such as dural arteriovenous fistula, jugular bulb dehiscence, or paraganglioma; however, the literature contains reports of numerous rare causes, particularly variant anatomic morphologies. We present the case of a novel cause of pulsatile tinnitus in which collateral vascular flow compensated for decreased normal intracranial cerebral arterial supply and might have caused catastrophic consequences if intervened upon after assumptions based on an incomplete evaluation. PMID:23493341

  3. Flow behavior within the 12-cc Penn State pulsatile pediatric ventricular assist device: an experimental study of the initial design.

    PubMed

    Manning, Keefe B; Wivholm, Brandon D; Yang, Ning; Fontaine, Arnold A; Deutsch, Steven

    2008-06-01

    Planar particle image velocimetry was used to explore the flow behavior of the newly designed 12-cc Penn State pneumatic pediatric assist pump. Wall shear maps complemented the velocity data. Bjork-Shiley Monostrut 17-mm mechanical heart valves were used in the inlet and outlet ports. In comparison with larger Penn State pumps, the 12-cc device is not only smaller but has reduced valve effective orifice areas and more highly angled valve ports. In contrast to results from the larger pumps, the flow field was highly three dimensional during early diastole with poorer penetration by the valve inlet jet. This led to a later start to a "wall washing" rotational pattern. A significant separation region, never before observed, was created upstream of the outlet valve leaflet during late diastole--effectively reducing the area and increasing the pressure drop through the valve. Wall shear maps suggest that regions of low shear might persist throughout the cycle at the bottom of the pump on the outlet side. An attempt to improve the flow field characteristics by exploring different valves, valve orientations and inlet valve angles, systolic/diastolic flow timing, and perhaps a larger outlet valve was planned. PMID:18422800

  4. Pulsatile control of reproduction.

    PubMed

    1984-08-18

    An aspect of the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction to emerge in the past decade is the pulsatile nature of hormone secretion. The pulse generator is in the central nervous system -- in the medial basal region of the hypothalamus. It works by a synchronous firing of entire populations of endocrine neurons, which discharge a quantum of the decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) into the portal blood capillaries which then carry it to the anterior pituitary gland. In man, episodic secretion of pituitary gonadotropins, especially luteinizing hormone (LH) is considered to imply a preceding pulsatile GnRH stimulus also, though this cannot be observed directly. This LH pattern is characterized by discrete bursts (pulses) separated by periods of little or no secretion. It is observalbe at all stages and states of reproductive life, being most evident at high secretion rates (e.g., at midcycle and after menopause). The pulse frequency is important and leads to the possibility of physiological and pharmacological control of pituitary-gonadal function by frequency modulation. Physiologically, pulses of LH secretion occur every 1-2 hours. The need for pulsatility in therapeutic GnRH stimulation of the pituitary also has been established following the early days of GnRH therapy when both constant and infrequent administration were found to be ineffective. Pulsatile GnRH therapy through portable pumps delivering small doses subcutaneously or intravenously every 1-2 hours has now been successfully applied to the treatment of anovulatory infertility, male hypogonadism, and the initiation of puberty. Supraphysiological GnRH stimulation, whether through increased frequency or amplitude or use of the "superactive" agonist analogues, produces a seemingly paradoxical inhibition of gonadotropin secretion. Although a postreceptor effect has been proposed, the mechanism appears to be a "down-regulation" of the GnRH receptors. Normally, the gaps between the physiological

  5. Assessment of subgrid-scale models with a large-eddy simulation-dedicated experimental database: The pulsatile impinging jet in turbulent cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baya Toda, Hubert; Cabrit, Olivier; Truffin, Karine; Bruneaux, Gilles; Nicoud, Franck

    2014-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in complex geometries and industrial applications like piston engines, gas turbines, or aircraft engines requires the use of advanced subgrid-scale (SGS) models able to take into account the main flow features and the turbulence anisotropy. Keeping this goal in mind, this paper reports a LES-dedicated experiment of a pulsatile hot-jet impinging a flat-plate in the presence of a cold turbulent cross-flow. Unlike commonly used academic test cases, this configuration involves different flow features encountered in complex configurations: shear/rotating regions, stagnation point, wall-turbulence, and the propagation of a vortex ring along the wall. This experiment was also designed with the aim to use quantitative and nonintrusive optical diagnostics such as Particle Image Velocimetry, and to easily perform a LES involving a relatively simple geometry and well-controlled boundary conditions. Hence, two eddy-viscosity-based SGS models are investigated: the dynamic Smagorinsky model [M. Germano, U. Piomelli, P. Moin, and W. Cabot, "A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model," Phys. Fluids A 3(7), 1760-1765 (1991)] and the σ-model [F. Nicoud, H. B. Toda, O. Cabrit, S. Bose, and J. Lee, "Using singular values to build a subgrid-scale model for large eddy simulations," Phys. Fluids 23(8), 085106 (2011)]. Both models give similar results during the first phase of the experiment. However, it was found that the dynamic Smagorinsky model could not accurately predict the vortex-ring propagation, while the σ-model provides a better agreement with the experimental measurements. Setting aside the implementation of the dynamic procedure (implemented here in its simplest form, i.e., without averaging over homogeneous directions and with clipping of negative values to ensure numerical stability), it is suggested that the mitigated predictions of the dynamic Smagorinsky model are due to the dynamic constant, which strongly depends on the mesh resolution

  6. Pulsatile-flow mechanical circulatory support (MCS) as a bridge to transplantation or recovery. Single-centre experience with the POLCAS system in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Szymański, Jarosław; Juraszek, Andrzej; Kołsut, Piotr; Kuśmierski, Krzysztof; Zieliński, Tomasz; Sobieszczańska-Małek, Małgorzata; Sitkowska-Rysiak, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is a recognised method of treatment for patients with end-stage chronic or acute heart failure. The POLCAS pulsatile-flow system has been used in our institution for 15 years. Currently, it is being widely replaced by continuous-flow mechanical circulatory support equipment of the second and third generations (HeartMateII, HeartWare). The MCS presented in this study is associated with a significant risk of complications and its use is increasingly considered controversial. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the results of treatment utilising the POLCAS MCS system at our institution in 2014. Material and methods The POLCAS system was implanted in 12 patients aged 16-63 years (42 ± 17 years) during a period of 12 months (from January to December, 2014). Full-blown cardiogenic shock was observed in all patients before MCS implantation. Four of the analysed patients (33%) required prior circulatory support with other devices: IABP (n = 2) or ECMO (n = 2). Episodes of cardiac arrest were reported in three patients; three other patients experienced serious arrhythmias, which accelerated the decision to implant MCS. The presented data was retrospectively obtained from the CliniNET system of the Institute of Cardiology. OpenOffice Calc spreadsheet was used for data analysis. Results Average MCS time was 41 days ± 25 (from 15 to 91 days). Survival until transplantation or explantation was 91.67%. The most frequent complications following the therapy were: cardiac tamponade or bleeding requiring an intervention – 25% (n = 3), renal failure requiring dialysis – 25% (n = 3), ischaemic stroke associated with the MCS – 16.6% (n = 2), bacteraemia – 16.6% (n = 2), and wound infection – 8% (n = 1). No malfunctions of the MCS system were reported. Early survival in patients who completed the MCS therapy, defined as discharge, amounted to 63.6% (n = 7). Conclusions The POLCAS heart assist system is an effective

  7. Stability of echogenic liposomes as a blood pool ultrasound contrast agent in a physiologic flow phantom

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J.; Huang, Shao-Ling; Klegerman, Melvin E.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) with a lipid shell encapsulating both air and an aqueous core. ELIP are being developed for molecular imaging and image-guided therapeutic delivery. Stability of the echogenicity of ELIP in physiologic conditions is crucial to their successful translation to clinical use. In this study we determined the effects of the surrounding media’s dissolved air concentration, temperature transition and hydrodynamic pressure on the echogenicity of a chemically modified formulation of ELIP to promote stability and echogenicity. ELIP samples were diluted in porcine plasma or whole blood and pumped through a pulsatile flow system with adjustable hydrodynamic pressures and temperature. B-mode images were acquired using a clinical diagnostic scanner every 5 s for a total duration of 75 s. Echogenicity in porcine plasma was assessed as a function of total dissolved gas saturation. ELIP were added to plasma at room temperature (22 °C) or body temperature (37 °C) and pumped through a system maintained at 22 °C or 37 °C to study the effect of temperature transitions on ELIP echogenicity. Echogenicity at normotensive (120/80 mmHg) and hypertensive pressures (145/90 mmHg) was measured. ELIP were echogenic in plasma and whole blood at body temperature under normotensive to hypertensive pressures. Warming of samples from room temperature to body temperature did not alter echogenicity. However, in plasma cooled rapidly from body temperature to room temperature or in degassed plasma, ELIP lost echogenicity within 20 s at 120/80 mmHg. The stability of echogenicity of a modified ELIP formulation was determined in vitro at body temperature, physiologic gas concentration and throughout the physiologic pressure range. However, proper care should be taken to ensure that ELIP are not cooled rapidly from body temperature to room temperature as they will lose their acoustic properties. Further in vivo

  8. A two-step optical flow method for strain estimation in elastography: Simulation and phantom study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaochang; Gao, Jing; Tao, Shengzhen; Liu, Ke; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2014-04-01

    Optical flow (OF) method has been used in ultrasound elastography to estimate the strain distribution in tissues. However the bias of strain estimation by OF has previously been shown to be close to 20%. The objective in this paper is to improve the performance of OF-based strain estimation, a two-step OF method with a local warping technique is proposed in this paper. The local warping technique effectively decreases the decorrelation of the signals, and hence improves the performance of strain estimation. Simulations on both homogeneous and heterogeneous models with different strains are performed. Experiments on a heterogeneous tissue-mimicking phantom are also carried out. Simulation results of the homogeneous model show that the two-step OF method reduces the bias of strain estimation from 23.77% to 1.65%, and reduces the standard deviation of strain estimation from 2.9×10(-3) to 0.47×10(-3). Simulation results of the heterogeneous model shows that the signals-to-noise ratio (SNRe) of strain estimation is improved by 2.1 and 5.3dB in the inclusion and background, respectively, and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe) is improved by 6.8dB. Finally, results of phantom experiments show that, by using the proposed method, the SNRe is increased by 4.0dB and 8.9dB in the inclusion and background, respectively, while the CNRe is increased by 13.1dB. The proposed two-step OF method is thus demonstrated capable of improving the performance of strain estimation in OF-based elastography. PMID:24393537

  9. Lumen pressure within obliquely insonated absorbent solid cylindrical shells with application to Doppler flow phantoms.

    PubMed

    Steel, Robin; Fish, Peter J

    2002-02-01

    Flow phantoms used in medical ultrasound usually employ a plastic tube as a blood vessel mimic. These tubes often have acoustic properties differing significantly from the tissue and blood-mimicking media, which results in distortion of the acoustic pressure field within the tubes and, hence, of the Doppler flow spectra. Previous analyses of this problem have used some form of the infinite plate transmission coefficient, although at least one ray-based analysis has considered a cylindrical interface but with zero wall thickness. In this paper, we compare these approximate pressure fields with the exact solution for oblique incidence on a viscoelastic cylindrical shell at 5 MHz to find for which materials the plate approximation is valid. The shell has water both inside and outside, but it can be modified to use a different fluid inside and also to include absorption in either fluid. We find the plate approximation is reasonable for soft tubes such as the copolymer Cflex (Cole-Palmer, Niles, IL) but much less so for hard tubes such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). PMID:11885684

  10. Why pulsatility still matters: a review of current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Barić, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have become standard therapy option for patients with advanced heart failure. They offer several advantages over previously used pulsatile-flow LVADs, including improved durability, less surgical trauma, higher energy efficiency, and lower thrombogenicity. These benefits translate into better survival, lower frequency of adverse events, improved quality of life, and higher functional capacity of patients. However, mounting evidence shows unanticipated consequences of continuous-flow support, such as acquired aortic valve insufficiency and acquired von Willebrand syndrome. In this review article we discuss current evidence on differences between continuous and pulsatile mechanical circulatory support, with a focus on clinical implications and potential benefits of pulsatile flow. PMID:25559832

  11. Phantom model of physiologic intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2012-06-01

    We describe herein a novel life-size phantom model of the intracranial cavity and its validation. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) domains including ventricular, cysternal, and subarachnoid spaces were derived via magnetic resonance imaging. Brain mechanical properties and cranio-spinal compliance were set based on published data. Both bulk and pulsatile physiologic CSF flow were modeled. Model validation was carried out by comparisons of flow and pressure measurements in the phantom with published in vivo data of healthy subjects. Physiologic intracranial pressure with 10 mmHg mean and 0.4 mmHg peak pulse amplitude was recorded in the ventricles. Peak CSF flow rates of 0.2 and 2 ml/s were measured in the cerebral aqueduct and subarachnoid space, respectively. The phantom constitutes a first-of-its-kind approach to modeling physiologic intracranial dynamics in vitro. Herein, we describe the phantom design and manufacturing, definition and implementation of its operating parameters, as well as the validation of the modeled dynamics. PMID:22333981

  12. Dual-beam optical coherence tomography system for quantification of flow velocity in capillary phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, S. M.; Silien, C.; Leahy, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    -c) of interference fluctuations between these positions is performed computationally, yielding a transit time for particle flow. This paper summarises the findings of the c-c db-Sd-OCT technique for absolute velocity estimation within capillary phantoms of various sizes using IntralipidTM solution to emulate red blood corpuscles (RBCs) and related blood constituents, driven by a calibrated syringe flow pump. The findings of the preliminary experimentation reveal the technique to be capable of estimating absolute velocity values with a maximum error difference of 0.077 mm s-1 using Bland Altman plots. Application of this technique and rigorous testing of the c-c db-Sd-OCT method with biological samples will be the focus of future work.

  13. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity. PMID:26277658

  14. Closed circuit MR compatible pulsatile pump system using a ventricular assist device and pressure control unit.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, R; Benk, C; Bock, J; Stalder, A F; Korvink, J G; Hennig, J; Markl, M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a closed circuit MR compatible pneumatically driven pump system using a ventricular assist device as pulsatile flow pump for in vitro 3D flow simulation. Additionally, a pressure control unit was integrated into the flow circuit. The performance of the pump system and its test-retest reliability was evaluated using a stenosis phantom (60% lumen narrowing). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a good test-retest reliability (mean differences = -0.016 m/s, limits of agreement = ±0.047 m/s) for in vitro flow measurements. Furthermore, a rapid prototyping in vitro model of a normal thoracic aorta was integrated into the flow circuit for a direct comparison of flow characteristics with in vivo data in the same subject. The pneumatically driven ventricular assist device was attached to the ascending aorta of the in vitro model to simulate the beating left ventricle. In the descending part of the healthy aorta a flexible stenosis was integrated to model an aortic coarctation. In vivo and in vitro comparison showed significant (P = 0.002) correlations (r = 0.9) of mean velocities. The simulation of increasing coarctation grade led to expected changes in the flow patterns such as jet flow in the post-stenotic region and increased velocities. PMID:21630351

  15. Heating in vascular tissue and flow-through tissue phantoms induced by focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinlan

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. This process, called acoustic hemostasis, is being studied in the hope that such a method would ultimately provide a lifesaving treatment during the so-called "golden hour", a brief grace period after a severe trauma in which prompt therapy can save the life of an injured person. Thermal effects play a major role in occlusion of small vessels and also appear to contribute to the sealing of punctures in major blood vessels. However, aggressive ultrasound-induced tissue heating can also impact healthy tissue and can lead to deleterious mechanical bioeffects. Moreover, the presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature of blood vessel walls owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in Newtonian viscous media. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments, in non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms, designed to provide a ground truth verification of the model predictions. The calculated and measured results were compared over a range of values for insonation pressure, insonation time, and flow rate; we show good agreement between predictions and measurements. We then conducted a series of simulations that address two limiting problems of interest: hemostasis in small and large vessels. We employed realistic human tissue properties and considered more complex geometries. Results show that the heating pattern in and around a blood vessel is different for different vessel sizes, flow rates and for varying beam orientations relative to the flow axis

  16. Functional Tissue Pulsatility Imaging of the Brain during Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kucewicz, John C.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Leotta, Daniel F.; Panagiotides, Heracles; Paun, Marla; Beach, Kirk W.

    2007-01-01

    Functional tissue pulsatility imaging (fTPI) is a new ultrasonic technique being developed to map brain function by measuring changes in tissue pulsatility due to changes in blood flow with neuronal activation. The technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older, non-ultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part due to perfusion. Perfused tissue expands by a fraction of a percent early in each cardiac cycle when arterial inflow exceeds venous outflow and relaxes later in the cardiac cycle when venous drainage dominates. Tissue pulsatility imaging (TPI) uses tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure this pulsatile “plethysmographic” signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. A feasibility study was conducted to determine if TPI could be used to detect regional brain activation during a visual contrast-reversing checkerboard block paradigm study. During a study, ultrasound data were collected transcranially from the occipital lobe as a subject viewed alternating blocks of a reversing checkerboard (stimulus condition) and a static, gray screen (control condition). Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was used to identify sample volumes with significantly different pulsatility waveforms during the control and stimulus blocks. In 7 out 14 studies, consistent regions of activation were detected from tissue around the major vessels perfusing the visual cortex. PMID:17346872

  17. Blood flow in intracranial aneurysms treated with Pipeline embolization devices: computational simulation and verification with Doppler ultrasonography on phantom models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of flow-diverter treatment through Doppler ultrasonography measurements in patient-specific models of intracranial bifurcation and side-wall aneurysms. Methods: Computational and physical models of patient-specific bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms were constructed from computed tomography angiography with use of stereolithography, a three-dimensional printing technology. Flow dynamics parameters before and after flow-diverter treatment were measured with pulse-wave and color Doppler ultrasonography, and then compared with CFD simulations. Results: CFD simulations showed drastic flow reduction after flow-diverter treatment in both aneurysms. The mean volume flow rate decreased by 90% and 85% for the bifurcation aneurysm and the side-wall aneurysm, respectively. Velocity contour plots from computer simulations before and after flow diversion closely resembled the patterns obtained by color Doppler ultrasonography. Conclusion: The CFD estimation of flow reduction in aneurysms treated with a flow-diverting stent was verified by Doppler ultrasonography in patient-specific phantom models of bifurcation and side-wall aneurysms. The combination of CFD and ultrasonography may constitute a feasible and reliable technique in studying the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with flow-diverting stents. PMID:25754367

  18. Comparative Study of Continuous and Pulsatile Left Ventricular Assist Devices on Hemodynamics of a Pediatric End-to-Side Anastomotic Graft

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ning; Deutsch, Steven; Paterson, Eric G.; Manning, Keefe B.

    2013-01-01

    Although there are many studies that focus on understanding the consequence of pumping mode (continuous vs. pulsatile) associated with ventricular assist devices (VADs) on pediatric vascular pulsatility, the impact on local hemodynamics has been largely ignored. Hence, we compare not only the hemodynamic parameters indicative of pulsatility but also the local flow fields in the aorta and the great vessels originating from the aortic arch. A physiologic graft anastomotic model is constructed based on a pediatric, patient specific, aorta with a graft attached on the ascending aorta. The flow is simulated using a previously validated second-order accurate Navier–Stokes flow solver based upon a finite volume approach. The major findings are: (1) pulsatile support provides a greater degree of vascular pulsatility when compared to continuous support, which, however, is still 20% less than pulsatility in the healthy aorta; (2) pulsatile support increases the flow in the great vessels, while continuous support decreases it; (3) complete VAD support results in turbulence in the aorta, with maximum principal Reynolds stresses for pulsatile support and continuous support of 7081 and 249 dyn/cm2, respectively; (4) complete pulsatile support results in a significant increase in predicted hemolysis in the aorta; and (5) pulsatile support causes both higher time-averaged wall shear stresses (WSS) and oscillatory shear indices (OSI) in the aorta than does continuous support. These findings will help to identify the risk of graft failure for pediatric patients with pulsatile and continuous VADs. PMID:24348881

  19. Angiographic analysis for phantom simulations of endovascular aneurysm treatments with a new fully retrievable asymmetric flow diverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganand, Aradhana; Wood, Rachel P.; Jimenez, Carlos; Siddiqui, Adnan; Snyder, Kenneth; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Baier, Robert; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2015-03-01

    Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the main diagnostic tool for intracranial aneurysms (IA) flow-diverter (FD) assisted treatment. Based on qualitative contrast flow evaluation, interventionists decide on subsequent steps. We developed a novel fully Retrievable Asymmetric Flow-Diverter (RAFD) which allows controlled deployment, repositioning and detachment achieve optimal flow diversion. The device has a small low porosity or solid region which is placed such that it would achieve maximum aneurysmal in-jet flow deflection with minimum impairment to adjacent vessels. We tested the new RAFD using a flow-loop with an idealized and a patient specific IA phantom in carotid-relevant physiological conditions. We positioned the deflection region at three locations: distally, center and proximally to the aneurysm orifice and analyzed aneurysm dome flow using DSA derived maps for mean transit time (MTT) and bolus arrival times (BAT). Comparison between treated and untreated (control) maps quantified the RAFD positioning effect. Average MTT, related to contrast presence in the aneurysm dome increased, indicating flow decoupling between the aneurysm and parent artery. Maximum effect was observed in the center and proximal position (~75%) of aneurysm models depending on their geometry. BAT maps, correlated well with inflow jet direction and magnitude. Reduction and jet dispersion as high as about 50% was observed for various treatments. We demonstrated the use of DSA data to guide the placement of the RAFD and showed that optimum flow diversion within the aneurysm dome is feasible. This could lead to more effective and a safer IA treatment using FDs.

  20. CFD modeling of pulsatile hemodynamics in the total cavopulmonary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobaer, S. M. Tareq; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    Total cavopulmonary connection is a blood flow pathway which is created surgically by an operation known as Fontan procedure, performed on children with single ventricle heart defects. Recent studies have shown that the hemodynamics in the connection can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. The aim of this paper is model the pulsatile flow patterns, and to calculate the vorticity field and power losses in an idealized 1.5D offset model of Total Cavopulmonary Connection. A three-dimensional polyhedral mesh was constructed for the numerical simulation. The rheological properties of blood were considered as Newtonian, and flow in the connection was assumed to be laminar. The results demonstrated complex flow patterns in the connection. The outcomes of the simulation showed reasonable agreement with the results available in the literature for a similar model.

  1. A comparison of the Doppler spectra from human blood and artificial blood used in a flow phantom.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, P R; Loupas, T; McDicken, W N

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Doppler signals from human blood and artificial blood used in a flow phantom is described. The artificial blood used was a suspension of Sephadex particles in a glycerol solution. The Doppler power was measured as a function of Sephadex concentration and found to peak at a concentration of about 40% by volume. The power from blood was less by a factor of 150-250 than the power from Sephadex of a similar concentration. The first and second order statistics of the Doppler spectra from Sephadex were independent of particle concentration, and were very similar to those of spectra from blood. PMID:1691560

  2. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  3. Validation of a Device for Fluorescence Sensing of Rare Circulating Cells with Diffusive Light in an Optical Flow Phantom Model

    PubMed Central

    Zettergren, Eric; Vickers, Dwayne; Runnels, Judith; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and quantification of rare circulating cells in biological tissues is an important problem and has many applications in biomedical research. Current methods normally involve extraction of blood samples and counting of cells ex vivo, or the use of microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry. The goal of this work is to develop an instrument for non-invasively enumerating very rare circulating cells in small animals with diffuse light with several orders of magnitude sensitivity improvement versus current approaches. In this work, we describe the design of our system and show that single, fluorescent microspheres can be detected in limb-mimicking optical flow phantoms with varying optical properties chosen to simulate in vivo conditions. Further, we demonstrate single cell counting capabilities using fluorescently (Vybrant-DiD) labeled Jurkat and Multiple Myeloma cells. Ongoing work includes in vivo testing and characterization of our system in mice. PMID:22254354

  4. Bile Flow Phantom Model and Animal Bile Duct Dilation Model for Evaluating Biliary Plastic Stents with Advanced Hydrophilic Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Won Seop; Lee, Don Haeng; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The efforts to improve biliary plastic stents (PSs) for decreasing biofilm formation and overcome short patency time have been continued. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of advanced hydrophilic coating for patency and biodurability of PS. Methods Using an in vitro bile flow phantom model, we compared patency between prototype PS with hydrophilic coating (PS+HC) and prototype PS without hydrophilic coating (PS−HC). We performed an analysis of the degree of luminal narrowing by microscopic examination. Using an in vivo swine bile duct dilation model made by endoscopic papillary closure and stent insertion, we evaluated biodurability of hydrophilic coating. Results In the phantom model, PS+HC showed less biofilm formation and luminal narrowing than PS−HC at 8 weeks (p<0.05). A total of 31 stents were inserted into the dilated bile duct of seven swine models, and 24 stents were successfully retrieved 8 weeks later. There was no statistical difference of stent patency between the polyethylene PS+HC and the polyurethane PS+HC. The biodurability of hydrophilic coating was sustained up to 8 weeks, when assessing the coating layer by scanning electron microscopy examination. Conclusions Advanced hydrophilic coating technology may extend the patency of PS compared to uncoated PS. PMID:27021507

  5. Computation of flow pressure fields from magnetic resonance velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Yang, G Z; Kilner, P J; Wood, N B; Underwood, S R; Firmin, D N

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping has unrivalled capacities for acquiring in vivo multi-directional blood flow information. In this study, the authors set out to derive both spatial and temporal components of acceleration, and hence differences of pressure in a flow field using cine magnetic resonance velocity data. An efficient numerical algorithm based on the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid was used. The computational approach was validated with in vitro flow phantoms. This work aims to contribute to a better understanding of cardiovascular dynamics and to serve as a basis for investigating pulsatile pressure/flow relationships associated with normal and impaired cardiovascular function. PMID:8892202

  6. Electrocardiogram-synchronized rotational speed change mode in rotary pumps could improve pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masahiko; Nishimura, Takashi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Kenji; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2011-10-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have greatly improved the prognosis of patients with end-stage heart failure, even if continuous flow is different from physiological flow in that it has less pulsatility. A novel pump controller of continuous-flow LVADs has been developed, which can change its rotational speed (RS) in synchronization with the native cardiac cycle, and we speculated that pulsatile mode, which increases RS just in the systolic phase, can create more pulsatility than the current system with constant RS does. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of this pulsatile mode of continuous-flow LVADs on pulsatility in in vivo settings. Experiments were performed on eight adult goats (61.7 ± 7.5 kg). A centrifugal pump, EVAHEART (Sun Medical Technology Research Corporation, Nagano, Japan), was installed by the apex drainage and the descending aortic perfusion. A pacing lead for the detection of ventricular electrocardiogram was sutured on the anterior wall of the right ventricle. In the present study, we compared pulse pressure or other parameters in the following three conditions, including Circuit-Clamp (i.e., no pump support), Continuous mode (constant RS), and Pulsatile mode (increase RS in systole). Assist rate was calculated by dividing pump flow (PF) by the sum of PF and ascending aortic flow (AoF). In continuous and pulsatile modes, these assist rates were adjusted around 80-90%. The following three parameters were used to evaluate pulsatility, including pulse pressure, dp/dt of aortic pressure (AoP), and energy equivalent pulse pressure (EEP = (∫PF*AoP dt)/(∫PF dt), mm Hg). The percent difference between EEP and mean AoP is used as an indicator of pulsatility, and normally it is around 10% of mean AoP in physiological pulse. Both pulse pressure and mean dp/dt max were decreased in continuous mode compared with clamp condition, while those were regained by pulsatile mode nearly to clamp condition (pulse

  7. Effect of swirling inlet condition on the flow field in a stenosis phantom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon; CenterBiofluid; Biomimic Research Team

    2013-11-01

    The spiral blood flow effect in an axisymmetric stenosis model was experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry velocity field measurement technique and streakline flow visualization. Spiral inserts with two different helical pitches (10D and 10/3D) were installed upstream of the stenosis to induce swirling flows. Results show that the spiral flow significantly reduces the length of recirculation flow and provokes early breakout of turbulent transition, but variation of swirling intensity does not induce significant changes of turbulence intensity. The present results about the spiral flow effects through the stenosis will contribute in achieving better understanding of the hemodynamic characteristics of atherosclerosis and in discovering better diagnosis procedures and clinical treatments.

  8. Advanced 3D mesh manipulation in stereolithographic files and post-print processing for the manufacturing of patient-specific vascular flow phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Ryan P.; Chand, Arpita; Vidiyala, Sowmya; Arechavala, Stacie M.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    Complex vascular anatomies can cause the failure of image-guided endovascular procedures. 3D printed patient-specific vascular phantoms provide clinicians and medical device companies the ability to preemptively plan surgical treatments, test the likelihood of device success, and determine potential operative setbacks. This research aims to present advanced mesh manipulation techniques of stereolithographic (STL) files segmented from medical imaging and post-print surface optimization to match physiological vascular flow resistance. For phantom design, we developed three mesh manipulation techniques. The first method allows outlet 3D mesh manipulations to merge superfluous vessels into a single junction, decreasing the number of flow outlets and making it feasible to include smaller vessels. Next we introduced Boolean operations to eliminate the need to manually merge mesh layers and eliminate errors of mesh self-intersections that previously occurred. Finally we optimize support addition to preserve the patient anatomical geometry. For post-print surface optimization, we investigated various solutions and methods to remove support material and smooth the inner vessel surface. Solutions of chloroform, alcohol and sodium hydroxide were used to process various phantoms and hydraulic resistance was measured and compared with values reported in literature. The newly mesh manipulation methods decrease the phantom design time by 30 - 80% and allow for rapid development of accurate vascular models. We have created 3D printed vascular models with vessel diameters less than 0.5 mm. The methods presented in this work could lead to shorter design time for patient specific phantoms and better physiological simulations.

  9. Evaluation of a novel pulsatile extracorporeal life support system synchronized to the cardiac cycle: effect of rhythm changes on hemodynamic performance.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunil; Wang, Shigang; Pauliks, Linda; Chang, Dennis; Clark, Joseph B; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a frequent complication during extracorporeal life support (ECLS). A new ECLS system can provide pulsatile flow synchronized to the patient's intrinsic cardiac cycle based upon the R wave of the electrocardiogram (ECG). It is unclear how the occurrence of arrhythmias may alter the hemodynamic performance of the system. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of simulated arrhythmias on hemodynamics during R wave-triggered pulsatile ECLS. The ECLS circuit with an i-cor diagonal pump and iLA membrane ventilator was primed with whole blood at room temperature. Flow and pressure data were collected at 2.5 and 4 L/min for each condition using a customized data acquisition system. Pulsatile ECLS flow was R wave synchronized to an ECG simulator using 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 assist ratios. Conditions tested included sinus rhythm at 45 and 90 bpm, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), ventricular tachycardia (VT), and irregular rhythms such as ventricular fibrillation. Pulsatile mode was successfully triggered by ECG signals of normal sinus rhythm, SVT, VT, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular bigeminy with assist ratios 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3. Regular rhythm at 90 bpm generated the best surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE). For SVT and VT, an assist ratio of 1:2 resulted in maximum pulsatile flow waveforms with optimal SHE at 2.5 L/min flow rate. At 4 L/min, SHE declined and the pressure drop increased independent of arrhythmia condition. Irregular rhythms still produced adequate pulsatile wave forms at lower pulsatile frequency. This study demonstrated the feasibility of generating pulsatile ECLS flow with the novel ECG-synchronized i-cor system during various simulated rhythms. The optimal rate for pulsatile flow was 90 bpm. During irregular rhythms, the lower pulsatile frequency was the more reliable synchronization mode for generating pulsatile flow. PMID:25626581

  10. Experimental validation of a tractable numerical model for focused ultrasound heating in flow-through tissue phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinlan; Holt, R. Glynn; Cleveland, Robin O.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2004-10-01

    Heating from high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. The presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in a Newtonian viscous medium. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments employing non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms and designed to provide verification of the model predictions. We show that blood flow of 2 cm/s (6.4 ml/min through a 2.6 mm `vessel') can reduce peak temperature in a vessel wall by 25%. We also show that HIFU intensities of 6.5×105 W/m2 can induce acoustic streaming with peak velocities up to 5 cm/s and this can reduce heating near a vessel wall by more than 10%. These results demonstrate that convective cooling is important in HIFU and can be accounted for within simulation models. .

  11. A wall-less poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel flow phantom with accurate scattering properties for transcranial Doppler ultrasound propagation channels analysis.

    PubMed

    Weir, Alexander J; Sayer, Robin; Cheng-Xiang Wang; Parks, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Medical phantoms are frequently required to verify image and signal processing systems, and are often used to support algorithm development for a wide range of imaging and blood flow assessments. A phantom with accurate scattering properties is a crucial requirement when assessing the effects of multi-path propagation channels during the development of complex signal processing techniques for Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound. The simulation of physiological blood flow in a phantom with tissue and blood equivalence can be achieved using a variety of techniques. In this paper, poly (vinyl alcohol) cryogel (PVA-C) tissue mimicking material (TMM) is evaluated in conjunction with a number of potential scattering agents. The acoustic properties of the TMMs are assessed and an acoustic velocity of 1524ms(-1), an attenuation coefficient of (0:49) × 10(-4)fdBm(1)Hz(-1), a characteristic impedance of (1.72) × 10(6)Kgm(-2)s(-1) and a backscatter coefficient of (1.12) × 10(-28)f(4)m(-1)Hz(-4)sr(-1) were achieved using 4 freeze-thaw cycles and an aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) scattering agent. This TMM was used to make an anatomically realistic wall-less flow phantom for studying the effects of multipath propagation in TCD ultrasound. PMID:26736851

  12. Use of computational fluid dynamics in the design of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging phantoms.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Freed, Melanie; Myers, Matthew R

    2013-09-21

    s of wash-in. This time was cut in half by the final CFD-derived strategy of flow pulsing. Driving the pump with a 25% duty cycle pulsatile waveform produced a nearly uniform concentration in the phantom in just a few seconds under typical conditions. Comparisons with published x-ray measurements using tumor-enhancement curves for both benign and malignant breast lesions showed a difference of approximately 4% between the CFD predictions and measurements of the contrast-agent concentration averaged over the lesion volume. The techniques derived using CFD optimization can be used in future phantom designs, including as starting points for future CFD phantom studies employing new lesion geometries and tumor-enhancement curves. PMID:23999605

  13. Use of computational fluid dynamics in the design of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Freed, Melanie; Myers, Matthew R.

    2013-09-01

    6 s of wash-in. This time was cut in half by the final CFD-derived strategy of flow pulsing. Driving the pump with a 25% duty cycle pulsatile waveform produced a nearly uniform concentration in the phantom in just a few seconds under typical conditions. Comparisons with published x-ray measurements using tumor-enhancement curves for both benign and malignant breast lesions showed a difference of approximately 4% between the CFD predictions and measurements of the contrast-agent concentration averaged over the lesion volume. The techniques derived using CFD optimization can be used in future phantom designs, including as starting points for future CFD phantom studies employing new lesion geometries and tumor-enhancement curves.

  14. Tissue Pulsatility Imaging of Cerebral Vasoreactivity during Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kucewicz, John C.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Giardino, Nicholas D.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Paun, Marla; Dager, Stephen R.; Beach, Kirk W.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue Pulsatility Imaging (TPI) is an ultrasonic technique that is being developed at the University of Washington to measure tissue displacement or strain due to blood flow over the cardiac and respiratory cycles. This technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older non-ultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part due to perfusion. TPI adapts tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure the “plethysmographic” signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. This paper presents a feasibility study to determine if TPI can be used to assess cerebral vasoreactivity. Ultrasound data were collected transcranially through the temporal acoustic window from four subjects before, during, and after voluntary hyperventilation. In each subject, decreases in tissue pulsatility during hyperventilation were observed that were statistically correlated with the subject’s end-tidal CO2 measurements. PMID:18336991

  15. New pulsatile bioreactor for fabrication of tissue-engineered patches.

    PubMed

    Sodian, R; Lemke, T; Loebe, M; Hoerstrup, S P; Potapov, E V; Hausmann, H; Meyer, R; Hetzer, R

    2001-01-01

    To date, one approach to tissue engineering has been to develop in vitro conditions to ultimately fabricate functional cardiovascular structures prior to final implantation. In our current experiment, we developed a new pulsatile flow system that provides biochemical and biomechanical signals to regulate autologous patch-tissue development in vitro. The newly developed patch bioreactor is made of Plexiglas and is completely transparent (Mediport Kardiotechnik, Berlin). The bioreactor is connected to an air-driven respirator pump, and the cell culture medium continuously circulates through a closed-loop system. We thus developed a closed-loop, perfused bioreactor for long-term patch-tissue conditioning, which combines continuous, pulsatile perfusion and mechanical stimulation by periodically stretching the tissue-engineered patch constructs. By adjusting the stroke volume, the stroke rate, and the inspiration/expiration time of the ventilator, it allows various pulsatile flows and different levels of pressure. The whole system is a highly isolated cell culture setting, which provides a high level of sterility, gas supply, and fits into a standard humidified incubator. The bioreactor can be sterilized by ethylene oxide and assembled with a standard screwdriver. Our newly developed bioreactor provides optimal biomechanical and biodynamical stimuli for controlled tissue development and in vitro conditioning of an autologous tissue-engineered patch. PMID:11410898

  16. Experimental techniques for studying poroelasticity in brain phantom gels under high flow microinfusion.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, O; Sindhwani, N; Linninger, A

    2010-05-01

    Convection enhanced delivery is an attractive option for the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and brain tumors. However, the occurrence of a backflow is a major problem impeding the widespread use of this technique. In this paper, we analyze experimentally the force impact of high flow microinfusion on the deformable gel matrix. To investigate these fluid structure interactions, two optical methods are reported. First, gel stresses during microinfusion were visualized through a linear polariscope. Second, the displacement field was tracked using 400 nm nanobeads as space markers. The corresponding strain and porosity fields were calculated from the experimental observations. Finally, experimental data were used to validate a computational model for fluid flow and deformation in soft porous media. Our studies demonstrate experimentally, the distribution and magnitude of stress and displacement fields near the catheter tip. The effect of fluid traction on porosity and hydraulic conductivity is analyzed. The increase in fluid content in the catheter vicinity enhances the gel hydraulic conductivity. Our computational model takes into account the changes in porosity and hydraulic conductivity. The simulations agree with experimental findings. The experiments quantified solid matrix deformation, due to fluid infusion. Maximum deformations occur in areas of relatively large fluid velocities leading to volumetric strain of the matrix, causing changes in hydraulic conductivity and porosity close to the catheter tip. The gradual expansion of this region with increased porosity leads to decreased hydraulic resistance that may also create an alternative pathway for fluid flow. PMID:20459209

  17. The Influence of Different Operating Conditions on the Blood Damage of a Pulsatile Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zihao; Yang, Ming; Wang, Xianghui; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Because of pulsatile blood flow's benefit for myocardial recovery, perfusion of coronary arteries and end organs, pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VADs) are still widely used as paracorporeal mechanical circulatory support devices in clinical applications, especially in pediatric heart failure patients. However, severe blood damage limits the VAD's service period. Besides optimizing the VAD geometry to reduce blood damage, the blood damage may also be decreased by changing the operating conditions. In this article, a pulsatile VAD was used to investigate the influence of operating conditions on its blood damage, including hemolysis, platelet activation, and platelet deposition. Three motion profiles of pusher plate (sine, cosine, and polynomial), three stroke volumes (ejection fractions) (56 ml [70%], 42 ml [52.5%], and 28 ml [35%]), three pulsatile rates (75, 100, and 150 bpm), and two assist modes (copulsation and counterpulsation) were implemented respectively in VAD fluid-structure interaction simulations to calculate blood damage. The blood damage indices indicate that cosine motion profile, higher ejection fraction, higher pulsatile rate, and counterpulsation can decrease platelet deposition whereas increase hemolysis and platelet activation, and vice versa. The results suggest that different operating conditions have different effects on pulsatile VAD's blood damage and may be beneficial to choose suitable operating condition to reduce blood damage in clinical applications. PMID:26164600

  18. Three-dimensional shape construction of pulsatile tissue from ultrasonic movies for assistance of clinical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Hikari; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2010-02-01

    Three-dimensional shape of pulsatile tissue due to blood flow, which is one of key diagnostic features in ischemia, has been constructed from 2D ultrasonic movies for assisting clinical diagnosis. The 2D ultrasonic movies (640x480pixels/frame, 8bits/pixel, 33ms/frame) were taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus and an ultrasonic probe, while measuring the probe orientations with a compact tilt-sensor. The 2D images of pulsatile strength were obtained from each 2D ultrasonic movie by evaluating a heartbeat-frequency component calculated by Fourier transform of a series of pixel values sampled at each pixel. The 2D pulsatile images were projected into a 3D domain to obtain a 3D grid of pulsatile strength according to the probe orientations. The 3D shape of pulsatile tissue was constructed by determining the iso-surfaces of appropriate strength in the 3D grid. The shapes of pulsatile tissue examined in neonatal crania clearly represented the 3D structures of several arteries such as middle cerebral artery, which is useful for diagnosis of ischemic diseases. Since our technique is based on feature extraction in tissue dynamics, it is also useful for homogeneous tissue, for which conventional 3D ultrasonogram is unsuitable due to unclear tissue boundary.

  19. Pulsed-injection method for blood flow velocity measurement in intraarterial digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C G; Plewes, D B

    1986-08-01

    The pulsed-injection method for measuring the velocity of blood flow in intraarterial digital subtraction angiography is described. With this technique, contrast material is injected at a pulsing frequency as high as 15 Hz, so that two or more boluses can be imaged simultaneously. The velocity of flow is determined by measuring the spacing between the boluses and multiplying it by the pulsing frequency. Results of tests with phantoms correlate well with flow measurements obtained with a graduated cylinder for velocities ranging from 8 to 60 cm/sec. The potential of the method for time-dependent velocity measurement has been demonstrated with simulated pulsatile flows. PMID:3523598

  20. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  1. A Pulsatile Cardiovascular Computer Model for Teaching Heart-Blood Vessel Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Kenneth; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a model which gives realistic predictions of pulsatile pressure, flow, and volume events in the cardiovascular system. Includes computer oriented laboratory exercises for veterinary and graduate students; equations of the dynamic and algebraic models; and a flow chart for the cardiovascular teaching program. (JN)

  2. The pulsating brain: A review of experimental and clinical studies of intracranial pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of adequate blood flow to the brain is critical for normal brain function; cerebral blood flow, its regulation and the effect of alteration in this flow with disease have been studied extensively and are very well understood. This flow is not steady, however; the systolic increase in blood pressure over the cardiac cycle causes regular variations in blood flow into and throughout the brain that are synchronous with the heart beat. Because the brain is contained within the fixed skull, these pulsations in flow and pressure are in turn transferred into brain tissue and all of the fluids contained therein including cerebrospinal fluid. While intracranial pulsatility has not been a primary focus of the clinical community, considerable data have accrued over the last sixty years and new applications are emerging to this day. Investigators have found it a useful marker in certain diseases, particularly in hydrocephalus and traumatic brain injury where large changes in intracranial pressure and in the biomechanical properties of the brain can lead to significant changes in pressure and flow pulsatility. In this work, we review the history of intracranial pulsatility beginning with its discovery and early characterization, consider the specific technologies such as transcranial Doppler and phase contrast MRI used to assess various aspects of brain pulsations, and examine the experimental and clinical studies which have used pulsatility to better understand brain function in health and with disease. PMID:21349153

  3. Towards an ideal blood analogue for Doppler ultrasound phantoms.

    PubMed

    Oates, C P

    1991-11-01

    If a phantom is to produce Doppler spectral waveforms accurately matching those that would be obtained in vivo, it is necessary to use a fluid that behaves like blood in vivo, both acoustically and rheologically. The use of blood itself is undesirable and an analogue is required. Blood exhibits non-Newtonian behaviour as a result of aggregation of erythrocytes at low shear rates. This behaviour affects flow not only in sub-millimetre diameter vessels, but also in large scale structures. An alternative to blood is described that uses finely powdered nylon suspended in a mixture of glycerol and water. The nylon particles used have dimensions and density close to those of erythrocytes and they aggregate at low shear rates to give non-Newtonian behaviour. Viscosity may be varied over a wide range by the addition of liquid detergent. Consideration is given to the importance of haematocrit in modelling pulsatile and disturbed flows as it affects the haemodynamics of flow and the backscattered power of an ultrasound beam. This adaptable blood analogue is suitable for use in models of both large structures and fine vessels. PMID:1754614

  4. Using a laser-Doppler flowmetry to measure pulsatile microcirculation on the kidney in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Ming-Yie; Chao, Pin-Tsun; Hsu, Tse-Lin; Wang, Yuh-Yin L.; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2001-10-01

    Although Laser Doppler flowmetery (LDF) been extensively used in measurement of microvascular blood flow of different tissues. However, due to some physiological vibrations, fast oscillations of the renal cortical flux (RCF) are hard to be measured. In the study, a commercial 3mW 780nm Laser Doppler flowmetery, with a single fiber and a de-vibration holder, was used to measure the pulsatile RCF in rats. Considering the fast response due to the heart rate of rats, the time constant (TC) was set to 0.05 second and thus the frequency response is up to 20Hz. Furthermore, a calibration standard and a static blood sample were also measured as the references without the pulsatile driving force. In order not to perturb the RCF with tiny momentum, the applying force that the fiber exerted on the renal surface was controlled below 100 dyne. To enhance the signal to noise ratio (SNR), an averaged periodogram was used to estimate the frequency components of the pulsatile microcirculation. It is found that the dominating fast oscillation of RCF is pulsatile and its harmonic components are directly correlated with those of the heartbeat (correlation coefficient =0.999, P<0.001, n=17). The result shows that, in the kidney, the pulsatile RCF is the dominating component of microcirculation oscillation and driven by the fast propagating blood pressure. This technique could be further utilized to analyze the pharmacological effect and hemodynamic parameters on renal function.

  5. A new imaging technique on strength and phase of pulsatile tissue-motion in brightness-mode ultrasonogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2007-03-01

    A new imaging technique has been developed for observing both strength and phase of pulsatile tissue-motion in a movie of brightness-mode ultrasonogram. The pulsatile tissue-motion is determined by evaluating the heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a series of pixel value as a function of time at each pixel in a movie of ultrasonogram (640x480pixels/frame, 8bit/pixel, 33ms/frame) taken by a conventional ultrasonograph apparatus (ATL HDI5000). In order to visualize both the strength and the phase of the pulsatile tissue-motion, we propose a pulsatile-phase image that is obtained by superimposition of color gradation proportional to the motion phase on the original ultrasonogram only at which the motion strength exceeds a proper threshold. The pulsatile-phase image obtained from a cranial ultrasonogram of normal neonate clearly reveals that the motion region gives good agreement with the anatomical shape and position of the middle cerebral artery and the corpus callosum. The motion phase is fluctuated with the shape of arteries revealing local obstruction of blood flow. The pulsatile-phase images in the neonates with asphyxia at birth reveal decreases of the motion region and increases of the phase fluctuation due to the weakness and local disturbance of blood flow, which is useful for pediatric diagnosis.

  6. Evaluation of a physiologic pulsatile pump system for neonate-infant cardiopulmonary bypass support.

    PubMed

    Undar, A; Masai, T; Inman, R; Beyer, E A; Mueller, M A; McGarry, M C; Frazier, O H; Fraser, C D

    1999-01-01

    An alternate physiologic pulsatile pump (PPP) system was designed and evaluated to produce sufficient pulsatility during neonate-infant open heart surgery. This hydraulically driven pump system has a unique "dual" pumping chamber mechanism. The first chamber is placed between the venous reservoir and oxygenator and the second chamber between the oxygenator and patient. Each chamber has two unidirectional tricuspid valves. Stroke volume (0.2-10 ml), upstroke rise time (10-350 msec), and pump rate (2-250 beats per minute [bpm]) can be adjusted independently to produce adequate pulsatility. This system has been tested in 3-kg piglets (n = 6), with a pump flow of 150 ml/kg/min, a pump rate of 150 bpm, and a pump ejection time of 110 msec. After initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), all animals were subjected to 25 minutes of hypothermia to reduce the rectal temperatures to 18 degrees C, 60 minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), then 10 minutes of cold perfusion with a full pump flow, and 40 minutes of rewarming. During CPB, mean arterial pressures were kept at less than 50 mm Hg. Mean extracorporeal circuit pressure (ECCP), the pressure drop of a 10 French aortic cannula, and the pulse pressure were 67+/-9, 21+/-6, and 16+/-2 mm Hg, respectively. All values are represented as mean+/-SD. No regurgitation or abnormal hemolysis has been detected during these experiments. The oxygenator had no damping effect on the quality of the pulsatility because of the dual chamber pumping mechanism. The ECCP was also significantly lower than any other known pulsatile system. We conclude that this system, with a 10 French aortic cannula and arterial filter, produces adequate pulsatility in 3 kg piglets. PMID:9952008

  7. In vitro performance of a perfusion and oxygenation optical sensor using a unique liver phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; King, Travis J.; Long, Ruiqi; Ericson, M. N.; Wilson, Mark A.; McShane, Michael J.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2012-03-01

    Between the years 1999 and 2008, on average 2,052 people died per year on the waiting list for liver transplants. Monitoring perfusion and oxygenation in transplanted organs in the 7 to 14 days period post-transplant can enhance graft and patient survival rates, and resultantly increase the availability of organs. In this work, we present in vitro results using a unique liver phantom that support the ability of our sensor to detect perfusion changes in the portal vein at low levels (50 mL/min . 4.5% of normal level). Our sensor measures diffuse reflection from three wavelengths (735, 805 and 940 nm) around the hemoglobin isobestic point (805 nm) to determine perfusion and oxygenation separately. To assess the sensitivity of our sensor to flow changes in the low range, we used two peristaltic pumps to pump a dye solution mimicking the optical properties of oxygenated blood, at various rates, through a PDMS based phantom mimicking the optical properties of liver tissue. The collected pulsatile signal increased by 120% (2.2X) for every 100 mL/min flow rise for all three wavelengths in the range 50 to 500 mL/min. In addition, we used different dye mixtures to mimic oxygenation changes at constant perfusion/flow levels. The optical properties of the dye mixtures mimic oxygen saturations ranging between 0 and 100%. The sensor was shown to be sensitive to changes in oxygen saturations above 50%.

  8. Feasibility of Pump Speed Modulation for Restoring Vascular Pulsatility with Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) diminish vascular pressure pulsatility, which may be associated with clinically reported adverse events including gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic valve insufficiency, and hemorrhagic stroke. Three candidate CF LVAD pump speed modulation algorithms designed to augment aortic pulsatility were evaluated in mock flow loop and ischemic heart failure (IHF) bovine models by quantifying hemodynamic performance as a function of mean pump speed, modulation amplitude, and timing. Asynchronous and synchronous copulsation (high revolutions per minute [RPM] during systole, low RPM during diastole) and counterpulsation (low RPM during systole, high RPM during diastole) algorithms were tested for defined modulation amplitudes (±300, ±500, ±800, and ±1,100 RPM) and frequencies (18.75, 37.5, and 60 cycles/minute) at low (2,900 RPM) and high (3,200 RPM) mean LVAD speeds. In the mock flow loop model, asynchronous, synchronous copulsation, and synchronous counterpulsation algorithms each increased pulse pressure (ΔP = 931%, 210%, and 98% and reduced left ventricular external work (LVEW = 20%, 22%, 16%). Similar improvements in vascular pulsatility (1,142%) and LVEW (40%) were observed in the IHF bovine model. Asynchronous modulation produces the largest vascular pulsatility with the advantage of not requiring sensor(s) for timing pump speed modulation, facilitating potential clinical implementation. PMID:26102173

  9. Film coatings for oral pulsatile release.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Alessandra; Zema, Lucia; Loreti, Giulia; Palugan, Luca; Gazzaniga, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Pulsatile delivery is generally intended as a release of the active ingredient that is delayed for a programmable period of time to meet particular chronotherapeutic needs and, in the case of oral administration, also target distal intestinal regions, such as the colon. Most oral pulsatile delivery platforms consist in coated formulations wherein the applied polymer serves as the release-controlling agent. When exposed to aqueous media, the coating initially performs as a protective barrier and, subsequently, undergoes a timely failure based on diverse mechanisms depending on its physico-chemical and formulation characteristics. Indeed, it may be ruptured because of the gradual expansion of the core, swell and/or erode due to the glassy-rubbery polymer transition or become permeable thus allowing the drug molecules to diffuse outwards. Otherwise, when the coating is a semipermeable membrane provided with one or more orifices, the drug is released through the latter as a result of an osmotic water influx. The vast majority of pulsatile delivery systems described so far have been prepared by spray-coating, which offers important versatility and feasibility advantages over other techniques such as press- and dip-coating. In the present article, the design, manufacturing and performance of spray-coated pulsatile delivery platforms is thus reviewed. PMID:23506956

  10. Validation of an optical flow algorithm to measure blood flow waveforms in arteries using dynamic digital x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, Kawal; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hawkes, David J.; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2000-06-01

    We have developed a weighted optical flow algorithm for the extraction of instantaneous blood velocity from dynamic digital x-ray images of blood vessels. We have carried out in- vitro validation of this technique. A pulsatile physiological blood flow circuit was constructed using sections of silicone tubing to simulate blood vessels with whole blood as the fluid. Instantaneous recording of flow from an electromagnetic flow meter (EMF) provided the gold standard measurement. Biplanar dynamic digital x-ray images of the blood vessel with injection of contrast medium were acquired at 25 fps using a PC frame capture card. Imaging of a Perspex calibration cube allowed 3D reconstruction of the vessel and determination of true dimensions. Blood flow waveforms were calculated off-line on a Sun workstation using the new algorithm. The correlation coefficient between instantaneous blood flow values obtained from the EMF and the x-ray method was r equals 0.871, n equals 1184, p less than 0.0001. The correlation coefficient for average blood flow was r equals 0.898, n equals 16, p less than 0.001. We have successfully demonstrated that our new algorithm can measure pulsatile blood flow in a vessel phantom. We aim to use this algorithm to measure blood flow clinically in patients undergoing vascular interventional procedures.

  11. [Comparative study of artificial circulation for the liver after cardiogenic shock: pulsatile or nonpulsatile?].

    PubMed

    Kohjima, T

    1998-11-01

    Because of multiple organ failure (MOF), the survival rate of patients with mechanical circulatory support has not been satisfactory, The purpose of this study is to estimate the effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile artificial circulation on hepatic microcirculation and function. Cardiogenic shock was induced experimentally by ligating of left anterior descending branch in pigs. For the right ventricular assist device, a nonpulsatile pump (Nikkiso HPM-15) was employed. The left ventricular function was supported by either a nonpulsatile pump (Nikkiso HPM-15: NP group) or a pulsatile pump (Zeon Medical: P group). NP group was further divided into 80% support (NP-1 group) and 100% support (NP-2 group) of the control cardiac output. All groups were maintained at an equivalent mean aortic pressure of 3 hours. We measured the hepatic artery blood flow, portal vein flow and hepatic regional blood flow. For the metabolic and hepatic oxygen metabolic data, GOT, GPT, arterial blood ketone body ratio (AKBR), lactate/pirubic acid (L/P), and hyaluronic acid were evaluated. The mean aortic pressure was higher in the NP-2 group than in the other groups. The hepatic arterial blood flow was significantly higher in the P group than in the others. The AKBR and hepatic oxygen metabolism showed significant improvement in the P group in comparison with others. The regional blood flow in the liver showed improvements in the P and NP-2 groups. These findings suggested that pulsatile circulation may be beneficial for microcirculation of the liver; and the augmented nonpulsatile flow had effects similar to those of pulsatile flow in hepatic circulation. PMID:9884562

  12. Parathyroid hormone pulsatility: physiological and clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Chiavistelli, Silvia; Giustina, Andrea; Mazziotti, Gherardo

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion is characterized by an ultradian rhythm with tonic and pulsatile components. In healthy subjects, the majority of PTH is secreted in tonic fashion, whereas approximately 30% is secreted in low-amplitude and high-frequency bursts occurring every 10–20 min, superimposed on tonic secretion. Changes in the ultradian PTH secretion were shown to occur in patients with primary and secondary osteoporosis, with skeletal effects depending on the reciprocal modifications of pulsatile and tonic components. Indeed, pathophysiology of spontaneous PTH secretion remains an area potentially suitable to be explored, particularly in those conditions such as secondary forms of osteoporosis, in which conventional biochemical and densitometric parameters may not always give reliable diagnostic and therapeutic indications. This review will highlight the literature data supporting the hypothesis that changes of ultradian PTH secretion may be correlated with skeletal fragility in primary and secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26273533

  13. Quantitative flow velocity measurements in vessels, aneurysms, and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using droplet path tracing with a biplane pulsed fluoroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Stephen; Lieber, Baruch B.; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Guterman, Lee R.; Hopkins, L. Nelson

    1997-05-01

    Detailed blood flow patterns appear to have a substantial effect upon arterial disease and the outcome of interventional endovascular therapeutic procedures. First, a demonstration of the effect of a stent on eliminating vortex flow in an aneurysm model is given. Next, a method is presented to measure the detailed 3D flow during pulsatile flow in a phantom. Finally, the method is applied to arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The method consists of the real-time radiographic tracking of contrast droplet paths with images from a biplane pulsed radiographic system used to derive the 3D particle location as a function of time. An example of droplet tracking in a sidewall aneurysm phantom is presented. The application of the method is already impacting the delineation of the detailed morphology and of flow characteristics of AVMs and the selection of transit times for endovascular occlusion of AVMs using cyanoacrylate in patients.

  14. Flap raising on pulsatile perfused cadaveric tissue: a novel method for surgical teaching and exercise.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fichter, Andreas; Braun, Christian; Bauer, Florian; Humbs, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Exercising flap raising procedures on cadavers is considered a prerequisite to prepare for clinical practise. To improve teaching and create conditions as realistic as possible, a perfusion device was developed providing pulsatile flow through the vessels of different donor sites. A plastic bag filled with red stained tab water was placed into a pump, which was driven by an electric motor. The bag was set under rhythmic compression with variable frequency and pressure. The pedicles of the radial forearm, anterolateral thigh, rectus abdominis, fibular and iliac crest flap were cannulated at the origin from their source arteries. Flap raising was performed under pulsatile perfusion in 15 fresh bodies and subsequently in 6 Thiel-embalmed cadavers during a flap raising course. We regularly observed staining of the skin and skin bleeding in fresh bodies and less reliable in embalmed cadavers. All flap pedicles showed pulsatile movements, and the radial pulse became palpable. Most perforators of the anterolateral thigh and osteocutaneous fibular flap could be identified by their pulse. Bleeding from bony tissue and venous return was seldom observed. We conclude that pulsatile perfusion of cadaveric tissue creates more realistic conditions for flap raising and improves teaching for beginners and advanced surgeons. PMID:24938642

  15. Recent technologies in pulsatile drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Raturi, Richa; Jain, Vikas; Bansal, Praveen; Singh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery systems (PDDS) have attracted attraction because of their multiple benefits over conventional dosage forms. They deliver the drug at the right time, at the right site of action and in the right amount, which provides more benefit than conventional dosages and increased patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body, and the drug is released rapidly and completely as a pulse after a lag time. These products follow the sigmoid release profile characterized by a time period. These systems are beneficial for drugs with chronopharmacological behavior, where nocturnal dosing is required, and for drugs that show the first-pass effect. This review covers methods and marketed technologies that have been developed to achieve pulsatile delivery. Marketed technologies, such as PulsincapTM, Diffucaps®, CODAS®, OROS® and PULSYSTM, follow the above mechanism to render a sigmoidal drug release profile. Diseases wherein PDDS are promising include asthma, peptic ulcers, cardiovascular ailments, arthritis and attention deficit syndrome in children and hypercholesterolemia. Pulsatile drug delivery systems have the potential to bring new developments in the therapy of many diseases. PMID:23507727

  16. Evolution of vortical structures in a curved artery model with non-Newtonian blood-analog fluid under pulsatile inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Steady flow and physiological pulsatile flow in a rigid 180° curved tube are investigated using particle image velocimetry. A non-Newtonian blood-analog fluid is used, and in-plane primary and secondary velocity fields are measured. A vortex detection scheme ( d 2-method) is applied to distinguish vortical structures. In the pulsatile flow case, four different vortex types are observed in secondary flow: deformed-Dean, Dean, Wall and Lyne vortices. Investigation of secondary flow in multiple cross sections suggests the existence of vortex tubes. These structures split and merge over time during the deceleration phase and in space as flow progresses along the 180° curved tube. The primary velocity data for steady flow conditions reveal additional vortices rotating in a direction opposite to Dean vortices—similar to structures observed in pulsatile flow—if the Dean number is sufficiently high.

  17. Power consumption of rotary blood pumps: pulsatile versus constant-speed mode.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Cotter, Chris; Bourque, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the power consumption of a HeartMate III rotary blood pump based on in vitro experiments performed in a cardiovascular simulator. To create artificial-pulse mode, we modulated the pump speed by decreasing the mean speed by 2000 rpm for 200 ms and then increasing speed by 4000 rpm (mean speeds plus 2000 rpm) for another 200 ms, creating a square waveform shape. The HeartMate III was connected to a cardiovascular simulator consisting of a hydraulic pump system to simulate left ventricle pumping action, arterial and venous compliance chambers, and an adjustable valve for peripheral resistance to facilitate the desired aortic pressure. The simulator operated based on Suga's elastance model to mimic the Starling response of the heart, thereby reproducing physiological blood flow and pressure conditions. We measured the instantaneous total electrical current and voltage of the pump to evaluate its power consumption. The aim was to answer these fundamental questions: (i) How does pump speed modulation affect pump power consumption? (ii) How does the power consumption vary in relation to external pulsatile flow? The results indicate that speed modulation and external pulsatile flow both moderately increase the power consumption. Increasing the pump speed reduces the impact of external pulsatile flow. PMID:24842216

  18. Evaluation of conventional nonpulsatile and novel pulsatile extracorporeal life support systems in a simulated pediatric extracorporeal life support model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Evenson, Alissa; Chin, Brian J; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate two extracorporeal life support (ECLS) circuits and determine the effect of pulsatile flow on pressure drop, flow/pressure waveforms, and hemodynamic energy levels in a pediatric pseudopatient. One ECLS circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump and Hilite 2400 LT oxygenator with arterial/venous tubing. The second circuit consisted of a Maquet RotaFlow centrifugal pump and Quadrox-iD Pediatric oxygenator with arterial/venous tubing. A 14Fr Medtronic Bio-Medicus one-piece pediatric arterial cannula was used for both circuits. All trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 500 to 2800 mL/min using pulsatile or nonpulsatile flow. The post-cannula pressure was maintained at 50 mm Hg. Blood temperature was maintained at 36°C. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. The results showed that the Deltastream DP3 circuit produced surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) in pulsatile mode at all flow rates, with greater SHE delivery at lower flow rates. Neither circuit produced SHE in nonpulsatile mode. The Deltastream DP3 pump also demonstrated consistently higher total hemodynamic energy at the pre-oxygenator site in pulsatile mode and a lesser pressure drop across the oxygenator. The Deltastream DP3 pump generated physiological pulsatility without backflow and provided increased hemodynamic energy. This novel ECLS circuit demonstrates suitable in vitro performance and adaptability to a wide range of pediatric patients. PMID:24660832

  19. Fistula of stapes footplate caused by pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid in inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, F; Hagen, R; Hofmann, E

    1997-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inner ear are well described, though the combination with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks remains controversial. In this paper a case of a bilateral Mondini malformation with a CSF otorrhea on one side is reported. The malformed stapes contains a perforation in the middle of the footplate and associated thinning analogous to a pothole in a mountain stream. The histological findings support the hypothesis of pulsatile flow of CSF as origin of the perforation of the footplate. PMID:9166882

  20. In vitro performance analysis of a novel pulsatile diagonal pump in a simulated pediatric mechanical circulatory support system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pump performance of the third-generation Medos diagonal pump, the Deltastream DP3, on hemodynamic profile and pulsatility in a simulated pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) system. The experimental circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 pump head and console (MEDOS Medizintechnik AG, Stolberg, Germany), a 14-Fr Terumo TenderFlow Pediatric arterial cannula and a 20-Fr Terumo TenderFlow Pediatric venous return cannula (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), and 3 ft of tubing with an internal diameter of in. for both arterial and venous lines. Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 250 mL/min to 1000 mL/min (250-mL/min increments) and rotational speeds ranging from 1000 to 4000 rpm (1000-rpm increments) using human blood (hematocrit 40%). The postcannula pressure was maintained at 60 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a Labview-based acquisition system. The pump provided adequate nonpulsatile and pulsatile flow, created more hemodynamic energy under pulsatile mode, and generated higher positive and negative pressures when the inlet and outlet of the pump head, respectively, were clamped. After the conversion from nonpulsatile to pulsatile mode, the flow rates and the rotational speeds increased. In conclusion, the novel Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump is able to supply the required flow rate for pediatric MCS, generate adequate quality of pulsatility, and provide surplus hemodynamic energy output in a simulated pediatric MCS system. PMID:24237183

  1. Simulation study of autoregulation responses of peripheral circulation to systemic pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    Aletti, Federico; Lanzarone, Ettore; Costantino, Maria Laura; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Background This simulation study investigated potential modulations of total peripheral resistance (TPR), due to distributed peripheral vascular activity, by means of a lumped model of the arterial tree and a non linear model of microcirculation, inclusive of local controls of blood flow and tissue-capillary fluid exchange. Results Numerical simulations of circulation were carried out to compute TPR under different conditions of blood flow pulsatility, and to extract the pressure-flow characteristics of the cardiovascular system. Simulations showed that TPR seen by the large arteries was increased in absence of pulsatility, while it decreased with an augmented harmonic content. This is a typically non linear effect due to the contribution of active, non linear autoregulation of the peripheral microvascular beds, which also generated a nonlinear relationship between arterial blood pressure and cardiac output. Conclusion This simulation study, though focused on a simple effect attaining TPR modulation due to pulsatility, suggests that non-linear autoregulation mechanisms cannot be overlooked while studying the integrated behavior of the global cardiovascular system, including the arterial tree and the peripheral vascular bed. PMID:19630959

  2. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus. PMID:15825857

  3. Validity of blood flow measurement using 320 multi-detectors CT and first-pass distribution theory: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Xuefang; Xu, Shaopeng; Zhou, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by first-pass technique. Heart was simulated with a container that was filled with pipeline of 3mm diameter; coronary artery was simulated with a pipeline of 2 cm diameter and connected with the simulated heart. The simulated coronary artery was connected with a big container with 1500 ml saline and 150ml contrast agent. One pump linking with simulated heart will withdraw with a speed of 10 ml/min, 15 ml/min, 20 ml/min, 25 ml/min and 30 ml/min. First CT scan starts after 30 s of pumpback with certain speed. The second CT scan starts 5 s after first CT scans. CT images processed as follows: The second CT scan images subtract first CT scan images, calculate the increase of CT value of simulated heart and the CT value of the unit volume of simulated coronary artery and then to calculate the total inflow of myocardial blood flow. CT myocardial blood flows were calculated as: 0.94 ml/s, 2.09 ml/s, 2.74 ml/s, 4.18 ml/s, 4.86 ml/s. The correlation coefficient is 0.994 and r2 = 0.97. The method of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by 2 scans is feasible. It is possible to develop a new method for quantitatively and functional assessment of myocardial perfusion blood flow with less radiation does.

  4. 4D-Flow validation, numerical and experimental framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Kurt; Liu, Haining; Canton, Gador; Aliseda, Alberto; Yuan, Chun

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a group of assessment metrics of new 4D MRI flow sequences, an imaging modality that allows for visualization of three-dimensional pulsatile flow in the cardiovascular anatomy through time-resolved three-dimensional blood velocity measurements from cardiac-cycle synchronized MRI acquisition. This is a promising tool for clinical assessment but lacks a robust validation framework. First, 4D-MRI flow in a subject's stenotic carotid bifurcation is compared with a patient-specific CFD model using two different boundary condition methods. Second, Particle Image Velocimetry in a patient-specific phantom is used as a benchmark to compare the 4D-MRI in vivo measurements and CFD simulations under the same conditions. Comparison of estimated and measureable flow parameters such as wall shear stress, fluctuating velocity rms, Lagrangian particle residence time, will be discussed, with justification for their biomechanics relevance and the insights they can provide on the pathophysiology of arterial disease: atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. Lastly, the framework is applied to a new sequence to provide a quantitative assessment. A parametric analysis on the carotid bifurcation pulsatile flow conditions will be presented and an accuracy assessment provided.

  5. Somatosensory Pulsatile Tinnitus Syndrome: Somatic Testing Identifies a Pulsatile Tinnitus Subtype That Implicates the Somatosensory System

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert Aaron; Nam, Eui-Cheol; Melcher, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A new tinnitus syndrome is described: high-pitched, cardiac-synchronous tinnitus, whose pulsations are suppressed by strong contractions or compressions of the neck and jaw muscles (somatic testing). 14 cases, 6 non-lateralized and 8 unilateral, are reported. In the non-lateralized cases, onset was bilateral. In the one intermittent case, while her tinnitus was absent her pulsatile tinnitus could be induced by somatic testing. No etiology was found from physical examination, imaging, or ancillary testing. Because these cases of pulsatile tinnitus can be both induced and suppressed by activation of the somatosensory system of the head or upper lateral neck, we propose that this syndrome is occurring from (a) cardiac synchronous somatosensory activation of the central auditory pathway or (b) failure of the somatosensory-auditory central nervous system interactions to suppress cardiac somatosounds. PMID:18632767

  6. Real-time visualization of pulsatile tissue-motion in B-mode ultrasonogram for assistance in bedside diagnosis of ischemic diseases of neonatal cranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, M.; Yamada, M.; Nakamori, N.; Kitsunezuka, Y.

    2008-03-01

    By developing a real-time visualization system, pulsatile tissue-motion caused by artery pulsation of blood flow has been visualized continuously from a video stream of ultrasonogram in brightness mode. The system concurrently executes the three processes: (1) capturing an input B-mode video stream (640×480 pixels/frame, 30 fps) into a ring buffer of 256 frames, (2) detecting intensity and phase of pulsatile tissue-motion at each pixel from a heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a series of pixel value through the latest 64 frames as a function of time, and (3) generating an output video-stream of pulsatile-phase image, in which the motion phase is superimposed as color gradation on an input video-stream when the motion intensity exceeds a proper threshold. By optimizing the visualization software with the streaming SIMD extensions, the pulsatile-phase image has been continuously updated at more than 10 fps, which was enough to observe pulsatile tissue-motion in real time. Compared to the retrospective technique, the real-time visualization had clear advantages not only in enabling bedside observation and quick snapshot of pulsatile tissue-motion but also in giving useful feedback to probe handling for avoiding unwanted motion-artifacts, which may strongly assist pediatricians in bedside diagnosis of ischemic diseases.

  7. Atraumatic Pulsatile Leukocyte Circulation for Long-Term In Vitro Dynamic Culture and Adhesion Assays.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Giulia; Stoiber, Martin; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Low flow rate pumping of cell suspensions finds current applications in bioreactors for short-term dynamic cell culture and adhesion assays. The aim of this study was to develop an atraumatic pump and hemodynamically adapted test circuit to allow operating periods of at least several hours. A computer-controlled mini-pump (MP) was constructed based on non-occlusive local compression of an elastic tube with commercial bi-leaflet valves directing the pulsatile flow into a compliant circuit. Cell damage and activation in the system were tested with whole blood in comparison with a set with a conventional peristaltic pump (PP). Activation of circulating THP-1 monocytes was tested by measuring the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1). Additionally, monocyte-endothelial interactions were monitored using a parallel-plate flow chamber with an artificial stenosis. The system required a priming volume of only 20 mL, delivering a peak pulsatile flow of up to 35 mL/min. After 8 h, blood hemolysis was significantly lower for MP with 11 ± 3 mg/dL compared with PP with 100 ± 16 mg/dL. CD142 (tissue factor) expression on blood monocytes was 50% lower for MP. With MP, THP-1 cells could be pumped for extended periods (17 h), with no enhanced expression of CD54 permitting the long-term co-culture of THP-1 with endothelial cells and the analysis of flow pattern effects on cell adhesion. A low-damage assay setup was developed, which allows the pulsatile flow of THP-1 cells and investigation of their interaction with other cells or surfaces for extended periods of time. PMID:25894522

  8. Non-dimensional physics of pulsatile cardiovascular networks and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Berk; Pekkan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, there exist a variety of cardiovascular circulation networks in which the energetic ventricular load has both steady and pulsatile components. Steady load is related to the mean cardiac output (CO) and the haemodynamic resistance of the peripheral vascular system. On the other hand, the pulsatile load is determined by the simultaneous pressure and flow waveforms at the ventricular outlet, which in turn are governed through arterial wave dynamics (transmission) and pulse decay characteristics (windkessel effect). Both the steady and pulsatile contributions of the haemodynamic power load are critical for characterizing/comparing disease states and for predicting the performance of cardiovascular devices. However, haemodynamic performance parameters vary significantly from subject to subject because of body size, heart rate and subject-specific CO. Therefore, a 'normalized' energy dissipation index, as a function of the 'non-dimensional' physical parameters that govern the circulation networks, is needed for comparative/integrative biological studies and clinical decision-making. In this paper, a complete network-independent non-dimensional formulation that incorporates pulsatile flow regimes is developed. Mechanical design variables of cardiovascular flow systems are identified and the Buckingham Pi theorem is formally applied to obtain the corresponding non-dimensional scaling parameter sets. Two scaling approaches are considered to address both the lumped parameter networks and the distributed circulation components. The validity of these non-dimensional number sets is tested extensively through the existing empirical allometric scaling laws of circulation systems. Additional validation studies are performed using a parametric numerical arterial model that represents the transmission and windkessel characteristics, which are adjusted to represent different body sizes and non-dimensional haemodynamic states. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed non

  9. Investigation of pulsatile flowfield in healthy thoracic aorta models.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yang, An-Shik; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Complex hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of aortic dissection and atherosclerosis, as well as many other diseases. Since fundamental fluid mechanics are important for the understanding of the blood flow in the cardiovascular circulatory system of the human body aspects, a joint experimental and numerical study was conducted in this study to determine the distributions of wall shear stress and pressure and oscillatory WSS index, and to examine their correlation with the aortic disorders, especially dissection. Experimentally, the Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) method was used to acquire the true geometry of a normal human thoracic aorta, which was readily converted into a transparent thoracic aorta model by the rapid prototyping (RP) technique. The thoracic aorta model was then used in the in vitro experiments and computations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ACE+((R)) to determine flow characteristics of the three-dimensional, pulsatile, incompressible, and Newtonian fluid in the thoracic aorta model. The unsteady boundary conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the aortic flow were specified from the measured flowrate and pressure results during in vitro experiments. For the code validation, the predicted axial velocity reasonably agrees with the PC-MRI experimental data in the oblique sagittal plane of the thoracic aorta model. The thorough analyses of the thoracic aorta flow, WSSs, WSS index (OSI), and wall pressures are presented. The predicted locations of the maxima of WSS and the wall pressure can be then correlated with that of the thoracic aorta dissection, and thereby may lead to a useful biological significance. The numerical results also suggest that the effects of low WSS and high OSI tend to cause wall thickening occurred along the inferior wall of the aortic arch and the

  10. Effect of the Pulsatile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation on Hemodynamic Energy and Systemic Microcirculation in a Piglet Model of Acute Cardiac Failure.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideshi; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito; Douguchi, Takuma; Obata, Hideaki; Inamori, Syuji; Iwasaki, Tatsuo; Kasahara, Shingo; Sano, Shunji; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on hemodynamic energy and systemic microcirculation in an acute cardiac failure model in piglets. Fourteen piglets with a mean body weight of 6.08 ± 0.86 kg were divided into pulsatile (N = 7) and nonpulsatile (N = 7) ECMO groups. The experimental ECMO circuit consisted of a centrifugal pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a pneumatic pulsatile flow generator system developed in-house. Nonpulsatile ECMO was initiated at a flow rate of 140 mL/kg/min for the first 30 min with normal heart beating, with rectal temperature maintained at 36°C. Ventricular fibrillation was then induced with a 3.5-V alternating current to generate a cardiac dysfunction model. Using this model, we collected the data on pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups. The piglets were weaned off ECMO at the end of the experiment (180 min after ECMO was initiated). The animals did not receive blood transfusions, inotropic drugs, or vasoactive drugs. Blood samples were collected to measure hemoglobin, methemoglobin, blood gases, electrolytes, and lactic acid levels. Hemodynamic energy was calculated using the Shepard's energy equivalent pressure. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor brain and kidney perfusion. The pulsatile ECMO group had a higher atrial pressure (systolic and mean), and significantly higher regional saturation at the brain level, than the nonpulsatile group (for both, P < 0.05). Additionally, the pulsatile ECMO group had higher methemoglobin levels within the normal range than the nonpulsatile group. Our study demonstrated that pulsatile ECMO produces significantly higher hemodynamic energy and improves systemic microcirculation, compared with nonpulsatile ECMO in acute cardiac failure. PMID:26526784

  11. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  12. Pulsatile roller pump perfusion is safe in high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Kocakulak, M; Küçükaksu, S; Pişkin, E

    2004-05-01

    In this study, controllability, safety, blood cell depletion, and hemolysis of a pulsatile roller pump in high-risk patients was evaluated. Sarns 8000 roller pump (Sams, Terumo CVS, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) with a pulsatile control module was used as arterial pump in a clinical setting. Forty patients undergoing elective open heart surgery with high-risk either having chronically obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic renal failure were randomly included in the study to be operated on using pulsatile perfusion or non-pulsatile perfusion. Blood samples were withdrawn at induction of anesthesia, at the time of aortic clamping and de-clamping and at 1 hour and 24 hours following cessation of the bypass. Hematocrit and plasma free hemoglobin values were measured. We observed that the pulsatile roller pump perfusion and the extracorporeal circuit used in the clinical study is safe in high-risk patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. We did not face any emboli, hemolysis, or technical problems. Pulsatile roller pump perfusion with Sarns 8000 heart-lung machine is a simple and reliable technique and can be easily applied during open heart surgery. PMID:15202823

  13. Measurement of directed blood flow by laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Evan R.; Thompson, Oliver B.; Andrews, Michael K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent success in reconciling laser Doppler and speckle measurements of dermal perfusion by the use of multi-exposure speckle has prompted an investigation of speckle effects arising from directed blood flow which might be expected in the small blood vessels of the eye. Unlike dermal scatter, the blood in retinal vessels is surrounded by few small and stationary scatterers able to assist the return of light energy by large-angle scatter. Returning light is expected to come from multiple small angle scatter from the large red blood cells which dominate the fluid. This work compares speckle measurements on highly scattering skin, with measurements on flow in a retinal phantom consisting of a glass capillary which is itself immersed in an index matching fluid to provide a flat air-phantom interface. Brownian motion dominated measurements when small easily levitated scatters were used, and flow was undetectable. With whole-blood, Brownian motion was small and directed flows in the expected region of tens of mm/s were detectable. The nominal flow speed relates to the known pump rate; within the capillary the flow will have a profile reducing toward the walls. The pulsatile effects on laser speckle contrast in the retina are discussed with preliminary multi-exposure measurements on retinal vessels using a fundus camera. Differences between the multiple exposure curves and power spectra of perfused tissue and ordered flow are discussed.

  14. Cora valveless pulsatile rotary pump: new design and control.

    PubMed

    Monties, J R; Trinkl, J; Mesana, T; Havlik, P J; Demunck, J L

    1996-01-01

    For decades, research for developing a totally implantable artificial ventricle has been carried on. For 4 to 5 years, two devices have been investigated clinically. For many years, we have studied a rotary (but not centrifugal) pump that furnishes pulsatile flow without a valve and does not need external venting or a compliance chamber. It is a hypocycloidal pump based on the principle of the Maillard-Wankel rotary compressor. Currently made of titanium, it is activated by an electrical brushless direct-current motor. The motor-pump unit is totally sealed and implantable, without noise or vibration. This pump was implanted as a left ventricular assist device in calves. The midterm experiments showed good hemodynamic function. The hemolysis was low, but serious problems were encountered: blood components collecting on the gear mechanism inside the rotor jammed the pump. We therefore redesigned the pump to seal the gear mechanism. We used a double system to seal the open end of the rotor cavity with components polished to superfine optical quality. In addition, we developed a control system based on the study of the predicted shape of the motor current. The new design is now underway. We hope to start chronic experiments again in a few months. If the problem of sealing the bearing could be solved, the Cora ventricle could be used as permanent totally implantable left ventricular assist device. PMID:8561627

  15. Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kazuki; Tabata, Yuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues has been examined in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by characterizing pulsatile intensities with different regions of interest (ROIs). The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point in pediatric diagnosis of brain tissue, was detected from a heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in a movie fragment. The averages of pulsatile intensity and power were evaluated in two ROIs: common fan-shape and individual cranial-shape. The area of pulsatile region was also evaluated as the number of pixels where the pulsatile intensity exceeds a proper threshold. The extracranial pulsatile region was found mainly in the sections where mirror image was dominant echo artifact. There was significant difference of pulsatile area between two ROIs especially in the specific sections where mirror image was included, suggesting the suitability of cranial-shape ROI for statistical study on pulsatile tissues in brain. The normalized average of pulsatile power in the cranial-shape ROI exhibited most similar tendency to the normalized pulsatile area which was treated as a conventional measure in spite of its requirement of thresholding. It suggests the potential of pulsatile power as an alternative measure for pulsatile area in further statistical study of pulsatile tissues because it was neither affected by echo artifacts nor threshold.

  16. Managing phantom pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay

    2004-07-01

    Since the first medical description of post-amputation phenomena reported by Ambrose Paré, persistent phantom pain syndromes have been well recognized. However, they continue to be difficult to manage. The three most commonly utilized terms include phantom sensation, phantom pain, and stump pain. Phantom limb sensation is an almost universal occurrence at some time during the first month following surgery. However, most phantom sensations generally resolve after two to three years without treatment, except in the cases where phantom pain develops. The incidence of phantom limb pain has been reported to vary from 0% to 88%. The incidence of phantom limb pain increases with more proximal amputations. Even though phantom pain may diminish with time and eventually fade away, it has been shown that even two years after amputation, the incidence is almost the same as at onset. Consequently, almost 60% of patients continue to have phantom limb pain after one year. In addition, phantom limb pain may also be associated with multiple pain problems in other areas of the body. The third symptom, stump pain, is located in the stump itself. The etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of phantom pain are not clearly defined. However, both peripheral and central neural mechanisms have been described, along with superimposed psychological mechanisms. Literature describing the management of phantom limb pain or stump pain is in its infancy. While numerous treatments have been described, there is little clinical evidence supporting drug therapy, psychological therapy, interventional techniques or surgery. This review will describe epidemiology, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment modalities. The review also examines the effectiveness of various described modalities for prevention, as well as management of established phantom pain syndromes. PMID:16858476

  17. Evaluating microcirculation by pulsatile laser Doppler signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, P. T.; Jan, M. Y.; Hsiu, H.; Hsu, T. L.; Wang, W. K.; Wang, Y. Y. Lin

    2006-02-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a popular method for monitoring the microcirculation, but it does not provide absolute measurements. Instead, the mean flux response or energy distribution in the frequency domain is generally compared before and after stimulus. Using the heartbeat as a trigger, we investigated whether the relation between pressure and flux can be used to discriminate different microcirculatory conditions. We propose the following three pulsatile indices for evaluating the microcirculation condition from the normalized pressure and flux segment with a synchronized-averaging method: peak delay time (PDT), pressure rise time and flux rise time (FRT). The abdominal aortic blood pressure and renal cortex flux (RCF) signals were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). The mean value of the RCF did not differ between SHR and WKY. However, the PDT was longer in SHR (87.14 ± 5.54 ms, mean ± SD) than in WKY (76.92 ± 2.62 ms; p < 0.001). The FRT was also longer in SHR (66.56 ± 1.98 ms) than in WKY (58.02 ± 1.77 ms; p < 0.001). We propose that a new dimension for comparing the LDF signals, which the results from the present study show, can be used to discriminate RCF signals that cannot be discriminated using traditional methods.

  18. Experimental validation of numerical simulations on a cerebral aneurysm phantom model

    PubMed Central

    Seshadhri, Santhosh; Janiga, Gábor; Skalej, Martin; Thévenin, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of cerebral aneurysms, found in roughly 5% of the population and associated in case of rupture to a high mortality rate, is a major challenge for neurosurgery and neuroradiology due to the complexity of the intervention and to the resulting, high hazard ratio. Improvements are possible but require a better understanding of the associated, unsteady blood flow patterns in complex 3D geometries. It would be very useful to carry out such studies using suitable numerical models, if it is proven that they reproduce accurately enough the real conditions. This validation step is classically based on comparisons with measured data. Since in vivo measurements are extremely difficult and therefore of limited accuracy, complementary model-based investigations considering realistic configurations are essential. In the present study, simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been compared with in situ, laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements in the phantom model of a cerebral aneurysm. The employed 1:1 model is made from transparent silicone. A liquid mixture composed of water, glycerin, xanthan gum and sodium chloride has been specifically adapted for the present investigation. It shows physical flow properties similar to real blood and leads to a refraction index perfectly matched to that of the silicone model, allowing accurate optical measurements of the flow velocity. For both experiments and simulations, complex pulsatile flow waveforms and flow rates were accounted for. This finally allows a direct, quantitative comparison between measurements and simulations. In this manner, the accuracy of the employed computational model can be checked. PMID:24265876

  19. First In Vivo Results of a Novel Pediatric Oxygenator with an Integrated Pulsatile Pump.

    PubMed

    Stang, Katharina; Borchardt, Ralf; Neumann, Bernd; Kurz, Julia; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Greiner, Tim O; Fahrner, Christine; Schenk, Martin; Schlensak, Christian; Schubert, Maria; Lausberg, Henning; Herold, Sabine; Schlanstein, Peter C; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta; Wendel, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a pivotal bridge to recovery for cardiopulmonary failure in children. Besides its life-saving quality, it is often associated with severe system-related complications, such as hemolysis, inflammation, and thromboembolism. Novel oxygenator and pump systems may reduce such ECMO-related complications. The ExMeTrA oxygenator is a newly designed pediatric oxygenator with an integrated pulsatile pump minimizing the priming volume and reducing the surface area of blood contact. The aim of our study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of this new ExMeTrA (expansion mediated transport and accumulation) oxygenator in an animal model. During 6 h of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in pigs, parameters of the hemostatic system including coagulation, platelets and complement activation, and flow rates were investigated. A nonsignificant trend in C3 consumption, thrombin-antithrombin-III (TAT) complex formation and a slight trend in hemolysis were detected. During the ECC, the blood flow was constantly at 500 ml/min using only flexible silicone tubes inside the oxygenator as pulsatile pump. Our data clearly indicate that the hemostatic markers were only slightly influenced by the ExMeTrA oxygenator. Additionally, the oxygenator showed a constant quality of blood flow. Therefore, this novel pediatric oxygenator shows the potential to be used in pediatric and neonatal support with ECMO. PMID:26098176

  20. User-guided automated segmentation of time-series ultrasound images for measuring vasoreactivity of the brachial artery induced by flow mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Chandra M.; Kao, Yen H.; Cary, Ted W.; Arger, Peter H.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2005-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in response to vasoactive stimuli is closely associated with diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and congestive heart failure. The current method of using ultrasound to image the brachial artery along the longitudinal axis is insensitive for measuring the small vasodilatation that occurs in response to flow mediation. The goal of this study is to overcome this limitation by using cross-sectional imaging of the brachial artery in conjunction with the User-Guided Automated Boundary Detection (UGABD) algorithm for extracting arterial boundaries. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was performed on rigid plastic tubing, on elastic rubber tubing phantoms with steady and pulsatile flow, and on the brachial artery of a healthy volunteer undergoing reactive hyperemia. The area of cross section of time-series images was analyzed by UGABD by propagating the boundary from one frame to the next. The UGABD results were compared by linear correlation with those obtained by manual tracing. UGABD measured the cross-sectional area of the phantom tubing to within 5% of the true area. The algorithm correctly detected pulsatile vasomotion in phantoms and in the brachial artery. A comparison of area measurements made using UGABD with those made by manual tracings yielded a correlation of 0.9 and 0.8 for phantoms and arteries, respectively. The peak vasodilatation due to reactive hyperemia was two orders of magnitude greater in pixel count than that measured by longitudinal imaging. Cross-sectional imaging is more sensitive than longitudinal imaging for measuring flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery, and thus may be more suitable for evaluating endothelial dysfunction.

  1. Pulsatile enophthalmos, severe esotropia, kinked optic nerve and visual loss in neurofibromatosis type-1

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Virender; Haque, Nazmul; Pathengay, Avinash; Kekunnaya, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type I if associated with aplasia of greater wing of sphenoid may be associated with a pulsatile exophthalmos. However, very rarely it may be associated with a pulsatile enophthalmos. This clinical image describes a rare presentation with pulsatile enophthalmos, esotropia and kinking of the optic nerve due to neurofibomatosis type I. PMID:26903735

  2. Pulsatile enophthalmos, severe esotropia, kinked optic nerve and visual loss in neurofibromatosis type-1.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Virender; Haque, Nazmul; Pathengay, Avinash; Kekunnaya, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type I if associated with aplasia of greater wing of sphenoid may be associated with a pulsatile exophthalmos. However, very rarely it may be associated with a pulsatile enophthalmos. This clinical image describes a rare presentation with pulsatile enophthalmos, esotropia and kinking of the optic nerve due to neurofibomatosis type I. PMID:26903735

  3. Pulsatile support using a rotary left ventricular assist device with an electrocardiography-synchronized rotational speed control mode for tracking heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Mamoru; Nishimura, Takashi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Umeki, Akihide; Ando, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Kishimoto, Satoru; Fujii, Yutaka; Date, Kazuma; Kyo, Shunei; Adachi, Hideo; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2016-06-01

    We previously developed a novel control system for a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD), the EVAHEART, and demonstrated that sufficient pulsatility can be created by increasing its rotational speed in the systolic phase (pulsatile mode) in a normal heart animal model. In the present study, we assessed this system in its reliability and ability to follow heart rate variability. We implanted an EVAHEART via left thoracotomy into five goats for the Study for Fixed Heart Rate with ventricular pacing at 80, 100, 120 and 140 beats/min and six goats for the Study for native heart rhythm. We tested three modes: the circuit clamp, the continuous mode and the pulsatile mode. In the pulsatile mode, rotational speed was increased during the initial 35 % of the RR interval by automatic control based on the electrocardiogram. Pulsatility was evaluated by pulse pressure and dP/dt max of aortic pressure. As a result, comparing the pulsatile mode with the continuous mode, the pulse pressure was 28.5 ± 5.7 vs. 20.3 ± 7.9 mmHg, mean dP/dt max was 775.0 ± 230.5 vs 442.4 ± 184.7 mmHg/s at 80 bpm in the study for fixed heart rate, respectively (P < 0.05). The system successfully determined the heart rate to be 94.6 % in native heart rhythm. Furthermore, pulse pressure was 41.5 ± 7.9 vs. 27.8 ± 5.6 mmHg, mean dP/dt max was 716.2 ± 133.9 vs 405.2 ± 86.0 mmHg/s, respectively (P < 0.01). In conclusion, our newly developed the pulsatile mode for continuous-flow LVADs reliably provided physiological pulsatility with following heart rate variability. PMID:26608806

  4. A case of Takayasu's arteritis with pulsatile neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Karimifar, Mansoor; Karimifar, Mozhgan; Salimi, Fereshteh; Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA), also known as pulseless disease or occlusive thromboaortopathy, is a form of vasculitis of unknown cause that chiefly affects the aorta and its major branches, most frequently in young women. We describe an 18-year-old female with a soft and pulsatile mass in the left side of her neck. PMID:22973373

  5. Sequential Application of Steady and Pulsatile Medium Perfusion Enhanced the Formation of Engineered Bone

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Cristina; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-01-01

    In native bone, cells experience fluctuating shear forces that are induced by pulsatile interstitial flow associated with habitual loading. We hypothesized that the formation of engineered bone can be augmented by replicating such physiologic stimuli to osteogenic cells cultured in porous scaffolds using bioreactors with medium perfusion. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of fluid flow regime on in vitro bone-like tissue development by human adipose stem cells (hASC) cultivated on porous three-dimensional silk fibroin scaffolds. To this end, we varied the sequential relative durations of steady flow (SF) and pulsatile flow (PF) of culture medium applied over a period of 5 weeks, and evaluated their effect on early stages of bone formation. Porous silk fibroin scaffolds (400–600 μm pore size) were seeded with hASC (30×106 cells/mL) and cultured in osteogenic medium under four distinct fluid flow regimes: (1) PF for 5 weeks; (2) SF for 1 week, PF for 4 weeks; (3) SF for 2 weeks, PF for 3 weeks; (4) SF for 5 weeks. The PF was applied in 12 h intervals, with the interstitial velocity fluctuating between 400 and 1200 μm/s at a 0.5 Hz frequency for 2 h, followed by 10 h of SF. In all groups, SF was applied at 400 μm/s. The best osteogenic outcomes were achieved for the sequence of 2 weeks of SF and 3 weeks of PF, as evidenced by gene expression (including the PGE2 mechanotransduction marker), construct compositions, histomorphologies, and biomechanical properties. We thus propose that osteogenesis in hASC and the subsequent early stage bone development involve a mechanism, which detects and responds to the level and duration of hydrodynamic shear forces. PMID:23259605

  6. Nonlinear analysis and prediction of pulsatile hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K. |; Kloppstech, M.; Nowlan, S.J.; Harms, H.M.; Brabant, G.; Hesch, R.; Sejnowski, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    Pulsatile hormone secretion is observed in almost every hormonal system. The frequency of episodic hormone release ranges from approximately 10 to 100 pulses in 24 hours. This temporal mode of secretion is an important feature of intercellular information transfer in addition to a dose-response dependent regulation. It has been demonstrated in a number of experiments that changes in the temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone secretion specifically regulate cellular and organ function and structure. Recent evidence links osteoporosis, a disease characterized by loss of bone mass and structure, to changes in the dynamics of pulsatile parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. In our study we applied nonlinear and linear time series prediction to characterize the secretory dynamics of PTH in both healthy human subjects and patients with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic patients appear to lack periods of high predictability found in normal humans. In contrast to patients with osteoporosis patients with hyperparathyroidism, a condition which despite sometimes reduced bone mass has a preserved bone architecture, show periods of high predictability of PTH secretion. Using stochastic surrogate data sets which match certain statistical properties of the original time series significant nonlinear determinism could be found for the PTH time series of a group of healthy subjects. Using classical nonlinear analytical techniques we could demonstrate that the irregular pattern of pulsatile PTH secretion in healthy men exhibits characteristics of deterministic chaos. Pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy subjects seems to be a first example of nonlinear determinism in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. In Vitro MRV-based Hemodynamic Study of Complex Helical Flow in a Patient-specific Jugular Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Haraldsson, Henrik; Saloner, David

    2014-11-01

    Neurointerventional Radiologists are frequently requested to evaluate the venous side of the intracranial circulation for a variety of conditions including: Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency thought to play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis; sigmoid sinus diverticulum which has been linked to the presence of pulsatile tinnitus; and jugular vein distension which is related to cardiac dysfunction. Most approaches to evaluating these conditions rely on structural assessment or two dimensional flow analyses. This study was designed to investigate the highly complex jugular flow conditions using magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV). A jugular phantom was fabricated based on the geometry of the dominant jugular in a tinnitus patient. Volumetric three-component time-resolved velocity fields were obtained using 4D PC-MRI -with the protocol enabling turbulence acquisition- and the patient-specific pulsatile waveform. Flow was highly complex exhibiting regions of jet, high swirling strength, and strong helical pattern with the core originating from the focal point of the jugular bulb. Specifically, flow was analyzed for helicity and the level of turbulence kinetic energy elevated in the core of helix and distally, in the post-narrowing region.

  8. Bedside assistance in freehand ultrasonic diagnosis by real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, M.; Kawata, K.; Nakamori, N.; Kitsunezuka, Y.

    2011-03-01

    By real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion, freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of neonatal ischemic diseases has been assisted at the bedside. The 2D ultrasonic movie was taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus (ATL HDI5000) and ultrasonic probes of 5-7 MHz with the compact tilt-sensor to measure the probe orientation. The real-time 3D visualization was realized by developing an extended version of the PC-based visualization system. The software was originally developed on the DirectX platform and optimized with the streaming SIMD extensions. The 3D scatter diagram of the latest pulsatile tissues has been continuously generated and visualized as projection image with the ultrasonic movie in the current section more than 15 fps. It revealed the 3D structure of pulsatile tissues such as middle and posterior cerebral arteries, Willis ring and cerebellar arteries, in which pediatricians have great interests in the blood flow because asphyxiated and/or low-birth-weight neonates have a high risk of ischemic diseases such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and periventricular leukomalacia. Since the pulsatile tissue-motion is due to local blood flow, it can be concluded that the system developed in this work is very useful to assist freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of ischemic diseases in the neonatal cranium.

  9. Formulating SLMs as oral pulsatile system for potential delivery of melatonin to pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Beatrice; Di Sabatino, Marcello; Melegari, Cecilia; Passerini, Nadia

    2014-07-20

    The formulation development of melatonin (MLT) for infants and children with neurodevelopmental difficulties was fully investigated. This population have a higher prevalence of sleep disorders and present special challenges for drug administration and swallowing. To solve these issues, solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) were designed to obtain an oral flexible dosage form constituted by GRAS excipients and a free flow pulsatile delivery system for MLT, able to maintain its release through 8h. Three groups of SLMs were produced by spray congealing and characterized as regards particle size, morphology, flowability, solid state, drug content and release behavior. The SLMs manipulation with milk and yogurt and the MLT stability in these foods were also investigated. Microparticles with different excipient composition were selected to obtain a pulsatile release pattern over 8h. The final delivery platform displayed a prompt release from group I SLMs together with a lag phase of groups II and III SLMs, followed by a repeated MLT release from group II and a prolonged MLT release related to the last group. Finally, MLT was compatible and stable in milk and yogurt suggesting that microparticles sprinkled into food is acceptable for MLT administration to children unable to swallow capsules or tablets. PMID:24768728

  10. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

    1993-11-30

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  11. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  12. [Phantom limb pains].

    PubMed

    Giraux, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    With the radical experience of an amputation, the adaptation of body image is often incomplete. Some people experience phantom body perceptions, often painful and difficult to treat, after the amputation of a limb. PMID:26145132

  13. Phantom limb pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... limb is still there. This is called phantom sensation. It may feel: Tingly Prickly Numb Hot or ... your missing limb is getting shorter (telescoping) These sensations slowly get weaker and weaker. You should also ...

  14. EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION vs. COUNTERPULSATILE, PULSATILE, AND CONTINUOUS LEFT VENTRICULAR UNLOADING FOR PEDIATRIC MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Carlo R.; Koenig, Steven C.; Ionan, Constantine; Gillars, Kevin J.; Mitchell, Mike E.; Austin, Erle H.; Gray, Laman A.; Pantalos, George M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite progress with adult ventricular assist devices (VADs), limited options exist to support pediatric patients with life-threatening heart disease. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) remains the clinical standard. To characterize (patho)physiologic responses to different modes of mechanical unloading of the failing pediatric heart, ECMO was compared to either intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), pulsatile-flow (PF)VAD, or continuous-flow (CF)VAD support in a pediatric heart failure model. DESIGN Experimental. SETTING Large animal laboratory operating room. SUBJECTS Yorkshire piglets (n=47, 11.7±2.6 kg). INTERVENTIONS In piglets with coronary ligation-induced cardiac dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support devices were implanted and studied during maximum support. MEASUREMENTS and MAIN RESULTS Left ventricular, right ventricular, coronary, carotid, systemic arterial, and pulmonary arterial hemodynamics were measured with pressure and flow transducers. Myocardial oxygen consumption and total-body oxygen consumption (VO2) were calculated from arterial, venous, and coronary sinus blood sampling. Blood flow was measured in 17 organs with microspheres. Paired student t-tests compared baseline and heart failure conditions. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA compared heart failure, device support mode(s), and ECMO. Statistically significant (p<0.05) findings included: 1) improved left ventricular blood supply/demand ratio during PFVAD, CFVAD, and ECMO but not IABP support, 2) improved global myocardial blood supply/demand ratio during PFVAD, and CFVAD but not IABP or ECMO support, and 3) diminished pulsatility during ECMO and CFVAD but not IABP and PFVAD support. A profile of systems-based responses was established for each type of support. CONCLUSIONS Each type of pediatric VAD provided hemodynamic support by unloading the heart with a different mechanism that created a unique profile of physiological changes. These data contribute novel, clinically

  15. Quantum phantom cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    DaPbrowski, Mariusz P.; Kiefer, Claus; Sandhoefer, Barbara

    2006-08-15

    We apply the formalism of quantum cosmology to models containing a phantom field. Three models are discussed explicitly: a toy model, a model with an exponential phantom potential, and a model with phantom field accompanied by a negative cosmological constant. In all these cases we calculate the classical trajectories in configuration space and give solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation in quantum cosmology. In the cases of the toy model and the model with exponential potential we are able to solve the Wheeler-DeWitt equation exactly. For comparison, we also give the corresponding solutions for an ordinary scalar field. We discuss, in particular, the behavior of wave packets in minisuperspace. For the phantom field these packets disperse in the region that corresponds to the big-rip singularity. This thus constitutes a genuine quantum region at large scales, described by a regular solution of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. For the ordinary scalar field, the big-bang singularity is avoided. Some remarks on the arrow of time in phantom models as well as on the relation of phantom models to loop quantum cosmology are given.

  16. Stability of phantom wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.

    2005-06-15

    It has recently been shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. In this work phantom wormhole geometries are modeled by matching an interior traversable wormhole solution, governed by the equation of state p={omega}{rho} with {omega}<-1, to an exterior vacuum spacetime at a finite junction interface. The stability analysis of these phantom wormholes to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations about static equilibrium solutions is carried out. A master equation dictating the stability regions is deduced, and by separating the cases of a positive and a negative surface energy density, it is found that the respective stable equilibrium configurations may be increased by strategically varying the wormhole throat radius. The first model considered, in the absence of a thin shell, is that of an asymptotically flat phantom wormhole spacetime. The second model constructed is that of an isotropic pressure phantom wormhole, which is of particular interest, as the notion of phantom energy is that of a spatially homogeneous cosmic fluid, although it may be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes.

  17. In-vitro validation of a novel model-based approach to the measurement of arterial blood flow waveforms from dynamic digital x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, Kawal; Lambrou, Tryphon; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Hawkes, David J.

    2002-04-01

    We have developed a waveform shape model-based algorithm for the extraction of blood flow from dynamic arterial x-ray angiographic images. We have carried out in-vitro validation of this technique. A pulsatile physiological blood flow circuit was constructed using an anthropomorphic cerebral vascular phantom to simulate the cerebral arterial circulation with whole blood as the fluid. Instantaneous recording of flow from an electromagnetic flow meter (EMF) provided the gold standard measurement. Biplane dynamic digital x-ray images of the vascular phantom with injection of contrast medium were acquired at 25 fps using a PC frame capture card with calibration using a Perspex cube. Principal component analysis was used to construct a shape model by collecting 434 flow waveforms from the EMF under varying flow conditions. Blood flow waveforms were calculated from the angiographic data by using our previous concentration-distance curve matching (ORG) algorithm and by using the new model-based (MB) algorithm. Both instantaneous and mean flow values calculated using the MB algorithm showed greater correlation, less bias, and lower variability than those calculated using the ORG algorithm when compared to the EMF values. We have successfully demonstrated that use of a priori waveform shape information can improve flow measurements from dynamic x-ray angiograms.

  18. Laboratory Evaluation of Hemolysis and Systemic Inflammatory Response in Neonatal Nonpulsatile and Pulsatile Extracorporeal Life Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Krawiec, Conrad; Patel, Sunil; Kunselman, Allen R; Song, Jianxun; Lei, Fengyang; Baer, Larry D; Ündar, Akif

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the systemic inflammatory response and hemolytic characteristics of a conventional roller pump (HL20-NP) and an alternative diagonal pump with nonpulsatile (DP3-NP) and pulsatile mode (DP3-P) in simulated neonatal extracorporeal life support (ECLS) systems. The experimental neonatal ECLS circuits consist of a conventional Jostra HL20 roller pump or an alternative Medos DP3 diagonal pump, and Medos Hilite 800 LT hollow-fiber oxygenator with diffusion membrane. Eighteen sterile circuits were primed with freshly donated whole blood and divided into three groups: conventional HL20 with nonpulsatile flow (HL20-NP), DP3 with nonpulsatile flow (DP3-NP), and DP3 with pulsatile flow (DP3-P). All trials were conducted for durations of 12 h at a flow rate of 500 mL/min at 36°C. Simultaneous blood flow and pressure waveforms were recorded. Blood samples were collected to measure plasma-free hemoglobin (PFH), human tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-8, in addition to the routine blood gas, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactic acid levels. HL20-NP group had the highest PFH levels (mean ± standard error of the mean) after a 12-h ECLS run, but the difference among groups did not reach statistical significance (HL20-NP group: 907.6 ± 253.1 mg/L, DP3-NP group: 343.7 ± 163.2 mg/L, and DP3-P group: 407.6 ± 156.6 mg/L, P = 0.06). Although there were similar trends but no statistical differences for the levels of proinflammatory cytokines among the three groups, the HL20-NP group had much greater levels than the other groups (P > 0.05). Pulsatile flow generated higher total hemodynamic energy and surplus hemodynamic energy levels at pre-oxygenator and pre-clamp sites (P < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that the alternative diagonal pump ECLS circuits appeared to have less systemic inflammatory response and hemolysis compared with the conventional roller pump ECLS circuit in simulated

  19. Phantom energy traversable wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.

    2005-04-15

    It has been suggested that a possible candidate for the present accelerated expansion of the Universe is 'phantom energy'. The latter possesses an equation of state of the form {omega}{identical_to}p/{rho}<-1, consequently violating the null energy condition. As this is the fundamental ingredient to sustain traversable wormholes, this cosmic fluid presents us with a natural scenario for the existence of these exotic geometries. 'Note, however, that the notion of phantom energy is that of a homogeneously distributed fluid. Nevertheless, it can be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes, and it is shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. Because of the fact of the accelerating Universe, macroscopic wormholes could naturally be grown from the submicroscopic constructions that originally pervaded the quantum foam. One could also imagine an advanced civilization mining the cosmic fluid for phantom energy necessary to construct and sustain a traversable wormhole. In this context, we investigate the physical properties and characteristics of traversable wormholes constructed using the equation of state p={omega}{rho}, with {omega}<-1. We analyze specific wormhole geometries, considering asymptotically flat spacetimes and imposing an isotropic pressure. We also construct a thin shell around the interior wormhole solution, by imposing the phantom energy equation of state on the surface stresses. Using the 'volume integral quantifier' we verify that it is theoretically possible to construct these geometries with vanishing amounts of averaged null energy condition violating phantom energy. Specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity and time are also deduced from the traversability conditions for a particular wormhole geometry. These phantom energy traversable wormholes have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications. For instance, an advanced civilization may use these geometries to induce closed timelike

  20. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation. PMID:20350689

  1. Recent advances in pulsatile oral drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Politis, Stavros N; Rekkas, Dimitrios M

    2013-08-01

    It is well established that several diseases exhibit circadian behavior, following the relevant rhythm of the physiological functions of the human body. Their study falls in the fields of chronobiology and chronotherapeutics, the latter being essentially the effort of timely matching the treatment with the disease expression, in order to maximize the therapeutic benefits and minimize side effects. Pulsatile drug delivery is one of the pillars of chronopharmaceutics, achieved through dosage form design that allows programmable release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to follow the disease's time profile. Its major characteristic is the presence of lag phases, followed by drug release in a variety of rates, immediate, repeated or controlled. The scope of this review is to summarize the recent literature on pulsatile oral drug delivery systems and provide an overview of the ready to use solutions and early stage technologies, focusing on the awarded and pending patents in this technical field during the last few years. PMID:23506535

  2. Arterial Stiffness, Central Pulsatile Hemodynamic Load, and Orthostatic Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Si; Wan, Shixi; Zhou, Yufei; Pan, Pei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Hang; Shi, Di; Shi, Rufeng; Chen, Xiaoping; Jangala, Tulasiram

    2016-07-01

    The association between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is unclear. The authors recruited 1099 participants from the community. Questionnaire, physical examination, and laboratory tests were performed. To assess the correlation between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and OH, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed, and the discriminatory power was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve. The prevalence of OH in this population was 5.6%. After adjusting for potential confounders, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV) was significantly and positively correlated with OH in both the hypertension and nonhypertension groups (all P<.05), while central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) was only significantly associated with OH in the hypertension subgroup. In addition, BaPWV seemed to have a better discriminatory power than CSBP in both subgroups. BaPWV appears to be a better indicator of OH than CSBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:26543017

  3. Influence of vascular function and pulsatile hemodynamics on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Vanessa; Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between cardiac and vascular structure and function normally are optimized to ensure delivery of cardiac output with modest pulsatile hemodynamic overhead. Aortic stiffening with age or disease impairs optimal ventricular-vascular coupling, increases pulsatile load, and contributes to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, reduced systolic function, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Aortic pulse pressure and timing of peak systolic pressure are well-known measures of hemodynamic ventricular-vascular interaction. Recent work has elucidated the importance of direct, mechanical coupling between the aorta and the heart. LV systolic contraction results in displacement of aortic and mitral annuli, thereby producing longitudinal stretch in the ascending aorta and left atrium, respectively. Force associated with longitudinal stretch increases systolic load on the LV. However, the resulting energy stored in the elastic elements of the proximal aorta during systole facilitates early diastolic LV recoil and rapid filling. This review discusses current views on hemodynamics and mechanics of ventricular-vascular coupling. PMID:26164466

  4. 21. Phantom pain.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Andre; Vanduynhoven, Eric; van Kleef, Maarten; Huygen, Frank; Pope, Jason E; Mekhail, Nagy

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the patients with phantom pain have stump pain as well. Phantom pain can also occur in other parts of the body; it has been described after mastectomies and enucleation of the eye. Most patients with phantom pain have intermittent pain, with intervals that range from 1 day to several weeks. Even intervals of over a year have been reported. The pain often presents itself in the form of attacks that vary in duration from a few seconds to minutes or hours. In most cases, the pain is experienced distally in the missing limb, in places with the most extensive innervation density and cortical representation. Although there are still many questions as to the underlying mechanisms, peripheral as well as central neuronal mechanisms seem to be involved. Conservative therapy consists of drug treatment with amitriptyline, tramadol, carbamazepine, ketamine, or morphine. Based on the available evidence some effect may be expected from drug treatment. When conservative treatment fails, pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the stump neuroma or of the spinal ganglion (DRG) or spinal cord stimulation could be considered (evidence score 0). These treatments should only be applied in a study design. PMID:21447079

  5. Child and adult vibrotactile thresholds for sinusoidal and pulsatile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, L E; Schechter, M B; Goldstein, M H

    1986-07-01

    Three experiments were performed to obtain vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds from hearing children and adults, and from deaf children. An adaptive two-interval forced-choice procedure was used to obtain estimates of the 70.7% point on the psychometric sensitivity curve. When hearing children of 5-6 and 9-10 years of age and adults were tested with sinusoids and haversine pulse stimuli, at 10, 100, 160, and 250 Hz or pps, respectively, only the 10-Hz stimulus resulted in an age effect. For this stimulus, young children were significantly less sensitive than adults. When sinusoids were again tested at 20, 40, 80, and 160 Hz, a small overall effect of age was observed with a significant effect only at 20 Hz. Two prelingually profoundly deaf children were tested with haversine pulse trains at 10, 50, 100, 160, and 250 pps. Both children were at least as sensitive to the tactile stimulation as were the hearing children and adults. Pulsatile stimulation, compared to sinusoidal stimulation, exhibited relatively flat threshold versus frequency functions. The present results, demonstrating no age effect for pulsatile stimulation and similar performance for deaf and hearing children, suggest that pulsatile stimulation would be appropriate in vibrotactile speech communication aids for the deaf. PMID:3745657

  6. Physicochemical Effects Enhance Surfactant Transport in Pulsatile Motion of a Semi-Infinite Bubble

    PubMed Central

    Pillert, Jerina E.; Gaver, Donald P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigate the sorption of pulmonary surfactant (Infasurf, Ony, Buffalo, NY) occurring at the air-liquid interface of a semi-infinite finger of air as it oscillates and progresses along a small rigid tube (1mminner diameter) occluded with a surfactant-doped solution of concentrations C=0.1,0.05,or0.01mg/mL. This simple experimental model of pulmonary airway reopening is designed to examine how altering the fluid flow field may lower reopening pressures and lead to a reduction in airway wall damage that is associated with the mechanical ventilation of an obstructed pulmonary system in airways of the deep lung with depleted endogenous and little exogenous surfactant. We analyzed a range of pulsatile flow scenarios by varying the oscillation frequency (0≤f≤1Hz), the oscillation flow waveform, and the steady flow rate (Qsteady=0.1or0.01mL/min). These experimental studies indicate that a high frequency (1 Hz, amplitude = 5 mm), fast-forward oscillation waveform superimposed onto a fast steady flow (0.1mL/min) substantially reduces mean reopening pressures (31%) as a consequence of the modified flow field and the commensurate increase in surfactant transport and adsorption. This result suggests that imposing high frequency, low amplitude oscillations during airway reopening will help to diminish ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:18849416

  7. Computation of residence time in the simulation of pulsatile ventricular assist devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. C.; Esmaily-Moghadam, M.; Marsden, A. L.; Bazilevs, Y.

    2014-10-01

    A continuum-based model of particle residence time for moving-domain fluid mechanics and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) computations is proposed, analyzed, and applied to the simulation of an adult pulsatile ventricular assist device (PVAD). Residence time is a quantity of clinical interest for blood pumps because it correlates with thrombotic risk. The proposed technique may be easily implemented in any flow or FSI solver. In the context of PVADs the results of the model may be used to assess how efficiently the pump moves the blood through its interior. Three scalar measures of particle residence time are also proposed. These scalar quantities may be used in the PVAD design with the goal of reducing thrombotic risk.

  8. Mock circulation loop to investigate hemolysis in a pulsatile total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Gräf, Felix; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Laumen, Marco; Mager, Ilona; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Hemocompatibility of blood pumps is a crucial parameter that has to be ensured prior to in vivo testing. In contrast to rotary blood pumps, a standard for testing a pulsatile total artificial heart (TAH) has not yet been established. Therefore, a new mock circulation loop was designed to investigate hemolysis in the left ventricle of the ReinHeart TAH. Its main features are a high hemocompatibility, physiological conditions, a low priming volume, and the conduction of blood through a closed tubing system. The mock circulation loop consists of a noninvasive pressure chamber, an aortic compliance chamber, and an atrium directly connected to the ventricle. As a control pump, the clinically approved Medos-HIA ventricular assist device (VAD) was used. The pumps were operated at 120 beats per minute with an aortic pressure of 120 to 80 mm Hg and a mean atrial pressure of 10 mm Hg, generating an output flow of about 5 L/min. Heparinized porcine blood was used. A series of six identical tests were performed. A test method was established that is comparable to ASTM F 1841, which is standard practice for the assessment of hemolysis in continuous-flow blood pumps. The average normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) values of the VAD and the ReinHeart TAH were 0.018 g/100 L and 0.03 g/100 L, respectively. The standard deviation of the NIH was 0.0033 for the VAD and 0.0034 for the TAH. Furthermore, a single test with a BPX-80 Bio-Pump was performed to verify that the hemolysis induced by the mock circulation loop was negligible. The performed tests showed a good reproducibility and statistical significance. The mock circulation loop and test protocol developed in this study are valid methods to investigate the hemolysis induced by a pulsatile blood pump. PMID:25586541

  9. Stress phase angle depicts differences in arterial stiffness: phantom and in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Lili; Meng, Long; Xu, Lisheng; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qiwen; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-06-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs) lining of a blood vessel wall are exposed to both the wall shear stress (WSS) of blood flow and the circumferential strain (CS) of pulsing artery wall motion. Both WSS and CS keep involved in the modulation of ECs’ biochemical response and function and the temporal phase angle between the two is called stress phase angle (SPA). Previous studies at the cellular level have indicated that SPA is highly negative at sites that are prone to atherosclerosis, and hypothesized that large SPA may contribute to atherogenesis. Till now, there is no experimental data to support this hypothesis, probably due to the lack of a proper tool for measuring WSS and CS simultaneously and real time. In this study, a non-invasive ultrasonic biomechanics method was utilized to quantitatively calculate the SPA and experimentally evaluate the role of SPA in predicting early atherosclerosis. Three silicon tubes with a stiffness of 1.15, 3.62, 9.38 MPa were assembled in a pulsatile flow circuit and the values of SPA were measured to be -101.86 ± 3.65°,-170.19 ± 17.77° and -260.63 ± 18.62°, respectively. For the PVA-c phantoms, stiffness was 162.45, 235.68 and 374.24 kPa, the SPA corresponding to -170.32 ± 17.55°,-207.56 ± 10.78° and -261.08 ± 10.90°, respectively. Both phantom studies results demonstrated that SPA was highly negative in stiffer arteries. Further, experiments were taken in healthy living rats as control group (n = 3), atherosclerotic model group (n = 3), and drug treated group (n = 3), and the results showed that SPA was most negative in the model group, and SPA was least negative in the control group. Together, this study suggested that highly negative SPA appeared to be a prominent mechanical feature of vessels prone to atherosclerotic disease.

  10. Development of a HIFU Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Randy L.; Herman, Bruce A.; Maruvada, Subha; Wear, Keith A.; Harris, Gerald R.

    2007-05-01

    The field of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is developing rapidly. For basic research, quality control, and regulatory assessment a reusable phantom that has both thermal and acoustic properties close to that of soft tissue is critical. A hydrogel-based tissue mimicking material (TMM) has been developed that shows promise for such a phantom. The acoustic attenuation, speed of sound, B/A, thermal diffusivity and conductivity, as well as the cavitation threshold, were measured and found to mimic published values for soft tissue. The attenuation of 0.53f1.04 from 1 MHz to 8 MHz, as well as the sound speed of 1565 m/s and the tissue-like image quality, indicate the usefulness of the TMM for ultrasound imaging applications. These properties along with the thermal conductivity of 0.58 W/m- °C, diffusivity of 0.15 (mm2)/s, and the ability to withstand temperatures above 95 °C make this material appropriate for HIFU applications. The TMM also allows for the embedding of thermocouples and the formation of wall-less vessels that do not deteriorate as a result of continuous flow of blood mimicking fluids through the material. Tissue characteristics are strongly dependent on the fabrication technique, and care must be taken to achieve reproducible results. Note: This research was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).