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Sample records for pulsatile luteinizing hormone

  1. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH. PMID:26443858

  2. Hypothalamic multiunit activity and pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in the castrated male rat.

    PubMed

    Goubillon, M L; Kaufman, J M; Thalabard, J C

    1995-11-01

    Using chronically implanted microelectrodes, multiunit electrical activity (MUA) was recorded from the arcuate nucleus of freely moving gonadectomized male rats. Intermittent increases in MUA activity (MUA volleys) closely associated with luteinizing hormone pulses measured in the peripheral circulation were observed, which confirms that this experimental approach can be used for monitoring the activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone-associated hypothalamic pulse generator in the male rat. The mean MUA volley frequency was 22.2 min (range 13-38 min), whereas the mean MUA volley duration was 2.7 +/- 0.8 min (standard deviation). In addition to a large inter-individual variability. MUA volley intervals also showed an important intra-individual variability. This observation suggests that, beside the mean frequency of pulse generator activation, the degree of variability in gonadotropin-releasing hormone-associated pulse generator activity might be an additional relevant parameter in the characterization of the reproductive function in the male rat. PMID:7581989

  3. Central estrogen action sites involved in prepubertal restraint of pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in female rats

    PubMed Central

    UENOYAMA, Yoshihisa; TANAKA, Akira; TAKASE, Kenji; YAMADA, Shunji; PHENG, Vutha; INOUE, Naoko; MAEDA, Kei-ichiro; TSUKAMURA, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine estrogen feedback action sites to mediate prepubertal restraint of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) release in female rats. Wistar-Imamichi strain rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and received a local estradiol-17β (estradiol) or cholesterol microimplant in several brain areas, such as the medial preoptic area (mPOA), paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial nucleus and arcuate nucleus (ARC), at 20 or 35 days of age. Six days after receiving the estradiol microimplant, animals were bled to detect LH pulses at 26 or 41 days of age, representing the pre- or postpubertal period, respectively. Estradiol microimplants in the mPOA or ARC, but not in other brain regions, suppressed LH pulses in prepubertal OVX rats. Apparent LH pulses were found in the postpubertal period in all animals bearing estradiol or cholesterol implants. It is unlikely that pubertal changes in responsiveness to estrogen are due to a change in estrogen receptor (ER) expression, because the number of ERα-immunoreactive cells and mRNA levels of Esr1, Esr2 and Gpr30 in the mPOA and ARC were comparable between the pre- and postpubertal periods. In addition, kisspeptin or GnRH injection overrode estradiol-dependent prepubertal LH suppression, suggesting that estrogen inhibits the kisspeptin-GnRH cascade during the prepubertal period. Thus, estrogen-responsive neurons located in the mPOA and ARC may play key roles in estrogen-dependent prepubertal restraint of GnRH/LH secretion in female rats. PMID:26004302

  4. Interleukin 1. alpha. inhibits prostaglandin E sub 2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F. ); Karara, A. ); Gonzalez, M.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1{alpha} into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1{alpha} caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1{alpha} (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1{alpha} reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1{alpha} suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-mediated release of LHRH.

  5. The effect of non-steroidal antiandrogen flutamide on luteinizing hormone pulsatile secretion in male-to-female transsexual subjects.

    PubMed

    Giusti, M; Falivene, M R; Carraro, A; Cuttica, C M; Valenti, S; Giordano, G

    1995-06-01

    We evaluated LH pulsatile patterns before and 4 weeks after the oral administration of flutamide (750 mg/day) in 9 male-to-female transsexuals (age range 17-28 yr) requesting gender reassignment. Flutamide was given to explore the feedback role of androgens on the LHRH-LH unit in LH pulsatility in transsexuals. Seven normal age-matched men served as a control group, without receiving flutamide, due to ethical considerations. LH pulsatility was evaluated on samples collected every 15 min for 360 min. FSH, PRL, cortisol, SHBG and sex steroids were evaluated on pooled samples. LH pulses were analyzed by the Santen and Bardin algorithm, slightly modified. No differences in FSH, PRL, total- or free-testosterone, estradiol and SHBG levels were noted between transsexuals and controls. Normal circadian cortisol decline was observed in all subjects. Mean LH levels (p < 0.05) and LH pulses (p < 0.01) were significantly lower in transsexuals. Flutamide induced an increase in mean LH and testosterone levels (p < 0.01). After flutamide administration there was an increase in LH pulse frequency (P < 0.01) and the frequency and amplitude of LH pulses in transsexuals were restored to levels observed in controls. No differences in FSH, PRL or estradiol levels were found after flutamide. These data suggest that a decrease in LH pulse frequency could be an endocrine marker in male-to-female transsexuals. An increase in endogenous androgen negative feed-back could be speculated in these subjects. However, normal testosterone levels indirectly suggest that a normal that a normal qualitative LH secretion is maintained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7594235

  6. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... medicines you take. These include: Birth control pills Hormone therapy Testosterone DHEA (a supplement) If you are ...

  7. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  8. Naloxone does not Affect the Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone-Induced Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A M; Porter, D W; Lincoln, D W

    1989-06-01

    Abstract Injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (21 pmol) into the third cerebral ventricle of long-term ovariectomized ewes caused a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly when compared with the control responses to saline (50 mul). A notable characteristic of the response was the delayed and sustained nature of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition. In the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone (4 +/- 25 mg iv), the central administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone still produced a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Again, mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly. When naloxone was injected iv, there was a significant rise in mean luteinizing hormone levels as a consequence of an increase in pulse frequency (in four out of five ewes) and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone pulse amplitude. In conclusion, these data suggest that central opioid pathways sensitive to blockade by naloxone are not involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone release. Furthermore, in the long-term ovariectomized ewe, endogenous opioid peptides exert a tonic inhibitory influence on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion. PMID:19210459

  9. Regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion by hypothalamic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Donoso, A O; Seltzer, A M; Navarro, C E; Cabrera, R J; López, F J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1994-04-01

    1. The present review discusses the proposed roles of the amino acids glutamate and GABA in the central regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. 2. Descriptions of the mechanisms of action of these neurotransmitters have focused on two diencephalic areas, namely, the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic area where the cell bodies of LHRH neurons are located, and the medial basal hypothalamus which contains the nerve endings of the LHRH system. Increasing endogenous GABA concentration by drugs, GABA agonists, or blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission by selective antagonists in rats and non-human primates prevents ovulation and pulsatile LH release, and blunts the LH surges induced by estrogen or an estrogen-progesterone combination. In contrast, glutamate and different glutamate agonists such as NMDA, AMPA and kainate, can increase LHRH/LH secretion. 3. The simultaneous enhancement of glutamatergic activity and a decrease of GABAergic tone may positively influence the maturation of the pituitary-gonadal system in rats and non-human primates. Administration of glutamate receptor agonists has been shown to significantly advance the onset of puberty. Conversely, glutamate antagonists or increased endogenous GABA levels may delay the onset of puberty. The physiological regulation of LHRH/LH secretion may thus involve a GABA-glutamate interaction and a cooperative action of the various types of ionotropic glutamate receptors. 4. The inhibitory actions of GABA on LH release and ovulation may be exerted at the level of afferent nerve terminals that regulate LHRH secretion. A likely candidate is noradrenaline, as suggested by the synaptic connections between noradrenergic nerve terminals and GABAergic interneurons in the preoptic area. Recent experiments have provided complementary evidence for the physiological balance between inhibitory and excitatory transmission resulting in modulation of the action of

  10. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  15. Simultaneous radioimmunoassay for luteinizing hormone and prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, M.K.; Deschepper, C.F.

    1985-05-01

    A combined radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of the anterior pituitary proteins luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin (PRL) is described and compared with individual RIAs for these hormones. The standard curves and the sample values for LH and PRL were identical when determined in a combined or in an individual RIA. This technique may prove useful to a number of laboratories where it is desirable to determine levels of more than one hormone in limited sample volumes.

  16. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  20. Parathyroid hormone pulsatility: physiological and clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Chiavistelli, Silvia; Giustina, Andrea; Mazziotti, Gherardo

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion is characterized by an ultradian rhythm with tonic and pulsatile components. In healthy subjects, the majority of PTH is secreted in tonic fashion, whereas approximately 30% is secreted in low-amplitude and high-frequency bursts occurring every 10–20 min, superimposed on tonic secretion. Changes in the ultradian PTH secretion were shown to occur in patients with primary and secondary osteoporosis, with skeletal effects depending on the reciprocal modifications of pulsatile and tonic components. Indeed, pathophysiology of spontaneous PTH secretion remains an area potentially suitable to be explored, particularly in those conditions such as secondary forms of osteoporosis, in which conventional biochemical and densitometric parameters may not always give reliable diagnostic and therapeutic indications. This review will highlight the literature data supporting the hypothesis that changes of ultradian PTH secretion may be correlated with skeletal fragility in primary and secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26273533

  1. Induction of ovulation in anestrous mares with pulsatile administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    1986-05-01

    Four seasonally anestrous mares (Standardbred), housed under a nonstimulatory photoperiod of 8 hours light:16 hours dark, were administered gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in a pulsatile pattern (50 or 250 micrograms of GnRH/hour) for 8 to 18 days during February and March 1985. Treatment with GnRH, irrespective of dose or month, induced an increase in serum luteinizing hormone from a mean pretreatment value typical of anestrus (0.58 +/- 0.02 ng/ml +/- SE) to 10.84 +/- 1.27 ng/ml on day 8 of GnRH treatment. Ovulation in the 4 mares occurred 8.8 +/- 0.7 days after the initiation of pulsatile GnRH administration. In each instance, ovulation was followed by a functional corpus luteum, as indicated by a luteal phase (defined as the number of days on which serum levels of progesterone were greater than 1.0 ng/ml) which lasted 14.5 +/- 0.6 days. These results indicate that infusion of GnRH in a pulsatile pattern is effective in inducing follicular development and ovulation in anestrous mares in the absence of a stimulatory photoperiod. PMID:3521408

  2. Nonlinear analysis and prediction of pulsatile hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K. |; Kloppstech, M.; Nowlan, S.J.; Harms, H.M.; Brabant, G.; Hesch, R.; Sejnowski, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    Pulsatile hormone secretion is observed in almost every hormonal system. The frequency of episodic hormone release ranges from approximately 10 to 100 pulses in 24 hours. This temporal mode of secretion is an important feature of intercellular information transfer in addition to a dose-response dependent regulation. It has been demonstrated in a number of experiments that changes in the temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone secretion specifically regulate cellular and organ function and structure. Recent evidence links osteoporosis, a disease characterized by loss of bone mass and structure, to changes in the dynamics of pulsatile parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. In our study we applied nonlinear and linear time series prediction to characterize the secretory dynamics of PTH in both healthy human subjects and patients with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic patients appear to lack periods of high predictability found in normal humans. In contrast to patients with osteoporosis patients with hyperparathyroidism, a condition which despite sometimes reduced bone mass has a preserved bone architecture, show periods of high predictability of PTH secretion. Using stochastic surrogate data sets which match certain statistical properties of the original time series significant nonlinear determinism could be found for the PTH time series of a group of healthy subjects. Using classical nonlinear analytical techniques we could demonstrate that the irregular pattern of pulsatile PTH secretion in healthy men exhibits characteristics of deterministic chaos. Pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy subjects seems to be a first example of nonlinear determinism in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug... milligrams of standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of...

  4. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection. PMID:6346309

  5. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  6. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  7. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in human and bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1982-10-01

    Two hypothalamic peptide hormones, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), have been isolated from human milk and bovine colostrum. Acidified methanolic extracts, prepared from human milk, bovine colostrum and rat hypothalami, as well as synthetic LHRH and TRH markers were subjected to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The eluates were tested for the presence of LHRH and TRH by specific radioimmunoassays. It was found that milk extracts contain significant amounts of LHRH (3.9 - 11.8 ng/ml) and TRH (0.16 - 0.34 ng/ml), which comigrate with the corresponding marker hormones and with those of hypothalamic origin. The HPLC-purified LHRH from both human and bovine milk was bioactive in a dose-response manner similar to synthetic LHRH. PMID:6816590

  8. Genetic Models for the Study of Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) is essential for fertility in men and women. LHCGR binds luteinizing hormone (LH) as well as the highly homologous chorionic gonadotropin. Signaling from LHCGR is required for steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in males and females and for sexual differentiation in the male. The importance of LHCGR in reproductive physiology is underscored by the large number of naturally occurring inactivating and activating mutations in the receptor that result in reproductive disorders. Consequently, several genetically modified mouse models have been developed for the study of LHCGR function. They include targeted deletion of LH and LHCGR that mimic inactivating mutations in hormone and receptor, expression of a constitutively active mutant in LHCGR that mimics activating mutations associated with familial male-limited precocious puberty and transgenic models of LH and hCG overexpression. This review summarizes the salient findings from these models and their utility in understanding the physiological and pathological consequences of loss and gain of function in LHCGR signaling. PMID:26483755

  9. Motivations and Methods for Analyzing Pulsatile Hormone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Keenan, Daniel M.; Pincus, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Endocrine glands communicate with remote target cells via a mixture of continuous and intermittent signal exchange. Continuous signaling allows slowly varying control, whereas intermittency permits large rapid adjustments. The control systems that mediate such homeostatic corrections operate in a species-, gender-, age-, and context-selective fashion. Significant progress has been made in understanding mechanisms of adaptive interglandular signaling in vivo. Principal goals are to understand the physiological origins, significance, and mechanisms of pulsatile hormone secretion. Key analytical issues are: 1) to quantify the number, size, shape, and uniformity of pulses, nonpulsatile (basal) secretion, and elimination kinetics; 2) to evaluate regulation of the axis as a whole; and 3) to reconstruct dose-response interactions without disrupting hormone connections. This review will focus on the motivations driving and the methodologies used for such analyses. PMID:18940916

  10. A comparison of methods for analyzing time series of pulsatile hormone data

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, N. E.; Horton, K. W.; Grunwald, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    Many endocrine systems are regulated by pulsatile hormoneshormones that are secreted intermittently in boluses rather than continuously over time. To study pulsatile secretion, blood is drawn every few minutes for an extended period. The result is a time series of hormone concentrations for each individual. The goal is to estimate pulsatile hormone secretion features such as frequency, location, duration, and amount of pulsatile and non-pulsatile secretion and compare these features between groups. Various statistical approaches to analyzing these data have been proposed, but validation has generally focused on one hormone. Thus, we lack a broad understanding of each method’s performance. By using simulated data with features seen in reproductive and stress hormones, we investigated the performance of three recently developed statistical approaches for analyzing pulsatile hormone data and compared them to a frequently used deconvolution approach. We found that methods incorporating a changing baseline modeled both constant and changing baseline shapes well; however, the added model flexibility resulted in a slight increase in bias in other model parameters. When pulses were well defined and baseline constant, Bayesian approaches performed similar to the existing deconvolution method. The increase in computation time of Bayesian approaches offered improved estimation and more accurate quantification of estimation variation in situations where pulse locations were not clearly identifiable. Within the class of deconvolution models for fitting pulsatile hormone data, the Bayesian approach with a changing baseline offered adequate results over the widest range of data. PMID:23787487

  11. Pulsatile glycoprotein hormone secretion in glycoprotein-producing pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Samuels, M H; Henry, P; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, B K; Lillehei, K; Ridgway, E C

    1991-12-01

    To study patterns of hormone production and secretion in glycoprotein-producing pituitary tumors, 12 patients with such tumors underwent the following studies. Preoperatively, all patients had serum TSH, LH, FSH, and alpha-subunit levels measured every 15 min for 24 h. Hormone pulses were located by cluster analysis, and pulse parameters were compared to those in healthy young men, healthy young women, healthy postmenopausal women, and subjects with primary hypothyroidism. After surgery, immunocytochemistry for the four glycoproteins was performed on all tumors, and Northern blot analysis was performed in six tumors with probes for the four subunits. By immunocytochemistry, 42% of the tumors were positive for TSH beta, 83% for LH beta, 75% for FSH beta, and 92% for alpha-subunit. Preoperative serum hormone levels varied widely between patients and were not well correlated with the intensity of immunocytochemical staining. Northern blot analysis did not appear to be as sensitive as immunocytochemistry for detection of the glycoproteins. All patients had pulsatile glycoprotein secretion, with pulses of normal frequency but varied amplitude. These results suggest that in patients with glycoprotein tumors, hormone pulses may be an integral part of autonomous secretion, or that hypothalamic control is involved in glycoprotein secretion and, perhaps, in the pathogenesis of these tumors. PMID:1955510

  12. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  13. Pulsatile Release of Parathyroid Hormone from an Implantable Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohua; Pettway, Glenda J.; McCauley, Laurie K.; Ma, Peter X.

    2007-01-01

    Intermittent (pulsatile) administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known to improve bone micro-architecture, mineral density and strength. Therefore, daily injection of PTH has been clinically used for the treatment of osteoporosis. However, this regimen of administration is not convenient and is not a favorable choice of patients. In this study, an implantable delivery system has been developed to achieve pulsatile release of PTH. A well-defined cylindrical device was first fabricated with a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), using a reverse solid free form fabrication technique. Three-component polyanhydrides composed of sebacic acid, 1,3-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy) propane and poly(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and used as isolation layers. The polyanhydride isolation layers and PTH-loaded alginate layers were then stacked alternately within the delivery device. The gap between the stacked PTH-releasing core and the device frame was filled with PLLA to seal. Multi-pulse PTH release was achieved using the implantable device. The lag time between two adjacent pulses were modulated by the composition and the film thickness of the polyanhydride. The released PTH was demonstrated to be biologically active using an in vitro assay. Timed sequential release of multiple drugs has also been demonstrated. The implantable device holds promise for both systemic and local therapies. PMID:17576005

  14. Clinical studies with d-Trp 6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in anovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, C J; Charro-Salgado, A; Peréz-Infante, V; del Campo, G L; Botella-Llusiá, J; Coy, D H; Schally, A V

    1978-04-01

    Nine anovulatory patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction were treated with d-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, an analog with far greater gonadotropin-releasing activity than luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. Four of eight patients, who were formerly unsuccessfully treated with clomiphene, human chorionic gonadotropin, and human menopausal gonadotropin, ovulated after treatment with the peptide alone or with peptide preceded by clomiphene, and three became pregnant. The ninth patient, who had amenorrhea and anovulation due to excessive loss of weight caused by anorexia nervosa, also ovulated after treatment with the analog. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this potent analog for induction of ovulation and pregnancy and point favorably toward clinical applications. PMID:348500

  15. The goldfish nervus terminalis: a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and molluscan cardioexcitatory peptide immunoreactive olfactoretinal pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Stell, W K; Walker, S E; Chohan, K S; Ball, A K

    1984-01-01

    Antisera to two putative neurotransmitters, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and molluscan cardioexcitatory tetrapeptide (H-Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2; FMRF-amide), bind specifically to neurites in the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layers of the goldfish retina. Retrograde labeling showed that intraocular axon terminals originate from the nervus terminalis, whose cell bodies are located in the olfactory nerves. Double immunocytochemical and retrograde labeling showed that some terminalis neurons project to the retina; others may project only within the brain. All terminalis neurons having proven retinal projections were both LHRH- and FMRF-amide-immunoreactive. The activity of retinal ganglion cells was recorded with microelectrodes in isolated superfused goldfish retinas. In ON- and OFF-center double-color-opponent cells, micromolar FMRF-amide and salmon brain gonadotropin-releasing factor ( [Trp7, Leu8] LHRH) caused increased spontaneous activity in the dark, loss of light-induced inhibition, and increased incidence of light-entrained pulsatile response. The nervus terminalis is therefore a putatively peptidergic retinopetal projection. Sex-related olfactory stimuli may act through it, thereby modulating the output of ganglion cells responsive to color contrast. Images PMID:6199789

  16. Lutein

    MedlinePlus

    ... including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, and retinitis pigmentosa. Some people also use it for preventing colon ... risk of respiratory infections An eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa. Some early evidence suggests that lutein might be ...

  17. Lutein

    MedlinePlus

    ... eye diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, and retinitis pigmentosa. Some people also use it ... lutein together with other ingredients shows conflicting results. Cataracts. Some studies suggest that eating higher amounts of ...

  18. Metabolic clearance of biologically active luteinizing hormone in man.

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, J D; Fraioli, F; Rogol, A D; Dufau, M L

    1986-01-01

    The plasma metabolic clearance of biologically active luteinizing hormone (bioactive LH) was studied using the rat interstitial cell testosterone (RICT) bioassay in six hypogonadotropic men after single bolus injection of highly purified human LH and during continuous steady-state infusions of three graded doses of LH. The LH bolus disappearance curves provided estimates of metabolic clearance rates (MCR) of 24.1 +/- 4.7 (+/- SD) ml/min for bioactive LH vs. 56.2 +/- 12 ml/min for immunoactive LH in the same men (P = 0.03). A lower MCR of bioactive LH compared with immunoactive LH was also observed during continuous infusions of physiological doses of LH; for example, the mean steady-state MCRs for bioactive and immunoactive LH were, respectively, 26.1 +/- 3.1 and 34.2 +/- 3.2 ml/min (P = 0.02). Moreover, the stepped-dose infusion regimens permitted us to demonstrate that increasing doses of pure human LH resulted in progressive and parallel decreases in the apparent MCRs of both bioactive and immunoactive LH. Based on the respective steady-state MCRs calculated at physiological plasma concentrations of immunoactive and bioactive LH, we estimate a mean endogenous production rate for bioactive hormone of 1,937 IU/24 h, and for immunoactive LH of 589 IU/24 h in normal men. These results indicate that previous estimates of LH production rates from immunoassay data alone markedly underestimate the quantity of biologically active hormone secreted in man. PMID:3958184

  19. Overtrained horses alter their resting pulsatile growth hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf-Roelfsema, E.; Veldhuis, P. P.; Keizer, H. A.; van Ginneken, M. M. E.; van Dam, K. G.; Johnson, M. L.; Barneveld, A.; Menheere, P. P. C. A.; van Breda, E.; Wijnberg, I. D.; van der Kolk, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of intensified and reduced training on nocturnal growth hormone (GH) secretion and elimination dynamics was studied in young (1.5 yr) Standardbred geldings to detect potential markers indicative for early overtraining. Ten horses trained on a treadmill for 32 wk in age-, breed-, and gender-matched fixed pairs. Training was divided into four phases (4, 18, 6, and 4 wk, respectively): 1) habituation to high-speed treadmill trotting, 2) normal training, in which speed and duration of training sessions were gradually increased, 3) in this phase, the horses were divided into 2 groups: control (C) and intensified trained (IT) group. In IT, training intensity, duration, and frequency were further increased, whereas in control these remained unaltered, and 4) reduced training (RT). At the end of phases 2, 3, and 4, blood was sampled overnight every 5 min for 8 h for assessment of GH secretory dynamics using pulse detection, deconvolution analysis, and approximate entropy (ApEn). Intensified training induced overtraining (performance decreased by 19% compared with C), which was associated with an increase in concentration peaks number (3.6 vs. 2.0, respectively), a smaller peak secretion pattern with a prolonged half-life (15.2 vs. 7.3 min, respectively), and an increased ApEn (0.89 vs. 0.49, respectively). RT did not lead to full recovery for the overtrained horses. The increased irregularity of nocturnal GH pulsatility pattern is indicative of a loss of coordinated control of GH regulation. Longer phases of somatostatin withdrawal are hypothesized to be the underlying mechanism for the observed changes in GH pulsatility pattern. PMID:19494168

  20. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  1. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  2. Role of luteinizing hormone in luteotropic complex of pregnant hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, H.; Greenwald, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    Hamsters were hypophysectomized on day 4 of pregnancy and injected subcutaneously on days 4-7 with various combinations of 200 ..mu..g prolactin (Prl), 10 ..mu..g follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and 20 ..mu..g luteinizing hormone (LH) in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to decrease its rate of absorption or in saline. End points for luteal function on day 8 were maintenance of pregnancy, serum progesterone (P/sub 4/), luteal weight, and luteal binding for human chorionic gonadotropin, FSH, and Prl. After hypophysectomy, a drastic decline occurred in all parameters including an 89% decrease in luteal weight. Injection of Prl did not maintain pregnancy nor serum P/sub 4/ but partially maintained luteal weight and human chorionic gonadotropin binding sites per corpus luteum. The minimal luteotropic complex of Prl and FSH was effective in maintaining pregnancy and significantly increased serum P/sub 4/ and Prl and FSH receptors but not to control levels. Thus, the luteotropic activity of LH was only demonstrable when it was injected in a long-acting form; when delivered as a bolus, LH (saline) was luteolytic. P/sub 4/ and estradiol were measured by radioimmunoassay. Radioiodinated gonadotropins were prepared. The percentage of tracer reacting with an excess of receptor were 51% of /sup 125/I-FSH and 45.9% of /sup 125/I-hCG using whole homogenates of hamster ovaries.

  3. Cadmium affects the episodic luteinizing hormone secretion in male rats: possible age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Piquero, S; Esquifino, A I

    1999-01-11

    Cadmium affects luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through unknown mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may affect the episodic secretion of LH and if these effects are age-dependent. Male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 50 ppm in the drinking water, from day 30 to 60 or from day 60 to 90 of life. Age-matched rats with access to cadmium-free water were used as controls. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected every 7 min for 3 h, from 10:30 to 13.30 in conscious, freely moving rats. In control animals, mean serum LH levels and pulse duration increased with age (P < or = 0.001), and pulse frequency and the relative amplitude of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.001). Cadmium administration, from day 30 to 60 of life, decreased the pulse frequency and mean half-life of the hormone (P < or = 0.05, P < or = 0.01, respectively). However, no changes in any other parameters studied were observed as compared to the control group. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90, mean serum LH levels and the duration of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.05), whereas the pulse frequency increased (P < or = 0.05). The absolute and relative amplitude of the LH peaks and the mean half-life of the hormone were not changed after cadmium administration from day 60 to 90. These results indicate that low doses of cadmium change the pulsatile secretion of LH in male rats and that the effect of cadmium on episodic LH release was age-dependent. PMID:10048746

  4. Regional differences in the pituitary distribution of luteinizing hormone in the gonadectomized and proestrous female rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous data have shown regional differences in the presence of anterior pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) that generally correlate with comparable disparities in the distribution of gonadotropes throughout the gland. In female rats, the differences are apparent over the estro...

  5. Inactivating mutations of luteinizing hormone beta-subunit or luteinizing hormone receptor cause oligo-amenorrhea and infertility in women.

    PubMed

    Arnhold, Ivo Jorge; Lofrano-Porto, Adriana; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Women harbouring inactivating mutations in luteinizing hormone (LH) beta subunit (LHB) or LH receptor (LHCGR) genes have similar clinical manifestations characterized by female external genitalia, spontaneous breast and pubic hair development at puberty, and normal or late menarche followed by oligo-amenorrhea and infertility. Oestradiol and progesterone levels are normal for the early to midfollicular phase, but do not reach ovulatory or luteal phase levels, confirming lack of ovulation. Notably, serum LH levels are low in patients with LHB mutations and high in those with LHCGR mutations, whereas follicle-stimulating hormone levels are normal or only slightly increased. Pelvic ultrasound has demonstrated a small or normal uterus and normal or enlarged ovaries with cysts. Women with LHB mutations may be treated with hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) or LH, whereas those with mutations in LHCGR are resistant. Lhb and Lhcgr knockout female mice are close phenocopies of the respective human mutations, and confirm that early follicular development, low levels of oestrogen production and theca cell development are independent of LH action, which is necessary for ovulation. Although inactivating mutations in LHB and LHCGR are rare in comparison to other genetic and non-genetic causes of hypogonadism, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of oligo-amenorrhea and infertility. PMID:19129711

  6. Highly potent antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone free of edematogenic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Bajusz, S; Kovacs, M; Gazdag, M; Bokser, L; Karashima, T; Csernus, V J; Janaky, T; Guoth, J; Schally, A V

    1988-01-01

    To eliminate the undesirable edematogenic effect of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonists containing basic D amino acids at position 6, exemplified by [Ac-D-Phe(pCl)1,2,D-Trp3,D-Arg6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Phe(pCl) indicates 4-chlorophenylalanine], analogs with D-ureidoalkyl amino acids such as D-citrulline (D-Cit) or D-homocitrulline (D-Hci) at position 6 were synthesized and tested in several systems in vitro and in vivo. HPLC analysis revealed that the overall hydrophobicity of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 analogs was similar to that of the basic D-Arg6 antagonists. In vitro, most of the analogs completely inhibited LH-RH-mediated luteinizing hormone release in perfused rat pituitary cell systems at an antagonist to LH-RH molar ratio of 5:1. In vivo, the most active peptides, [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Trp3,D-Cit6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Nal(2) indicates 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine] and its D-Hci6 analog, caused 100% inhibition of ovulation in cycling rats in doses of 3 micrograms and suppressed the luteinizing hormone level in ovariectomized female rats for 47 hr when administered at doses of 25 micrograms. Characteristically, these peptides did not exert any edematogenic effects even at 1.5 mg/kg. These properties of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 antagonists may make them useful clinically. PMID:3278323

  7. Immunoreactive luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the seminal plasma and human semen parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, S.; Makino, T.; Iizuka, R.

    1985-04-01

    A luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH)-like substance has been detected in human seminal plasma by a radioimmunoassay (RIA) with a highly specific anti-LH-RH antiserum. The seminal samples - not only the plasma itself but also the sample extracted by an acid/alcohol method - showed satisfactory displacement curves in our RIA system. The relationship between fertility and the LH-RH values in the seminal plasma was studied by comparing the peptide levels with sperm concentration and motility. By these two parameters, 103 samples were divided into four groups. In the low-concentration groups (oligozoospermic patients), the hormonal concentrations differed significantly between those specimens demonstrating good and poor motility. These data suggest that this immunoreactive LH-RH may play a role in human spermatogenesis.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF TOXICANT-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE CONTROL OF OVULATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the female rat, the large surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary into the general circulation that takes place on the afternoon of the day of vaginal proestrus is both a measurable and functional hormonal event. ince its occurrence is necessary for the expression...

  9. Noradrenaline concentrations in the hypothalamus of anoestrus ewes following the ram-induced luteinizing hormone release.

    PubMed

    Fabre-Nys, Claude; Kendrick, Keith M

    2015-05-01

    Sheep are seasonal breeders, but exposure of anoestrus ewes to rams results in a rapid increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, eventually leading to surge in LH. Although LH secretion is known to be under the control of many neurotransmitters, noradrenaline (NA) is of particular importance for the LH surge in induced ovulators, although little is known about its role in LH secretion induced by males in spontaneous ovulators. To address this question, anoestrus ewes fitted with guide-tubes in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) or the ventromedial hypothalamus were subjected to microdialysis and blood sampling every 15 min for an hour before and 2 h after exposure to rams, and the concentrations of LH, monoamine and amino acid transmitters were measured. In ewes implanted in the posterior MPOA that responded to the ram by an increase in LH pulses, NA concentrations changed after exposure to the ram (P<0.018) and were higher at 15 (P<0.054) and 45 min (P<0.03) after male introduction than before. By contrast, no change in NA could be detected in ewes implanted in the same region, but not responding to the ram, or in those showing increased LH pulsatility, but implanted in the anterior MPOA or in the ventromedial hypothalamus. No changes were observed in other neurotransmitters or when the ewes were exposed to male odour alone. These results suggest that NA release in the posterior MPOA is selectively involved in the triggering of LH secretion by rams in anoestrus ewes. PMID:25839177

  10. Different follicle stimulating hormone/luteinizing hormone ratios for ovarian stimulation.

    PubMed

    Duijkers, I J; Vemer, H M; Hollanders, J M; Willemsen, W N; Bastiaans, L A; Hamilton, C J; Thomas, C M; Borm, G F

    1993-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether reducing the amount of luteinizing hormone (LH) in gonadotrophic preparations impairs follicular growth in in-vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles during suppression of endogenous LH levels. A selected group of 20 IVF patients was randomly divided into two groups. One group was treated with Org 31338 [follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)/LH 3:1], the other group with Metrodin (purified FSH), both during pituitary down-regulation with buserelin. A fixed daily dose of 150 IU FSH i.m. was given. Serum concentrations of FSH, LH, oestradiol and progesterone were determined frequently and serial ultrasound examinations were performed. Multiple follicular growth with concomitant rise of oestradiol levels was observed in all cycles. The duration of the stimulation phase was shorter in the group treated with Org 31338 than in the group treated with Metrodin. The number of follicles and oocytes and the fertilization rate was larger and the mean embryo quality was higher in the Org 31338 group, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. No significant differences were found in hormonal values. In women with normal endocrine profiles, lowering of the LH activity in gonadotrophic preparations during gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist treatment results in adequate ovarian stimulation. However, a preparation with some LH needed a shorter stimulation than a purified FSH preparation. Whether the other beneficial effects of Org 31338 also occur in a larger population needs further investigation. PMID:8253923

  11. SUPPRESSION OF THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE SURGE BY CHLORDIMEFORM IN OVARIECTOMIZED, STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The midcycle surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary provides the physiological trigger in the mammalian female for the process of ovulation. ccordingly, any agent that compromises the LH surge could function as a reproductive toxicant. ince ovariectomized (OVX) rats...

  12. Luteinizing hormone secretion as influenced by age and estradiol in the prepubertal gilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine if there is an age related reduction in the sensitivity of the negative feedback action of estradiol on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the prepubertal gilt. Ovariectomized gilts at 90 (n = 12), 150 (n = 11) or 210 (n = 12) days of age received estradiol ...

  13. PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT CAUSED BY BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: EFFECTS ON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT CAUSED BY BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: EFFECTS ON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS
    Bielmeier1, S.R., D.S. Best2, and M.G. Narotsky2; 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Curriculum in Toxicology, 2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Enviro...

  14. Glucose-regulated protein, 78-kilodalton is a modulator of luteinizing hormone receptor expression in luteinizing granulosa cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Kayoko; Nakamura, Kazuto; Ikeda, Sadatomo; Kitahara, Yoshikazu; Nishimura, Toshio; Iwamune, Masayuki; Minegishi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein, 78-kilodalton (GRP78) is a molecular chaperone that exists in the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the assembly, transportation, and folding of proteins. Previously, GRP78 was reported to associate with gonadotropin receptors. However, little is known about how GRP78 is involved in the regulation of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR). Thus, in this study, we investigated the significance of GRP78 for the induction of LHR in rat luteinizing granulosa cells. Western blot analysis of rat LHR expressed in HEK293 cells revealed that the protein levels of LHR were increased, depending on the increment of GRP78 protein. In both in vivo and in vitro experiments, the GRP78 mRNA level peaked while LHR mRNA was down-regulated by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). To examine the time-dependent localization of GRP78 in vivo, immunohistochemistry was performed. GRP78 was expressed mainly in granulosa cells, and the GRP78 protein peaked 18 h after the ovulatory dose of hCG injection in equine chorionic gonadotropin-primed immature rats. To ascertain the role of GRP78 in LHR after down-regulation, small interfering GRP78 was transfected to cultured rat granulosa cells, demonstrating that knockdown of the GRP78 protein level impaired the recovery of cell surface LHR from down-regulation that negatively affected progesterone synthesis. Moreover, luciferase assays showed that CRE mediated the hCG-induced promoter activity of GRP78 in rat luteinizing granulosa cells. These results reveal a novel mechanism of LHR by GRP78 in the early stage of corpus lustrum formation, which may be an important factor in the recovery of LHR after the down-regulation. PMID:23175774

  15. Correlation of protein kinase activation and testosterone production after stimulation of Leydig cells with luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, B A; Lindh, M L; Janszen, F H

    1976-01-01

    The effect of different doses of luteinizing hormone on activation of protein kinases, cyclic AMP and testosterone production was studied in purified rat testis Leydig-cell preparations in the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor). In addition, the nature of the protein kinases present in these cells and other tissues was investigated. The following results were obtained. 1. With all the amounts of luteinizing hormone used (0.1-1000 ng/ml), both activation of protein kinase and stimulation of testosterone production were demonstrated. With the lowest amount of luteinizing hormone (0.1 ng/ml), an 8.4+/-0.9% (S.E.M.,n=6) stimulation of protein kinase activation occurred, increasing to 100% with 1000 ng/ml, compared with 3.2+/-1.0%(S.E.M.,n=7) and 100% stimulation of testosterone production with 0.1 and 100 ng/ml respectively. 2. With amounts of luteinizing hormone up to 1 ng/ml (which gave half-maximal stimulation of testosterone production) no detectable increases in net cyclic AMP production were obtained. With higher amounts of luteinizing hormone, cyclic AMP production increased, but maximal production was not reached with 1000 ng/ml. 3. Two isoenzymic forms of protein kinase were present in Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules; type I was eluted with 0.075 M-and type II with 0.22-0.25 m-NaCl from DEAE-cellulose columns. 4. The protein kinase activity was not affected by the presence of erythrocytes in the Leydig-cell preparation, but varied depending on the type of histone used as substrate (histone F2b greater than mixed greater than histone F1). PMID:189752

  16. Nonlinear dynamics in pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Harms, Heio; Brabant, Georg; Hesch, Rolf-Dieter; Dämmig, Matthias; Mitschke, Fedor

    1995-03-01

    In many biological systems, information is transferred by hormonal ligands, and it is assumed that these hormonal signals encode developmental and regulatory programs in mammalian organisms. In contrast to the dogma of endocrine homeostasis, it could be shown that the biological information in hormonal networks is not only present as a constant hormone concentration in the circulation pool. Recently, it has become apparent that hormone pulses contribute to this hormonal pool, which modulates the responsiveness of receptors within the cell membrane by regulation of the receptor synthesis, movement within the membrane layer, coupling to signal transduction proteins and internalization. Phase space analysis of dynamic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion allowed the definition of a (in comparison to normal subjects) relatively quiet ``low dynamic'' secretory pattern in osteoporosis, and a ``high dynamic'' state in hyperparathyroidism. We now investigate whether this pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy men exhibits characteristics of nonlinear determinism. Our findings suggest that this is conceivable, although on the basis of presently available data and techniques, no proof can be established. Nevertheless, pulsatile secretion of PTH might be a first example of nonlinear deterministic dynamics in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology.

  17. Annual cycle of plasma luteinizing hormone and sex hormones in male and female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donham, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons between 'wild'and 'game farm' mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were made to assess the differences in the temporal changes of plasma hormones. Seasonal variation in the levels of immunoreactive luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, 5 -dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estrone, estradiol-17i?? and progesterone were measured in male and female mallards. In all birds there was a vernal increase in the concentrations of LH and testosterone in plasma which were correlated with the development of the testes and ovaries prior to and during the nesting season. The concentrations of estrogens in the plasma of the females were, in general, slightly higher during the nesting season but were much lower than the levels of testosterone. The highest levels of LH and testosterone in the females coincided precisely with the period of egg laying which occurred approximately one month earlier in game farm females than in wild females. The concentrations of LH and testosterone in the plasma of females decreased rapidly during incubation. In wild males, the decline in levels of these hormones temporally coincided with that of females. In contrast, plasma levels of LH and testosterone of males of the game farm stock remained elevated after the beginning of incubation in females to which they were paired. On the basis of these results and an examination of the literature, it appears that domestication results in: 1) increased reproductive potential through earlier initiation of nesting and by delay of the termination of reproduction until later in the summer; and 2) a decrease in the synchronization of the hormonal events supporting reproduction between the male and female of a pair. Testicular weights and plasma levels of testosterone become higher in game farm and domestic males than in the wild stock but levels of LH are similar.

  18. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  19. Specific protein synthesis in isolated rat testis leydig cells. Influence of luteinizing hormone and cycloheximide.

    PubMed Central

    Janszen, F H; Cooke, B A; van der Molen, H J

    1977-01-01

    The effect of luteinizing hormone (luteotropin) and cycloheximide on specific protein synthesis in rat testis Leydig cells has been investigated. Proteins were labelled with either I114C]leucine, [3H]leucine or [35S]methionine during incubation with Leydig-cell suspensions in vitro. Total protein was extracted from the cells and separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. No detectable increase in the synthesis of specific proteins could be observed after incubation of Leydig cells with luteinizing hormone for up to 1 h. However, after a 2h incubation period, an increase in [35S]methionine incorporation was observed in a protein with an apparent mol.wt. of 21000 (referred to as 'protein 21"). When, after labelling of this protein with [35S]-methionine, Leydig cells were incubated for another 30min with cycloheximide, no decrease in radioactivity of this protein band was observed, indicating that it does not have a short half-life. However, another protein band was detected, which after incubation with cycloheximide disappeared rapidly, the reaction following first-order kinetics, with a half-life of about 11 min. This protein, with an apparent mol.wt. of 33000 (referred to as "protein 33"), was found to be located in the particulate fraction of the Leydig cell, and could not be demonstrated in other rat testis-cell types or blood cells. No effect of luteinizing hormone on molecular weight, subcellular localization or half-life of protein 33 was observed. A possible role for protein 33 and protein 21 in the mechanism of action of luteinizing hormone on testosterone production of Leydig cells is discussed. Images PLATE 4 PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PLATE 3 PMID:849289

  20. Responses of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin to prolonged administration of the dopamine antagonist in normal women and women with low-weight amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S

    1981-06-01

    The responses of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin to prolonged administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist metoclopramide (5 mg twice daily) were investigated in six normal women and six women with low-weight amenorrhea (LWA). In contrast to the normal group, the LWA group showed no significant changes in the mean basal prolactin level or the mean prolactin response to stimulation with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, but there was an significant elevation of the mean net increase in luteinizing hormone after stimulation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone. On the basis of these data, the possibility of increased central dopaminergic activity in women with LWA is discussed. PMID:6788608

  1. Pulsatile control of reproduction.

    PubMed

    1984-08-18

    An aspect of the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction to emerge in the past decade is the pulsatile nature of hormone secretion. The pulse generator is in the central nervous system -- in the medial basal region of the hypothalamus. It works by a synchronous firing of entire populations of endocrine neurons, which discharge a quantum of the decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) into the portal blood capillaries which then carry it to the anterior pituitary gland. In man, episodic secretion of pituitary gonadotropins, especially luteinizing hormone (LH) is considered to imply a preceding pulsatile GnRH stimulus also, though this cannot be observed directly. This LH pattern is characterized by discrete bursts (pulses) separated by periods of little or no secretion. It is observalbe at all stages and states of reproductive life, being most evident at high secretion rates (e.g., at midcycle and after menopause). The pulse frequency is important and leads to the possibility of physiological and pharmacological control of pituitary-gonadal function by frequency modulation. Physiologically, pulses of LH secretion occur every 1-2 hours. The need for pulsatility in therapeutic GnRH stimulation of the pituitary also has been established following the early days of GnRH therapy when both constant and infrequent administration were found to be ineffective. Pulsatile GnRH therapy through portable pumps delivering small doses subcutaneously or intravenously every 1-2 hours has now been successfully applied to the treatment of anovulatory infertility, male hypogonadism, and the initiation of puberty. Supraphysiological GnRH stimulation, whether through increased frequency or amplitude or use of the "superactive" agonist analogues, produces a seemingly paradoxical inhibition of gonadotropin secretion. Although a postreceptor effect has been proposed, the mechanism appears to be a "down-regulation" of the GnRH receptors. Normally, the gaps between the physiological

  2. Follicle-stimulating hormone potentiates the steroidogenic activity of chorionic gonadotropin and the anti-apoptotic activity of luteinizing hormone in human granulosa-lutein cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Casarini, Livio; Riccetti, Laura; De Pascali, Francesco; Nicoli, Alessia; Tagliavini, Simonetta; Trenti, Tommaso; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Simoni, Manuela

    2016-02-15

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and choriogonadotropin (hCG) are glycoprotein hormones regulating ovarian function and pregnancy, respectively. Since these molecules act on the same receptor (LHCGR), they were traditionally assumed as equivalent in assisted reproduction techniques (ART), although differences between LH and hCG were demonstrated at molecular and physiological level. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that co-treatment with a follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) dose in the ART therapeutic range potentiates different LH- and hCG-dependent responses in vitro, measured in terms of cAMP, phospho-CREB, -ERK1/2 and -AKT activation, gene expression, progesterone and estradiol production in human granulosa-lutein cells (hGLC). We show that in the presence of FSH, hCG biopotency is about 5-fold increased, in the presence of FSH, in terms of cAMP activation. Accordingly, CREB phosphorylation and steroid production is increased under hCG and FSH co-treatment. LH effects, evaluated as steroidogenic cAMP/PKA pathway activation, do not change in the presence of FSH, which, however, increases LH-dependent ERK1/2 and AKT, but not CREB phosphorylation, resulting in anti-apoptotic effects. The different modulatory activity of FSH on LH and hCG action in vitro corresponds to their different physiological functions, reflecting proliferative effects exerted by LH during the follicular phase and before trophoblast development, and the high steroidogenic potential of hCG requested to sustain pregnancy from the luteal phase onwards. PMID:26690776

  3. Plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in mares treated with gondotropin-releasing hormone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M C; Ginther, O J

    1975-11-01

    Three experiments were performed to study the luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulatory responses to various doses and methods of administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in estrous pony mares and the influence of estradiol-17beta (E2-17beta) on LH response to GnRH treatment. In experiment 1, single injections of synthetic GnRH were subcutaneously given to 5 groups of estrous (day 2) mares (3 mares/group) on a body weight basis as follows: group A--isotonic saline solution; group B--GnRH, 0.14 mug/kg; group C--GnRH, 0.28 mug/kg; group D--KGnRH, 0.59 mug/kg; and group E--GnRH, 2.37 mug/kg. Significant increase of plasma LH concentration lasting for approximately 2 hours occurred only in mares of group E given the largest dose of GnRH (2.37 mug/kg). Plasma LH concentration increase at 1 hour after treatment approached significane (P less than 0.10) in mares of group D given the next smaller dose. In experiment 2, GnRH (2.37 mug/kg) was intravenously infused for 24 hours to a group of 6 mares (group F); 6 other mares (group G) were given saline solution infusion. Mean plasma LH concentration was increased at 3 hours, continued to increase until 6 hours, and remained at approximately the 6-hour concentration throughout the period of GnRH infusion. In the 3rd experiment, 3 groups of mares (4 mares/group) were subcutaneously given the following treatments on days 2 and 3 of estrus, respectively: group H--corn oil and saline solution; group I--corn oil and GnRH, 0.59 mug/kg; and group J--estradiol-17beta, 0.5 mg, and GnRH, 0.59 mug/kg. Plasma LH response was not seen in group H mares given corn oil and saline solution. Mean plasma LH concentration at 1 hour after administration of GnRH approached significance (P less than 0.10) in group I mares given corn oil and GnRH. For the mares in group J given E2-17beta and GnRH, E2-17beta pretreatment increased plasma LH after 24 horus; significnat increases of plasma LH concentration were seen from 1 to 6 hours after

  4. Developmental changes in hypothalamic Kiss1 expression during activation of the pulsatile release of luteinising hormone in maturing ewe lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onset of puberty is characterized by a marked increase in the frequency of release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The KISS1 gene plays a critical role in pubertal development and its product, kisspeptin, stimulates GnRH and LH release. In the study reported h...

  5. Metabolism of testosterone by human granulosa cells in culture: influence of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Y.S.; Duleba, A.; Leung, P.C.; Gomel, V.

    1982-03-15

    Human granulosa cells were isolated from follicles (8 to 15 mm) and cultivated for 24 hours in the presence or absence of follicle-stimulating hormone (NIH-FSH-HS-1, 1 microgram/ml) and luteinizing hormone (NIAMDD-hLH-1, 1 microgram/ml). Testosterone -4-14C was added subsequently to all cultures for 4-, 6-, and 24-hour periods. Of the seven metabolites of testosterone studied, 17 beta-estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) were the major products. In all patients, levels of E2 were three to ten times higher than those of E1. Production of E2, but not E1, was stimulated by either follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH). The cells of the largest follicle (15 mm) showed greater response to LH than to FSH. Production of the other C19 and C18 metabolites was very low or negligible. These results further suggest that FSH regulates the aromatization of testosterone in human granulosa cells, and that LH may have the same effect on the matured follicle during the preovulatory period.

  6. Synthesis and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-conjugated peptide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-11-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is a decapeptide hormone released from the hypothalamus and shows high affinity binding to the LHRH receptors. It is reported that several cancer cells also express LHRH receptors such as breast, ovarian, prostatic, bladder and others. In this study, we linked B1, an anti-cancer peptide, to LHRH and its analogs to improve the activity against cancer cells with LHRH receptor. Biological evaluation revealed that TB1, the peptide contains triptorelin sequence, present favorable anti-cancer activity as well as plasma stability. Further investigations disclosed that TB1 trigger apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-cytochrome c-caspase apoptotic pathway, it also exhibited the anti-migratory effect on cancer cells. PMID:26058357

  7. Organophosphorus insecticide induced decrease in plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in white-footed mice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Michael, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Oral intubation of 50 and 100 mg/kg acephate inhibited brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by 45% and 56%, and reduced basal luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration by 29% and 25% after 4 h in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis). Dietary exposure to 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for 5 days substantially inhibited brain AChE activity, but did not affect plasma LH concentration. These preliminary findings suggest that acute exposure to organophosphorus insecticides may affect LH secretion and possibly reproductive function.

  8. Effect of a combination of norethynodrel and mestranol on plasma luteinizing hormone in normal women.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G E; Klaiber, E L; Broverman, D

    1969-08-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay in 6 normal nulliparous women (ages 21-25) during 2 consecutive menstrual cycles. Cycle 1 served as the control, while a combination of 5 mg norethynodrel and .075 mg mestranol (Enovid) was administered daily during the second cycle. Midcycle LH peaks observed in all subjects during the control cycle were completely suppressed in the treated cycle. Basal LH levels during the treated cycle were significantly lower than during the follicular phase of control cycles. Mechanisms by which Enovid could affect plasma LH include decreased synthesis or release of LH and different sites of drug action with different dosages. PMID:5794834

  9. Leap of Faith: Does serum luteinizing hormone always accurately reflect central reproductive neuroendocrine activity?

    PubMed Central

    Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Function of the central aspects of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis has been assessed in a number of ways including direct measurements of hypothalamic output and indirect measures using gonadotropin release from the pituitary as a bioassay for reproductive neuroendocrine activity. Here, methods for monitoring these various parameters are briefly reviewed and then examples presented of both concordance and discrepancy between central and peripheral measurements, with a focus on situations in which elevated GnRH neurosecretion is not reflected accurately by pituitary luteinizing hormone release. Implications for interpretation of gonadotropin data are discussed. PMID:26278916

  10. Biological Time Series Analysis Using a Context Free Language: Applicability to Pulsatile Hormone Data

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Dennis A.; Adler, Gail K.; Nguyen, David P.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach for analyzing biological time-series data using a context-free language (CFL) representation that allows the extraction and quantification of important features from the time-series. This representation results in Hierarchically AdaPtive (HAP) analysis, a suite of multiple complementary techniques that enable rapid analysis of data and does not require the user to set parameters. HAP analysis generates hierarchically organized parameter distributions that allow multi-scale components of the time-series to be quantified and includes a data analysis pipeline that applies recursive analyses to generate hierarchically organized results that extend traditional outcome measures such as pharmacokinetics and inter-pulse interval. Pulsicons, a novel text-based time-series representation also derived from the CFL approach, are introduced as an objective qualitative comparison nomenclature. We apply HAP to the analysis of 24 hours of frequently sampled pulsatile cortisol hormone data, which has known analysis challenges, from 14 healthy women. HAP analysis generated results in seconds and produced dozens of figures for each participant. The results quantify the observed qualitative features of cortisol data as a series of pulse clusters, each consisting of one or more embedded pulses, and identify two ultradian phenotypes in this dataset. HAP analysis is designed to be robust to individual differences and to missing data and may be applied to other pulsatile hormones. Future work can extend HAP analysis to other time-series data types, including oscillatory and other periodic physiological signals. PMID:25184442

  11. AGE-RELATED ALTERATIONS IN THE STIMULATED RELEASE IN VITRO OF CATECHOLAMINES AND LUTEINIZING HORMONE-RELEASING HORMONE FROM THE MALE RAT HYPOTHALAMUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using an in vitro perifusion system, the present study investigated the possibility that alterations in catecholamine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion from the male rat mediobasal hypothalamus are present during the period of middle-age. The results indi...

  12. The effect of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog regime and stage of oocyte maturity for induced ovulation of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effective LHRHa (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog) dose based on the gonadal maturity of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus to optimize channel x blue hybrid catfish production was evaluated in 4 trials (twice in early part of the season and twice in the peak spawning season) in a ...

  13. Effect of carp pituitary extract and luteinizing hormone releasing analog hormone on reproductive indices and spawning of 3-year-old channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of carp pituitary extract (CPE) and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRHa) treatments to induce spawning in young-adult channel catfish undergoing first oogenesis just prior to the spawning season was evaluated in four commercial strains of channel catfish. Prior to injection of ...

  14. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone synergy: A review of role in controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Gottumukkala Achyuta Rama; Chavan, Rahul; Deenadayal, Mamata; Gunasheela, Devika; Gutgutia, Rohit; Haripriya, Geetha; Govindarajan, Mirudhubashini; Patel, Nayana Hitesh; Patki, Ameet Shashikant

    2013-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) in synergy with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates normal follicular growth and ovulation. FSH is frequently used in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Recent studies have facilitated better understanding on the complementary role of the LH to FSH in regulation of the follicle; however, role of LH in stimulation of follicle, optimal dosage of LH in stimulation and its importance in advanced aged patients has been a topic of discussion among medical fraternity. Though the administration of exogenous LH with FSH is obligatory for controlled ovarian stimulation in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, there is still a paucity of information of its usage in other patient population. In this review we looked in to the multiple roles that LH plays complementary to FSH to better understand the LH requirement in patients undergoing ART. PMID:24672160

  15. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) as a diagnostic and research tool in gynecologic endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Taymor, M L; Thompson, I E; Berger, M J; Patton, W

    1974-11-15

    A study is reported on the effects of 150 mcg. of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), administered iv to 48 women with 5 types of secondary oligoamenorrhea, on the serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) Levels. At Time 0, patients with pituitary disease showed a markedly diminished LH response and patients with polycystic ovarian disease with enlarged ovaries showed a brisk, elevated LH response. FSH levels in patients with pituitary disease and polycystic ovarian disease showed a negligible rise at Time 0. 9 of 10 patients with pituitary disease and 5 of 9 patients with dietary amenorrhea had a low LH response 30 minutes after LH-RH administration. FSH response 60 minutes after injection in patients with pituitary disease and polycystic ovarian disease seemed to be lowered though too much overlap prevented a complete diagnosis. The conclusion of this initial study is that through baseline determinations of FSH and LH, along with a LH-RH stimulation test, useful data are provided for determining whether amenorrhea is due to ovarian or pituitary failure. A 2nd study evaluated the effects of 150 mcg of LH-RH administered iv before and after the im administration of various dosages of estrogen and progesterone to anovulatory women. A vigorous response in pituitary gonadotropin, particularly LH, was observed with LH-RH administered only. The effect with estrogen and progesterone was diminished pituitary response in terms of LH production. It is concluded that estrogen and progesterone exert a negative feedback effect on gonadotropin secretion at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels. PMID:4611213

  16. Effect of priming injections of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on spermiation and ovulation in Gϋnther's Toadlet, Pseudophryne guentheri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the majority of vertebrates, gametogenesis and gamete-release depend on the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) from the hypothalamus. Studies attempting to artificially stimulate ovulation and spermiation may benefit from mimicking the naturally episodic secretion of LHRH by administering priming injections of a synthetic analogue (LHRHa). This study investigated the impact of low-dose priming injections of LHRHa on gamete-release in the Australian toadlet Pseudophryne guentheri. Methods Toadlets were administered a single dose of two micrograms per. gram LHRHa without a priming injection (no priming), or preceded by one (one priming) or two (two priming) injections of 0.4 micrograms per. gram LHRHa. Spermiation responses were evaluated at 3, 7 and 12 hrs post hormone administration (PA), and sperm number and viability were quantified using fluorescent microscopy. Oocyte yields were evaluated by stripping females at 10-11 hrs PA. A sub-sample of twenty eggs per female was then fertilised (with sperm obtained from testis macerates) and fertilisation success determined. Results No priming induced the release of the highest number of spermatozoa, with a step-wise decrease in the number of spermatozoa released in the one and two priming treatments respectively. Peak sperm-release occurred at 12 hrs PA for all priming treatments and there was no significant difference in sperm viability. Females in the control treatment failed to release oocytes, while those administered an ovulatory dose without priming exhibited a poor ovulatory response. The remaining two priming treatments (one and two priming) successfully induced 100% of females to expel an entire clutch. Oocytes obtained from the no, or two priming treatments all failed to fertilise, however oocytes obtained from the one priming treatment displayed an average fertilisation success of 97%. Conclusion Spermiation was most effectively induced in male P. guentheri by

  17. The problem of anti-doping control of luteinizing hormone in boxing.

    PubMed

    Llouquet, Jean Louis; Crepin, Nathalie; Lasne, Françoise

    2013-04-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) is physiologically produced by the anterior pituitary gland. Male athletes may use pharmaceutical LH for doping since it increases the production of testosterone by testes. This hormone is thus on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) list of substances prohibited for males. Anti-doping laboratories perform the assay of this hormone in urine and report abnormally elevated results. We observed a highly significant prevalence of abnormal results in samples taken after a boxing match. Comparison of the descriptive statistics for 426 LH values observed in boxing and other sports showed significant differences. An experimental study comparing urinary LH levels in 17 boxers before and after a match demonstrated a clear increase after the match. The same observation was made for urinary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in all of the eight boxers tested for this other pituitary gonadotropin. These observations have consequences for anti-doping controls, as the reference range for urinary LH levels must take into account the specificities of boxers. They also suggest consequences for the health of boxers. Although to our knowledge such observations have never been described, other pituitary disorders have been reported. Our results deserve further investigation from a medical point of view. PMID:23315937

  18. Effect of naloxone treatment on luteinizing hormone and testosterone concentrations in boars with high and low libido

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the effects of naloxone, an opioid peptide receptor antagonist on circulating concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone in boars characterized as having high (n = 8) or low libido (n = 8) based on the willingness to mount an artificial sow and allow s...

  19. Luteinizing hormone receptors in human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the menstrual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Yamoto, M.; Nakano, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Ikoma, H.; Furukawa, K.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled human luteinizing hormone (hLH) to the 2000-g fraction of human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the entire menstrual cycle was examined. Specific high affinity, low capacity receptors for hLH were demonstrated in the 2000-g fraction of both follicles and corpora lutea. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hLH to follicular tissue increased from the early follicular phase to the ovulatory phase. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hLH to luteal tissue increased from the early luteal phase to the midluteal phase and decreased towards the late luteal phase. The results of the present study indicate that the increase and decrease in receptors for hLH during the menstrual cycle might play an important role in the regulation of the ovarian cycle.

  20. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  1. Luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in male workers exposed to urban stressors.

    PubMed

    Tomao, Enrico; Tomei, Gianfranco; Rosati, Maria Valeria; Caciari, Tiziana; Danese, Daniele; Gamberale, Daniele; Vacca, Daniele; Palermo, Paola; Anzelmo, Vincenza; Tomei, Francesco

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate if occupational exposure to urban stressors could cause alterations in luteinizing hormone (LH) plasma levels in male traffic policemen vs. administrative staff of Municipal Police.After excluding the subjects with the main confounding factors, male traffic police and administrative staff of Municipal Police were matched by age, working life, body mass index (BMI), alcohol drinking habit, cigarette smoking habit and habitual consumption of Italian coffee.In 166 male traffic police mean LH values were significantly higher compared to 166 male administrative employees. The distribution of LH values in traffic police and in administrative employees was statistically significant.Our results suggest that recent exposure to urban stressors (chemical, physical and psycho-social) can alter the plasma concentration of LH. In agreement with our previous research, levels of plasma LH may be used as early biological markers, valuable for the group, used in occupational set before the appearance of the disease. PMID:19477485

  2. Association of luteinizing hormone receptor gene expression with cell cycle progression in granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jennifer D.; Seekallu, Srinivas V.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.; Chaffin, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    During hormonally induced ovarian follicle growth, granulosa cell proliferation increases and returns to baseline prior to the administration of an ovulatory stimulus. Several key genes appear to follow a similar pattern, including the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR), suggesting an association between cell cycle progression and gene expression. The expression of LHCGR mRNA in granulosa cells isolated from immature rats and treated in culture with FSH increased in a time-dependent manner, whereas administration of the cell cycle inhibitor mimosine completely suppressed expression. Although forskolin was able to induce luteinization in cells treated with mimosine, human chorionic gonadotropin had no effect, indicating the functional loss of LHCGR. The effects of mimosine on cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression were reversible within 24 h of mimosine removal. Cell cycle inhibition did not alter the stability of LHCGR mRNA, indicating that the primary effect was at the transcriptional level. To determine whether the relationship between LHCGR expression and cell cycle were relevant in vivo, immature rats were given a bolus of PMSG, followed by a second injection of either saline or PMSG 24 h later to augment levels of proliferation. The expression of LHCGR mRNA was elevated in the ovaries of animals receiving a supplement of PMSG. Mimosine also blocked cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression in macaque granulosa cells isolated following controlled ovarian stimulation cycles and in two different mouse Leydig tumor lines. These data collectively indicate that LHCGR mRNA is expressed as a function of the passage of cells across the G1-S phase boundary. PMID:19293332

  3. Evaluation of an immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) using automated system for determination of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, E; Mason, M; Galván, R E; Pascoe, D; Ochoa, R; Hernández, M; Zárate, A

    1997-01-01

    It has been proposed that automated systems for immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) may substitute traditional radioimmunoassay (RIA) for measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in blood due to the advantage of being more rapid, higher sensitivity, lower cost and not requiring radioactive reagents. The study was designed to evaluate both systems using serum samples to determine luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations. The automatic system (ES-300) for IEMA utilized two monoclonal antibodies, one of them on the solid phase was the specific extractant for the antigen, and the other was a peroxidase labeled antibody which recognizes a different epitope in the antigen molecule, specifically bound in linear proportion to the antigen concentration. Blood samples were obtained from patients who were treated at the hospital for various clinical problems ("problem group") as well as blood samples from patients in whom FSH and LH concentrations were already known ("high", "medium" and "low" levels) by previous RIA ("control group"). IEMA showed a higher sensitivity, 0.42 and 0.96 mIU/ml for FSH and LH, respectively, whereas RIA was 1.95 mIU/ml for both hormones. Intra- and interassay coefficient of variation were below 10% within the range of 15-150 mIU/ml for FSH and 5-100 mIU/ml for LH; however, the coefficient of variation was 15-25% at lower concentrations of FSH and LH. Accuracy of IEMA was evaluated by recovery percentage, thus when high and medium concentrations of FSH and LH were analyzed the recovery was between 99-104%. On the other hand, the recovery was 110% when low levels of FSH and LH were used. In conclusion, IEMA resulted reliable when FSH and LH concentrations are in the middle and high range; likewise, the detection limit of IEMA was lower than RIA, particularly for FSH. On the bases of these results, IEMA showed several advantages over RIA, but its reliability diminishes when serum

  4. Plasma and urinary luteinizing hormone levels in the diagnosis of endocrine disease.

    PubMed

    Wikramanayake, R; Keenan, J R; Spathis, G S; Nabarro, J D; Leonard, P J; Gallagher, M J

    1972-03-25

    The diagnostic value of measurements of plasma and urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) has been studied in 209 patients with endocrine disease. In 44 patients puberty was either delayed or had failed to occur. In those with chromosomal abnormalities the LH levels were often within the normal range, whereas those with a pituitary cause usually had low levels. In boys with delayed puberty plasma LH levels rose before physical changes occurred and had prognostic value. In patients with later gonadal failure, men with impotence or infertility, and women with secondary amenorrhoea LH assays proved of little value, although in one case a premature menopause was suspected and six patients with anorexia nervosa had low LH levels.Sixty patients with disorders of the hypothalamicpituitary area were studied. Levels of LH were measured and considered in relation to the other anterior pituitary hormones. Impairment of LH secretion was one of the first effects on hormone production of disease affecting this area, and this was, of course, most readily detected in postmenopausal women.The normal ranges of both plasma and urine LH are wide and there seems to be considerable day-to-day variation, especially of urinary output. Several samples should, therefore, be measured if therapeutic decisions are involved. PMID:5014251

  5. Signaling Responses to Pulsatile Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone in LβT2 Gonadotrope Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Mistry, Devendra; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is secreted in a pulsatile fashion by hypothalamic neurons, and alterations in pulse frequency and amplitude differentially regulate gonadotropin synthesis and release. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of Gs and Gq signaling in response to continuous or pulsatile GnRH using fluorescence resonance energy transfer reporters in live mouse LβT2 gonadotrope cells. cAMP and protein kinase A-dependent reporters showed a rapid but transient increase in fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal with increasing doses of constant GnRH, and in contrast diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium reporters showed a rapid and sustained signal. Multiple pulses of GnRH caused multiple pulses of cAMP and protein kinase A activation without desensitization, but the DAG and calcium reporters were rapidly desensitized resulting in inhibition of calcium and DAG responses. At the transcriptional level, both a cAMP-dependent cAMP-response element reporter and a DAG/calcium-dependent AP-1 reporter showed a pulse frequency-dependent increase in luciferase activity. However, constant GnRH stimulation gave very little cAMP-response element activation but very strong AP-1 activation. Based on these data, we propose that both the GnRH-R-Gs and Gq pathways are responsive to pulses of GnRH, but only the Gq pathway is responsive to constant GnRH. Furthermore, the Gq pathway is subject to desensitization with multiple GnRH pulses, but the Gs pathway is not. PMID:20406815

  6. Hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone and ovarian steroids in women with recurrent early miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Watson, H; Kiddy, D S; Hamilton-Fairley, D; Scanlon, M J; Barnard, C; Collins, W P; Bonney, R C; Franks, S

    1993-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) which has been implicated in the aetiology of early pregnancy loss. Although 82% of women with recurrent early loss have polycystic ovaries on ultrasound imaging, random serum LH concentrations are normal. In the present study, we have obtained further information from serial samples concerning the cyclical patterns of gonadotrophin and sex steroid secretion in these women. Twenty-one women with recurrent early pregnancy loss and 10 multiparous controls were investigated; 81% of them and one of ten control subjects had polycystic ovaries. Mean mid-follicular and mid-luteal serum LH and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were similar in both groups. Seventeen women with pregnancy loss had either raised urinary LH excretion or a premature LH surge; one control subject had a premature LH surge. Total LH excretion during the cycle and mean follicular phase serum testosterone was significantly greater with early pregnancy loss than in the control group, the difference in LH being greatest in the early luteal phase. Urinary oestrone-3-glucuronide excretion was raised in the early luteal phase of the cycle in the group with early pregnancy loss; there was no difference between the groups in pregnanediol-3 alpha-glucuronide excretion. These data demonstrate abnormalities in LH secretion in 81% of women with recurrent fetal loss. Inappropriately raised LH levels may have adverse effects on the developing oocyte or endometrium either directly, or indirectly by causing an elevation in testosterone and oestrogen levels. PMID:8345070

  7. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes blocks the positive feedback release of luteinizing hormone in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Kienast, S G; Fadden, C; Steger, R W

    1993-01-01

    The effects of streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes on the release of gonadotropins was studied in female rats. In the first experiment, rats were ovariectomized and 2 days later were injected with STZ. Three weeks later rats were treated with estrogen and progesterone and blood samples were taken via intraatrial cannulae for luteinizing hormone (LH) assay. Afternoon surges of LH were seen in 4/5 control but 0/8 STZ rats. Pituitary responses to LH-releasing hormone in vitro did not differ. In the 2nd experiment, ovariectomized estrogen-primed rats were killed prior to and during a progesterone-induced LH surge. As in Experiment 1, STZ-treatment inhibited the LH surge but did not effect the afternoon rise in median eminence norepinephrine turnover which has previously been shown to be important in stimulating LH release. Turnover of norepinephrine in the anterior hypothalamus was depressed in the diabetic rats both prior to and during the expected time of the LH surge. Dopamine turnover was depressed in all three brain regions studied. It can be concluded that the positive feedback control of LH release is severely attenuated in diabetic rats but the mechanism explaining the loss is not clear. Diabetes-induced alterations in hypothalamic catecholamine metabolism may be involved but further work is needed to more carefully define these relationships. PMID:8221130

  8. Thecal cell sensitivity to luteinizing hormone and insulin in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cadagan, David; Khan, Raheela; Amer, Saad

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether a defect of steroid synthesis in ovarian theca cells may lead to the development of PCOS, through contributions to excess androgen secretion. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the leading causes of infertility worldwide affecting around 1 in 10 of women of a reproductive age. One of the fundamental abnormalities in this syndrome is the presence of hormonal irregularities, including hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone (LH). Studies suggest that insulin treatment increases progesterone and androstenedione secretion in PCOS theca cells when compared to insulin treated normal theca cells. Furthermore the augmented effects of LH and insulin have been seen to increase ovarian androgen synthesis in non-PCOS theca cultures whilst also increasing the expression of steroidogenic enzymes specific to the PI3-K pathway. Our examination of primary thecal cultures showed an increase in both the expression of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17 and androgen secretion in PCOS theca cells under basal conditions, when compared to non-PCOS cells. This was increased significantly under treatments of LH and insulin combined. Our results support the previous reported hypothesis that a dysfunction may exist within the PI3-K pathway. Specifically, that sensitivity exists to physiological symptoms including hyperinsulinemia and hyper secretion of LH found in PCOS through co-stimulation. The impact of these findings may allow the development of a therapeutic target in PCOS. PMID:26952754

  9. Targeted overexpression of luteinizing hormone in transgenic mice leads to infertility, polycystic ovaries, and ovarian tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Risma, K A; Clay, C M; Nett, T M; Wagner, T; Yun, J; Nilson, J H

    1995-01-01

    Hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) is implicated in infertility and miscarriages in women. A lack of animal models has limited progress in determining the mechanisms of LH toxicity. We have recently generated transgenic mice expressing a chimeric LH beta subunit (LH beta) in gonadotropes. The LH beta chimera contains the C-terminal peptide of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit. Addition of this peptide to bovine LH beta resulted in a hormone with a longer half-life. Furthermore, targeted expression of the LH beta chimera led to elevated LH levels and infertility in female transgenics. These mice ovulated infrequently, maintained a prolonged luteal phase, and developed pathologic ovarian changes such as cyst formation, marked enlargement of ovaries, and granulosa cell tumors. Testosterone and estradiol levels were increased compared to nontransgenic littermates. An unusual extragonadal phenotype was also observed: transgenic females developed hydronephropathy and pyelonephritis. The pathology observed demonstrates a direct association between abnormal secretion of LH and infertility and underscores the utility of the transgenic model for studying how excess LH leads to cyst formation, ovarian tumorigenesis, and infertility. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7877975

  10. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  11. Inhibition of progesterone secretion during the luteal phase by two luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists in Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, J P; Mary, I; Moguilewsky, M; Mouren, M; Labrie, F

    1980-12-01

    The administration of 200 microgram of the potent luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist [D-Leu6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide on day 6 following the plasma estradiol peak to 11 female monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) during two consecutive menstrual cycles decreased plasma progesterone levels by 40.0% +/- 3.9% as compared with previous control cycles. The plasma estradiol profile and the cycle length were not affected significantly by the treatment. Similar results were obtained with 25 microgram of [D-Ser(TBU)6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide administered to one monkey at the same period of the cycle, such treatment leading to a 41% inhibition of circulating progesterone levels. Although plasma progesterone levels were still reduced in the two post-treatment cycles in monkeys treated with the high dose (200 microgram) of [D-Leu6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide, the recovery cycle was normal after the administration of a lower dose (25 microgram) of [D-Ser(TBU)6, des-Gly-NH2(10)] LHRH ethylamide. The M. fascicularis monkey thus appears as a valid model with which to study the inhibitory effects of LHRH agonists on luteal function. PMID:6778718

  12. Is radiation-induced ovarian failure in rhesus monkeys preventable by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists?: Preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ataya, K.; Pydyn, E.; Ramahi-Ataya

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of cancer patients are achieving long term survival. Impaired ovarian function after radiation therapy has been reported in several studies. Some investigators have suggested that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) can prevent radiation-induced ovarian injury in rodents. Adult female rhesus monkeys were given either vehicle or Leuprolide acetate before, during, and after radiation. Radiation was given in a dose of 200 rads/day for a total of 4000 rads to the ovaries. Frequent serum samples were assayed for estradiol (E{sub 2}) and FSH. Ovariectomy was performed later. Ovaries were processed and serially sectioned. Follicle count and size distribution were determined. Shortly after radiation started, E{sub 2} dropped to low levels, at which it remained, whereas serum FSH level, which was low before radiation, rose soon after starting radiation. In monkeys treated with a combination of LHRHa and radiation, FSH started rising soon after the LHRHa-loaded minipump was removed (after the end of radiation). Serum E{sub 2} increased after the end of LHRHa treatment in the non-irradiated monkey, but not in the irradiated monkey. Follicle counts were not preserved in the LHRHa-treated monkeys that received radiation. The data demonstrated no protective effect of LHRHa treatment against radiation-induced ovarian injury in this rhesus monkey model. 58 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from perifused equine pituitaries.

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M A; Roser, J F; Dybdal, N

    1991-07-01

    cycle, being highest in estrus, and appears to be related, in part, to pituitary LH content and (2) GnRH self-priming occurs independently of the stage of the estrous cycle. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the pulsatile mode of GnRH can act directly on the anterior pituitary to dictate the pulsatile release pattern of LH in the cycling mare. PMID:1747998

  14. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin receptors in various epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Venencie, P Y; Méduri, G; Pissard, S; Jolivet, A; Loosfelt, H; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1999-09-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes were used to study the localization of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin (LH/hCG) receptors in human skin. Immunolabelling was observed only in the epidermis and derived structures but not in the dermis. The basal, spinal and granular layers were stained, whereas no receptors were detected in the non-nucleated horny cells. In the growing (anagen) hair, immunostaining was found in the inner root sheath below the level of the sebaceous glands and in the outer root sheath above this level. In the resting (telogen) hair, only the latter staining was observed. In the sebaceous glands, only the thin cells close to the walls of the ducts were immunolabelled. In the eccrine sweat glands, the external clear cells were stained in the secretory portion of the gland, whereas only the cells close to the lumen were labelled in the ducts. The distribution of LH/hCG receptors was compared with that of steroidogenic enzymes (side chain cleavage cytochrome P450, adrenodoxin, 3-beta-hydroxy-5-ene steroid dehydrogenase Delta5-Delta4 isomerase, 17-hydroxylase cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 aromatase). Only partial overlaps were observed. The presence of LH receptor mRNA in the skin was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor failed to detect the latter in the epidermal structures and in the dermis. The role of LH and hCG in skin modifications occurring during pregnancy and after the menopause is unknown. These hormones may possibly act by regulating steroidogenic enzymes or by modulating cell growth and differentiation. PMID:10583046

  15. Effects of external radiation therapy for cancer of the prostate on the serum concentrations of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Tomic, R.; Bergman, B.; Damber, J.E.; Littbrand, B.; Loefroth, P.O.

    1983-08-01

    Testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin were analyzed in serum from 31 patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated primarily with megavoltage radiation therapy. The total tumor dose varied between 58 and 71 gray (mean 63.5 gray). Absorbed doses to the testes were measured at approximately 1 to more than 10 gray. We investigated retrospectively 17 patients 3 to 60 months (mean 20 months) after therapy and found significantly lower serum testosterone concentrations and significantly higher luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations than in age-matched controls. Of the patients, 14 were followed before and after radiation treatment. Testosterone concentrations were reduced significantly 1 week as well as 3 months after treatment but pre-treatment values were found on analysis 6 and 12 months after treatment. The values for luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones were significantly higher 3, 6 and 12 months after radiation treatment compared to pre-treatment values. The follicle-stimulating hormone value already increased after 1 week. The greatest observed testosterone alteration occurred 1 week after treatment in patients who received more than 10 gray over the gonads. The use of lead shields protecting the testes reduced the dose absorbed to the gonads by approximately 50 percent.

  16. Differential thermal stability of human, bovine and ovine Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH) quaternary structures.

    PubMed

    Haj Hassan, Maya; Cahoreau, Claire; Jégot, Gwenhael; Jouanny, Camille; Mariot, Julie; Lecompte, François; Klett, Danièle; Combarnous, Yves

    2015-02-01

    Quaternary structure of human, bovine and ovine Follicle-Stimulating Hormones (hFSH, bFSH and oFSH) and Luteinizing Hormone was assessed in sandwich ELISAs using monoclonal anti-oFSHβ or anti-oLHβ antibodies, respectively, for capture and a biotinylated anti-hFSHα (α4 epitope) for detection. Neither free subunit gave any signal in this assay so that it was possible to measure the residual heterodimeric fraction after thermal treatment of the gonadotropins under study. The hormones were subjected to 5-min heating between 37 and 90 °C before rapid cooling in melting ice before ELISA. The data show half-dissociation of natural and recombinant human and ovine FSH preparations between 68 and 74 °C whereas bovine FSH preparations exhibited lower stability in these conditions with half-dissociation between 61 and 64 °C. Moreover, whereas all human and bovine as well as most ovine FSH preparations were fully dissociated at temperatures above 80 °C, one natural oFSH and one recombinant hLH preparations contained an important fraction that resisted dissociation even at 93 °C and retained in vitro bioactivity. This suggests the existence of gonadotropin αβ heterodimer with covalently linked subunits. Similarly, about 20% of the recombinant hLH preparation was also found withstand heat denaturation and also probably to have cross-linked subunits. The origin and chemical nature of these inter-subunit bonds remain to be determined. PMID:24732063

  17. Ovine luteinizing hormone heterogeneity: androgens increase the percentage of less basic isohormones.

    PubMed

    Christianson, S L; Zalesky, D D; Grotjan, H E

    1998-03-01

    The heterogeneity of luteinizing (LH) is hormonally regulated with androgens having been reported to increase the percentage of extremely basic LH isohormones in the ovine pituitary. This study re-examined the effects of androgens on the heterogeneity of LH in the ovine pituitary because the extremely basic isoforms of LH reported previously were subsequently demonstrated to be artifacts resulting from the conditions used for chromatofocusing. Pituitary extracts from wethers, rams, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-implanted wethers were desalted by flow dialysis and chromatofocused on pH 10.5 to 7.0 gradients. LH was quantitated by radioimmunoassays. When compared with rams, wethers had increased percentages of LH isoforms eluting between pH 9.6 and 10. Patterns of intrapituitary LH isohormones were comparable in rams and DHT-implanted wethers except that rams had a higher percentage of LH eluting at pH 9.2 (20.9 +/- 2.1% vs. 13.3 +/- 1.3%). In contrast to what was previously reported, rams and DHT-implanted wethers had higher percentages of ovine LH isoforms eluting at pH's 9.4 or lower. Thus, androgens alter LH heterogeneity yielding increased percentages of isohormones eluting at pH's of 9.4 or lower. PMID:9532422

  18. Mutational analysis of the luteinizing hormone receptor gene in two individuals with Leydig cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Canto, Patricia; Söderlund, Daniela; Ramón, Guillermo; Nishimura, Elisa; Méndez, Juan Pablo

    2002-03-01

    Inactivating mutations of the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) gene in males induce Leydig cell agenesis or hypoplasia, while activating mutations cause testotoxicosis. Recently, it was demonstrated that a somatic heterozygous activating mutation of the LHR gene (Asp578His), limited to the tumor, was the cause of Leydig cell adenomas in three unrelated patients. We describe the molecular study of two unrelated boys with gonadotropin-independent hypersecretion of testosterone due to Leydig cell adenomas. Genomic DNA was extracted from the tumor, the adjacent normal testis tissue, and blood leukocytes. Both individuals exhibited an heterozygous missense mutation, limited only to the tumor, consisting of a guanine (G) to cytosine (C) substitution at codon 578 (GAT to CAT), turning aspartic acid into histidine. The presence of the same mutation in different ethnic groups demonstrates the existence of a mutational hot spot in the LHR gene. Indeed, this mutation occurs at the conserved aspartic acid residue at amino acid 578, where a substitution by glycine is the most common mutation observed in testotoxicosis and where a substitution by tyrosine has been linked to a more severe clinical phenotype where diffuse Leydig cell hyperplasia is found. Our results confirm the fact that somatic activating mutations of gonadotropin receptors are involved in gonadal tumorigenesis. PMID:11857565

  19. Effect of supplemental light on growth, prolactin, progesterone and luteinizing hormone in water buffalo ( Bubalus bubalis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, K. S.; Gwazdauskas, F. C.; Akers, R. M.; McGilliard, M. L.

    1989-06-01

    Fifty non-pregnant Surti buffalo heifers aged between 17 and 42 months ( n=24, <24 months; n=26, >24 months) were randomly assigned to groups subject to either natural daylight +4h supplemental light ( n=25) or natural day light ( n=25), to study changes in growth, serum prolactin (Prl), progesterone (P4) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to supplemental lighting. Ambient temperatures (T) and relative humidity (RH) generally were >27° C and <70% during the day-time, respectively. Light-supplemented heifers had 16.2 kg net body weight (BW) gain at 9 weeks compared to 20.8 kg for controls, but higher mean Prl after 6.5 weeks ( P<0.01), and higher P4 (0.41 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P<0.06) than control heifers. Older heifers had 39.7% greater BW ( P<0.01), but a net 4.3% BW gain compared to a 10.1% gain for younger heifers at 10 weeks. Older, light-supplemented heifers had higher mean P4 (0.63 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P<0.07) than the other groups. These weight and hormonal changes suggest that 4 h supplemental light can alter growth and endocrine function in buffaloes under similar planes of nutrition. While light supplementation did not have a positive effect on body wieght during the 10 week study, body weight and endocrine changes due to supplemental light may be important factors for initiation of reproductive cyclicity.

  20. Uncoupling clutch size, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone using experimental egg removal.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Calen P; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Williams, Tony D

    2015-03-01

    Clutch size is a key avian fitness and life history trait. A physiological model for clutch size determination (CSD), involving an anti-gonadal effect of prolactin (PRL) via suppression of luteinizing hormone (LH), was proposed over 20 years ago, but has received scant experimental attention since. The few studies looking at a PRL-based mechanistic hypothesis for CSD have been equivocal, but recent experiments utilizing a pharmacological agent to manipulate PRL in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) found no support for a role of this hormone in clutch size determination. Here, we take a complementary approach by manipulating clutch size through egg removal, examining co-variation in PRL and LH between two breeding attempts, as well as through experimentally-extended laying. Clutch size increased for egg removal females, but not controls, but this was not correlated with changes in PRL or LH. There were also no differences in PRL between egg removal females and controls, nor did PRL levels during early, mid- or late-laying of supra-normal clutches predict clutch size. By uncoupling PRL, LH and clutch size in our study, several key predictions of the PRL-based mechanistic model for CSD were not supported. However, a positive correlation between PRL levels late in laying and days relative to the last egg (clutch completion) provides an alternative explanation for the equivocal results surrounding the conventional PRL-based physiological model for CSD. We suggest that females coordinate PRL-mediated incubation onset with clutch completion to minimize hatching asynchrony and sibling hierarchy, a behavior that is amplified in females laying larger clutches. PMID:25687742

  1. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  2. Effect of permeation enhancer pretreatment on the iontophoresis of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) through human epidermal membrane (HEM).

    PubMed

    Smyth, Hugh D C; Becket, Gordon; Mehta, Samir

    2002-05-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial design was performed to determine the effect of a permeation enhancer (oleic acid/propylene glycol), iontophoresis (2 V), and the combination of the two treatments on the permeation enhancement of a model peptide, LHRH (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone), through human epidermal membrane (HEM). In parallel studies, TEAB (tetraethylammonium bromide, a small ionic solute) and sucrose (an electroosmotic flow marker) were also investigated. Structural changes in the HEM were monitored via conductance measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy experiments. LHRH enhancement due to enhancer in combination with iontophoresis (I + E; 29.5 times passive permeability, P), was greater than during iontophoresis alone (I; 14.3) and enhancer treatment alone (E; 3.5). I + E had an additive effect of I and E, indicating the mechanisms of action of the individual enhancement strategies were likely to be located at different sites in the skin. Also, no synergistic enhancement was observed with I + E for either TEAB or sucrose. For TEAB, permeability enhancement due to I (approximately 1400) was much higher than that due to E (14.9), and no additive effect could be detected. For sucrose, E had no effect on either passive or iontophoretic permeability, eliminating the possibility that electroosmosis could explain increases in LHRH permeability. Evidence of synergy between E and I was found, with conductance measurements indicating that I + E synergistically increased the membrane permeability to conducting ions (Na+ and Cl-). It appears these pathways were not available for transport for the solutes used in the current study. DSC and IR investigations showed significant changes in stratum corneum lipid structure following E treatment but not following I. These findings probably arise from the localized action of iontophoresis compared with the bulk action of enhancer. In summary, increased LHRH delivery through HEM in

  3. Ability of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 binding to LHRH receptor on human liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shou-Liang; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Hong-Guang; Lü, Wen-Tian; Liu, Guang-Wei; Zhu, Ping

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the ability of recombinant toxin luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 (LHRH-PE40) and LHRH binding to LHRH receptor (LHRHR) on the membrane surface of human liver cancer HEPG cells. METHODS: LHRH was labeled by using 125I with enzymatic reaction. The affinity and receptor volume of LHRH-PE40 and LHRH binding to LHRHR on the membrane surface of human liver cancer cells were measured with radioligand receptor assay. RESULTS: The specific activity of LHRH labeled with 125I was 2.7 × 104 kBq/μL, and its radiochemical purity reached to 99.2%-99.7%. The binding of 125I to LHRH was maximal for 240 min in the warm cultivation, and this binding was stabilized. The inhibiting rates of 125I-LHRH and LHRH on the proliferation of human liver cancer HEPG cells were not significantly different. On the basis of the saturation curve of 125I-LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells, 125I-LHRH of 1 × 105 cpm was selected for radioligand receptor assay. The affinity constants (Kd) of LHRH-PE40 and LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells were 0.43 ± 0.12 nmol/L and 4.86 ± 1.47 nmol/L, respectively, and their receptor volumes were 0.37 ± 0.15 μmol/g and 0.42 ± 0.13 μmol/g, respectively. The binding of LHRH-PE40 to the membrane protein of normal liver cells was not observed. CONCLUSION: The recombinant toxin LHRH-PE40 binding to the membrane surface of LHRHR of human liver cancer HEPG cells was very strong, while the specific binding of it to normal liver cells was not observed. The results provide an important experimental basis for the clinical application of LHRH-PE. PMID:15334689

  4. Acute regulation of plasma insulin-like peptide 3 concentrations by luteinizing hormone in male goats.

    PubMed

    Hannan, M A; Kawate, N; Fukami, Y; Pathirana, I N; Büllesbach, E E; Inaba, T; Tamada, H

    2016-08-01

    Recently, it was reported that in bulls secretion of insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) in blood occurred in a pulsatile manner and was acutely regulated by LH. In the present study, the acute regulation of plasma INSL3 and its temporal relationships with LH and testosterone were examined in six sexually matured male goats using the following experimental design. (1) After stimulating LH release by administering a GnRH analogue, blood levels of LH, INSL3, and testosterone were monitored at 15-minute intervals for 2 hours followed by hourly intervals up to 8 hours. (2) After activation of the LH receptor by hCG blood levels of INSL3 and testosterone were determine at 15-minute intervals for 2 hours, followed by hourly intervals up to 8 hours, daily intervals up to Day 8, and finally on Day 12. (3) The release of LH, INSL3, and testosterone in normal physiology was established at 15-minute intervals for an 8-hour session. Concentrations of LH, INSL3, and testosterone in plasma were measured by enzyme-immunoassays. After GnRH treatment, mean plasma concentrations of all three hormones increased (P < 0.05) dramatically from 30 minutes and remained high until 120 minutes (LH), 75 minutes (INSL3), and 4 hours (testosterone) after treatment. After hCG treatment, mean plasma INSL3 concentrations increased (P < 0.05) from 30 minutes and remained elevated until the end of sampling on Day 12. An increase (P < 0.05) in mean plasma testosterone concentrations occurred from 15 minutes and remained high until Day 6. The mean increase (maximum per pretreatment concentration) of INSL3 concentrations after administration of GnRH and hCG was lower (P < 0.01) than that of testosterone. The secretory pattern of LH, INSL3, and testosterone in the general circulation was pulsatile with a frequency of 5.5 ± 0.6, 4.7 ± 0.5, and 2.2 ± 0.5, respectively, during the 8-hour period. Twenty out of 28 (71%) of these INSL3 pulses peaked within 1 hour after a peak of an LH

  5. Association of Luteinizing Hormone Chorionic Gonadotropin Receptor Gene Polymorphism (rs2293275) with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kodati, Vijayalakshmi; Erukkambattu, Jayashankar; Addepally, Uma; Qurratulain, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovaries and irregular menstruation/anovulation are important diagnostic criteria along with hyperandrogenism as per the Androgen Excess Society–2006 criteria for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). In the etiopathogenesis of PCOS, one of the candidate genes causing ovarian failure is the luteinizing hormone (LH) chorionic gonadotropin hormone receptor (LHCGR). Our aim was to study the association of LHCGR polymorphism (rs2293275) with PCOS in our study population. Materials and Methods: Genetic case–control study from multiple gynecological centers from Hyderabad, a cosmopolitan city in South India. The study involved 204 women with PCOS and 204 healthy, sex-, and age-matched controls. Anthropometric and biochemical profiles were taken in a well-designed pro forma. Isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and genotype analysis were done for the entire study population using the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism method followed by 12% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: In this study, we have demonstrated an association between LHCGR (rs2293275) polymorphism and PCOS. The frequency of the G allele was 0.60 in PCOS and 0.49 in controls (odds ratio [OR] 1.531, confidence interval [CI] 1.16–2.01, and p-value=0.0026), which indicates that the G allele is associated with PCOS in our population. The GG genotype conferred a significant risk of developing PCOS (OR 3.36, CI 1.96–5.75, and p-value<0.0001). We found a significant association of the GG allele with body–mass index, waist to hip ratio, insulin resistance, LH, and LH/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio in PCOS when compared with controls. The AA allele showed high basal FSH levels. Conclusions: This study suggests that LHCGR (rs2293275) polymorphism is associated with PCOS and could be used as a relevant molecular marker to identify women with the risk of developing PCOS in our population and may provide an understanding about the

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation and pretreatment with (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide on developing rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J.; YoungLai, E.V.; McMahon, A.; Barr, R.; O'Connell, G.; Belbeck, L.

    1987-10-01

    To assess the effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide, in ameliorating the damage caused by ionizing radiation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist was administered to rats from day 22 to 37 of age in doses of 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 microgram/day or vehicle and the rats were sacrificed on day 44 of age. There were no effects on estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing, or follicle-stimulating hormone, nor an effect on ovarian follicle numbers or development. In separate experiments, rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in doses of 0.04, 0.1, 0.4, or 1.0 microgram/day were either irradiated or sham irradiated on day 30 and all groups sacrificed on day 44 of age. Irradiation produced a reduction in ovarian weight and an increase in ovarian follicular atresia. Pretreatment with the agonist prevented the reduction in ovarian weight and numbers of primordial and preantral follicles but not healthy or atretic antral follicles. Such putative radioprotection should be tested on actual reproductive performance.

  7. Augmentation of Metastin/Kisspeptin mRNA Expression by the Proestrous Luteinizing Hormone Surge in Granulosa Cells of Rats: Implications for Luteinization.

    PubMed

    Laoharatchatathanin, Titaree; Terashima, Ryota; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Kurusu, Shiro; Kawaminami, Mitsumori

    2015-07-01

    Variations in mRNA levels and sources of metastin/kisspeptin, neurokinin B (NKB), dynorphin, and kisspeptin receptor GPR54 were examined in the ovaries of cycling rats. Kisspeptin and dynorphin mRNAs dramatically increased at 2000 h of the proestrous day. NKB mRNA also increased, but the peak was delayed by 6 h. GPR54 mRNA declined inversely with kisspeptin. Whole-ovary expressions of kisspeptin and dynorphin mRNAs, but not of NKB mRNA, were augmented by the administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). By means of laser-capture microdissection, kisspeptin mRNA was shown mostly in follicles at 2000 h of proestrus, whereas NKB and dynorphin were expressed mainly in interstitial tissues. GPR54 mRNA was detected equally in follicles, corpora lutea, and interstitial tissues. The hCG stimulated the follicular expression of kisspeptin and interstitial tissue expression of dynorphin mRNA. In primary cultures of granulosa cells prepared from equine chorionic gonadotropin-pretreated immature rats, hCG stimulated the expression of kisspeptin, dynorphin, and NKB mRNAs. Distortion of the corpus luteum and surrounding tissue borders was sometimes seen after intra-ovarian bursa administration of kisspeptin antagonist p234 for 3 days from proestrus. Progesterone production stimulated by hCG in granulosa cell culture was suppressed by p234. These data demonstrate that significant amounts of kisspeptin are synthesized in granulosa cells and dynorphin in interstitial tissues, in response to the proestrous luteinizing hormone surge, whereas granulosa cells also contain dynorphin and NKB, suggesting at least a role for kisspeptin in the luteinization of granulosa cells. PMID:25995272

  8. Kisspeptin receptor agonist (FTM080) increased plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone in anestrous ewes

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Joseph A.; Amelse, Lisa L.; Tanco, Valeria M.; Chameroy, Kelly A.; Schrick, F. Neal

    2015-01-01

    Kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) agonists with increased half-life and similar efficacy to kisspeptin in vitro may provide beneficial applications in breeding management of many species. However, many of these agonists have not been tested in vivo. These studies were designed to test and compare the effects of a KISS1R agonist (FTM080) and kisspeptin on luteinizing hormone (LH) in vivo. In experiment 1 (pilot study), sheep were treated with FTM080 (500 pmol/kg BW) or sterile water (VEH) intravenosuly. Blood was collected every 15 min before (1 h) and after (1 h) treatment. In experiment 2, sheep were treated with KP-10 (human Metastin 45-54; 500 pmol/kg BW), one of three dosages of FTM080 (500 (FTM080:500), 2500 (FTM080:2500), or 5000 (FTM080:5000) pmol/kg BW), or VEH intravenously. Blood was collected every 15 min before (1 h) and after (4 h) treatment. In experiment 1, FTM080:500 increased (P < 0.05) plasma LH concentrations when compared to VEH. The area under the curve (AUC) of LH following FTM080:500 treatment was also increased (P < 0.05). In experiment 2, plasma LH concentrations increased (P < 0.05) following treatment with KP-10 and FTM080:5000 when compared to VEH and FTM080:500. The AUC of LH following KP-10 was greater than (P < 0.05) all other treatments and the AUC of LH following FTM080:5000 was greater than (P < 0.05) all treatments except KP-10. These data provide evidence to suggest that FTM080 stimulates the gonadotropic axis of ruminants in vivo. Any increased half-life and comparable efficacy of FTM080 to KP-10 in vitro does not appear to translate to in vivo in sheep. PMID:26587345

  9. Induction of the expressions of antioxidant enzymes by luteinizing hormone in the bovine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Syota; Sakumoto, Ryosuke; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Luteoprotective mechanisms of luteinizing hormone (LH) involved in the maintenance of bovine corpus luteum (CL) function have not been completely clarified. Since antioxidant enzymes are well documented as antiapoptotic factors in the CL of many mammals, we hypothesized that the luteoprotective action of LH is mediated by stimulating the local production and action of antioxidant enzymes. To test the above hypothesis, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms involved in the luteoprotective actions of LH. Cultured bovine luteal cells obtained from the CL at the mid-luteal stage (days 8-12 of the estrous cycle) were treated with LH (10 ng/ml), onapristone (OP; a specific progesterone receptor antagonist, 100 μM) and diethyldithiocarbamate [DETC; an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase (SOD), 100 μM] for 24 h. LH in combination with or without OP significantly increased the mRNA and protein expressions of manganese SOD (Mn-SOD) and catalase (CATA) and SOD activity. While LH alone significantly increased the mRNA and protein expressions of SOD containing copper and zinc (Cu,Zn-SOD), OP in combination with or without LH significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of Cu,Zn-SOD. In addition, Cu,Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and CATA mRNA expressions were higher at the mid luteal phase than the other luteal phases. LH in combination with DETC significantly decreased LH-increased cell viability. The overall results suggest that LH increases cell viability by LH-increased antioxidant enzymes, resulting in maintenance of CL function during the luteal phase in cattle. PMID:23386101

  10. MicroRNA Expression and Regulation in Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells by Luteinizing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Juan; Eldredge, Joanna B.; Xu, Ying; Puett, David

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs have been widely-studied with regard to their aberrant expression and high correlation with tumorigenesis and progression in various solid tumors. With the major goal of assessing gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone, LH) contributions to LH receptor (LHR)-positive ovarian cancer cells, we have conducted a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis on human epithelial ovarian cancer cells to identify the microRNA-associated cellular response to LH-mediated activation of LHR. Methods Human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3) were chosen as negative control (LHR−) and stably transfected to express functional LHR (LHR+), followed by incubation with LH (0–20 h). At different times of LH-mediated activation of LHR the cancer cells were analyzed by a high-density Ovarian Cancer Disease-Specific-Array (DSA, ALMAC™), which profiled ∼100,000 transcripts with ∼400 non-coding microRNAs. Findings In total, 65 microRNAs were identified to exhibit differential expression in either LHR expressing SKOV3 cells or LH-treated cells, a few of which have been found in the genomic fragile regions that are associated with abnormal deletion or amplification in cancer, such as miR-21, miR-101-1, miR-210 and miR-301a. By incorporating the dramatic expression changes observed in mRNAs, strong microRNA/mRNA regulatory pairs were predicted through statistical analyses coupled with collective computational prediction. The role of each microRNA was then determined through a functional analysis based on the highly-confident microRNA/mRNA pairs. Conclusion The overall impact on the transcriptome-level expression indicates that LH may regulate apoptosis and cell growth of LHR+ SKOV3 cells, particularly by reducing cancer cell proliferation, with some microRNAs involved in regulatory roles. PMID:21765906

  11. Supression of the steroid-primed luteinizing hormone surge in the female rat by sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate: Relationship to hypothalamic catecholamines and GnRH neuronal activation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rodents, hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) has a role in stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) that triggers the ovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). NE synthesis from dopamine requires the presence of dopamine--hydroxylase (DH) an...

  12. Pregnancy rates to timed artificial insemination in dairy cows treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone or porcine luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Colazo, M G; Gordon, M B; Rajamahendran, R; Mapletoft, R J; Ambrose, D J

    2009-07-15

    We compared the effects of porcine luteinizing hormone (pLH) versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) on ovulatory response and pregnancy rate after timed artificial insemination (TAI) in 605 lactating dairy cows. Cows (mean+/-SEM: 2.4+/-0.08 lactations, 109.0+/-2.5 d in milk, and 2.8+/-0.02 body condition score) at three locations were assigned to receive, in a 2x2 factorial design, either 100 microg GnRH or 25mg pLH im on Day 0, 500 microg cloprostenol (PGF) on Day 7, and GnRH or pLH on Day 9, with TAI 14 to 18h later. Ultrasonographic examinations were performed in a subset of cows on Days 0, 7, 10, and 11 to determine ovulations, presence of corpus luteum, and follicle diameter and in all cows 32 d after TAI for pregnancy determination. In 35 cows, plasma progesterone concentrations were determined 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 12 d after ovulation. The proportion of noncyclic cows and cows with ovarian cysts on Day 0 were 12% and 6%, respectively. Ovulatory response to first treatment was 62% versus 44% for pLH and GnRH and 78% versus 50% for noncyclic and cyclic cows (P<0.01). Location, ovulatory response to first pLH or GnRH, cyclic status, presence of an ovarian cyst, and preovulatory follicle size did not affect pregnancy rate. Plasma progesterone concentrations after TAI did not differ among treatments. Pregnancy rate to TAI was greater (P<0.01) in the GnRH/PGF/pLH group (42%) than in the other three groups (28%, 30%, and 26% for GnRH/PGF/GnRH, pLH/PGF/GnRH, and pLH/PGF/pLH, respectively). Although only 3% of cows given pLH in lieu of GnRH on Day 9 lost their embryo versus 7% in those subjected to a conventional TAI using two GnRH treatments, the difference was not statistically significant. In summary, pLH treatment on Day 0 increased ovulatory response but not pregnancy rate. Cows treated with GnRH/PGF/pLH had the highest pregnancy rate to TAI, but progesterone concentrations after TAI were not increased. In addition, preovulatory follicle diameter did not

  13. Pulsatile growth hormone secretion in patients with acromegaly and normal men: the effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone infusion.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C; Oldfield, E; Loriaux, D L; Merriam, G R

    1990-09-01

    Twenty-four GH secretory patterns were studied before and during continuous infusions of GHRH in six patients with active acromegaly and in six normal adult men. GH release was episodic in both groups. Control subjects showed a normal diurnal variation in GH release, with the majority of GH released at night (2200-0800 h); mean levels were 1.5 +/- 0.4 (SE) ng/mL (day) and 4.2 +/- 0.8 ng/mL (night). Acromegalics had no diurnal variation in GH; levels were 45.3 +/- 13.7 ng/mL (day) and 39.8 +/- 12.2 ng/mL (night). Acromegalics demonstrated an increased frequency of GH pulses compared to normals (11.8 +/- 0.8 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.3/24 h). During continuous 24-h infusions of GHRH, the normal subjects continued to show a diurnal variation in GH release, but GH pulse frequency increased to a rate (11.7 +/- 1.4 pulses/24 h) very similar to that of the patients with acromegaly. In contrast, GHRH infusion did not alter the GH pulse frequency in the acromegalics. GHRH increased the mean levels of GH in both groups (patients 80.2 +/- 20.3 vs. 41.0 +/- 12.1 ng/mL, x +/- SE. P less than 0.05; controls 10.2 +/- 2.0 vs. 3.33 +/- 0.5 ng/mL, P less than 0.01). Some of the patients with acromegaly showed a progressive decline in GH levels during the infusion period, suggesting desensitization or exhaustion of releaseable stores; however, GH levels remained above basal values in all patients. After the 24-h GHRH infusions, the GH response to a bolus of GHRH was diminished in the normal subjects (2.1 +/- 0.9 vs. 16.8 +/- 5 ng/mL, x +/- SE; P less than 0.01) but not in the acromegalic patients (30.2 +/- 8.9 vs. 35.5 +/- 12.5 ng/mL; NS). These results indicate that GH release is episodic under basal conditions and during continuous GHRH infusion in both acromegalic and normal subjects, indicating the importance of other modulators of GH release, such as somatostatin, which may remain pulsatile even in acromegaly. PMID:2118536

  14. Identification, cDNA Cloning, and Characterization of Luteinizing Hormone Beta Subunit (lhb) Gene in Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Sharma, Rupam

    2016-07-01

    Reproductive hormones play a significant role in the gonadal development and gametogenesis process of animals. In the present study luteinizing hormone beta, (lhb) subunit gene was cloned and characterized from the brain of Catla catla. The lhb full-length of cDNA sequence is 629 bp which consists of 43bp 5'-UTR (untranslated region) 447bp, ORF(open reading frame) and 139 bp of 3'-UTR respectively. The coding region of lhb gene encoded a peptide of 148 amino acids. The coding sequence of lhb gene consist of a single N-linked glycosylation site (NET) and 12 cysteine knot residues. Phylogenetic analysis of C. catla Lhβ deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity with Carassius auratus followed by Gobiocypris rarus. 3D structure Lhβ protein comprises of five β-sheets and six coils/loops. The qPCR results revealed lhb mRNA is mainly expressed in the pituitary, ovary while moderate expression was observed in brain and testis. To best our knowledge, this is the first report on the identification, molecular characterization and structural information regarding luteinizing hormone in Indian major carp. PMID:26980432

  15. Inhibition of growth of a prolactin and growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor in rats by D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Aleman, I; Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1985-01-01

    The effect of long-term administration of analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) and somatostatin on the growth of the growth hormone (GH)- and prolactin (PRL)-secreting rat pituitary GH3 tumor was investigated. Daily administration of [D-Trp6]LH-RH (50 micrograms/day), early after inoculation of the GH3 tumor, inhibited tumor growth by more than 90% as compared to controls. Similarly, in two experiments, a single once-a-month injection of long-acting [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules (in a dose calculated to release about 25 micrograms/day for 30 days) inhibited the growth of GH3 pituitary tumor by more than 50% 6 or 13 wk after transplantation, when the tumors were fully developed. Serum GH and PRL levels also were reduced markedly by treatment with [D-Trp6]LH-RH. On the other hand, the administration of an antagonistic analog of LH-RH, N-Ac-[D-Phe(4Cl)1,2, D-Trp3, D-Arg6, D-Ala10]LH-RH, did not significantly reduce the growth of this tumor, and the treatment with two different analogs of somatostatin, cyclo(Pro-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Phe) and D-Phe-Cys-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys-Thr NH2, appeared to enhance it. These results are in agreement with previous findings of growth inhibition of 7315a pituitary tumors with different hormone-secreting characteristics by agonistic analogs of LH-RH. The collective data from experimental work with rat pituitary tumor models support the contention that the use of [D-Trp6]LH-RH might be considered for the treatment of some patients with pituitary tumors who failed to respond to conventional therapy. PMID:2858096

  16. Pubertal development in the male pig: effects of treatment with a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist on plasma luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, V L; Meijer, J C; Erkens, J H; van de Wiel, D F; Wensing, C J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist, [D-Trp6]-GnRH (GnRH-A) on developmental profiles of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulation hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T), and pituitary responsiveness to exogenous GnRH were studied in male Dutch Landrace x Large White crossbred pigs from 1 to 30 wk of age. Group 1 control animals (control; n = 12) were injected subcutaneously in the neck with vehicle at 1 and 16 wk of age. Group 2 animals (early treatment; n = 10) were injected with 600 micrograms [D-Trp6]-GnRH at 1 wk and with vehicle at 16 wk. Group 3 animals (late treatment; n = 8) were injected with vehicle and 3 mg GnRH-A at 1 and 16 wk, respectively. Group 4 animals (early plus late treatment; n = 9) were injected at both 1 and 16 wk with GnRH-A. Blood was collected by brachiocephalic puncture at weekly or biweekly intervals, and through brachiocephalic cannulae, to determine longitudinal profiles of LH, FSH and T, and plasma gonadotropin responses to intravenous injection of GnRH (0.1 microgram/kg), respectively. In control animals, LH and FSH declined over the first 5 wk of postnatal life and peaked again at 10-14 wk. Levels of both hormones were basal from 18 to 30 wk. Plasma T was high in the first week, declined progressively over the next few weeks and remained low until 24 wk when a transient increment was noted. The LH and FSH responses to acute GnRH stimulation were similar at 7 and 14 wk and declined significantly at 23 wk of age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1534270

  17. Cloning and functional expression of the equine luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Saint-Dizier, Marie; Foulon-Gauze, Florence; Lecompte, François; Combarnous, Yves; Chopineau, Maryse

    2004-12-01

    Pituitary equine luteinizing hormone (eLH) and fetal chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) have identical polypeptidic chains, but different linked carbohydrates. In equine tissues, eCG and eLH bind only to the LH/CG receptor (eLH/CG-R) and have no FSH activity. However, radio-receptor assays on equine luteal or testicular tissues have shown that eCG binds to the eLH/CG-R with only 2-4% of the binding activity of eLH. In order to study the structure-function relationship of eLH and eCG in a homologous system, we undertook the cloning and functional expression of the eLH/CG-R. Based on sequence homologies among mammalian sequences for the LH/CG-R, overlapping partial fragments of LH/CG-R cDNAs were obtained from mare luteal RNA using reverse transcription-PCR and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Ligations of the partial cDNA fragments encoded a part of the signal peptide followed by a putative 672 amino acid eLH/CG-R mature protein. The mature eLH/CG-R displayed 88.2-92.8% overall sequence homology with the other mammalian LH/CG-Rs and contained one unique seventh N-glycosylation site in its extracellular domain. COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with a cDNA construct encoding an engineered complete signal peptide and the mature eLH/CG-R. Membrane preparations from transfected COS-7 cells bound 125I-eLH with high affinity (Kd 3.8 x 10(-10) M). On a molar basis, eCG competed with 125I-eLH on membrane preparations with only 12.4% of the eLH binding activity. In transfected COS-7, both eLH and eCG increased the extracellular cAMP concentration in a dose-dependent manner, whereas eFSH did not. Furthermore, on a molar basis, eCG stimulated cAMP production with only 13.9% of the eLH stimulating activity. We conclude that the cloned cDNA encodes a The differences functional eLH/CG-R. between eLH and eCG activities towards this receptor will be useful in studies of the influence of carbohydrates on gonadotrophin receptor binding and activation. PMID:15590981

  18. Regulation of gene expression in ovarian cancer cells by luteinizing hormone receptor expression and activation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since a substantial percentage of ovarian cancers express gonadotropin receptors and are responsive to the relatively high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins during the postmenopausal years, it has been suggested that receptor activation may contribute to the etiology and/or progression of the neoplasm. The goal of the present study was to develop a cell model to determine the impact of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor (LHR) expression and LH-mediated LHR activation on gene expression and thus obtain insights into the mechanism of gonadotropin action on ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) carcinoma cells. Methods The human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV-3, was stably transfected to express functional LHR and incubated with LH for various periods of time (0-20 hours). Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells to identify LHR expression/activation-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. Results Through comparative analysis on the LHR-transfected SKOV-3 cells exposed to LH, we observed the differential expression of 1,783 genes in response to LH treatment, among which five significant families were enriched, including those of growth factors, translation regulators, transporters, G-protein coupled receptors, and ligand-dependent nuclear receptors. The most highly induced early and intermediate responses were found to occupy a network impacting transcriptional regulation, cell growth, apoptosis, and multiple signaling transductions, giving indications of LH-induced apoptosis and cell growth inhibition through the significant changes in, for example, tumor necrosis factor, Jun and many others, supportive of the observed cell growth reduction in in vitro assays. However, other observations, e.g. the substantial up-regulation of the genes encoding the endothelin-1 subtype A receptor, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor II, all of which are potential therapeutic

  19. Seasonal variation in plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone concentrations and LH-RH responsiveness in mature, male rusa deer (Cervus rusa timorensis).

    PubMed

    van Mourik, S; Stelmasiak, T; Outch, K H

    1986-01-01

    Plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations in immobilized or yarded rusa stags (Cervus rusa timorensis) were investigated over a two-year period. Testosterone concentrations showed a minor elevation in autumn (May) and reached maximal levels in late winter-early spring (August) coinciding with the rut. Luteinizing hormone in plasma was only detectable from January to May. Maximal responsiveness of the pituitary-gonadal axis to LH-RH stimulation was recorded in August. The combination of Fentaz (fentanylcitrate and azaperone) and Rompun (xylazine hydrochloride) for immobilizing deer influences hypothalamic function. PMID:2869876

  20. Growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone regulation by neuropeptide Y in both sexes of the cichlid fish, Cichlasoma dimerus.

    PubMed

    Di Yorio, M P; Delgadin, T H; Pérez Sirkin, D I; Vissio, P G

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is considered the most potent orexigenic peptide, increasing before meal time and during fasting. In teleost, most studies on NPY action upon growth hormone (GH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were conducted in females or group of animals without sex discrimination. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether NPY modulates the expression and release of GH and gonadotropins in both sexes of Cichlasoma dimerus. By double-label immunofluorescence, we first determined the association between NPY fibers and pituitary cells. In addition, we performed in vitro studies to evaluate the effect of NPY on GH and gonadotropins expression by real-time PCR, and release by Western blot, in males and females separately. Contacts between NPY fibers and GH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-producing cells were detected, indicating possible functional relationships. We observed an increase in GH release in the culture medium at 2 nM for males (p = 0.043) and 20 nM for females (p = 0.028). Pituitary FSH release was stimulated at 20 nM (p = 0.026) and 200 nM (p = 0.033) for males and females, respectively. Finally, NPY only increased β-LH mRNA expression at 20 nM in females (p = 0.028) and its release at 2 nM (p = 0.049) and 200 nM for males (p = 0.005) and 200 nM for females (p = 0.018). In conclusion, NPY acts as a GH-, LH- and FSH-releasing factor, in a dose- and sex-dependent way. PMID:25869217

  1. Control of gonadotrophin secretion by steroid hormones in castrated male transsexuals. I. Effects of oestradiol infusion on plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Goh, H H; Chew, P C; Karim, S M; Ratnam, S S

    1980-02-01

    Twenty-four infusions of oestradiol (E2) in graded doses ranging from 0--200 micrograms administered over a period of 7 hours were carried out in eleven healthy male transsexuals who had undergone sex reassignment at least 3 months previously. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and E2 were analysed by radioimmunoassay, while sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was measured using 3H-testosterone as the saturating ligand. Infusion of 5--200 micrograms of E2 raised plasma E2 to levels ranging from 38.4--367.8 pg/ml which present 83%--800% of levels found in a control group of sixty-three normal males. SHBG capacity remained unchanged at all doses of E2 studied. No change in plasma levels of FSH and LH was observed in control infusions and infusion of 5 micrograms of E2. From 10 micrograms-200 micrograms, suppression of plasma levels of FSH was noted at the 5--7 hour period. The suppression increased up to 20 micrograms and thereafter the levels of FSH remained constant. On the other hand, the suppression of LH increased up to the highest E2 dose (200 micrograms) studied. Further, significant suppression of LH occurred earlier than the 5--7 hours as the dose of E2 increased. These observations are consistent with the conclusions that: (1) E2 plays a part in the regulation of secretion of FSH and LH in men; and (2) at doses higher than physiological, E2 exerts a differential effect on the secretion of FSH and LH. PMID:6772356

  2. Stimulation of cholesterol side-chain cleavage by a luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (luliberin) agonist (ICI 118630) in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M H; Cooke, B A

    1983-01-01

    The action of a luliberin (luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone) agonist (ICI 118630) and lutropin (luteinizing hormone) on the activity of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat Leydig cells has been investigated. This has been carried out by studying the metabolism of exogenous (22R)-22- and 25-hydroxycholesterol to testosterone. It was found that both hydroxycholesterols increased testosterone production to higher levels than achieved by lutropin alone. Addition of luliberin agonist but not lutropin was found to increase further the metabolism of the hydroxycholesterol to testosterone; this occurred in the presence of saturating and subsaturating levels of the hydroxycholesterols. This effect of luliberin agonist was potentiated in the presence of lutropin. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, inhibited the luliberin agonist-induced stimulation of the hydroxycholesterol metabolism. At low calcium levels (1.1 microM), testosterone production was increased by addition of (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol but the luliberin agonist effect was negated. The calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine inhibited (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol-stimulated steroidogenesis and negated the luliberin agonist effect. These results indicate that luliberin agonist specifically increases the synthesis of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat testis Leydig cells. PMID:6230077

  3. Hypothalamic Prolactin Regulation of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in the Female Rat.

    PubMed

    Grachev, Pasha; Li, Xiao Feng; Goffin, Vincent; O'Byrne, Kevin T

    2015-08-01

    Prolactin (PRL) levels increase in response to long-term antipsychotic treatment that disrupts reproductive function. Recent evidence suggests that activation of central PRL receptors (PRLR) inhibits LH secretion and in ovariectomized rats. However, the mechanisms involved, the mode of LH secretion affected and relevance to hyperprolactinemia remain unknown. We therefore investigated the contribution of central PRL/PRLR signaling to the control of estradiol-induced surges of LH and PRL and pulsatile LH secretion under basal and hyperprolactinemic conditions. First, by subjecting ovariectomized estradiol-primed rats intracerebroventricularly administered with PRL to frequent blood sampling, we demonstrated that acute activation of hypothalamic PRLR disrupts pulsatile LH secretion. Pretreatment (intracerebroventricularly) with the pure PRLR antagonist, Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL, or the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A antagonist, bicuculline, blocked this effect. Next, we revealed that sustained blockade of hypothalamic PRLR using Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL augmented the magnitude of LH surges induced by estradiol benzoate and progesterone treatment and suppressed the concomitant surges of PRL. Finally, we determined that acute antagonism of central PRLR is insufficient to normalize the duration of the LH pulse interval prolonged as a result of hyperprolactinemia induced by chronic exposure to the atypical antipsychotic sulpiride. These data serve as the first evidence to suggest that PRL signaling through hypothalamic PRLR inhibits pulsatile secretion of LH in a γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A-dependent fashion and tonically restrains the magnitude of the LH surge. Furthermore, our results indicate that transient blockade of hypothalamic PRL/PRLR signaling is not an effective strategy for restoring LH pulsatility perturbed by chronic hyperprolactinemia. PMID:25993525

  4. First attempt to monitor luteinizing hormone and reproductive steroids in urine samples of the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis).

    PubMed

    Amaral, Rodrigo S; Rosas, Fernando C W; Graham, Laura H; da Silva, Vera M F; Oliveira, Claudio A

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) in urine samples of Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis; Mammalia: Sirenia) and to monitor urinary LH and reproductive steroids during the ovarian cycle in this species. Urine samples were collected from two captive males following a hormonal challenge with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. The urinary LH results from hormonal challenge were compared with urinary androgens for the purpose of EIA validation. Furthermore, urine samples were collected daily, over a 12-wk period, from two captive adult females, for 2 consecutive yr. The urinary LH pattern from females was compared with the patterns of urinary progestagens and estrogen conjugates throughout the ovarian cycle. An LH peak was observed in both male Amazonian manatees after the hormonal challenge, occurring prior to or together with peak androgen levels. In the females, the ovarian cycle ranged from 40 to 48 days (mean of 43.7 days). Two distinct peaks of estrogen conjugates were observed across all cycles analyzed, and the urinary LH peaks observed were accompanied by peaks of urinary estrogen conjugates. The EIA was validated as a method for the quantification of urinary LH from Amazonian manatees, as it was able to detect variations in the levels of LH in urine samples. These results suggest that T. inunguis exhibits a peculiar hormonal pattern during the ovarian cycle. Therefore, further studies are desirable and necessary to clarify the relationship between this hormonal pattern and morphological changes, as well as mating behavior, in Amazonian manatee. PMID:25632672

  5. Testosterone antagonist (flutamide) blocks ovulation and preovulatory surges of progesterone, luteinizing hormone and oestradiol in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Rangel, P L; Sharp, P J; Gutierrez, C G

    2006-06-01

    The preovulatory release of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the domestic hen occurs after the initiation of a preovulatory surge of testosterone. The objective of this study was to determine whether this testosterone surge has functional significance in the endocrine control of ovulation. Groups of laying hens (n = 10-22) were treated with the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide, at 8 h intervals for 24 h at doses of 0, 31.25, 62.5, 125 and 250 mg. All doses reduced egg laying (P < 0.001), with the highest dose being the most effective. In a second study, laying hens (n = 9) were treated with 250 mg flutamide at 8 h intervals for 24 h with a control group being given placebo (n = 10). Blood samples were taken for hormone measurements at 2 h intervals for 18 h starting 4 h before the onset of darkness. The percentage of hens laying per day did not differ between groups before treatment (control, 88% vs flutamide, 86%). Ovulation was blocked in all hens treated with flutamide within 2 days while the control hens continued to lay at the pretreatment rate (80%). Preovulatory surges of plasma testosterone, progesterone, oestradiol and LH were observed in control hens but with the exception of testosterone, flutamide treatment blocked the progesterone, oestradiol and LH surges. LH concentrations declined progressively with time in the flutamide-treated hens. It is concluded that inhibition of testosterone action blocks egg laying and the preovulatory surges of progesterone, luteinizing hormone and oestradiol demonstrating a key role for the preovulatory release of testosterone in the endocrine control of ovulation in the domestic hen. PMID:16735550

  6. Characterization of recombinant DNA derived-human luteinizing hormone in vitro and in vivo: efficacy in ovulation induction and corpus luteum support

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.A.; Danforth, D.R.; Hutchison, J.S.; Hodgen, G.D.

    1988-06-10

    The present data are the first, to the authors knowledge, to demonstrate the production feasibility of a commercially available medication of pure human luteinizing hormone from recombinant DNA technology (rechLH). The rechLH preparation achieved ovulation induction and corpus luteum support in the primate menstrual cycle. The observations described herein indicate the opportunity for significant improvement in the treatment of infertile women and men who require gonadal stimulation. Recombinant DNA-derived gonadotropin products, rechLH in this case, will have several therapeutic advantages compared with current medications extracted from urine. These advantages include (1) better reliability of an available supply of hormone and (2) improved treatment flexibility in determining the optimal dose ratio of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone or avoidance of the long-acting effects of human chorionic gonadotropin, as the needs of individual patients may dictate.

  7. Pulsatile growth hormone release in Turner's syndrome and short normal children.

    PubMed

    Ghizzoni, L; Lamborghini, A; Ziveri, M; Volta, C; Panza, C; Balestrazzi, P; Bernasconi, S

    1990-09-01

    To determine whether the quantitative and qualitative aspects of GH secretion in girls with Turner's syndrome are similar to those of short-normal children we studied the 24-h GH secretion of 10 patients with Turner's syndrome and 9 short-normal children with comparable auxological features. GH profiles, obtained by 30-min sampling, were analysed by the Pulsar programme. The pulsatile GH release over the 24 h in Turner's syndrome was similar to that in normal children. However, when the GH release over the 12 day and night hours were separately analysed, only normal children showed a night-time increase in the sum of peak amplitudes. Moreover, patients with Turner's syndrome had significantly decreased number and frequency of peaks in the night-time compared with short children. In short-normal children but not in Turner's syndrome, height velocity was related to the 24-h integrated concentration of GH, area under the curve over zero-line and over baseline, sum of peak areas, and amplitudes. Night-time GH area over zero-line and over baseline, mean peak amplitude, height area, sum of peak area and amplitudes were positively correlated with height velocity in short children, whereas in Turner's syndrome height velocity was related to daytime parameters only. In conclusion, girls with Turner's syndrome have a discrete pattern of pulsatile GH release. However, the relation of GH secretion to growth in these patients, is uncertain. PMID:2239077

  8. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, estradiol, and inhibin regulation of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone surges: implications for follicle emergence and selection in heifers.

    PubMed

    Haughian, James M; Ginther, O J; Diaz, Francisco J; Wiltbank, Milo C

    2013-06-01

    Mechanisms regulating gonadotropin surges and gonadotropin requirements for follicle emergence and selection were studied in heifers. Experiment 1 evaluated whether follicular inhibins regulate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) surges elicited by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) injection (Hour = 0) and the subsequent periovulatory FSH surge. Treatments included control (n = 6), steroid-depleted bovine follicular fluid (bFF) at Hour -4 (n = 6), and bFF at Hour 6 (n = 6). Gonadotropins in blood were assessed hourly from Hours -6 to 36, and follicle growth tracked by ultrasound. Consistent with inhibin independence, bFF at Hour -4 did not impact the GnRH-induced preovulatory FSH surge, whereas treatment at Hour 6 delayed onset of the periovulatory FSH surge and impeded growth of a new follicular wave. Experiment 2 examined GnRH and estradiol (E2) regulation of the periovulatory FSH surge. Treatment groups were control (n = 8), GnRH-receptor antagonist (GnRHr-ant, n = 8), and E2 + GnRHr-ant (n = 4). GnRHr-ant (acyline) did not reduce the concentrations of FSH during the periovulatory surge and early follicle development (<7.0 mm) was unaffected, although subsequent growth of a dominant follicle (>8.0 mm) was prevented by GnRHr-ant. Addition of E2 delayed both the onset of the periovulatory FSH surge and emergence of a follicular wave. Failure to select a dominant follicle in the GnRHr-ant group was associated with reduced concentrations of LH but not FSH. Maximum diameter of F1 in controls (13.3 ± 0.5 mm) was greater than in both GnRHr-ant (7.7 ± 0.3 mm) and E2 + GnRHr-ant (6.7 ± 0.8 mm) groups. Results indicated that the periovulatory FSH surge stems from removal of negative stimuli (follicular E2 and inhibin), but is independent of GnRH stimulation. Emergence and early growth of follicles (until about 8 mm) requires the periovulatory FSH surge but not LH pulses. However, follicular deviation and late-stage growth of

  9. Heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits have different paracrine action in the modulation of luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, A.J.W.; Dahl, K.D.; Vaughan, J.; Tucker, E.; Rivier, J.; Bardin, C.W.; Vale, W.

    1987-07-01

    Inhibin, a gonadal hormone capable of preferential suppression of pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion, has recently been purified. The major form of this protein is an ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer encoded by two separate genes. In contrast to the FSH-suppressing action of the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer, the ..beta beta.. homodimer stimulates FSH secretion. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-secreting pituitary cells and gonadal androgen-producing cells have long been shown to form a closed-loop feedback axis. Based on recent studies demonstrated the FSH stimulation of inhibin biosynthesis by ovarian granulosa and testis Sertoli cells, an additional closed-loop feedback axis exists between pituitary FSH- and gonadal inhibin-producing cells. Because uncharacterized Sertoli cell factors have been suggested to either stimulate or inhibit androgen production by testicular Leydig cells, the authors have tested the intragonadal paracrine actions of heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits. In primary cultures of testis cells, the ..cap alpha beta.. heterodimer of inhibin enhances Leydig cell androgen biosynthesis stimulated by LH, whereas the ..beta beta.. homodimer suppresses androgen production. The data indicate that the inhibin-related gene products synthesized by Sertoli and granulosa cells may form heterodimers or homodimers to serve as intragonadal paracrine signals in the modulation of LH-stimulated androgen biosynthesis and allow cross-communication between the two feedback loops.

  10. Radioimmunoassay for 6-D-tryptophan analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: measurement of serum levels after administration of long-acting microcapsule formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mason-Garcia, M.; Vigh, S.; Comaru-Schally, A.M.; Redding, T.W.; Somogyvari-Vigh, A.; Horvath, J.; Schally, A.V.

    1985-03-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) was developed and used for following the rate of liberation of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH from a long-acting delivery systems based on a microcapsule formulation. Rabbit antibodies were generated against (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH conjugated to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. Crossreactivity with LH-RH was less than 1%; there was no significant cross-reactivity with other peptides. The minimal detectable dose of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was 2 pg per tube. In tra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 8% and 10%, respectively. The radioimmunoassay was suitable for direct determination of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH in serum, permitting the study of blood levels of the analog after single injections into normal men and after one-a-month administration of microcapsules to rats. In men, 90 min after subcutaneous injection of 250 ..mu..g of the peptide, serum (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH rose to 6-12 ng/ml. Luteinizing hormone was increased 90 min and 24 hr after the administration of the analog. Several batches of microcapsules were tested in rats and the rate of release of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was followed. The improved batch of microcapsules of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH increased serum concentrations of the analog for 30 days or longer after intramuscular injection.

  11. Luteinizing hormone downregulation but not estrogen replacement improves ovariectomy-associated cognition and spine density loss independently of treatment onset timing.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jeffrey A; Palm, Russell; Chang, Jaewon; McGee, Henry; Zhu, Xiongwei; Wang, Xinglong; Casadesus, Gemma

    2016-02-01

    Age-related changes in reproductive hormone levels are a well-known risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia in women. We and others have shown an important contribution of gonadotropins in this process. Lowering serum gonadotropin levels is able to rescue cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease and menopause models, but whether this is time-dependent and the exact mechanism through which gonadotropins regulate cognitive function is unknown. We show that pharmacologically lowering serum levels of luteinizing hormone lead to cognitive improvement immediately after ovariectomy and with a 4month interval after ovariectomy, when the benefits of 17β-estradiol are known to disappear in rodents. Importantly, we show that these improvements are associated with spine density changes at both time points. These findings suggest a role of luteinizing hormone in learning and memory and neuroplasticity processes as well as provide an alternative therapeutic strategy of menopause associated cognitive loss. PMID:26497249

  12. Negative energy balance in a male songbird, the Abert's towhee, constrains the testicular endocrine response to luteinizing hormone stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Scott; Gao, Sisi; Valle, Shelley; Bittner, Stephanie; Hutton, Pierce; Meddle, Simone L.; Deviche, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Energy deficiency can suppress reproductive function in vertebrates. As the orchestrator of reproductive function, endocrine activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis is potentially an important mechanism mediating such effects. Previous experiments in wild-caught birds found inconsistent relationships between energy deficiency and seasonal reproductive function, but these experiments focused on baseline HPG axis activity and none have investigated the responsiveness of this axis to endocrine stimulation. Here, we present data from an experiment in Abert's towhees, Melozone aberti, using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) challenges to investigate whether energy deficiency modulates the plasma testosterone responsiveness of the HPG axis. Wild-caught birds were either ad libitum fed or energetically constrained via chronic food restriction during photoinduced reproductive development. Energy deficiency did not significantly affect the development of reproductive morphology, the baseline endocrine activity of the HPG axis, or the plasma testosterone response to GnRH challenge. Energy deficiency did, however, decrease the plasma testosterone responsiveness to LH challenge. Collectively, these observations suggest that energy deficiency has direct gonadal effects consisting of a decreased responsiveness to LH stimulation. Our study, therefore, reveals a mechanism by which energy deficiency modulates reproductive function in wild birds in the absence of detectable effects on baseline HPG axis activity. PMID:26333925

  13. CREB Binding Protein (CBP) Activation Is Required for Luteinizing Hormone Beta Expression and Normal Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan S.; Wolfe, Andrew; He, Ling; Radovick, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is dependent on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH)-stimulated synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gonadotroph. While the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) is known to interact with Egr-1, the major mediator of GNRH action on the Lhb gene, the role of CBP in Lhb gene expression has yet to be characterized. We show that in the LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, overexpression of CBP augmented the response to GNRH and that knockdown of CBP eliminated GNRH responsiveness. While GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 increased the interaction with Egr-1 on the Lhb promoter, loss of this phosphorylation site eliminated GNRH-mediated Lhb expression in LβT2 cells. In vivo, loss of CBP phosphorylation at Ser436 rendered female mice subfertile. S436A knock-in mice had disrupted estrous cyclicity and reduced responsiveness to GNRH. Our results show that GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 is required for Egr-1 to activate Lhb expression and is a requirement for normal fertility in female mice. As CBP can be phosphorylated by other factors, such as insulin, our studies suggest that CBP may act as a key regulator of Lhb expression in the gonadotroph by integrating homeostatic information with GNRH signaling. PMID:22508984

  14. Commercial radioimmunoassay for beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin: falsely positive determinations due to elevated serum luteinizing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Platoff, G.E.; Kubrock, C.A.; Stuzman, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Among 17 men who had received seemingly curative treatment for unilateral non-seminomatous germ cell tumors for the testis and who had consistently normal serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) levels at a reference laboratory, 7 (41%) had at least one falsely positive commercial serum HCG determination. To investigate the cause of these falsely positive determinations the authors measured the cross reactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) standards in the commercial HCG assay, and studied the relationships between commercial HCG levels and serum LH levels, serum FSH levels and gonadal status in men with and without normal gonadal function. The falsely positive HCG determinations appeared to be due to elevated serum LH levels and cross reactivity of LH in the commercial HCG assay because: 1) there was substantial cross reactivity of the LH standards in the commercial assay, 2) the serum LH was elevated in four of six men with solitary testes, 3) there was a striking correlation between elevated serum LH levels and falsely elevated commercial HCG levels in ten men with solitary or absent testes, and 4) there were no falsely positive HCG determinations in 13 normal men but there were falsely positive HCG determinations in seven of ten anorchid men.

  15. Molecular and biological interaction between major histocompatibility complex class I antigens and luteinizing hormone receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors triggers cellular response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, A R; Cremaschi, G; Sánchez, M L; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L; Podestá, E J

    1988-01-01

    Purified IgG from BALB/c mouse anti-C3H serum exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects in C3H mouse atria and induces testosterone synthesis in C3H mouse Leydig cells. The effect depends on IgG concentration and can be abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor and luteinizing hormone-receptor antagonists. IgG interferes with the binding of dihydroalprenolol and luteinizing hormone. Monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I antigens were active on the Leydig cells of C3H and BALB/c mice. There was a parallelism between the effect of each individual monoclonal antibody with specificity for a particular haplotype and the response of the target cell from the strains carrying such haplotypes. These antibodies could precipitate the soluble luteinizing hormone-receptor complex. The results suggested that bound hormone triggers the association of major histocompatibility class I antigen with the receptor, thereby activating the respective target cells. PMID:2839829

  16. Pituitary self-priming actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Kinetics of estradiol's potentiating effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-facilitated luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone release in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Rogol, A D; Kolp, L; Thorner, M O; Stumpf, P

    1986-06-01

    We examined the kinetically distinct characteristics of estradiol's effects upon pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release in response to pulses of exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy postmenopausal individuals. The putative self-priming actions of GnRH on LH and FSH release were tested by intravenous injections of equal paired doses of GnRH (10 micrograms) before and after 1, 5, 10, and 30 d of pure estradiol-17 beta delivery via an intravaginal silastic ring. Self-priming actions of GnRH, as defined by heightened gonadotropin release in response to the second pulse of GnRH compared with the first, were completely absent in the hypoestrogenemic state. However, estradiol administration unmasked GnRH self-priming in a time-dependent fashion, with maximal expression after 5 and 10 d of steroid replacement, followed by attenuation by 30 d. Since estradiol's modulation of GnRH action was expressed differentially on LH and FSH release, we suggest that such facilitation of GnRH-stimulated pituitary LH and FSH release may provide an additional mechanism for dissociated secretion of gonadotropic hormones in health or disease. PMID:3086382

  17. Age-Related Mercury Contamination and Relationship with Luteinizing Hormone in a Long-Lived Antarctic Bird

    PubMed Central

    Tartu, Sabrina; Bustamante, Paco; Goutte, Aurélie; Cherel, Yves; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bustnes, Jan Ove; Chastel, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Seabirds, as long-lived top predators, accumulate contaminants such as mercury (Hg), an established endocrine disruptor. In long lived species hormonal secretion varies with age; therefore, Hg-induced endocrine disruption may be exacerbated in some age classes. Here we investigated relationships between blood total Hg and luteinizing hormone (LH, a key pituitary hormone for the onset of breeding), in pre-laying known-age (11–45 years old) snow petrels (Pagodroma nivea) from Adélie Land, Antarctica. We predicted that 1) blood Hg would increase with advancing age as a consequence of bio-accumulation; and that 2) increasing blood Hg would be related to decreased concentrations of LH in the most Hg-contaminated individuals. Hg concentrations were higher in females than in males (p<0.001), and contrary to our prediction, decreased with advancing age in males (p = 0.009) and tended to do so in females (p = 0.06). The analysis of stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) suggested that this unexpected pattern could originate from age and sex-related variations in trophic niche, and hence Hg exposure. Regarding LH, our prediction was only supported in young birds (≤23 years) where baseline LH was inversely correlated with Hg concentrations (p = 0.04). Hg burden did not predict baseline LH or GnRH-induced LH in birds that were more than 23 years old. These results show that age and contaminants may interfere with major endocrine mechanisms and, together with other recent studies, support the view that Hg could be connected to LH secretion and could then impair the fitness of long-lived birds. PMID:25072936

  18. Heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits have different paracrine action in the modulation of luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, A J; Dahl, K D; Vaughan, J; Tucker, E; Rivier, J; Bardin, C W; Vale, W

    1987-01-01

    Inhibin, a gonadal hormone capable of preferential suppression of pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion, has recently been purified. The major form of this protein is an alpha beta heterodimer encoded by two separate genes. In contrast to the FSH-suppressing action of the alpha beta heterodimer, the beta beta homodimer stimulates FSH secretion. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-secreting pituitary cells and gonadal androgen-producing cells have long been shown to form a closed-loop feedback axis. Based on recent studies demonstrating the FSH stimulation of inhibin biosynthesis by ovarian granulosa and testis Sertoli cells, an additional closed-loop feedback axis exists between pituitary FSH- and gonadal inhibin-producing cells. Because uncharacterized Sertoli cell factors have been suggested to either stimulate or inhibit androgen production by testicular Leydig cells, we have tested the intragonadal paracrine actions of heterodimers and homodimers of inhibin subunits. In primary cultures of testis cells, the alpha beta heterodimer of inhibin enhances Leydig cell androgen biosynthesis stimulated by LH, whereas the beta beta homodimer suppresses androgen production. Furthermore, similar modulatory actions of inhibin-related proteins were found in cultured ovarian theca-interstitial cells and theca explants treated with LH. In contrast, treatment with the inhibin-related proteins alone did not affect gonadal steroidogenesis. Our data indicate that the inhibin-related gene products synthesized by Sertoli and granulosa cells may form heterodimers or homodimers to serve as intragonadal paracrine signals in the modulation of LH-stimulated androgen biosynthesis and allow cross-communication between the two feedback loops. PMID:3474640

  19. Multifollicular ovaries: clinical and endocrine features and response to pulsatile gonadotropin releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Franks, S; Polson, D W; Mason, H D; Abdulwahid, N; Tucker, M; Morris, D V; Price, J; Jacobs, H S

    By means of pelvic ultrasonography, a multifollicular ovarian appearance was observed in women with weight-loss-related amenorrhoea. Multifollicular ovaries (MFO) are normal in size or slightly enlarged and filled by six or more cysts 4-10 mm in diameter; in contrast to women with polycystic ovaries (PCO), stroma is not increased. Unlike PCO patients, women with MFO were not hirsute and serum concentrations of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone were normal and decreased, respectively. The uterus was small indicating oestrogen deficiency. In MFO, treatment with gonadotropin releasing hormone (LHRH) induced ovulation in 83% of cycles and there were seven pregnancies in 8 women; in PCO, only 40% of cycles were ovulatory and there were eleven pregnancies (8 women) but six of these aborted. In MFO ovarian morphology reverted to normal in ovulatory cycles, whereas in PCO the polycystic pattern persisted despite the presence of a dominant follicle. MFO may represent a normal ovarian response to weight-related hypothalamic disturbance of gonadotropin control. PMID:2867389

  20. Identification of major urinary metabolites of nafarelin acetate, a potent agonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.L.; Chaplin, M.D.

    1985-09-01

    Nafarelin acetate (less than Glu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2) is a potent agonistic analogue of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. After a single iv administration of nafarelin acetate (with UC label at C-3 of 3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala) to female rhesus monkeys, about 80% of the radioactivity was eliminated in urine. Five major radioactive urinary metabolites were isolated and purified by reversed phase HPLC. Four of these metabolites, identified by amino acid analysis, were short peptides: the 5-10-hexapeptide amide, the 6-10-pentapeptide amide, the 5-7-tripeptide, and the 6-7-dipeptide. The fifth metabolite, which accounted for about 15% of the radioactivity administered, was shown by NMR and mass spectrometry to be 2-naphthylacetic acid. A possible pathway of its formation is by oxidative deamination of 3-(2-napthyl)-D-Ala to give the corresponding alpha-keto acid, followed by oxidative decarboxylation of the alpha-keto acid. These five metabolites together accounted for about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in the urine of rhesus monkeys, or more than half of the radioactivity in the administered dose. Nafarelin acetate was also present in small amounts. Several of these metabolites were also present in plasma of the rhesus monkey.

  1. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone targeted poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles for doxorubicin delivery to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Ghazzavi, Jila

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a targeted anti-cancer drug delivery system for breast cancer. Therefore, doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Zn(2+) ions. To optimise the effect of DOX/polymer ratio, Zn/polymer ratio, and stirrer rate a full factorial design was used and their effects on particle size, zeta potential, loading efficiency (LE, %), and release efficiency in 72 h (RE72, %) were studied. Targeted NPs were prepared by chemical coating of tiptorelin/polyallylamin conjugate on the surface of NPs by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboiimid HCl as cross-linking agent. Conjugation efficiency was measured by Bradford assay. Conjugated triptorelin and targeted NPs were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in targeted NPs and non-targeted ones were studied on MCF-7 cells which overexpress luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors and SKOV3 cells as negative LHRH receptors using Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. The best results obtained from NPs prepared by DOX/polymer ratio of 5%, Zn/polymer ratio of 50%, and stirrer rate of 960 rpm. FTIR spectrum confirmed successful conjugation of triptorelin to NPs. The conjugation efficiency was about 70%. The targeted NPs showed significantly less IC50 for MCF-7 cells compared to free DOX and non-targeted NPs. PMID:27463791

  2. Profile of follitropin alpha/lutropin alpha combination for the stimulation of follicular development in women with severe luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Leonardo; Selman, Helmy

    2016-01-01

    A severe gonadotropin deficiency together with chronic estradiol deficiency leading to amenorrhea characterizes patients suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Administration of both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to these patients has been shown to be essential in achieving successful stimulation of follicular development, ovulation, and rescue of fertility. In recent years, the availability of both recombinant FSH (rFSH) and recombinant LH (rLH) has provided a new therapeutic option for the stimulation of follicular growth in hypopituitary–hypogonadotropic women (World Health Organization Group I). In this article, we review the data reported in the literature to highlight the role and the efficacy of using recombinant gonadotropins, rFSH and rLH, in the treatment of women with severe LH/FSH deficiency. Although the studies on this issue are limited and the experiences available in the literature are few due to the small number of such patients, it is clearly evident that the recombinant gonadotropins rFSH and rLH are efficient in treating patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The results observed in the studies reported in this review suggest that recombinant gonadotropins are able to induce proper follicular growth, oocyte maturation, and eventually pregnancy in this group of women. Moreover, the clinical use of recombinant gonadotropins in this type of patients has given more insight into some endocrinological aspects of ovarian function that have not yet been fully understood. PMID:27307766

  3. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries.

    PubMed

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R; Rabideau, Amanda C; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-07-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects. We have previously generated and characterized a mouse model (KiLHR(D582G)) for familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by an activating mutation in the receptor. We demonstrated that the phenotype of the KiLHR(D582G) male mice is an accurate phenocopy of male patients with activating LHCGR mutations. In this study, we observed that unlike women with activating LHCGR mutations who are normal, female KiLHR(D582G) mice are infertile. Mice exhibit irregular estrous cyclicity, anovulation, and precocious puberty. A temporal study from 2-24 wk of age indicated elevated levels of progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol and upregulation of several steroidogenic enzyme genes. Ovaries of KiLHR(D582G) mice exhibited significant pathology with the development of large hemorrhagic cysts as early as 3 wk of age, extensive stromal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with luteinization, numerous atretic follicles, and granulosa cell tumors. Ovulation could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous gonadotropins. The body weights of the KiLHR(D582G) mice were higher than wild-type counterparts, but there was no increase in the body fat composition or metabolic abnormalities such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These studies demonstrate that activating LHCGR mutations do not produce the same phenotype in female mice as in humans and clearly illustrate species differences in the expression and regulation of LHCGR in the ovary, but not in the testis. PMID:26040673

  4. A controlled study of human chorionic gonadotrophin induced ovulation versus urinary luteinizing hormone surge for timing of intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A R; Bernadus, R E; Voorhorst, F J; Vermeiden, J P; Schoemaker, J

    1991-10-01

    Forty-eight patients in a programme of intrauterine insemination (IUI) were randomized in a cross-over study. All were stimulated with clomiphene citrate (CC) and inseminated either after follicular rupture induced by human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) or after a spontaneous urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The HCG was administered when follicles of 18-22 mm in diameter were observed on ultrasound and IUI was performed 37-40 h thereafter. The monitoring of a urinary LH peak was carried out using a rapid urinary LH test. IUI took place approximately 22 h after detection of the LH surge. Overall, the pregnancy rates were 9.3% (4/43) after HCG induced ovulation and 20.5% (9/44) after spontaneous ovulation (P = 0.12). Analysis of mid-cycle events showed that following sonographic criteria, the HCG injection was performed significantly earlier in the cycle compared with the spontaneous LH surge. In addition, the mean diameter of the preovulatory follicles was significantly smaller and insemination was substantially earlier in the HCG induced cycles. These findings suggest that a beneficial effect arises from allowing the natural process of final follicular maturation to occur. PMID:1752926

  5. Isolation and characterization of testis-specific cDNAs for luteinizing hormone beta-subunit in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F P; Rannikko, A; Huhtaniemi, I

    1995-05-25

    To study further the unexpected expression of the luteinizing hormone (LH) beta-subunit in the rat testis, we identified in a rat testicular cDNA library three LH beta clones with lengths of 3.2, 2.4 and 0.86 kb (TLH beta 1, TLH beta 2 and TLH beta 3). The clones were identified using a 32P-labeled cDNA probe complimentary to the known rat pituitary LH beta mRNA. Clone TLH beta 2 corresponds in size to the main LH beta mRNA species (2.7 kb) detected by Northern hybridization in the rat testis. Sequence analysis indicated that the different sizes of the three clones are due to alternative RNA splicing and differences at the 5' ends of transcripts. The sequence of one open reading frame deduced from TLH beta 1 is almost identical with the pituitary LH beta peptide, differing only in three amino acids in the putative signal peptide. It might encode a functional testis-specific LH beta peptide. Shorter transcripts from clones TLH beta 2 and TLH beta 3 may correspond to short testicular LH beta peptides. The present findings provide further evidence in the rat for expression of testis-specific mRNA variants of the LH beta gene. Their translation products may form a novel class of testicular para/autocrine factors. PMID:7763258

  6. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor overexpressed in granulosa cells from polycystic ovary syndrome ovaries is functionally active.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Gordon, Uma D; López Bernal, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with anovulatory infertility. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR), which is critical for ovulation, has been suggested to be expressed prematurely in the ovarian follicles of women with PCOS. This study aimed to analyse the expression and activity of LHCGR in ovarian granulosa cells from PCOS patients and the involvement of ARF6 small GTPase in LHCGR internalization. Granulosa cells (GC) isolated from follicular fluid collected during oocyte retrieval from normal women (n = 19) and women with PCOS (n = 17) were used to study differences in LHCGR protein expression and activity between normal and PCOS patients. LHCGR expression is up-regulated in GC from PCOS women. LHCGR in PCOS GC is functionally active, as shown by increased cAMP production upon human gonadotrophin (HCG)-stimulation. Moreover, ARF6 is highly expressed in GC from PCOS patients and HCG-stimulation increases the concentrations of active ARF6. The inhibition of ARF6 activation attenuates HCG-induced LHCGR internalization in both normal and PCOS GC, indicating that there are no alterations in LHCGR internalisation in GC from PCOS. In conclusion, the expression and activation of LHCGR and ARF6 are up-regulated in GC from PCOS women but the mechanism of agonist-induced LHCGR internalization is unaltered. PMID:27061682

  7. A new variant in signal peptide of the human luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) affects receptor biogenesis causing leydig cell hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Valeria; Duminuco, Paolo; Vottero, Alessandra; Kleinau, Gunnar; Schülein, Ralf; Minari, Roberta; Bassi, Ivan; Bernasconi, Sergio; Persani, Luca; Bonomi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The human luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) plays a fundamental role in male and female reproduction. In males, loss-of-function mutations in LHCGR have been associated with distinct degrees of impairment in pre- and postnatal testosterone secretion resulting in a variable phenotypic spectrum, classified as Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH) type 1 (complete LH resistance and disorder of sex differentiation) and type 2 (partial LH resistance with impaired masculinization and fertility). Here, we report the case of an adolescent who came to the pediatric endocrinologist at the age of 12 years old for micropenis and cryptorchidism. Testis biopsy showed profound LCH and absent germinal line elements (Sertoli-only syndrome). The sequence analysis of the LHCGR gene showed the presence of a compound heterozygosity, being one variation, c.1847C>A p.S616Y, already described in association to Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism, and the other, c.29 C>T p.L10P, a new identified variant in the putative signal peptide (SP) of LHCGR. Functional and structural studies provide first evidence that LHCGR have a functional and cleavable SP required for receptor biogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate the pathogenic role of the novel p.L10P allelic variant, which has to be considered a loss-of-function mutation significantly contributing, in compound heterozygosity with p.S616Y, to the LCH type 2 observed in our patient. PMID:26246498

  8. Thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor extracellular domain chimeras as probes for thyrotropin receptor function

    SciTech Connect

    Nagayama, Yuji; Wadsworth, H.L.; Chazenbalk, G.D.; Russo, D.; Seto, Pui; Rapoport, B. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1991-02-01

    To define the sites in the extracellular domain of the human thyrotropin (TSH) receptor that are involved in TSH binding and signal transduction the authors constructed chimeric thyrotropin-luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin (TSH-LH/CG) receptors. The extracellular domain of the human TSH receptor was divided into five regions that were replaced, either singly or in various combinations, with homologous regions of the rat LH/CG receptor. The chimeric receptors were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The data obtained suggest that the carboxyl region of the extracellular domain (amino acid residues 261-418) and particularly the middle region (residues 171-260) play a role in signal transduction. The possibility is also raised of an interaction between the amino and carboxyl regions of the extracellular domain in the process of signal transduction. In summary, these studies suggest that the middle region and carboxyl half of the extracellular domain of the TSH receptor are involved in signal transduction and that the TSH-binding region is likely to span the entire extracellular domain, with multiple discontinuous contact sites.

  9. Carboxymethylation of methionine residues in bovine pituitary luteinizing hormone and its subunits. Location of specifically modified methionine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K W

    1976-01-01

    Bovine lutropin (luteinizing hormone) was carboxymethylated at pH3.0 for 12 h at 37 degrees C with iodoacetic acid for specific modification of methionine residues. To facilitate the location of preferentially modified methionine residues, iodoE114C]acetic acid was added as tracer. The alpha and beta subunits of bovine lutropin were carboxymethylated with a 2- or 5-fold molar excess of iodoacetic acid either in the presence or absence of their counterpart subunits. The modified subunits were separated and isolated by counter-current distribution followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. To locate the modified methiones, the isolated alpha or beta chain was reduced. S-carboxymethylated and subjected to tryptic hydrolysis. The tryptic peptides were fractionated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-10. From analyses of the purified 14C-labelled tryptic peptides, it was observed that methionine-8 and -33 in bovine lutropin alpha chain and methionine-52 in the beta chain were preferentially modified. Similar results were obtained when isolated alpha and beta subunits were individually carboxymethylated in the absence of their counterpart subunit under identical conditions. The fact that a recombinant of native human lutropin alpha chain, in which a valine residue is present in the position corresponding to methionine-8 of bovine lutropin alpha chain, and carboxymethylated bovine lutropin beta chain regenerated a substantial amount of receptor-site-binding activity indicated that methionine-8 in bovine alpha chain was biologically not essential. These studies showed clearly that both methionine-33 in the alpha chain and methionine-52 in the beta subunit were involved for optimum binding between bovine lutropin and its receptors for expression of hormonal activity. Images PLATE 1 PMID:999646

  10. Luteinizing hormone, a reproductive regulator that modulates the processing of amyloid-beta precursor protein and amyloid-beta deposition.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Richard L; Verdile, Giuseppe; Liu, Tianbing; Parlow, Albert F; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Martins, Ralph N; Atwood, Craig S

    2004-05-01

    Hormonal changes associated with the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis following menopause/andropause have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental support for this has come from studies demonstrating an increase in amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition following ovariectomy/castration. Because sex steroids and gonadotropins are both part of the HPG feedback loop, any loss in sex steroids results in a proportionate increase in gonadotropins. To assess whether Abeta generation was due to the loss of serum 17beta-estradiol or to the up-regulation of serum gonadotropins, we treated C57Bl/6J mice with the anti-gonadotropin leuprolide acetate, which suppresses both sex steroids and gonadotropins. Leuprolide acetate treatment resulted in a 3.5-fold (p < 0.0001) and a 1.5-fold (p < 0.024) reduction in total brain Abeta1-42 and Abeta1-40 concentrations, respectively, after 8 weeks of treatment. To further explore the role of gonadotropins in promoting amyloidogenesis, M17 neuroblastoma cells were treated with the gonadotropin luteinizing hormone (LH) at concentrations equivalent to early adulthood (10 mIU/ml) or post-menopause/andropause (30 mIU/ml). LH did not alter amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) expression but did alter AbetaPP processing toward the amyloidogenic pathway as evidenced by increased secretion and insolubility of Abeta, decreased alphaAbetaPP secretion, and increased AbetaPP-C99 levels. These results suggest the marked increases in serum LH following menopause/andropause as a physiologically relevant signal that could promote Abeta secretion and deposition in the aging brain. Suppression of the age-related increase in serum gonadotropins using anti-gonadotropin agents may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:14871891

  11. Altered regulation of luteinizing hormone secretion in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstaff, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) severely decreases plasma androgen concentrations, yet plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations remain unchanged. The mechanism by which TCDD prevents the expected compensatory increase in plasma LH was investigated. No effect on the plasma disappearance rate of LH or on pituitary capacity to synthesize or secrete LH was detected. Rather, TCDD altered the regulation of LH secretion by substantially increasing the potency of both androgens and estrogens as feedback inhibitors of LH secretion. The mechanism by which TCDD alters androgen-regulated LH secretion was further investigated. Seven days after dosing, TCDD decreased plasma testosterone concentrations but prevented the expected compensatory increases in pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor number, pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, and plasma LH concentrations as seen in similarly hypoandrogenic vehicle dosed rats. Furthermore, the TCDD dose-response relationships for preventing the compensatory increases in pituitary GnRH receptor number and plasma LH concentration were similar. However, in the absence of gonadal steroids (7 days after castration) TCDD did not affect the compensatory increases in pituitary GnRH receptor number, pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, or plasma LH concentration. All of these parameters increased substantially relative to intact TCDD treated rats, and to levels virtually identical to those seen in castrated control rats. Treatment of castrated rats with testosterone restored the ability of TCDD to prevent these compensatory increases. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the presence of androgens is required for TCDD to alter the regulation of pituitary GnRH receptors.

  12. A comparison of human chorionic gonadotropin and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone on the induction of spermiation and amplexus in the American toad (Anaxyrus americanus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Captive breeding programs for endangered amphibian species often utilize exogenous hormones for species that are difficult to breed. The purpose of our study was to compare the efficacy of two different hormones at various concentrations on sperm production, quantity and quality over time in order to optimize assisted breeding. Methods Male American toads (Anaxyrus americanus) were divided into three separate treatment groups, with animals in each group rotated through different concentrations of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog (LHRH; 0.1, 1.0, 4.0 and 32 micrograms/toad), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 50, 100, 200, and 300 IU), or the control over 24 hours. We evaluated the number of males that respond by producing spermic urine, the sperm concentration, percent motility, and quality of forward progression. We also evaluated the effects of hCG and LHRH on reproductive behavior as assessed by amplexus. Data were analyzed using the Generalized Estimating Equations incorporating repeated measures over time and including the main effects of treatment and time, and the treatment by time interaction. Results The hormone hCG was significantly more effective at stimulating spermiation in male Anaxyrus americanus than LHRH and showed a dose-dependent response in the number of animals producing sperm. At the most effective hCG dose (300 IU), 100% of the male toads produced sperm, compared to only 35% for the best LHRH dose tested (4.0 micrograms). In addition to having a greater number of responders (P < 0.05), the 300 IU hCG treatment group had a much higher average sperm concentration (P < 0.05) than the treatment group receiving 4.0 micrograms LHRH. In contrast, these two treatments did not result in significant differences in sperm motility or quality of forward progressive motility. However, more males went into amplexus when treated with LHRH vs. hCG (90% vs. 75%) by nine hours post-administration. Conclusion There is a clear

  13. New insights on the role of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Rossi, Giovanni; Lambertini, Matteo; Poggio, Francesca; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonists (LH-RHa) are effective in the treatment of advanced endocrine-sensitive breast cancer in premenopausal patients, but their role in the adjuvant setting has remained controversial for a long time. Tamoxifen for 5 years has been traditionally considered the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal patients and this is still valid for many patients. However, the recently reported SOFT trial has suggested that adding ovarian function suppression (OFS) to tamoxifen could improve DFS in women at sufficient risk to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal after this therapy. The administration of an aromatase inhibitor plus OFS represents an additional therapeutic option for hormone-receptor positive premenopausal breast cancer patients, according to the combined analysis of the SOFT and TEXT trials. Temporary ovarian suppression induced by LH-RHa has been recognized as an effective strategy to preserve ovarian function from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and is now recommended in young breast cancer patients with endocrine-insensitive tumors. In this review, we discuss recent data on the role of LH-RHa in combination with tamoxifen or with an aromatase inhibitor, and we comment on its role as a strategy to preserve ovarian function in young patients candidates for adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26613834

  14. Total Androgen Blockade Versus a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Alone in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess whether short-course total androgen blockade vs. a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist alone affects the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with localized but high-risk disease treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 628 men with T1-T4, N0, M0 prostate cancer with high-risk disease (prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >=8, or clinical category >=T3) treated with 45 Gy of external beam radiotherapy followed by a brachytherapy boost in addition to receiving a median of 4.3 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.6-6.4) months of hormonal blockade with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen or monotherapy with an LHRH agonist. Fine and Gray's multivariable regression analysis was used to determine whether combination androgen suppression therapy (AST) vs. monotherapy affected the risk of PCSM, adjusting for treatment year, duration of AST, age, and known prognostic factors. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 (IQR, 3.5-6.5) years, men receiving combination AST had a lower risk of PCSM than those treated with monotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04-0.90; p = 0.04). An increasing prostate-specific antigen level (AHR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.64-4.45; p < 0.001) and clinical category T3/4 disease (AHR, 29.6; 95% CI, 2.88-303.5; p = 0.004) were also associated with an increased risk of PCSM. Conclusions: In men with localized but high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, short-course AST with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen is associated with a decreased risk of PCSM when compared with monotherapy with an LHRH agonist.

  15. Implications of ultrasonically diagnosed polycystic ovaries. II. Studies of dynamic and pulsatile hormonal patterns.

    PubMed

    Abdel Gadir, A; Khatim, M S; Mowafi, R S; Alnaser, H M; Muharib, N S; Shaw, R W

    1992-04-01

    Studies of 6-h hormone pulse patterns distinguished patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) from those with hyperprolactinaemia or hypothyroidism associated with ultrasonically diagnosed polycystic ovaries (PCO). No specific derangement in the gonadotrophin pulse pattern was responsible for these changes, as shown in patients with and without PCO in the latter two groups. These changes may reflect an abnormal ovarian response to normal or abnormal gonadotrophic drive. Out of 26 patients with PCO and elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) levels, only three patients (11.5%) proved to have adrenal 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Ultrasonic visualization of polycystic ovaries must be supplemented with an endocrine biochemical assessment. Moreover, mild elevation of DHEA-S, without a concurrently high 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone level was not diagnostic of adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:1387880

  16. Induction of spermatogenesis and fertility in hypogonadotropic azoospermic men by intravenous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Z; Makler, A; Frisch, L; Brandes, J M

    1988-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has only recently become a helpful tool in the medication of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Two azoospermic patients with HH who had previously been treated with hCG/hMG because of delayed puberty and each of whom had fathered a child after previous gonadotropin therapy were referred due to secondary failure of hCG/hMG treatment to induce spermatogenesis and fertility. A pulse study where blood was drawn every 15 minutes for LH, FSH and PRL RIAs was performed in each patient, and afterwards a bolus of i.v. GnRH was injected to assess gonadotropin responsiveness. A portable GnRH pump was connected to each patient so that it administered 5-20 micrograms of GnRH i.v. every 89 minutes. Spermatogenesis was first detected after 42 and 78 days respectively in the 2 treated HH men and 4 1/2 months from the start of treatment their wives became pregnant. No thrombophlebitis or other complications of the i.v. therapy occurred. In the case of the first patient, the semen was washed and concentrated and intra-uterine inseminations were carried out in an attempt to shorten the time needed to achieve fertility. The first pregnancy was successfully terminated at 38 weeks with the delivery of 2 heterozygotic normal male babies. The second pregnancy ended in spontaneous delivery of a healthy female. We conclude that i.v. pulsatile, intermittent GnRH administration is a safe, efficient and highly successful means of treating azoospermic men with HH. PMID:3055820

  17. INTERACTION BETWEEN GABA AND NOREPINEPHRINE IN INTERLEUKIN-1β-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE SURGE

    PubMed Central

    Sirivelu, Madhu P.; Burnett, Robert; Shin, Andrew C.; Kim, Charlotte; MohanKumar, P.S.; MohanKumar, Sheba M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), a cytokine that is closely associated with inflammation and immune stress, is known to interfere with reproductive functions. Earlier studies have demonstrated that IL-1β inhibits the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during the afternoon of proestrus in female rats. We have shown that this effect is most probably mediated through a reduction in norepinephrine (NE) levels in the medial preoptic area (MPA) of the hypothalamus. However, the mechanism by which IL-1β decreases NE levels in the MPA is unclear. We hypothesized that the inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA could play a role in decreasing NE levels in the MPA. To test this, ovariectomized, steroid-primed rats were injected (i.p.) with either PBS-BSA (control) or 5 μg of IL-1β, alone or in combination with i.c.v. administration of GABA-A and GABA-B receptor antagonists, Bicuculline and CGP 35348 (CGP) respectively. Animals were subjected to push-pull perfusion of the MPA and perfusates collected at 30 min intervals were analyzed for both NE and GABA levels using HPLC-EC. Simultaneously, serial plasma samples were obtained through jugular catheters and were analyzed for LH levels using RIA. Compared to control rats, NE levels decreased significantly in the MPA in IL-1β-treated rats (p<0.05). Concurrently, there was a significant increase in GABA levels in the MPA (p<0.05). The GABA-A receptor antagonist, bicuculline, was able to reverse the effect of IL-1β on NE and LH, while the GABA-B receptor antagonist, CGP 35348 was without any effect. This leads us to conclude that the IL-1β-induced suppression of the LH surge is most probably mediated through an increase in GABA levels in the MPA which causes a reduction in NE levels. This is probably one of the mechanisms by which IL-1β inhibits reproductive functions. PMID:19014915

  18. Human chorionic gonadotropin (a luteinizing hormone homologue) decreases spatial memory and increases brain amyloid-β levels in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Anne S.; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ghiso, Jorge; Thornton, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that estradiol (E) improves spatial memory as female rats with E perform better than those without E. However there is an inverse relationship between E and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels and LH could play a role. We examined whether treatment with the LH homologue human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), would impair spatial memory of adult E-treated female rats. In the Object Location Memory Task, ovariectomized (ovxed) rats treated with E and either a single high dose (400IU/kg) or a lower repeated dose of hCG (75 IU/kg hourly for 8 hours) showed spatial memory disruption compared to ovxed rats treated with estradiol alone. Impairment was attributed to memory disruption as performance improved with shortened delay between task exposure and testing. Tests on another spatial memory task, the Barnes maze, confirmed that hCG (400IU/kg) can impair memory: although E + veh treated animals made significantly fewer hole errors across time, E + hCG treated did not. In humans, high LH levels have been correlated with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Because brain amyloid-beta (Aβ) species have been implicated as a toxic factor thought to cause memory loss in AD, we analyzed whether hCG-treated animals had increased Aβ levels. Levels of Aβ from whole brains or hippocampi were assessed by Western Blot. hCG treatment to E-implanted females significantly increased soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels. These results indicate that high levels of LH/hCG can impair spatial memory, and an increase in brain Aβ species may account for the memory impairment in hCG-treated rats. PMID:18413150

  19. Genetic heterogeneity of activating mutations of the luteinizing hormone receptor gene in familial male-limited precocious puberty

    SciTech Connect

    Laue, L.; Chan, W.Y.; Wu, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial male-limited precocious puberty (FMPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by elevated serum levels of testosterone, low levels of gonadotropins, and Leydig cell hyperplasia. Recently, 3 mutations have been found in FMPP families which encode substitution of Gly for Asp 578, Ile for Met 571, and Ile for Thr 577 in transmembrane helix 6 (TM 6) of the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR). We have studied 28 additional unrelated FMPP families. Genomic DNA was isolated from affected males and PCR was performed to amplify a fragment of the LHR gene encoding amino acid residues 441 to 594. MspI restriction enzyme digests were positive for the Asp 578 to Gly mutation in 22 families. Four new mutations were found in the remaining 6 families: an A to C transition encoding substitution of Leu for Ile 542 in transmembrane helix 5 (TM 5), an A to G transition encoding substitution of Gly for Asp 564 in the third cytoplasmic loop, a G to T transition encoding substitution of Try for Asp 578 in TM 6, and a T to C transition encoding substitution of Arg for Cys 581 in TM 6 of the LHR. 293 cells transfected with cDNAs for each of the 4 mutant LHRs, created by site-directed mutagenesis of the wild-type LHR cDNA, exhibited markedly increased levels of basal cAMP production in the absence of agonist, indicating constitutive activation of the mutant LHRs. We conclude that substitution of residues at multiple sites with TM 5, TM 6, and the intervening third cytoplasmic loop of the LHR cause constitutive receptor activation resulting in FMPP. These findings allow future diagnosis of affected patients and provide the basis to study the receptor domains involved in G-protein activation.

  20. Luteinizing Hormone-Induced RUNX1 Regulates the Expression of Genes in Granulosa Cells of Rat Periovulatory Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Misung; Curry, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    The LH surge induces specific transcription factors that regulate the expression of a myriad of genes in periovulatory follicles to bring about ovulation and luteinization. The present study determined 1) the localization of RUNX1, a nuclear transcription factor, 2) regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression, and 3) its potential function in rat ovaries. Up-regulation of mRNA and protein for RUNX1 is detected in preovulatory follicles after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) injection in gonadotropin-treated immature rats as well as after the LH surge in cycling animals by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. The regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression was investigated in vitro using granulosa cells from rat pre-ovulatory ovaries. Treatments with hCG, forskolin, or phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression. The effects of hCG were reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase A, MAPK kinase, or p38 kinase, indicating that Runx1 expression is regulated by the LH-initiated activation of these signaling mediators. In addition, hCG-induced Runx1 mRNA expression was inhibited by a progesterone receptor antagonist and an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas amphiregulin stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression, demonstrating that the expression is mediated by the activation of the progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor. Finally, knockdown of Runx1 mRNA by small interfering RNA decreased progesterone secretion and reduced levels of mRNA for Cyp11a1, Hapln1, Mt1a, and Rgc32. The hormonally regulated expression of Runx1 in periovulatory follicles, its involvement in progesterone production, and regulation of preovulatory gene expression suggest important roles of RUNX1 in the periovulatory process. PMID:16675540

  1. The Naturally Occurring Luteinizing Hormone Surge Is Diminished in Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor Beta in the Ovary1

    PubMed Central

    Jayes, Friederike L.; Burns, Katherine A.; Rodriguez, Karina F.; Kissling, Grace E.; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Female ESR2-null mice (betaERKO) display defects in ovarian function and are subfertile. Follicular maturation is impaired and explains smaller litters, but betaERKO also produce fewer litters, which may be partially due to inadequate ovulatory signals. To test this, the amplitude and timing of the naturally occurring luteinizing hormone (LH) surge was measured in individual intact betaERKO and wild-type (WT) mice. Vaginal cytology was evaluated daily, and blood samples were taken from mice in proestrus. The amplitude of the LH surge was severely blunted in betaERKO mice compared to WT, but pituitary LH levels revealed no differences. The betaERKO mice did not produce a preovulatory estradiol surge. To determine if the smaller LH surges and the reduced number of litters in betaERKO were due to the lack of ESR2 in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis or due to the absence of ESR2 in the ovary, ovaries were transplanted from WT into betaERKO mice and vice versa. The size of the LH surge was reduced only in mice lacking ESR2 within the ovary, and these mice had fewer litters. Fertility and size of the LH surge were rescued in betaERKO mice receiving a WT ovary. These data provide the first experimental evidence that the LH surge is impaired in betaERKO females and may contribute to their reduced fertility. ESR2 is not necessary within the pituitary and hypothalamus for the generation of a normal LH surge and for normal fertility, but ESR2 is essential within the ovary to provide proper signals. PMID:24337314

  2. Evidence that cells expressing luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the mouse are derived from progenitor cells in the olfactory placode

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, S.; Grant, P.; Gainer, H. )

    1989-10-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to study the prenatal expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) cells in the mouse. Cells expressing LHRH mRNA and peptide product were first detected on embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) in the olfactory pit. On E12.5, the majority of LHRH cells were located on tracks extending from the olfactory pit to the base of the telencephalon. From E12.5 to E15.5, LHRH cells were detected in a rostral-to-caudal gradient in forebrain areas. Prior to E12.5, cells expressing LHRH mRNA were not detected in forebrain areas known to contain LHRH cells in postnatal animals. Quantitation of cells expressing LHRH mRNA showed that the number of labeled cells on E12.5 (approximately 800) equaled the number of LHRH cells in postnatal animals, but more than 90% of these cells were located in nasal regions. Between E12.5 and E15.5, the location of LHRH cells shifted. The number of LHRH cells in the forebrain increased, while the number of LHRH cells in nasal regions decreased over this same period. These findings establish that cells first found in the olfactory pit and thereafter in forebrain areas express the LHRH gene and correspond to the position of LHRH immunopositive cells found at these developmental times. To further examine the ontogeny of the LHRH system, immunocytochemistry in combination with (3H)thymidine autoradiography was used to determine when LHRH cells left the mitotic cycle. We show that LHRH neurons exhibit a discrete time of birth, suggesting that they arise as a single neuronal population between E10.0 and E11.0. Postnatal LHRH neurons were birth-dated shortly after differentiation of the olfactory placode and before LHRH mRNA was expressed in cells in the olfactory pit.

  3. The effect of dietary monensin on th luteinizing hormone response of prepuberal heifers given a multiple gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge.

    PubMed

    Randel, R D; Rhodes, R C

    1980-10-01

    Ten prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers (average weight 208 +/- 4 kg) were randomly assigned to receive either 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 0 mg monensin sodium (C) or 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 200 mg monensin sodium (M). Both groups of animals (n = 5) received Coastal bermudagrass hay ad libitum throughout the trial. On day 21 of the feeding period all heifers were fitted with jugular cannulas. Immediately after cannulation, the heifers were injected IM with 100 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and blood was collected every 10 min for 4 hours. Four hours after the first GnRH challenge, a second 100-microgram GnRH injection was administered, and blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals for an additional 5 hours. Serum was stored at -20 C until radioimmunoassayed for luteinizing hormone (LH). The amount of LH released after each GnRH injection was greater in the heifers fed M than in the controls (P less than .05). Peak LH after the first GnRH challenge was greater (P less than .05) in heifers fed M than in controls. The area under th first GnRH induced LH curve tended (P less than .20) to be greater for the M group than for the controls. Peak LH concentration was greater in heifers fed M than in control heifers, as the duration (P less than .05) and area under the second GnRH-induced LH curve. In prepuberal heifers, dietary monensin appears to increase hypophyseal capability of releasing LH after a first and second GnRH challenge. PMID:7007307

  4. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    RUDOLF, Faidiban O.; KADOKAWA, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1. PMID:26522383

  5. Intracerebroventricular infusion of neuropeptide Y up-regulates synthesis and accumulation of luteinizing hormone but not follicle stimulating hormone in the pituitary cells of prepubertal female lambs.

    PubMed

    Wańkowska, Marta; Lerrant, Yannick; Wójcik-Gładysz, Anna; Starzec, Anna; Counis, Raymond; Polkowska, Jolanta

    2002-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a putative neuroregulator of the reproductive axis in the central nervous system. In this study we evaluated the effects of central infusion of exogenous NPY on the secretory activity of pituitary gonadotrophic cells in prepubertal lambs. Immature female Merino sheep (n=12) were infused of Ringer solution (control) or 50 microg of NPY to the third ventricle for 5 min and then slaughtered 3 h later. Immunoreactive luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) cells were localised by immunohistochemistry using antibody raised against LHbeta and FSHbeta. Messenger RNA analyses were performed by in situ hybridisation using sense and antisense riboprobes produced from beta subunits of LH and FSH cDNA clones. The results were generated by computer image analysis to determine the area fraction occupied by immunoreactive and/or hybridising cells and optical density for immunostaining and hybridisation signal. LH in the blood plasma was determined by radioimmunoassay. It was found, that in the lambs infused with NPY the area fraction and optical density for immunoreactive LH cells and mRNA LHbeta-expressing cells increased significantly (P<0.001), compared to the vehicle-infused animals. The concentration of LH in the blood plasma did not differ between control and treated groups. The NPY infusions had no effect on the immunoreactivity of FSH cells or on expression of mRNA for FSHbeta. In conclusion we suggest that NPY may be an important component of mechanisms stimulating the synthesis and storage but not the release of LH in the pituitary gonadotrophs from prepubertal female sheep. In addition, this effect is specific for LH, no such effect was apparent on FSH. PMID:11841917

  6. Alterations in RFamide-Related Peptide Expression Are Coordinated with the Preovulatory Luteinizing Hormone Surge

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Erin M.; Humber, Stephanie A.; Jain, Sachi; Williams, Wilbur P.; Zhao, Sheng; Bentley, George E.; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.

    2008-01-01

    The preovulatory LH surge is triggered when the circadian pacemaker, the bilateral suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), stimulates the GnRH system in the presence of high estrogen concentrations (positive feedback). Importantly, during the remainder of the estrous cycle, estradiol inhibits LH release via negative feedback. We have recently documented the presence of a novel mammalian RFamide-related peptide (RFRP), a putative gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), that presumably acts upstream of GnRH to modulate the negative feedback effects of estrogen. The present series of studies used female Syrian hamsters to examine the possibility that, in addition to driving the LH surge positively, the SCN concomitantly coordinates the removal of steroid-mediated RFRP inhibition of the gonadotropic axis to permit the surge. We found that the SCN forms close appositions with RFRP cells, suggesting the possibility for direct temporal control of RFRP activity. During the time of the LH surge, immediate-early gene expression is reduced in RFRP cells, and this temporal regulation is estrogen dependent. To determine whether projections from the SCN regulate the timed reduction in activation of the RFRP system, we exploited the phenomenon of splitting. In split animals in which the SCN are active in antiphase, activation of the RFRP system is asymmetrical. Importantly, this asymmetry is opposite to the state of the GnRH system. Together, these findings point to novel circadian control of the RFRP system and potential participation in the circuitry controlling ovulatory function. PMID:18566114

  7. Comparison between lactating and non-lactating dairy cows on follicular growth and corpus luteum development, and endocrine patterns of ovarian steroids and luteinizing hormone in the estrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Endo, Natsumi; Nagai, Kiyosuke; Tanaka, Tomomi; Kamomae, Hideo

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of ovarian follicle, corpus luteum (CL), and peripheral plasma ovarian steroids were compared between lactating and non-lactating cows, and a possible association of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion with the dynamics was examined. Lactating (n=5) and non-lactating (n=5) cows were monitored daily for follicle and CL throughout two consecutive estrous cycles (Day 0: day of ovulation). Blood samples were collected daily and at 15 min intervals for 8h on Days 2, 4, 6, 8, and 14 of the second cycle. Lactating cows had larger CL (25.4 ± 1.8mm vs. 23.5 ± 1.5mm, P<0.01) and greater progesterone concentrations (4.6 ± 1.0ng/ml vs. 3.9 ± 0.9 ng/ml, P<0.01) during mid-luteal phase compared with non-lactating cows. Maximal diameters of the first wave dominant follicle (17.2 ± 1.8mm vs. 15.5 ± 0.8mm) and the ovulatory follicle (17.9 ± 1.2mm vs. 15.2 ± 0.8mm) were greater (P<0.05) in lactating cows than in non-lactating cows during the estrous cycles with two follicular waves, but no significant differences were detected between the groups during the estrous cycles with three follicular waves. Plasma estradiol concentrations did not differ between the groups throughout the experiment. Lactating cows had more LH pulses from Days 2 to 14 than non-lactating cows. These results imply that differences in ovarian dynamics may exist between lactating and non-lactating cows, for which the increased number of LH pulses observed in lactating cows may have responsibility. PMID:22951117

  8. Differential effects of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones on testosterone production by mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Dalterio, S L; Suter, D E; Schwartz, N B; Mayfield, D; Rettori, V B

    1986-07-01

    In adult mice, direct intratesticular injection of ovine follicle-stimulating hormone (o-FSH-13; AFP 2846-C, from NIAMDD, less than 1% LH contamination) at 10, 100 or 1000 ng significantly elevated concentrations of testosterone (T) within the testis. These effects were rapid, with peak values attained by 15 min, and transient, with return to values comparable to that in the contralateral, saline-injected testis within 90 min. Intratesticular injection of FSH (1 microgram) significantly increased testicular T levels in 15- and 60-day old mice. This contrasted with the effects of intratesticular administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which stimulated T production significantly at 30 days of age through adulthood. In adult mice, the equivalent LH to the possible contamination in the FSH preparation (1 ng) had no effect. Intratesticular injection of 10 ng LH produced comparable stimulation to that by 100 ng FSH (approximately 7-fold). Systemic pre-treatment with a charcoal-treated porcine follicular fluid (PFF) extract for 2 days reduced plasma FSH levels [86 +/- 17 (5) vs 700 +/- 8 (6); P less than 0.05], but had no effect on plasma LH. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, the response to intratesticular injection of hCG (2.5 mIU), FSH (100 ng) or LH (10 ng) was also significantly attenuated in these mice. Intratesticular injection of PFF had no direct effect on testicular T levels. In vitro T production in the presence of hCG, LH or FSH were differentially affected by the concentrations of calcium (Ca2+) or magnesium (Mg2+) in the incubation media. The stimulatory effects of FSH were apparent at significantly lower levels of Ca2+ or Mg2+, than were those of LH or hCG. The results of these studies indicate that FSH is capable of stimulating testicular T production. Furthermore, the responsiveness to FSH is qualitatively different than that to LH/hCG in terms of the age pattern, as well as the dependence on Ca2+ or Mg2+. In addition, plasma FSH

  9. Protective effects of analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone against x-radiation-induced testicular damage in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schally, A.V.; Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Schlosser, J.V.; Karashima, T.; Debeljuk, L.; Gandle, B.; Sampson, M.

    1987-02-01

    Possible protective effects of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH and antagonist N-Ac(D-Phe(pCl)/sup 1,2/,D-Trp/sup 3/,D-Arg/sup 6/,D-Ala/sup 10/)LH-RH against testicular damage caused by x-radiation were investigated in rats. Three months after being subjected to x-irradiation of the testes with 415 or 622 rads, control rats showed marked reduction in the weights of the testes and elevated levels of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), indicating tubular damage. Histological studies demonstrated that, in testes of rats given 415 rads, most seminiferous tubules had only Sertoli cells and no germinal cells, and, in the group give 622 rads, the depression of spermatogenesis was even more marked. Rats pretreated for 50 days with LH-RH antagonist showed a complete recovery of testicular weights and spermatogenesis 3 months after 415 rads and showed partial recovery after 622 rads, and LH and FSH levels returned to normal in both of these groups. Three experiments were also carried out in which the rats were pretreated for 1-2 months with long-acting microcapsules of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH. Some rats were then subjected to gonadal irradiation with 415 or 622 rads and allowed a recovery period of 2-4 months. On the basis of testicular weights, histology, and gonadotropin levels, it could be concluded that the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH did not protect the rat testes exposed to 622 rads and, at most, only partially protected against 415 rads. These results suggest that pretreatment with LH-RH antagonists and possibly agonists, might decrease the testicular damage caused by radiation and accelerate the recovery of reproductive functions.

  10. Profiling of urinary testosterone and luteinizing hormone in exercise-stressed male athletes, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and enzyme immunoassay techniques.

    PubMed

    Yap, B K; Kazlauskas, R; Elghazi, K; Johnston, G A; Weatherby, R P

    1996-12-01

    Knowledge of the effects of episodic or short-term exercise-stress on endogenous testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels still remains fragmentary and inconclusive. In this study, an approach based on the absolute concentrations of urinary total testosterone (T), luteinizing hormone (LH) and the T/LH concentration ratios, was used to profile short-term exercise-stress responses in healthy drug-free male athletes. Testosterone and luteinizing hormone concentrations were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and microparticle enzyme immunoassay (MEIA) techniques, respectively. Stress profiles derived from exercise-stress at VO2max, 68.1% VO2max and 51.6% VO2max were plotted using the concentrations of T, LH and the ratios of T/LH found under non-stressed and stressed conditions. Significant changes in LH concentrations (p < 0.005) and T/LH ratios (p < 0.005) levels were observed between the pre-stress and post-exercise conditions during acute exercise-stress at VO2max but the T concentration did not show any marked change relative to the non-stressed condition. Whilst exercise-stress appeared to reduce the change in T concentrations between the pre- and post-exercise states compared to that in the non-stressed control condition, the change in LH concentrations showed a moderate increase at submaximal oxygen uptake values. The stress profiles derived from this study facilitated an assessment of the relationship between the endogenous T, LH and T/LH ratio stress-responses over a short period of applied exercise-stress. PMID:9001959

  11. Association between genes encoding components of the Leutinizing hormone/Luteinizing hormone-choriogonadotrophin receptor pathway and polycystic ovary syndrome in Egyptian women.

    PubMed

    El-Shal, Amal S; Zidan, Haidy E; Rashad, Nearmeen M; Abdelaziz, Ahmed M; Harira, Mervat M

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders; however, its pathophysiology is still unclear. Certain polymorphisms of luteinizing hormone beta-subunit (LHβ) and LH/choriogonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR) genes may lead to changes in the bioactivity of this hormone. We aimed to investigate possible associations between polymorphisms in the LHβ and LHCGR genes and PCOS among Egyptian women. We also aimed to shed light on the impact of these polymorphisms on LH level, hormonal, and metabolic features of PCOS. A case-control study included unrelated 210 patients with PCOS and 200 healthy controls, and they were stratified according to their body mass index into two subgroups: lean and obese. Polymorphisms of LHβ G1502A and LHCGR [G935A, and ins18LQ] genes were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Our results revealed that LHβ G1052A GA genotype and A allele, LHCGR G935A GA, AA genotypes, or A allele were significantly associated with PCOS risk, while the LHCGR ins18LQ polymorphism was not. Additionally, there is a synergism between LHβ G1052A minor A and minor A allele of LHCGR G935A or minor ins allele of LHCGR ins18LQ and susceptibility to PCOS. When we stratified PCOS women or controls into obese and lean subjects, we found that LHβ G1502A GA genotype and A allele being more frequent in the obese group when compared with lean patients with PCOS [The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were 5.6 (1.30-24.56) and 5.15 (1.21-21.90), respectively, P = 0.01, for each group.] These results suggested that LHβ G1052A and LHCGR G935A genes polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of PCOS in Egyptian women especially in obese cases. There was a synergism between LHβ G1052A minor A allele and of LHCGR G935A minor A or minor ins alleles of LHCGR ins18LQ and PCOS risk. © 2015 IUBMB Life, 68(1):23-36, 2016. PMID:26662070

  12. Combination of long-acting microcapsules of the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with chemotherapy: investigation in the rat prostate cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Redding, T W

    1985-01-01

    The effect of combining hormonal treatment consisting of long-acting microcapsules of the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH (the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) with the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide was investigated in the Dunning R-3327H rat prostate cancer model. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH formulated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calculated to release a controlled dose of 25 micrograms/day were injected intramuscularly once a month. Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) (5 mg/kg of body weight) was injected intraperitoneally twice a week. When the therapy was started 90 days after tumor transplantation--at the time that the cancers were well developed-and was continued for 2 months, tumor volume was significantly reduced by the microcapsules or Cytoxan given alone. The combination of these two agents similarly inhibited tumor growth but did not show a synergistic effect. In another study, the treatment was started 2 months after transplantation, when the developing tumors measured 60-70 mm3. Throughout the treatment period of 100 days, the microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH reduced tumor volume more than Cytoxan did, and the combination of the two drugs appeared to completely arrest tumor growth. Tumor weights also were diminished significantly in all experimental groups, the decrease in weight being smaller in the Cytoxan-treated group than in rats that received the microcapsules. The combination of Cytoxan plus the microcapsules was 10-100 times more effective than the single agents in reducing tumor weights. In both experiments, testes and ventral prostate weights were significantly diminished, serum testosterone was suppressed to undetectable levels, and prolactin values were reduced by administration of microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH alone or in combination with Cytoxan. These results in rats suggest that combined administration of long acting microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH with a chemotherapeutic agent, started soon after the

  13. Degarelix monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists plus anti-androgen flare protection in advanced prostate cancer: an analysis of two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Peter; Damber, Jan-Erik; Malmberg, Anders; Persson, Bo-Eric; Klotz, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess differences in efficacy outcomes between luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist plus antiandrogen (AA) flare protection and monotherapy with the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist degarelix in patients with prostate cancer. Methods: Data from 1455 patients were pooled from two prospective, phase III randomized 1-year clinical trials of degarelix versus LHRH agonist with or without AA. The AA bicalutamide was administered at the investigator’s discretion. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model and a conditional logistic regression model was used for a case-control analysis of odds ratios (ORs). Results: Patients received degarelix monotherapy (n = 972) or LHRH agonist (n = 483) of whom 57 also received AA. Overall, prostate-specific antigen progression-free survival (PSA PFS) was improved with degarelix versus LHRH agonist + AA (Cox proportional hazards regression model-adjusted HR for PSA PFS failure was 0.56 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.97, p = 0.038]). To compensate for a higher proportion of patients with metastases, Gleason score 7–10, and PSA >20 ng/ml in the LHRH agonist + AA group, a case-control analysis using a conditional logistic regression model was utilized. This resulted in an OR for PSA PFS of 0.42 (95% CI 0.20–0.89; p = 0.023) in the overall population, and 0.35 (95% CI 0.13–0.96; p = 0.042) in patients with PSA >50 ng/ml at baseline, when treated with degarelix versus LHRH agonists + AA. There were a small number of deaths, 1.9% with degarelix and 7% with LHRH agonists + AA (case-control analysis OR = 0.37; p = 0.085). Conclusions: Degarelix monotherapy produced a more favorable effect on PSA PFS outcomes than a LHRH agonist + AA flare protection therapy in patients with prostate cancer when a case-control analysis was used to compensate for differences between treatment groups. PMID:27034720

  14. The effects of 3 gonadorelin products on luteinizing hormone release, ovulation, and follicular wave emergence in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Marcelo F.; Mapletoft, Reuben J.; Kastelic, John P.; Carruthers, Terry

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to determine luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and follicular dynamics in cattle following administration of 3 gonadorelin formulations that are commercially available in Canada. In experiment 1, nonlactating Holstein cows (n = 4 per group) were randomly assigned to receive 100 μg gonadorelin diacetate tetrahydrate, intramuscularly (C; Cystorelin, or FE; Fertagyl). Blood samples (for LH analysis) were collected 0, 1, 2, and 4 hours after treatment. In experiment 2, nonlactating Holstein cows (n = 10 per group) were randomly allocated to receive 100 μg gonadorelin, intramuscularly as follows: 2 mL of C; 1 mL of FE; or 2 mL of Factrel (FA, gonadorelin hydrochloride). Gonadorelin treatment was done on days 6 or 7 after ovulation and blood samples for LH analysis were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after treatment. Ovaries were examined by ultrasonography, twice daily, to detect ovulation. A replicate was conducted using only C (n = 10) or FE (n = 10); blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 hours. In experiment 3, beef heifers (n = 10 per group) were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 GnRH gonadorelin treatments (as in the first phase of experiment 2) on days 6 or 7 after ovulation and blood samples were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, and 4 hours. In experiments 2 and 3, both mean and mean peak plasma LH concentrations were higher (P < 0.05) in cattle treated with C. The proportion of dominant follicles that ovulated was higher (P < 0.02) in Holstein cows treated with C than in those treated with FE or FA (18/19, 11/19, and 4/7, respectively), but there was no significant difference among the products in beef heifers (6/10, 6/10, and 4/10, respectively). No significant differences were found in the interval from treatment to the emergence of the next follicular wave. In summary, C induced a greater LH release and this resulted in a higher ovulatory rate in Holstein cows but not in beef heifers. PMID:12650040

  15. Lead (Pb) alters the norepinephrine-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone from the median eminence of adult male rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, G.R.; Hiney, J.K.; Dees, W.L. )

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the in vitro effects of lead (Pb) on basal and stimulated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and Prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]) secretion. Median eminences (ME) were removed from brains of adult male rats and preincubated for 15 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in an atmosphere of 95% O[sub 2]-5% CO[sub 2]. These media were discarded and all MEs were subjected to one of the following experiments. In Experiment 1, all MEs were incubated for 30 minutes in medium only. These media were collected and replaced with medium only (controls) or with medium containing Pb doses ranging from 5 to 20 [mu]M. After this 60-minute incubation, media were collected, then replaced with new medium containing 60 [mu]M norepinephrine (NE), or NE plus each dose of Pb, then incubated for a final 30-minute period. Experiment 2 was conducted as above, except PGE[sub 2] (2.8 [mu]M) replaced the NE. In both experiments, the amounts of LHRH released was measured by RIA. In experiment 3, NE was again used for the challenge; however, this time, the amount of PGE[sub 2] released was measured by RIA. Results indicate that Pb did not alter basal LHRH release, but compared with controls, significantly blocked NE-induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner. Conversely, Pb had no effect on the PGE[sub 2]-induced release of LHRH. Additionally, Pb did not alter basal PGE[sub 2] release; however, it significantly blocked the NE-induced release of PGE[sub 2]. Since NE-induced LHRH release is mediated by PGE[sub 2], these results support the hypothesis that Pb is capable of altering the hypothalamus and suggest that this effect is due, at least in part, to the diminished PGE[sub 2] synthesis/release within the ME, resulting in diminished LHRH secretion.

  16. LH (Luteinizing Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... LH and FSH may be ordered when a boy or girl does not appear to be entering puberty at ... pubic hair Growth of testicles and penis in boys Beginning of menstruation in girls ^ Back to top What does the test result ...

  17. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Motschall, Edith; Antes, Gerd; Dahm, Philipp; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effects of non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for treating advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. We searched the Cochrane Prostatic Diseases and Urologic Cancers Group Specialized Register (PROSTATE), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, three trial registries and abstracts from three major conferences to 23 December 2013, together with reference lists, and contacted selected experts in the field and manufacturers. We included randomized controlled trials comparing non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for men in advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. Two review authors independently examined full-text reports, identified relevant studies, assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias as well as quality of evidence according to the GRADE working group guidelines. We used Review Manager 5.2 for data synthesis and the fixed-effect model as primary analysis (when heterogeneity was low with I(2) < 50%); we used a random-effects model when confronted with substantial or considerable heterogeneity (when I(2) ≥50%). A total of 11 studies involving 3060 randomly assigned participants were included in the present review. Use of non-steroidal antiandrogens resulted in lower overall survival times (hazard ratio [HR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.48, six studies, 2712 participants) and greater clinical progression (1 year: risk ratio [RR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, five studies, 2067 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, six studies, 2373 participants; 2 years: RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.25, three studies, 1336 participants), as well as treatment failure (1 year: RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.38, four studies, 1539 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1

  18. Sexual maturation, serum steroid concentrations, and mRNA expression of IGF-1, luteinizing and progesterone hormone receptors and survivin gene in Japanese quail hens.

    PubMed

    Shit, N; Sastry, K V H; Singh, R P; Pandey, N K; Mohan, J

    2014-03-15

    In avian species, sexual maturation represents the evidence of start laying, which is a consequence of the development of ovarian follicles. These follicles are the functional reproductive unit whose maturation and viability critically depends on endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors beyond the signals from the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to investigate the correlation of sexual maturity with tissue growth, mRNA expression of certain genes, and serum steroid concentrations in Japanese quail hens. To carry out the present study, a total of forty Japanese quail hens (5 weeks) were housed individually under uniform husbandry condition with ad libitum quail layer ration and water at 14-hour photo schedule. On sixth week onwards, four birds were sacrificed at each time on 1, 3, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, and 28 days. Serum was extracted aseptically to analyze the gonadal steroid hormones (estrogen and progesterone) and corticosterone to investigate the liaison with sexual maturation of the species. Expression analyses of four genes i.e., insulin-like growth factor-1, luteinizing hormone receptor, progesterone receptor, and survivin were carried out in the three largest ovarian yellow follicles. A significant (P < 0.05) increase in body weight gain and oviduct weight was recorded during the phase of sexual maturation. Smaller follicles revealed higher insulin-like growth factor-1 and survivin gene expression, whereas the reverse result was manifested in both the luteinizing and progesterone hormone receptors. In biochemical study, the gonadal steroids (estrogen and progesterone) were recorded higher at the first half of the experiment when a gradual decrease in corticosterone concentration was confirmed from the very beginning of this study. This result substantiated that sexual maturation in Japanese quail may be completed by the time of 8 weeks after its birth in support of the analyzed information studied in the current investigation

  19. The Luteinizing Hormone-Testosterone Pathway Regulates Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Self-Renewal by Suppressing WNT5A Expression in Sertoli Cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi; Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Lei, Zhenmin; Rao, C V; Shinohara, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Spermatogenesis originates from self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Previous studies have reported conflicting roles of gonadotropic pituitary hormones in SSC self-renewal. Here, we explored the role of hormonal regulation of SSCs using Fshb and Lhcgr knockout (KO) mice. Although follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is thought to promote self-renewal by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), no abnormalities were found in SSCs and their microenvironment. In contrast, SSCs were enriched in Lhcgr-deficient mice. Moreover, wild-type SSCs transplanted into Lhcgr-deficient mice showed enhanced self-renewal. Microarray analysis revealed that Lhcgr-deficient testes have enhanced WNT5A expression in Sertoli cells, which showed an immature phenotype. Since WNT5A was upregulated by anti-androgen treatment, testosterone produced by luteinizing hormone (LH) is required for Sertoli cell maturation. WNT5A promoted SSC activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, FSH is not responsible for GDNF regulation, while LH negatively regulates SSC self-renewal by suppressing WNT5A via testosterone. PMID:27509137

  20. Insulin Receptor Signaling in the GnRH Neuron Plays a Role in the Abnormal GnRH Pulsatility of Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    DiVall, Sara A.; Herrera, Danny; Sklar, Bonnie; Wu, Sheng; Wondisford, Fredric; Radovick, Sally; Wolfe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Infertility associated with obesity is characterized by abnormal hormone release from reproductive tissues in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. These tissues maintain insulin sensitivity upon peripheral insulin resistance. Insulin receptor signaling may play a role in the dysregulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in obesity, but the interdependence of hormone secretion in the reproductive axis and the multi-hormone and tissue dysfunction in obesity hinders investigations of putative contributing factors to the disrupted GnRH secretion. To determine the role of GnRH insulin receptor signaling in the dysregulation of GnRH secretion in obesity, we created murine models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) with and without intact insulin signaling in the GnRH neuron. Obese control female mice were infertile with higher luteinizing hormone levels and higher GnRH pulse amplitude and total pulsatile secretion compared to lean control mice. In contrast, DIO mice with a GnRH specific knockout of insulin receptor had improved fertility, luteinizing hormone levels approaching lean mice, and GnRH pulse amplitude and total secretion similar to lean mice. Pituitary responsiveness was similar between genotypes. These results suggest that in the obese state, insulin receptor signaling in GnRH neurons increases GnRH pulsatile secretion and consequent LH secretion, contributing to reproductive dysfunction. PMID:25780937

  1. Synergistic interaction between insulin-like growth factors-I and -II in central regulation of pulsatile growth hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Harel, Z; Tannenbaum, G S

    1992-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and -II peptides, receptors, mRNAs, and binding proteins are widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), yet their physiological role in the brain remains largely unknown. While earlier in vivo studies in the rat suggested that IGF-I may participate in feedback regulation of GH secretion at a CNS level, the preparations used were only partially pure. The recent availability of purified recombinant IGF-I and -II peptides prompted us to reexamine the involvement of the IGFs in vivo in central regulation of pulsatile GH secretion. Five groups of free-moving adult male rats bearing chronic intracerebroventricular (icv) and intracardiac venous cannulae were icv administered IGF-I (in doses of 0.5, 2, 3, and 10 micrograms) or the acid-saline vehicle; an additional group received 1 microgram of the potent IGF-I analog, long R3 IGF-I. Spontaneous 6-h plasma GH secretory profiles were obtained from all groups. Vehicle-injected control animals exhibited the typical pulsatile pattern of GH secretion, with most peak GH values above 150 ng/ml and trough levels below 1.2 ng/ml. Central administration of IGF-I alone or long R3 IGF-I at all doses tested failed to alter the pulsatile pattern of GH release; there were no significant differences in GH peak amplitude, GH trough level, GH interpeak interval, or mean 6-h plasma GH level compared to those in vehicle-injected controls. In a second study, designed to determine the effects of central administration of IGF-I and IGF-II, in combination, icv injection of 1 microgram IGF-I and 1 microgram IGF-II resulted in a marked suppression in the amplitude of spontaneous GH secretory bursts approximately 3 h after injection; both GH pulse amplitude (43.5 +/- 5.6 vs. 130.6 +/- 14.6 ng/ml; P less than 0.001) and mean plasma GH level (16.3 +/- 1.9 vs. 35.2 +/- 1.8 ng/ml; P less than 0.001) were severely reduced 3-6 h after injection compared to those in vehicle-injected controls. These results

  2. Pulsatile intravenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration averts fasting-induced hypogonadotropism and hypoandrogenemia in healthy, normal weight men.

    PubMed

    Aloi, J A; Bergendahl, M; Iranmanesh, A; Veldhuis, J D

    1997-05-01

    Fasting or severe caloric restriction in the human or experimental animal suppresses serum LH and sex steroid concentrations. In healthy men undergoing prolonged (5-day) nutrient deprivation, the daily LH secretion rate, the mass of LH secreted per burst, and the serum testosterone concentration fall markedly, with no decrease in responsiveness to a single bolus of GnRH. Here we test the hypothesis that the hypogonadotropic hypoandrogenemia accompanying fasting reflects decreased endogenous GnRH release. To this end, six healthy young men were studied on a fed day and during two 83-h fasting sessions with concurrent saline or pulsatile GnRH administration (100 ng/kg, i.v., every 90 min for 24 h) followed by a single bolus of 10 microg GnRH, i.v., to evaluate pituitary responsiveness. We employed a highly sensitive LH immunoradiometric assay, which correlates well with an in vitro Leydig cell bioassay, and deconvolution analysis to calculate in vivo LH secretory burst frequency, amplitude, duration, mass, and LH half-life. Fasting resulted in 30-50% declines in serum total and free testosterone and LH concentrations, and a 3-fold decrease in the calculated 24-h LH secretion rate (fed, 42 +/- 12; fasting, 14 +/- 1.9 U/L distribution volume x day; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.05, by ANOVA). Reduced LH secretion was accounted for by dual mechanisms, viz. a fall in both the apparent number of computer-resolved LH secretory bursts per 24 h (fed, 16 +/- 1.1; fasting, 10 +/- 1.2; P < 0.01) and the mass of LH secreted per burst (fed, 2.5 +/- 0.5; fasting, 1.5 +/- 0.1 U/L; P < 0.05). Fasting also decreased the mean value of the 24-h (nyctohemeral) rhythm in serum LH concentrations and reduced the approximate entropy (disorderliness) of LH release. Exogenous pulsatile GnRH injections prevented both the reduction in the calculated daily LH secretion rate (fed, 42 +/- 12; fasting plus GnRH, 64 +/- 16 IU/L; P = NS) and the decline in serum testosterone concentrations (fed, 556 +/- 71 ng

  3. MAPK3/1 is conducive to luteinizing hormone-mediated C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in bovine granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Lei; WEI, Qiang; GE, Junbang; ZHAO, Xiaoe; MA, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) plays a role as an oocyte maturation inhibitor (OMI) in many species, including the bovine. However, the effects of luteinizing hormone (LH) on CNP expression and its potential mechanisms have not reported in the bovine. In the present study, we aimed to study the effects of LH on CNP expression and to illuminate the potential molecular mechanism in this process. Our results showed that LH induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, mitogen-activated protein kinase3/1 (MAPK3/1) activation and CNP mRNA decrease in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Further study revealed that LH suppressed CNP expression via the MAPK3/1 signaling pathway, which was activated by the EGFR pathway. In conclusion, our research suggested that MAPK3/1 is involved in LH-mediated decrease of CNP and that this process is related to the EGFR and MAPK3/1 signal pathways. PMID:26655567

  4. Effect of different seasons on concentration of plasma luteinizing hormone and seminal quality vis-à-vis freezability of buffalo bulls ( Bubalus bubalis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahga, C. S.; Khokar, B. S.

    1991-12-01

    Seasonal variations in semen quality, freezability and plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were studied between summer and spring. Semen volume, density and initial sperm motility did not differ significantly between different seasons. Plasma LH decreased between summer and spring but the differences were, however, not significant. Pre-freezing motility did not differ significantly but post-freezing motility varied significantly ( P<0.01) between seasons. Post-freezing motility was lowest during summer and highest during winter. It can be concluded that summer spermatozoa may be fragile and cannot withstand freezing stress. To increase reproductive efficiency in buffalo during summer, semen should be frozen during winter and spring and used during hot weather conditions. Seasonal variations in plasma LH levels were insignificant.

  5. Luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone receptors and their transcribed genes (mRNA) are present in the lower urinary tract of intact male and female dogs.

    PubMed

    Ponglowhapan, S; Church, D B; Scaramuzzi, R J; Khalid, M

    2007-01-15

    In dogs, one of the side effects of neutering is the development of urinary incontinence. The relationship between neutering and urinary incontinence caused by acquired urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) has been reported. Recently, GnRH analogue treatment that suppresses elevated plasma gonadotrophin concentrations post-spaying has been successfully used in incontinent bitches. These data and the fact that non-gonadal tissues may contain receptors for LH (LHR) and FSH (FSHR) suggest that there might be a functional relationship between gonadotrophins and the lower urinary tract in dogs. This study aimed to investigate the presence of LHR and FSHR in the lower urinary tract of intact male and female dogs. Four regions of the lower urinary tract, i.e. (i) body of the bladder, (ii) neck of the bladder, (iii) proximal urethra and (iv) distal urethra were collected from 10 healthy dogs (5 males and 5 anoestrous females). In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were performed to characterise the presence of receptor mRNA and receptor protein. Staining was rated semi-quantitatively, incorporating both the distribution and intensity of specific staining. The distribution of receptor expression in different tissue layers (epithelium, subepithelial stroma and muscle) in each region was statistically analyzed. Luteinizing hormone receptor and FSHR mRNA and protein were present in all four regions and in three tissue layers of males and females. Irrespective of region and layer, female dogs expressed significantly higher expression for LHR mRNA (P<0.001), LHR protein (P<0.05) and FSHR protein (P<0.001). The expression of LHR and FSHR mRNA and protein was not uniform and depended on region, tissue layer and gender. The expression of LHR mRNA was higher in the bladder, compared to the urethra (P<0.05). The FSHR mRNA significantly increased from the bladder to the urethra. Protein expression for LHR and FSHR was highest in the proximal urethra (P<0.05). The

  6. Events surrounding the initiation of puberty with long term subcutaneous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone in a female patient with Kallman's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seibel, M M; Claman, P; Oskowitz, S P; McArdle, C; Weinstein, F G

    1985-09-01

    An 18-yr-old woman with primary amenorrhea, anosmia, and total lack of secondary sexual development was treated for 230 days using sc pulsatile GnRH. GnRH testing with 100 micrograms, sc, initially revealed a peak FSH to LH ratio greater than 1. After 28 days of treatment, this ratio had reversed. A dosage of 20 micrograms/2 h for 200 days resulted in a LH to FSH ratio greater than 2. Widening the interval to 20 micrograms/3 h significantly lowered LH, but not FSH, levels. Increasing the frequency to 20 micrograms/90 min again increased the LH to FSH ratio. Twenty-four-hour testing revealed a sleep-entrained PRL rise both during and after GnRH therapy, but no sleep-entrained rise in LH. Ultrasound monitoring revealed cyclic changes in ovarian diameter at 30- to 60-day intervals that coincided with cyclic increases in LH and estradiol. The uterine fundus doubled in length between days 50 and 110 of treatment. The patient progressed from Tanner pubic hair and breast stage I to stage II during treatment, which was terminated due to an allergic reaction to GnRH. This study provides the first report of hormonal and ultrasound events surrounding puberty induction with GnRH in the female. We conclude widening the interval of GnRH administration can reduce LH levels while maintaining FSH levels, cyclic changes in ovarian diameter, LH, and estradiol occur before menarche, and although pulsatile GnRH provides a fascinating model for the study of puberty in the female, the chronicity of therapy needed and its potential for allergic reaction make this method of inducing puberty suboptimal. PMID:3926811

  7. Carboxymethylation of methionine residues in bovine pituitary luteinizing hormone and its subunits. Effects on the binding activity with receptor sites and interactions between subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K W

    1976-01-01

    The reaction of iodoacetic acid with bovine lutropin (luteinizing hormone) at pH 3.0 was specific for methionine residues; it was slow and reached its equilibrium after 12 h at 37 degrees C. The number of modified methionine residues increased proportionately with the amount of the alkylating reagent in the reaction mixture. In the presence of a 20-fold molar excess of iodoacetic acid with respect to methionine, essentially all methionine residues in both subunits of bovine lutropin were carboxymethylated. Studies of various recombinations of modified and native alpha and beta subunits showed that methionine residues in bovine lutropin were not essential for interactions between subunits. Various recombinants were characterized by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and gel filtration of Sephadex G-100. Immunological cross-reactivity by radioimmunoassay of the recombinants of modified alpha and beta subunits was relatively similar to that of the native subunits. However, the biological activity measured by receptor-site binding of the recombinants of alpha and beta chains with a total of three alkylated methionine residues was less than 5% of the activity of native lutropin. It is noteworthy that recombinants of a modified subunit and a native counterpart subunit regenerated 20-30 % of biological activity. These findings suggested that at least 1-2 methionine residues in each subunit are involved in the hormone-receptor interaction for bovine lutropin. Images PLATE 1 PMID:187169

  8. Effect of a calcium channel blocker on pituitary luteinizing hormone secretion in intact and castrated male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, V.N.; Sidneva, L.N.; Ozol', L.Yu.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of a calcium channel blocker on leuteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through experiments on rats. LH was determined by radioimmunoassay in two or three parallel tests and in two dilutions. The effect of verapamil on the LH level in rat blood serum and the pituitary gland is shown.

  9. Ontogeny of gene expression in the hypothalamic-pitutitary axis and luteinizing hormone secretion during pubertal development in the gilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The occurrence of puberty in the female is due to the interplay of central and peripheral mechanisms in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis regulates growth, gonadal function, as well as, adipocyte hormone secretion. Hypothalamic GnRH mRNA expression did not change. Concomitant with the ag...

  10. /sup 125/I-luteinizing hormone (LH) binding to soluble receptors from the primate (Macaca mulatta) corpus luteum: effects of ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, D.R.; Stouffer, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the current study, we compared the effects of ethanol on gonadotropin receptors solubilized from macaque luteal membranes to those on receptors associated with the lipid bilayer. Treatment with 1% Triton X-100 for 30 min at 4C, followed by precipitation with polyethylene glycol, resulted in recovery of 50% more binding sites for /sup 125/I-human luteinizing hormone (hLH) than were available in particulate preparations. However, the soluble receptors displayed a 3-fold lower affinity for /sup 125/I-hLH. Conditions which enhanced LH binding to particulates, i.e., 1-8% ethanol at 25C, decreased specific /sup 125/I-hLH binding to soluble receptors. Steady-state LH binding to soluble receptors during incubation at 4C was half of that observed at 25C. The presence of 8% ethanol at 4C restored LH binding to levels observed in the absence of ethanol at 25C. Thus, LH binding sites in the primate corpus luteum can be effectively solubilized with Triton X-100. The different binding characteristics of particulate and soluble receptors, including the response to ethanol exposure, suggest that the lipid environment in the luteal membrane modulates the availability and affinity of gonadotropin receptors.

  11. Luteinizing hormone causes MAP kinase-dependent phosphorylation and closure of connexin 43 gap junctions in mouse ovarian follicles: one of two paths to meiotic resumption

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Rachael P.; Freudzon, Marina; Mehlmann, Lisa M.; Cowan, Ann E.; Simon, Alexander M.; Paul, David L.; Lampe, Paul D.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Luteinizing hormone (LH) acts on ovarian follicles to reinitiate meiosis in prophase-arrested mammalian oocytes, and this has been proposed to occur by interruption of a meioisis-inhibitory signal that is transmitted through gap junctions into the oocyte from the somatic cells that surround it. To investigate this idea, we microinjected fluorescent tracers into live antral follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes, and demonstrate for the first time that LH causes a decrease in the gap junction permeability between the somatic cells, prior to nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). The decreased permeability results from MAP kinase-dependent phosphorylation of connexin 43 on serines 255, 262, and 279/282. We then tested whether inhibition of gap junction communication is sufficient and necessary for the reinitiation of meiosis. Inhibitors that reduced gap junction permeability caused NEBD, but an inhibitor of MAP kinase activation that blocked gap junction closure in response to LH did not prevent NEBD. Thus both MAP kinase-dependent gap junction closure and another redundant pathway function in parallel to ensure that meiosis resumes in response to LH. PMID:18776144

  12. The effects of luteinizing hormone ablation/replacement versus steroid ablation/replacement on gene expression in the primate corpus luteum

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cecily V.; Hennebold, Jon D.; Stouffer, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to provide a genome-wide analysis of the effects of luteinizing hormone (LH) versus steroid ablation/replacement on gene expression in the developed corpus luteum (CL) in primates during the menstrual cycle. On Days 9–11 of the luteal phase, female rhesus monkeys were left untreated (control) or received a GnRH antagonist Antide (A), A + LH, A + LH + the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitor Trilostane (TRL) or A + LH + TRL + a progestin R5020. On Day 12 of the luteal phase, CL were removed and samples of RNA from individual CL were hybridized to Affymetrix™ rhesus macaque total genome microarrays. The greatest number of altered transcripts was associated with the ablation/replacement of LH, while steroid ablation/progestin replacement affected fewer transcripts. Replacement of LH during Antide treatment restored the expression of most transcripts to control levels. Validation of a subset of transcripts revealed that the expression patterns were similar between microarray and real-time PCR. Analyses of protein levels were subsequently determined for two transcripts. This is the first genome-wide analysis of LH and steroid regulation of gene transcription in the developed primate CL. Further analysis of novel transcripts identified in this data set can clarify the relative role for LH and steroids in CL maintenance and luteolysis. PMID:19168862

  13. Luteinizing Hormone Reduces the Activity of the NPR2 Guanylyl Cyclase in Mouse Ovarian Follicles, Contributing to the Cyclic GMP Decrease that Promotes Resumption of Meiosis in Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jerid W.; Zhang, Meijia; Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Norris, Rachael P.; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Eppig, John J.; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2012-01-01

    In preovulatory ovarian follicles of mice, meiotic prophase arrest in the oocyte is maintained by cyclic GMP from the surrounding granulosa cells that diffuses into the oocyte through gap junctions. The cGMP is synthesized in the granulosa cells by the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) in response to the agonist C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). In response to luteinizing hormone (LH), cGMP in the granulosa cells decreases, and as a consequence, oocyte cGMP decreases and meiosis resumes. Here we report that within 20 minutes, LH treatment results in decreased guanylyl cyclase activity of NPR2, as determined in the presence of a maximally activating concentration of CNP. This occurs by a process that does not reduce the amount of NPR2 protein. We also show that by a slower process, first detected at 2 hours, LH decreases the amount of CNP available to bind to the receptor. Both of these LH actions contribute to decreasing cGMP in the follicle, thus signaling meiotic resumption in the oocyte. PMID:22546688

  14. The expression of the urinary forms of human luteinizing hormone beta fragment in various populations as assessed by a specific immunoradiometric assay.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J F; Kovalevskaya, G; Birken, S; Schlatterer, J P; Schechter, D; McMahon, D J; Canfield, R E

    1998-04-01

    Human gonadotrophins undergo metabolic transformations which result in the presence of several smaller, structurally and immunologically related forms of gonadotrophins in the urine. For luteinizing hormone (LH), a beta core fragment (LHbeta cf) has been isolated from the pituitary and characterized. The corresponding urinary fragment is inferred from mass spectral and immunochemical analysis of chromatographically separated urinary forms. Physicochemical characteristics, primarily mass spectral and chromatographic, indicate that the pituitary and urinary forms of LHbeta cf have a different structure, probably in the carbohydrate moieties. This communication characterizes the expression of LHbeta cf in the urine of both reproductive and post-reproductive age women and in men, employing assays highly specific for the pituitary form of the fragment. It was found that LHbeta cf is the predominant LH associated molecular form in the urine during peri-ovulatory period, peaking 1-3 days later than intact LH and reaching a concentration of approximately 600 fmol/mg creatinine, 7-fold higher than either LH or LH free beta subunit. Corresponding concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) beta cf were <1% that of LHbeta cf. LHbeta cf cross-reaction with some LH or LHbeta monoclonal antibodies may well interfere with the accurate estimation of the day of the LH surge when urinary tests are utilized. PMID:9619532

  15. Evidence for a daily rhythmicity in the acute release of luteinizing hormone in response to electrical stimulation in the Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Konishi, H; Foster, R G; Follett, B K

    1987-08-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus at different times of day on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in male castrated quail on short days (8L:16D). The posterior hypothalamus was stimulated with square-wave pulses of 80 microA for 2 min through chronically-implanted platinum microelectrodes. Stimulation was carried out on each quail at 4 (treatment A), 10 (B), or 14 h (C) after dawn. Plasma LH levels were increased markedly within 2 min of ending the stimulation but reached basal levels again over the next 20 min or so. The absolute increase was significantly greater in treatment B (10 h after lights on) than at the other times tested. This is consistent with a rhythm in hypothalamic responsivity. The results are discussed in the context of the rhythm of photoinducibility which occurs early in the night and which is used by quail as a photoperiodic clock to regulate seasonal reproduction. PMID:3625579

  16. Luteinizing hormone induces ovulation via tumor necrosis factor α-dependent increases in prostaglandin F2α in a nonmammalian vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Diego; Goetz, Frederick W.; Planas, Josep V.

    2015-01-01

    Ovulation is induced by the preovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) that acts on the ovary and triggers the rupture of the preovulatory ovarian follicle by stimulating proteolysis and apoptosis in the follicle wall, causing the release of the mature oocyte. The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and prostaglandin (PG) F2α (PGF2α) are involved in the control of ovulation but their role mediating the pro-ovulatory actions of LH is not well established. Here we show that Lh induces PGF2α synthesis through its stimulation of Tnfα production in trout, a primitive teleost fish. Recombinant trout Tnfα (rTnfα) and PGF2α recapitulate the stimulatory in vitro effects of salmon Lh (sLh) on contraction, proteolysis and loss of cell viability in the preovulatory follicle wall and, finally, ovulation. Furthermore, all pro-ovulatory actions of sLh are blocked by inhibition of Tnfα secretion or PG synthesis and all actions of rTnfα are blocked by PG synthesis inhibitors. Therefore, we provide evidence that the Tnfα–dependent increase in PGF2α production is necessary for the pro-ovulatory actions of Lh. The results from this study shed light onto the mechanisms underlying the pro-ovulatory actions of LH in vertebrates and may prove important in clinical assessments of female infertility. PMID:26374476

  17. Studies on the metabolic clearance rate and production rate of human luteinizing hormone and on the initial half-time of its subunits in man.

    PubMed Central

    Pepperell, R J; Kretser, D M; Burger, H G

    1975-01-01

    The metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of human luteinizing hormone (hLH) has been determined in 10 normal men, 3 normal women, and in 12 women with ovulatory disorders resulting in oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea. The MCR was determined by the constant infusion technique using either iodinated or unlabeled highly purified hLH, and these results were compared to MCR determined by using crude pituitary preparations containing both follicle-stimulating hormone and hLH. Both preparations produced essentially similar results for the MCR of hLH and virtually identical results were obtained when complete or incomplete immunoprecipitation of the infused material was achieved. The MCR/body surface area of hLH was significantly greater in normal men (25.6 plus or minus 3.6 ml/min-m-2) than in normal premenopausal (19.2 plus or minus 0.9 ml/min-m-2) or postmenopausal women (17.4 plus or minus 1.9 ml/min-m-2). No difference was noted in the MCR of hLH in women with oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea. Production rates (PRs) were calculated by using a pituitary standard, the values being 85.1 plus or minus 21.5 IU/24 h in normal men, 39.9 plus or minus 12.6 IU/24 h in normal premenopausal women, and 294.6 plus or minus 61.9 IU/24 h in normal postmenopausal women. The initial half-times of disappearance of the alpha- and beta-subunits of hLH were measured in two normal men and found to be 15-18 min, respectively. The half-time of intact hLH was twice as great. PMID:1170215

  18. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase types 1 and 2 in postnatal development of rat testis: gene expression, localization and regulation by luteinizing hormone and androgens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yu; Chen, Xin-Xin; Lin, Han; Fei, Ai-Li; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2014-01-01

    11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) and type 2 (11β-HSD2) are expressed in rat testis, where they regulate the local concentrations of glucocorticoids. Here, we investigated the expression and localization of 11β-HSD in rat testis during postnatal development, and the regulation of these genes by luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens. mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively, in testes collected from rats at postnatal day (PND) 7, 14, 21, 35, and 90, and from rats treated with LH, 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) and testosterone at PND 21 and PND 90. Immunohistochemical staining was used to identify the localization of the 11β-HSD in rat testis at PND 7, 14, and 90. We found that 11β-HSD1 expression was restricted to the interstitial areas, and that its levels increased during rat testis development. In contrast, whereas 11β-HSD2 was expressed in both the interstitial areas and seminiferous tubules at PND 7, it was present only in the interstitial areas at PND 90, and its levels declined during testicular development. Moreover, 11β-HSD1 mRNA was induced by LH in both the PND 21 and 90 testes and by MENT at PND 21, whereas 11β-HSD2 mRNA was induced by testosterone and MENT in the PND 21 testis and by LH in the PND 90 testis. In conclusion, our study indicates that the 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2 genes have distinct patterns of spatiotemporal expression and hormonal regulation during postnatal development of the rat testis. PMID:25038180

  19. Antibodies against the beta-subunit of ovine luteinizing hormone can decrease the clearance of human chorionic gonadotropin in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Gunsalus, G L; Sundaram, K; Thau, R B

    1984-06-01

    Contraceptive vaccines based on active immunization against gonadotropic hormones are being investigated in humans and other primates. Immunization against the beta-subunit of ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH beta) reduces fertility in rhesus monkeys by inducing inadequate luteal phases and preventing corpus luteum rescue by rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (rhCG). These effects result from the cross-reactions of the oLH beta-antibodies with rhCG and rhLH. We used human CG (hCG), which also cross-reacts strongly with anti-oLH beta to examine how the circulating oLH beta-antibodies affect the metabolic clearance rates (MCR) of hCG in rhesus monkeys. 125I-hCG was injected into four nonimmunized and seven immunized monkeys and blood was collected at frequent intervals over 7 days. Total and immunoprecipitable radioactivity did not differ significantly, suggesting that the radioactivity in the plasma consisted almost entirely of 125I-hCG. This was confirmed by column chromatography. The MCR (mean +/- SE) was significantly lower (p less than 0.001) in six immunized monkeys (0.35 +/- 0.06 liters/day) as compared to controls (1.19 +/- 0.09 liters/day). The hCG disappearance curve in control monkeys was best described by a two-compartmental system (slow and fast) while an additional third (intermediate) compartment of distribution was typical for immunized animals. The half-lives of hCG for the two exponentials corresponding to the slow and fast components of distribution were not significantly different between the two groups. One immunized monkey had a MCR (1.44 liters/day) that was much greater than the MCR of the other six.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6507705

  20. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones during the reproductive cycle of wild and cultured Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis).

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Fatsini, Elvira; Duncan, Neil; Ollé, Judith; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana; Cerdà, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The intensive culture of the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is hampered by the low or null fertilization rates exhibited by the first generation (F1) of reared males. To investigate the regulation of the reproductive processes in this species by the pituitary gonadotropins follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones (Fsh and Lh, respectively), we developed a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Lh measurements. Quantification of the Fsh and Lh plasma levels in cultured sole using the Lh ELISA developed here, and a previously developed ELISA for Fsh, indicated that in both males and females circulating Fsh steadily increased during autumn and winter and prior to the major spawning in spring, whereas an Lh surge occurred specifically during spawning. The increase in Fsh was associated with a rise of plasma levels of the steroid hormones testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and estradiol-17β (E2), but that of Lh was concomitant with a strong decline of the levels of E2 in females and of 11-KT in males, possibly reflecting a rapid steroidogenic shift promoting the final maturation of gametes. Comparison of the plasma levels of gonadotropins and steroids between wild and F1 fish during autumn and spring revealed that F1 males showed significantly lower plasma Lh titres compared to wild males, whereas the levels of T and 11-KT were similar or more elevated in the F1 fish. These data suggest that an impaired Lh secretion during spawning, and perhaps altered Lh-mediated mechanisms in the testis, may be underlying causes for the low reproductive performance of Senegalese sole F1 males. PMID:26419696

  1. Editing of the Luteinizing Hormone Gene to Sterilize Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Using a Modified Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology with Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenkui; Li, Yun; Su, Baofeng; Cheng, Qi; Ye, Zhi; Perera, Dayan A; Fobes, Michael; Shang, Mei; Dunham, Rex A

    2016-04-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the most important freshwater aquaculture species in the USA. Genetically enhanced fish that are sterile could both profit the catfish industry and reduce potential environmental and ecological risks. As the first step to generate sterile channel catfish, three sets of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) plasmids targeting the luteinizing hormone (LH) gene were designed and electroporated into one-cell embryos, different concentrations were introduced, and the Cel-I assay was conducted to detect mutations. Channel catfish carrying the mutated LH gene were sterile, as confirmed by DNA sequencing and mating experiments. The overall mutation rate was 19.7 % for 66 channel catfish, and the best treatment was ZFN set 1 at the concentration 25 μg/ml. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of gene editing of fish via plasmid introduction instead of mRNA microinjection. The introduction of the ZFN plasmids may have reduced mosaicism, as mutated individuals were gene edited in every tissue evaluated. Apparently, the plasmids were eventually degraded without integration, as they were not detectable in mutated individuals using PCR. Carp pituitary extract failed to induce spawning and restoration of fertility, indicating the need for developing other hormone therapies to achieve reversal of sterility upon demand. This is the first sterilization achieved using ZFN technology in an aquaculture species and the first successful gene editing of channel catfish. Our results will help understand the roles of the LH gene, purposeful sterilization of teleost fishes, and is a step towards control of domestic, hybrid, exotic, invasive, and transgenic fishes. PMID:26846523

  2. Hyposmolar stimulation of in vitro pituitary secretion of luteinizing hormone: a potential clue to the secretory process.

    PubMed

    Greer, M A; Greer, S E; Opsahl, Z; McCafferty, L; Maruta, S

    1983-10-01

    Diluting the perifusion medium with water caused a striking prompt increase in LH secretion from perifused, acutely dispersed adenohypophseal cells. The minimum effective proportion of water was 4%; the quantity of hormone secreted was proportional to the dilution of the medium up to greater than 50% water. Secretion was not induced if the dilution was made with 5% aqueous mannitol to maintain isotonicity. The LH secretory responses to hyposmolarity or to LHRH were qualitatively indistinguishable. We suggest that expansion of the outer cell membrane may be an important initial component of the mechanism of secretion from adenohypophyseal cells. PMID:6413197

  3. The NK3 Receptor Antagonist ESN364 Interrupts Pulsatile LH Secretion and Moderates Levels of Ovarian Hormones Throughout the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graeme L; Hoveyda, Hamid R; Clarke, Iain J; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M; Rose, Claudia; Millar, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Women's health disorders such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis are currently treated by GnRH modulators that effectively suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) is an alternative target with an important role in the modulation of this axis. In this report, we demonstrate that systemic administration of an NK3R antagonist (ESN364) prolongs the LH interpulse interval in ovarectomized ewes and significantly lowers plasma LH and FSH concentrations in castrated nonhuman primates (Macaca fascicularis). Moreover, daily oral dosing of ESN364 throughout the menstrual cycle in M fascicularis lowered plasma estradiol levels in a dose-dependent manner, although nadir levels of estradiol were maintained well above menopausal levels. Nevertheless, estradiol levels during the follicular phase were sufficiently inhibited at all doses to preclude the triggering of ovulation as evidenced by the absence of the LH surge and failure of a subsequent luteal phase rise in plasma progesterone concentrations, consistent with the absence of normal cycle changes in the uterus. Apart from the point at surge, FSH levels were not altered over the course of the menstrual cycle. These effects of ESN364 were reversible upon cessation of drug treatment. Together these data support the proposed role of neurokinin B-NK3R signaling in the control of pulsatile GnRH secretion. Furthermore, in contrast to GnRH antagonists, NK3R antagonists induce a partial suppression of estradiol and thereby offer a viable therapeutic approach to the treatment of ovarian sex hormone disorders with a mitigated risk of menopausal-like adverse events in response to long-term drug exposure. PMID:26305889

  4. A low dose euglycemic infusion of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I rapidly suppresses fasting-enhanced pulsatile growth hormone secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Clayton, P E; Johnson, M L; Celniker, A; Perlman, A J; Alberti, K G; Thorner, M O

    1993-01-01

    To determine if insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) inhibits pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion in man, recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) was infused for 6 h at 10 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 during a euglycemic clamp in 10 normal men who were fasted for 32 h to enhance GH secretion. Saline alone was infused during an otherwise identical second admission as a control. As a result of rhIGF-I infusion, total and free IGF-I concentrations increased three- and fourfold, respectively. Mean GH concentrations fell from 6.3 +/- 1.6 to 0.59 +/- 0.07 micrograms/liter after 120 min. GH secretion rates, calculated by a deconvolution algorithm, decreased with a t 1/2 of 16.6 min and remained suppressed thereafter. Suppression of GH secretion rates occurred within 60 min when total and free IGF-I concentrations were 1.6-fold and 2-fold above baseline levels, respectively, and while glucose infusion rates were < 1 mumol.kg-1.min-1. During saline infusion, GH secretion rates remained elevated. Infusion of rhIGF-I decreased the mass of GH secreted per pulse by 84% (P < 0.01) and the number of detectable GH secretory pulses by 32% (P < 0.05). Plasma insulin and glucagon decreased to nearly undetectable levels after 60 min of rhIGF-I. Serum free fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate were unaffected during the first 3 h of rhIGF-I but decreased thereafter to 52, 32, and 50% of levels observed during saline. We conclude that fasting-enhanced GH secretion is rapidly suppressed by a low-dose euglycemic infusion of rhIGF-I. This effect of rhIGF-I is likely mediated through IGF-I receptors independently of its insulin-like metabolic actions. PMID:8514857

  5. In vitro effect of. Delta. sup 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE{sub 2} suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE{sub 2} synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release.

  6. Occurrence of D-aspartic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid in rat neuroendocrine tissues and their role in the modulation of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    D'Aniello, A; Di Fiore, M M; Fisher, G H; Milone, A; Seleni, A; D'Aniello, S; Perna, A F; Ingrosso, D

    2000-04-01

    Using two specific and sensitive fluorometric/HPLC methods and a GC-MS method, alone and in combination with D-aspartate oxidase, we have demonstrated for the first time that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), in addition to D-aspartate (D-Asp), is endogenously present as a natural molecule in rat nervous system and endocrine glands. Both of these amino acids are mostly concentrated at nmol/g levels in the adenohypophysis, hypothalamus, brain, and testis. The adenohypophysis maximally showed the ability to accumulate D-Asp when the latter is exogenously administered. In vivo experiments, consisting of the i.p. injection of D-Asp, showed that D-Asp induced both growth hormone and luteinizing hormone (LH) release. However, in vitro experiments showed that D-Asp was able to induce LH release from adenohypophysis only when this gland was co-incubated with the hypothalamus. This is because D-Asp also induces the release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, which in turn is directly responsible for the D-Asp-induced LH secretion from the pituitary gland. Compared to D-Asp, NMDA elicits its hormone release action at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than D-Asp. D-AP5, a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, inhibited D-Asp and NMDA hormonal activity, demonstrating that these actions are mediated by NMDA receptors. NMDA is biosynthesized from D-Asp by an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent enzyme, which we tentatively denominated as NMDA synthase. PMID:10744627

  7. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries1

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R.; Rabideau, Amanda C.; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects. We have previously generated and characterized a mouse model (KiLHRD582G) for familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by an activating mutation in the receptor. We demonstrated that the phenotype of the KiLHRD582G male mice is an accurate phenocopy of male patients with activating LHCGR mutations. In this study, we observed that unlike women with activating LHCGR mutations who are normal, female KiLHRD582G mice are infertile. Mice exhibit irregular estrous cyclicity, anovulation, and precocious puberty. A temporal study from 2–24 wk of age indicated elevated levels of progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol and upregulation of several steroidogenic enzyme genes. Ovaries of KiLHRD582G mice exhibited significant pathology with the development of large hemorrhagic cysts as early as 3 wk of age, extensive stromal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with luteinization, numerous atretic follicles, and granulosa cell tumors. Ovulation could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous gonadotropins. The body weights of the KiLHRD582G mice were higher than wild-type counterparts, but there was no increase in the body fat composition or metabolic abnormalities such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These studies demonstrate that activating LHCGR mutations do not produce the same phenotype in female mice as in humans and clearly illustrate species differences in the expression and regulation of LHCGR in the ovary, but not in the testis. PMID:26040673

  8. Relative effectiveness of carp pituitary extract, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog LHRHa injections and LHRHa implants for producing hybrid catfish fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adoption of the hybrid catfish (channel catfish, Ictalruus punctatus, female x blue catfish, I. furcatus, male) is increasing in the catfish industry. The most effective way to produce fry is hormone induced spawning of females coupled with hand stripping and in vitro fertilization. The success of...

  9. Effects of Ghrelin on Sexual Behavior and Luteinizing Hormone Beta-subunit Gene Expression in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Babaei-Balderlou, Farrin; Khazali, Homayoun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hormones of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have facilitative effects on reproductive behavior in mammals. Ghrelin as a starvation hormone has an inhibitory effect on HPG axis’ function. Hence, it is postulated that ghrelin may reduce the sexual behavior through inhibiting of HPG axis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ghrelin and its antagonist, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6, on sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 128 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Each group was further subdivided into eight subgroups (n=8 rats/subgroup) including the animals that received saline, ghrelin (2, 4 or 8 nmol), [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) or co-administration of ghrelin (4 nmol) and [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) through the stereotaxically implanted cannula into the third cerebral ventricle. The sexual behavior of male rats encountering with females and the hypo-physeal LH beta-subunit gene expression were evaluated at two different groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) significantly (p<0.01) increased the latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation as well as the post-ejaculatory interval. Also, 4 and 8 nmol ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) increased the number of mount and decreased the number of ejaculation. In co-administrated groups, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonized the effects of ghrelin. Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) reduced the LH beta-subunit gene expression while pretreatment with [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 improved the gene expression. Conclusion: Ghrelin decreased the sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats, whereas [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonizes these effects. PMID:27141463

  10. Primary and secondary structural determinants in the receptor binding sequence. beta. -(38-57) from human luteinizing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Keutmann, H.T.; Charlesworth, M.C.; Kitzmann, K.; Mason, K.A.; Johnson, L.; Ryan, R.J.

    1988-12-13

    The intercysteine loop sequence 38-57 in the ..beta.. subunit has been shown to be a determinant for expression of biological activity in human lutropin (hLH) and choriogonadotropin (hCG). Together with other sequences, the 38-57 region may contribute to a multicomponent receptor binding domain in hLH/hCG. Because the structural features influencing activity in this important region are not easy to evaluate in the full-length subunit, the authors have used analogues of hLH..beta..-(38-57) prepared by solid-phase synthesis. The peptides were tested for inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled hCG binding to rat ovarian membrane receptors. Secondary structure was analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) and by reactivity with antibodies to the native 38-57 peptide. An analogue lacking the 38-57 disulfide linkage retained 20% receptor binding and full immunoreactivity. Far-ultraviolet CD profiles were essentially identical with those of the disulfide-intact peptide; a transition from 10% to 30% ..cap alpha..-helix in 90% trifluoroethanol was characteristic of both. The peptide thus appears not to require the disulfide bridge to retain a looped conformation with amphipathic secondary structure. An essential positive charge at position 43 was shown by complete loss of activity upon substitution of Asp or Ala for the Arg found in all known species of LH. These results indicate that the 38-57 sequence is a relatively rigid and structurally autonomous region, not merely a series of residues constrained passively into a loop by a disulfide linkage. It includes segments of ordered structure, probably including both amphipathic helical and turn sequences. Evidence from studies of other hormones suggests that this region may be important to binding and specificity in the glycoprotein hormones as a group.

  11. PPARγ co-activator-1α co-activates steroidogenic factor 1 to stimulate the synthesis of luteinizing hormone and aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liuluan; Ke, Yaojun; Shao, Di; Cui, Ying; Qiao, Aijun; Liu, Xiaojun; Fang, Fude; Chang, Yongsheng

    2010-12-15

    The orphan nuclear receptor SF-1 (steroidogenic factor 1) is highly expressed in the pituitary, gonad and adrenal glands and plays key roles at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-steroidogenic tissue axis. In the present study, we show that PGC-1α [PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) co-activator 1α] interacts with and co-activates SF-1 to induce LHβ (luteinizing hormone β) and αGSU (α-glycoprotein subunit) gene expression, subsequently leading to the increased secretion of LH in pituitary gonadotrope-derived αT3-1 cells. PGC-1α co-activation of LHβ expression requires an SF-1-binding element [GSE (gonadotrope-specific element)] mapped to the promoter region of LHβ. Mammalian two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays, as well as GST (glutathione transferase) pull-down experiments demonstrated that PGC-1α interacts with SF-1 in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, PGC-1α stimulates the expression of Cyp11b2 (aldosterone synthase gene), Cyp11b1 (steroid 11β-hydroxylase gene) and P450scc (cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme), and the synthesis of aldosterone in adrenal-cortex-derived Y-1 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that endogenous PGC-1α co-localizes with SF-1 in the LHβ and Cyp11b2 promoter region. Knockdown of endogenous SF-1 by siRNA (small interfering RNA) abolished the PGC-1α induction of LHβ and Cyp11b2 gene expression in αT3-1 and Y-1 cells respectively. Finally, we demonstrated that PGC-1α induces SF-1 gene expression in both αT3-1 and Y-1 cells. Taken together, our findings reveal the potential role of PGC-1α and suggest that it may play important roles in steroidogenesis, gonad development and sex differentiation through SF-1. PMID:21108604

  12. Dephosphorylation of juxtamembrane serines and threonines of the NPR2 guanylyl cyclase is required for rapid resumption of oocyte meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Edmund, Aaron B; Uliasz, Tracy F; Dickey, Deborah M; Yee, Siu-Pok; Potter, Lincoln R; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2016-01-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses until luteinizing hormone (LH) acts on the granulosa cells of the follicle surrounding the oocyte to restart the cell cycle. An essential event in this process is a decrease in cyclic GMP in the granulosa cells, and part of the cGMP decrease results from dephosphorylation and inactivation of the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) guanylyl cyclase, also known as guanylyl cyclase B. However, it is unknown whether NPR2 dephosphorylation is essential for LH-induced meiotic resumption. Here, we prevented NPR2 dephosphorylation by generating a mouse line in which the seven regulatory serines and threonines of NPR2 were changed to the phosphomimetic amino acid glutamate (Npr2-7E). Npr2-7E/7E follicles failed to show a decrease in enzyme activity in response to LH, and the cGMP decrease was attenuated; correspondingly, LH-induced meiotic resumption was delayed. Meiotic resumption in response to EGF receptor activation was likewise delayed, indicating that NPR2 dephosphorylation is a component of the pathway by which EGF receptor activation mediates LH signaling. We also found that most of the NPR2 protein in the follicle was present in the mural granulosa cells. These findings indicate that NPR2 dephosphorylation in the mural granulosa cells is essential for the normal progression of meiosis in response to LH and EGF receptor activation. In addition, these studies provide the first demonstration that a change in phosphorylation of a transmembrane guanylyl cyclase regulates a physiological process, a mechanism that may also control other developmental events. PMID:26522847

  13. Novel C617Y mutation in the 7th transmembrane segment of luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor in a Japanese boy with peripheral precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Keisuke; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Ogawa, Yohei; Kikuchi, Toru; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Testotoxicosis, also known as familial male-limited precocious puberty, is an autosomal dominant form of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty caused by heterozygous constitutively activating mutations of the LHCGR gene encoding the luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR). The patient is an 8-year-old boy who started to develop pubic hair and penile enlargement at 6 years of age. The patient had elevated serum testosterone levels, but initially exhibited a prepubertal response of gonadotropins to GnRH, which was followed by central activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. The father reported having experienced precocious puberty, and is 158 cm tall. There is no history of short stature and precocious puberty in the family except for the father. The LHCGR gene was analyzed by direct DNA sequencing of amplified PCR products from the patient and his parents. The wild-type and mutant LH/CGRs were transiently expressed in COS-1 cells and cAMP levels in the cells were determined with or without hCG stimulation. Genetic analysis revealed a novel C617Y mutation of the LHCGR gene in the patient and his mother, while his father had no mutations. Functional expression study demonstrated around 15% increase in the basal intracellular cAMP level in cells expressing the mutant LH/CGR compared with that in cells expressing the wild-type receptor. We have reported the first missense C617Y mutation located in the 7th transmembrane segment of LH/CGR causing testotoxicosis. The modest phenotype of our patient may be explained, at least in part, by the modest increase in the intracellular cAMP level caused by the C617Y mutation. PMID:21060208

  14. Effects of hypophysectomy and administration of pituitary hormones on luteal function and uptake of high density lipoproteins by luteinized ovaries and adrenals of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.; Rajkumar, K.; McKibbin, P.E.; Macdonald, G.J.; Buhr, M.M.; Grinwich, D.L.

    1985-04-01

    The role of plasma lipoproteins and hypophyseal hormones in the maintenance of progesterone secretion by the rat corpus luteum was investigated. In the first experiment, rats were treated daily from days 1-6 of pregnancy with 5 mg/kg 4-aminopyrozolopyramidine (4APP), a blocker of hepatic lipoprotein secretion, or with 5 mg/kg 4APP and 1 or 2 mg ovine PRL or 0.1 ml 0.5% phosphoric acid (4APP vehicle). The administration of 4APP reduced serum cholesterol and progesterone levels on days 2-6 of pregnancy and ovarian progesterone on day 6. The reduced progesterone secretion had no effect on embryo implantation. PRL, in the doses used, was incapable of abrogating the effects of 4APP on circulating or ovarian progesterone levels. Ovaries and adrenals, but not kidneys, of pseudopregnant rats exhibited specific and saturable uptake of porcine high density lipoprotein (HDL). Time-course studies indicated that the uptake of HDL was rapid in ovaries compared to that in adrenals. Ovaries from rats not only exhibited uptake of porcine HDL, but also were capable of using it for progesterone synthesis. Treatment with 4APP increased the adrenal uptake of HDL, but ovarian uptake was not different from that in the control group. Hypophysectomy reduced both adrenal and ovarian uptake of HDL. In adrenals only ACTH at the dose employed ameliorated reduction of HDL uptake induced by hypophysectomy, while in the ovaries, both PRL and LH reversed the effect of hypophysectomy. The effect of PRL on uptake was specific to (/sup 125/I)HDL and did not alter (/sup 125/I)albumin uptake. It is concluded that: 1) hypophysectomy reduces HDL uptake in the luteinized rat ovary; and 2) PRL and LH replacement therapy maintain ovarian uptake of HDL, suggesting a direct effect of these luteotropins on lipoprotein uptake.

  15. Concentrations of progesterone, a metabolite of PGF2α, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone during development of idiopathic persistent corpus luteum in mares.

    PubMed

    Ginther, O J; Baldrighi, J M; Castro, T; Wolf, C A; Santos, V G

    2016-04-01

    In experiment 1, daily blood samples were available from Days 0 to 20 (Day 0 = ovulation) in mares with an interovulatory interval (IOI, n = 5) and in mares that developed idiopathic persistent corpus luteum (PCL, n = 5). The PCL was confirmed by maintenance of progesterone (P4) concentration until end of the experiment (Day 20). Significant interactions of group and day revealed the novel findings that luteinizing hormone (LH) was lower (P < 0.05) in the PCL group than that in the IOI group on Days 0 to 4, and prolactin was lower (P < 0.05) on Days 1, 4, 6, and 7. In experiment 2, treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (n = 6) significantly reduced LH on Days 1 to 6 compared with the controls (n = 6) but did not support the hypothesis that low LH during the postovulatory period increases the frequency of PCL. In experiment 3, P4, PGFM (a PGF2α metabolite), and prolactin concentrations on Days 12 to 20 from 2 reported experiments were combined to increase the number of mares with an IOI (n = 11) or a PCL (n = 11). An abrupt and complete decrease in P4 (luteolysis) began on Day 13 in the IOI group compared with a gradual and partial P4 decline after Day 12 in the PCL group. Concentrations of PGFM and prolactin were lower (P < 0.05) in the PCL group than those in the IOI group on the day at the end of the most pronounced decrease in P4. The PCL mares were subgrouped into those with an abrupt but incomplete P4 decrease (partial luteolysis; n = 5) at the expected time and those without partial luteolysis (n = 6). There were no significant differences between the 2 subgroups in concentrations of PGFM and prolactin, but on a tentative basis (P < 0.10), the concentration of PGFM seemed more focused on the day of the most pronounced decrease in P4 in the subgroup with partial luteolysis. Results for PCL compared with IOI indicated (1) postovulatory LH and prolactin were lower, (2) treatment to reduce postovulatory LH did not increase the incidence

  16. Blunted Sleep-Related Luteinizing Hormone Rise in Healthy Premenarcheal Pubertal Girls with Elevated Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Bordini, Brian; Littlejohn, Elizabeth; Rosenfield, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to determine whether excessive adiposity is associated with alteration of the normal hormonal changes of early pubertal girls. Design and Participants: Healthy 6.4- to 9.5-yr-old, prepubertal (PRE, n = 20) and 9.4- to 13.0-yr-old pubertal premenarcheal volunteers (PUB, n = 20) were divided into excessive-weight (EW) or normal-weight (NW) groups according to the 85th percentile body mass index. Interventions and Setting: Overnight blood sampling; GnRH agonist (GnRHag), low-dose ACTH, oral glucose tolerance tests, and pelvic ultrasonograms were performed in our Clinical Research Center. Results: EW girls were similar in age and baseline and ACTH- and GnRHag-stimulated androgen levels to stage-matched NW girls. However, the sleep-related LH rise was blunted in EW-PUB girls compared with NW-PUB girls. The sleep-related rise of mean LH in EW-PUB [0.68 ± 0.35 (sem) U/liter] was insignificant, less than that of NW-PUB (2.1 ± 0.45, P < 0.05) and not significantly different from that of PRE girls (0.08±0.03). EW-PUB had slower LH pulse frequency and a lower rise in LH pulse amplitude during sleep than NW-PUB girls (both P < 0.05). Overnight FSH patterns paralleled LH patterns, whereas estradiol levels were similar in stage-matched NW and EW groups, differing between stages as expected. Early morning and peak LH, FSH, and estradiol responses to GnRHag were similar in EW-PUB and NW-PUB and significantly greater than those of PRE girls. Conclusions: Healthy EW-PUB girls have significantly blunted sleep-related LH production. These data suggest that excess adiposity, in the absence of sex steroid excess, may subtly suppress hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in premenarcheal pubertal girls. PMID:19190110

  17. Serum copper, follicular stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, spermatic count, viability, progression and seminal zinc correlations in a human (male) infertility study

    SciTech Connect

    Sella, G.E.; Cunnane, S.C.; McInnes, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The role of copper and its correlations to other parameters has been investigated in a male-fertility pilot study at a University infertility clinic in Montreal. Serum and semen Cu concentrations were determined in 100 men (age 25 to 54 years) referred to the clinic for infertility evaluation. The results of the significant correlations between serum Cu concentrations and male fertility parameters such as (1) the serum concentrations of the hormones FSH, LH and prolactin; (2) spermatozoal count, viability and progression and (3) seminal zinc concentrations are reported.

  18. Tripartite neuroendocrine activation of the human growth hormone (GH) axis in women by continuous 24-hour GH-releasing peptide infusion: pulsatile, entropic, and nyctohemeral mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shah, N; Evans, W S; Bowers, C Y; Veldhuis, J D

    1999-06-01

    Despite the discovery of potent GH-releasing peptides (GHRPs) more than 15 yr ago and the recent cloning of human, rat, and pig GHRP receptors in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, the neuroregulatory mechanisms of action of GHRP agonists on the human hypothalamo-somatotroph unit are not well delineated. To gain such clinical insights, we evaluated the ultradian (pulsatile), entropic (pattern orderliness), and nyctohemeral GH secretory responses during continuous 24-h i.v. infusion of saline vs. the most potent clinically available hexapeptide, GHRP-2 (1 microg/kg x h) in estrogen-unreplaced (mean serum estradiol, 12 +/- 2.4 pg/mL) postmenopausal women (n = 7) in a paired, randomized design. Blood was sampled every 10 min for 24 h during infusions and was assayed by ultrasensitive GH chemiluminescence assay. Pulsatile GH secretion was quantitated by deconvolution analysis, orderliness of GH release patterns by the approximate entropy statistic, and 24-h GH rhythmicity by cosinor analysis. Statistical analysis revealed that GHRP-2 elicited a 7.7-fold increase in (24-h) mean serum (+/-SEM) GH concentrations, viz. from 0.32 +/- 0.042 (saline) to 2.4 +/- 0.34 microg/L (GHRP-2; P = 0.0006). This occurred via markedly stimulated pulsatile GH release, namely a 7.1-fold augmentation of GH secretory burst mass: 0.87 +/- 0.18 (control) vs. 6.3 +/- 1.3 microg/L (GHRP-2; P = 0.0038). Enhanced GH pulse mass reflected a commensurate 10-fold (P = 0.023) rise in GH secretory burst amplitude [maximal GH secretory rate (micrograms per L/min) attained within a secretory pulse] with no prolongation in event duration. GH burst frequency, interpulse interval, and calculated GH half-life were all invariant of GHRP-2 treatment. Concurrently, as detected in the ultrasensitive GH assay, GHRP-2 augmented deconvolution-estimated interpulse (basal) GH secretion by 4.5-fold (P = 0.025). The approximate entropy of 24-h serum GH concentration profiles rose significantly during GHRP-2 infusion

  19. Stability of cytotoxic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone conjugate (AN-152) containing doxorubicin 14-O-hemiglutarate in mouse and human serum in vitro: implications for the design of preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Nagy, A; Plonowski, A; Schally, A V

    2000-01-18

    Recently, we developed a series of cytotoxic peptide conjugates containing 14-O-glutaryl esters of doxorubicin (DOX) or 2-pyrrolino-DOX (AN-201). Serum carboxylesterase enzymes (CE) can partially hydrolyze these conjugates in the circulation, releasing the cytotoxic radical, before the targeting is complete. CE activity in serum of nude mice is about 10 times higher than in human serum. Thus, we found that the t(1/2) of AN-152, an analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) containing DOX, at 0.3 mg/ml is 19. 49 +/- 0.74 min in mouse serum and 126.06 +/- 3.03 min in human serum in vitro. The addition of a CE inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), to mouse serum in vitro significantly (P < 0. 01) prolongs the t(1/2) of AN-152 to 69.63 +/- 4.44 min. When DFP is used in vivo, 400 nmol/kg cytotoxic somatostatin analog AN-238 containing AN-201 is well tolerated by mice, whereas all animals die after the same dose without DFP. In contrast, DFP has no effect on the tolerance of AN-201. A better tolerance to AN-238 after DFP treatment is due to the selective uptake of AN-238 by somatostatin receptor-positive tissues. Our results demonstrate that the suppression of the CE activity in nude mice greatly decreases the toxicity of cytotoxic hybrids containing 2-pyrrolino-DOX 14-O-hemiglutarate and brings this animal model closer to the conditions that exist in humans. The use of DFP together with these peptide conjugates in nude mice permits a better understanding of their mechanism of action and improves the clinical predictability of the oncological and toxicological results. PMID:10639165

  20. Relationships between Serum Luteinizing Hormone Level, Endometrial Thickness and Body Mass Index in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Patients with and without Endometrial Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanali, Fariba; Khalili, Gholamreza; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Bagheri Lankarani, Narges; Moini, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background The endometrial hyperplasia measured by ultrasound in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women is strongly related to pathologic endometrial thickness, but there is no consensus on the relation between serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and either of these factors: pathologic endometrial hyperplasia and body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods In this observational cross-sectional study, three hundred fifty infertile PCOS women were involved in this research. An endometrial biopsy was taken by using a pipelle instrument, regardless of menstrual cycle’s day and all samples were reported by the same pathologist. Basal serum LH level was compared between two subgroups (hyperplasia and non-hyperplasia). The intended population was divided into three groups according to BMI and basal serum LH, later on the comparison was made in three groups. Chi-square test was applied to compare nominal variables between groups. Mann-Whitney U, and one way ANOVA tests were used to compare means on the basis of the result of normality test. Results The frequency of endometrial hyperplasia was 2.6%. Endometrial thickness in the patients with endometrial hyperplasia was significantly higher than that of a normal endometrium (10.78 ± 3.70 vs. 7.90 ± 2.86 respectively, P=0.020). There was no relation between endometrial hyperplasia and serum LH (P=0.600). The ANOVA test showed serum LH levels were not the same among three BMI groups (P=0.007). Post hoc test was also performed. It showed that the LH level in normal BMI group was significantly higher than those of other groups (P=0.005 and P=0.004), but there was no statistical difference between overweight and obese groups (P=0.8). We found no relationship between BMI and endometrial thickness in PCOS patients (P=0.6). Conclusion Sonographic endometrial stripe thickness is predictive for endometrial hyperplasia in PCOS women. We could not find out any relationship between serum LH level and BMI with endometrial thickness in

  1. Utrogestan as an effective oral alternative for preventing premature luteinizing hormone surges in women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuxian; Zhang, Xiaole; Fu, Yonglun

    2015-05-01

    A major cause of cycle cancellation during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) is the occurrence of premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surges. Steroidal preparations can modulate the secretion of gonadotropins (Gn); however, few studies using progesterone to inhibit the premature LH surges in COH have been published. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the oral delivery of progesterone soft capsules (Utrogestan) to prevent LH surges from the follicular phase and to compare cycle characteristics as well as to evaluate pregnancy outcomes in subsequent frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles. A total of 374 patients were enrolled in this retrospective study, among which 187 patients were simultaneously administered Utrogestan and human menopausal gonadotrophin (hMG) from cycle day 3 until the trigger day. A short protocol including 187 controls with comparable age, body mass index (BMI), infertility duration, and antral follicle count was also used. GnRH agonist (0.1 mg) or hCG (3000 IU) was used for a trigger when the dominant follicles matured. Viable embryos were cryopreserved for later transfer in both groups. The primary outcome was the number of oocytes retrieved. The secondary outcomes included the number of mature oocytes, incidence of premature LH surge, and clinical pregnancy outcomes from FET cycles. Consistent LH suppression was achieved during COH, with a range of 0.07 to 8.9 IU/L, and no premature LH surge was detected. The number of oocytes retrieved in the Utrogestan and hMG protocol was comparable with that in the short protocol (10.92 ± 5.74 vs 10.6 ± 6.22, P > 0.05), and the dose of hMG was higher than that used in the short protocol (1884.22 ± 439.47 IU vs 1446.26 ± 550.48 IU, P < 0.05). No significant between-group difference was observed in the mature oocyte rate (88.88% vs 90.12%), cleavage rate (96.58% vs 96.58%), clinical pregnancy rate (54.27% vs

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Signaling: Integrating Cyclic Nucleotides into the Network

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Rebecca M.; McArdle, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the primary regulator of mammalian reproductive function in both males and females. It acts via G-protein coupled receptors on gonadotropes to stimulate synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropin hormones luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. These receptors couple primarily via G-proteins of the Gq/ll family, driving activation of phospholipases C and mediating GnRH effects on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. There is also good evidence that GnRH causes activation of other heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gs and Gi) with consequent effects on cyclic AMP production, as well as for effects on the soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases that generate cGMP. Here we provide an overview of these pathways. We emphasize mechanisms underpinning pulsatile hormone signaling and the possible interplay of GnRH and autocrine or paracrine regulatory mechanisms in control of cyclic nucleotide signaling. PMID:24312080

  3. Lutein and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, John W.; Smith, Joshua W.; Kuchan, Matthew J.; Mohn, Emily S.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Wang, Lin; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Neuringer, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated as macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Recently, interest in lutein has expanded beyond the retina to its possible contributions to brain development and function. Only primates accumulate lutein within the brain, but little is known about its distribution or physiological role. Our team has begun to utilize the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model to study the uptake and bio-localization of lutein in the brain. Our overall goal has been to assess the association of lutein localization with brain function. In this review, we will first cover the evolution of the non-human primate model for lutein and brain studies, discuss prior association studies of lutein with retina and brain function, and review approaches that can be used to localize brain lutein. We also describe our approach to the biosynthesis of 13C-lutein, which will allow investigation of lutein flux, localization, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Lastly, we describe potential future research opportunities. PMID:26566524

  4. Objective pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Casas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Tinnitus is the usually unwanted perception of sound, in most cases there is no genuine physical source of sound. Less than 10% of tinnitus patients suffer from pulsatile tinnitus. Objective Pulsatile tinnitus can also be the first indication of dural arteriovenous fistula, so examination for such vascular origin must be performed. PMID:26733223

  5. Circannual changes in progesterone secretion in intact ewes, luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized estradiol-implanted ewes, and prolactin secretion in three sheep breeds anticipated to differ in seasonality of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Goff, Katherine J; Knight, James W; Pelzer, Kevin D; Akers, R Michael; Notter, David R

    2013-05-01

    Changes in progesterone secretion in intact ewes (7 or 9 per breed) and luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized, estradiol-implanted ewes (9 or 10 per breed) were monitored for 12 mo in Suffolk, tropically adapted St. Croix, and OOS ewes. The OOS line is a composite population of 50% Dorset, 25% Rambouillet, and 25% Finnish Landrace breeding that was selected for 10 yr for ability to lamb in October and early November. Ewes were isolated from rams, and blood samples were collected twice weekly. Circulating prolactin concentrations were also determined from blood samples collected near the summer and winter solstice and vernal and autumnal equinox. Intact OOS ewes entered anestrus later, began the subsequent breeding season sooner, and had a shorter seasonal anestrus than Suffolk and St. Croix ewes (P ≤ 0.005). St. Croix ewes did not differ from Suffolk ewes in date of onset or cessation of breeding or duration of anestrus (P ≥ 0.06). Breed differences in duration of luteinizing hormone inhibition in ovariectomized ewes were essentially identical to those observed for duration of anestrous. Prolactin concentrations varied during the year: annual changes were larger in relatively seasonal Suffolk ewes than in tropically-derived St. Croix ewes (P<0.01), and OOS ewes were intermediate to, and tended to differ from (P<0.10), the other two breeds. We conclude that OOS ewes developed by selection for fertility in spring matings had an abbreviated seasonal anestrus that is one of the shortest ever reported for temperate breeds, and that tropical St. Croix sheep did not have a shorter seasonal anestrus than Suffolk sheep under temperate conditions and ram isolation. PMID:23528712

  6. The non-steroidal mycoestrogen zeranol suppresses luteinizing hormone secretion from the anterior pituitary of cattle via the estradiol receptor GPR30 in a rapid, non-genomic manner.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Urara; Rudolf, Faidiban O; Pandey, Kiran; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2015-05-01

    Picomolar concentrations of estradiol produce rapid suppression of GnRH-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from the anterior pituitary (AP) of cattle via G-protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). Zeranol is a strong estrogenic metabolite derived from zearalenone, a non-steroidal mycoestrogen produced by Fusarium that induces reproductive disorders in domestic animals. The hypothesis was tested that zeranol suppresses GnRH-induced LH release from the AP of cattle via GPR30 in a rapid, non-genomic manner. The AP cells (n=15) were cultured for 3 days in steroid-free conditions and then treated them with estradiol (0.001-10nM) or zeranol (0.001-100nM) for 5min before GnRH stimulation. Pre-treatment with 0.001-0.1nM estradiol suppressed GnRH-stimulated LH secretion. Pre-treatment with zeranol at concentrations of 0.001nM (P<0.01), 0.01nM (P<0.01), 0.1nM (P<0.05), and 1nM (P<0.05), but not at concentrations of 10 and 100nM, also inhibited GnRH-stimulated LH secretion from AP cells. Pre-treatment for 5min with a GPR30-specific antagonist, G36, inhibited estradiol or zeranol suppression of LH secretion from cultured AP cells. Cyclic AMP measurements and quantitative PCR analyses revealed that pre-treatment with small amounts of estradiol (P<0.05) or zeranol (P<0.01) decreased cAMP, but not gene expressions of the LHα, LHβ, or FSHβ subunits in the AP cells. Hence, zeranol may suppress luteinizing hormone secretion from the AP of cattle via GPR30 in a rapid, non-genomic manner. PMID:25824341

  7. Changes in brain mRNA levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide, and somatostatin during ovulatory luteinizing hormone and growth hormone surges in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Canosa, Luis Fabián; Stacey, Norm; Peter, Richard Ector

    2008-12-01

    In goldfish, circulating LH and growth hormone (GH) levels surge at the time of ovulation. In the present study, changes in gene expression of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), somatostatin (SS) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) were analyzed during temperature- and spawning substrate-induced ovulation in goldfish. The results demonstrated that increases in PACAP gene expression during ovulation are best correlated with the GH secretion profile. These results suggest that PACAP, instead of GnRH, is involved in the control of GH secretion during ovulation. Increases of two of the SS transcripts during ovulation are interpreted as the activation of a negative feedback mechanism triggered by high GH levels. The results showed a differential regulation of sGnRH and cGnRH-II gene expression during ovulation, suggesting that sGnRH controls LH secretion, whereas cGnRH-II correlates best with spawning behavior. This conclusion is further supported by the finding that nonovulated fish induced to perform spawning behavior by prostaglandin F2alpha treatment increased cGnRH-II expression in both forebrain and midbrain, but decreased sGnRH expression in the forebrain. PMID:18815210

  8. Luteinizing Hormone Receptor-Stimulated Progesterone Production by Preovulatory Granulosa Cells Requires Protein Kinase A-Dependent Activation/Dephosphorylation of the Actin Dynamizing Protein Cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Amelia B.; Maizels, Evelyn T.; Flynn, Maxfield P.; Jones, Jonathan C.; Shelden, Eric A.; Bamburg, James R.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the LH receptor (LHR) on preovulatory granulosa cells stimulates the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway to regulate expression of genes required for ovulation and luteinization. LHR signaling also initiates rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Because disruption of the actin cytoskeleton has been causally linked to steroidogenesis in various cell models, we sought to identify the cellular mechanisms that may modulate reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and to determine whether cytoskeletal reorganization is required for steroidogenesis. Herein we report that LHR signaling in preovulatory granulosa cells promotes rapid dephosphorylation of the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin at Ser3 that is dependent on PKA. The LHR-stimulated dephosphorylation of cofilin(Ser3) switches on cofilin activity to bind actin filaments and enhance their dynamics. Basal phosphorylation of cofilin(Ser3) is mediated by active/GTP-bound Rho and downstream protein kinases; LHR signaling promotes a decrease in active/GTP-bound Rho by a PKA-dependent mechanism. LHR-dependent Rho inactivation and subsequent activation of cofilin does not involve ERK, epidermal growth factor receptor, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways downstream of PKA. To understand the biological significance of cofilin activation, preovulatory granulosa cells were transduced with a mutant cofilin adenoviral vector in which Ser3 was mutated to Glu (S-E cofilin). Inactive S-E cofilin abolished LHR-mediated reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and caused a 70% decrease in LHR-stimulated progesterone that is obligatory for ovulation. Taken together, these results show that LHR signaling via PKA activates a cofilin-regulated rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and that active cofilin is required to initiate progesterone secretion by preovulatory granulosa cells. PMID:20610540

  9. A high response to controlled ovarian stimulation induces premature luteinization with a negative impact on pregnancy outcomes in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hwa Seon; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hye Ok; Song, In Ok; Min, Eung Gi; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum progesterone (P4) levels on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration and the pregnancy rate among women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET) using a flexible antagonist protocol. Methods This prospective study included 200 IVF and ICSI-ET cycles in which a flexible antagonist protocol was used. The patients were divided into five distinct groups according to their serum P4 levels at the time of hCG administration (0.80, 0.85, 0.90, 0.95, and 1.00 ng/mL). The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was calculated for each P4 interval. Statistically significant differences were observed at a serum P4 level of 0.9 ng/mL. These data suggest that a serum P4 concentration of 0.9 ng/mL may represent the optimal threshold level for defining premature luteinization (PL) based on the presence of a significant negative impact on the CPR. Results The CPR for each round of ET was significantly lower in the PL group defined using this threshold (25.8% vs. 41.8%; p=0.019), and the number of oocytes retrieved was significantly higher than in the non-PL group (17.3±7.2 vs. 11.0±7.2; p=0.001). Elevated serum P4 levels on the day of hCG administration were associated with a reduced CPR, despite the retrieval of many oocytes. Conclusion Measuring serum P4 values at the time of hCG administration is necessary in order to determine the optimal strategy for embryo transfer. PMID:26816874

  10. MicroRNA miR-513a-3p acts as a co-regulator of luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor gene expression in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Troppmann, B; Kossack, N; Nordhoff, V; Schüring, A N; Gromoll, J

    2014-06-01

    The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) is essential for normal male and female reproductive processes. The spatial and temporal LHCGR gene expression is controlled by a complex system of regulatory mechanisms which are crucial for normal physiological function, especially during the female cycle. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether microRNAs are involved in this network and play a role in regulating LHCGR expression. Computational analysis predicted that miR-513a-3p interacts with the LHCGR mRNA via three binding sites located in the 3'UTR region, enabling a synergistic action. Moreover, using a luciferase-based reporter assay we found that miR-513a-3p targets the LHCGR, resulting in a significant down-regulation of its expression. In human primary granulosa cell cultures we detected a dynamic, inversely associated expression pattern of miR-513a-3p and the LHCGR. In addition, transfection with miR-513a-3p or its specific inhibitor led to a down- or up-regulation at the LHCGR mRNA level, respectively. An increased amount of miR-513a-3p resulted in the down-regulation of the LHCGR mRNA, reflected by the attenuation of cAMP synthesis after hormonal stimulation. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that miR-513a-3p is involved in the control of the LHCGR expression by an inversely regulated mechanism at the post-transcriptional level and show for the first time that this kind of post-transcriptional process contributes to the multifaceted system of the human LHCGR regulation. PMID:24747085

  11. Stability of lutein in wholegrain bakery products naturally high in lutein or fortified with free lutein.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Young, J Christopher; Akhtar, Humayoun; Rabalski, Iwona

    2010-09-22

    Lutein is a yellow pigment found in common foods that promotes the health of eyes and skin and is associated with reduced risk of age-related macular degeneration and cataracts. In the present study, selected high-lutein wheat and corn were milled into wholegrain flours by two mills to improve flour uniformity. The high-lutein and lutein-fortified wholegrain flours were processed into breads, cookies, and muffins to study lutein stability during baking and subsequent storage. Lutein and its isomers were separated, identified, and quantified by LC-UV/vis and LC-MS following extraction with water-saturated 1-butanol. Baking resulted in a significant reduction in all-trans-lutein and the formation of cis-lutein and cis-zeaxanthin isomers. Subsequent storage at ambient temperature had a slight impact on the content of all-trans-lutein. Effects of processing were more pronounced in lutein-fortified products, and the degradation rate of lutein was influenced by concentration and baking recipe. Fortified cookies and muffins showed greater lutein reduction compared with bread. Despite the significant reduction in lutein, the fortified bakery products still possessed reasonable amounts per serving that would enhance daily intake and consumption of wholegrain foods. PMID:20734986

  12. Lutein and brain function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated in macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Rece...

  13. Relationships Between the Appearances and Changes of Estrous Signs and the Estradiol-17β Peak, Luteinizing Hormone Surge and Ovulation During the Periovulatory Period in Lactating Dairy Cows Kept in Tie-stalls

    PubMed Central

    SUMIYOSHI, Toshiaki; TANAKA, Tomomi; KAMOMAE, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Lactating Holstein-Friesian cows kept in tie-stall barn were used as subjects in this study. Rectal examination, ultrasonography and blood sampling were conducted every other day and then daily after the day on which diameter of the corpus luteum decreased. After the luteal diameter decreased for 2 consecutive days, rectal and ultrasound examinations, blood sampling, and observation of estrous signs were conducted at 6-h intervals. Most of the estrous signs became obvious with the increase in estradiol-17β (E2) and became most remarkable 24 to 30 hours before ovulation, at which point the E2 peak and luteinizing hormone (LH) surge were achieved, and then weakened which progression to ovulation. The correlation between the intensity of four estrous signs (hyperemia and swelling of the intravaginal part of the uterus, opening of the external uterine orifice and viscosity of the cervical mucus) and the plasma E2 concentration was higher than that of three estrous signs (swelling of the vulva, contraction of the uterus, diameter of uterine horn) and the plasma E2 concentration. The relaxation of the intravaginal part of the uterus showed a unique change compared with the other estrous signs, and it became most obvious 6, 12 and 18 h before ovulation; this obviously relaxed period was consistent with the generally accepted theoretical optimal time for artificial insemination (AI), i.e., 6 to 24 h after initiation of estrus. These results suggest that observation of estrous signs by vaginoscopic examination gave useful information for detection of the optimal timing of AI in the periovulatory period in lactating dairy cows kept in a tie-stall barn. PMID:24492642

  14. Luteinizing Hormone Causes Phosphorylation and Activation of the cGMP Phosphodiesterase PDE5 in Rat Ovarian Follicles, Contributing, Together with PDE1 Activity, to the Resumption of Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Jeremy R; Uliasz, Tracy F; Shuhaibar, Leia C; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Kleiman, Robin J; Humphrey, John M; Lampe, Paul D; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rybalkin, Sergei D; Beavo, Joseph A; Movsesian, Matthew A; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2016-05-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes in preovulatory follicles is held in prophase arrest by diffusion of cGMP from the surrounding granulosa cells into the oocyte. Luteinizing hormone (LH) then releases meiotic arrest by lowering cGMP in the granulosa cells. The LH-induced reduction of cGMP is caused in part by a decrease in guanylyl cyclase activity, but the observation that the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5 is phosphorylated during LH signaling suggests that an increase in PDE5 activity could also contribute. To investigate this idea, we measured cGMP-hydrolytic activity in rat ovarian follicles. Basal activity was due primarily to PDE1A and PDE5, and LH increased PDE5 activity. The increase in PDE5 activity was accompanied by phosphorylation of PDE5 at serine 92, a protein kinase A/G consensus site. Both the phosphorylation and the increase in activity were promoted by elevating cAMP and opposed by inhibiting protein kinase A, supporting the hypothesis that LH activates PDE5 by stimulating its phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Inhibition of PDE5 activity partially suppressed LH-induced meiotic resumption as indicated by nuclear envelope breakdown, but inhibition of both PDE5 and PDE1 activities was needed to completely inhibit this response. These results show that activities of both PDE5 and PDE1 contribute to the LH-induced resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes, and that phosphorylation and activation of PDE5 is a regulatory mechanism. PMID:27009040

  15. Circadian Clock genes Per2 and clock regulate steroid production, cell proliferation, and luteinizing hormone receptor transcription in ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Takashi; Hirai, Yuko; Murayama, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Akio; Miyazaki, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Koyomi

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression. {yields}Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom. {yields} Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. {yields}Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. {yields} The expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. -- Abstract: Circadian Clock genes are associated with the estrous cycle in female animals. Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression in follicle-stimulating hormone FSH-treated granulosa cells. Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom, whereas Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. Similarly, expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. Our data provide a new insight that Per2 and Clock have different action on ovarian granulosa cell functions.

  16. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  17. Ovarian hemangioma associated with concomitant stromal luteinization and ascites.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, T; Hirai, Y; Takeshima, N; Hasumi, K

    1996-06-01

    A 62-year-old female presented with a pelvic mass and ascites. The Papanicolaou vaginal smear showed an unusual maturation, maturation index being 0/80/20. The serum level of estradiol was 48.7 pg/ml. The preoperative checkup suggested a pelvic malignancy with a differential diagnosis of hormone-secreting ovarian tumor. On surgical exploration, she had a hemangioma of the ovary without malignant cytology in the ascitic fluid. Histologically, this tumor was associated with stromal luteinization. This is the first case, reported in the literature, possessing ovarian hemangioma with stromal luteinization accompanying massive ascites. It should be noted that an ovarian hemangioma can be associated with stromal luteinization and ascites, and that MR imaging is sometimes of value for making a preoperative diagnosis of ovarian hemangioma. PMID:8641629

  18. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein ...

  19. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  20. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonists , which are sometimes called LHRH analogs, are synthetic proteins that are structurally similar to LHRH and ... gland to stop producing luteinizing hormone, which prevents testosterone from being produced. Treatment with an LHRH agonist ...

  1. Induction of follicular luteinization by equine chorionic gonadotropin in cyclic guinea pigs*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-rong; Wang, Wei; Shi, Fang-xiong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) on follicular development and ovulation in cyclic guinea pigs were investigated by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Three groups of guinea pigs (n=12) were administrated subcutaneously with saline, 20 or 50 IU of eCG, respectively, on cyclic Day 12 (Day 1=vaginal openings). Ovaries were collected at 4 and 8 d after administration (6 animals per group each time). The eCG administration induced significant and distinct morphological changes in the ovaries, as it promoted the luteinization of granulosa cells, but not follicular development. In addition, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) were immunolocalized specifically in luteinized follicles. Our experiments together indicate that eCG administration can induce follicular luteinization but not superovulation in guinea pigs. The eCG in cyclic guinea pigs functions similar to that of luteinizing hormone (LH), but not follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). PMID:26642181

  2. Effects of acute feed restriction combined with targeted use of increasing luteinizing hormone content of follicle-stimulating hormone preparations on ovarian superstimulation, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bender, R W; Hackbart, K S; Dresch, A R; Carvalho, P D; Vieira, L M; Crump, P M; Guenther, J N; Fricke, P M; Shaver, R D; Combs, D K; Wiltbank, M C

    2014-02-01

    Multiple metabolic and hormonal factors can affect the success of protocols for ovarian superstimulation. In this study, the effect of acute feed restriction and increased LH content in the superstimulatory FSH preparation on numbers of ovulations, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows was evaluated. Two experiments were performed using a Latin square design with treatments arranged as a 2 × 2 factorial: feed restriction (FR; 25% reduction in dry matter intake) compared with ad libitum (AL) feeding, combined with high (H) versus low (L) LH in the last 4 injections of the superstimulatory protocol. As expected, FR decreased circulating insulin concentrations (26.7 vs. 46.0 μU/mL). Two analyses were performed: one that evaluated the complete Latin square in experiment 2 and a second that evaluated only the first periods of experiments 1 and 2. For both analyses, follicle numbers, ovulation rates, and corpora lutea on d 7 were not different. In the first period analysis of experiments 1 and 2, we observed an interaction between feed allowance and amount of LH on fertilization rates, percentage of embryos or oocytes that were quality 1 and 2 embryos, and number of embryos or oocytes that were degenerate. Fertilization rates were greater for the AL-L (89.4%) and FR-H (80.1%) treatments compared with the AL-H (47.9%) and FR-L (59.9%) treatments. Similarly, the proportion of total embryos or oocytes designated as quality 1 and 2 embryos was greater for AL-L (76.7%) and FR-H (73.4%) treatments compared with AL-H (35.6%) and FR-L (47.3%) treatments. In addition, the number of degenerate embryos was decreased for AL-L (1.3) and FR-H (0.4) treatments compared with the AL-H (2.6) and FR-L (2.3) treatments. Thus, cows with either too low (FR-L) or too high (AL-H) insulin and LH stimulation had lesser embryo production after superstimulation because of reduced fertilization rate and increased percentage of degenerate embryos. Therefore, interaction of the

  3. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  4. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein.

    PubMed

    Kamil, Alison; Smith, Donald E; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Astete, Carlos; Sabliov, Cristina; Oliver Chen, C-Y

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein uptake and secretion was also assessed in Caco-2 cells. Compared to free lutein, PLGA-NP increased the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the time-concentration curve in rats by 54.5- and 77.6-fold, respectively, while promoting tissue accumulation in the mesenteric fat and spleen. In comparison with micellized lutein, PLGA-NP lutein improved the Cmax in rat plasma by 15.6-fold and in selected tissues by ⩾ 3.8-fold. In contrast, PLGA-NP lutein had a lower uptake and secretion of lutein in Caco-2 cells by 10.0- and 50.5-fold, respectively, compared to micellized lutein. In conclusion, delivery of lutein with polymeric NP may be an approach to improve the bioavailability of lutein in vivo. PMID:26304429

  5. Characterization of milk proteins-lutein complexes and the impact on lutein chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Fan, Yuting; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Liqing

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the interaction of WPI (whey protein isolate) and SC (sodium caseinate) with hydrophobic lutein was investigated through UV-vis spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) as well as fluorescence. The effects on lutein's chemical stability were also examined. The decrease of turbidity of lutein suggested that lutein's aqueous solubility was improved after binding with milk proteins. CD analysis indicated lutein had little impact on the secondary structures of both proteins. Different preparation methods have significant impacts on the binding constant. Fluorescence results indicated that WPI and SC interact with lutein by hydrophobic contacts. Milk proteins have protective effects on lutein against oxidation and decomposition, and SC showed better capability in protecting lutein from oxidation than WPI during 16 days storage. The lutein's chemical stability was increased with increasing of proteins concentration. The results indicated that milk proteins may act as effective carriers for lipophilic nutraceuticals. PMID:26830565

  6. Low reversibility of intracellular cAMP accumulation in mouse Leydig tumor cells (MLTC-1) stimulated by human Luteinizing Hormone (hLH) and Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG).

    PubMed

    Klett, Danièle; Meslin, Philippine; Relav, Lauriane; Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Mariot, Julie; Jégot, Gwenhaël; Cahoreau, Claire; Combarnous, Yves

    2016-10-15

    In order to study the intracellular cAMP response kinetics of Leydig cells to hormones with LH activity, we used MLTC-1 cells transiently expressing a chimeric cAMP-responsive luciferase so that real-time variations of intracellular cAMP concentration could be followed using oxiluciferin luminescence produced from catalyzed luciferin oxidation. The potencies of the different LHs and CGs were evaluated using areas under the curves (AUC) of their kinetics over 60 min stimulation. All mammalian LHs and CGs tested were found to stimulate cAMP accumulation in these cells. The reversibility of this stimulation was studied by removing the hormone from the culture medium after 10 min of incubation. The ratios of kinetics AUC after removing or not the hormone were used to evaluate the stimulation reversibility of each hormone. Natural and recombinant hLHs and hCGs were found to exhibit slowly reversible activation compared to pituitary rat, ovine, porcine, camel and equine LHs, serum-derived eCG (PMSG) and recombinant eLH/CGs. Carbohydrate side chains are not involved in this phenomenon since natural and recombinant homologous hormones exhibit the same reversibility rates. It is still unknown whether only one human subunit, α or β, is responsible for this behaviour or whether it is due to a particular feature of the hLH and hCG quaternary structure. PMID:27373440

  7. Hormonal changes in humans during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F

    1999-01-01

    Readers of this review may feel that there is much more that we do not know about space endocrinology than what we know. Several reasons for this state of affairs have been given: 1. the complexity of the field of endocrinology with its still increasing number of known hormones, releasing factors and precursors, and of the interactions between them through various feedback mechanisms 2. the difficulty in separating the microgravity effects from the effects of stress from launch, isolation and confinement during flight, reentry, and postflight re-adaptation 3. the experimental limitations during flight, such as limited number of subjects, limited number of samples, impossibility of collecting triple samples for pulsatile hormones like growth hormone 4. the disturbing effects of countermeasures used by astronauts 5. the inadequacy of postflight samples for conclusions about inflight values 6. limitations of conclusions from animal experiments and space simulation studies The endocrinology field is divided in to nine systems or axes, which are successively reviewed: 1. Rapid bone demineralization in the early phase of spaceflight that, when unopposed, leads to catastrophic effects after three months but that slows down later. The endocrine mechanism, apart from the effect of exercise as a countermeasure, is not yet understood. 2. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is involved in stress reactions, which complicate our understanding and makes postflight analysis dubious. 3. In the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, pulsatility poses a problem for obtaining representative values (e.g., for luteinizing hormone). Reproduction of rats in space is possible, but much more needs to be known about this aspect, particularly in women, before the advent of space colonies, but also in males because some evidence for reversible testicular dysfunction in space has been found. 4. The hypothalamic-pituitary-somato-mammotrophic axis involves prolactin and growth hormone. The

  8. Environmental Effects on Lutein Concent and Relationship of Lutein and Other Seed Components in Soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein is a major carotenoid in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. ] seed, and has been shown to be beneficial for eye health in humans. Development of soybeans high in lutein is a goal of some breeding programs. Little is known about how different growing environments affect lutein concentration. Obje...

  9. The Tissue Distribution of Lutein in Laying Hens Fed Lutein Fortified Chlorella and Production of Chicken Eggs Enriched with Lutein.

    PubMed

    An, Byoung-Ki; Jeon, Jin-Young; Kang, Chang-Won; Kim, Jin-Man; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the dietary effects of conventional or lutein fortified chlorella on lutein absorptions, the tissue distributions and the changes in lutein content of eggs in laying hens. In Exp 1, a total of one hundred and fifty, 70 wk-old Hy-Line brown layers were divided into three groups with five replicates and fed with each experiment diet (control diet, diet with 1% conventional chlorella or lutein fortified chlorella) for 2 wk, respectively. The egg production in groups fed diets containing both chlorella powders were higher than that of the control group (p<0.01). With chlorella supplementations, the yolk color significantly increased, although there were no significant differences in the eggshell qualities. The lutein contents of serum, liver and growing oocytes were greatly increased by feeding conventional or lutein fortified chlorella (p<0.01). In Exp. 2, a total of ninety 60 wk-old Hy-Line brown layers were assigned into three groups with three replicates per group (10 birds per replicate). The birds were fed with one of three experimental diets (0, 0.1 or 0.2% lutein fortified chlorella) for 2 wk, respectively. The egg production was not affected by dietary treatments. The egg weight in the group fed with diet containing 0.2% of lutein fortified chlorella was higher than that of the control (p<0.05). As the dietary chlorella levels increased, the daily egg mass linearly increased, although not significantly. The yolk colors in groups fed diets containing lutein fortified chlorella were dramatically increased as compared to the control (p<0.001). The lutein in chicken eggs significantly increased when fed with 0.2% of lutein fortified chlorella (p<0.01). These results suggested that the dietary lutein derived from chlorella was readily absorbed into the serum and absorbed by the liver with growing oocyte for commercial laying hens. Particularly, the lutein fortified chlorella was a valuable natural source for the

  10. Absorption and ocular deposition of dietary lutein in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Koutsos, Elizabeth A; Schmitt, Todd; Colitz, Carmen M H; Mazzaro, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Cataracts and ocular disease are common lesions of marine mammals in zoological collections. Lutein, an oxygenated carotenoid, may have therapeutic or prophylactic effects on ocular disorder. Therefore, this study examined the ability of marine mammals to absorb dietary lutein. Two preliminary trials examined lutein in two forms (beadlet or ester) in a small sample size of marine mammals representing pinnipeds and cetaceans. Lutein was fed daily in tablets providing 0.89-3.6 mg lutein/kg body weight(0.75) per day for 15 days to 2 years. A third study was conducted using lutein beadlet fed at 3.6 mg lutein/kg body weight(0.75) per day for 15-21 days. Blood was analyzed for lutein pre- and postsupplementation. In the preliminary trials, lutein beadlet was observed to result in greater blood lutein levels than lutein esters, and cetaceans had more noticeable responses than pinnipeds. In Study 3, serum lutein and zeaxanthin increased postsupplementation in beluga whales (P < 0.05), and serum lutein tended to increase postsupplementation in dolphins (P < 0.10), but little change was seen in serum lutein in pinnipeds or manatee. Opportunistic retinal samples demonstrated some detectable lutein in the retina of a dolphin and several harp seals. The lutein levels in dolphins after supplementation are similar to those reported in free-ranging animals. Ocular lutein in harp seals demonstrates that ocular deposition occurs despite low circulating lutein levels. PMID:22753123

  11. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  12. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  13. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  14. Pulsatile driving of the helical flow pump.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kohei; Hosoda, Kyohei; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ariyoshi, Koki; Inoue, Yusuke; Sato, Masami; Hara, Sintaro; Lee, Xinyang; Wu, Sheng-Yuan; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Imachi, Kou; Abe, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) is newly developed blood pomp for total artificial heart (TAH). HFP can work with lower rotational speed than axial and centrifugal blood pump. It can be seen reasonable feature to generate pulsatile flow because high response performance can be realized. In this article, pulsatility of HFP was evaluated using mock circulation loop. Pulsatile flow was generated by modulating the rotational speed in various amplitude and heart rate. In the experiment, relationship between Pump flow, pump head, rotational speed amplitude, heart rate and power consumption is evaluated. As the result, complete pulsatile flow with mean flow rate of 5 L/min and mean pressure head of 100 mmHg can be obtained at ± 500 rpm with mean rotational speed of 1378 to 1398 rpm in hart rate from 60 to 120. Flow profiles which are non-pulsatile, quasi-pulsatile or complete flow can be adjusted arbitrarily. Therefore, HFP has excellent pulsatility and control flexibility of flow profile. PMID:24110290

  15. MULTIPLE STABLE PERIODIC SOLUTIONS IN A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The pituitary hormones, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and the ovarian hormones, estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and inhibin (Ih), are five hormones important for the regulation and maintenance of the human menstrual cycle. The...

  16. Study on the effect of steady, simple pulsatile and physiological pulsatile flows through a stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, P.; Mandal, D. K.; Manna, N. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, the comparison of steady, simple pulsatile flow and physiological pulsatile flow on flow reversal zone and hemodynamic wall parameters [wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI)] for the progression of the disease, atherosclerosis has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved by finite volume method. For the numerical analysis, Womersley number, Reynolds number and percentage of restriction are taken as 10, 100 and 50 % respectively. From this study it is revealed that the separated flow from the stenosis strongly depends on inlet flow situations, the maximum chance of deposition of plaque material due to streamline contour is higher at time step t* = 0.75 for simple pulsatile flow and at time step t* = 0 for physiological pulsatile flow and this chance is lower in case of steady flow. The effect of WSS on the disease is higher in physiological pulsatile flow compared to steady as well as simple pulsatile flow. The maximum possibility of initiation as well as progression for atherosclerosis in arterial wall due to high WSS takes place at t* = 0.25 for physiological pulsatile flow. OSI indicates same length of separation for two cases of transient flow, but the rate of cyclic departure of WSS is higher in case of physiological pulsatile flow.

  17. Plasma steroid hormone concentrations and blood flow of the ovarian structures of the female dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) during growth, dominance, spontaneous ovulation, luteinization and regression of the follicular wave.

    PubMed

    Rawy, M S; Derar, R I; El-Sherry, T M; Megahed, G A

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the ovarian follicular waves and their corresponding hormonal changes in she-camels and to elucidate blood perfusion of the ovarian structures. Three reproductively sound, non-pregnant female camels were examined daily using B-mode and color Doppler to detect changes in their ovarian structures and blood vasculature for 22 follicular waves. Blood area (BA) and percentage (BA%) were determined for the ovarian structures. Three phases of follicular development, those of growth, maturation, and regression, were observed during each follicular wave. Deviation occurred on Day 6.1±1.08. Estradiol increased from basal levels of 27.4±0.4pg/ml to peak concentrations of 134.4±47.5pg/ml as the follicle reached a diameter of 13.2mm. Peripheral progesterone concentrations remained low (<0.4ng/ml) throughout the follicular waves. The blood flow to the dominant follicles increased gradually with follicular growth. The BA and BA% reached the maximum values of 18.4±11.6mm(2) and 6.04±2.03%, respectively, when the diameter of the dominant follicle was 17.5±3.4mm. The blood flow to the corpus luteum rose markedly after ovulation to reach a maximum BA% and BA at Days 5 and 7, respectively, post ovulation. In conclusion, the follicular wave pattern in dromedaries consists of individually variable periods of growth, maturation and regression. Deviation occurs 6.1±1.08d from emergence. Transrectal color-Doppler sonography is a useful technique for noninvasive evaluation of follicular vascularity in camels during various stages of the follicular wave. It provides additional information to assess the developmental stage and activity of the ovarian structures. PMID:24957969

  18. Functional lutein cyst in a postmenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Stevens, M L; Plotka, E D

    1977-07-01

    A postmenopausal woman presented with enlarged breasts, increased vaginal mucus, and elevated serum estrogen and normal progesterone levels. A laparotomy was performed and revealed a cystic right ovary. Histologic examination of the ovary demonstrated a cyst lined by stratified lutein cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. The endometrium showed cystic and adenomatous hyperplasia. The diagnosis was functional lutein cyst. Removal of the cystic ovary reduced the estrogen levels, and the clinical picture reverted to that of a normal postmenopausal state. PMID:876536

  19. Lutein and cataract: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Manayi, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Raman, Thiagarajan; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Cataract is one of the most important leading causes of blindness in the world. Extensive research showed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the initiation and progression of a cataract and other age-related eye diseases. Extra-generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the eye tissue has been shown as one of the most important risk factors for cataracts and other age-related eye diseases. With respect to this, it can be hypothesized that dietary antioxidants may be useful in the prevention and/or mitigation of cataract. Lutein is an important xanthophyll which is widely found in different vegetables such as spinach, kale and carrots as well as some other foods such as eggs. Lutein is concentrated in the macula and suppresses the oxidative stress in the eye tissues. A plethora of literature has shown that increased lutein consumption has a close correlation with reduction in the incidence of cataract. Despite this general information, there is a negligible number of review articles considering the beneficial effects of lutein on cataracts and age-related eye diseases. The present review is aimed at discussing the role of oxidative stress in the initiation and progression of a cataract and the possible beneficial effects of lutein in maintaining retinal health and fighting cataract. We also provide a perspective on the chemistry, sources, bioavailability and safety of lutein. PMID:26042352

  20. Lutein bioavailability from lutein ester-fortified fermented milk: in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Herrero-Barbudo, Carmer; Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña; Blanco-Navarro, Inmaculada; Pérez-Sacristán, Belén

    2010-02-01

    We assessed the bioavailability of lutein from lutein-fortified fermented milk using in vivo and in vitro approaches. Twenty-four volunteers were randomized to take lutein-fortified fermented milk at two levels of fortification. Single-dose bioavailability study (2x100 ml, ca. 8 or 16 mg of lutein) was performed using a three-point approach (baseline, 3.5 and 6.5 h). Multiple-dose study consisted of consuming one serving/day (ca. 4 or 8 mg/100 ml) for 14 days. Blood samples for biochemical, hematological and lutein analysis were drawn at baseline, Day 7 and Day 14. In vitro bioaccessibility was assessed by a static gastrointestinal digestion model. Lutein content, in vitro ester hydrolysis and micellarization, and lutein concentrations achieved in serum were analyzed by HPLC. In vivo, post-prandial response was higher using the high content fermented milk, but the percentage of absorption was not different according to the dose consumed. Net increments at Day 7 and Day 14 were significantly higher on consuming the high-dose milk as well. In vitro, lutein ester hydrolysis was incomplete regardless of the amount initially present. Free lutein released was higher using the high-dose fermented milk, but the percentage of hydrolysis was similar at both levels of fortification. In the micellar phase, the percentage of free and total lutein was not different according to the dose. Our results support the suitability of the fermented milk as a carrier of lutein esters and an in vivo dose-dependent effect upon regular consumption and suggest the usefulness of in vitro models to provide relevant information to predict in vivo responses. PMID:19201183

  1. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Pasricha, Natasha; Smeets, Johanna A S; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate-i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  2. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Johanna A. S.; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate—i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  3. Pulsatile hyperglucagonemia fails to increase hepatic glucose production in normal man

    SciTech Connect

    Paolisso, G.; Scheen, A.J.; Luyckx, A.S.; Lefebvre, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    To study the metabolic effects of pulsatile glucagon administration, six male volunteers were submitted to a 260-min glucose-controlled glucose intravenous infusion using the Biostator. The endogenous secretion of the pancreatic hormones was inhibited by somatostatin, basal insulin secretion was replaced by a continuous insulin infusion, and glucagon was infused intravenously in two conditions at random: either continuously or intermittently. Blood glucose levels and glucose infusion rate were monitored continuously by the Biostator, and classical methodology using a D-(3-/sup 3/H)glucose infusion allowed the authors to study glucose turnover. While basal plasma glucagon levels were similar in both conditions, they plateaued at 189 +/- 38 pg ml/sup -1/ during continuous infusion and varied between 95 and 501 pg x ml/sup -1/ during pulsatile infusion. When compared with continuous administration, pulsatile glucagon infusion 1) initially induced a similar increase in endogenous (hepatic) glucose production and blood glucose, 2) did not prevent the so-called evanescent effect of glucagon on blood glucose, and 3) after 3 h tended to reduce rather than increase hepatic glucose production. In conclusion, in vivo pulsatile hyperglucanemia in normal man fails to increase hepatic glucose production.

  4. Macular lutein and zeaxanthin are related to brain lutein and zeaxanthin in primates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The xanthophyll pigments lutein and zeaxanthin cross the blood-retina barrier to preferentially accumulate in the macular region of the neural retina. There they form macular pigment, protecting the retina from blue light damage and oxidative stress. Lutein and zeaxanthin also accumulate in brain t...

  5. DynPeak: An Algorithm for Pulse Detection and Frequency Analysis in Hormonal Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Alexandre; Zhang, Qinghua; Médigue, Claire; Fabre, Stéphane; Clément, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    The endocrine control of the reproductive function is often studied from the analysis of luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatile secretion by the pituitary gland. Whereas measurements in the cavernous sinus cumulate anatomical and technical difficulties, LH levels can be easily assessed from jugular blood. However, plasma levels result from a convolution process due to clearance effects when LH enters the general circulation. Simultaneous measurements comparing LH levels in the cavernous sinus and jugular blood have revealed clear differences in the pulse shape, the amplitude and the baseline. Besides, experimental sampling occurs at a relatively low frequency (typically every 10 min) with respect to LH highest frequency release (one pulse per hour) and the resulting LH measurements are noised by both experimental and assay errors. As a result, the pattern of plasma LH may be not so clearly pulsatile. Yet, reliable information on the InterPulse Intervals (IPI) is a prerequisite to study precisely the steroid feedback exerted on the pituitary level. Hence, there is a real need for robust IPI detection algorithms. In this article, we present an algorithm for the monitoring of LH pulse frequency, basing ourselves both on the available endocrinological knowledge on LH pulse (shape and duration with respect to the frequency regime) and synthetic LH data generated by a simple model. We make use of synthetic data to make clear some basic notions underlying our algorithmic choices. We focus on explaining how the process of sampling affects drastically the original pattern of secretion, and especially the amplitude of the detectable pulses. We then describe the algorithm in details and perform it on different sets of both synthetic and experimental LH time series. We further comment on how to diagnose possible outliers from the series of IPIs which is the main output of the algorithm. PMID:22802933

  6. Film coatings for oral pulsatile release.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Alessandra; Zema, Lucia; Loreti, Giulia; Palugan, Luca; Gazzaniga, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Pulsatile delivery is generally intended as a release of the active ingredient that is delayed for a programmable period of time to meet particular chronotherapeutic needs and, in the case of oral administration, also target distal intestinal regions, such as the colon. Most oral pulsatile delivery platforms consist in coated formulations wherein the applied polymer serves as the release-controlling agent. When exposed to aqueous media, the coating initially performs as a protective barrier and, subsequently, undergoes a timely failure based on diverse mechanisms depending on its physico-chemical and formulation characteristics. Indeed, it may be ruptured because of the gradual expansion of the core, swell and/or erode due to the glassy-rubbery polymer transition or become permeable thus allowing the drug molecules to diffuse outwards. Otherwise, when the coating is a semipermeable membrane provided with one or more orifices, the drug is released through the latter as a result of an osmotic water influx. The vast majority of pulsatile delivery systems described so far have been prepared by spray-coating, which offers important versatility and feasibility advantages over other techniques such as press- and dip-coating. In the present article, the design, manufacturing and performance of spray-coated pulsatile delivery platforms is thus reviewed. PMID:23506956

  7. Pulsatility of Hypothalamo-Pituitary Hormones: A Challenge in Quantification.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Daniel M; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine systems control many of the most fundamental physiological processes, e.g., reproduction, growth, adaptations to stress, and metabolism. Each such system involves the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and a specific target gland or organ. In the quantification of the interactions among these components, biostatistical modeling has played an important role. In the present article, five key challenges to an understanding of the interactions of these systems are illustrated and discussed critically. PMID:26674550

  8. Nanoscaffold matrices for size-controlled, pulsatile transdermal testosterone delivery: nanosize effects on the time dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ritu; Tondwal, Shailesh; Venkatesh, K. S.; Misra, Amit

    2008-10-01

    Pulsatile transdermal testosterone (T) has applications in hormone supplementation and male contraception. Pulsatile T delivery was achieved by assembling crystalline and nanoparticulate T in nucleation-inhibiting polymer matrices of controlled porosity. Different interference patterns observed from various polymeric films containing T were due to the various particle sizes of T present in the polymer matrices. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the size and shape of T crystals. Skin-adherent films containing T nanoparticles of any size between 10-500 nm could be prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable vinylic polymers. Drug release and skin permeation profiles were studied. The dissolution-diffusion behavior of nanoparticles differed from crystalline and molecular states. Nanosize may thus be used to engineer chronopharmacologically relevant drug delivery.

  9. Homeostasis, thymic hormones and aging.

    PubMed

    Goya, R G; Bolognani, F

    1999-01-01

    The thymic-pituitary axis constitutes a bidirectional circuit where the ascending feedback loop is effected by thymic factors of epithelial origin. The aim of the present article is, first, to introduce the idea of an immune-neuroendocrine homeostatic network in higher animals. Next, the relevance of the thymus in this network and the possible role of this gland in the neuroendocrine imbalances associated with aging are discussed. A number of studies are next reviewed which show that the endocrine thymus produces several bioactive molecules, generally called thymic hormones, which in addition to possessing immunoregulatory properties are also active on nervous and endocrine circuits. In particular, the reported activities of thymosin fraction five, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 on beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, glucocorticoids, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion in different animal and cell models are reviewed. The known hypophysiotropic actions of other thymic hormones like thymulin, homeostatic thymus hormone and thymus factor are also summarized, and the impact of aging on pituitary responsiveness to thymic hormones is discussed. As a conclusion, it is proposed that in addition to its central role in the regulation of the immune function, the thymus gland may extend its influence to nonimmunologic components of the body, including the neuroendocrine system. The early onset of thymus involution might, therefore, act as a triggering event which would initiate the gradual decline in homeostatic potential that characterizes the aging process. PMID:10202264

  10. The Impact of Polymeric Nanoencapsulation on the Bioavailability of Lutein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil, Alison

    Lutein, a fat-soluble xanthophyll, contributes partially to the health benefits from consuming plant foods. Like all dietary carotenoids, lutein has a low bioavailability. In addition to increasing the intake of lutein-rich foods to enhance lutein status, delivery of lutein in polymeric nanoparticles (NP) presents a novel approach to enhancing lutein bioavailability. The overall research objective of this project was to investigate, in rats, the impact of nanoencapsulation using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) on the pharmacokinetics of lutein. We also used an in vitro cell culture approach utilizing human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells grown in both conventional (CONV) and permeable support (PS) systems to investigate the impact of PLGA-NP on the absorption of lutein in intestinal cells. In chapter one, we compared the efficacy of lutein absorption in vitro using Caco-2 cells grown in both CONV and PS systems. We further examined the role of the micelle, the physiological vehicle for lutein within the small intestine, on its intestinal absorption in vitro compared to an organic solvent, ethanol, which is safe and consumed by humans. The finding from this study demonstrated that the CONV system displayed a larger efficacy of lutein uptake by Caco-2 cells. Further, in the PS system, micelle components appeared to facilitate more effective intestinal secretion of lutein. These findings suggest that lutein uptake by Caco-2 cells is subject to the influence of culturing system (CONV vs. PS) and delivery vehicle (ethanol vs. micelle). Chapter two examined the impact of PLGA-NP in rats on lutein pharmacokinetics in plasma and distribution in selected tissues as compared to free lutein. We also investigated the effect of nanoencapsulation on the absorption of lutein in intestinal cells compared to a more physiological vehicle, the micelle, using the PS method. In addition, we explored the need of additional micelles for the ultimate absorption of

  11. Electronic spectra of structurally deformed lutein.

    PubMed

    Macernis, Mindaugas; Sulskus, Juozas; Duffy, Christopher D P; Ruban, Alexander V; Valkunas, Leonas

    2012-10-11

    Quantum chemical calculations have been employed for the investigation of the lowest excited electronic states of lutein, with particular reference to its function within light harvesting antenna complexes of higher plants. Through comparative analysis obtained by using different methods based on gas-phase calculations of the spectra, it was determined that variations in the lengths of the long C-C valence bonds and the dihedral angles of the polyene chain are the dominant factors in determining the spectral properties of Lut 1 and Lut 2 corresponding to the deformed lutein molecules taken from crystallographic data of the major pigment-protein complex of photosystem II. By MNDO-CAS-CI method, it was determined that the two singlet B(u) states of lutein (nominally 1B(u)(-)* and 1B(u)(+)) arise as a result of mixing of the canonical 1B(u)(-) and 1B(u)(+) states of the all-trans polyene due to the presence of the ending rings in lutein. The 1B(u)(-)* state of lutein is optically allowed, while the 1B(u)(-) of a pure all-trans polyene chain is optically forbidden. As demonstrated, the B(u) states are much more sensitive to minor distortions of the conjugated chain due to mixing of the canonical states, resulting in states of poorly defined particle-hole symmetry. Conversely, the A(g) states are relatively robust with respect to geometric distortion, and their respective inversion and particle-hole symmetries remain relatively well-defined. PMID:22974387

  12. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity. PMID:26277658

  13. Recent technologies in pulsatile drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Raturi, Richa; Jain, Vikas; Bansal, Praveen; Singh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery systems (PDDS) have attracted attraction because of their multiple benefits over conventional dosage forms. They deliver the drug at the right time, at the right site of action and in the right amount, which provides more benefit than conventional dosages and increased patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body, and the drug is released rapidly and completely as a pulse after a lag time. These products follow the sigmoid release profile characterized by a time period. These systems are beneficial for drugs with chronopharmacological behavior, where nocturnal dosing is required, and for drugs that show the first-pass effect. This review covers methods and marketed technologies that have been developed to achieve pulsatile delivery. Marketed technologies, such as PulsincapTM, Diffucaps®, CODAS®, OROS® and PULSYSTM, follow the above mechanism to render a sigmoidal drug release profile. Diseases wherein PDDS are promising include asthma, peptic ulcers, cardiovascular ailments, arthritis and attention deficit syndrome in children and hypercholesterolemia. Pulsatile drug delivery systems have the potential to bring new developments in the therapy of many diseases. PMID:23507727

  14. Breeding success and lutein availability in great tit ( Parus major)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, Saila; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Eeva, Tapio

    2009-11-01

    The relationship among temporal variation in the availability of carotenoid-rich food, tissue carotenoid levels and breeding success are poorly known. We studied how diet quality and quantity affect the carotenoid profile and fledging success of great tit ( Parus major) nestlings along a pollution gradient. We found declining seasonal trend in lutein concentration of caterpillars, which may be the explanation for the declining trend in nestlings' lutein concentration of plasma with season, despite the increase in caterpillar biomass. This may be because the biomass of most lutein-rich caterpillars (autumnal moths) decreased and less lutein-rich caterpillars (sawflies) increased during the breeding season. The temporal difference in occurrence of different caterpillar species means that peak lutein availability does not coincide with peak caterpillar abundance. However the positive association between total larval biomass and the number of great tit fledglings may suggest that fledging success depends more on total caterpillar availability than on lutein concentration of caterpillars.

  15. Pulsatile flow past an oscillating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Adnan; Seda, Robinson; Bull, Joseph L.

    2011-04-01

    A fundamental study to characterize the flow around an oscillating cylinder in a pulsatile flow environment is investigated. This work is motivated by a new proposed design of the total artificial lung (TAL), which is envisioned to provide better gas exchange. The Navier-Stokes computations in a moving frame of reference were performed to compute the dynamic flow field surrounding the cylinder. Cylinder oscillations and pulsatile free-stream velocity were represented by two sinusoidal waves with amplitudes A and B and frequencies ωc and ω, respectively. The Keulegan-Carpenter number (Kc=Uo/Dωc) was used to describe the frequency of the oscillating cylinder while the pulsatile free-stream velocity was fixed by imposing ω /Kc=1 for all cases investigated. The parameters of interest and their values were amplitude (0.5D

  16. hCG-dependent regulation of angiogenic factors in human granulosa lutein cells.

    PubMed

    Phan, B; Rakenius, A; Pietrowski, D; Bettendorf, H; Keck, C; Herr, D

    2006-07-01

    As prerequisite for development and maintenance of many diseases angiogenesis is of particular interest in medicine. Pathologic angiogenesis takes place in chronic arthritis, collagen diseases, arteriosclerosis, retinopathy associated with diabetes, and particularly in cancers. However, angiogenesis as a physiological process regularly occurs in the ovary. After ovulation the corpus luteum is formed by rapid vascularization of initially avascular granulosa lutein cell tissue. This process is regulated by gonadotropic hormones. In order to gain further insights in the regulatory mechanisms of angiogenesis in the ovary, we investigated these mechanisms in cell culture of human granulosa lutein cells. In particular, we determined the expression and production of several angiogenic factors including tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), Leptin, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), meningioma-associated complimentary DNA (Mac25), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and Midkine. In addition, we showed that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has distinct effects on their expression and production. hCG enhances the expression and production of TIMP-1, whereas it downregulates the expression of CTGF and Mac25. Furthermore it decreases the expression of Leptin. Our results provide evidence that hCG determines growth and development of the corpus luteum by mediating angiogenic pathways in human granulosa lutein cells. Hence we describe a further approach to understand the regulation of angiogenesis in the ovary. PMID:16596638

  17. Fractality of pulsatile flow in speckle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M.; Kenjeres, S.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2016-05-01

    The scattering of coherent light from a system with underlying flow can be used to yield essential information about dynamics of the process. In the case of pulsatile flow, there is a rapid change in the properties of the speckle images. This can be studied using the standard laser speckle contrast and also the fractality of images. In this paper, we report the results of experiments performed to study pulsatile flow with speckle images, under different experimental configurations to verify the robustness of the techniques for applications. In order to study flow under various levels of complexity, the measurements were done for three in-vitro phantoms and two in-vivo situations. The pumping mechanisms were varied ranging from mechanical pumps to the human heart for the in vivo case. The speckle images were analyzed using the techniques of fractal dimension and speckle contrast analysis. The results of these techniques for the various experimental scenarios were compared. The fractal dimension is a more sensitive measure to capture the complexity of the signal though it was observed that it is also extremely sensitive to the properties of the scattering medium and cannot recover the signal for thicker diffusers in comparison to speckle contrast.

  18. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-03-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  19. Somatosensory Pulsatile Tinnitus Syndrome: Somatic Testing Identifies a Pulsatile Tinnitus Subtype That Implicates the Somatosensory System

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert Aaron; Nam, Eui-Cheol; Melcher, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A new tinnitus syndrome is described: high-pitched, cardiac-synchronous tinnitus, whose pulsations are suppressed by strong contractions or compressions of the neck and jaw muscles (somatic testing). 14 cases, 6 non-lateralized and 8 unilateral, are reported. In the non-lateralized cases, onset was bilateral. In the one intermittent case, while her tinnitus was absent her pulsatile tinnitus could be induced by somatic testing. No etiology was found from physical examination, imaging, or ancillary testing. Because these cases of pulsatile tinnitus can be both induced and suppressed by activation of the somatosensory system of the head or upper lateral neck, we propose that this syndrome is occurring from (a) cardiac synchronous somatosensory activation of the central auditory pathway or (b) failure of the somatosensory-auditory central nervous system interactions to suppress cardiac somatosounds. PMID:18632767

  20. A Novel Rotary Pulsatile Flow Pump for Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Teman, Nicholas R.; Mazur, Daniel E.; Toomasian, John; Jahangir, Emilia; Alghanem, Fares; Goudie, Marcus; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Haft, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that pulsatile blood flow is superior to continuous flow in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, adoption of pulsatile flow (PF) technology has been limited due to practically and complexity of creating a consistent physiologic pulse. A pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) was designed to address this problem. We evaluated the PRVP in an animal model, and determined its ability to generate PF during CPB. The PRVP (modified peristaltic pump, with tapering of the outlet of the pump chamber) was tested in 4 piglets (10-12kg). Cannulation was performed with right atrial and aortic cannulae, and pressure sensors were inserted into the femoral arteries. Pressure curves were obtained at different levels of flow and compared with both the animal's baseline physiologic function and a continuous flow (CF) roller pump. Pressure and flow waveforms demonstrated significant pulsatility in the PRVP setup compared to CF at all tested conditions. Measurement of hemodynamic energy data, including the percent pulsatile energy and the surplus hydraulic energy, also revealed a significant increase in pulsatility with the PRVP (p <0.001). PRVP creates physiologically significant PF, similar to the pulsatility of a native heart, and has the potential to be easily implemented in pediatric CPB. PMID:24625536

  1. Novel Lutein Loaded Lipid Nanoparticles on Porcine Corneal Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsien; Chiu, Hao-Che; Wu, Wei-Chi; Sahoo, Soubhagya Laxmi; Hsu, Ching-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Topical delivery has the advantages including being user friendly and cost effective. Development of topical delivery carriers for lutein is becoming an important issue for the ocular drug delivery. Quantification of the partition coefficient of drug in the ocular tissue is the first step for the evaluation of delivery efficacy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of lipid nanoparticles and cyclodextrin (CD) on the corneal lutein accumulation and to measure the partition coefficients in the porcine cornea. Lipid nanoparticles combined with 2% HPβCD could enhance lutein accumulation up to 209.2 ± 18 (μg/g) which is 4.9-fold higher than that of the nanoparticles. CD combined nanoparticles have 68% of drug loading efficiency and lower cytotoxicity in the bovine cornea cells. From the confocal images, this improvement is due to the increased partitioning of lutein to the corneal epithelium by CD in the lipid nanoparticles. The novel lipid nanoparticles could not only improve the stability and entrapment efficacy of lutein but also enhance the lutein accumulation and partition in the cornea. Additionally the corneal accumulation of lutein was further enhanced by increasing the lutein payload in the vehicles. PMID:25101172

  2. Is Lutein a Physiologically Important Ligand for Transthyretin in Humans?

    SciTech Connect

    Liwei Chen

    2003-05-31

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are the only carotenoids accumulated in the macula of the human retina and are known as the macular pigments (MP). These pigments account for the yellow color of the macula and appear to play an important role in protecting against age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The uptake of lutein and zeaxanthin in human eyes is remarkably specific. It is likely that specific transport or binding proteins are involved. The objective is to determine whether transthyretin (TTR) is a transport protein in human plasma and could thus deliver lutein from the blood to the retina. In this study, they used a biosynthetic {sup 13}C-lutein tracer and gas chromatography-combustion interfaced-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) to gain the requisite sensitivity to detect the minute amounts of lutein expected as a physiological ligand for human transthyretin. The biosynthetic {sup 13}C-labeled lutein tracer was purified from algae. Healthy women (n = 4) each ingested 1 mg of {sup 13}C-labeled lutein daily for 3 days and a blood sample was collected 24 hours after the final dose. Plasma TTR was isolated by retinol-binding protein (RBP)-sepharose affinity chromatography and extracted with chloroform. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio in the TTR extract was measured by GCC-IRMS. There was no {sup 13}C-lutein enrichment in the pure TTR extract. This result indicated that lutein is not associated with TTR in human plasma after ingestion in physiological amounts. Some hydrophobic compounds with yellow color may bind to human TTR in the plasma. However, this association needs to be further proved by showing specificity. The study provides a new approach for carotenoid-binding protein studies using a stable isotope tracer method combined with the high precision of GCC-IRMS. The mechanism of selective transport, uptake, and accumulation of lutein in human macula remain to be determined.

  3. Changes in Macular Pigment Optical Density and Serum Lutein Concentration in Japanese Subjects Taking Two Different Lutein Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and serum concentration changes of lutein in Japanese subjects participating in a clinical trial in which two formulations of lutein and zeaxanthin supplements with different physiochemical properties are used. Methods Thirty-six healthy volunteers were recruited into this prospective, randomized, parallel-group, double-masked comparative study at a single institute. Two products were used, FloraGLO® (Kemin Japan) and XanMax® (Katra Phytochem). The lutein particle size and zeaxanthin concentrations differed between the formulations. The subjects consumed one of the two supplements for a duration of up to 6 months. MPOD levels were measured by resonance Raman spectrometry at baseline and once a month until the end of the study. Serum lutein concentration was measured at baseline, month 3, and month 6. The subjects were also tested for contrast sensitivity, glare sensitivity, visual acuity, and in addition had a focal electroretinogram measured. Results The mean serum lutein concentrations increased significantly after the first three months, but the mean MPOD levels in either supplement group did not show any statistically significant increase. A detailed analysis, however, revealed three response patterns in both groups for the increase of MPOD levels and serum lutein concentration, i.e. “retinal responders”, who had an increase of both MPOD levels and serum lutein concentrations (n = 13), “retinal non-responders”, who had only increased serum concentrations and no change in MPOD levels (n = 20), and “retinal and serum non-responders”, who had neither MPOD level nor plasma concentration increases (n = 3). The subjects with low MPOD levels at baseline appeared to show increased MPOD levels at the 6 month time point upon lutein supplementation (r = -0.4090, p = 0.0133). Glare sensitivity improved in retinal responders in both supplement groups, while there were no remarkable changes in

  4. Possible degradation/biotransformation of lutein in vitro and in vivo: isolation and structural elucidation of lutein metabolites by HPLC and LC-MS (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization).

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayana, Rangaswamy; Aruna, Gorusupudi; Sangeetha, Ravi Kumar; Bhaskar, Narayan; Divakar, Sounder; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2008-10-01

    Metabolites of lutein are highly concentrated in the human macula and are known to provide protection against age-related macular degeneration. The aim of this investigation was to characterize the in vitro oxidation products of lutein obtained through photo-oxidation and to compare them with biologically transformed dietary lutein in intestine, plasma, liver, and eyes of rats. In vivo studies involved feeding rats a diet devoid of lutein for 2 weeks to induce deficiency. Rats were divided into two equal groups (n=6/group) and received either micellar lutein by gavage for 10 days or diet supplemented with fenugreek leaves as a lutein source for 4 weeks. Lutein metabolites/oxidation products obtained from in vivo and in vitro studies were characterized by HPLC and LC-MS (APCI) techniques to elucidate their structure. The characteristic fragmented ions resulting from photo-oxidation of lutein were identified as 523 (M(+)+H(+)-3CH(3)), 476 (M(+)+H(+)-6CH(3)), and 551 (M(+)+H(+)-H(2)O). In the eyes, the fragmented molecules resulting from lutein were 13-Z lutein, 13'-Z lutein, 13-Z zeaxanthin, all-E zeaxanthin, 9-Z lutein, 9'-Z lutein, and 3'-oxolutein. Epoxycarotenoids were identified in liver and plasma, whereas anhydrolutein was identified in intestine. This study emphasizes the essentiality of dietary lutein to maintain its status in the retina. PMID:18640265

  5. Hormones in Synergy: Regulation of the Pituitary Gonadotropin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Coss, Djurdjica

    2009-01-01

    The precise interplay of hormonal influences that governs gonadotropin hormone production by the pituitary includes endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activin and steroids. However, most studies of hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary gonadotrope have been limited to analyses of the isolated actions of individual hormones. LHβ and FSHβ subunits have distinct patterns of expression during the menstrual/estrous cycle as a result of the integration of activin, GnRH, and steroid hormone action. In this review, we focus on studies that delineate the interplay among these hormones in the regulation of LHβ and FSHβ gene expression in gonadotrope cells and discuss how signaling cross-talk contributes to differential expression. We also discuss how recent technological advances will help identify additional factors involved in the differential hormonal regulation of LH and FSH. PMID:19747958

  6. Occipital artery anastomosis to vertebral artery causing pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew David; English, Joey; Hetts, Steven W

    2014-03-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus can result from various vascular etiologies that cause transmission of pulsatile turbulent flow into the inner ear. Less commonly, non-vascular sources cause increased blood flow and transmission of sound perceived as tinnitus. Thorough clinical examination leads to appropriate imaging evaluation and therapeutic planning. Most pulsatile tinnitus results from expected mechanisms, such as dural arteriovenous fistula, jugular bulb dehiscence, or paraganglioma; however, the literature contains reports of numerous rare causes, particularly variant anatomic morphologies. We present the case of a novel cause of pulsatile tinnitus in which collateral vascular flow compensated for decreased normal intracranial cerebral arterial supply and might have caused catastrophic consequences if intervened upon after assumptions based on an incomplete evaluation. PMID:23493341

  7. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice... May 28, 1976. Any other cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator shall have an approved PMA...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice... May 28, 1976. Any other cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator shall have an approved PMA...

  9. Changes in LH pulsatility profiles in dairy heifers during exposure to oestrous urine and vaginal mucus.

    PubMed

    Nordéus, K; Båge, R; Gustafsson, H; Söderquist, L

    2012-12-01

    Difficulty in observing oestrus is a problem for many dairy farmers performing AI. Finding ways to synchronize oestrous cycles or strengthen display of oestrus without hormonal treatments would be of great interest because many consumers object to the use of exogenous hormones on healthy animals. Modification of reproductive cycles through chemical communication has been reported in several species including cattle. LH is an important regulator of the follicular phase and could possibly be subject to pheromonal influence. This study focuses on the effect of volatile compounds from oestrous substances on LH pulsatility preceding the preovulatory LH surge in cattle. Four heifers of the Swedish Red breed were kept individually in isolation. Exposure to water during the control cycle (CC), and bovine oestrous urine and vaginal mucus during the treated cycle (TC), started simultaneously with induction of oestrus. Blood sampling at 15-min intervals started 37 h after administration of PGF(2α) and continued for 8 h. Monitoring of reproductive hormones, visual oestrus detection and ultrasonographic examination of the ovaries continued until ovulation had occurred. The mean concentration of LH at pulse nadir was significantly higher during TC (2.04 ± 0.18 ng/ml) than during CC (1.79 ± 0.16 ng/ml), and peak amplitude was significantly higher during CC (Δ1.03 ± 0.09) than during TC (Δ0.87 ± 0.09). No other parameters differed significantly between the two cycles. We conclude that the difference in LH pulsatility pattern may be an effect of exposing heifers to oestrous vaginal mucus and/or urine and that the mechanism behind this needs further investigation. PMID:22390462

  10. Changes in LH Pulsatility Profiles in Dairy Heifers During Exposure to Oestrous Urine and Vaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Nordéus, K; Båge, R; Gustafsson, H; Söderquist, L

    2012-01-01

    Contents Difficulty in observing oestrus is a problem for many dairy farmers performing AI. Finding ways to synchronize oestrous cycles or strengthen display of oestrus without hormonal treatments would be of great interest because many consumers object to the use of exogenous hormones on healthy animals. Modification of reproductive cycles through chemical communication has been reported in several species including cattle. LH is an important regulator of the follicular phase and could possibly be subject to pheromonal influence. This study focuses on the effect of volatile compounds from oestrous substances on LH pulsatility preceding the preovulatory LH surge in cattle. Four heifers of the Swedish Red breed were kept individually in isolation. Exposure to water during the control cycle (CC), and bovine oestrous urine and vaginal mucus during the treated cycle (TC), started simultaneously with induction of oestrus. Blood sampling at 15-min intervals started 37 h after administration of PGF2α and continued for 8 h. Monitoring of reproductive hormones, visual oestrus detection and ultrasonographic examination of the ovaries continued until ovulation had occurred. The mean concentration of LH at pulse nadir was significantly higher during TC (2.04 ± 0.18 ng/ml) than during CC (1.79 ± 0.16 ng/ml), and peak amplitude was significantly higher during CC (Δ1.03 ± 0.09) than during TC (Δ0.87 ± 0.09). No other parameters differed significantly between the two cycles. We conclude that the difference in LH pulsatility pattern may be an effect of exposing heifers to oestrous vaginal mucus and/or urine and that the mechanism behind this needs further investigation. PMID:22390462

  11. Mathematical modeling of fluid dynamics in pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Pennati, Giancarlo; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Laganà, Katia; Fumero, Roberto

    2004-02-01

    The design criteria of an extracorporeal circuit suitable for pulsatile flow are quite different and more entangled than for steady flow. The time and costs of the design process could be reduced if mutual influences between the pulsatile pump and other extracorporeal devices were considered without experimental trial-and-error activities. With this in mind, we have developed a new lumped-parameter mathematical model of the hydraulic behavior of the arterial side of an extracorporeal circuit under pulsatile flow conditions. Generally, components feature a resistant-inertant-compliant behavior and the most relevant nonlinearities are accounted for. Parameter values were derived either by experimental tests or by analytical analysis. The pulsatile pump is modeled as a pure pulsatile flow generator. Model predictions were compared with flow rate and pressure tracings measured during hydraulic tests on two different circuits at various flow rates and pulse frequencies. The normalized root mean square error did not exceed 24% and the model accurately describes the changes that occur in the basic features of the pressure and flow wave propagating from the pulsatile pump to the arterial cannula. PMID:14961960

  12. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  13. Pulsatile roller pump perfusion is safe in high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Kocakulak, M; Küçükaksu, S; Pişkin, E

    2004-05-01

    In this study, controllability, safety, blood cell depletion, and hemolysis of a pulsatile roller pump in high-risk patients was evaluated. Sarns 8000 roller pump (Sams, Terumo CVS, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) with a pulsatile control module was used as arterial pump in a clinical setting. Forty patients undergoing elective open heart surgery with high-risk either having chronically obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic renal failure were randomly included in the study to be operated on using pulsatile perfusion or non-pulsatile perfusion. Blood samples were withdrawn at induction of anesthesia, at the time of aortic clamping and de-clamping and at 1 hour and 24 hours following cessation of the bypass. Hematocrit and plasma free hemoglobin values were measured. We observed that the pulsatile roller pump perfusion and the extracorporeal circuit used in the clinical study is safe in high-risk patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. We did not face any emboli, hemolysis, or technical problems. Pulsatile roller pump perfusion with Sarns 8000 heart-lung machine is a simple and reliable technique and can be easily applied during open heart surgery. PMID:15202823

  14. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  15. Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kazuki; Tabata, Yuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues has been examined in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by characterizing pulsatile intensities with different regions of interest (ROIs). The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point in pediatric diagnosis of brain tissue, was detected from a heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in a movie fragment. The averages of pulsatile intensity and power were evaluated in two ROIs: common fan-shape and individual cranial-shape. The area of pulsatile region was also evaluated as the number of pixels where the pulsatile intensity exceeds a proper threshold. The extracranial pulsatile region was found mainly in the sections where mirror image was dominant echo artifact. There was significant difference of pulsatile area between two ROIs especially in the specific sections where mirror image was included, suggesting the suitability of cranial-shape ROI for statistical study on pulsatile tissues in brain. The normalized average of pulsatile power in the cranial-shape ROI exhibited most similar tendency to the normalized pulsatile area which was treated as a conventional measure in spite of its requirement of thresholding. It suggests the potential of pulsatile power as an alternative measure for pulsatile area in further statistical study of pulsatile tissues because it was neither affected by echo artifacts nor threshold.

  16. Lutein and lutein esters in whole grain flours made from 75 genotypes of 5 triticum species grown at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jochen U; Wahl, Sabine; Würschum, Tobias; Longin, C Friedrich H; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2015-05-27

    Concentrations of lutein and lutein esters were determined in an ample collection of 75 wheat genotypes comprising bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), durum (Triticum durum Desf.), spelt (Triticum spelta L.), emmer (Triticum dicoccum Schrank), and einkorn (Triticum monococcum L.) grown in five different environments. Einkorn genotypes showed the highest total amounts of lutein (4.5-7.8 μg/g dry matter), followed by durum (2.0-4.6 μg/g), spelt (0.9-2.0 μg/g), emmer (0.8-1.9 μg/g), and bread wheat (0.7-2.0 μg/g). Due to the observed highly significant genetic variance and high heritability, lutein contents of wheat genotypes may be increased by future plant breeding. Detailed HPLC-DAD-APCI(±)-MS(n) data allowing the identification of six lutein monoesters and nine diesters are presented. Linoleic, palmitic, and oleic acids were the most abundant fatty acids in both the lutein esters and total free lipid fractions. Lutein esters were virtually absent in the tetraploid durum and emmer species, whereas their concentrations considerably differed among the genotypes belonging to the other species. PMID:25946219

  17. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone fusion protein vaccines block estrous cycle activity in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J D; Sosa, J M; deAvila, D M; Oatley, J M; Bertrand, K P; Gaskins, C T; Reeves, J J

    2005-01-01

    Two LHRH fusion proteins, thioredoxin and ovalbumin, each containing seven LHRH inserts were tested for their ability to inhibit estrous cycle activity. The objective was to evaluate immune and biological responses from alternating the two fusion proteins in an immunization schedule. One hundred ten heifers were divided equally into 11 groups. Two control groups consisted of either spayed or intact, untreated heifers. Heifers in the other nine groups were immunized on wk 0, 4, and 9. Treatments were immunizations of the same protein throughout or alternating the proteins in different booster sequences. Blood was collected weekly for 22 wk, and serum was assayed for concentrations of progesterone and titers of anti-LHRH. At slaughter, reproductive tracts were removed from each heifer and weighed. Heifers with >or=1 ng/mL of progesterone were considered to have a functional corpus luteum and thus to have estrous cycle activity. All LHRH-immunized groups of heifers had a smaller (P < 0.05) proportion of heifers showing estrous cycle activity after 6 wk than the intact, untreated control group. There was no difference in number of heifers cycling between the immunized groups and the spayed heifers during wk 9 to 22. Anti-LHRH did not differ among immunized groups during wk 1 to 9. Starting at wk 10 and continuing through the conclusion of the study, there was an overall difference among treatment groups for anti-LHRH (P < 0.05). Uterine weights differed among treatments (P < 0.05), with intact control animals having heavier uteri than all other groups (P < 0.05). Uterine weights were negatively correlated with maximum LHRH antibody binding (r = -0.44). In summary, the LHRH fusion proteins were as effective as surgical spaying in suppression of estrous cycle activity, but alternating the two proteins in an immunization schedule did not enhance the immunological or biological effectiveness of the vaccine. PMID:15583055

  18. Luteinizing hormone-releasing immunization alters pituitary hormone synthesis and storage in bulls and steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this study were (1) to determine if trenbolone acetate (TBA) co-administered with LHRH immunization would suppress reproductive function in beef bulls and (2) to examine the effects of LHRH immunization and TBA treatment on pituitary function. To address these objectives 44 Angus x He...

  19. Evaluating microcirculation by pulsatile laser Doppler signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, P. T.; Jan, M. Y.; Hsiu, H.; Hsu, T. L.; Wang, W. K.; Wang, Y. Y. Lin

    2006-02-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a popular method for monitoring the microcirculation, but it does not provide absolute measurements. Instead, the mean flux response or energy distribution in the frequency domain is generally compared before and after stimulus. Using the heartbeat as a trigger, we investigated whether the relation between pressure and flux can be used to discriminate different microcirculatory conditions. We propose the following three pulsatile indices for evaluating the microcirculation condition from the normalized pressure and flux segment with a synchronized-averaging method: peak delay time (PDT), pressure rise time and flux rise time (FRT). The abdominal aortic blood pressure and renal cortex flux (RCF) signals were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). The mean value of the RCF did not differ between SHR and WKY. However, the PDT was longer in SHR (87.14 ± 5.54 ms, mean ± SD) than in WKY (76.92 ± 2.62 ms; p < 0.001). The FRT was also longer in SHR (66.56 ± 1.98 ms) than in WKY (58.02 ± 1.77 ms; p < 0.001). We propose that a new dimension for comparing the LDF signals, which the results from the present study show, can be used to discriminate RCF signals that cannot be discriminated using traditional methods.

  20. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  1. Collapse in High-Grade Stenosis during Pulsatile Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shunichi; Tang, Dalin; Ku, David N.

    It has been hypothesized that blood flow through high grade stenotic arteries may produce conditions in which elastic flow choking may occur. The development of atherosclerotic plaque fracture may be exacerbated by the compressive stresses during collapse. This study explored the effects of pulsatile flow on stenotic flow collapse. Pulsatile flow was produced using a gear pump controlled by a digitized physiologic waveform. Upstream and downstream mean pressures and pulsatile flow rates were measured and digitized. An improved model of arterial stenosis was created using an elastomer with an incremental modulus of elasticity matched to a bovine carotid artery in the relevant range of collapse. Additionally, the model retained a very thick wall in the stenotic region similar to arterial disease. Flow choking was observed for pulsatile pressure drops close to those previously reported for steady flow. The phase difference between flow rate and pressure between upstream and downstream of the stenosis occurred by the compliance of tube and stenosis resistance. For 80% nominal stenosis by diameter and 100+/-30mmHg upstream pressure, collapse occurred for average pulsatile pressure drops of 93mmHg. Pulsatile flow experiments in this model revealed the range of conditions for the flow choking and the paradoxical collapse of the stenosis during systole with expansion during diastole. The stenosis severity was dynamic through the pulse cycle and was significantly greater under flow than the nominal severity. The results indicate that flow choking and stenotic compression may be significant in thick-walled arterial stenoses subjected to pulsatile flow.

  2. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  3. EFFECTS OF METAL CATIONS ON PITUITARY HORMONE SECRETION IN VITRO (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was to determine, in vitro, the effects of nickel, cadmium, and zinc (50 microM) on both baseline and potassium chloride (KCl)-stimulated pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (Prl), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) release. Baseline and stim...

  4. Nutritional and clinical relevance of lutein in human health.

    PubMed

    Granado, F; Olmedilla, B; Blanco, I

    2003-09-01

    Lutein is one of the most widely found carotenoids distributed in fruits and vegetables frequently consumed. Its presence in human tissues is entirely of dietary origin. Distribution of lutein among tissues is similar to other carotenoids but, along with zeaxanthin, they are found selectively at the centre of the retina, being usually referred to as macular pigments. Lutein has no provitamin A activity in man but it displays biological activities that have attracted great attention in relation to human health. Epidemiological studies have shown inconsistent associations between high intake or serum levels of lutein and lower risk for developing cardiovascular disease, several types of cancer, cataracts and age-related maculopathy. Also, lutein supplementation has provided both null and positive results on different biomarkers of oxidative stress although it is effective in increasing macular pigment concentration and in improving visual function in some, but not all, subjects with different eye pathologies. Overall, data suggest that whereas serum levels of lutein have, at present, no predictive, diagnostic or prognostic value in clinical practice, its determination may be very helpful in assessing compliance and efficacy of intervention as well as potential toxicity. In addition, available evidence suggests that a serum lutein concentration between 0.6 and 1.05 micromol/l seems to be a safe, dietary achievable and desirable target potentially associated with beneficial impact on visual function and, possibly, on the development of other chronic diseases. The use of lutein as a biomarker of exposure in clinical practice may provide some rationale for assessing its relationship with human health as well as its potential use within the context of evidence-based medicine. PMID:14513828

  5. Human Ovarian Cancer Stroma Contains Luteinized Theca Cells Harboring Tumor Suppressor Gene GT198 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Zhang, Hao; Jaafar, Lahcen; Risinger, John I.; Huang, Shuang; Mivechi, Nahid F.; Ko, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal gynecological cancer, and its causes remain to be understood. Using a recently identified tumor suppressor gene, GT198 (PSMC3IP), as a unique marker, we searched for the identity of GT198 mutant cells in ovarian cancer. GT198 has germ line mutations in familial and early onset breast and ovarian cancers and recurrent somatic mutations in sporadic fallopian tube cancers. GT198 protein has been shown as a steroid hormone receptor coregulator and also as a crucial factor in DNA repair. In this study, using GT198 as a marker for microdissection, we find that ovarian tumor stromal cells harboring GT198 mutations are present in various types of ovarian cancer including high and low grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and granulosa cell carcinomas and in precursor lesions such as inclusion cysts. The mutant stromal cells consist of a luteinized theca cell lineage at various differentiation stages including CD133+, CD44+, and CD34+ cells, although the vast majority of them are differentiated overexpressing steroidogenic enzyme CYP17, a theca cell-specific marker. In addition, wild type GT198 suppresses whereas mutant GT198 protein stimulates CYP17 expression. The chromatin-bound GT198 on the human CYP17 promoter is decreased by overexpressing mutant GT198 protein, implicating the loss of wild type suppression in mutant cells. Together, our results suggest that GT198 mutant luteinized theca cells overexpressing CYP17 are common in ovarian cancer stroma. Because first hit cancer gene mutations would specifically mark cancer-inducing cells, the identification of mutant luteinized theca cells may add crucial evidence in understanding the cause of human ovarian cancer. PMID:24097974

  6. Comparison of continuous-flow and pulsatile-flow left ventricular assist devices: is there an advantage to pulsatility?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Allen; Williamitis, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CFVAD) are currently the most widely used type of mechanical circulatory support as bridge-to-transplant and destination therapy for end-stage congestive heart failure (HF). Compared to the first generation pulsatile-flow left ventricular assist devices (PFVADs), CFVADs have demonstrated improved reliability and durability. However, CFVADs have also been associated with certain complications thought to be linked with decreased arterial pulsatility. Previous studies comparing CFVADs and PFVADs have presented conflicting results. It is important to understand the outcome differences between CFVAD and PFVAD in order to further advance the current VAD technology. Methods In this review, we compared the outcomes of CFVADs and PFVADs and examined the need for arterial pulsatility for the future generation of mechanical circulatory support. Results CVADs offer advantages of smaller size, increased reliability and durability, and subsequent improvements in survival. However, with the increasing duration of long-term support, it appears that CFVADs may have specific complications and a lower rate of left ventricular recovery associated with diminished pulsatility, increased pressure gradients on the aortic valve and decreased compliance in smaller arterial vessels. PFVAD support or pulsatility control algorithms in CFVADs could be beneficial and potentially necessary for long term support. Conclusions Given the relative advantages and disadvantages of CFVADs and PFVADs, the ultimate solution may lie in incorporating pulsatility into current and emerging CFVADs whilst retaining their existing benefits. Future studies examining physiologic responses, end-organ function and LV remodeling at varying degrees of pulsatility and device support levels are needed. PMID:25512897

  7. Effects of non-pulsatile flow on thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph; Harting, Matthew; Delgado, Reynolds; Frazier, O. Howard

    2002-11-01

    Congestive heart failure afflicts 4.5 million people in the US alone, with an average 5-year mortality of more than 50%. Among the most promising treatments for this condition are VADs (ventricular assist devices). While conventional pulsatile flow VADs are large and introduce some significant complications such as thrombosis, non-pulsatile axial flow VADs have potentially significant advantages in being smaller, with smaller thrombogenic surfaces. However, the long term effects of non-pulsatile flow on the vascular system are not well understood. We have investigated the effects of pulsatility of blood flow in the stenotic human carotid artery using unsteady, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations. We have found that permanent, low shear stagnation zones can develop distal to stenoses with non-pulsatile flow, potentially leading to thrombus formation. In contrast, systolic peak flow tends to flush out such stagnation zones. These results are consistent with observed thrombus formation in two patients who underwent implantation of a Jarvik 2000 LVAD.

  8. Functional Tissue Pulsatility Imaging of the Brain during Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kucewicz, John C.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Leotta, Daniel F.; Panagiotides, Heracles; Paun, Marla; Beach, Kirk W.

    2007-01-01

    Functional tissue pulsatility imaging (fTPI) is a new ultrasonic technique being developed to map brain function by measuring changes in tissue pulsatility due to changes in blood flow with neuronal activation. The technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older, non-ultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part due to perfusion. Perfused tissue expands by a fraction of a percent early in each cardiac cycle when arterial inflow exceeds venous outflow and relaxes later in the cardiac cycle when venous drainage dominates. Tissue pulsatility imaging (TPI) uses tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure this pulsatile “plethysmographic” signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. A feasibility study was conducted to determine if TPI could be used to detect regional brain activation during a visual contrast-reversing checkerboard block paradigm study. During a study, ultrasound data were collected transcranially from the occipital lobe as a subject viewed alternating blocks of a reversing checkerboard (stimulus condition) and a static, gray screen (control condition). Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was used to identify sample volumes with significantly different pulsatility waveforms during the control and stimulus blocks. In 7 out 14 studies, consistent regions of activation were detected from tissue around the major vessels perfusing the visual cortex. PMID:17346872

  9. Composition of Lutein Ester Regioisomers in Marigold Flower, Dietary Supplement, and Herbal Tea.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Rabalski, Iwona

    2015-11-11

    Characterization of lutein and its esters in a health product is necessary for its efficacy. In the current study lutein ester regioisomers were quantified and identified in several dietary supplements and herbal teas in comparison with marigold flower, the commercial source of lutein. The products were extracted with three solvents and separated on a C30 column. The separated esters were identified/confirmed with LC-MS in APCI+ve mode with the use of synthetic lutein esters. The total content of lutein esters substantially varied among marigold flowers (167-5752 μg/g), supplements (88,000-110,700 μg/g), and herbal teas (12.4-91.3 μg/g). Lutein supplement had a lutein profile similar to that of marigold flower, whereas herbal tea showed an extremely different profile. Lutein dipalmitate was the dominant compound in supplements and marigold flowers followed by lutein 3'-O-myristate-3-O-palmitate and lutein 3'-O-palmitate-3-O-myristate. Lutein was the major compound in marigold herbal tea with small amounts of lutein mono- and diesters. Differences in the concentration and composition of lutein compounds among marigold products could indicate distinct product quality and lutein bioavailability. PMID:26496496

  10. Binding of progesterone to cell surfaces of human granulosa-lutein cells.

    PubMed

    Younglai, Edward V; Wu, Yanjing; Foster, Warren G; Lobb, Derek K; Price, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    Progesterone is produced by granulosa cells under the influence of luteinizing hormone. Nuclear progesterone receptors have been found in rat granulosa cells. Human granulosa-lutein cells rapidly respond to progesterone with an increase in intracellular calcium suggesting the existence of a nongenomic mechanism. This study was conducted to determine whether binding of progesterone to granulosa cells could occur at the membrane. Granulosa cells were obtained from an in vitro fertilization program and examined immunohistochemically with an antiserum to membrane progesterone receptors. Approximately 14-70% of freshly harvested or cultured granulosa cells of six patients showed a positive reaction to the antiserum, limited to the cell membrane. Western blot analysis of homogenates of granulosa cells and a granulosa cell tumour confirmed the presence of progesterone receptors A, B and C and low amounts of a putative membrane receptor. These results demonstrate that the plasma membranes of human granulosa cells possess binding components for progesterone which may be involved in its nongenomic mechanism of action. PMID:16905308

  11. Hormonal Perturbations in Occupationally Exposed Nickel Workers

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Safia; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Shaheen, Weam; Shahy, Eman M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel exposure is recognized as an endocrine disruptor because of its adverse effects on reproduction. AIM: This study was designed to investigate the possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations on workers occupationally exposed to nickel and to assess its effects on human male sexual function. METHODS: Cross-sectional comparative study, comprising 105 electroplating male non-smoker, non-alcoholic workers exposed to soluble nickel and 60 controls was done. Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone levels and urinary nickel concentrations were determined for the studied groups. RESULTS: Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, urinary nickel and the simultaneous incidence of more than one sexual disorder were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to controls. The occurrence of various types of sexual disorders (decreased libido, impotence and premature ejaculation) in the exposed workers was 9.5, 5.1 and 4.4 folds respectively than the controls. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to nickel produces possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations in those exposed workers. PMID:27335607

  12. Why pulsatility still matters: a review of current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Barić, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have become standard therapy option for patients with advanced heart failure. They offer several advantages over previously used pulsatile-flow LVADs, including improved durability, less surgical trauma, higher energy efficiency, and lower thrombogenicity. These benefits translate into better survival, lower frequency of adverse events, improved quality of life, and higher functional capacity of patients. However, mounting evidence shows unanticipated consequences of continuous-flow support, such as acquired aortic valve insufficiency and acquired von Willebrand syndrome. In this review article we discuss current evidence on differences between continuous and pulsatile mechanical circulatory support, with a focus on clinical implications and potential benefits of pulsatile flow. PMID:25559832

  13. Entrainment and thrust augmentation in pulsatile ejector flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Bernal, L.; Bui, T.

    1981-01-01

    This study comprised direct thrust measurements, flow visualization by use of a spark shadowgraph technique, and mean and fluctuating velocity measurements with a pitot tube and linearized constant temperature hot-wire anemometry respectively. A gain in thrust of as much as 10 to 15% was observed for the pulsatile ejector flow as compared to the steady flow configuration. From the velocity profile measurements, it is concluded that this enhanced augmentation for pulsatile flow as compared to a nonpulsatile one was accomplished by a corresponding increased entrainment by the primary jet flow. It is also concluded that the augmentation and total entrainment by a constant area ejector critically depends upon the inlet geometry of the ejector. Experiments were performed to evaluate the influence of primary jet to ejector area ratio, ejector length, and presence of a diffuser on pulsatile ejector performance.

  14. Hormonal therapy for stage D cancer of the prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Gudziak, M R; Smith, A Y

    1994-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common malignant neoplasm occurring in men. About half of patients present with metastatic disease. The mainstay of the treatment of stage D cancer of the prostate is hormonal therapy. Bilateral simple orchiectomy remains the gold standard with which other therapies must be compared. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogues and antiandrogens are now most commonly used but are costly. Initiating hormonal therapy immediately on diagnosing metastatic disease appears to have some advantage over delaying therapy until a patient is symptomatic. Total androgen blockade also appears to be beneficial in terms of survival but at high cost. PMID:8023485

  15. Pulsatile enophthalmos, severe esotropia, kinked optic nerve and visual loss in neurofibromatosis type-1

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Virender; Haque, Nazmul; Pathengay, Avinash; Kekunnaya, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type I if associated with aplasia of greater wing of sphenoid may be associated with a pulsatile exophthalmos. However, very rarely it may be associated with a pulsatile enophthalmos. This clinical image describes a rare presentation with pulsatile enophthalmos, esotropia and kinking of the optic nerve due to neurofibomatosis type I. PMID:26903735

  16. Pulsatile enophthalmos, severe esotropia, kinked optic nerve and visual loss in neurofibromatosis type-1.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Virender; Haque, Nazmul; Pathengay, Avinash; Kekunnaya, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type I if associated with aplasia of greater wing of sphenoid may be associated with a pulsatile exophthalmos. However, very rarely it may be associated with a pulsatile enophthalmos. This clinical image describes a rare presentation with pulsatile enophthalmos, esotropia and kinking of the optic nerve due to neurofibomatosis type I. PMID:26903735

  17. Lutein derived fragments exhibit higher antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties than lutein in lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nidhi, Bhatiwada; Sharavana, Gurunathan; Ramaprasad, Talahalli R; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we appraise the anti-inflammatory efficacy of lutein oxidative degradation derivatives mediated through UV-irradiation over lutein in counteracting the inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats (n = 5 per group). UV-irradiated lutein fragments were identified as anhydrolutein (B, C40H54O), 2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexa-1,4-dienylium (M1, C9H13), (2E,4E,6E,8E)-9-(4-hydroxy-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-1en-1-yl)-3,7-dimethylnona-2,4,6,8-tetraen-1-ylium (M2, C20H29O), 4-[(1E,3E,5E,7E)-3,7,-dimethyldeca-1,3,5,7-tetraen-1-yl]-3,5,5-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-ol (M3, C21H30O) and zeaxanthin (M4, C40H56O) and its isomers as 13'-Z zeaxanthin, 13'-Z lutein, all-trans zeaxanthin, and 9-Z lutein. Induction of inflammation by LPS significantly increased the production of nitrites (3.3 fold in the serum and 2.6 fold in the liver), prostaglandin E2 (26 fold in the serum), and pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-α (6.6 fold in the serum), and interleukin-6 (4.8 fold in the serum). Oxidative derivatives of lutein, especially M1, M2 and M3, ameliorated acute inflammation in rats by inhibiting the production of nitrites, malondialdehyde (MDA), PGE2, TNF-α, and IL-6 cytokines more efficiently than lutein in rats. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of derivatives might be related to the decrease of inflammatory cytokines and the increase of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S transferase, glutathione reductase), which would result in the reduction of iNOS, COX-2 and MDA and subsequently inflammatory responses. PMID:25469663

  18. The Role of Lutein in Eye-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koushan, Keyvan; Rusovici, Raluca; Li, Wenhua; Ferguson, Lee R.; Chalam, Kakarla V.

    2013-01-01

    The lens and retina of the human eye are exposed constantly to light and oxygen. In situ phototransduction and oxidative phosphorylation within photoreceptors produces a high level of phototoxic and oxidative related stress. Within the eye, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are present in high concentrations in contrast to other human tissues. We discuss the role of lutein and zeaxanthin in ameliorating light and oxygen damage, and preventing age-related cellular and tissue deterioration in the eye. Epidemiologic research shows an inverse association between levels of lutein and zeaxanthin in eye tissues and age related degenerative diseases such as macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. We examine the role of these carotenoids as blockers of blue-light damage and quenchers of oxygen free radicals. This article provides a review of possible mechanisms of lutein action at a cellular and molecular level. Our review offers insight into current clinical trials and experimental animal studies involving lutein, and possible role of nutritional intervention in common ocular diseases that cause blindness. PMID:23698168

  19. Role of lutein and zeaxanthin in visual and cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between lutein and zeaxanthin and visual and cognitive health throughout the lifespan is compelling. There is a variety of evidence to support a role for lutein and zeaxanthin in vision. Lutein's role in cognition has only recently been considered. Lutein and its isomer, zeaxanthin, are taken up selectively into eye tissue. Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in human brain tissue. Lutein and zeaxanthin in neural tissue may have biological effects that include antioxidation, anti-inflammation, and structural actions. In addition, lutein and zeaxanthin may be protective against eye disease because they absorb damaging blue light that enters the eye. In pediatric brains, the relative contribution of lutein to the total carotenoids is twice that found in adults, accounting for more than half the concentration of total carotenoids. The greater proportion of lutein in the pediatric brain suggests a need for lutein during neural development as well. In adults, higher lutein status is related to better cognitive performance, and lutein supplementation improves cognition. The evidence to date warrants further investigation into the role of lutein and zeaxanthin in visual and cognitive health throughout the lifespan. PMID:25109868

  20. The Photobiology of Lutein and Zeaxanthin in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joan E.; Dennison, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are antioxidants found in the human retina and macula. Recent clinical trials have determined that age- and diet-related loss of lutein and zeaxanthin enhances phototoxic damage to the human eye and that supplementation of these carotenoids has a protective effect against photoinduced damage to the lens and the retina. Two of the major mechanisms of protection offered by lutein and zeaxanthin against age-related blue light damage are the quenching of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species and the absorption of blue light. Determining the specific reactive intermediate(s) produced by a particular phototoxic ocular chromophore not only defines the mechanism of toxicity but can also later be used as a tool to prevent damage. PMID:26798505

  1. The Photobiology of Lutein and Zeaxanthin in the Eye.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joan E; Dennison, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are antioxidants found in the human retina and macula. Recent clinical trials have determined that age- and diet-related loss of lutein and zeaxanthin enhances phototoxic damage to the human eye and that supplementation of these carotenoids has a protective effect against photoinduced damage to the lens and the retina. Two of the major mechanisms of protection offered by lutein and zeaxanthin against age-related blue light damage are the quenching of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species and the absorption of blue light. Determining the specific reactive intermediate(s) produced by a particular phototoxic ocular chromophore not only defines the mechanism of toxicity but can also later be used as a tool to prevent damage. PMID:26798505

  2. Relationship between lutein and mycotoxin content in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Rosa M; Sulyok, Michael; Jirsa, Ondřej; Spitzer, Tomáš; Krska, Rudolf; Polišenská, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Levels of lutein and a number of mycotoxins were determined in seven varieties of durum wheat (Triticum durum) and two varieties of common wheat (Triticum aestivum) in order to explore possible relationships amongst these components. Durum wheat cultivars always showed both higher lutein and mycotoxin contents than common wheat cultivars. The mycotoxins detected in both common and durum wheat cultivars were produced by the genera Fusarium, Claviceps, Alternaria and Aspergillus. Fusarium was the major producer of mycotoxins (26 mycotoxins) followed by Claviceps (14 mycotoxins), which was present only in some cultivars such as Chevalier (common wheat), Lupidur and Selyemdur (both durum wheat), Alternaria (six mycotoxins) and Aspergillus (three mycotoxins). Positive correlations between the levels of lutein and mycotoxins in durum wheat cultivars were found for the following mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON), its derivative DON-3-glucoside, moniliformin, culmorin and its derivatives (5-hydroxyculmorin and 15-hydroxyculmorin). PMID:24844356

  3. Lutein and Zeaxanthin Isomers in Eye Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mares, Julie

    2016-07-17

    Current evidence suggests lutein and its isomers play important roles in ocular development in utero and throughout the life span, in vision performance in young and later adulthood, and in lowering risk for the development of common age-related eye diseases in older age. These xanthophyll (oxygen-containing) carotenoids are found in a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, and they are present in especially high concentrations in leafy green vegetables. Additionally, egg yolks and human milk appear to be bioavailable sources. The prevalence of lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin in supplements is increasing. Setting optimal and safe ranges of intake requires additional research, particularly in pregnant and lactating women. Accumulating evidence about variable interindividual response to dietary intake of these carotenoids, based on genetic or metabolic influences, suggests that there may be subgroups that benefit from higher levels of intake and/or alternate strategies to improve lutein and zeaxanthin status. PMID:27431371

  4. A case of Takayasu's arteritis with pulsatile neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Karimifar, Mansoor; Karimifar, Mozhgan; Salimi, Fereshteh; Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA), also known as pulseless disease or occlusive thromboaortopathy, is a form of vasculitis of unknown cause that chiefly affects the aorta and its major branches, most frequently in young women. We describe an 18-year-old female with a soft and pulsatile mass in the left side of her neck. PMID:22973373

  5. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Growth Hormone Secretion.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Frederik J; Tolle, Virginie; Chen, Chen; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the main findings that emerged in the intervening years since the previous volume on hormonal control of growth in the section on the endocrine system of the Handbook of Physiology concerning the intra- and extrahypothalamic neuronal networks connecting growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin hypophysiotropic neurons and the integration between regulators of food intake/metabolism and GH release. Among these findings, the discovery of ghrelin still raises many unanswered questions. One important event was the application of deconvolution analysis to the pulsatile patterns of GH secretion in different mammalian species, including Man, according to gender, hormonal environment and ageing. Concerning this last phenomenon, a great body of evidence now supports the role of an attenuation of the GHRH/GH/Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis in the control of mammalian aging. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:687-735, 2016. PMID:27065166

  6. Lipid and Protein Oxidation in Newborn Infants after Lutein Administration

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, S.; Tei, M.; Longini, M.; Santacroce, A.; Turrisi, G.; Proietti, F.; Felici, C.; Picardi, A.; Bazzini, F.; Vasarri, P.; Buonocore, G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To test the hypothesis that neonatal supplementation with lutein in the first hours of life reduces neonatal oxidative stress (OS) in the immediate postpartum period. Methods. A randomized controlled, double-blinded clinical trial was conducted among 150 newborns divided into control group, not supplemented (n = 47), and test group, supplemented with lutein on the first day postpartum (n = 103). Blood Samples were collected at birth from cord and at 48 hrs postpartum while routine neonatal metabolic screenings were taking place. Total hydroperoxide (TH), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) were measured by spectrophotometry and data were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum test and by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results. Before lutein supplementation, the mean blood concentrations of AOPP, TH, and BAP were 36.10 umol/L, 156.75 mmol/H2O2, and 2361.04 umol/L in the test group. After lutein supplementation, significantly higher BAP increment (0.17 ± 0.22 versus 0.06 versus ± 0.46) and lower TH increment (0.46 ± 0.54 versus 0.34 ± 0.52) were observed in the test group compared to controls. Conclusion. Neonatal supplementation with lutein in the first hours of life increases BAP and reduces TH in supplemented babies compared to those untreated. The generation of free radical-induced damage at birth is reduced by lutein. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02068807. PMID:24876916

  7. Cognitive Findings of an Exploratory Trial of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Lutein in Older Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and low intake of foods rich in lutein may negatively affect cognitive function. DHA and lutein are concentrated in the brain. The objective of this study was to determine effects of supplemental DHA (800 mg/d) and/or lutein (12 mg/d) on cognitive function in...

  8. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  9. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  10. Biocompatible lutein-polymer-lipid nanocapsules: Acute and subacute toxicity and bioavailability in mice.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Arunkumar; Hindupur, Ravi; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2016-12-01

    Lutein-poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-phospholipid (PL) nanocapsules were prepared (henceforth referred as lutein nanocapsules) and studied for acute, subacute oral toxicity and bioavailability of lutein in mice. Prior to examining the safety of lutein nanocapsules, particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology and interaction between lutein, PLGA and PL were studied. In acute study, mice were gavaged with a single dose of lutein nanocapsules at 0.1, 1, 10 and 100mg/kg body weight (BW) and examined for 2weeks, while in subacute study, daily mice were gavaged with a dose of 1 and 10mg/kg BW for 4weeks. Results revealed that mean size and zeta value of lutein nanocapsules were 140nm and -44mV, respectively. Acute and subacute toxicity studies did not show any mortality or treatment related adverse effect in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body and organ weights. No toxicity related findings were observed in hematology, histopathology and other blood and tissue clinical chemistry parameters. In subacute study, no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of lutein nanocapsules was found to be at a dose of 10mg/kg BW. Feeding lutein nanocapsules resulted in a significant (p<0.01) increase in lutein level in plasma and tissue compared to the control group. Lutein nanocapsules did not cause toxicity in mice. However, human trials are warranted. PMID:27612832

  11. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the stability of all-trans lutein and its degradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Da-Jing; Pang, Hui-Li; Liu, Chun-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound treatment has been widely applied in the extraction of biologically active compounds including carotenoids. However, there are few reports on their effects on the stability of these compounds. In the present study, the stability of all-trans lutein, one of the carotenoids, was investigated under the action of ultrasound. Results showed that ultrasound induced the isomerization of all-trans lutein to its isomers, namely to 13-cis lutein, 13'-cis lutein, 9-cis lutein and 9'-cis lutein as analyzed by HPLC coupled with DAD and LC-MS; and the percentage of the isomerization increased with increasing both ultrasonic frequency and power. The stability of all-trans lutein in dichloromethane was worst among multiple kinds of solvents. Interestingly, the retention rate of all-trans lutein improved as the temperature increased, which runs counter to the Arrhenius law. Under ultrasound irradiation, the degradation mechanism might be different with various temperatures, the degradation of all-trans lutein followed first-order kinetics at 20°C, while second-order kinetics was followed at 30-50°C. As the ultrasonic reaction time prolonged, lutein epoxidation nearly occurred. Those results presented here emphasized that UAE techniques should be carefully used in the extraction of all-trans lutein. PMID:25934130

  12. Incorporation of lutein and docosahexaenoic acid from dietary microalgae into the retina in quail.

    PubMed

    Schnebelen-Berthier, Coralie; Acar, Niyazi; Pouillart, Philippe; Thabuis, Clementine; Rodriguez, Bertrand; Depeint, Flore; Clerc, Elise; Mathiaud, Adeline; Bourdillon, Anne; Baert, Blandine; Bretillon, Lionel; Lecerf, Jean-Michel

    2015-03-01

    Lutein and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with the prevention of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since microalgae are potent natural sources of these nutrients, their nutritional value should be evaluated based on the bioavailability of lutein and DHA for the retina via the plasmatic compartment. In this study, quail were fed for 5 months either with a diet supplemented or deprived with microalgae rich in lutein and DHA. In the microalgae-fed group, the retinal concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin gradually increased whereas in plasma, these compounds started to increase from the first month of supplementation. We also observed a significant increase in retinal and plasmatic levels of DHA in the microalgae-fed group. In conclusion, the plasmatic and retinal contents of lutein and DHA were significantly increased in quail fed with lutein- and DHA-rich microalgae. Food fortification with microalgae may be an innovative way to increase lutein and DHA consumption in humans. PMID:25657100

  13. Arterial Stiffness, Central Pulsatile Hemodynamic Load, and Orthostatic Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Si; Wan, Shixi; Zhou, Yufei; Pan, Pei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Hang; Shi, Di; Shi, Rufeng; Chen, Xiaoping; Jangala, Tulasiram

    2016-07-01

    The association between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is unclear. The authors recruited 1099 participants from the community. Questionnaire, physical examination, and laboratory tests were performed. To assess the correlation between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and OH, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed, and the discriminatory power was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve. The prevalence of OH in this population was 5.6%. After adjusting for potential confounders, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV) was significantly and positively correlated with OH in both the hypertension and nonhypertension groups (all P<.05), while central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) was only significantly associated with OH in the hypertension subgroup. In addition, BaPWV seemed to have a better discriminatory power than CSBP in both subgroups. BaPWV appears to be a better indicator of OH than CSBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:26543017

  14. Tissue Pulsatility Imaging of Cerebral Vasoreactivity during Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kucewicz, John C.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Giardino, Nicholas D.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Paun, Marla; Dager, Stephen R.; Beach, Kirk W.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue Pulsatility Imaging (TPI) is an ultrasonic technique that is being developed at the University of Washington to measure tissue displacement or strain due to blood flow over the cardiac and respiratory cycles. This technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older non-ultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part due to perfusion. TPI adapts tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure the “plethysmographic” signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. This paper presents a feasibility study to determine if TPI can be used to assess cerebral vasoreactivity. Ultrasound data were collected transcranially through the temporal acoustic window from four subjects before, during, and after voluntary hyperventilation. In each subject, decreases in tissue pulsatility during hyperventilation were observed that were statistically correlated with the subject’s end-tidal CO2 measurements. PMID:18336991

  15. Numerical computation of pulsatile flow through a locally constricted channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Layek, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the numerical solution of a pulsatile laminar flow through a locally constricted channel. A finite difference technique has been employed to solve the governing equations. The effects of the flow parameters such as Reynolds number, flow pulsation in terms of Strouhal number, constriction height and length on the flow behaviour have been studied. It is found that the peak value of the wall shear stress has significantly changed with the variation of Reynolds numbers and constriction heights. It is also noted that the Strouhal number and constriction length have little effect on the peak value of the wall shear stress. The flow computation reveals that the peak value of the wall shear stress at maximum flow rate time in pulsatile flow situation is much larger than that due to steady flow. The constriction and the flow pulsation produce flow disturbances at the vicinity of the constriction of the channel in the downstream direction.

  16. CFD modeling of pulsatile hemodynamics in the total cavopulmonary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobaer, S. M. Tareq; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    Total cavopulmonary connection is a blood flow pathway which is created surgically by an operation known as Fontan procedure, performed on children with single ventricle heart defects. Recent studies have shown that the hemodynamics in the connection can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. The aim of this paper is model the pulsatile flow patterns, and to calculate the vorticity field and power losses in an idealized 1.5D offset model of Total Cavopulmonary Connection. A three-dimensional polyhedral mesh was constructed for the numerical simulation. The rheological properties of blood were considered as Newtonian, and flow in the connection was assumed to be laminar. The results demonstrated complex flow patterns in the connection. The outcomes of the simulation showed reasonable agreement with the results available in the literature for a similar model.

  17. Recent advances in pulsatile oral drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Politis, Stavros N; Rekkas, Dimitrios M

    2013-08-01

    It is well established that several diseases exhibit circadian behavior, following the relevant rhythm of the physiological functions of the human body. Their study falls in the fields of chronobiology and chronotherapeutics, the latter being essentially the effort of timely matching the treatment with the disease expression, in order to maximize the therapeutic benefits and minimize side effects. Pulsatile drug delivery is one of the pillars of chronopharmaceutics, achieved through dosage form design that allows programmable release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to follow the disease's time profile. Its major characteristic is the presence of lag phases, followed by drug release in a variety of rates, immediate, repeated or controlled. The scope of this review is to summarize the recent literature on pulsatile oral drug delivery systems and provide an overview of the ready to use solutions and early stage technologies, focusing on the awarded and pending patents in this technical field during the last few years. PMID:23506535

  18. Influence of vascular function and pulsatile hemodynamics on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Vanessa; Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between cardiac and vascular structure and function normally are optimized to ensure delivery of cardiac output with modest pulsatile hemodynamic overhead. Aortic stiffening with age or disease impairs optimal ventricular-vascular coupling, increases pulsatile load, and contributes to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, reduced systolic function, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Aortic pulse pressure and timing of peak systolic pressure are well-known measures of hemodynamic ventricular-vascular interaction. Recent work has elucidated the importance of direct, mechanical coupling between the aorta and the heart. LV systolic contraction results in displacement of aortic and mitral annuli, thereby producing longitudinal stretch in the ascending aorta and left atrium, respectively. Force associated with longitudinal stretch increases systolic load on the LV. However, the resulting energy stored in the elastic elements of the proximal aorta during systole facilitates early diastolic LV recoil and rapid filling. This review discusses current views on hemodynamics and mechanics of ventricular-vascular coupling. PMID:26164466

  19. Numerical modeling of pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sonu S; Frankel, Steven H

    2003-08-01

    Pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels has been numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation approach. The commercially available computational fluid dynamics code (CFD), FLUENT, has been used for these studies. Two different experiments were modeled involving pulsatile flow through axisymmetric stenoses. Four different turbulence models were employed to study their influence on the results. It was found that the low Reynolds number k-omega turbulence model was in much better agreement with previous experimental measurements than both the low and high Reynolds number versions of the RNG (renormalization-group theory) k-epsilon turbulence model and the standard k-epsilon model, with regard to predicting the mean flow distal to the stenosis including aspects of the vortex shedding process and the turbulent flow field. All models predicted a wall shear stress peak at the throat of the stenosis with minimum values observed distal to the stenosis where flow separation occurred. PMID:12968569

  20. GnRH-1 mRNA, LH surges, steroid hormones, egg production, and intersequence pause days alter in birds exposed to longer wavelength of light in the later stages of production in Gallus gallus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ippala Janardhan; David, Corbon Godfrey; Selvaraju, Sellen; Mondal, Sunato; Ravi Kiran, Gorti

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this was to establish the effects of red spectrum of light (650 nm, treated n = 12) and normal spectrum of light (450 nm control = 12) on GnRH-I mRNA expression, amplitude and frequency of luteinizing hormone (LH), and egg production from 72-82 weeks of age in white leghorn hens. Birds exposed to red spectrum of wavelength significantly improved (P < 0.01) steroid hormone, and egg production improved over old laying 72 to 82 weeks. Weekly interval profiles followed the same pattern. At 77th weeks of age blood, samples from both the groups were collected at every 3 h for 36 h to study the pulsatile secretion of LH surges. Plasma LH concentration was higher (P < 0.01) in treated birds with more number of frequencies and amplitude LH surges in plasma of treated birds. LH frequencies were more pronounced and advanced during 36 h of sampling at 3 h interval in treated birds. Weekly interval of plasma LH, E2β, and P(4) concentrations increased (P < 0.01) in treated birds from 72 to 82 weeks of age. GnRH-I mRNA concentration was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in birds exposed to red spectrum of light compared to controls. It is hypothesized that exposure of birds to red spectrum of light-enhanced (P < 0.01) GnRH-I mRNA with more number of yellow yolky follicles was found in birds exposed to red spectrum of light during 77 days (72-82 weeks of age) of experimental period. It is concluded that higher levels of GnRH-I mRNA, LH, E2β, and P(4) concentration with lower incidence of pause days enabled the birds to lay more eggs even later in the productive period by modulating the wavelengths of light under normal husbandry conditions. PMID:22532077

  1. CCAP and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of the antennal accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Julia M; Jones, Talitha H; Murphree, Steven C; Hillyer, Julián F

    2016-08-01

    Insects rely on specialized accessory pulsatile organs (APOs), also known as auxiliary hearts, to propel hemolymph into their antennae. In most insects, this is accomplished via the pulsations of a pair of ampulla located in the head, each of which propels hemolymph across an antenna via an antennal vessel. Once at the distal end of the appendage, hemolymph returns to the head via the antennal hemocoel. Although the structure of the antennal hearts has been elucidated in various insect orders, their hormonal modulation has only been studied in cockroaches and other hemimetabolous insects within the superorder Polyneoptera, where proctolin and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of these auxiliary hearts. Here, we assessed the hormonal modulation of the antennal APOs of mosquitoes, a group of holometabolous (Endopterygota) insects within the order Diptera. We show that crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide and SALDKNFMRFamide increase the contraction rate of the antennal APOs and the heart of Anopheles gambiae Both antennal hearts are synchronously responsive to these neuropeptides, but their contractions are asynchronous with the contraction of the heart. Furthermore, we show that these neuropeptides increase the velocity and maximum acceleration of hemolymph within the antennal space, suggesting that each contraction is also more forceful. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that hormones of a holometabolous insect modulate the contraction dynamics of an auxiliary heart, and the first report that shows that the hormones of any insect accelerate the velocity of hemolymph in the antennal space. PMID:27247317

  2. Child and adult vibrotactile thresholds for sinusoidal and pulsatile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, L E; Schechter, M B; Goldstein, M H

    1986-07-01

    Three experiments were performed to obtain vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds from hearing children and adults, and from deaf children. An adaptive two-interval forced-choice procedure was used to obtain estimates of the 70.7% point on the psychometric sensitivity curve. When hearing children of 5-6 and 9-10 years of age and adults were tested with sinusoids and haversine pulse stimuli, at 10, 100, 160, and 250 Hz or pps, respectively, only the 10-Hz stimulus resulted in an age effect. For this stimulus, young children were significantly less sensitive than adults. When sinusoids were again tested at 20, 40, 80, and 160 Hz, a small overall effect of age was observed with a significant effect only at 20 Hz. Two prelingually profoundly deaf children were tested with haversine pulse trains at 10, 50, 100, 160, and 250 pps. Both children were at least as sensitive to the tactile stimulation as were the hearing children and adults. Pulsatile stimulation, compared to sinusoidal stimulation, exhibited relatively flat threshold versus frequency functions. The present results, demonstrating no age effect for pulsatile stimulation and similar performance for deaf and hearing children, suggest that pulsatile stimulation would be appropriate in vibrotactile speech communication aids for the deaf. PMID:3745657

  3. The Dynamics of Agglomerated Ferrofluid in Steady and Pulsatile Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alicia; Stewart, Kelley; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2007-11-01

    Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT) is a promising technique to deliver medication via functionalized magnetic particles to target sites in the treatment of diseases. In this work, the physics of steady and pulsatile flows laden with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a square channel under the influence of a magnetic field induced by a 0.6 Tesla permanent magnet is studied. Herein, the dynamics of ferrofluid shedding from an initially accumulated mass in water are examined through shadowgraph imaging using two orthogonal cameras. Fundamental differences in the ferrofluid behavior occur between the steady and pulsatile flow cases, as expected. For steady flows, vortex ring shedding is visualized from the mass, and periodic shedding occurs only for moderate mass sizes where the shear forces in the flow interact with the magnetic forces. At Reynolds numbers below 500 with pulsatile flow, suction and roll up of the ferrofluid is seen during the low and moderate periods of flow, followed by the ejection of ferrofluid during high flow. These shadowgraphs illustrate the beauty and richness of ferrofluid dynamics, an understanding of which is instrumental to furthering MDT as an effective drug delivery device.

  4. Analysis and performance of subsonic ejectors for pulsatile flow applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, J.G.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    This study looks at the application of ejectors to four-stroke engines. The goal is to develop a system of exhaust gas emission control by premixing exhaust gas with fresh atmospheric air. The constraints on the system include relatively low pressure pulsatile flow of the primary gas, geometric constraints (small size), significant density differences between the two fluid streams and possible large back-pressure operating conditions. A model is applied to the ejector application to pulsatile flow based on a global control volume analysis. The model constrains the operating conditions based on conservation of mass, momentum and energy for incompressible flow conditions. The time dependent effects are modeled by including a representative inertia term in the momentum equation based on quasi-steady conditions. The results are used to illustrate the operating characteristics for a small four-stroke engine application. The sensitivity of operation to the operating and design parameters of the system are illustrated. In particular, the effects of the pulsatile flow on the operation are shown to increase the performance under certain operating conditions. The model simulation is compared to some data available in the literature.

  5. Visualization of pulsatile flow for magnetic nanoparticle based therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzel, Andrew; Yecko, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Pulsatile flow of blood through branched, curved, stenosed, dilated or otherwise perturbed vessels is more complex than flow through a straight, uniform and rigid tube. In some magnetic hyperthermia and magnetic chemo-therapies, localized regions of magnetic nanoparticle laden fluid are deliberately formed in blood vessels and held in place by magnetic fields. The effect of localized magnetic fluid regions on blood flow and the effect of the pulsatile blood flow on such magnetic fluid regions are poorly understood and difficult to examine in vivo or by numerical simulation. We present a laboratory model that facilitates both dye tracer and particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) studies of pulsatile flow of water through semi-flexible tubes in the presence of localized magnetic fluid regions. Results on the visualization of flows over a range of Reynolds and Womersley numbers and for several different (water-based) ferrofluids are compared for straight and curved vessels and for different magnetic localization strategies. These results can guide the design of improved magnetic cancer therapies. Support from the William H. Sandholm Program of Cooper Union's Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. New pulsatile bioreactor for fabrication of tissue-engineered patches.

    PubMed

    Sodian, R; Lemke, T; Loebe, M; Hoerstrup, S P; Potapov, E V; Hausmann, H; Meyer, R; Hetzer, R

    2001-01-01

    To date, one approach to tissue engineering has been to develop in vitro conditions to ultimately fabricate functional cardiovascular structures prior to final implantation. In our current experiment, we developed a new pulsatile flow system that provides biochemical and biomechanical signals to regulate autologous patch-tissue development in vitro. The newly developed patch bioreactor is made of Plexiglas and is completely transparent (Mediport Kardiotechnik, Berlin). The bioreactor is connected to an air-driven respirator pump, and the cell culture medium continuously circulates through a closed-loop system. We thus developed a closed-loop, perfused bioreactor for long-term patch-tissue conditioning, which combines continuous, pulsatile perfusion and mechanical stimulation by periodically stretching the tissue-engineered patch constructs. By adjusting the stroke volume, the stroke rate, and the inspiration/expiration time of the ventilator, it allows various pulsatile flows and different levels of pressure. The whole system is a highly isolated cell culture setting, which provides a high level of sterility, gas supply, and fits into a standard humidified incubator. The bioreactor can be sterilized by ethylene oxide and assembled with a standard screwdriver. Our newly developed bioreactor provides optimal biomechanical and biodynamical stimuli for controlled tissue development and in vitro conditioning of an autologous tissue-engineered patch. PMID:11410898

  7. Effect of pulsatile swirling flow on stenosed arterial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-09-01

    The existence of swirling flow phenomena is frequently observed in arterial vessels, but information on the fluid-dynamic roles of swirling flow is still lacking. In this study, the effects of pulsatile swirling inlet flows with various swirling intensities on the flow field in a stenosis model are experimentally investigated using a particle image velocimetry velocity field measurement technique. A pulsatile pump provides cyclic pulsating inlet flow and spiral inserts with two different helical pitches (10D and 10/3D) induce swirling flow in the stenosed channel. Results show that the pulsatile swirling flow has various beneficial effects by reducing the negative wall shear stress, the oscillatory shear index, and the flow reverse coefficient at the post-stenosis channel. Temporal variations of vorticity fields show that the short propagation length of the jet flow and the early breakout of turbulent flow are initiated as the swirling flow disturbs the symmetric development of the shear layer. In addition, the overall energy dissipation rate of the flow is suppressed by the swirling component of the flow. The results will be helpful for elucidating the hemodynamic characteristics of atherosclerosis and discovering better diagnostic procedures and clinical treatments. PMID:24984589

  8. Changes in Bone Mineral Density and Metabolic Parameters after Pulsatile Gonadorelin Treatment in Young Men with Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Xi; Tang, Song-Tao; Zhang, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and to investigate the changes of BMD and metabolic parameters, a total of 22 young male patients with HH and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. BMD, biochemical, and hormonal parameters were measured in two groups. Osteoporosis was more prevalent in HH patients (45.45%) than the control subjects (10.00%) (P < 0.001). The patients with HH had lower BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P < 0.001, for all) and higher fasting insulin (P = 0.001), HOMA-IR (P = 0.002), and SHBG (P < 0.001) compared to the controls. After 6 months of pulsatile gonadorelin treatment, BMI (P = 0.021) and BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P = 0.002, P = 0.003, and P = 0.003, resp.) increased dramatically and total cholesterol (P = 0.034), fasting insulin (P = 0.025), HOMA-IR (P = 0.021), and SHBG (P = 0.001) decreased significantly in HH patients. The study shows a higher prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with HH. Long-term pulsatile gonadorelin treatment indicates a positive effect on BMD and metabolic parameters of HH patients. PMID:26417369

  9. In vitro bioaccessibility and monolayer uptake of lutein from wholegrain baked foods.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew; Wright, Amanda; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M

    2015-05-01

    Lutein-enriched foods would contribute towards promoting the consumption of this important carotenoid. In the current study cookies, muffins, and flatbreads were produced at three enrichment levels (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mg lutein per serving) to investigate lutein bioavailability in vitro. Foods were subjected to in vitro simulation of human upper gastrointestinal digestion coupled with a Caco-2 monolayer absorption assay. Digestive conditions representative of the fed state conditions associated with significantly higher lutein bioaccessibility compared with the fasted state (p < 0.001). Lutein bioaccessibility of cookies and muffins was higher than flatbreads due to their elevated fat content, measured under either fed or fasted conditions. Lutein concentration in the aqueous phase was the most important factor in determining apical cell uptake of lutein, with cookies and muffins exhibiting a higher lutein uptake than flatbreads (p < 0.05). As commonly consumed foods, lutein-enriched cookies, muffins, and flatbreads have the potential to improve lutein intake. PMID:25529679

  10. Expression of the putative gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor, NPFFR1, in the anterior pituitary gland of the gilt is affected by age and sexual maturation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) purportedly suppresses secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by acting through a G-protein coupled receptor (NPFFR1) in the anterior pituitary gland and hypothalamus. The objective of these studies was to determine if expression of mRNA for NPFFR1 in the reprod...

  11. Specificity of synergistic coronary flow enhancement by adenosine and pulsatile perfusion in the dog.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, P; Senzaki, H; Paolocci, N; Isoda, T; Sunagawa, G; Recchia, F A; Kass, D A

    1999-10-01

    1. Coronary flow elevation from enhanced perfusion pulsatility is synergistically amplified by adenosine. This study determined the specificity of this interaction and its potential mechanisms. 2. Mean and phasic coronary flow responses to increasing pulsatile perfusion were assessed in anaesthetized dogs, with the anterior descending coronary artery servoperfused to regulate real-time physiological flow pulsatility at constant mean pressure. Pulsatility was varied between 40 and 100 mmHg. Hearts ejected into the native aorta whilst maintaining stable loading. 3. Increasing pulsatility elevated mean coronary flow +11.5 +/- 1.7 % under basal conditions. Co-infusion of adenosine sufficient to raise baseline flow 66 % markedly amplified this pulsatile perfusion response (+82. 6 +/- 14.3 % increase in mean flow above adenosine baseline), due to a leftward shift of the adenosine-coronary flow response curve at higher pulsatility. Flow augmentation with pulsatility was not linked to higher regional oxygen consumption, supporting direct rather than metabolically driven mechanisms. 4. Neither bradykinin, acetylcholine nor verapamil reproduced the synergistic amplification of mean flow by adenosine and higher pulsatility, despite being administered at doses matching basal flow change with adenosine. 5. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) activation (pinacidil) amplified the pulse-flow response 3-fold, although this remained significantly less than with adenosine. Co-administration of the phospholipase A2 inhibitor quinacrine virtually eliminated adenosine-induced vasodilatation, yet synergistic interaction between adenosine and pulse perfusion persisted, albeit at a reduced level. 6. Thus, adenosine and perfusion pulsatility specifically interact to enhance coronary flow. This synergy is partially explained by KATP agonist action and additional non-flow-dependent mechanisms, and may be important for modulating flow reserve during exercise or other high output states where

  12. Effect of Flow Pulsatility on Modeling the Hemodynamics in the Total Cavopulmonary Connection

    PubMed Central

    khiabani, Reza H.; Restrepo, Maria; Tang, Elaine; De Zélicourt, Diane; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Total Cavopulmonary Connection is the result of a series of palliative surgical repairs performed on patients with single ventricle heart defects. The resulting anatomy has complex and unsteady hemodynamics characterized by flow mixing and flow separation. Although varying degrees of flow pulsatility have been observed in vivo, non-pulsatile (time-averaged) boundary conditions have traditionally been assumed in hemodynamic modeling, and only recently have pulsatile conditions been incorporated without completely characterizing their effect or importance. In this study, 3D numerical simulations with both pulsatile and non-pulsatile boundary conditions were performed for 24 patients with different anatomies and flow boundary conditions from Georgia Tech database. Flow structures, energy dissipation rates and pressure drops were compared under rest and simulated exercise conditions. It was found that flow pulsatility is the primary factor in determining the appropriate choice of boundary conditions, whereas the anatomic configuration and cardiac output had secondary effects. Results show that the hemodynamics can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. However, there was a minimum pulsatility threshold, identified by defining a weighted pulsatility index (wPI), above which the influence was significant. It was shown that when wPI < 30%, the relative error in hemodynamic predictions using time-averaged boundary conditions was less than 10% compared to pulsatile simulations. In addition, when wPI <50, the relative error was less than 20%. A correlation was introduced to relate wPI to the relative error in predicting the flow metrics with non-pulsatile flow conditions. PMID:22841650

  13. Determination of Lutein from Fruit and Vegetables Through an Alkaline Hydrolysis Extraction Method and HPLC Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fratianni, Alessandra; Mignogna, Rossella; Niro, Serena; Panfili, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method for the determination of lutein content, successfully used for cereal matrices, was evaluated in fruit and vegetables. The method involved the determination of lutein after an alkaline hydrolysis of the sample matrix, followed by extraction with solvents and analysis by normal phase HPLC. The optimized method was simple, precise, and accurate and it was characterized by few steps that could prevent loss of lutein and its degradation. The optimized method was used to evaluate the lutein amounts in several fruit and vegetables. Rich sources of lutein were confirmed to be green vegetables such as parsley, spinach, chicory, chard, broccoli, courgette, and peas, even if in a range of variability. Taking into account the suggested reference values these vegetables can be stated as good sources of lutein. PMID:26540023

  14. Treatment with anticancer agents induces dysregulation of specific Wnt signaling pathways in human ovarian luteinized granulosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana Maria; Giorgione, Veronica; Viganò, Paola; Papaleo, Enrico; Candiani, Massimo; Mangili, Giorgia; Panina-Bordignon, Paola

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy has been associated with premature ovarian failure and infertility in women with cancer. It is well known that anticancer drugs reduce the primordial follicle pool and harm the ovarian blood vascularization leading to ovarian atrophy. However, their mechanism of injury still remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in the toxicity of chemotherapy drugs belonging to different classes on human ovarian luteinized granulosa cells (LGCs). Treatment with doxorubicin (DXR), paclitaxel (PC), and cisplatin (CP) affected LGCs viability by inducing apoptosis and downregulating both estrogen receptor β and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Several members of the WNT signaling pathway are expressed in granulosa cells where they regulate follicle development, ovulation, and luteinization. Here we show that treatment with DXR, PC, and CP induced upregulation of WNT4 expression, whereas WNT3 expression was downregulated by DXR and PC and upregulated by CP. Analysis of the WNT3 downstream signaling pathway showed that total β-catenin protein levels were reduced upon treatment with DXR and PC. Additionally, restoration of β-catenin signaling by lithium chloride protected LGCs from the injury induced by chemotherapy. The in vitro LGC toxicity model described might represent a tool to identify components of specific signaling pathways, such as the Wnt pathway, that can be targeted in order to limit the follicular damage caused by chemotherapy. PMID:23956100

  15. An optimization formulation for characterization of pulsatile cortisol secretion

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Cortisol is released to relay information to cells to regulate metabolism and reaction to stress and inflammation. In particular, cortisol is released in the form of pulsatile signals. This low-energy method of signaling seems to be more efficient than continuous signaling. We hypothesize that there is a controller in the anterior pituitary that leads to pulsatile release of cortisol, and propose a mathematical formulation for such controller, which leads to impulse control as opposed to continuous control. We postulate that this controller is minimizing the number of secretory events that result in cortisol secretion, which is a way of minimizing the energy required for cortisol secretion; this controller maintains the blood cortisol levels within a specific circadian range while complying with the first order dynamics underlying cortisol secretion. We use an ℓ0-norm cost function for this controller, and solve a reweighed ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm for obtaining the solution to this optimization problem. We use four examples to illustrate the performance of this approach: (i) a toy problem that achieves impulse control, (ii) two examples that achieve physiologically plausible pulsatile cortisol release, (iii) an example where the number of pulses is not within the physiologically plausible range for healthy subjects while the cortisol levels are within the desired range. This novel approach results in impulse control where the impulses and the obtained blood cortisol levels have a circadian rhythm and an ultradian rhythm that are in agreement with the known physiology of cortisol secretion. The proposed formulation is a first step in developing intermittent controllers for curing cortisol deficiency. This type of bio-inspired pulse controllers can be employed for designing non-continuous controllers in brain-machine interface design for neuroscience applications. PMID:26321898

  16. An optimization formulation for characterization of pulsatile cortisol secretion.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Rose T; Dahleh, Munther A; Brown, Emery N

    2015-01-01

    Cortisol is released to relay information to cells to regulate metabolism and reaction to stress and inflammation. In particular, cortisol is released in the form of pulsatile signals. This low-energy method of signaling seems to be more efficient than continuous signaling. We hypothesize that there is a controller in the anterior pituitary that leads to pulsatile release of cortisol, and propose a mathematical formulation for such controller, which leads to impulse control as opposed to continuous control. We postulate that this controller is minimizing the number of secretory events that result in cortisol secretion, which is a way of minimizing the energy required for cortisol secretion; this controller maintains the blood cortisol levels within a specific circadian range while complying with the first order dynamics underlying cortisol secretion. We use an ℓ0-norm cost function for this controller, and solve a reweighed ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm for obtaining the solution to this optimization problem. We use four examples to illustrate the performance of this approach: (i) a toy problem that achieves impulse control, (ii) two examples that achieve physiologically plausible pulsatile cortisol release, (iii) an example where the number of pulses is not within the physiologically plausible range for healthy subjects while the cortisol levels are within the desired range. This novel approach results in impulse control where the impulses and the obtained blood cortisol levels have a circadian rhythm and an ultradian rhythm that are in agreement with the known physiology of cortisol secretion. The proposed formulation is a first step in developing intermittent controllers for curing cortisol deficiency. This type of bio-inspired pulse controllers can be employed for designing non-continuous controllers in brain-machine interface design for neuroscience applications. PMID:26321898

  17. Modeling diurnal hormone profiles by hierarchical state space models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyue; Guo, Wensheng

    2015-10-30

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) diurnal patterns contain both smooth circadian rhythms and pulsatile activities. How to evaluate and compare them between different groups is a challenging statistical task. In particular, we are interested in testing (1) whether the smooth ACTH circadian rhythms in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia patients differ from those in healthy controls and (2) whether the patterns of pulsatile activities are different. In this paper, a hierarchical state space model is proposed to extract these signals from noisy observations. The smooth circadian rhythms shared by a group of subjects are modeled by periodic smoothing splines. The subject level pulsatile activities are modeled by autoregressive processes. A functional random effect is adopted at the pair level to account for the matched pair design. Parameters are estimated by maximizing the marginal likelihood. Signals are extracted as posterior means. Computationally efficient Kalman filter algorithms are adopted for implementation. Application of the proposed model reveals that the smooth circadian rhythms are similar in the two groups but the pulsatile activities in patients are weaker than those in the healthy controls. PMID:26152819

  18. Neocortical capillary flow pulsatility is not elevated in experimental communicating hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shams; McAllister, James P; Yu, Yiting; Wagshul, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    While communicating hydrocephalus (CH) is often characterized by increased pulsatile flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct, a clear-cut explanation for this phenomenon is lacking. Increased pulsatility of the entire cerebral vasculature including the cortical capillaries has been suggested as a causative mechanism. To test this theory, we used two-photon microscopy to measure flow pulsatility in neocortical capillaries 40 to 500 μm below the pial surface in adult rats with CH at 5 to 7 days (acute, n=8) and 3 to 5 weeks (chronic, n=5) after induction compared with intact controls (n=9). Averaging over all cortical depths, no increase in capillary pulsatility occurred in acute (pulsatility index (PI): 0.15±0.06) or chronic (0.14±0.05) CH animals compared with controls (0.18±0.07; P=0.07). More specifically, PI increased significantly with cortical depth in controls (r=0.35, P<0.001), but no such increase occurred in acute (r=0.06, P=0.3) or chronic (r=0.05, P=0.5) CH. Pulsatile CSF aqueductal flow, in contrast, was elevated 10- to 500-fold compared with controls. We conclude that even in the presence of markedly elevated pulsatile CSF flow in the aqueduct, there is no concurrent increase in microvascular pulsatile flow. PMID:21934694

  19. Lutein acts via multiple antioxidant pathways in the photo-stressed retina.

    PubMed

    Kamoshita, Mamoru; Toda, Eriko; Osada, Hideto; Narimatsu, Toshio; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Lutein slows the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in ageing societies. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we evaluated lutein's effects on light-induced AMD-related pathological events. Balb/c mice exposed to light (2000 lux, 3 h) showed tight junction disruption in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at 12 h, as detected by zona occludens-1 immunostaining. Substantial disruption remained 48 h after light exposure in the vehicle-treated group; however, this was ameliorated in the mice treated with intraperitoneal lutein at 12 h, suggesting that lutein promoted tight junction repair. In the photo-stressed RPE and the neighbouring choroid tissue, lutein suppressed reactive oxygen species and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity at 24 h, and produced sustained increases in sod1 and sod2 mRNA levels at 48 h. SOD activity was induced by lutein in an RPE cell line, ARPE19. We also found that lutein suppressed upregulation of macrophage-related markers, f4/80 and mcp-1, in the RPE-choroid tissue at 18 h. In ARPE19, lutein reduced mcp-1 mRNA levels. These findings indicated that lutein promoted tight junction repair and suppressed inflammation in photo-stressed mice, reducing local oxidative stress by direct scavenging and most likely by induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27444056

  20. Dietary effects of lutein-fortified chlorella on milk components of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Park, Keun-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Jang, Seung-Wan; Moon, Byung-Hern; An, Byoung-Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the dietary effect of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella on milk production and lutein incorporation in milk. Fifteen Holstein cows in mid-lactation were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design each with a 21-day period. Cows were top-dressed daily with 30 g of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella for 3 weeks. Cows without chlorella served as the control. The feed intake and milk yield were not affected by dietary treatments. The concentrations of milk protein and solids non-fat in groups fed diets containing both conventional and lutein-fortified chlorella were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in content of milk fat among groups. The levels of plasma glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 were not influenced by the dietary treatments. Lutein content in milk was significantly increased in groups fed lutein-fortified chlorella as compared with those of conventional chlorella and control, respectively (P < 0.01). These results imply that conventional and lutein-fortified chlorella has positive effects on milk components and the use of lutein-fortified chlorella in a dairy diet is effective in the production of milk enriched with lutein. PMID:27386352

  1. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Seiji; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  2. Differentiation between lutein monoester regioisomers and detection of lutein diesters from marigold flowers (Tagetes erecta L.) and several fruits by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Breithaupt, Dietmar E; Wirt, Ursula; Bamedi, Ameneh

    2002-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (LC-APCIMS) was employed for the identification of eight lutein monoesters, formed by incomplete enzymatic saponification of lutein diesters of marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) by Candida rugosa lipase. Additionally, the main lutein diesters naturally occurring in marigold oleoresin were chromatographically separated and identified. The LC-MS method allows for characterization of lutein diesters occurring as minor components in several fruits; this was demonstrated by analysis of extracts of cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.), kiwano (Cucumis metuliferus E. Mey. ex Naud.), and pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.). The assignment of the regioisomers of lutein monoesters is based on the characteristic fragmentation pattern: the most intense daughter ion generally results from the loss of the substituent (fatty acid or hydroxyl group) bound to the epsilon-ionone ring, yielding an allylic cation. The limit of detection was estimated at 0.5 microg/mL with lutein dimyristate as reference compound. This method provides a useful tool to obtain further insight into the biochemical reactions leading to lutein ester formation in plants. PMID:11754543

  3. Localization and synthesis of the hormone-binding regions of the human thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Atassi, M.Z.; Manshouri, T. ); Sakata, Shigeki )

    1991-05-01

    Two regions of human thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) receptor (TSHR) were selected on the basis that they exhibit no sequence resemblance to luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor. Five synthetic overlapping peptides (12-30, 24-44, 308-328, 324-344, and 339-364) were studied for their ability to bind {sup 125}I-labeled human TSH (hTSH), its isolated {alpha} and {beta} subunits, bovine TSH, ovine TSH, human luteinizing hormone, and human follicle-stimulating hormone. The human TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 exhibited remarkable binding activity to human, bovine, and ovine TSH and to the {beta} chain of hTSH. Lower binding activity resided in the adjacent overlapping peptides, probably due to the contribution of the shared overlap to the binding. The specificity of TSH binding to these peptides was confirmed by their inability to bind human luteinizing hormone, human follicle-stimulating hormone, and the {alpha} chain of hTSH. Thyrotropins did not bind to bovine serum albumin or to peptide controls unrelated to the TSHR system. It is concluded that the binding of TSH to its receptor involves extensive contacts and that the TSHR peptides 12-30 and 324-344 contain specific binding regions for TSH that might be either independent sites or two faces (subsites) within a large binding site.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction for nonlinear response of shells conveying pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    Circular cylindrical shells with flexible boundary conditions conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated. The equations of motion are obtained based on the nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory via Lagrangian approach. The flow is set in motion by a pulsatile pressure gradient. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model that contains the unsteady effects obtained from the linear potential flow theory and the pulsatile viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior. The case of shells containing quiescent fluid subjected to the action of a pulsatile transmural pressure is also addressed. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pressure are here presented via frequency-response curves and time histories. The vibrations involving both a driven mode and a companion mode, which appear due to the axial symmetry, are also investigated. This theoretical framework represents a pioneering study that could be of great interest for biomedical applications. In particular, in the future, a more refined model of the one here presented will possibly be applied to reproduce the dynamic behavior of vascular prostheses used for repairing and replacing damaged and diseased thoracic aorta in cases of aneurysm, dissection or coarctation. For this purpose, a pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is here considered by applying physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. This study provides, for the first time in literature, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model with deep insights in the nonlinear vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to pulsatile pressure and pulsatile flow.

  5. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  6. Identification of the Temperature Field in Pulsatile Impinging Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vít, Tomáš; Lédl, Vít

    2010-09-01

    The presented paper shows the possibility of using holographic interferometry and hot-wire anemometry in the research of heat transfer from impingement pulsatile flow. The intensity of heat transfer in the case of impingement flow is often measured with glue-on heat flux sensors, or by indirect methods such as naphthalene sublimation. All these methods have a response time too long for measuring instant values of the heat transfer coefficient on a surface cooled/heated by impingement pulsatile flow. This shortcoming should be overcome by using CTA glue-on probes or, preferably, by using optical methods such as holographic interferometry. It is necessary to employ a special holographic setup with double sensitivity instead of the commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of holographic interferometer in order to attain the parameters sufficient for the studied case. This setup is not light efficient like the Mach-Zehnder type but has double sensitivity. The results from the holographic interferometry experiments will be compared with the temperature field achieved by methods of hot-wire anemometry.

  7. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Luke J.; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s-1. A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s-1. Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  8. Predictable pulsatile release of tramadol hydrochloride for chronotherapeutics of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dabhi, Chandu; Randale, Shivsagar; Belgamwar, Veena; Gattani, Surendra; Tekade, Avinash

    2010-07-01

    The present investigation deals with the development of a pH and time-dependent press-coated pulsatile drug delivery system for delivering drugs into the colon. The system consists of a drug containing core, coated by a combination of natural polymer Delonix regia gum (DRG) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC K4M) in various proportions, which controls the onset of release. The whole system was coated with methacrylic acid copolymers, which not only prevents the drug release in the stomach, but also prolongs the lag time. Tramadol HCl was used as a model drug and varying combinations of DRG and HPMC K4M were used to achieve the desired lag time before rapid and complete release of the drug in the colon. It was observed that the lag time depends on the coating ratio of DRG to HPMC and also on press coating weight. Drug release was found to be increased by 15-30% in the presence of colonic microbial flora. The results showed the capability of the system in achieving pulsatile release for a programmable period of time and pH-dependent release to attain colon-targeted delivery. PMID:20524906

  9. Lutein acts via multiple antioxidant pathways in the photo-stressed retina

    PubMed Central

    Kamoshita, Mamoru; Toda, Eriko; Osada, Hideto; Narimatsu, Toshio; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Lutein slows the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in ageing societies. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we evaluated lutein’s effects on light-induced AMD-related pathological events. Balb/c mice exposed to light (2000 lux, 3 h) showed tight junction disruption in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at 12 h, as detected by zona occludens-1 immunostaining. Substantial disruption remained 48 h after light exposure in the vehicle-treated group; however, this was ameliorated in the mice treated with intraperitoneal lutein at 12 h, suggesting that lutein promoted tight junction repair. In the photo-stressed RPE and the neighbouring choroid tissue, lutein suppressed reactive oxygen species and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity at 24 h, and produced sustained increases in sod1 and sod2 mRNA levels at 48 h. SOD activity was induced by lutein in an RPE cell line, ARPE19. We also found that lutein suppressed upregulation of macrophage-related markers, f4/80 and mcp-1, in the RPE-choroid tissue at 18 h. In ARPE19, lutein reduced mcp-1 mRNA levels. These findings indicated that lutein promoted tight junction repair and suppressed inflammation in photo-stressed mice, reducing local oxidative stress by direct scavenging and most likely by induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27444056

  10. Distribution of lutein, zeaxanthin, and related geometrical isomers in fruit, vegetables, wheat, and pasta products.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Julia M; Khachik, Frederick

    2003-02-26

    Quantitative data with regard to dietary (3R,3'R,6'R)-lutein, (3R,3'R)-zeaxanthin, and their (E/Z)-geometrical isomers are scarce, and in most cases, only the combined concentrations of these two carotenoids in foods are reported. Lutein and zeaxanthin accumulate in the human macula and have been implicated in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The qualitative and quantitative distributions of lutein, zeaxanthin, and their (E/Z)-isomers in the extracts from some of the most commonly consumed fruits, vegetables, and pasta products were determined by HPLC employing a silica-based nitrile-bonded column. Green vegetables had the highest concentration of lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z), and the ratios of these carotenoids (L/Z) were in the range 12-63. The yellow-orange fruits and vegetables, with the exception of squash (butternut variety), had much lower levels of lutein in comparison to greens but contained a higher concentration of zeaxanthin. The ratio of lutein to zeaxanthin (L/Z) in two North American bread varieties of wheat (Pioneer, Catoctin) was 11 and 7.6, respectively, while in a green-harvested wheat (Freekeh) imported from Australia, the ratio was 2.5. Between the two pasta products examined, lasagne and egg noodles, the latter had a much higher concentration of lutein and zeaxanthin. The levels of the (E/Z)-geometrical isomers of lutein and zeaxanthin in these foods were also determined. PMID:12590476

  11. Antioxidant properties of lutein contribute to the protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced uveitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lutein is an important eye-protective nutrient. This study investigates the protective effects and mechanisms of lutein on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced uveitis in mice. Methods Lutein, suspended in drinking water at a final concentration of 12.5 and 25 mg/mL, was administered to mice at 0.1 mL/10 g body weight for five consecutive days. Control and model group received drinking water only. Uveitis was induced by injecting LPS (100 mg per mouse) into the footpad in the model and lutein groups on day 5 after the last drug administration. Eyes of the mice were collected 24 hours after the LPS injection for the detection of indicators using commercial kits and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results LPS-induced uveitis was confirmed by significant pathological damage and increased the nitric oxide level in eye tissue of BALB/C mice 24 hours after the footpad injection. The elevated nitric oxide level was significantly reduced by oral administration of lutein (125 and 500 mg/kg/d for five days) before LPS injection. Moreover, lutein decreased the malondialdehyde content, increased the oxygen radical absorbance capacity level, glutathione, the vitamin C contents and total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Lutein further increased expressions of copper-zinc SOD, manganese SOD and GPx mRNA. Conclusion The antioxidant properties of lutein contribute to the protection against LPS-induced uveitis, partially through the intervention of inflammation process. PMID:22040935

  12. Lutein and Age-Related Ocular Disorders in the Older Adult: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein, a carotenoid found in dark green, leafy vegetables, has been implicated as being protective against the acquired ocular diseases, such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. In the eye, lutein may act as an antioxidant and as a blue light filter to protect the underlying tissues ...

  13. Production, extraction and stabilization of lutein from microalga Chlorella sorokiniana MB-1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Jesisca; Hsieh, Chienyan; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-01-01

    The efficiencies of extraction and preservation of lutein from microalgae are critical for the success of its commercialization. In this study, lutein was produced by Chlorella sorokiniana MB-1 via semi-batch mixotrophic cultivation. The microalgal biomass with a lutein content of 5.21mg/g was pretreated by bead-beating and high pressure cell disruption methods, and the lutein content was harvested by a reduced pressure extraction method. The effect of pretreatment, pressure, solvent type, extraction time and temperature on lutein recovery was investigated. Using high pressure pretreatment followed by extraction with tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvent resulted in high lutein recovery efficiencies of 87.0% (20min) and 99.5% (40min) at 850mbar and 25°C. In contrast, using ethanol as the solvent, 86.2% lutein recovery was achieved under 450mbar, 35°C and 40min extraction. The extracted lutein was stabilized in olive oil or sunflower oil with half-lives of 53.1 and 63.8days, respectively. PMID:26519703

  14. A possible role for lutein and zeaxanthin in cognitive function in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological studies suggest that dietary lutein and zeaxanthin may be of benefit in maintaining cognitive health. Among the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, are the only two that cross the blood-retina barrier to form macular pigment (MP) in the eye. They also preferentially accumulate in hum...

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Lutein on NMDA-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Injury in Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chanjuan; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Li, Qin; Huang, Cuiqin; Zhu, Lihong; Lu, Daxiang

    2016-05-01

    Lutein injection is a possible therapeutic approach for retinal diseases, but the molecular mechanism of its neuroprotective effect remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate its protective effects in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced retinal damage in vivo. Retinal damage was induced by intravitreal NMDA injection in rats. Each animal was given five daily intraperitoneal injections of Lutein or vehicle along with intravitreal NMDA injections. Electroretinograms were recorded. The number of viable RGCs was quantified using the retinal whole-mount method by immunofluorescence. Proteins were measured by Western blot assays. Lutein reduced the retinal damage and improved the response to light, as shown by an animal behavior assay (the black-and-white box method) in rats. Furthermore, Lutein treatment prevented the NMDA-induced reduction in phNR wave amplitude. Lutein increased RGC number after NMDA-induced retina damage. Most importantly, Bax, cytochrome c, p-p38 MAPK, and p-c-Jun were all upregulated in rats injected with NMDA, but these expression patterns were reversed by continuous Lutein uptake. Bcl-2, p-GSK-3β, and p-Akt in the Lutein-treated eyes were increased compared with the NMDA group. Lutein has neuroprotective effects against retinal damage, its protective effects may be partly mediated by its anti-excitability neurotoxicity, through MAPKs and PI3K/Akt signaling, suggesting a potential approach for suppressing retinal neural damage. PMID:26119305

  16. Optimization of culture media for large-scale lutein production by heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Young; Kwon, Ji-Sue; Kang, Soon Tae; Kim, Bo-Ra; Jung, Yuchul; Han, Jae Gap; Park, Joon Hyun; Hwang, Jae Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid with a purported role in protecting eyes from oxidative stress, particularly the high-energy photons of blue light. Statistical optimization was performed to growth media that supports a higher production of lutein by heterotrophically cultivated Chlorella vulgaris. The effect of media composition of C. vulgaris on lutein was examined using fractional factorial design (FFD) and central composite design (CCD). The results indicated that the presence of magnesium sulfate, EDTA-2Na, and trace metal solution significantly affected lutein production. The optimum concentrations for lutein production were found to be 0.34 g/L, 0.06 g/L, and 0.4 mL/L for MgSO4 ·7H2 O, EDTA-2Na, and trace metal solution, respectively. These values were validated using a 5-L jar fermenter. Lutein concentration was increased by almost 80% (139.64 ± 12.88 mg/L to 252.75 ± 12.92 mg/L) after 4 days. Moreover, the lutein concentration was not reduced as the cultivation was scaled up to 25,000 L (260.55 ± 3.23 mg/L) and 240,000 L (263.13 ± 2.72 mg/L). These observations suggest C. vulgaris as a potential lutein source. PMID:24550199

  17. Chlorella is an effective dietary source of lutein for human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kimura, Fumiko; Nakashima, Yuya; Maruyama, Isao; Higuchi, Ohki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella contains a high amount of carotenoids, especially lutein, and has received attention as a possible dietary source for improving carotenoid levels in human blood. In the present study, we performed a 2-month single arm human study, and investigated the efficacy of Chlorella supplementation (9 g Chlorella/day; equivalent to 32 mg lutein/day) on lutein and other carotenoid concentrations in plasma as well as erythrocytes of 12 healthy subjects. Following Chlorella supplementation, lutein was the predominant carotenoid in erythrocytes, showing a 4-fold increase (from 14 to 54 pmol/mL packed cells). After the one month without Chlorella ingestion, erythrocyte lutein then decreased to a basal level (17 pmol/mL packed cells). Erythrocyte carotenoid (lutein, zeaxanthin, α-carotene, and β-carotene) levels were proportional to plasma carotenoid levels. The results suggest the transfer of Chlorella carotenoids, especially lutein, from plasma lipoprotein particles to the erythrocyte membrane. Chlorella intake would be effective for improving and maintaining lutein concentrations in human erythrocytes. PMID:24088514

  18. Increasing pulmonary artery pulsatile flow improves hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in piglets.

    PubMed

    Courboulin, Audrey; Kang, Chantal; Baillard, Olivier; Bonnet, Sebastien; Bonnet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease affecting distal pulmonary arteries (PA). These arteries are deformed, leading to right ventricular failure. Current treatments are limited. Physiologically, pulsatile blood flow is detrimental to the vasculature. In response to sustained pulsatile stress, vessels release nitric oxide (NO) to induce vasodilation for self-protection. Based on this observation, this study developed a protocol to assess whether an artificial pulmonary pulsatile blood flow could induce an NO-dependent decrease in pulmonary artery pressure. One group of piglets was exposed to chronic hypoxia for 3 weeks and compared to a control group of piglets. Once a week, the piglets underwent echocardiography to assess PAH severity. At the end of hypoxia exposure, the piglets were subjected to a pulsatile protocol using a pulsatile catheter. After being anesthetized and prepared for surgery, the jugular vein of the piglet was isolated and the catheter was introduced through the right atrium, the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, under radioscopic control. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was measured before (T0), immediately after (T1) and 30 min after (T2) the pulsatile protocol. It was demonstrated that this pulsatile protocol is a safe and efficient method of inducing a significant reduction in mean PAP via an NO-dependent mechanism. These data open up new avenues for the clinical management of PAH. PMID:25993379

  19. College Students' Dietary Practices Affect Lutein/Zeaxanthin Intake: A Two-Generation, Ethnic and Gender Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osaseri, Uyi E.; Kwok, Shiu Y.; Kwok, Wendy; Tam, Chick F.

    2008-01-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are important anti-oxidant nutrients obtained only from foods that are essential for good eye health. The purpose of this study was to assess food choices rich in lutein/zeaxanthin and compare the amount of lutein/zeaxanthin intake amongst college students and their live-in parents. Three-day dietary records from 95…

  20. Exploratory metabolomic analyses reveal compounds correlated with lutein concentration in frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex of human infant brain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with...

  1. Effects of abiotic stressors on lutein production in the green microalga Dunaliella salina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent years have witnessed a rising trend in exploring microalgae for valuable carotenoid products as the demand for lutein and many other carotenoids in global markets has increased significantly. In green microalgae lutein is a major carotenoid protecting cellular components from damage incurred by reactive oxygen species under stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of abiotic stressors on lutein accumulation in a strain of the marine microalga D. salina which had been selected for growth under stress conditions of combined blue and red lights by adaptive laboratory evolution. Results Nitrate concentration, salinity and light quality were selected as three representative influencing factors and their impact on lutein production in batch cultures of D. salina was evaluated using response surface analysis. D. salina was found to be more tolerant to hyper-osmotic stress than to hypo-osmotic stress which caused serious cell damage and death in a high proportion of cells while hyper-osmotic stress increased the average cell size of D. salina only slightly. Two models were developed to explain how lutein productivity depends on the stress factors and for predicting the optimal conditions for lutein productivity. Among the three stress variables for lutein production, stronger interactions were found between nitrate concentration and salinity than between light quality and the other two. The predicted optimal conditions for lutein production were close to the original conditions used for adaptive evolution of D. salina. This suggests that the conditions imposed during adaptive evolution may have selected for the growth optima arrived at. Conclusions This study shows that systematic evaluation of the relationship between abiotic environmental stresses and lutein biosynthesis can help to decipher the key parameters in obtaining high levels of lutein productivity in D. salina. This study may benefit future stress-driven adaptive

  2. Physicochemical properties and storage stability of lutein microcapsules prepared with maltodextrins and sucrose by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Pengqun; Zhang, Hongchao; Bajaj, Poonam R; Yuan, Qipeng; Tang, Juming; Chen, Shulin; Sablani, Shyam S

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the physicochemical properties of lutein microcapsules. Nine types of lutein microcapsules were prepared in order to determine their encapsulation efficiency and yield. Results show that lutein microcapsules with maltodextrin M040 and sucrose at the weight ratio of 3:1 (designated as M040:1) had the highest encapsulation efficiency (90.1%) among the lutein microcapsules, as well as a higher encapsulation yield (90.4%). The onset glass transition temperatures (Tgi ) and the surface dents of the lutein microcapsules decreased as the dextrose equivalent value of maltodextrin and the weight ratio of sucrose increased. Enthalpy relaxation experiments were conducted for the lutein microcapsules M040:1 at (Tgi - 5) , (Tgi - 10), and (Tgi - 15) °C, and the obtained data were fitted to the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts model. Results show that the mean relaxation time (τ) (316 h) of M040:1 lutein microcapsules aged at (Tgi - 15) °C was greater than the τ (161 h) at (Tgi - 10) °C and τ (60.5 h) at (Tgi - 5) °C. Effects of temperature and oxygen transmission rates for package film on the storage stability of M040:1 lutein microcapsules were also investigated. Findings show that rates of lutein degradation and color change increased by an order of magnitude as storage temperature (4 to 97 °C) and oxygen transmission rate of the package film (0.018 to 62.8 cc/m(2) day) increased. These results suggest that lutein is highly unstable and susceptible to thermal and oxidative degradations. However, microencapsulation with appropriate wall materials of higher relaxation time and high oxygen barrier packaging can increase the storage life. PMID:25597919

  3. Pre-translational regulation of luteinizing hormone receptor in follicular somatic cells of cattle

    PubMed Central

    Marsters, P.; Kendall, N.R.; Campbell, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Differential regulation of LHR in theca cells (TC) and granulosa cells (GC) is important for normal follicular development. Unlike TC, GC only acquire LH-responsiveness during the later stages of antral follicle development. This study tested the hypothesis that differential LH-responsiveness in these two cell types may be due, in part, to shifts in cellular patterns of alternatively spliced LHR mRNA transcripts which may not be obvious from analysis of total LHR gene expression. It also further explored the role of translation inhibition by an LHR binding protein (LHBP), normally associated with the production of endogenous cholesterol. LHR mRNA variation arises as a result of the alternative splicing of two variable deletion sites (VDS) designated 5′ VDS and 3′ VDS, and it was proposed that differences in cell sensitivity to LH may be due in part to variations in the pattern of the mRNA expression of the receptor variants. The outcomes of the present study support a dynamic multi-facetted regulation of LHR during pre-translation. Not only did the ratio between variants change during antral follicle growth and in vitro cell differentiation but also between TC and GC. Regulation could also be linked to LH concentration feedback mechanisms as the absence of LH caused cultured TC to markedly up-regulate amounts of LHR mRNA. In both TC and GC, LHR mRNA was greatly reduced after treatment to block mevalonate production in the de novo cholesterol pathway, adding further support for a regulatory mechanism linked to enriched cellular amounts of mevalonate kinase. PMID:26507944

  4. Neuroendocrine mechanisms that control seasonal changes of luteinizing hormone secretion in sheep are sexually differentiated.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, L S; Jackson, G L

    1993-12-01

    The apparent earlier onset of seasonal breeding activity of adult male versus adult female sheep suggests that the neuroendocrine mechanisms that control onset of the breeding season may be sexually differentiated in this species. However, it is difficult to compare gradual onset of testicular growth to abrupt changes in ovarian activity. To determine the relative timing of seasonal transitions in neuroendocrine reproductive activity, we compared temporal changes of LH concentrations in adult, gonadectomized, estradiol (E)-treated (experiment 1), or testosterone (T)-treated (experiment 2) Suffolk male and female sheep held outdoors for 18 mo. In addition, we compared the rates at which E-treated males and females become photorefractory to a winter solstice hold (WSH) photoperiod. In all three experiments, blood samples were collected weekly. In addition, serial blood samples were collected every 12 min for 4 h at approximately 2-mo intervals for experiment 1 and at monthly intervals for experiment 2. Neither plasma E nor T concentrations differed (p > 0.05) between sexes. In E-treated animals, mean LH changed (p < 0.001) over time in both sexes, and there was a sex x time interaction (p < 0.001). LH pulse amplitude changed (p < 0.001) over time in both sexes, but there was no detectable (p > 0.05) sex x time interaction. LH pulse frequency varied significantly over time in E-treated females (p < 0.001) but not in males (p < 0.05). The amplitude of the annual oscillation of mean LH was greater (p < 0.01) in E-treated females than in males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8286619

  5. Luteinizing hormone induces mouse vas deferens protein expression in the murine ovary.

    PubMed

    Brockstedt, E; Peters-Kottig, M; Badock, V; Hegele-Hartung, C; Lessl, M

    2000-07-01

    The aim of our study was to isolate and identify novel proteins that are involved in the process of ovulation. To achieve this goal we used the technique of proteome analysis. Comparison of ovary protein patterns, obtained by high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis from recombinant FSH (rFSH)- and rFSH + human CG (hCG)-treated mice, showed significant differences in protein spot positions and intensities. Subsequent analysis of one of these proteins was performed by mass spectrometry, resulting in the identification of the mouse vas deferens protein (MVDP). MVDP, which was absent in the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis protein pattern of rFSH-primed mice and appeared 3 h after the hCG surge, is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily and was originally identified in the mouse vas deferens. This is the first study describing MVDP expression and regulation by LH in the ovary. Northern blot analysis of female mice tissues showed that mvdp messenger RNA (mRNA) was only present in adrenal glands and in hCG-treated ovaries. In situ hybridization studies localized the mvdp mRNA unequivocally to ovarian thecal and interstitial cells with an expression profile starting already 1.5 h, and decreasing 24 h, after LH treatment. In the adrenal glands, mvdp mRNA was not regulated by LH and localized in the cells of the zona fasciculata. In murine adrenocortical cells, a recent study proposed a detoxifying role of MVDP. MVDP might fulfill the same function in the ovary; however, because of its strong and early transcriptional induction by LH, it is also possible that MVDP catalyses another important step during the cascade of events occurring at the time of ovulation. PMID:10875260

  6. Evidence that a decrease in opioid tone may evoke preovulatory luteinizing hormone release in the rat.

    PubMed

    Allen, L G; Kalra, S P

    1986-06-01

    We have assessed the effects on LH release of prolonged naloxone (NAL) treatment before the critical period on proestrus. When LH secretion was monitored at 5-min intervals immediately after the start of continuous NAL infusion (2 mg/0.6 ml saline X h iv) at 1000 h, two types of responses were observed. In three of six rats, a small increase (1-2 ng rat LHRH-2/ml) during the first hour was followed by a sharp rise to 4-5 ng/ml in the second hour and a gradual return to baseline levels (0.5-1.00 ng/ml) in the third hour of infusion. In the remaining rats, LH responses were small with peak levels reaching 2 ng/ml range. When the effects were monitored 1 h after starting NAL infusion at 1000 h, the LH response was improved. Peak LH levels observed shortly before or after 1200 h varied between 4-14 ng/ml and in some rats the levels were comparable to those seen normally in the afternoon of proestrus (9-24 ng/ml). However, delaying the start of NAL infusion to 1200 h produced LH surges before 1400 h, with peak levels (27.5 +/- 5.5 ng/ml) in the range of normal preovulatory LH surges (peak levels 16.6 +/- 2.5 ng/ml), followed by a steady decrease in LH secretion. Additionally, sc NAL pellets implanted at 0930 h provoked premature LH hypersecretion with a temporal pattern (0930-1430 h) and magnitude (peak levels, 26.3 +/- 4.3 ng/ml between 1100-1200 h) comparable to the normal preovulatory LH surge observed after 1330 h. Since NAL is believed to antagonize the inhibitory effects of endogenous opioids on LH secretion, the results of this study imply that a sustained restraint on this inhibitory opioid tone can elicit the LH surge before the critical period on proestrus. These findings are in accord with our thesis that the neural clock that normally triggers the preovulatory LH surge may transiently decrease the inhibitory opioid tone to allow expression of crucial neural events which culminate in preovulatory LH secretion. PMID:3698918

  7. Effects of RFRP2 and RF9 on secretion of luteinizing hormone in prepubertal gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most mammals, the RF-amide related peptide (RFRP) pre-pro-protein contains cleavage sites for 2 peptides (RFRP1 and RFRP3). Our laboratory did not observe RFRP3-induced suppression of LH secretion in gilts. However, the porcine sequence encodes an additional peptide (RFRP2) with an amidated C-ter...

  8. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 5A Plays an Essential Role in Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Gulappa, Thippeswamy

    2014-01-01

    Down-regulation of LH receptor (LHR) in the ovary by its ligand is mediated by a specific RNA-binding protein, designated LH receptor mRNA–binding protein (LRBP), through translational suppression and mRNA degradation. Using yeast 2-hybrid screens, we previously identified eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as one of the proteins that interacts with LRBP during LHR mRNA down-regulation. The present study examined the role of eIF5A and its hypusination in the context of LHR mRNA down-regulation. The association of eIF5A with LRBP or LHR mRNA was determined using immunoprecipitation and RNA immunoprecipitation assays. The results showed that the association of eIF5A with the LHR mRNA-LRBP complex increased significantly during down-regulation. Furthermore, gel fractionation and the hypusination activity assay both showed increased hypusination of eIF5A during LHR mRNA down-regulation. Abolishment of hypusination by pretreatment with the chemical inhibitor GC7 prevented the association of eIF5A with LHR mRNA and LRBP. Inhibition of hypusination also reduced the extent of ligand-induced down-regulation of LHR mRNA as well as the expression of functional LHRs assessed by real-time PCR and 125I-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) binding assays, respectively. The loss of human chorionic gonadotropin–mediated downstream signaling during LHR down-regulation was also restored by inhibition of hypusination of eIF5A. Thus, the present study, for the first time, reveals the crucial role of eIF5A and its hypusination in the regulation of LHR expression in the ovary. PMID:25216047

  9. In vivo dynamics of luteinizing hormone secretion and clearance in man: assessment by deconvolution mechanics.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Johnson, M L

    1988-06-01

    The dynamics of LH secretion and clearance were studied in vivo in eight healthy young men using a novel multiple parameter deconvolution procedure to resolve underlying secretion and clearance rates simultaneously from serial serum immunoactive LH concentrations. This deconvolution analysis disclosed random LH secretory bursts occurring at a mean (+/- SEM) interpulse interval of 72 +/- 5 min. The frequency of these secretory bursts was 6.9 +/- 0.6 episodes/8 h. Each resolved LH secretory event had an average half-duration of only 7.8 +/- 0.5 min, which was remarkably shorter than the LH concentration peak duration of 60 +/- 6 min. The maximal LH secretory rate achieved within a secretory burst averaged 0.40 +/- 0.05 mIU/min.mL (0.14 IU/min.L), which corresponded to a mass of LH released of 3.2 +/- 0.3 mIU/mL distribution vol (IU/L). By linear regression analysis, both the maximal rate and mass of LH released per secretory burst were positively correlated with the duration of the subsequent interpulse interval (P less than 0.001). In physiological experiments, the mass of LH released per secretory burst was increased by iv GnRH injections or primary gonadal failure, and decreased by sc administration of a selective GnRH antagonist (Nal,Glu-GnRH). The mean endogenous LH production rate calculated by deconvolution [180 +/- 40 mIU/min (0.18 IU/min)] was not different from a nominal value of 228 +/- 80 mIU/min (0.228 IU/min) extrapolated from earlier steady state LH infusions. Deconvolution estimated single phase half-times of endogenous LH disappearance of 87 +/- 8 min, were in general harmony with values of 44-106 min obtained previously in four LH-deficient men injected with purified LH. Moreover, creation of synthetic LH series using our deconvolution estimates yielded 24-h LH pulse profiles similar quantitatively and qualitatively to those in normal men. In summary, we applied a new multiple parameter deconvolution procedure to immunoactive LH pulse profiles to discern the nature of physiological LH secretory events and estimate endogenous LH disappearance rates. These studies in normal men have revealed that 1) LH secretory bursts occur every 72 min; their mean half-duration is 7.8 min; and 3.2 mIU/mL (3.2 IU/L) are released per secretory peak; 2) amplitudes of in vivo LH secretory bursts are augmented in primary gonadal failure and/or by exogenous GnRH injections and attenuated by a GnRH antagonist; 3) the duration of a postsecretory pause is proportional to the amplitude of the preceding LH secretory burst; and (4) 95% of total daily LH release occurs in only 5 h/day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3372689

  10. Microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow loop for hemodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T G; Hobson, R W; Pawel, H E

    1986-03-01

    Validation of spectral analytic techniques in the clinical assessment and quantitation of vascular stenoses has been aided by use of in vitro flow loops. We have used a recently developed microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow model to examine the influence of varying stenoses on Doppler-shifted peak systolic frequencies. A nonaxisymmetric, vertically oriented stenosis was produced by extrinsic compression of latex rubber tubing 12 mm in diameter, reducing the cross-sectional area (CSA) by 25, 40, 50, 60, 70, 85, and 97%. A rolling diaphragm pump, driven through a slider-crank mechanism by a microprocessor-controlled stepper motor, generated characteristic arterial pulse waves at a rate of 75 cycles per minute. Using an 8 MHz, continuous-wave, directional Doppler velocimeter, the Doppler-shifted frequencies were recorded at the stenosis. Four sets of observations were made at each of the stenoses, and the peak systolic frequency (PSF) was determined using a spectrum analyzer. The PSF in the absence of an obstructing stenosis was 2.56 +/- 0.03 (KHz +/- SEM). This increased significantly (P less than 0.05) to 4.80 +/- 0.09 when the CSA was reduced by 50%, to 5.90 +/- 0.37 when the CSA was reduced by 60% (P less than 0.05), to 8.40 +/- 0.10 when the CSA was reduced by 70% (P less than 0.05), and to 17.84 +/- 0.89 when the CSA was reduced by 85% (P less than 0.05). These data establish the utility of this pulsatile flow model, confirming the direct relationship between the Doppler-shifted PSF and the percentage reduction in CSA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3951221

  11. An evaluation of the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LH-RH) test in patients with secondary amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Henderson, S R; Bonnar, J; Souka, A R; Bogie, W; MacKinnon, P; Mattock, J; Dutton, A

    1976-04-01

    An analysis of the gonadotrophin response to an intravenous injection of LH-RH (50 mug) has been undertaken in 41 patients with secondary amenorrhoea. Thirty-five of the patients were free of any recognizable pathology to account for their amenorrhoea and apparently had a dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. In these patients, the gonadotrophin response to LH-RH was highly variable. There was in general a correlation between baseline plasma LH or FSH levels and their respective increments. There was no correlation, however, between basal oestrogen levels and gonadotrophin increments except in the case of those patients whose basal levels of plasma FSH were higher than those of LH and in those patients whose body weight was less than the ideal for the population. It appears that the gonadotrophin response to a single injection of LH-RH in the majority of patients with secondary amenorrhoea of unknown origin is too variable to be of use either as a diagnostic or prognostic tool. PMID:773418

  12. Effect of gonadotropin secretion rate on the radiosensitivity of the rat luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neuron and gonadotroph

    SciTech Connect

    Winterer, J.; Barnes, K.M.; Lichter, A.S.; Deluca, A.M.; Loriaux, D.L.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that the functional state of hypothalamic LHRH neurons and pituitary gonadotrophs might alter their radiosensitivity, we determined the experimental conditions under which the gonadotropin response to castration could be impaired by a single dose of cranial irradiation. Single doses of cranial irradiation greater than 2000 rads were lethal to unshielded rats. Shielding of the oropharynx and esophagus allowed the animals to survive doses up to 5000 rads. Doses between 2000 and 5000 rads had no effect on basal gonadotropin levels for as long as 3 months after irradiation. Irradiation caused a dose- and time-dependent impairment, however, in the gonadotropin response to castration. Impairment of the gonadotropin levels of castrate animals occurred in animals that were irradiated either before or after castration. However, rats irradiated in the castrate state showed a decreased susceptibility to irradiation damage. Additionally, stimulation of the pituitary by LHRH agonist (LHRHa) 3 h before irradiation significantly reduced the impairment of gonadotropin secretion 12-20 weeks after irradiation (P less than 0.05). Thus, increased functional activity of the rat hypothalamus or pituitary at the time of irradiation, induced by either castration or acute LHRHa administration, was associated with some protection against the gonadotropin-lowering effect of irradiation. Based upon these data, we hypothesize that stimulation of gonadotropin secretion at the time of therapeutic cranial irradiation in humans might protect against subsequent impairment of gonadotropin secretion.

  13. Serum leptin concentrations, luteinizing hormone and growth hormone secretion during feed and metabolic fuel restriction in the prepuberal gilt.

    PubMed

    Barb, C R; Barrett, J B; Kraeling, R R; Rampacek, G B

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine 1) the effect of acute feed deprivation on leptin secretion and 2) if the effect of metabolic fuel restriction on LH and GH secretion is associated with changes in serum leptin concentrations. Experiment (EXP) I, seven crossbred prepuberal gilts, 66 +/- 1 kg body weight (BW) and 130 d of age were used. All pigs were fed ad libitum. On the day of the EXP, feed was removed from four of the pigs at 0800 (time = 0) and pigs remained without feed for 28 hr. Blood samples were collected every 10 min from zero to 4 hr = Period (P) 1, 12 to 16 hr = P 2, and 24 to 28 hr = P 3 after feed removal. At hr 28 fasted animals were presented with feed and blood samples collected for an additional 2 hr = P 4. EXP II, gilts, averaging 140 d of age (n = 15) and which had been ovariectomized, were individually penned in an environmentally controlled building and exposed to a constant ambient temperature of 22 C and 12:12 hr light: dark photoperiod. Pigs were fed daily at 0700 hr. Gilts were randomly assigned to the following treatments: saline (S, n = 7), 100 (n = 4), or 300 (n = 4) mg/kg BW of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), a competitive inhibitor of glycolysis, in saline iv. Blood samples were collected every 15 min for 2 hr before and 5 hr after treatment. Blood samples from EXP I and II were assayed for LH, GH and leptin by RIA. Selected samples were quantified for glucose, insulin and free fatty acids (FFA). In EXP I, fasting reduced (P < 0.04) leptin pulse frequency by P 3. Plasma glucose concentrations were reduced (P < 0.02) throughout the fast compared to fed animals, where as serum insulin concentrations did not decrease (P < 0.02) until P 3. Serum FFA concentrations increased (P < 0.02) by P 2 and remained elevated. Subcutaneous back fat thickness was similar among pigs. Serum IGF-I concentration decreased (P < 0.01) by P 2 in fasted animals compared to fed animals and remained lower through periods 3 and 4. Serum LH and GH concentrations were not effected by fast. Realimentation resulted in a marked increase in serum glucose (P < 0.02), insulin (P < 0.02), serum GH (P < 0.01) concentrations and leptin pulse frequency (P < 0.01). EXP II treatment did not alter serum insulin levels but increased (P < 0.01) plasma glucose concentrations in the 300 mg 2DG group. Serum leptin concentrations were 4.0 +/- 0.1, 2.8 +/- 0.2, and 4.9 +/- 0.2 ng/ml for S, 100 and 300 mg 2DG pigs respectively, prior to treatment and remained unchanged following treatment. Serum IGF-I concentrations were not effected by treatment. The 300 mg dose of 2DG increased (P < 0.0001) mean GH concentrations (2.0 +/- 0.2 ng/ml) compared to S (0.8 +/- 0.2 ng/ml) and 100 mg 2DG (0.7 +/- 0.2 ng/ml). Frequency and amplitude of GH pulses were unaffected. However, number of LH pulses/5 hr were decreased (P < 0.01) by the 300 mg dose of 2DG (1.8 +/- 0.5) compared to S (4.0 +/- 0.4) and the 100 mg dose of 2DG (4.5 +/- 0.5). Mean serum LH concentrations and amplitude of LH pulses were unaffected. These results suggest that acute effects of energy deprivation on LH and GH secretion are independent of changes in serum leptin concentrations. PMID:11164333

  14. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  15. Leptin inhibits steroid biosynthesis by human granulosa-lutein cells.

    PubMed

    Ghizzoni, L; Barreca, A; Mastorakos, G; Furlini, M; Vottero, A; Ferrari, B; Chrousos, G P; Bernasconi, S

    2001-06-01

    Absence of leptin secretion compromises reproductive function and fertility in the ob/ob mouse which, when given leptin, shows a rise in serum LH levels and becomes fertile. Recently, the long and active isoform of the leptin receptor was detected in the ovary, indicating that leptin may also show direct gonad-related activity. To examine this, we studied the effect of graded doses of human leptin on estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) concentrations in the culture media of human granulosa-lutein cells obtained from follicular fluid of women undergoing in vitro fertilization. We also evaluated the mRNA expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), aromatase, and cytochrome P450 17alpha (CYP17) in these cells at baseline and after exposure to leptin. Estradiol levels were significantly decreased in the media 24 hours after incubation of the cells with increasing hLeptin concentrations (10(-11) - 10(-7) mol/l). The maximal 30% decrease in E2 production was caused by the 10(-9) mol/l hLeptin concentration; however, P4 levels in the media were not influenced by leptin. Exposure of granulosa-lutein cells to 10(-9) mol/l hLeptin did not produce any measurable changes on StAR, aromatase, or CYP17 mRNA expression. When hLeptin (10(-9) mol/l) was co-incubated with increasing concentrations of hCG (1.25 - 10 mlU/ml), IGF-II (15-60 ng/ml) or 1-6 desaminated IGF-II (deslGF-II; 15-60 ng/ml), it did not modify the elevation of E2 concentrations caused by each of the different stimuli. We conclude that leptin suppresses E2 secretion by human granulosa-lutein cells but does not impair the stimulatory effects of hCG and IGFs on these cells. Leptin may play a minor, but direct regulatory role on unstimulated human ovarian steroidogenesis by interfering with either the translational or post-translational steps of the baseline CYP17 and/or aromatase synthesis and/or the activation of the enzymes. PMID:11456279

  16. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25744850

  17. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Climacteric in untreated isolated growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Menilson; Salvatori, Roberto; Oliveira, Carla R.P.; Pereira, Rossana M.C.; Souza, Anita H.O.; Nobrega, Luciana M.A.; Cruz, Edla do A.C.; Menezes, Marcos; Alves, Érica O.; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the time, intensity of symptoms, hormonal profile, and related morbidity of climacteric in women with untreated isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency (IGHD). Design Women belonging to a large Brazilian kindred with IGHD due to a homozygous mutation in the GH-releasing hormone receptor gene were studied. None of them had ever received GH replacement therapy. A two-step protocol was performed. In the first case-control experiment, aimed to determine the age at climacteric, we compared eight women with IGHD and 32 normal women between 37 and 55 years of age. In the second cross-sectional experiment, aimed to determine the severity of climacteric symptoms, seven women with IGHD (aged 47-65 y) were compared with 13 controls (aged 44-65 y). The Kupperman Index scores, serum follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and estradiol levels were determined, and pelvic and mammary ultrasonography, mammography, and colpocytology were performed. Results The number of women with follicle-stimulating hormone above 20 mIU/mL was higher in women with IGHD than controls. Kupperman’s Index was not different between the two groups. Menarche had been delayed and parity was lower in women with IGHD. Hormonal profile was similar, but prolactin was lower in women with IGHD. Uterine volume was smaller in women with IGHD, and endometrial thickness and ovarian volume were similar in the two groups. No difference in breast images or in colpocytology was observed between the two groups. Conclusions Menarche was delayed and the beginning of climacteric is anticipated in untreated lifetime IGHD, but menopausal symptoms and hormonal profile resemble the normal climacteric. PMID:18223507

  19. Lutein absorption is facilitated with cosupplementation of ascorbic acid in young adults.

    PubMed

    Tanumihardjo, Sherry A; Li, Jialiang; Dosti, Mandy Porter

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the bioavailability of crystalline lutein supplements and compare lutein uptake and clearance in humans simultaneously supplemented with either vitamin C or E. The design was an intervention in which area under the curve (AUC) of lutein was compared with and without each of the supplements. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 32, 60, 128, and 504 hours after the dose to measure serum lutein concentration. Four men and five women, aged 26.6+/-2.6 years, participated in this study. Treatments consisted of 18 mg lutein softgel supplements given either alone (L) or with 2 g vitamin C (LC) or 800 IU vitamin E (LE). Comparison of AUCs for the three treatments was examined using analysis of variance. Individual variations, both between and within subjects, 190- and 70-fold, respectively, were very high. AUC analyses for the first 128 hours postdosing; 2.93+/-1.93, 5.37+/-5.0, and 4.11+/-3.04 micromol . hr/L for L, LC, and LE treatments, respectively; were not significantly different. However, by fitting a multiple regression model of serum concentration over time, lutein is absorbed faster with simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C ( P lutein from supplements varies greatly both within and between subjects and therefore reformulation should be considered. Cosupplementation with another antioxidant may facilitate absorption. PMID:15635356

  20. Elevation of lutein content in tomato: a biochemical tug-of-war between lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Giovanni; Yildirim, Arzu; Stigliani, Adriana Lucia; D'Ambrosio, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    Lutein is becoming increasingly important in preventive medicine due to its possible role in maintaining good vision and in preventing age-related maculopathy. Average daily lutein intake in developed countries is often below suggested daily consumption levels, and lutein supplementation could be beneficial. Lutein is also valuable in the food and feed industries and is emerging in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical markets. Currently, lutein is obtained at high cost from marigold petals, and synthesis alternatives are thus desirable. Tomato constitutes a promising starting system for production as it naturally accumulates high levels of lycopene. To develop tomato for lutein synthesis, the tomato Red Setter cultivar was transformed with the tomato lycopene ε-cyclase-encoding gene under the control of a constitutive promoter, and the HighDelta (HD) line, characterised by elevated lutein and δ-carotene content in ripe fruits, was selected. HD was crossed to the transgenic HC line and to RS(B) with the aim of converting all residual fruit δ-carotene to lutein. Fruits of both crosses were enriched in lutein and presented unusual carotenoid profiles. The unique genetic background of the crosses used in this study permitted an unprecedented analysis of the role and regulation of the lycopene cyclase enzymes in tomato. A new defined biochemical index, the relative cyclase activity ratio, was used to discern post-transcriptional regulation of cyclases, and will help in the study of carotenoid biosynthesis in photosynthetic plant species and particularly in those, like tomato, that have been domesticated for the production of food, feed or useful by-products. PMID:24141052

  1. The influence of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin on visual performance.

    PubMed

    Stringham, James M; Bovier, Emily R; Wong, Jennifer C; Hammond, Billy R

    2010-01-01

    The idea that normal constituents of the diet can influence visual function is not new. As early as 1782, Buzzi identified the yellow of the macula and Schulze (1866) specifically postulated that the yellow pigments led to improvements in human vision. These pigments were later found to be derived from dietary lutein and zeaxanthin that are known to be oxygenated carotenoids (xanthophylls). Walls and Judd (1933) postulated that these yellow intraocular pigments could improve visual performance by absorbing light scattered both within (for example, glare) and outside of the eye (increasing visual range by absorbing blue light scattered in the atmosphere), and by improving spatial vision through enhancing contrast and reducing chromatic blur. In this article, evidence for these ideas is reviewed with particular emphasis towards more recent data on glare effects. PMID:20492192

  2. The Influence of Different Operating Conditions on the Blood Damage of a Pulsatile Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zihao; Yang, Ming; Wang, Xianghui; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Because of pulsatile blood flow's benefit for myocardial recovery, perfusion of coronary arteries and end organs, pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VADs) are still widely used as paracorporeal mechanical circulatory support devices in clinical applications, especially in pediatric heart failure patients. However, severe blood damage limits the VAD's service period. Besides optimizing the VAD geometry to reduce blood damage, the blood damage may also be decreased by changing the operating conditions. In this article, a pulsatile VAD was used to investigate the influence of operating conditions on its blood damage, including hemolysis, platelet activation, and platelet deposition. Three motion profiles of pusher plate (sine, cosine, and polynomial), three stroke volumes (ejection fractions) (56 ml [70%], 42 ml [52.5%], and 28 ml [35%]), three pulsatile rates (75, 100, and 150 bpm), and two assist modes (copulsation and counterpulsation) were implemented respectively in VAD fluid-structure interaction simulations to calculate blood damage. The blood damage indices indicate that cosine motion profile, higher ejection fraction, higher pulsatile rate, and counterpulsation can decrease platelet deposition whereas increase hemolysis and platelet activation, and vice versa. The results suggest that different operating conditions have different effects on pulsatile VAD's blood damage and may be beneficial to choose suitable operating condition to reduce blood damage in clinical applications. PMID:26164600

  3. Three-dimensional shape construction of pulsatile tissue from ultrasonic movies for assistance of clinical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Hikari; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2010-02-01

    Three-dimensional shape of pulsatile tissue due to blood flow, which is one of key diagnostic features in ischemia, has been constructed from 2D ultrasonic movies for assisting clinical diagnosis. The 2D ultrasonic movies (640x480pixels/frame, 8bits/pixel, 33ms/frame) were taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus and an ultrasonic probe, while measuring the probe orientations with a compact tilt-sensor. The 2D images of pulsatile strength were obtained from each 2D ultrasonic movie by evaluating a heartbeat-frequency component calculated by Fourier transform of a series of pixel values sampled at each pixel. The 2D pulsatile images were projected into a 3D domain to obtain a 3D grid of pulsatile strength according to the probe orientations. The 3D shape of pulsatile tissue was constructed by determining the iso-surfaces of appropriate strength in the 3D grid. The shapes of pulsatile tissue examined in neonatal crania clearly represented the 3D structures of several arteries such as middle cerebral artery, which is useful for diagnosis of ischemic diseases. Since our technique is based on feature extraction in tissue dynamics, it is also useful for homogeneous tissue, for which conventional 3D ultrasonogram is unsuitable due to unclear tissue boundary.

  4. Increased erythrocyte adhesion to VCAM-1 during pulsatile flow: Application of a microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennell; Lancelot, Moira; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hines, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by microvascular occlusion mediated by adhesive interactions of sickle erythrocytes (SSRBCs) to the endothelium. Most in vitro flow adhesion assays measure SSRBC adhesion during continuous flow, although in vivo SSRBC adhesive interactions occur during pulsatile flow. Using a well-plate microfluidic flow adhesion system, we demonstrate that isolated SSRBCs adhere to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) at greater levels during pulsatile versus continuous flow. A significant increase in adhesive interactions was observed between all pulse frequencies 1 Hz to 2 Hz (60–120 beats/min) when compared to non-pulsatile flow. Adhesion of isolated SSRBCs and whole blood during pulsatile flow was unaffected by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, and exposure of SSRBCs to pulsatile flow did not affect the intrinsic adhesive properties of SSRBCs. The cell type responsible for increased adhesion of whole blood varied from patient to patient. We conclude that low flow periods of the pulse cycle allow more adhesive interactions between sickle erythrocytes and VCAM-1, and sickle erythrocyte adhesion in the context of whole blood may better reflect physiologic cellular interactions. The microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay used in this study may have applications for clinical assessment of sickle erythrocyte adhesion during pulsatile flow. PMID:24898561

  5. Electrocardiogram-synchronized rotational speed change mode in rotary pumps could improve pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masahiko; Nishimura, Takashi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Yamazaki, Kenji; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2011-10-01

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have greatly improved the prognosis of patients with end-stage heart failure, even if continuous flow is different from physiological flow in that it has less pulsatility. A novel pump controller of continuous-flow LVADs has been developed, which can change its rotational speed (RS) in synchronization with the native cardiac cycle, and we speculated that pulsatile mode, which increases RS just in the systolic phase, can create more pulsatility than the current system with constant RS does. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of this pulsatile mode of continuous-flow LVADs on pulsatility in in vivo settings. Experiments were performed on eight adult goats (61.7 ± 7.5 kg). A centrifugal pump, EVAHEART (Sun Medical Technology Research Corporation, Nagano, Japan), was installed by the apex drainage and the descending aortic perfusion. A pacing lead for the detection of ventricular electrocardiogram was sutured on the anterior wall of the right ventricle. In the present study, we compared pulse pressure or other parameters in the following three conditions, including Circuit-Clamp (i.e., no pump support), Continuous mode (constant RS), and Pulsatile mode (increase RS in systole). Assist rate was calculated by dividing pump flow (PF) by the sum of PF and ascending aortic flow (AoF). In continuous and pulsatile modes, these assist rates were adjusted around 80-90%. The following three parameters were used to evaluate pulsatility, including pulse pressure, dp/dt of aortic pressure (AoP), and energy equivalent pulse pressure (EEP = (∫PF*AoP dt)/(∫PF dt), mm Hg). The percent difference between EEP and mean AoP is used as an indicator of pulsatility, and normally it is around 10% of mean AoP in physiological pulse. Both pulse pressure and mean dp/dt max were decreased in continuous mode compared with clamp condition, while those were regained by pulsatile mode nearly to clamp condition (pulse

  6. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  7. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  8. Potential role of hCG in apoptosis of human luteinized granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Rei; Hojo, Takuo; Sano, Masahiro; Hayashi, Nobuyoshi; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) forms after ovulation and acts as a temporary endocrine gland that produces progesterone (P4), a hormone that is essential for implantation and maintenance of pregnancy in mammals. In pregnant women, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secreted by the conceptus prevents luteolysis. hCG also increases the survival of cultured human luteinized granulosa cells (hLGCs). To clarify the maintenance mechanism of the human CL, we investigated the effects of hCG and P4 receptor antagonists, onapristone (OP) and RU486, on the viability of hLGCs. With the patients' consent, hLGCs were isolated from follicular aspirates for in vitro fertilization. The cells were cultured with hCG (0.1, 1, 10, 100 IU/ml), OP (10, 25, 50, 100 μM), RU486 (100 μM), P4 (1, 10, 25, 50 μM) or some combination of the four for 24 h. Cell viability was significantly increased by hCG (100 IU/ml) and significantly decreased by OP (100 μM) compared with the control. Cells treated with hCG and OP together were significantly less viable than the control and OP-treated cells. The combined treatment also significantly increased CASP3 activity and cleaved CASP3 protein expression. Furthermore, P4 addition reversed the reduction in cell viability caused by the combination of hCG and OP treatment. The overall findings suggest that hCG cooperates with P4 to increase survival of hLGCs and to induce apoptosis when P4 action supported by hCG is attenuated in the human CL. PMID:25451535

  9. Management of Ocular Diseases Using Lutein and Zeaxanthin: What Have We Learned from Experimental Animal Studies?

    PubMed

    Xue, Chunyan; Rosen, Richard; Jordan, Adrienne; Hu, Dan-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Zeaxanthin and lutein are two carotenoid pigments that concentrated in the retina, especially in the macula. The effects of lutein and zeaxanthin on the prevention and treatment of various eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and cataract, ischemic/hypoxia induced retinopathy, light damage of the retina, retinitis pigmentosa, retinal detachment, and uveitis, have been studied in different experimental animal models. In these animal models, lutein and zeaxanthin have been reported to have beneficial effects in protecting ocular tissues and cells (especially the retinal neurons) against damage caused by different etiological factors. The mechanisms responsible for these effects of lutein and zeaxanthin include prevention of phototoxic damage by absorption of blue light, reduction of oxidative stress through antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging, and their anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. The results of these experimental animal studies may provide new preventive and therapeutic procedures for clinical management of various vision-threatening diseases. PMID:26617995

  10. Numerical investigation of physiologically realistic pulsatile flow through arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Long, Q; Xu, X Y; Ramnarine, K V; Hoskins, P

    2001-10-01

    Numerical simulations of pulsatile blood flow in straight tube stenosis models were performed to investigate the poststenotic flow phenomena. In this study, three axisymmetrical and three asymmetrical stenosis models with area reduction of 25%, 50% and 75% were constructed. A measured human common carotid artery blood flow waveform was used as the upstream flow condition which has a mean Reynold's number of 300. All calculations were performed with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Flow features such as velocity profiles, flow separation zone (FSZ), and wall shear stress (WSS) distributions in the poststenotic region for all models are presented. The results have demonstrated that the formation and development of FSZs in the poststenotic region are very complex, especially in the flow deceleration phase. In axisymmetric stenoses the poststenotic flow is more sensitive to changes in the degree of stenosis than in asymmetric models. For severe stenoses, the stenosis influence length is shorter in asymmetrical models than in axisymmetrical cases. WSS oscillations (between positive and negative values) have been observed at various downstream locations in some models. The amplitude of the oscillation depends strongly on the axial location and the degree of stenosis. PMID:11522303

  11. A pulsatile pump for cardiopulmonary bypass and its clinical use.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Kawai, T; Nishiyama, K; Murayama, Y; Toda, S; Wada, T; Kitaura, K; Sato, S; Kadowaki, M; Kanki, Y

    1988-09-01

    A pulsatile pump driven by a coil spring, which was designed and constructed by us, is described in this report. It consists of two main parts, a disposable blood chamber and a driving section. The blood chamber has two leaflet valves and a piston, which is covered with two bellofram rolling diaphragms and moves into the housing to draw in and eject the blood. The driving section consists of three cams, an electric motor and a coil spring. The ejection force is wholly produced by the compressed coil spring and is transmitted to the piston in the blood chamber by a rod. This pump allows the ejection pressure, the beat rates, and the stroke volume all to be changed independently. The performance of the pump was tested by using a circulation model where the beat rate was adjusted from 30 to 250 bpm. The output subsequently increased from 0.8 l/min to 5.7 l/min and the stroke volume, from 20.4 ml to 36.7 ml. This new pump has been used for clinical cardiopulmonary bypasses in 24 patients of open heart surgery and the pressure traces during perfusion resembled those of the patients' own hearts. PMID:3230723

  12. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus. PMID:15825857

  13. Cora valveless pulsatile rotary pump: new design and control.

    PubMed

    Monties, J R; Trinkl, J; Mesana, T; Havlik, P J; Demunck, J L

    1996-01-01

    For decades, research for developing a totally implantable artificial ventricle has been carried on. For 4 to 5 years, two devices have been investigated clinically. For many years, we have studied a rotary (but not centrifugal) pump that furnishes pulsatile flow without a valve and does not need external venting or a compliance chamber. It is a hypocycloidal pump based on the principle of the Maillard-Wankel rotary compressor. Currently made of titanium, it is activated by an electrical brushless direct-current motor. The motor-pump unit is totally sealed and implantable, without noise or vibration. This pump was implanted as a left ventricular assist device in calves. The midterm experiments showed good hemodynamic function. The hemolysis was low, but serious problems were encountered: blood components collecting on the gear mechanism inside the rotor jammed the pump. We therefore redesigned the pump to seal the gear mechanism. We used a double system to seal the open end of the rotor cavity with components polished to superfine optical quality. In addition, we developed a control system based on the study of the predicted shape of the motor current. The new design is now underway. We hope to start chronic experiments again in a few months. If the problem of sealing the bearing could be solved, the Cora ventricle could be used as permanent totally implantable left ventricular assist device. PMID:8561627

  14. PLATELET ADHESION TO POLYURETHANE UREA UNDER PULSATILE FLOW CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Navitsky, Michael A.; Taylor, Joshua O.; Smith, Alexander B.; Slattery, Margaret J.; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Manning, Keefe B.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s−1. The aim of the current work is to determine platelet adhesion properties to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system is used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g. cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments retain the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk is rotated in platelet rich bovine plasma for two hours with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow is found to exponentially decay with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels are found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices. PMID:24721222

  15. Pulsatile instability in rapid directional solidification - Strongly-nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, G. J.; Braun, R. J.; Brattkus, K.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the rapid directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy, analysis reveals that, in addition to the cellular mode of Mullins and Sekerka (1964), there is an oscillatory instability. For the model analyzed by Merchant and Davis (1990), the preferred wavenumber is zero; the mode is one of pulsation. Two strongly nonlinear analyses are performed that describe this pulsatile mode. In the first case, nonequilibrium effects that alter solute rejection at the interface are taken asymptotically small. A nonlinear oscillator equation governs the position of the solid-liquid interface at leading order, and amplitude and phase evolution equations are derived for the uniformly pulsating interface. The analysis provides a uniform description of both subcritical and supercritical bifurcation and the transition between the two. In the second case, nonequilibrium effects that alter solute rejection are taken asymptotically large, and a different nonlinear oscillator equation governs the location of the interface to leading order. A similar analysis allows for the derivation of an amplitude evolution equation for the uniformly pulsating interface. In this case, the bifurcation is always supercritical. The results are used to make predictions about the characteristics of solute bands that would be frozen into the solid.

  16. Pulsatile blood pump with a linear drive actuator.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Homma, Akihiko; Funakubo, Akio; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichiro; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an implantable direct-electromagnetic left ventricular assist system driven by a linear actuator (linear LVAS). The linear LVAS is a pulsatile pump with a pusher plate that is driven directly by a linear oscillatory actuator (LOA) without any movement converters. This prototype pump unit with a LOA was 100 mm in diameter, 50 mm in thickness, and weighed 740 g. The full-fill/full-eject driving method was applied to the control algorithm. In addition, a mechanism to detect and release sucking was realized to overcome this problem that accompanies the active-filling type of VAS. The performance of the linear LVAS was evaluated in a long-term animal experiment using a goat (56 kg). The goat survived for 42 days. The reason why we terminated this experiment was that thrombus was found in the pump. There was no frictional debris found around the LOA. The linear LVAS did not exhibit electrical or mechanical problems during the first animal experiment. PMID:17574509

  17. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G.

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Structure of the lutein-binding domain of human StARD3 at 1.74 Å resolution and model of a complex with lutein

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Martin P.; George, Evan W.; Tran, Quang T.; Baumgardner, Kody; Zharov, Gabe; Lee, Sarah; Sharifzadeh, Hassan; Shihab, Saeed; Mattinson, Ty; Li, Binxing; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    A crystal structure of the lutein-binding domain of human StARD3 (StAR-related lipid-transfer protein 3; also known as MLN64) has been refined to 1.74 Å resolution. A previous structure of the same protein determined to 2.2 Å resolution highlighted homology with StARD1 and shared cholesterol-binding character. StARD3 has since been recognized as a carotenoid-binding protein in the primate retina, where its biochemical function of binding lutein with specificity appears to be well suited to recruit this photoprotective molecule. The current and previous structures correspond closely to each other (r.m.s.d. of 0.25 Å), especially in terms of the helix-grip fold constructed around a solvent-filled cavity. Regions of interest were defined with alternate conformations in the current higher-resolution structure, including Arg351 found within the cavity and Ω1, a loop of four residues found just outside the cavity entrance. Models of the complex with lutein generated by rigid-body docking indicate that one of the ionone rings must protrude outside the cavity, and this insight has implications for molecular interactions with transport proteins and enzymes that act on lutein. Interestingly, models with the ∊-ionone ring characteristic of lutein pointing towards the bottom of the cavity were associated with fewer steric clashes, suggesting that steric complementarity and ligand asymmetry may play a role in discriminating lutein from the other ocular carotenoids zeaxanthin and meso-zeaxanthin, which only have β-ionone rings. PMID:27487925

  19. Structure of the lutein-binding domain of human StARD3 at 1.74 Å resolution and model of a complex with lutein.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Martin P; George, Evan W; Tran, Quang T; Baumgardner, Kody; Zharov, Gabe; Lee, Sarah; Sharifzadeh, Hassan; Shihab, Saeed; Mattinson, Ty; Li, Binxing; Bernstein, Paul S

    2016-08-01

    A crystal structure of the lutein-binding domain of human StARD3 (StAR-related lipid-transfer protein 3; also known as MLN64) has been refined to 1.74 Å resolution. A previous structure of the same protein determined to 2.2 Å resolution highlighted homology with StARD1 and shared cholesterol-binding character. StARD3 has since been recognized as a carotenoid-binding protein in the primate retina, where its biochemical function of binding lutein with specificity appears to be well suited to recruit this photoprotective molecule. The current and previous structures correspond closely to each other (r.m.s.d. of 0.25 Å), especially in terms of the helix-grip fold constructed around a solvent-filled cavity. Regions of interest were defined with alternate conformations in the current higher-resolution structure, including Arg351 found within the cavity and Ω1, a loop of four residues found just outside the cavity entrance. Models of the complex with lutein generated by rigid-body docking indicate that one of the ionone rings must protrude outside the cavity, and this insight has implications for molecular interactions with transport proteins and enzymes that act on lutein. Interestingly, models with the ℇ-ionone ring characteristic of lutein pointing towards the bottom of the cavity were associated with fewer steric clashes, suggesting that steric complementarity and ligand asymmetry may play a role in discriminating lutein from the other ocular carotenoids zeaxanthin and meso-zeaxanthin, which only have β-ionone rings. PMID:27487925

  20. Increasing LH Pulsatility in Women With Hypothalamic Amenorrhoea Using Intravenous Infusion of Kisspeptin-54

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, Channa N.; Abbara, Ali; Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Comninos, Alexander N.; Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; De Silva, Akila; Nijher, Gurjinder M. K.; Ganiyu-Dada, Zainab; Mehta, Amrish; Todd, Catriona; Ghatei, Mohammad A.; Bloom, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is the one of the most common causes of period loss in women of reproductive age and is associated with deficient LH pulsatility. High-dose kisspeptin-54 acutely stimulates LH secretion in women with HA, but chronic administration causes desensitization. GnRH has paradoxical effects on reproductive activity; we therefore hypothesized that a dose-dependent therapeutic window exists within which kisspeptin treatment restores the GnRH/LH pulsatility in women with HA. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine whether constant iv infusion of kisspeptin-54 temporarily increases pulsatile LH secretion in women with HA. Methods: Five patients with HA each underwent six assessments of LH pulsatility. Single-blinded continuous iv infusion of vehicle or kisspeptin-54 (0.01, 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, or 1.00 nmol/kg/h) was administered. The LH pulses were detected using blinded deconvolution. Results: Kisspeptin increased LH pulsatility in all patients with HA, with peak responses observed at different doses in each patient. The mean peak number of pulses during infusion of kisspeptin-54 was 3-fold higher when compared with vehicle (number of LH pulses per 8 h: 1.6 ± 0.4, vehicle; 5.0 ± 0.5, kisspeptin-54, P < .01 vs vehicle). The mean peak LH pulse secretory mass during kisspeptin-54 was 6-fold higher when compared with vehicle (LH pulse secretory mass in international units per liter: 3.92 ± 2.31, vehicle; 23.44 ± 12.59, kisspeptin-54; P < .05 vs vehicle). Conclusions: Kisspeptin-54 infusion temporarily increases LH pulsatility in women with HA. Furthermore, we have determined the dose range within which kisspeptin-54 treatment increases basal and pulsatile LH secretion in women with HA. This work provides a basis for studying the potential of kisspeptin-based therapies to treat women with HA. PMID:24517142

  1. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region—specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development. PMID:26317757

  2. Ultrasound-Enhanced Subcritical CO2 Extraction of Lutein from Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao-Dan; Hou, Yan; Huang, Xing-Xin; Qiu, Tai-Qiu; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-13

    Lutein is an important pigment of Chlorella pyrenoidosa with many beneficial functions in human health. The main purpose of this study was to extract lutein from C. pyrenoidosa using ultrasound-enhanced subcritical CO2 extraction (USCCE). Effects of operating conditions on the extraction, including extraction pretreatment, temperature, pressure, time, CO2 flow rate, and ultrasonic power, were investigated, and an orthogonal experiment was designed to study the effects of extraction pressure, temperature, cosolvent amount, and time on the extraction yields. The USCCE method was compared with other extraction methods in terms of the yields of lutein and the microstructure of C. pyrenoidosa powder by scanning electron microscopy. A maximal extraction yield of 124.01 mg lutein/100 g crude material was achieved under optimal conditions of extraction temperature at 27 °C, extraction pressure at 21 MPa, cosolvent amount at 1.5 mL/g ethanol, and ultrasound power at 1000 W. Compared to other methods, USCCE could significantly increase the lutein extraction yield at lower extraction temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the kinetic models of USCCE and subcritical CO2 extraction (SCCE) of lutein from C. pyrenoidosa were set as E = 130.64 × (1 - e(-0.6599t)) and E = 101.82 × (1 - e(-0.5683t)), respectively. The differences of parameters in the kinetic models indicate that ultrasound was able to enhance the extraction process of SCCE. PMID:25837869

  3. Lutein Leads to a Decrease of Factor D Secretion by Cultured Mature Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Kijlstra, Aize; Renes, Johan; Wabitsch, Martin; Webers, Carroll A. B.; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Complement plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD) and trials are currently being conducted to investigate the effect of complement inhibition on AMD progression. We previously found that the plasma level of factor D (FD), which is the rate limiting enzyme of the complement alternative pathway, was significantly decreased following lutein supplementation. FD is synthesized by adipose tissue, which is also the main storage site of lutein. In view of these findings we tested the hypothesis whether lutein could affect FD synthesis by adipocytes. Methods. A cell line of mature human adipocytes was incubated with 50 μg/mL lutein for 24 and 48 h, whereafter FD mRNA and protein expression were measured. Results. Lutein significantly inhibited adipocyte FD mRNA expression and FD protein release into adipocyte culture supernatants. Conclusions. Our earlier observations showing that a daily lutein supplement in individuals with early signs of AMD lowered the level of circulating FD might be caused by blocking adipocyte FD production. PMID:26504594

  4. Non-invasive estimation of static and pulsatile intracranial pressure from transcranial acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Levinsky, Alexandra; Papyan, Surik; Weinberg, Guy; Stadheim, Trond; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether a method for estimation of non-invasive ICP (nICP) from transcranial acoustic (TCA) signals mixed with head-generated sounds estimate the static and pulsatile invasive ICP (iICP). For that purpose, simultaneous iICP and mixed TCA signals were obtained from patients undergoing continuous iICP monitoring as part of clinical management. The ear probe placed in the right outer ear channel sent a TCA signal with fixed frequency (621 Hz) that was picked up by the left ear probe along with acoustic signals generated by the intracranial compartment. Based on a mathematical model of the association between mixed TCA and iICP, the static and pulsatile nICP values were determined. Total 39 patients were included in the study; the total number of observations for prediction of static and pulsatile iICP were 5789 and 6791, respectively. The results demonstrated a good agreement between iICP/nICP observations, with mean difference of 0.39 mmHg and 0.53 mmHg for static and pulsatile ICP, respectively. In summary, in this cohort of patients, mixed TCA signals estimated the static and pulsatile iICP with rather good accuracy. Further studies are required to validate whether mixed TCA signals may become useful for measurement of nICP. PMID:26997563

  5. Pulsatility flow around a single cylinder - an experimental model of flow inside an artificial lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Bull, Joseph L.

    2004-11-01

    Pulsatile flow past a single cylinder is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry. This study aims to elucidate the effects of pulstility on the velocity field, which influences the convection-dominated transport within the fluid. The artificial lung device can be connected in parallel or series with the native lungs and may potentially be used as a bridge to transplant or for pulmonary replacement. The artificial lung consists of hollow microfibers through which gas flows and blood flows around. Blood flow through the device is pulsatile because it is driven entirely by the right heart. Steady flow over bluff bodies has been investigated in many contexts, such as heat exchangers. However, few studies have been investigated the effect of pulsatility. The effects of frequency, amplitude of pulsatility, and average flow rate on the formation of vortices after a cylinder are examined. Vortices near the cylinder are found to develop at lower Reynolds number in pulsatile flow than in steady flow. This work is supported by NIH grant R01 HL69420-01.

  6. Using a laser-Doppler flowmetry to measure pulsatile microcirculation on the kidney in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Ming-Yie; Chao, Pin-Tsun; Hsu, Tse-Lin; Wang, Yuh-Yin L.; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2001-10-01

    Although Laser Doppler flowmetery (LDF) been extensively used in measurement of microvascular blood flow of different tissues. However, due to some physiological vibrations, fast oscillations of the renal cortical flux (RCF) are hard to be measured. In the study, a commercial 3mW 780nm Laser Doppler flowmetery, with a single fiber and a de-vibration holder, was used to measure the pulsatile RCF in rats. Considering the fast response due to the heart rate of rats, the time constant (TC) was set to 0.05 second and thus the frequency response is up to 20Hz. Furthermore, a calibration standard and a static blood sample were also measured as the references without the pulsatile driving force. In order not to perturb the RCF with tiny momentum, the applying force that the fiber exerted on the renal surface was controlled below 100 dyne. To enhance the signal to noise ratio (SNR), an averaged periodogram was used to estimate the frequency components of the pulsatile microcirculation. It is found that the dominating fast oscillation of RCF is pulsatile and its harmonic components are directly correlated with those of the heartbeat (correlation coefficient =0.999, P<0.001, n=17). The result shows that, in the kidney, the pulsatile RCF is the dominating component of microcirculation oscillation and driven by the fast propagating blood pressure. This technique could be further utilized to analyze the pharmacological effect and hemodynamic parameters on renal function.

  7. Morphogenetic reaggregation and luteinization of mouse preantral follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, S V; Tojo, R

    1979-11-01

    Small (60-90 micrometer) and large (100-130 micrometer) preantral follicles were isolated from adult mouse ovaries by a collagenase-dissection technique. These follicles were composed of resting oocytes surrounded either by granulosa cells, only, or by granulosa and undifferentiated theca cells. Further enzymatic dissociation of primary follicles yielded monodisperse cells characterized by abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, microfilament-rich pseudopodia and only scant lipid droplets. These cells reaggregated, when explanted in stationary culture, forming epithelial cords and structures macroscopically reminiscent of native ovarian follicles. Anticipated association of follicular cells in epithelial-like monolayers was rare (less than or equal to 10% of all cultured cells). Formation and growth of both follicle-like (FLS) and cord-like (CLS) structures occurred within 24 hours of culture, continued for 14 days, and was inhibited by cytochalasin B, but not by neuraminidase. FLS and CLS, as well as cell monolayers, underwent luteinization, as indicated by the presence in the culture medium of radioimmunoassayable progesterone and by frequent cytological features suggestive of active steroidogenesis. The present report indicates that (a) specific cell affinities exist among immature follicular cells which may play a role in folliculogenesis; and (b) follicular cells are endowed, from their early developmental stages with intrinsic steroidogenic capabilities which become phenotypically expressed after escape from the intraovarian environment. PMID:532792

  8. Can we prevent premature luteinization in IVF cycles?

    PubMed

    Manno, Massimo; Tomei, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    From 1991 there is a long-lasting discussion on a possible detrimental effect of premature increase of progesterone levels during ovarian stimulation in IVF. A recent meta-analysis of more than 60,000 cycles states that premature progesterone increase reduces pregnancy rates starting from P4 values of 0.8 ng/ml. The detrimental effect seems to be related to endometrial receptivity impairment according to lack of detrimental effect on oocytes competence in ovodonation. Embryo freezing and deferred embryo transfer on artificial endometrium permits to avoid this detrimental effect but the cycle has to be segmented in two phases. Moreover embryo freezing is an extra burden for IVF lab and could induce embryo damage. So the implementation of an effective pharmacological treatment to prevent premature luteinization could be very interesting for our daily ART practice. On the basis of so far available literature data and our preliminary proof of concept experience we suggest that metformin (1000-1500 mg daily) from first monitoring until ovulation triggering could be suitable for this purpose irrespective of ovarian reserve of the patient. PMID:24290658

  9. Investigation of pulsatile flowfield in healthy thoracic aorta models.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yang, An-Shik; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Complex hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of aortic dissection and atherosclerosis, as well as many other diseases. Since fundamental fluid mechanics are important for the understanding of the blood flow in the cardiovascular circulatory system of the human body aspects, a joint experimental and numerical study was conducted in this study to determine the distributions of wall shear stress and pressure and oscillatory WSS index, and to examine their correlation with the aortic disorders, especially dissection. Experimentally, the Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) method was used to acquire the true geometry of a normal human thoracic aorta, which was readily converted into a transparent thoracic aorta model by the rapid prototyping (RP) technique. The thoracic aorta model was then used in the in vitro experiments and computations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ACE+((R)) to determine flow characteristics of the three-dimensional, pulsatile, incompressible, and Newtonian fluid in the thoracic aorta model. The unsteady boundary conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the aortic flow were specified from the measured flowrate and pressure results during in vitro experiments. For the code validation, the predicted axial velocity reasonably agrees with the PC-MRI experimental data in the oblique sagittal plane of the thoracic aorta model. The thorough analyses of the thoracic aorta flow, WSSs, WSS index (OSI), and wall pressures are presented. The predicted locations of the maxima of WSS and the wall pressure can be then correlated with that of the thoracic aorta dissection, and thereby may lead to a useful biological significance. The numerical results also suggest that the effects of low WSS and high OSI tend to cause wall thickening occurred along the inferior wall of the aortic arch and the

  10. Differential responsiveness of luteinized human granulosa cells to gonadotropins and insulin-like growth factor I for induction of aromatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, G.M.; Randolph, J.F. Jr.; Peegel, H.; Menon, K.M. )

    1991-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro responsiveness of cultured luteinized human granulosa cells over time to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for the induction of aromatase activity. Granulosa cells were retrieved from preovulatory follicles in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. Cells were cultured for a period of 72 hours or 10 days. The ability of hCG, human FSH, and/or IGF-I to induce aromatase activity was assayed by the stereospecific release of tritium from (1B-3H)androstenedione. Short-term cultures (72 hours) demonstrated a marked rise in aromatase activity in response to human FSH and IGF-I, whereas a smaller response to hCG was observed. In contrast, 10-day cultures demonstrated responsiveness predominantly to hCG rather than human FSH for the induction of aromatase activity with no remarkable effect of IGF-I. Luteinized human granulosa cells undergo a transformation from an initial human FSH and IGF-I responsive state to an hCG responsive state in long-term cultures.

  11. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  12. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. PMID:26464260

  13. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    International Resource Center Online Store Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Healthy Living ...

  14. Dietary intake of lutein and diabetic retinopathy in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Sahli, Michelle W.; Mares, Julie A.; Meyers, Kristin J.; Klein, Ronald; Brady, William E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Donahue, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that dietary intake of lutein is inversely associated with prevalence of diabetic retinopathy due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and its location within the retina. Methods We used logistic regression to examine the association between prevalent DR and energy-adjusted lutein intake [by quartile (Q)] using data collected from 1,430 ARIC study participants with diabetes (n=994 White and n=508 Black). DR was assessed using a 45-degree nonmydriatic retinal photograph from one randomly chosen eye taken at visit 3 (1993–95). Dietary lutein intake was estimated using a 66-item food frequency questionnaire at visit 1(1987–89). Results The median estimated daily lutein intake was 1,370 μg/1000 kcals and the prevalence of DR was ~21%. We found a crude association between lutein and DR [OR (95% CI) for Q4 (high intake) vs. Q1 (low intake) =2.11 (1.45–3.09); p for trend<0.0001] which was attenuated after adjustment for race, duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, field center and energy intake [1.41 (0.87–2.28); p for trend=0.01]. In analyses limited to persons with a short duration of diabetes (<6 years), the association no longer persisted [0.94 (0.31–2.16); p for trend=0.72] as compared to the association in those with a longer duration of diabetes (≥6 year) [1.58 (0.91–2.75); p for trend=0.01]. Conclusion Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that the odds of higher lutein intake were greater among those with DR than those without DR. However, after adjusting for confounders, intake of lutein was not associated with DR. PMID:26949989

  15. Evaluation of a physiologic pulsatile pump system for neonate-infant cardiopulmonary bypass support.

    PubMed

    Undar, A; Masai, T; Inman, R; Beyer, E A; Mueller, M A; McGarry, M C; Frazier, O H; Fraser, C D

    1999-01-01

    An alternate physiologic pulsatile pump (PPP) system was designed and evaluated to produce sufficient pulsatility during neonate-infant open heart surgery. This hydraulically driven pump system has a unique "dual" pumping chamber mechanism. The first chamber is placed between the venous reservoir and oxygenator and the second chamber between the oxygenator and patient. Each chamber has two unidirectional tricuspid valves. Stroke volume (0.2-10 ml), upstroke rise time (10-350 msec), and pump rate (2-250 beats per minute [bpm]) can be adjusted independently to produce adequate pulsatility. This system has been tested in 3-kg piglets (n = 6), with a pump flow of 150 ml/kg/min, a pump rate of 150 bpm, and a pump ejection time of 110 msec. After initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), all animals were subjected to 25 minutes of hypothermia to reduce the rectal temperatures to 18 degrees C, 60 minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), then 10 minutes of cold perfusion with a full pump flow, and 40 minutes of rewarming. During CPB, mean arterial pressures were kept at less than 50 mm Hg. Mean extracorporeal circuit pressure (ECCP), the pressure drop of a 10 French aortic cannula, and the pulse pressure were 67+/-9, 21+/-6, and 16+/-2 mm Hg, respectively. All values are represented as mean+/-SD. No regurgitation or abnormal hemolysis has been detected during these experiments. The oxygenator had no damping effect on the quality of the pulsatility because of the dual chamber pumping mechanism. The ECCP was also significantly lower than any other known pulsatile system. We conclude that this system, with a 10 French aortic cannula and arterial filter, produces adequate pulsatility in 3 kg piglets. PMID:9952008

  16. Two-equation turbulence modeling of pulsatile flow in a stenosed tube.

    PubMed

    Ryval, J; Straatman, A G; Steinman, D A

    2004-10-01

    The study of pulsatile flow in stenosed vessels is of particular importance because of its significance in relation to blood flow in human pathophysiology. To date, however, there have been few comprehensive publications detailing systematic numerical simulations of turbulent pulsatile flow through stenotic tubes evaluated against comparable experiments. In this paper, two-equation turbulence modeling has been explored for sinusoidally pulsatile flow in 75% and 90% area reduction stenosed vessels, which undergoes a transition from laminar to turbulent flow as well as relaminarization. Wilcox's standard k-omega model and a transitional variant of the same model are employed for the numerical simulations. Steady flow through the stenosed tubes was considered first to establish the grid resolution and the correct inlet conditions on the basis of comprehensive comparisons of the detailed velocity and turbulence fields to experimental data. Inlet conditions based on Womersley flow were imposed at the inlet for all pulsatile cases and the results were compared to experimental data from the literature. In general, the transitional version of the k-omega model is shown to give a better overall representation of both steady and pulsatile flow. The standard model consistently over predicts turbulence at and downstream of the stenosis, which leads to premature recovery of the flow. While the transitional model often under-predicts the magnitude of the turbulence, the trends are well-described and the velocity field is superior to that predicted using the standard model. On the basis of this study, there appears to be some promise for simulating physiological pulsatile flows using a relatively simple two-equation turbulence model. PMID:15648815

  17. Formulation and process optimization of multiparticulate pulsatile system delivered by osmotic pressure-activated rupturable membrane.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane (Eudragit(®) RS) via osmotic pressure (with NaCl as the osmogent) was developed and characterized for omeprazole, omeprazole sodium, and propranolol HCl which have different water solubilities. Multiparticulates in pellet form for incorporation with or without the osmogent were manufactured by three methods and then used to coat a polymeric membrane. Results demonstrated that drug/osmogent-containing pellets manufactured by the extrusion/spheronization method with incorporation of the osmogent were optimal. The lag time (tL) to initiate pulsatile release is regulated by tL=l(2)/(6×D), which is dependent on the coating levels (l(2)) and plasticizer content (D). The pulsatile release pattern was found to be dependent on the osmotic pressure (osmogent), drug solubility, and mechanical properties of the polymeric membrane (elasticity and toughness). Omeprazole with lower water solubility could not generate sufficient osmotic pressure to create a crack in the membrane to activate pulsatile release, whereas the two other model drugs with higher solubilities could. But adsorption of omeprazole sodium on Eudragit(®) RS via charge-charge interactions led the its incomplete release. Finally, with 4% osmogent of NaCl added, a lag time in a range from 0 to 12h proportionally regulated by varying both the membrane thickness and plasticizer level initiated the complete pulsatile release of propranolol HCl. In conclusion, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane via osmotic pressure was successfully developed, and clinical applications of chronotherapy with drugs like propranolol HCl are expected. PMID:25575473

  18. Forceful pulsatile local infusion of enzyme accelerates thrombolysis: in vivo evaluation of a new delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kandarpa, K; Drinker, P A; Singer, S J; Caramore, D

    1988-09-01

    Forceful local pulsatile infusion of fibrinolytic enzyme disrupts thrombi, increases clot surface area, and thereby hastens enzyme action compared with conventional constant infusion methods, which are time consuming and therefore expensive. Prolonged thrombolytic therapy is associated with increased patient morbidity. A prototype for a clinically applicable pulsatile jet infusion system for accelerating thrombolysis was designed. The system is adaptable to standard angiographic catheters and techniques. The core of the system is a reciprocating syringe pump that delivers small volumes of thrombolytic enzyme in short, rapid, frequent pulses at high exit-jet velocity through any side-hole catheter (the smallest used was a 3-F catheter). Comparison of this system with a constant infusion system was made in vivo in a 48-hour-old thrombus model in rabbit inferior vena cava (IVC). One hour of lysis by streptokinase was conducted with each of the methods. In the first experiment, the IVC thrombi were left intact before chemical lysis. Pulsatile infusion lysed 61% of the thrombus by weight in an hour, whereas constant infusion lysed only 15% (P less than .001). In the second experiment, IVC thrombi were subjected initially to standardized mechanical perturbation by a guide wire before chemical lysis. In the latter experiment, pulsatile infusion lysed 54% of the thrombus by weight, and constant infusion lysed only 26% (P less than .005). The difference in percentage of lysis by weight between pulsatile infusion groups in the two experiments (61% vs 54%) was not significant (P greater than .1). The same was true of the difference between the two constant infusion groups (26% vs 15%, P greater than .05). The effect of initial perturbation of the thrombus by a guide wire appears to be less important than the thrombus disruption and accelerated thrombolysis caused by the pulsatile delivery system. No angiographic or macroscopically visible damage was seen in any IVC

  19. Visualization and finite element analysis of pulsatile flow in models of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Matsuzawa, T; Homma, T

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile flows in glass models simulating fusiform and lateral saccular aneurysms were investigated by a flow visualization method. When resting fluid starts to flow, the initial fluid motion is practically irrotational. After a short period of time, the flow began to separate from the proximal wall of the aneurysm. Then the separation bubble or vortex grew rapidly in size and filled the whole area of the aneurysm circumferentially. During this period of time, the center of the vortex moved from the proximal end to the distal point of the aneurysm. The transient reversal flow, for instance, which may occur at the end of the ejection period, passed between the wall of the aneurysm and the centrally located vortex. When the rate and pulsatile frequency of flow were high, the vortex broke down into highly disturbed flow (or turbulence) at the distal portion of the aneurysm. The same effect was observed when the length of the aneurysm was increased. A reduction in pulsatile amplitude made the flow pattern close to that in steady flow. A finite element analysis was made to obtain velocity and pressure fields in pulsatile flow through a tube with an axisymmetric expansion. Calculations were performed with the pulsatile flows used in the visualization experiment in order to study the effects of change in the pulsatile wave form by keeping the time-mean Reynolds number and Womersley's parameter unchanged. Calculated instantaneous patterns of velocity field and stream lines agreed well with the experimental results. The appearance and disappearance of the vortex in the dilated portion and its development resulted in complex distributions of pressure and shear fields. Locally minimum and maximum values of wall shear stress occurred at points just upstream and downstream of the distal end of the expansion when the flow rate reached its peak. PMID:2605323

  20. Application of full field optical studies for pulsatile flow in a carotid artery phantom

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, M.; Loozen, G. B.; van der Wekken, N.; van de Belt, G.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.; Kenjeres, S.

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary comparative measurement between particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) to study pulsatile flow using ventricular assist device in a patient-specific carotid artery phantom is reported. These full-field optical techniques have both been used to study flow and extract complementary parameters. We use the high spatial resolution of PIV to generate a full velocity map of the flow field and the high temporal resolution of LASCA to extract the detailed frequency spectrum of the fluid pulses. Using this combination of techniques a complete study of complex pulsatile flow in an intricate flow network can be studied. PMID:26504652

  1. Optimization by response surface methodology of lutein recovery from paprika leaves using accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Suna; Moon, BoKyung

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we used response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the extraction conditions for recovering lutein from paprika leaves using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The lutein content was quantitatively analyzed using a UPLC equipped with a BEH C18 column. A central composite design (CCD) was employed for experimental design to obtain the optimized combination of extraction temperature (°C), static time (min), and solvent (EtOH, %). The experimental data obtained from a twenty sample set were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis. The adjusted coefficient of determination (R(2)) for the lutein extraction model was 0.9518, and the probability value (p=0.0000) demonstrated a high significance for the regression model. The optimum extraction conditions for lutein were temperature: 93.26°C, static time: 5 min, and solvent: 79.63% EtOH. Under these conditions, the predicted extraction yield of lutein was 232.60 μg/g. PMID:27006224

  2. Development and characterization of lutein-loaded SNEDDS for enhanced absorption in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Niamprem, Pattravee; Rujivipat, Soravoot; Tiyaboonchai, Waree

    2014-09-01

    A self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) has been developed for enhanced oral bioavailability of lutein. Its permeation enhancement has been evaluated using monolayers of Caco-2 cells. SNEDDS is composed of a mixture of Lexol® and Emulmetik® 900, Labrasol®, and Tween 80 as oil, surfactant and co-surfactant, respectively. Upon dilution of lutein-loaded SNEDDS with water, a nanoemulsion was obtained in <10 s with spherical droplets of 40-150 nm in diameter. The zeta potential was in the range of -19 to -32 mV. Increasing the ratio of surfactant to co-surfactant decreased the mean droplet size. Dissolution studies showed that lutein was released rapidly (<5 min) from SNEDDS into 0.1 N HCl and pH 6.8 phosphate buffer solution without any aggregation. In vitro studies using Caco-2 cells revealed that lutein-loaded SNEDDS showed shorter lag time and greater (2-fold) cellular accumulation compared with the lutein dispersion. PMID:23985012

  3. Dietary Sources of Lutein and Zeaxanthin Carotenoids and Their Role in Eye Health

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M.; Akhtar, Humayoun; Zaheer, Khalid; Ali, Rashida

    2013-01-01

    The eye is a major sensory organ that requires special care for a healthy and productive lifestyle. Numerous studies have identified lutein and zeaxanthin to be essential components for eye health. Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoid pigments that impart yellow or orange color to various common foods such as cantaloupe, pasta, corn, carrots, orange/yellow peppers, fish, salmon and eggs. Their role in human health, in particular the health of the eye, is well established from epidemiological, clinical and interventional studies. They constitute the main pigments found in the yellow spot of the human retina which protect the macula from damage by blue light, improve visual acuity and scavenge harmful reactive oxygen species. They have also been linked with reduced risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. Research over the past decade has focused on the development of carotenoid-rich foods to boost their intake especially in the elderly population. The aim of this article is to review recent scientific evidences supporting the benefits of lutein and zexanthin in preventing the onset of two major age-related eye diseases with diets rich in these carotenoids. The review also lists major dietary sources of lutein and zeaxanthin and refers to newly developed foods, daily intake, bioavailability and physiological effects in relation to eye health. Examples of the newly developed high-lutein functional foods are also underlined. PMID:23571649

  4. Aging-related premature luteinization of granulosa cells is avoided by early oocyte retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Guang; Barad, David H; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Lazzaroni, Emanuela; Wang, Qi; Albertini, David F; Gleicher, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Why IVF pregnancy rates decline sharply after age 43 is unknown. In this study, we compared granulosa cell (GC) function in young oocyte donors (n=31, ages 21-29), middle-aged (n=64, ages 30-37) and older infertile patients (n=41, ages 43-47). Gene expressions related to gonadotropin activity, steroidogenesis, apoptosis and luteinization were examined by real-time PCR and western blot in GCs collected from follicular fluid. FSH receptor (FSHR), aromatase (CYP19A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B) expression were found down regulated with advancing age, while LH receptor (LHCGR), P450scc (CYP11A1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) were up regulated. Upon in vitro culture, GCs were found to exhibit lower proliferation and increased apoptosis with aging. While FSH supplementation stimulated GCs growth and prevented luteinization in vitro. These observations demonstrate age-related functional declines in GCs, consistent with premature luteinization. To avoid premature luteinization in women above age 43, we advanced oocyte retrieval by administering human chorionic gonadotropin at maximal leading follicle size of 16  mm (routine 19-21  mm). Compared to normal cycles in women of similar age, earlier retrieved patients demonstrated only a marginal increase in oocyte prematurity, yet exhibited improved embryo numbers as well as quality and respectable clinical pregnancy rates. Premature follicular luteinization appears to contribute to rapidly declining IVF pregnancy chances after age 43, and can be avoided by earlier oocyte retrieval. PMID:26264981

  5. Biodegradable Poly (Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid)-Polyethylene Glycol Nanocapsules: An Efficient Carrier for Improved Solubility, Bioavailability, and Anticancer Property of Lutein.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Ranganathan; Prashanth, Keelara Veerappa Harish; Manabe, Yuki; Hirata, Takashi; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Dharmesh, Shylaja Mallaiah; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2015-06-01

    Lutein bioavailability is limited because of its poor aqueous solubility. In this study, lutein-poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanocapsules were prepared to improve the solubility, bioavailability, and anticancer property of lutein. The scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering examination revealed that the nanocapsules are smooth and spherical with size ranging from 80 to 500 nm (mean = 200 nm). In vitro lutein release profile from nanocapsules showed controlled sustainable release (66%) up to 72 h. Aqueous solubility of lutein nanocapsules was much higher by 735-fold than the lutein. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses showed no chemical interaction among PLGA, PEG, and lutein, indicating possible weak intermolecular forces like hydrogen bonds. X-ray diffraction revealed lutein is distributed in a disordered amorphous state in nanocapsules. Postprandial plasma kinetics (area under the curve) of an oral dose of lutein from nanocapsules was higher by 5.4-fold compared with that of micellar lutein (control). The antiproliferative effect of lutein from nanocapsules (IC50 value, 10.9 μM) was higher (43.6%) than the lutein (IC50 value, 25 μM). Results suggest that PLGA-PEG nanocapsule is an efficient carrier for enhancing hydrophilicity, bioavailability, and anticancer property of lipophilic molecules such as lutein. PMID:25824524

  6. Expression Levels of the Oxidative Stress Response Gene ALDH3A2 in Granulosa-Lutein Cells Are Related to Female Age and Infertility Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Rebeca; Hernández, Jairo; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo; Puopolo, Maria; Palumbo, Angela; Ávila, Julio

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in all physiological processes. The effect of OS on cellular processes is modulated by the ability of the cell to express genes implicated in the reversal of lipid, protein, and DNA injury. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3, member A2 (ALDH3A2) is a ubiquitous enzyme involved in lipid detoxification. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression ofALDH3A2in human granulosa-lutein (GL) cells of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and its relationship with age, infertility diagnosis, and IVF outcome variables. Relative expression levels ofALDH3A2were determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To investigate the effect of age onALDH3A2expression, 72 women between 18 and 44 years of age with no ovarian factor (NOF) were analyzed. To evaluate the effect of infertility diagnosis onALDH3A2expression, the following groups were analyzed: 22 oocyte donors (ODs), 24 women >40 years old (yo) with tubal or male factor and no ovarian pathology, 18 poor responders (PRs), 19 cases with endometriosis (EM), and 18 patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). In NOF,ALDH3A2expression correlated positively with age and with the doses of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone administered and negatively with the number of total and mature oocytes. When different groups were analyzed,ALDH3A2expression levels were higher in patients >40 yo and in PR compared to OD. On the contrary, EM and PCOS levels were lower than expected for age. These data suggest that GL cellALDH3A2expression levels correlate with age, cause of infertility, and ovarian response to stimulation. PMID:26449735

  7. Athletic Activity and Hormone Concentrations in High School Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wojtys, Edward M.; Jannausch, Mary L.; Kreinbrink, Jennifer L.; Harlow, Siobán D.; Sowers, MaryFran R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Physical activity may affect the concentrations of circulating endogenous hormones in female athletes. Understanding the relationship between athletic and physical activity and circulating female hormone concentrations is critical. Objective: To test the hypotheses that (1) the estradiol-progesterone profile of high school adolescent girls participating in training, conditioning, and competition would differ from that of physically inactive, age-matched adolescent girls throughout a 3-month period; and (2) athletic training and conditioning would alter body composition (muscle, bone), leading to an increasingly greater lean–body-mass to fat–body-mass ratio with accompanying hormonal changes. Design: Cohort study. Settings: Laboratory and participants' homes. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 106 adolescent girls, ages 14–18 years, who had experienced at least 3 menstrual cycles in their lifetime. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants were prospectively monitored throughout a 13-week period, with weekly physical activity assessments and 15 urine samples for estrogen, luteinizing hormone, creatinine, and progesterone concentrations. Each girl underwent body-composition measurements before and after the study period. Results: Seventy-four of the 98 girls (76%) who completed the study classified themselves as athletes. Body mass index, body mass, and fat measures remained stable, and 17 teenagers had no complete menstrual cycle during the observation period. Mean concentrations of log(estrogen/creatinine) were slightly greater in nonathletes who had cycles of <24 or >35 days. Mean log(progesterone/creatinine) concentrations in nonathletes were less in the first half and greater in the second half of the cycle, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: A moderate level of athletic or physical activity did not influence urine concentrations of estrogen, progesterone, or luteinizing hormones. However, none of the

  8. Suppression in the secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, and ovarian follicle development in heifers continuously infused with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist.

    PubMed

    Gong, J G; Campbell, B K; Bramley, T A; Gutierrez, C G; Peters, A R; Webb, R

    1996-07-01

    A novel experimental model was developed in cattle to investigate the requirement for FSH and LH during ovarian follicle growth and development. On Day 5 of the estrous cycle, 7 heifers were each implanted with an osmotic minipump containing a GnRH agonist (GnRHa), Buserelin (release rate, 2.5 micrograms/h). Another 7 heifers served as controls. Each minipump was replaced 28 days later with a second pump, which was left in place for a further 20 days. Blood samples were collected daily throughout the experimental period, and frequent samples were also collected on both days of minipump insertion and at 10 days after insertion of the second pump. The ovaries of all heifers were scanned daily by real-time ultrasonography to monitor follicular dynamics. All controls displayed 2 or 3 waves of FSH and follicular development per estrous cycle during the experiment. Insertion of the first minipump produced a large LH and FSH surge and induced ovulation in all 7 animals. Within 8 days of the start of treatment, serum LH concentrations fell to basal levels; they then remained constant at this level throughout the infusion period, only beginning to recover 4-5 days after the termination of infusion. After the initial increase, FSH returned to basal levels before showing a normal wave that was coincident with the emergence, growth, and regression of a dominant follicle. However, despite the peak levels of FSH, dominant follicles from the next wave failed to grow beyond 7-9 mm; they remained at this size for 3 wk until 3-4 days after insertion of the second minipump, when FSH fell precipitously to reach low levels that were maintained throughout the remainder of the infusion. After this fall in FSH concentrations, these follicles regressed rapidly, and no antral follicles > 4 mm were detected until after the termination of treatment. Thereafter, FSH concentrations increased significantly; the increase was accompanied by the emergence of a follicular wave and development of a dominant follicle, with estrus observed 8-11 days later. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated clearly that in cattle the early stages of follicle development (< or = 4 mm) are not dependent on acute support by gonadotropins. However, FSH is required for further growth of follicles up to 9 mm, while LH pulses are indispensable for follicle development beyond 9 mm in diameter. The model developed in this study should be valuable for studying the control of ovarian follicle development and atresia in vivo. PMID:8793060

  9. Gonads and the evolution of hormonal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Kimberly A; Bergeon Burns, Christine M; Jayaratna, Sonya P; Dossey, Emma K; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-08-01

    Hormones are dynamic signaling molecules that influence gene activity and phenotype, and they are thus thought to play a central role in phenotypic evolution. In vertebrates, many fitness-related traits are mediated by the hormone testosterone (T), but the mechanisms by which T levels evolve are unclear. Here, we summarize a series of studies that advance our understanding of these mechanisms by comparing males from two subspecies of dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) that differ in aggression, body size, and ornamentation. We first review our research demonstrating population differences in the time-course of T production, as well as findings that point to the gonad as a major source of this variation. In a common garden, the subspecies do not differ in pituitary output of luteinizing hormone, but males from the more androgenized subspecies have greater gonadal gene expression for specific steroidogenic enzymes, and they may be less sensitive to feedback along the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Furthermore, we present new data from a common garden study demonstrating that the populations do not differ in gonadal sensitivity to gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (i.e., GnIH receptor mRNA abundance), but the more androgenized subspecies expresses less gonadal mRNA for glucocorticoid receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor, suggesting altered cross-talk between the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal and -adrenal axes as another mechanism by which these subspecies have diverged in T production. These findings highlight the diversity of mechanisms that may generate functional variation in T and influence hormone-mediated phenotypic evolution. PMID:27252189

  10. Interfacial properties of Quillaja saponins and its use for micellisation of lutein esters.

    PubMed

    Tippel, Janine; Lehmann, Maren; von Klitzing, Regine; Drusch, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Natural food colourants, colouring foods and bioactive food ingredients need to be solubilised for their incorporation in food. Aim of the present study was to investigate the micelle-forming properties of saponins from Quillaja saponaria Mollina (QS) in order to solubilise a lutein ester extract for its incorporation in food matrices. QS showed a high surface activity and functionality with respect to micellisation as derived from interfacial tension measurements and subsequent data fitting to the classical Frumkin model. The composition of the aqueous phase affected the lutein ester incorporation as revealed by particle size, zeta potential and colour measurements. In terms of morphology of lutein ester loaded saponin micelles (LMS), cryo-TEM micrographs showed depending on the composition of the medium both, spherical and elongated branched micelles. PMID:27374503

  11. Modeling of fluorescence quenching by lutein in the plant light-harvesting complex LHCII.

    PubMed

    Duffy, C D P; Chmeliov, J; Macernis, M; Sulskus, J; Valkunas, L; Ruban, A V

    2013-09-26

    Photoprotective non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in higher plants is the result of the formation of energy quenching traps in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). It has been proposed that this quenching trap is a lutein molecule closely associated with the chlorophyll terminal emitter of the major light-harvesting complex LHCII. We have used a combination of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and the semiempirical MNDO-CAS-CI method to model the chlorophyll-lutein energy transfer dynamics of the highly quenched crystal structure of LHCII. Our calculations reveal that the incoherent "hopping" of energy from Chla612 to the short-lived, dipole forbidden 2(1)A(g)(-) state of lutein620 accounts for the strong fluorescence quenching observed in these crystals. This adds weight to the argument that the same dissipative pathway is responsible for in vivo NPQ. PMID:23234311

  12. Pulsatile protein release from monodisperse liquid-core microcapsules of controllable shell thickness

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yujie; Pack, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pulsatile delivery of proteins, in which release occurs over a short time after a period of little or no release, is desirable for many applications. This paper investigates the effect of biodegradable polymer shell thickness on pulsatile protein release from biodegradable polymer microcapsules. Methods Using precision particle fabrication (PPF) technology, monodisperse microcapsules were fabricated encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a liquid core surrounded by a drug-free poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) shell of uniform, controlled thickness from 14 to 19 μm. Results When using high molecular weight PLG (Mw 88 kDa), microparticles exhibited the desired core-shell structure with high BSA loading and encapsulation efficiency (55-65%). These particles exhibited very slow release of BSA for several weeks followed by rapid release of 80-90% of the encapsulated BSA within seven days. Importantly, with increasing shell thickness the starting time of the pulsatile release could be controlled from 25 to 35 days. Conclusions Biodegradable polymer microcapsules with precisely controlled shell thickness provide pulsatile release with enhanced control of release profiles. PMID:24831313

  13. The pulsating brain: A review of experimental and clinical studies of intracranial pulsatility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of adequate blood flow to the brain is critical for normal brain function; cerebral blood flow, its regulation and the effect of alteration in this flow with disease have been studied extensively and are very well understood. This flow is not steady, however; the systolic increase in blood pressure over the cardiac cycle causes regular variations in blood flow into and throughout the brain that are synchronous with the heart beat. Because the brain is contained within the fixed skull, these pulsations in flow and pressure are in turn transferred into brain tissue and all of the fluids contained therein including cerebrospinal fluid. While intracranial pulsatility has not been a primary focus of the clinical community, considerable data have accrued over the last sixty years and new applications are emerging to this day. Investigators have found it a useful marker in certain diseases, particularly in hydrocephalus and traumatic brain injury where large changes in intracranial pressure and in the biomechanical properties of the brain can lead to significant changes in pressure and flow pulsatility. In this work, we review the history of intracranial pulsatility beginning with its discovery and early characterization, consider the specific technologies such as transcranial Doppler and phase contrast MRI used to assess various aspects of brain pulsations, and examine the experimental and clinical studies which have used pulsatility to better understand brain function in health and with disease. PMID:21349153

  14. Feasibility of Pump Speed Modulation for Restoring Vascular Pulsatility with Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) diminish vascular pressure pulsatility, which may be associated with clinically reported adverse events including gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic valve insufficiency, and hemorrhagic stroke. Three candidate CF LVAD pump speed modulation algorithms designed to augment aortic pulsatility were evaluated in mock flow loop and ischemic heart failure (IHF) bovine models by quantifying hemodynamic performance as a function of mean pump speed, modulation amplitude, and timing. Asynchronous and synchronous copulsation (high revolutions per minute [RPM] during systole, low RPM during diastole) and counterpulsation (low RPM during systole, high RPM during diastole) algorithms were tested for defined modulation amplitudes (±300, ±500, ±800, and ±1,100 RPM) and frequencies (18.75, 37.5, and 60 cycles/minute) at low (2,900 RPM) and high (3,200 RPM) mean LVAD speeds. In the mock flow loop model, asynchronous, synchronous copulsation, and synchronous counterpulsation algorithms each increased pulse pressure (ΔP = 931%, 210%, and 98% and reduced left ventricular external work (LVEW = 20%, 22%, 16%). Similar improvements in vascular pulsatility (1,142%) and LVEW (40%) were observed in the IHF bovine model. Asynchronous modulation produces the largest vascular pulsatility with the advantage of not requiring sensor(s) for timing pump speed modulation, facilitating potential clinical implementation. PMID:26102173

  15. Flap raising on pulsatile perfused cadaveric tissue: a novel method for surgical teaching and exercise.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fichter, Andreas; Braun, Christian; Bauer, Florian; Humbs, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Exercising flap raising procedures on cadavers is considered a prerequisite to prepare for clinical practise. To improve teaching and create conditions as realistic as possible, a perfusion device was developed providing pulsatile flow through the vessels of different donor sites. A plastic bag filled with red stained tab water was placed into a pump, which was driven by an electric motor. The bag was set under rhythmic compression with variable frequency and pressure. The pedicles of the radial forearm, anterolateral thigh, rectus abdominis, fibular and iliac crest flap were cannulated at the origin from their source arteries. Flap raising was performed under pulsatile perfusion in 15 fresh bodies and subsequently in 6 Thiel-embalmed cadavers during a flap raising course. We regularly observed staining of the skin and skin bleeding in fresh bodies and less reliable in embalmed cadavers. All flap pedicles showed pulsatile movements, and the radial pulse became palpable. Most perforators of the anterolateral thigh and osteocutaneous fibular flap could be identified by their pulse. Bleeding from bony tissue and venous return was seldom observed. We conclude that pulsatile perfusion of cadaveric tissue creates more realistic conditions for flap raising and improves teaching for beginners and advanced surgeons. PMID:24938642

  16. Pulsatile lavage for pressure ulcer management in spinal cord injury: a retrospective clinical safety review.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Kath M; Ho, Chester H

    2013-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are major complications of reduced mobility and/or sensation. Pulsatile lavage therapy delivers localized hydrotherapy directly to the wound utilizing a pulsatile pressurized stream of normal saline. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical safety of pulsatile lavage therapy, provided daily at the bedside, in routine management of Stage III and Stage IV pressure ulcers. Charts from 28 male patients with Stage III and Stage IV pressure ulcers and spinal cord injury (SCI) or spinal cord disorders (SCD) were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of adverse events/safety concerns. Mean therapy duration was 46 days (SD 37 days, range 6-152 days). Treatment was interrupted for 6 days in one patient due to minor wound bleeding. No other adverse events, including backsplash injuries, were documented. The results of this chart review suggest pulsatile lavage therapy can be administered at the patient's bedside without adverse events if appropriate protocols are followed. Additional research to confirm the efficacy and effectiveness of this treatment modality in a broader subject population is warranted. PMID:23475450

  17. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone presenting with pulsatile tinnitus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone is an unusual but distinct disease entity. The most common presenting symptoms are otalgia, otorrhea, hearing loss, facial palsy, and vertigo. We describe here what we believe to be the first reported case of a patient presenting with persistent pulsatile tinnitus. The clinical features, radiological and histopathologic findings, and treatment outcomes of the patient are presented. Case presentation A 59-year-old woman of Chinese Han origin presented with complaints of left-sided pulsatile tinnitus and progressive hearing loss for several years. Clinical evaluations revealed a reddish mass behind the intact tympanic membrane, and a moderately severe conductive hearing loss in the left ear. The computed tomographic imaging of the temporal bone demonstrated a slightly ill-defined left middle ear soft tissue mass involving the posterior portion of the mesotympanum and epitympanum, and the mastoid antrum. The patient underwent surgical excision of the lesion which subsequently resolved her symptoms. Postoperative pathology was consistent with an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. Conclusions An inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone can present clinically with pulsatile tinnitus and masquerade as venous hum or vascular tumors of the middle ear; therefore, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of pulsatile tinnitus. PMID:23787119

  18. 3D separation over a wall-mounted hemisphere in steady and pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Flow separation over a surface-mounted hemispheriod is prevalent in countless applications, both under steady (constant freestream velocity) and unsteady flow over the protuberance. Previous studies of 3D separation have been limited to steady inflow conditions. In biological and geophysical flows, pulsatile flow conditions are much more commonly observed, yet such conditions have not been well studied. Primarily motivated by previous studies of the flow observed in various human vocal fold pathologies, such as polyps, our research aims to fill the knowledge gap in unsteady 3D flow separation. This is achieved by characterizing surface pressure fields and velocity fields, focused primarily on the vortical flow structures and dynamics that occur around a hemispheroid protuberance under pulsatile flow conditions. Surface static pressure and two-dimensional, instantaneous and phase-averaged, particle image velocimetry data in steady and pulsatile flow are presented and compared. Coherent vortical flow structures have been identified using the λci vortex identification criterion. This analysis has revealed a novel set of flow structures dependent on the pulsatile flow forcing function. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351.

  19. Three-dimensional flow separation over a surface-mounted hemisphere in pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Flow separation over a surface-mounted obstacle is prevalent in numerous applications. Previous studies of 3D separation around protuberances have been limited to steady flow. In biological and geophysical flows, pulsatile conditions are frequently encountered, yet this situation has not been extensively studied. Primarily motivated by our previous studies of the flow patterns observed in various human vocal fold pathologies such as polyps, our research aimed to fill this gap in the knowledge concerning unsteady 3D flow separation. This is achieved by characterizing velocity fields surrounding the obstacle, focused primarily on the vortical flow structures and dynamics that occur around a hemispheroid in pulsatile flow. As part of this study, two-dimensional, instantaneous and phase-averaged particle image velocimetry data in both steady and pulsatile flows are presented and compared. Coherent vortical flow structures have been identified by their swirling strength. This analysis revealed flow structures with dynamics dependent on the pulsatile forcing function. A mechanism to explain the formation and observed dynamics of these flow structures based on the self-induced velocity of vortex rings interacting with the unsteady flow is proposed.

  20. A Pulsatile Cardiovascular Computer Model for Teaching Heart-Blood Vessel Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Kenneth; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a model which gives realistic predictions of pulsatile pressure, flow, and volume events in the cardiovascular system. Includes computer oriented laboratory exercises for veterinary and graduate students; equations of the dynamic and algebraic models; and a flow chart for the cardiovascular teaching program. (JN)

  1. Development and optimization of press coated floating pulsatile drug delivery of sumatriptan succinate.

    PubMed

    Jagdale, Swati C; Pawar, Chandrakala R

    2014-01-01

    Floating pulsatile is combined approach designed according to circadian rhythm to deliver the drug at right time, in right quantity and at right site as per pathophysiological need of disease with prolong gastric residence and lag phase followed by burst release. As the migraine follows circadian rhythm in which headache is more painful at the awakening time, the dosage form should be given during night time to release drug when pain get worsen. Present work deals with formulation and optimization of floating pulsatile tablet of sumatriptan succinate. Core tablet containing crospovidone as superdisintegrant (10%) showed burst release. Lag time was maintained using swellable polymer as polyoxN12K and xanthum gum. 3(2) experimental design was carried out. Developed formulations were evaluated for physical characteristics, in vitro and in vivo study. Optimized batch F2 with concentration of polyox N12K (73.43%) and xanthum gum (26.56%) of total polymer weight showed floating lag time 15±2 sec, drug content 99.58±0.2 %, hardness 6±0.2 Kg/cm(2) and drug release 99.54±2% with pulsatile manner followed lag period of 7±0.1h. In vivo x-ray study confirms prolong gastric residence of system. Programmable pulsatile release has been achieved by formulation F2 which meet demand of chronotherapeutic objective of migraine. PMID:24893996

  2. Random Centroid Optimization of Phyosphatidylglycerol Stablized Lutein-Enriched Oil-In-Water Emulsions at Acidic pH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein has been identified by various studies as a dietary compound that may help delay the onset of macular degeneration. Random centroid optimization was applied to design, prepare, and characterize lutein-enriched oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions containing corn oil (15-25%), whey proteins (1.5-3.5%...

  3. Comparative Study of Continuous and Pulsatile Left Ventricular Assist Devices on Hemodynamics of a Pediatric End-to-Side Anastomotic Graft

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ning; Deutsch, Steven; Paterson, Eric G.; Manning, Keefe B.

    2013-01-01

    Although there are many studies that focus on understanding the consequence of pumping mode (continuous vs. pulsatile) associated with ventricular assist devices (VADs) on pediatric vascular pulsatility, the impact on local hemodynamics has been largely ignored. Hence, we compare not only the hemodynamic parameters indicative of pulsatility but also the local flow fields in the aorta and the great vessels originating from the aortic arch. A physiologic graft anastomotic model is constructed based on a pediatric, patient specific, aorta with a graft attached on the ascending aorta. The flow is simulated using a previously validated second-order accurate Navier–Stokes flow solver based upon a finite volume approach. The major findings are: (1) pulsatile support provides a greater degree of vascular pulsatility when compared to continuous support, which, however, is still 20% less than pulsatility in the healthy aorta; (2) pulsatile support increases the flow in the great vessels, while continuous support decreases it; (3) complete VAD support results in turbulence in the aorta, with maximum principal Reynolds stresses for pulsatile support and continuous support of 7081 and 249 dyn/cm2, respectively; (4) complete pulsatile support results in a significant increase in predicted hemolysis in the aorta; and (5) pulsatile support causes both higher time-averaged wall shear stresses (WSS) and oscillatory shear indices (OSI) in the aorta than does continuous support. These findings will help to identify the risk of graft failure for pediatric patients with pulsatile and continuous VADs. PMID:24348881

  4. Effects of nitrogen source availability and bioreactor operating strategies on lutein production with Scenedesmus obliquus FSP-3.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Xie, Youping; Chan, Ming-Chang; Liu, Chen-Chun; Chen, Chun-Yen; Lee, Duu-Jong; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the effects of the type and concentration of nitrogen sources on the cell growth and lutein content of an isolated microalga Scenedesmus obliquus FSP-3 were investigated. With batch culture, the highest lutein content (4.61 mg/g) and lutein productivity (4.35 mg/L/day) were obtained when using 8.0 mM calcium nitrate as the nitrogen source. With this best nitrogen source condition, the microalgae cultivation was performed using two bioreactor strategies (namely, semi-continuous and two-stage operations) to further enhance the lutein content and productivity. Using semi-continuous operation with a 10% medium replacement ratio could obtain the highest biomass productivity (1304.8 mg/L/day) and lutein productivity (6.01 mg/L/day). This performance is better than most related studies. PMID:25453431

  5. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions. PMID:24231821

  6. Circulating hormone concentrations in hypothyroid rats with induced polycystic ovaries.

    PubMed

    Lee, M T; Adams, W C; Bruot, B C

    1991-11-01

    The induction of polycystic ovaries in hypothyroid rats by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been studied for many years. A complete understanding of this phenomenon requires information regarding the circulating levels of the hormones of the hypophyseal-gonadal axis. In this study, serum prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, testosterone, and progesterone were measured by radioimmunoassay at intervals during the 40-day period in which large ovarian cysts were induced in hypothyroid rats by daily injections of hCG. After 20 injections, ovaries increased in weight 10-fold, and well-developed ovarian cysts were present, accompanied by lutein tissue; cyst development continued for the subsequent 20 days of hCG. Both PRL and LH rose during the first 5 days of treatment and were maintained at high levels from day 20 on. The pattern of change of gonadal steroids showed greater increases with hCG in hypothyroid than in euthyroid rats. Levels of estradiol in hypothyroid, hCG-injected rats increased in parallel to ovarian hypertrophy, whereas progesterone was high in initial stages and then declined. Testosterone increased in both euthyroid and hypothyroid animals, with no clear pattern coincident with cyst formation. The data suggest that the formation of polycystic ovaries in the hypothyroid rat is associated with high levels of PRL and LH followed by elevations of estradiol, which may serve to maintain continuous PRL, as well as LH, stimulation of the ovary. PMID:1924408

  7. Electrical synapses connect a network of gonadotropin releasing hormone neurons in a cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunyong; Hu, Caroline K.; Huguenard, John R.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    Initiating and regulating vertebrate reproduction requires pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH1) from the hypothalamus. Coordinated GnRH1 release, not simply elevated absolute levels, effects the release of pituitary gonadotropins that drive steroid production in the gonads. However, the mechanisms underlying synchronization of GnRH1 neurons are unknown. Control of synchronicity by gap junctions between GnRH1 neurons has been proposed but not previously found. We recorded simultaneously from pairs of transgenically labeled GnRH1 neurons in adult male Astatotilapia burtoni cichlid fish. We report that GnRH1 neurons are strongly and uniformly interconnected by electrical synapses that can drive spiking in connected cells and can be reversibly blocked by meclofenamic acid. Our results suggest that electrical synapses could promote coordinated spike firing in a cellular assemblage of GnRH1 neurons to produce the pulsatile output necessary for activation of the pituitary and reproduction. PMID:25775522

  8. GONADOTROPIN RELEASING HORMONE (GNRH) PARTIALLY REVERSES THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN ON OVULATION IN THE IMMATURE GONADOTROPIN-TREATED RAT. (R826132)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Several studies have shown that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has inhibitory effects on ovulation. This action may be the result of either direct effect(s) of TCDD on ovarian function or via altered secretion of pituitary luteinizing hormon...

  9. Determinants of GH-releasing hormone and GH-releasing peptide synergy in men

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Bowers, Cyril Y.

    2009-01-01

    Age, sex steroids, and abdominal-visceral fat (AVF) jointly affect pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion. Pulsatile GH secretion in turn is controlled by GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), GH-releasing peptide (GHRP), and somatostatin. Marked stimulation of pulsatile GH secretion is achieved via GHRH-GHRP synergy. Nonetheless, how key modulators of GH secretion, such as age, sex steroids, and body mass index, modify GHRH-GHRP synergy is not known. The present strategy was to 1) infuse GHRH and GHRP-2 simultaneously to evoke synergy and 2) downregulate the gonadal axis with leuprolide and then restore placebo (Pl) or testosterone (T) to clamp the sex steroid milieu. Forty-seven men [18–74 yr of age, T = 7–1,950 ng/dl, estradiol (E2) = 5–79 pg/ml, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I = 115–817 μg/l, AVF = 11–349 cm2] were studied. GHRH-GHRP synergy correlated negatively with age and AVF (both P < 0.001) and positively with IGF-I (P < 0.001) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 (P = 0.031). Unstimulated basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion correlated positively with T (P = 0.015) and E2 (P = 0.004) concentrations. Fasting pulsatile GH secretion varied negatively with age (P = 0.017) and positively with IGF-I (P = 0.002) and IGFBP-3 (P = 0.001). By stepwise forward-selection multivariate analyses, AVF, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 together explained 60% of the variability in GHRH-GHRP synergy (P < 0.001), E2 accounted for 17% of the variability in basal GH secretion (P = 0.007), and IGF-I explained 20% of the variability in fasting pulsatile GH secretion (P = 0.002). In conclusion, a paradigm examining GHRH-GHRP synergy under a sex steroid clamp reveals highly selective control of basal, pulsatile, and synergistic peptide-driven GH secretion by AVF, E2, and IGF-I in healthy men. PMID:19240251

  10. Insulin-like factor 3: a novel circulating hormone of testicular origin in humans.

    PubMed

    Ferlin, Alberto; Foresta, Carlo

    2005-05-01

    Insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3) affects testicular descent. Mutations in the INSL3 gene or its receptor, LGR8/GREAT, can cause cryptorchidism. Expression of LGR8/GREAT in different tissues and production of INSL3 by adult-type Leydig cells suggest additional roles for this hormonal system in adults. We used a novel radioimmunoassay kit to measure INSL3 concentrations in the serum of normal men and those with different testicular pathologies. We demonstrate that INSL3 circulates in adult men and is almost exclusively of testicular origin. Subjects with severe testicular damage (infertility) produce small amounts of INSL3, and concentrations of this hormone seem to reflect the functional status of the Leydig cells. Analysis of men treated with different combinations of hormones of the hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis suggests that the production of INSL3 is related to the luteinizing hormone. PMID:15956751

  11. Effect of tulsi (Ocimum Sanctum Linn.) on sperm count and reproductive hormones in male albino rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Jyoti; Yadav, Mridul; Sood, Sushma; Dahiya, Kiran; Singh, Veena

    2010-10-01

    Fresh leaves of Ocimum Sanctum (OS) were used to study its effect on male reproductive function (sperm count and reproductive hormones) in male albino rabbits. Animals in the test group received supplementation of 2 g of fresh leaves of OS per rabbit for 30 days, while the control group was maintained on normal diet for the same duration. Sperm count and hormonal estimation [testosterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH)] were done in serum samples of both groups and compared. A significant decrease was noted in the sperm count in test group rabbits. Serum testosterone levels showed marked increase while FSH and LH levels were significantly reduced in OS-treated rabbits. The results suggest the potential use of OS as an effective male contraceptive agent. PMID:21455446

  12. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  13. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  14. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  15. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  16. Hot issues in female and male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Gava, Giulia; Lantadilla, Claudia; Martelli, Valentina; Fattorini, Anna; Seracchioli, Renato; Meriggiola, Maria C

    2016-02-01

    In recent years a number of significant developments in the field of female hormonal contraception have been made which have produced new formulations and delivery systems providing high efficacy, safety and important non-contraceptive benefits. In particular long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) formulations have been demonstrated to ensure extremely high efficacy in typical use, minimal contraindications, optimal safety in all women thereby representing the best option for most women of all ages. Their effectiveness is not reliant upon user adherence and their ability to reduce unintended pregnancies and abortions has been proven. Unfortunately the same considerations cannot be made for male hormonal contraception. Although a large number of men are interested and would welcome the opportunity to use male contraceptive methods, no safe, effective and reversible methods are available on the market. Current methods available for men are limited to condoms and vasectomy. Highly effective prototype regimens have been developed but the pharmaceutical industry is unwilling to pursue further development and market these products. Of all new approaches to male contraception, hormonal methods are the closest to clinical application. These are based on the reversible suppression of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone with subsequent reversible inhibition of spermatogenesis and consequent replacement to maintain androgen dependent physiological functions. Most approaches tested combination regimens such as testosterone and a progestin or testosterone and a GnRH analog. PMID:26633041

  17. Clinical trial of lutein in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to determine whether lutein supplementation will slow visual function decline in patients with retinitis pigmentosa receiving vitamin A. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled, double-masked trial of 225 nonsmoking patients, aged 18 to 60 years, evaluated over a 4-year interval. Patients received ...

  18. Intake of lutein and zeaxanthin differ with age, sex, and ethnicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoids that are selectively taken up into the macula of the eye where they are thought to protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Current dietary databases make it difficult to ascertain their individual roles in eye health because their concentrations ...

  19. Lutein, zeaxanthin, meso-zeaxanthin content in egg yolk and their absence in fish and seafood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are carotenoids that are selectively taken up into the macula of the eye where they may protect against age-related macular degeneration. Meso-zeaxanthin (MZ) is also found in the macula, but is derived from L. It has been reported that MZ was found in certain fish and ...

  20. Xanthophyll (lutein, zeaxanthin) content in fruits, vegetables, and corn and egg products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoids that are selectively taken up into the macula of the eye where they are thought to protect against the development of age-related macular degeneration. Current dietary databases make it difficult to ascertain their individual roles in eye health because their co...

  1. Xanthophyll (Lutein, Zeaxanthin) Content in Fruits, Vegetables and Corn & Egg Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are carotenoids that are selectively taken up into the macula of the eye where they are thought to protect against the development of age-related macular degeneration. Current dietary databases make it difficult to ascertain their individual roles in eye health because their co...

  2. Isolation of a novel lutein-protein complex from Chlorella vulgaris and its functional properties.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xixi; Huang, Qimin; Wang, Shaoyun

    2015-06-01

    A novel kind of lutein-protein complex (LPC) was extracted from heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris through aqueous extraction. The purification procedure contained solubilization of thylakoid proteins by a zwitterionic detergent CHAPS, anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Both wavelength scanning and HPLC analysis confirmed that lutein was the major pigment of the protein-based complex, and the mass ratio of lutein and protein was determined to be 9.72 : 100. Besides showing lipid peroxidation inhibition activity in vitro, LPC exerted significant antioxidant effects against ABTS and DPPH radicals with IC50 of 2.90 and 97. 23 μg mL(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, in vivo antioxidant activity of the complex was evaluated using the mice hepatotoxicity model; LPC significantly suppressed the carbon tetrachloride-induced elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, and decreased hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the hepatosomatic index. Moreover, LPC could effectively restore the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the treated mice livers. Our findings further the progress in the research of natural protein-based lutein complexes, suggesting that LPC has the potential in hepatoprotection against chemical induced toxicity and in increasing the antioxidant capacity of the defense system in the human body. PMID:25945783

  3. Purified canola lutein selectively inhibits specific isoforms of mammalian DNA polymerases and reduces inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Horie, Sho; Okuda, Chiaki; Yamashita, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Hosokawa, Masashi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kakuda, Makiko; Miyashita, Kazuo; Sugawara, Fumio; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2010-08-01

    In the screening of DNA polymerase (pol) inhibitor, we isolated lutein, a carotenoid, from the crude (unrefined) pressed oil of canola (low erucic acid rapeseed, Brassica napus L.). Commercially prepared carotenoids such as lutein (1), zeaxanthin (2), beta-cryptoxanthin (3), astaxanthin (4), canthaxanthin (5), beta-carotene (6), lycopene (7), capsanthin (8), fucoxanthin (9) and fucoxanthinol (10), were investigated for the inhibitory activities of pols. Compounds 1, 2 and 8 exhibited strong inhibition of the activities of mammalian pols beta and lambda, which are DNA repair- and/or recombination-related pols. On the other hand, all carotenoids tested had no influence on the activity of a mammalian pol alpha, which is a DNA replicative pol. Lutein (1) was the strongest pol inhibitor of mammalian pols beta and lambda in the prepared ten carotenoids tested, but did not influence of the activities of mammalian pols alpha, gamma, delta and epsilon. The tendency for pols beta and lambda inhibition by these carotenoids showed a positive correlation with the suppression of TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced inflammation. These results suggest that cold pressed unrefined canola/rapeseed oil, or other oils with high levels of lutein and other carotenoids, may be useful for their anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:20669052

  4. Lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation reduces H202-induced oxidative damage in human lens epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies suggest that dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin is inversely related to the risk for senile cataract. The objectives of this work were to investigate the mechanisms by which these nutrients provide anti-cataract effects. We evaluated their modulation of oxid...

  5. Clearance of yellow pigments lutein and zeathanxin in channel catfish reared at different water temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine clearance time of yellow pigments lutein and zeaxanthin in channel catfish at various temperatures. Fish of initial weight of 13.4 g were stocked into flow-through aquaria and fed once daily with a yellow pigment enhanced diet for 11 weeks when the yellow color be...

  6. Ameliorative effects of lutein on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiang; Gao, Dan-Hong; Xiang, Xiao; Xiong, Yu-Fang; Zhu, Teng-Shi; Liu, Lie-Gang; Sun, Xiu-Fa; Hao, Li-Ping

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effects of lutein against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the related underlying mechanism. METHODS: After 9 d of acclimation to a constant temperature-controlled room (20 °C-22 °C) under 12 h light/dark cycles, male Sprague-Darley rats were randomly divided into two groups and fed a standard commercial diet (n = 8) or a high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 32) for 10 d. Animals receiving HFD were then randomly divided into 4 groups and administered with 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg (body weight) per day of lutein for the next 45 d. At the end of the experiment, the perinephric and abdominal adipose tissues of the rats were isolated and weighed. Additionally, serum and liver lipid metabolic condition parameters were measured, and liver function and insulin resistance state indexes were assessed. Liver samples were collected and stained with hematoxylin eosin and Oil Red O, and the expression of the key factors related to insulin signaling and lipid metabolism in the liver were detected using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses. RESULTS: Our data showed that after being fed a high-fat diet for 10 d, the rats showed a significant gain in body weight, energy efficiency, and serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels. Lutein supplementation induced fat loss in rats fed a high-fat diet, without influencing body weight or energy efficiency, and decreased serum TC and hepatic TC and TG levels. Moreover, lutein supplementation decreased hepatic levels of lipid accumulation and glutamic pyruvic transaminase content, and also improved insulin sensitivity. Lutein administration also increased the expression of key factors in hepatic insulin signaling, such as insulin receptor substrate-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and glucose transporter-2 at the gene and protein levels. Furthermore, high-dose lutein increased the expression of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor-α and sirtuin 1

  7. Sex hormone receptors in the hypothalamus and their role in sexual differentiation of the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkina, I.V.; Babichev, V.N.; Ozol', L.Yu.

    1986-09-01

    In this investigation, changes in the level of receptors for sex hormones in the hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats were studied on the first through fifth days of postnatal life, and the results obtained were compared with the levels of luteinizing hormone and sex hormones in the peripheral blood in order to discover any correlation between these parameters. 2,4,6,7,-/sup 3/H-estradiol-17..beta.. and 1,2,6,7-/sup 3/H-testosterone were used as labeled hormones. The values of the association constant and concentration of specific binding sites for estradiol and testosterone in hypothalamus and cerebral cortex of male rats during neonatal development is shown. It is found that in male rats on the first day after birth, receptors for estradiol and testosterone are present and they enable the action both of the testicular hormone and that of estradiol to be realized.

  8. Physicochemical, morphological and cellular uptake properties of lutein nanodispersions prepared by using surfactants with different stabilizing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tai Boon; Chu, Wern Cui; Yussof, Nor Shariffa; Abas, Faridah; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Cheah, Yoke Kqueen; Nehdi, Imededdine Arbi; Tan, Chin Ping

    2016-04-20

    In this study, we prepared a series of lutein nanodispersions via the solvent displacement method, by using surfactants with different stabilizing mechanisms. The surfactants used include Tween 80 (steric stabilization), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS; electrostatic stabilization), sodium caseinate (electrosteric stabilization) and SDS-Tween 80 (electrostatic-steric stabilization). We then characterized the resulting lutein nanodispersions in terms of their particle size, particle size distribution, zeta potential, lutein content, flow behavior, apparent viscosity, transmittance, color, morphological properties and their effects on cell viability and cellular uptake. The type of surfactant used significantly (p < 0.05) affected the physical properties of the nanodispersions, but the chemical properties (lutein content) remained unaffected. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images obtained from this study demonstrated that the solvent displacement method was capable of producing lutein nanodispersions containing spherical particles with sizes ranging from 66.20-125.25 nm, depending on the type of surfactant used. SDS and SDS-Tween 80 surfactants negatively affected the viability of the HT-29 cells used in this study. Thus, for the cellular uptake determination, only Tween 80 and sodium caseinate surfactants were used. The cellular uptake of the lutein nanodispersion stabilized by sodium caseinate was higher than that which was stabilized by Tween 80. All things considered, the type of surfactant with different stabilizing mechanisms did produce lutein nanodispersions with different characteristics. These findings would aid in future selection of surfactants in order to produce nanodispersions with desirable properties. PMID:27010495

  9. Plasma and macular responses to lutein supplement in subjects with and without age-related maculopathy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hui-Hiang; Murray, Ian J; Nolan, Daniel; Carden, Dave; Feather, Jim; Beatty, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence which suggests that macular pigment (MP), which is entirely of dietary origin, protects against age-related maculopathy. We evaluated the effect of a daily 20 mg lutein ester (equivalent of 10 mg/day free lutein) supplement in patients with early age-related maculopathy (ARM), in terms of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and plasma concentrations of lutein. MPOD was measured using a flicker photometric technique in seven ARM sufferers and six age-matched controls over a period of supplementation which lasted 18-20 weeks. Plasma lutein increased from a mean (SD) baseline concentration of 182 (127)ng ml(-1) to a peak of 1077 (165)ng ml(-1) in ARM patients, and from 152 (57) to 1110 (605)ng ml(-1) in control subjects. Mean MPOD had increased significantly from baseline of 0.24 to a peak of 0.31 in ARM sufferers. This mean increment of 0.07 was the same for the age-matched controls (baseline: 0.20; peak: 0.27). The augmentation of MP, and plasma concentrations of lutein, following supplementation in subjects with ARM provides the first evidence the disease is not associated with intestinal malabsorption of the relevant macular carotenoids, and that a diseased macula can accumulate and stabilise lutein and/or zeaxanthin. Furthermore, these results suggest that the beneficial effects of lutein supplementation, if any, may be extended to subjects with established ARM. PMID:15183097

  10. Effect of Supplemental Lutein and Zeaxanthin on Serum, Macular Pigmentation, and Visual Performance in Patients with Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang-Mu; Dou, Hong-Liang; Huang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xian-Rong; Zou, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the 2-year effect of multiple doses of lutein/zeaxanthin on serum, macular pigmentation, and visual performance on patients with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods. In this randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled trial, 112 early AMD patients randomly received either 10 mg lutein, 20 mg lutein, a combination of lutein (10 mg) and zeaxanthin (10 mg), or placebo daily for 2 years. Serum concentration of lutein/zeaxanthin, macular pigment optical density (MPOD), visual functions including best-spectacle corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast sensitivity (CS), flash recovery time (FRT), and vision-related quality of life (VFQ25) was quantified. Results. Serum lutein concentration and MPOD significantly increased in all the active treatment groups. Supplementation with 20 mg lutein was the most effective in increasing MPOD and CS at 3 cycles/degree for the first 48 weeks. However, they both significantly increased to the same peak value following supplementation with either 10 mg or 20 mg lutein during the intervention. No statistical changes of BCVA or FRT were observed during the trial. Conclusions. Long-term lutein supplementation could increase serum lutein concentration, MPOD, and visual sensitivities of early AMD patients. 10 mg lutein daily might be an advisable long-term dosage for early AMD treatment. PMID:25815324

  11. Stiffening-Induced High Pulsatility Flow Activates Endothelial Inflammation via a TLR2/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi-Ou; Wang, Daren; Zhang, Hui; Hunter, Kendall; Hertzberg, Jean; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Tan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stiffening of large arteries is increasingly used as an independent predictor of risk and therapeutic outcome for small artery dysfunction in many diseases including pulmonary hypertension. The molecular mechanisms mediating downstream vascular cell responses to large artery stiffening remain unclear. We hypothesize that high pulsatility flow, induced by large artery stiffening, causes inflammatory responses in downstream pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) through toll-like receptor (TLR) p