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Sample records for pulsating tube flow

  1. Total-pressure-tube averaging in pulsating flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.

    1973-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a nonsteady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. The tests were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach numbers up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonances which further increased the indicated pressure were encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles.

  2. Influence of a pulsating flow on the transfer of heat from cylinders and finned tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perwaiz, J.; Base, T. E.

    The effect of pulsations in the flow on forced convective heat transfer coefficients around a circular cylinder and a finned tube is studied. Convection measurement experiments were performed to determine the rate of heat transfer (average Nusselt numbers) from a circular cylinder and a finned tube in a pulsating crossflow. The experiments were performed using the unsteady flow inducer wind tunnel, which had facility for generating time-dependent flow. The forced convective heat transfer in steady crossflows was checked for both the circular cylinder and the finned tube to validate the experimental techniques and apparatus. The findings indicate the dependence of heat transfer on the dimensionless frequency of the crossflow. Specifically, at higher mean flows there is considerable discrepancy between the Nusselt number for steady flows and the Nusselt number for unsteady flows with the same mean flow value. The effects on the variation in the heat transfer must be carefully taken into account in the design and analysis of thermal systems exposed to pulsating flows.

  3. An experimental investigation of heat transfer in a spiral-coil tube with pulsating turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharvani, H. Ramezani; Doshmanziari, F. Ilami; Zohir, A. E.; Jalali-Vahid, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, in order to increase the heat transfer rate in a spiral-coil tube by an active method, a rotating ball valve was mounted downstream/upstream of the spiral-coil tube and used as a pulse generator. Influence of pulsation on heat transfer in the spiral-coil tube was experimentally investigated. Cold water was used as a working fluid inside the spiral-coil that was immersed horizontally in a hot water reservoir tank. The Average temperature of the hot water bath was kept constant at 60 °C to establish a uniform temperature. All experiments for both pulsator locations (upstream and downstream pulsation) were performed at fixed pulsation amplitude. Reynolds number was ranged from 6220 to 16,300 while pulsation frequency was varied from 0 to 20 Hz. It can be clearly observed from heat transfer results that the overall average heat transfer coefficient was enhanced up to 26 % for pulsating flow compared to steady flow without pulsation at all pulsation frequencies. It is also clear that the relative overall average heat transfer coefficient is strongly affected by Reynolds number. Finally, it was obtained that the upstream pulsation heat transfer coefficient has better heat transfer results than the corresponding ones of downstream pulsation in the studied range of Reynolds number.

  4. Characteristics of heat transfer and flow of Al2O3/water nanofluid in a spiral-coil tube for turbulent pulsating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshmanziari, F. Ilami; Zohir, A. E.; Kharvani, H. Ramezani; Jalali-Vahid, D.; Kadivar, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In the past two decades, enhancement of heat transfer characteristics of original fluid using nanofluids has been proposed by a large number of researchers. In this paper, an experimental study was carried out to investigate effect of pulsation on heat transfer of fluid flow inside a spiral-coil tube. In order to perform the experiments, a hot water reservoir tank was prepared and the spiral-coil was immersed horizontally inside the tank. Average temperature of the hot water bath was kept constant at 60 °C to establish a quiescent region of uniform temperature. The experiments were conducted in turbulent flow regime using distilled water and Al2O3/water nanofluid at 0.5, 1, and 1.5 % particle volume concentration. Results showed that overall heat transfer coefficient of the base fluid flow increases by using nanofluid or pulsation into the base fluid flow up to 14 %. Heat transfer results also indicated that combination of the nanofluid and the pulsation into the fluid flow can increase significantly the overall heat transfer coefficient up to 23 %.

  5. Characteristics of heat transfer and flow of Al2O3/water nanofluid in a spiral-coil tube for turbulent pulsating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshmanziari, F. Ilami; Zohir, A. E.; Kharvani, H. Ramezani; Jalali-Vahid, D.; Kadivar, M. R.

    2015-08-01

    In the past two decades, enhancement of heat transfer characteristics of original fluid using nanofluids has been proposed by a large number of researchers. In this paper, an experimental study was carried out to investigate effect of pulsation on heat transfer of fluid flow inside a spiral-coil tube. In order to perform the experiments, a hot water reservoir tank was prepared and the spiral-coil was immersed horizontally inside the tank. Average temperature of the hot water bath was kept constant at 60 °C to establish a quiescent region of uniform temperature. The experiments were conducted in turbulent flow regime using distilled water and Al2O3/water nanofluid at 0.5, 1, and 1.5 % particle volume concentration. Results showed that overall heat transfer coefficient of the base fluid flow increases by using nanofluid or pulsation into the base fluid flow up to 14 %. Heat transfer results also indicated that combination of the nanofluid and the pulsation into the fluid flow can increase significantly the overall heat transfer coefficient up to 23 %.

  6. Understanding thermo-fluidic characteristics of a glass tube closed loop pulsating heat pipe: flow patterns and fluid oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, V. K.; Ramachandran, K.; Pillai, B. C.; Brusly Solomon, A.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental program has been carried out to understand the thermo-fluidic characterization of deionized (DI) water charged closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP) with flow patterns and fluid oscillations. The CLPHP is examined under vertical and horizontal heating modes with varying heat power. The flow patterns along with fluid oscillations are correlated with thermal performance of the CLPHP. Further, the CLPHP with copper oxide nanofluid study is carried out to understand operational behavior of the device. Fast Fourier frequencies, average frequency of the internal fluid temperature are investigated. Several important features of CLPHP operation are identified by the visual study.

  7. Total-pressure averaging in pulsating flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a nonsteady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered with the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles.

  8. Total pressure averaging in pulsating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a non-steady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles. The experiments were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach number up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz.

  9. Convective heat transfer characteristics of laminar pulsating pipe air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Attya, A. M.; Eid, A. I.; Aly, A. Z.

    Heat transfer characteristics to laminar pulsating pipe flow under different conditions of Reynolds number and pulsation frequency were experimentally investigated. The tube wall of uniform heat flux condition was considered. Reynolds number was varied from 780 to 1987 while the frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 29.5Hz. The results showed that the relative mean Nusselt number is strongly affected by pulsation frequency while it is slightly affected by Reynolds number. The results showed enhancements in the relative mean Nusselt number. In the frequency range of 1-4Hz, an enhancement up to 30% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 1.4Hz) was obtained. In the frequency range of 17-25Hz, an enhancement up to 9% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 17.5Hz) was indicated. The rate of enhancement of the relative mean Nusselt number decreased as pulsation frequency increased or as Reynolds number increased. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number occurred outside these ranges of pulsation frequencies. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number up to 40% for pulsation frequency range of 4.1-17Hz and a reduction up to 20% for pulsation frequency range of 25-29.5Hz for Reynolds numbers range of 780-1987 were considered. This reduction is directly proportional to the pulsation frequency. Empirical dimensionless equations have been developed for the relative mean Nusselt number that related to Reynolds number (750

  10. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Warnecke, Sascha; Hof, Bjoern; Avila, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow. This flow is a prototype of various pulsating flows in both nature and engineering, such as in the cardiovascular system where the onset of turbulence is often possibly related to various diseases (e.g., the formation of aneurysms). The experiments are carried out in a straight rigid pipe using water with a sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate. The governing parameters, Reynolds number, Womersley number α (dimensionless pulsating frequency) and the pulsating amplitude A, cover a wide range 3 < α < 23 and 0 < A < 1 . To characterize the transition to turbulence, we determine how the characteristic lifetime of turbulent spots (/puffs) are affected by the pulsation. While at high pulsation frequencies (α > 12) lifetimes of turbulent spots are entirely unaffected by the pulsation, at lower frequencies they are substantially affected. With decreasing frequency much larger Reynolds numbers are needed to obtain spots of the same characteristic lifetime. Hence at low frequency transition is delayed significantly. In addition the effect of the pulsation amplitude on the transition delay is quantified. Duo Xu would like to acknowledge the support from Humboldt Foundation.

  11. Some spectral and pulsation characteristics of the horizontal flow of a gas-liquid suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovnyi, P. M.

    1980-02-01

    In the experiments described, the turbulence characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid pipe flow were studied, using a 6 m long, 19-mm-diam tube. The inlet temperature of the suspension was maintained at 25 C. The friction energy spectra and the relative intensity of the friction pulsations were measured. The spectral and pulsation characteristics were obtained by an electrodiffusion technique which provided reliable data on the pulsations of the wall shear stress.

  12. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hof, Bjorn; Warnecke, Sascha; Xu, Duo

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow the most important example of pulsating flows is the cardiovascular system where the onset of fluctuations and turbulence can be a possible cause for various diseases such as the formation of aneurysms. The present study is limited to a straight rigid pipe, sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate and a Newtonian fluid. The dimensionless parameters (Womersley and Reynolds numbers) were chosen to include the parameter range encountered in larger arteries. We observe that at large frequencies the critical point for the onset of turbulence remains completely unaffected by pulsation for all amplitudes investigated (up to 40%). However for smaller frequencies (Womersley numbers below 10) the critical point considerably increases. Furthermore we investigate how the transition scenario is affected for a fixed frequency and increasing amplitudes (approaching oscillatory flow).

  13. An experimental investigation of heat transfer to pulsating pipe air flow with different amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohir, A. E.; Habib, M. A.; Attya, A. M.; Eid, A. I.

    2006-05-01

    Heat transfer characteristics to both laminar and turbulent pulsating pipe flows under different conditions of Reynolds number, pulsation frequency, pulsator location and tube diameter were experimentally investigated. The tube wall of uniform heat flux condition was considered for both cases. Reynolds number varied from 750 to 12,320 while the frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 10 Hz. With locating the pulsator upstream of the inlet of the test section tube, results showed an increase in heat transfer rate due to pulsation by as much as 30% with flow Reynolds number of 1,643 and pulsation frequency of 1 Hz, depending on the upstream location of the pulsator valve. Closer the valve to the tested section inlet, the better improvement in the heat transfer coefficient is achieved. Upon comparing the heat transfer results of the upstream and the downstream pulsation, at Reynolds number of 1,366 and 1,643, low values of the relative mean Nusselt number were obtained with the upstream pulsation. Comparing the heat transfer results of the two studied test sections tubes for Reynolds number range from 8,000 to 12,000 and pulsation frequency range from 1.0 to 10 Hz showed that more improvement in heat transfer rate was observed with a larger tube diameter. For Reynolds number ranging from 8,000 to 12,000 and pulsation frequency of 10 Hz, an improvement in the relative mean Nusselt number of about 50% was obtained at Reynolds number of 8,000 for the large test section diameter of 50 mm. While, for the small test section diameter of 15 mm, at same conditions of Reynolds number and frequency, a reduction in the relative mean Nusselt number of up to 10% was obtained.

  14. The Effect of Flow Pulsations on Coriolis Mass Flow Meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheesewright, R.; Clark, C.

    1998-11-01

    It has been reported that the accuracy of Coriolis mass flow meters can be adversely affected by the presence of pulsations (at particular frequencies) in the flow. A full analysis of the transient performance of a commercial Coriolis meter is only possible using finite element techniques. However, this is a transient, nonlinear problem in which the space and time variables are not (strictly) separable and the finite element techniques for tackling such problems make it desirable to have an analytical solution for a simplified meter, against which the finite element solution can be compared. This paper reports such a solution. The solution will also provide guidance for experiments. Existing analytical solutions for the performance of Coriolis meters in steady flow (a complex eigenvalue problem) are not easily extended to the transient flow case. The paper thus begins with the presentation of an alternative solution for steady flow through a simple, straight tube, Coriolis meter and it is notable that this solution gives a simple analytical expression for the experimentally observed small change in the resonant frequency of the meter, with flow rate, as well as an analytical expression for the meter sensitivity. The analysis is extended to the transient case, using classical, forced vibration, modal decomposition techniques. The solution shows that, unlike the steady flow case where the detector signals contain components at the drive frequency and the second mode frequency (Coriolis frequency), for pulsatile flow the detector signals will in general contain components involving at least four frequencies. It is demonstrated that the meter error depends on the algorithm used to estimate the phase difference from the detector signals. The particular flow pulsation frequencies which could possibly lead to large meter errors are identified.

  15. Theoretical and experimental investigations of flow pulsation effects in Coriolis mass flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svete, A.; Kutin, J.; Bobovnik, G.; Bajsić, I.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the effects of flow pulsations on the dynamic behavior of Coriolis flowmeters is very important for their further development. In order to determine the phase difference between the vibrational signals, which represents the basic measurement effect of Coriolis flowmeters, there are many methods that include the proper filtering of all the signal components, except those with frequencies close to the drive frequency. Therefore, an understanding of the phenomenon of exciting the meter at its first natural frequency is very important. The results of a simple, linear, two-degree-of-freedom, lumped-parameter, dynamic model of a flowmeter show that the flow pulsations can degrade the accuracy of such a flowmeter as a result of indirect excitations of the measuring tube at the first natural frequency through the second-order perturbations by means of the Coriolis forces induced in pulsating flow conditions. In order to experimentally investigate these flow pulsation effects, a prototype of a straight-tube Coriolis mass flowmeter was developed to enable the processing of the response signals logged directly from the flow tube's sensors with the dual quadrature demodulation method, and therefore to provide the information available within the phase-difference data. The experimental results show that the flow pulsations upset the meter at its first natural frequency indirectly, as well as directly at the frequency of the pulsations due to the geometric imperfections of the measuring tube.

  16. A statistical method for draft tube pressure pulsation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerfler, P. K.; Ruchonnet, N.

    2012-11-01

    Draft tube pressure pulsation (DTPP) in Francis turbines is composed of various components originating from different physical phenomena. These components may be separated because they differ by their spatial relationships and by their propagation mechanism. The first step for such an analysis was to distinguish between so-called synchronous and asynchronous pulsations; only approximately periodic phenomena could be described in this manner. However, less regular pulsations are always present, and these become important when turbines have to operate in the far off-design range, in particular at very low load. The statistical method described here permits to separate the stochastic (random) component from the two traditional 'regular' components. It works in connection with the standard technique of model testing with several pressure signals measured in draft tube cone. The difference between the individual signals and the averaged pressure signal, together with the coherence between the individual pressure signals is used for analysis. An example reveals that a generalized, non-periodic version of the asynchronous pulsation is important at low load.

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pulsating Turbulent Flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingston, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the effects of small amplitude sinusoidal pulsations on fully developed turbulent flow in a tube from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Theoretical models for the macroscopic behavior of pulsating turbulent tube flow were developed for the two cases of very low and very high pulsation frequencies. The models are based on assumptions of quasi-steady and frozen eddy viscosity flow behavior, respectively. The models successfully predict unsteady velocity profiles, thereby supporting the currently proposed definitions of frequency regimes in pulsating turbulent flow. Experimental measurements were made of the time-dependent pressure drop and velocity profiles over the range of frequency-to-Reynolds number ratios from 0.0095 to 0.24. The two macroscopic models developed in this study predict unsteady velocity profiles which are in moderately good agreement with the experiments in their respective frequency regimes, and a previously developed quasi-steady model is found to predict experimental velocity profiles well in both the quasisteady and the frozen eddy viscosity frequency regimes. The effect of flow pulsations on the dissipation of turbulence energy in the vicinity of the wall was measured in the lower transition frequency regime. The long-time averaged dissipation was observed to be unchanged from the steady flow dissipation, within the accuracy of the experiment. A theoretical model of the periodic viscous sublayer was also developed and applied to pulsating flow in a tube, in order to investigate the effects of flow pulsations on the rate of production of turbulence in the region of the wall. The periodic viscous sublayer model predicts sublayer growth periods in steady flow which agree with the published experimental data. When the model is applied to pulsating flow, the response of the sublayer growth period falls into three frequency regimes, the parameters of which are in approximate agreement

  18. Pulsating laminar fully developed channel and pipe flows.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Kais; Ertunç, Ozgür; Mishra, Manoranjan; Delgado, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Analytical investigations are carried out on pulsating laminar incompressible fully developed channel and pipe flows. An analytical solution of the velocity profile for arbitrary time-periodic pulsations is derived by approximating the pulsating flow variables by a Fourier series. The explicit interdependence between pulsations of velocity, mass-flow rate, pressure gradient, and wall shear stress are shown by using the proper dimensionless parameters that govern the flow. Utilizing the analytical results, the scaling laws for dimensionless pulsation amplitudes of the velocity, mass-flow rate, pressure gradient, and wall shear stress are analyzed as functions of the dimensionless pulsation frequency. Special attention has been given to the scaling laws describing the flow reversal phenomenon occurring in pulsating flows, such as the condition for flow reversal, the dependency of the reversal duration, and the amplitude. It is shown that two reversal locations away from the wall can occur in pulsating flows in pipes and channels and the reversed amount of mass per period reaches a maximum at a certain dimensionless frequency for a given amplitude of mass-flow rate fluctuations. These analyses are numerically conducted for pipe and channel flows over a large frequency range in a comparative manner. PMID:20365456

  19. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  20. Flow and mixing characteristics of an elevated pulsating transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Hsu, Ching M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow-evolution processes as well as the penetration, spread, and dispersion characteristics of elevated pulsating transverse jets were studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. Jet pulsations were induced by means of acoustic excitation. Streak pictures of the smoke-flow patterns, illuminated by a laser-light sheet in the median plane, were recorded by a high-speed digital camera. A hot-wire anemometer was used to digitize instantaneous velocities of instabilities in the flow. Penetration height and spread width were obtained through a binary edge identification technique. Tracer-gas concentrations were measured to provide information on jet dispersions and trajectories. Three characteristic flow modes (synchronized flapping jet, transition, and synchronized shear-layer vortices) were identified in the domain of the jet-to-crossflow momentum-flux ratio and the excitation Strouhal number. At low excitation Strouhal numbers, the jet column near the tube exit flapped back-and-forth periodically at the excitation frequency and induced large up-down motions of the deflected jet. The penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet increased drastically compared with the non-excited jet because the up-down oscillating motions of the deflected jet transformed the axial momentum into oscillating lateral momentum. Forcing the jet into the transition and synchronized shear-layer vortices regimes caused the vortices to appear along the upwind shear layer of the deflected jet. Under these conditions, the penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet presented insignificant increases because the entrainment effect induced by the shear-layer vortices was not as large as that produced by the jet oscillating motions in the synchronized flapping jet regime.

  1. Heat transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Said, S. A. M.; Al-Farayedhi, A. A.; Al-Dini, S. A.; Asghar, A.; Gbadebo, S. A.

    Heat Transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow under different conditions of pulsation frequency, amplitude and Reynolds number were experimentally investigated. The pipe wall was kept at uniform heat flux. Reynolds number was varied from 5000 to 29 000 while frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 8 Hz. The results show an enhancement in the local Nusselt number at the entrance region. The rate of enhancement decreased as Re increased. Reduction of heat transfer coefficient was observed at higher frequencies and the effect of pulsation is found to be significant at high Reynolds number. It can be concluded that the effect of pulsation on the mean Nusselt numbers is insignificant at low values of Reynolds number.

  2. Effects of pulsating flow on current meter performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.

    1995-01-01

    Summarized are laboratory tests for current meter response to pulsating flows. Included are results for mechanical and electromagnetic water-current meters that are commonly used for stream gaging. Most of the vertical-axis and horizontal-axis types of mechanical meters that were tested significantly underregistered the mean flow velocity when the magnitude of the pulsating portion of the flow velocity was greater than half the mean velocity but less than the mean velocity. Errors for all meters tested were largest at the lowest mean flow velocity, 0.076 m/s.

  3. CFD simulation of pulsation noise in a small centrifugal compressor with volute and resonance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaki, Daich; Sakuka, Yuta; Inokuchi, Yuzo; Ueda, Kosuke; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    The rotational frequency tone noise emitted from the automobile turbocharger is called the pulsation noise. The cause of the pulsation noise is not fully understood, but is considered to be due to some manufacturing errors, which is called the mistuning. The effects of the mistuning of the impeller blade on the noise field inside the flow passage of the compressor are numerically investigated. Here, the flow passage includes the volute and duct located downstream of the compressor impeller. Our numerical approach is found to successfully capture the wavelength of the pulsation noise at given rotational speeds by the comparison with the experiments. One of the significant findings is that the noise field of the pulsation noise in the duct is highly one-dimensional although the flow fields are highly three-dimensional.

  4. Draft tube pressure pulsation predictions in Francis turbines with transient Computational Fluid Dynamics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melot, M.; Nennemann, B.; Désy, N.

    2014-03-01

    An automatic Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure that aims at predicting Draft Tube Pressure Pulsations (DTPP) at part load is presented. After a brief review of the physics involved, a description of the transient numerical setup is given. Next, the paper describes a post processing technique, namely the separation of pressure signals into synchronous, asynchronous and random pulsations. Combining the CFD calculation with the post-processing technique allows the quantification of the potential excitation of the mechanical system during the design phase. Consequently it provides the hydraulic designer with a tool to specifically target DTPP and thus helps in the development of more robust designs for part load operation of turbines.

  5. The Simulation of Coriolis Meter Response to Pulsating Flow Using a General Purpose F.E. Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhadj, A.; Cheesewright, R.; Clark, C.

    2000-07-01

    The publication of a theoretical analysis of the response of a simple straight-tube Coriolis meter to flow pulsations raised the question of the extent to which the results of that analysis are generic over the wide range of geometric configurations used in commercially available meters. A procedure for using a general purpose finite element (FE) code to investigate this question is presented. The dual time scales, which are an essential feature of pulsating flow through a Coriolis meter, are used to minimize the amount of computation required to simulate the meter response. The FE model is developed in a full 3-D form with shear deflection and axial forces, and the computation of the simulated response for the geometrically most complex meter currently available shows that this level of representation is necessary to reveal the full details of the response. The response derived from the FE simulation for straight-tube meters, is compared with the published theoretical response and to experimental data. Over a range of different meters, the characteristics of the sensor signals in the presence of flow pulsations are shown to be generally similar. In all cases, the simulated sensor signals contain components corresponding to beating between the pulsation frequency and the meter drive frequency, in addition to the main component at the drive frequency. Spectra are computed from the simulated meter responses and these are used to show that the relationship between the mass flow rate and the phase difference between the component of the sensor signals at the drive frequency, is not significantly affected by the pulsations. Thus, the work suggests that the reports of changes in meter calibration due to certain frequencies of flow pulsation represent errors in signal processing rather than fundamental changes in the meter characteristics.

  6. The pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    The finite difference method is used to solve the task of the developed pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel. The optimum of the difference scheme parameters was determined. Data on the amplitude and phase of the longitudinal velocity oscillations, the hydraulic and friction drag coefficients, the shear stress on the wall have been obtained. Using the dimensionless value of the frequency pulsations two characteristic regimes — the quasisteady-state regime and the high-frequency regime have been identified. In the quasi-steady-state regime, the values of all hydrodynamic quantities at each instant of time correspond to the velocity value averaged over the cross section at a given moment of time. It is shown that in the high-frequency regime, the dependences on the dimensionless oscillation frequency of oscillating components of hydrodynamic quantities are identical for rectilinear channels with a different cross-sectional form (round pipe, flat and a rectangular channels). The effect of the aspect ratio of the rectangular channel sides channel on the pulsating flow dynamics has been analyzed.

  7. Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics and Blade Excitations of the Radial Turbine with Pulsating Inlet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Yang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The aerodynamic performance, detailed unsteady flow and time-based excitations acting on blade surfaces of a radial flow turbine have been investigated with pulsation flow condition. The results show that the turbine instantaneous performance under pulsation flow condition deviates from the quasi-steady value significantly and forms obvious hysteretic loops around the quasi-steady conditions. The detailed analysis of unsteady flow shows that the characteristic of pulsation flow field in radial turbine is highly influenced by the pulsation inlet condition. The blade torque, power and loading fluctuate with the inlet pulsation wave in a pulse period. For the blade excitations, the maximum and the minimum blade excitations conform to the wave crest and wave trough of the inlet pulsation, respectively, in time-based scale. And toward blade chord direction, the maximum loading distributes along the blade leading edge until 20% chord position and decreases from the leading to trailing edge.

  8. Vibration of a Flexible Pipe Conveying Viscous Pulsating Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GORMAN, D. G.; REESE, J. M.; ZHANG, Y. L.

    2000-02-01

    The non-linear equations of motion of a flexible pipe conveying unsteadily flowing fluid are derived from the continuity and momentum equations of unsteady flow. These partial differential equations are fully coupled through equilibrium of contact forces, the normal compatibility of velocity at the fluid- pipe interfaces, and the conservation of mass and momentum of the transient fluid. Poisson coupling between the pipe wall and fluid is also incorporated in the model. A combination of the finite difference method and the method of characteristics is employed to extract displacements, hydrodynamic pressure and flow velocities from the equations. A numerical example of a pipeline conveying fluid with a pulsating flow is given and discussed.

  9. Carreau model for oscillatory blood flow in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakova, S.; Nikolova, E.; Radev, St.

    2014-11-01

    The analysis of the blood flow dynamics (hemodynamics) in tubes is crucial when investigating the rupture of different types of aneurysms. The blood viscosity nonlinear dependence on the flow shear rate creates complicated manifestations of the blood pulsations. Although a great number of studies exists, experimental and numerical, this phenomenon is still not very well understood. The aim of the present work is to propose a numerical model of the oscillatory blood flow in a tube on the basis of the Carreau model of the blood viscosity (nonlinear model with respect to the shear rate). The obtained results for the flow velocity and tangential stress on the tube wall are compared well with other authors' results.

  10. Turbulent flow and heat transfer in rotating channels and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitiakov, V. Y.; Petropavlovskii, R. R.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnov, S. A.

    This document is a reduction of the author's experimental results on turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer in rotating channels whose axes are parallel to the plane of rotation. Substantial dissimilarities of longitudinal velocity field profile and pulsational characteristics are caused by effects of stabilization and destabilization and secondary flow production. Local heat transfer coefficients vary over the perimeter of the tube section connecting detected flow peculiarities. It is shown that the increase in rotational intensity caused an increase in the relative dissimilarity of the local heat transfer coefficients and increased their mean value.

  11. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  12. Multiobjective optimal design of runner blade using efficiency and draft tube pulsation criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilev, I. M.; Sotnikov, A. A.; Rigin, V. E.; Semenova, A. V.; Cherny, S. G.; Chirkov, D. V.; Bannikov, D. V.; Skorospelov, V. A.

    2012-11-01

    In the present work new criteria of optimal design method for turbine runner [1] are proposed. Firstly, based on the efficient method which couples direct simulation of 3D turbulent flow and engineering semi empirical formulas, the combined method is built for hydraulic energy losses estimation in the whole turbine water passage and the efficiency criterion is formulated. Secondly, the criterion of dynamic loads minimization is developed for those caused by vortex rope precession downstream of the runner. This criterion is based on the finding that the monotonic increase of meridional velocity component in the direction to runner hub, downstream of its blades, provides for decreasing the intensity of vortex rope and thereafter, minimization of pressure pulsation amplitude. The developed algorithm was applied to optimal design of 640 MW Francis turbine runner. It can ensure high efficiency at best efficiency operating point as well as diminished pressure pulsations at full load regime.

  13. Heat transfer from a fully-developed pulsating flow in a curved pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jae Hwa; Hyun, Jae Min

    1994-01-01

    Numerical studies are made of the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a fully-developed pulsating flow in a strongly curved pipe. Emphasis is placed on delineating the effects of the Reynolds number, and pulsation amplitude and frequency. By using a toroidal coordinate system, the complete, time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are formulated. The peripherally-uniform temperature condition is imposed on the pipe wall. Particular attention is given to heat transfer properties over substantially extended parameter ranges of the Reynolds number Re and the Womersley number Wo. Use is made of a well-established numerical solution procedure, with minor amendments. The computed results on the flow field are in close agreement with the existing data in the overlapping parameter ranges. The spatial distributions of axial and secondary flows are depicted. The time variations of flow structure are displayed. The numerical results on the spatial and temporal variations of the thermal field are presented. The circumferential profiles of local Nusselt number are plotted at selected instants. When Wo is small, the time- and space-averaged Nusselt numbers, bar-Nu(sub w), is lower for a pulsating flow than for a corresponding non-pulsating flow. At moderate and high Wo, however, the difference in bar-Nu(sub w) between a pulsating and a non-pulsating flow is insignificant.

  14. Milk flow-controlled changes of pulsation ratio and pulsation rate affect milking characteristics in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ambord, Sarah; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2009-08-01

    To test a system with milk flow-controlled pulsation, milk flow was recorded in 29 Holstein cows during machine milking. The three different treatments were routine milking (including a pre-stimulation of 50-70 s), milking with a minimum of teat preparation and milking with milk flow-controlled b-phase, i.e. with a gradually elongated b-phase of the pulsation cycle with increasing milk flow rate and shortening again during decreasing milk flow. For data evaluation the herd was divided into three groups based on the peak flow rate at routine milking (group 1: <3.2 kg/min; group 2: 3.2-4.5 kg/min; group 3: >4.5 kg/min). Compared with routine milking, milking with milk flow-controlled b-phase caused a significant elevation of the peak flow rate and the duration of incline lasted longer especially in cows with a peak flow rate of >3.2 kg/min in routine milking. In milking with a minimum of teat preparation the duration of incline lasted longer compared with the two other treatments. Bimodality of milk flow, i.e. delayed milk ejection at the start of milking, was most frequent at milking with a minimum of teat preparation. No significant differences between routine milking and milking with milk flow-controlled b-phase were detected for all other milking characteristics. In summary, milking with milk flow-controlled b-phase changes the course of milk removal, however mainly in cows with high peak flow rates. PMID:19250576

  15. Effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics for sinusoidal pulsating laminar flow in a heated square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiu-Yang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Tao

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of flow pulsation on the flow and heat transfer from a heated square cylinder at Re = 100. Numerical calculations are carried out by using a finite volume method based on the pressure-implicit with splitting of operators algorithm in a collocated grid. The effects of flow pulsation amplitude (0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.8) and frequency (0 ≤ f p ≤ 20 Hz) on the detailed kinematics of flow (streamlines, vorticity patterns), the macroscopic parameters (drag coefficient, vortex shedding frequency) and heat transfer enhancement are presented in detail. The Strouhal number of vortices shedding, drag coefficient for non-pulsating flow are compared with the previously published data, and good agreement is found. The lock-on phenomenon is observed for a square cylinder in the present flow pulsation. When the pulsating frequency is within the lock-on regime, time averaged drag coefficient and heat transfer from the square cylinder is substantially augmented, and when the pulsating frequency in about the natural vortex shedding frequency, the heat transfer is also substantially enhanced. In addition, the influence of the pulsating amplitude on the time averaged drag coefficient, heat transfer enhancement and lock-on occurrence is discussed in detail.

  16. Effects of pulsation on separated flow and heat transfer in enlarged channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Kai, Tomonori; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2011-03-01

    Numerical results of three-dimensional separated flow and heat transfer in an enlarged rectangular channel are presented in this paper. The expansion ratio and aspect ratio of the channel are 2.0 and 16.0, respectively. Reynolds number of the flow is 200 and it is over the critical Reynolds number. Over the critical Reynolds number, the flow in the symmetric channel becomes asymmetric and deflects to one side of the walls. Effects of the pulsating fluctuation at the inlet upon the flow in the channel are investigated. It is clarified that the inlet flow with a pulsating fluctuation of Strouhal number 0.05 and 0.10 strongly affects on the flow in the channel, and heat transfer on the walls is enhanced, especially on the wall surface covered with long separation bubble. On the other hand, the pulsation of St = 0.0125 oscillates the shear layer more weakly than that of St = 0.05, 0.10 and the enhancement of heat transfer is smaller, though some vortices are shed from the vicinity of the side wall near the reattachment region. The oscillation of the main flow calms down gradually as the Strouhal number of the pulsation increases over 0.10. The influence of pulsation of St = 0.20 on the flow is restricted in the near downstream of the step, and heat transfer on the walls is almost similar to that of the steady flow in the channel.

  17. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper considers steady siphon flows in isolated thin magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas, with plasma beta greater than or equal to 1, appropriate for conditions in the solar photosphere. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube varies along the tube in response to pressure changes induced by the siphon flow. Consideration is also given to steady isothermal siphon flows in arched magnetic flux tubes in a stratified atmosphere. Applications of the results to intense magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere and to the photospheric Evershed flow in a sunspot penumbra are addressed.

  18. On Flow Stagnation in a Tube Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian; Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Zhang, Nengli

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the physical process for occurrence of flow stagnation in a space tube-radiator is performed and the mechanism and mathematic description for the flow stagnation are presented. Two causes for pressure drop unbalance between tubes of the radiator are identified: non-uniform cooling environment and different local flow resistances between the tubes. This analysis provides a theoretical basis for experimental simulations of the flow stagnation in a ground-based lab as well as two suggested methods to experimentally simulate flow stagnation. Criteria for the flow stagnation, depending on the viscosity data regressive polynomial, are derived from the extreme condition of the pressure drop in colder tubes. A preliminary numerical calculation is conducted for a space tube-radiator model which confirms the physical and mathematical analyses. The prediction by the criteria for flow stagnation in the tube-radiator model coincides with the numerical calculation result.

  19. Detection of apparent skin motion using optical flow analysis: Blood pulsation signal obtained from optical flow sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuki; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi; Miike, Hidetoshi

    1997-02-01

    A skin motion imaging system with two modes of operation, diffusive and specular reflections, was developed. The system consists of image capturing and processing elements. Using optical flow analyses of skin motion at the wrist, we have detected successfully a blood pulsation signal that concurs with the electrocardiogram. The signal provides information not only about blood pulsation, but also about blood circulation and the biomechanical properties of the skin. This system may have other applications in the future, such as noncontact blood pulsation detection and evaluation of the biomechanical properties of skin, for example.

  20. On the effect of pulsating flow on surge margin of small centrifugal compressors for automotive engines

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, J.; Climent, H.; Guardiola, C.; Tiseira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Surge is becoming a limiting factor in the design of boosting systems of downsized diesel engines. Although standard compressor flowcharts are used for the selection of those machines for a given application, on-engine conditions widely differ from steady flow conditions, thus affecting compressor behaviour and consequently surge phenomenon. In this paper the effect of pulsating flow is investigated by means of a steady gas-stand that has been modified to produce engine-like pulsating flow. The effect of pressure pulses' amplitude and frequency on the compressor surge line location has been checked. Results show that pulsating flow in the 40-67 Hz range (corresponding to characteristic pulsation when boosting an internal combustion engine) increases surge margin. This increased margin is similar for all the tested frequencies but depends on pulsation amplitude. In a further step, a non-steady compressor model is used for modelling the tests, thus allowing a deeper analysis of the involved phenomena. Model results widely agree with experimental results. (author)

  1. Investigation of the mixed flow turbine performance under inlet pulsating flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Mohammed; Abidat, Miloud; Litim, Sid Ali

    2012-03-01

    Turbochargers are widely used in Diesel engines as a means of increasing the output power. Most of them are fitted with radial or mixed flow turbines. In applications where high boost pressure is required, radial turbines are replaced by mixed flow turbines which can achieve a maximum efficiency at a lower value of blade speed to isentropic expansion velocity ratio than the usual 0.7 (for radial turbines). This study, performed with the ANSYS-CFX software, presents a numerical performance prediction of a mixed flow turbine under inlet pulsating flow conditions. In addition, the influence of the pulse frequency is studied and the numerical results are compared with those of a one-dimensional model and experimental data.

  2. Characteristics of velocity pulsations in a turbulent recirculated melt flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpo, M.; Jakovics, A.; Baake, E.

    2005-06-01

    For the modern industrial applications it is necessary to develop and investigate metallic and oxide materials of high purity or predicted composition. Such materials can be produced by the induction melting method, especially in inductor and cold crucible furnaces. Measurements taken in experimental furnaces show that the velocity pulsations dominate for the heat and mass exchange in the melt, especially in a zone between typical upper and lower eddies. Understanding of the pulsation mechanism and development of models to estimate the exchange characteristics are very important for the development and optimisation of industrial furnaces. The authors present experimental results and propose a simple 3D large eddy simulation (LES) model of the induction furnace that can be adapted to qualitative analysis of experimental data. Tables 2, Figs 13, Refs 7.

  3. LDA measurements on swirling flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, M.; Rosendal, F. J.; Brouwers, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    As part of research on swirler stabilized combustors, swirling flows in an expanding and, after a length L, contracting tube are investigated. If the flow is given sufficient rotation in a flow pattern with central recirculation area is measured in a tube with expansion ratio 0.69. In a larger tube with expansion ratio 0.23 a toroidal recirculation area is found. The time dependence of the flow is investigated by determining the autocorrelation function of the velocity signal. In the range of rotational velocities of the flow the flow field is shown to be periodic in time. This is a very interesting phenomenon that occurs only in sufficiently large tubes, with expansion ratio normally encountered in industrial furnaces. Numerical simulation of this flow will be difficult as it is periodically oscillating and probably not axisymmetric.

  4. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  5. Numerical study of unsteady convective heat transfer in pulsating duct flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, N.; Hanjalic, K.

    Numerical study results are presented for hydrodynamic parameters and heat transfer in a periodic gas flow, within a circular pipe in which flow oscillations were generated by pressure variation at one of the pipe ends. A comparison of experimental and numerical results has demonstrated satisfactory agreement, as well as the significant augmentation of the heat transfer coefficient under those resonant conditions in which the flow pulsation incitement frequencies correspond to the natural frequencies of the duct.

  6. Study on transient local entropy generation in pulsating fully developed laminar flow through an externally heated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapıcı, Hüseyin; Kayataş, Nesrin; Baştürk, Gamze; Kahraman, Nafiz

    2006-11-01

    This study presents the investigation of transient local entropy generation rate in pulsating fully developed laminar flow through an externally heated pipe. The flow inlet to the pipe is considered as pulsating at a constant period and amplitude (only the velocity oscillates). The simulations are extended to include different pulsating flow cases (sinusoidal flow, step flow, and saw-down flow). To determine the effects of the mean velocity, the period and the amplitude of the pulsating flow on the entropy generation rate, the pulsating flow is examined for various cases of these parameters. Two-dimensional flow and temperature fields are computed numerically with the help of the fluent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. In addition to this CFD code, a computer program has been developed to calculate numerically the entropy generation and other thermodynamic parameters by using the results of the calculations performed for the flow and temperature fields. In all investigated cases, the irreversibility due to the heat transfer dominates. The step flow constitutes the highest temperature (about 919 K) and generates the highest total entropy rate (about 0.033 W/K) within the pipe. The results of this study indicate that in the considered situations, the inverse of square of temperature (1/ T 2) is more dominant on the entropy generation than the temperature gradients, and that the increase of the mean velocity of the pulsating flow has an adverse effect on the ratio of the useful energy transfer rate to irreversibility rate.

  7. Average Nusselt number correlation in the thermal entrance region of steady and pulsating turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbadebo, S. A.; Said, S. A. M.; Habib, M. A.

    Empirical correlation has been developed for local and average Nusselt numbers in the thermal entrance region of steady and pulsating turbulent air-flows in a pipe. The correlation was based on experimental data obtained from experiment carried out on a pipe heated under uniform heat flux conditions. The rate of flow was periodically varied at frequencies ranging from 1Hz to 13Hz while the average Reynolds number varied from 6400 to 42000.

  8. Discrete-vortex simulation of pulsating flow on a turbulent leading-edge separation bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, Hyung Jin; Rhim, Jae Wook; Kiya, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Studies are made of the turbulent separation bubble in a two-dimensional semi-infinite blunt plate aligned to a uniform free stream with a pulsating component. The discrete-vortex method is applied to simulate this flow situation because this approach is effective for representing the unsteady motions of the turbulent shear layer and the effect of viscosity near the solid surface. The numerical simulation provides reasonable predictions when compared with the experimental results. A particular frequency with a minimum reattachment is related to the drag reduction. The most effective frequency is dependent on the amplified shedding frequency. The turbulent flow structure is scrutinized. This includes the time-mean and fluctuations of the velocity and the surface pressure, together with correlations between the fluctuating components. A comparison between the pulsating flow and the non-pulsating flow at the particular frequency of the minimum reattachment length of the separation bubble suggests that the large-scale vortical structure is associated with the shedding frequency and the flow instabilities.

  9. Pulsating electrolyte flow in a full vanadium redox battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, C. Y.; Cao, H.; Chng, M. L.; Han, M.; Birgersson, E.

    2015-10-01

    Proper management of electrolyte flow in a vanadium redox battery (VRB) is crucial to achieve high overall system efficiency. On one hand, constant flow reduces concentration polarization and by extension, energy efficiency; on the other hand, it results in higher auxiliary pumping costs, which can consume around 10% of the discharge power. This work seeks to reduce the pumping cost by adopting a novel pulsing electrolyte flow strategy while retaining high energy efficiency. The results indicate that adopting a short flow period, followed by a long flow termination period, results in high energy efficiencies of 80.5% with a pumping cost reduction of over 50%.

  10. Reduced order model of draft tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.; Štefan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Swirling flow with compact coherent structures is very good candidate for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), i.e. for decomposition into eigenmodes, which are the cornerstones of the flow field. Present paper focuses on POD of steady flows, which correspond to different operating points of Francis turbine draft tube flow. Set of eigenmodes is built using a limited number of snapshots from computational simulations. Resulting reduced order model (ROM) describes whole operating range of the draft tube. ROM enables to interpolate in between the operating points exploiting the knowledge about significance of particular eigenmodes and thus reconstruct the velocity field in any operating point within the given range. Practical example, which employs axisymmetric simulations of the draft tube flow, illustrates accuracy of ROM in regions without vortex breakdown together with need for higher resolution of the snapshot database close to location of sudden flow changes (e.g. vortex breakdown). ROM based on POD interpolation is very suitable tool for insight into flow physics of the draft tube flows (especially energy transfers in between different operating points), for supply of data for subsequent stability analysis or as an initialization database for advanced flow simulations.

  11. Heat transfer in pulsating laminar flow in a pipe - A constant wall temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Y.; Hirose, K.; Hayashi, T.

    1982-02-01

    An analytical model of heat transfer in a pulsating laminar pipe flow with a constant wall temperature is presented. Governing equations for the velocity profile and the wall shear stress are defined and the temperature field is studied for an instantaneous Nusselt number. Cases of steady and unsteady temperature fields are considered, along with the heat flux in the unsteady state, and a ratio for the Nusselt number in the steady state to that in the pulsating flow is obtained. A method for deriving the instantaneous pipe friction factor is demonstrated and the range of the pressure-gradient amplitudes is determined. Finally, conditions are formulated in which the temperature field, including the heat flux, at the wall are equal to that of the steady state.

  12. Evaluation of Pump Pulsation in Respirable Size-Selective Sampling: Part I. Pulsation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry; Möhlmann, Carsten; Flemmer, Michael M.; Kashon, Michael; Harper, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsations generated by personal sampling pumps modulate the airflow through the sampling trains, thereby varying sampling efficiencies, and possibly invalidating collection or monitoring. The purpose of this study was to characterize pulsations generated by personal sampling pumps relative to a nominal flow rate at the inlet of different respirable cyclones. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of 13 widely used sampling pumps (11 medium and 2 high volumetric flow rate pumps having a diaphragm mechanism) and 7 cyclones [10-mm nylon also known as Dorr-Oliver (DO), Higgins-Dewell (HD), GS-1, GS-3, Aluminum, GK2.69, and FSP-10]. A hot- wire anemometer probe cemented to the inlet of each cyclone type was used to obtain pulsation readings. The three medium flow rate pump models showing the highest, a midrange, and the lowest pulsations and two high flow rate pump models for each cyclone type were tested with dust-loaded filters (0.05, 0.21, and 1.25 mg) to determine the effects of filter loading on pulsations. The effects of different tubing materials and lengths on pulsations were also investigated. The fundamental frequency range was 22–110 Hz and the magnitude of pulsation as a proportion of the mean flow rate ranged from 4.4 to 73.1%. Most pump/cyclone combinations generated pulse magnitudes >10% (48 out of 59 combinations), while pulse shapes varied considerably. Pulsation magnitudes were not considerably different for the clean and dust-loaded filters for the DO, HD, and Aluminum cyclones, but no consistent pattern was observed for the other cyclone types. Tubing material had less effect on pulsations than tubing length; when the tubing length was 183 cm, pronounced damping was observed for a pump with high pulsation (>60%) for all tested tubing materials except for the Tygon Inert tubing. The findings in this study prompted a further study to determine the possibility of shifts in cyclone sampling efficiency due to sampling pump pulsations

  13. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. IV - Critical flows with standing tube shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinos, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    Critical siphon flows in arched, isolated magnetic flux tubes are studied within the thin flux tube approximation, with a view toward applications to intense magnetic flux concentrations in the solar photosphere. The results of calculations of the strength and position of the standing tube shock in the supercritical downstream branch of a critical siphon flow are presented, as are calculations of the flow variables all along the flux tube and the equilibrium path of the flux tube in the surrounding atmosphere. It is suggested that arched magnetic flux tubes, with magnetic field strength increased by a siphon flow, may be associated with some of the intense, discrete magnetic elements observed in the solar photosphere.

  14. Effect of flow pulsation on mass transport in a cathode channel of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hun Sik; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Seo Young; Hyun, Jae Min

    2012-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on the cathode flow pulsation in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is performed. A 10-cell PEM fuel cell stack with open-air cathode channels is employed to investigate the effects of the cathode flow pulsation on the overall performance. The polarization and corresponding power curves obtained show that both the limiting current density and the maximum power density are substantially enhanced when the pulsating component is added to the cathode mainstream flow. The flow pulsation at Re = 77 provides the maximum increment of 40% and 35.5% in the limiting current density and in the maximum power density, respectively. The enhancement of the overall performance is more pronounced at low Reynolds numbers. Also, the theoretical mass transport analysis in the pulsating cathode flow channel is carried out to verify the present experimental results. The momentum and species conservation equations are analytically solved, and the effective time-averaged dispersion coefficient is defined to account for the enhanced mass transport by the flow pulsation. Comprehensive analytical solutions show that the effect of the relevant parameters is in well accordance with the experimental results.

  15. Pulsation-driven mean zonal and meridional flows in rotating massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Umin; Mathis, Stéphane; Neiner, Coralie

    2016-04-01

    Zonal and meridional axisymmetric flows can deeply impact the rotational and chemical evolution of stars. Therefore, momentum exchanges between waves propagating in stars, differential rotation, and meridional circulation must be carefully evaluated. In this work, we study axisymmetric mean flows in rapidly and initially uniformly rotating massive stars driven by small amplitude non-axisymmetric κ-driven oscillations. We treat them as perturbations of second order of the oscillation amplitudes and derive their governing equations as a set of coupled linear ordinary differential equations. This allows us to compute 2D zonal and meridional mean flows driven by low frequency g and r modes in slowly pulsating B stars and p modes in β Cephei stars. Oscillation-driven mean flows usually have large amplitudes only in the surface layers. In addition, the kinetic energy of the induced 2D zonal rotational motions is much larger than that of the meridional motions. In some cases, meridional flows have a complex radial and latitudinal structure. We find pulsation-driven and rotation-driven meridional flows can have similar amplitudes. These results show the importance of taking wave - mean flow interactions into account when studying the evolution of massive stars.

  16. A search for p-mode pulsations in white dwarf stars using the Berkeley Visible Imaging Tube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Welsh, B. Y.; Koen, C.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Kotze, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present high-speed photometry (resolution 0.1 s) obtained during the commissioning of the Berkely Visible Imaging Tube system on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). The observations were an attempt to search for very rapid p-mode oscillations in white dwarf stars and included three DA stars known to be g-mode pulsators (ZZ Cet, HK Cet and AF Pic), one other DA star (WD 1056-384) not known to be variable and one AM Cvn star (HP Lib). No evidence was found for any variations greater than about 1 mmag in amplitude (˜0.1 per cent) at frequencies in excess of 60 mHz (periods <17 s) in any of the target stars, though several previously known g-mode frequencies were recovered.

  17. Calculation of He II flow in tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, H.A.; Mord, A.J. )

    1992-02-01

    The equations for the flow of He II are integrated using a new one-dimensional, steady state model to study the flow in a tube. A wide range of driving conditions is studied. The temperature and pressure profiles along the tube fall into four classes. A dimensionless parameter called {sigma} is defined which determines the progression through the four classes of behavior. The deviation of the flow from Newtonian is measured by {sigma}. Significant maxima of the temperature and pressure can occur between the ends of the tube for large values of {sigma}. The shapes of the profiles and the mass flux depend primarily on {sigma}, the geometry and the boundary conditions. Formulas are presented which relate the variables of interest to the boundary conditions. These formulas result from averaging the equations of motion along the tube. A general and unified approach, based on {sigma}, is presented for analyzing experimental data and designing new experiments. It is shown that the common practice of neglecting the pressure term in the energy equation results in poor prediction for many situations. The occurrence of large maxima of pressure and temperature imply that the interpretation of some of the experimental data of the literature should be reconsidered.

  18. Interaction of a pulsating vortex rope with the local velocity field in a Francis turbine draft tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.; Bullani, A.; Dreyer, M.; Roth, S.; Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Avellan, F.

    2012-11-01

    Acoustic resonances in Francis turbines often define undesirable limitations to their operating ranges at high load. The knowledge of the mechanisms governing the onset and the sustenance of these instabilities in the swirling flow leaving the runner is essential for the development of a reliable hydroacoustic model for the prediction of system stability. The present work seeks to study experimentally the unstable draft tube flow by conducting a series of measurements on a reduced Francis Turbine model. The key physical parameters and their interaction with the hydraulic and mechanical system are studied and quantified. In particular, the evolution of the axial and tangential velocity components in the draft tube cone is analysed by means of Laser Doppler Anemometry. Combined with the calculation of the instantaneous vortex rope volume based on flow visualization and the measurement of the pressure fluctuations, the nature of the auto-oscillation in the draft tube flow is investigated.

  19. Fluid dynamics and vibration of tube banks in fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zukauskas, A.; Ulinskas, R.; Katinas, V.

    1988-01-01

    This work presents results derived in fluid dynamics, hydraulic drag and flow-induced vibrations within transverse and yawed tube banks. The studies encompass banks of smooth, rough and finned tubes at Reynolds numbers from 1 to 2x10/sup 6/. Highlighted in the text are fluid dynamic parameters of tube banks measured at inter-tube spaces and tube surfaces.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of Flow Across Tube Banks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, M.J.; Tifford, A.N.

    1942-01-01

    Flow across tube banks was investigated by surveys of total dynamic and static pressure by visualization of the flow through the use of titanium tetrachloride smoke, by thermocouple surveys of heated tubes, and by hot-wire surveys of both heated and unheated tubes. It was found that turbulence increased as the depth of the bank increased and that the broad wake behind each tube affected flow over the succeeding tubes.

  1. The effect of pressure pulsations and vibrations on fully developed pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, D. O.

    1981-08-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of longitudinal pressure pulsations or vibrations on the velocity distribution in laminar or turbulent fully developed pipe flow. Specifically, the Reynolds equations are formulated in a noninertial reference frame so that the influence of pressure pulsations, vibrations, or a combined pressure and vibrational oscillation can be obtained from a single solution. For axisymmetric developed flow of a constant property (incompressible) fluid, the radial and circumferential momentum equations can be solved and the axial momentum equation is linearized so that the velocity field can be obtained as the sum of a steady and a time-dependent component. By obtaining a solution for the case where the pressure (or amplitude of vibration) varies sinusoidally, one obtains the solution for disturbances of arbitrary waveform through a Fourier series expansion of the disturbance. Results are presented that show that the velocity field is dependent upon the mean flow Reynolds number, a vibrational Reynolds number, and the amplitude of the forcing function. In general, the fluid response to differing waveforms is similar to that obtained for simple harmonic oscillations with respect to the various parameters explored.

  2. Some spectral and pulsation characteristics of a horizontal gas-liquid stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovnyi, P. M.

    1980-07-01

    In the experiments described, the turbulence characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid pipe flow were studied, using a 6 m long, 19-mm-diam tube. The inlet temperature of the suspension was maintained at 25 C. The friction energy spectra and the relative intensity of the friction pulsations were measured. The spectral and pulsation characteristics were obtained by an electrodiffusion technique which provided reliable data on the pulsations of the wall shear stress.

  3. Long range effect of turbulent pressure pulsations in plane-parallel flows at different velocities with various flame fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, G. N.; Rutovskiy, V. B.

    1985-01-01

    The levels of turbulent velocity and pressure pulsations in a diffusion flare both with and without a slipstream in the flow are calculated. The analytical expressions are derived from a plane model in which the vortices are replaced by rotating cylinders having axes perpendicular to the flow and radii proportional to an integral turbulence scale; the flow originates from two planar nozzles of substantially different size. The resulting formulas for these pulsations and the estimate of the increase in the turbulence in the presence of a flame front are in good agreement with test data. Pressure pulsations are independent of the density distribution at a nozzle section, while this density is the critical factor in determining the pulsation velocity field. When the nozzles are sufficiently close together, two velocity pulsation maxima are to be expected and their position can be computed beforehand. The case when the distance to the boundary of the second nozzle is small and both streams merge rapidly into a common flow is also considered.

  4. Motions of a liquid in a pulsating bulb with application to problems of blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Potential flows may be utilized to represent motions produced in pulsating bulbs. While the initial bulb shape may be arbitrary, sequential shapes are related by affine transformations. Two components appear in the distribution of pressure, one dependent on the instantaneous velocity and the other on the acceleration. For flows with stationary streamlines the inertial impedance is that of a simple mass, and is proportional to the first moment of the actual mass of fluid contained within the bulb. Examples treated are: (1) Expanding and collapsing circular cylinders, and (2) elliptical cylinders in which the perimeter is held constant. The thickness of the pulsatile laminar boundary layer is found to be approximately on millimeter for conditions in the vicinity of the heart. Conditions for separation and turbulence differ from those in steady flow.

  5. Effects of bulk flow pulsations on film cooling from different length injection holes at different blowing ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, H.J.; Lee, J.S.; Ligrani, P.M.

    1999-07-01

    Bulk flow pulsations in the form of sinusoidal variations of velocity and static pressure at injectant Strouhal numbers from 0.8 to 10.0 are investigated as they affect film cooling from a single row of simple angle holes. Similar flow variations are produced by potential flow interactions and passing shock waves near turbine surfaces in gas turbine engines. Time-averaged temperature distributions, phase-averaged temperature distributions, adiabatic film cooling effectiveness values, and iso-energetic Stranton numbers show that important alterations to film cooling protection occur as pulsation frequency, coolant Strouhal number, blowing ratio, and nondimensional injection hole length are changed. Overall, the pulsations affect film performance and behavior more significantly both as L/D decreases, and as blowing ratio decreases.

  6. The Selective Myosin II Inhibitor Blebbistatin Reversibly Eliminates Gastrovascular Flow and Stolon Tip Pulsations in the Colonial Hydroid Podocoryna carnea

    PubMed Central

    Connally, Noah; Anderson, Christopher P.; Bolton, Jules E.; Bolton, Edward W.; Buss, Leo W.

    2015-01-01

    Blebbistatin reversibly disrupted both stolon tip pulsations and gastrovascular flow in the colonial hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Epithelial longitudinal muscles of polyps were unaffected by blebbistatin, as polyps contracted when challenged with a pulse of KCl. Latrunculin B, which sequesters G actin preventing F actin assembly, caused stolons to retract, exposing focal adhesions where the tip epithelial cells adhere to the substratum. These results are consistent with earlier suggestions that non-muscle myosin II provides the motive force for stolon tip pulsations and further suggest that tip oscillations are functionally coupled to hydrorhizal axial muscle contraction. PMID:26605798

  7. Information about accretion flows from X-ray timing of pulsating sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1976-01-01

    The response was studied of a rotating neutron star to fluctuating torques and it was found that the observed variations in the pulsation periods of the compact X-ray sources Cen X-3 and Her X-1 could be caused by short time scale fluctuations in the accretion torques acting on the neutron stars. The sizes and rates of the required fluctuations are consistent with current accretion models. Such fluctuations can cause period variations either (a) directly, by causing a random walk of the star's angular velocity or (b) indirectly, by exciting a long-period mode of the neutron star, such as the Tkachenko mode of the rotating neutron superfluid. Phenomena in compact X-ray sources and cataclysmic variables which may be caused by fluctuating mass flow rates are also discussed.

  8. Jet-flow from shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingery, Charles N.; Gion, Edmund J.

    1989-07-01

    This project was designed to map the magnitude and extent of the high velocity jet flow exiting shock tubes. The flow was measured by installing stagnation probes along three blast lines and by supplementing these measurements with calibrated displacement cubes. The side-on and stagnation overpressure versus time were measured, and from that, the side-on and stagnation impulse were calculated. The stagnation impulse showed a large drop in magnitude as the blast line was moved from the zero line to a 1.5 and then to a 3-diameter offset. A helium driver was used in the 2.54-cm-diameter shock tube to simulate an explosion in a storage magazine. Results are presented in the form of stagnation impulse versus distance along the three blast lines. The significance of these findings is that the present quantity-distance criteria for munitions stored in underground magazines are based on side-on peak overpressure, but our results show that the peak stagnation pressure and impulse are much greater. At a distance where 10.3-kPa (1.5 psi) side-on pressure was measured, a 49.6-kPa (7.2 psi) stagnation pressure was measured. At the same distance, a side-on impulse was 12.6 kPa-ms (1.83 psi-ms), while the stagnation impulse was 134 kPa-ms (20.2 psi-ms)--a dramatic difference.

  9. Effects of vacuum level and pulsation rate on milk ejection and milk flow traits in Tunisian dairy camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Atigui, Moufida; Marnet, Pierre-Guy; Barmat, Ahmed; Khorchani, Touhami; Hammadi, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to compare the effects of milking at two vacuum levels (38 and 48 kPa) and three pulsation rates (60, 90, and 120 cpm) on milk production and milk flow characteristics. Six multiparous Maghrebi camels in late lactation and once daily milked were used. The best combination of setting for camel's milking was high vacuum and low pulsation rate (48 kPa/60 cpm). Milk yield and average and peak milk flow rate were the highest, while milking time was the shortest using this combination of setting (3.05 ± 0.30 kg, 1.52 ± 0.21 kg/min, 2.52 ± 0.21 kg/min, and 3.32 ± 0.31 min, respectively). Lower vacuum level lengthened milking time by more than 100 % and was not sufficient to extract milk correctly (1.69 to 2.48 times less milk yield harvested), suggesting a negative interaction with the stimulatory effect of pulsation. Higher pulsation rates did not better stimulate the camels and induced more bimodality and lower milk flow rates. Animal characteristics and liner/claw design affect machine milking and further investigations must be carried out to verify their effects and to study long-term effect of high vacuum level on udder health and teat condition. PMID:25348647

  10. Problems of unsteady temperature measurements in a pulsating flow of gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olczyk, A.

    2008-05-01

    Unsteady flow temperature is one of the most difficult and complex flow parameters to measure. Main problems concern insufficient dynamic properties of applied sensors and an interpretation of recorded signals, composed of static and dynamic temperatures. An attempt is made to solve these two problems in the case of measurements conducted in a pulsating flow of gas in the 0-200 Hz range of frequencies, which corresponds to real conditions found in exhaust pipes of modern diesel engines. As far as sensor dynamics is concerned, an analysis of requirements related to the thermometer was made, showing that there was no possibility of assuring such a high frequency band within existing solutions. Therefore, a method of double-channel correction of sensor dynamics was proposed and experimentally tested. The results correspond well with the calculations made by means of the proposed model of sensor dynamics. In the case of interpretation of the measured temperature signal, a method for distinguishing its two components was proposed. This decomposition considerably helps with a correct interpretation of unsteady flow phenomena in pipes.

  11. Visualization of entry flow separation for oscillating flow in tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang; Simon, Terence W.

    1992-01-01

    Neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles with laser illumination are used to document entry flow separation for oscillating flow in tubes. For a symmetric entry case, the size of the separation zone appears to mildly depend on Reynolds number in the acceleration phase, but is roughly Reynolds number independent in the deceleration phase. For the asymmetric entry case, the separation zone was larger and appeared to grow somewhat during the deceleration phase. The separation zones for both entry geometry cases remain relatively small throughout the cycle. This is different from what would be observed in all-laminar, oscillator flows and is probably due to the high turbulence of the flow, particularly during the deceleration phase of the cycle.

  12. Experimental investigation of flow and heating in a resonance tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Back, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the basic mechanism of heating in resonance tubes of square section with constant area excited by underexpanded jet flows. The jet flow between the nozzle exit and the tube inlet plays a key role in the performance of a resonance tube. A detailed and systematic investigation of the unsteady complex shock structure in this part of the flow region has led to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms associated with the gas heating in such tubes. A study of the effects of tube location in relation to free-jet shock location (without the presence of the resonance tube) has shed further light on the underlying mechanism of sustained oscillations of the flow in a resonance tube.

  13. Ionospheric outflows as possible source of the low-energy plasma flux tubes controlling the dimension of pulsating auroral patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Donovan, E.; Nishimura, T.; Yang, B.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Conjunctive observations of low-Earth-orbit satellites and optical auroral imagers have indicated that, a majority of pulsating auroral patches (PAPs) are associated with low-energy ion (LEI) precipitation structures with core energies ranging from several tens of eV up to a few hundred eV. This result is consistent with a long-standing proposal that the PAPs connect to flux tubes filled with enhanced "cold" plasma. To further explore the origin and generation mechanism of those LEI structures, we investigate a few THEMIS events when the in-situ probes are conceived as conjugate to PAPs, judging by an apparent correlation between the in-situ whistler-mode chorus and the oscillation of the PAP luminosity [Nishimura et al., 2011]. We notice a common existence of LEI structures from THEMIS in-situ data during those conjugacy event intervals. Such LEI structures are always strongly field-aligned, with core energies ranging from several tens of eV up to a few hundred eV, and often exhibit distinct energy dispersion features. Contingent upon the energy range and time, the pitch-angle distribution of the LEI structures can be either heavily biased toward parallel direction, or biased toward anti-parallel direction, or roughly symmetric between parallel and anti-parallel directions. The above observations allude to the ion outflows from the ionosphere as a plausible origin of the observed LEI structures. To check the above notion, we perform particle simulations assuming that the low-energy ions originate from the ion outflows in topside ionosphere and bounce between hemispheres while convecting with EXB drift. The simulation results can reproduce some of the basic observable features of the LEI structures, such as the energy dispersion and the variation of pitch-angle distribution versus time and energy. Combining the results from low-Earth-orbit satellites observations, THEMIS in-situ observations, and simulations, we propose that the ion outflows into the magnetosphere

  14. Leakage-flow-induced vibration of a tube-in-tube slip joint. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1983-06-01

    The susceptibility of a cantilevered tube conveying water to self-excitation by leakage flow through a slip joint is assessed experimentally. The slip joint is formed by inserting a smaller, rigid tube into the free end of the cantilevered tube. Variations of the slip joint annular gaps and engagement lengths are tested, and several mechanisms for self-excitation are described.

  15. Leakage-flow-induced vibration of a tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1984-01-01

    The susceptibility of a cantilevered tube conveying water to self-excitation by leakage flow through a slip joint is assessed experimentally. The slip joint is formed by inserting a smaller, rigid tube into the free end of the cantilevered tube. Variations of the slip joint annular gaps and engagement lengths are tested, and several mechanisms for self-excitation are described.

  16. Gas-solid flow in vertical tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pita, J.A.; Sundaresan, S. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on a computational study of fully-developed flow of gas-particle suspensions in vertical pipes which was carried out, using the model proposed recently by Sinclair and Jackson, to understand the predicted scale-up characteristics. It was shown that the model can capture the existence of steady-state multiplicity wherein different pressure gradients can be obtained for the same gas and solids fluxes. A pronounced and nonmonotonic variation of the pressure gradient required to achieve desired fluxes of solid and gas with tube diameter was predicted by the model, and this is explained on a physical basis. The computed results were compared with the experimental data. The model manifests an unsatisfactory degree of sensitivity to the inelasticity of the particle-particle collisions and the damping of particle-phase fluctuating motion by the gas.

  17. Mass Transfer in a Rigid Tube With Pulsatile Flow and Constant Wall Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Moschandreou, T. E.; Ellis, C. G.; Goldman, D.

    2011-01-01

    An approximate-analytical solution method is presented for the problem of mass transfer in a rigid tube with pulsatile flow. For the case of constant wall concentration, it is shown that the generalized integral transform (GIT) method can be used to obtain a solution in terms of a perturbation expansion, where the coefficients of each term are given by a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Truncating the system at some large value of the parameter N, an approximate solution for the system is obtained for the first term in the perturbation expansion, and the GIT-based solution is verified by comparison to a numerical solution. The GIT approximate-analytical solution indicates that for small to moderate nondimensional frequencies for any distance from the inlet of the tube, there is a positive peak in the bulk concentration C1b due to pulsation, thereby, producing a higher mass transfer mixing efficiency in the tube. As we further increase the frequency, the positive peak is followed by a negative peak in the time-averaged bulk concentration and then the bulk concentration C1b oscillates and dampens to zero. Initially, for small frequencies the relative Sherwood number is negative indicating that the effect of pulsation tends to reduce mass transfer. There is a band of frequencies, where the relative Sherwood number is positive indicating that the effect of pulsation tends to increase mass transfer. The positive peak in bulk concentration corresponds to a matching of the phase of the pulsatile velocity and the concentration, respectively, where the unique maximum of both occur for certain time in the cycle. The oscillatory component of concentration is also determined radially in the tube where the concentration develops first near the wall of the tube, and the lobes of the concentration curves increase with increasing distance downstream until the concentration becomes fully developed. The GIT method proves to be a working approach to solve the first

  18. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  19. CHARACTERIZING PULSATING MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the physical properties for defining the operation of a pulse jet mixing system. Pulse jet mixing operates with no moving parts located in the vessel to be mixed. Pulse tubes submerged in the vessel provide a pulsating flow due to a controlled combination of applied pressure to expel the fluid from the pulse tube nozzle followed by suction to refill the pulse tube through the same nozzle. For mixing slurries nondimensional parameters to define mixing operation include slurry properties, geometric properties and operational parameters. Primary parameters include jet Reynolds number and Froude number; alternate parameters may include particle Galileo number, particle Reynolds number, settling velocity ratio, and hindered settling velocity ratio. Rating metrics for system performance include just suspended velocity, concentration distribution as a function of elevation, and blend time.

  20. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. 3: The equilibrium path of the flux tube arch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinis, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    The arched equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a plane-stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere is calculated for cases in which the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The large scale mechanical equilibrium of the flux tube involves a balance among the magnetic buoyancy force, the net magnetic tension force due to the curvature of the flux tube axis, and the inertial (centrifugal) force due to the siphon flow along curved streamlines. The ends of the flux tube are assumed to be pinned down by some other external force. Both isothermal and adiabatic siphon flows are considered for flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere. For the isothermal case, in the absence of a siphon flow the equilibrium path reduces to the static arch calculated by Parker (1975, 1979). The presence of a siphon flow causes the flux tube arch to bend more sharply, so that magnetic tension can overcome the additional straightening effect of the inertial force, and reduces the maximum width of the arch. The curvature of the arch increases as the siphon flow speed increases. For a critical siphon flow, with supercritical flow in the downstream leg, the arch is asymmetric, with greater curvature in the downstream leg of the arch. Adiabatic flow have qualitatively similar effects, except that adiabatic cooling reduces the buoyancy of the flux tube and thus leads to significantly wider arches. In some cases the cooling is strong enough to create negative buoyancy along sections of the flux tube, requiring upward curvature of the flux tube path along these sections and sometimes leading to unusual equilibrium paths of periodic, sinusoidal form.

  1. Osteocytes subjected to pulsating fluid flow regulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Chen Qian . E-mail: j.kleinnulend@vumc.nl

    2006-09-29

    Osteocytes are thought to orchestrate bone remodeling, but it is unclear exactly how osteocytes influence neighboring bone cells. Here, we tested whether osteocytes, osteoblasts, and periosteal fibroblasts subjected to pulsating fluid flow (PFF) produce soluble factors that modulate the proliferation and differentiation of cultured osteoblasts and periosteal fibroblasts. We found that osteocyte PFF conditioned medium (CM) inhibited bone cell proliferation, and osteocytes produced the strongest inhibition of proliferation compared to osteoblasts and periosteal fibroblasts. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuated the inhibitory effects of osteocyte PFF CM, suggesting that a change in NO release is at least partially responsible for the inhibitory effects of osteocyte PFF CM. Furthermore, osteocyte PFF CM stimulated osteoblast differentiation measured as increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and L-NAME decreased the stimulatory effects of osteocyte PFF CM on osteoblast differentiation. We conclude that osteocytes subjected to PFF inhibit proliferation but stimulate differentiation of osteoblasts in vitro via soluble factors and that the release of these soluble factors was at least partially dependent on the activation of a NO pathway in osteocytes in response to PFF. Thus, the osteocyte appears to be more responsive to PFF than the osteoblast or periosteal fibroblast with respect to the production of soluble signaling molecules affecting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  2. Measuring and metering of unsteady flows

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, M.; Dodge, F.T.; Heidrick, T.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on unsteady flow. Topics considered at the conference included the identification of pulsation induced orifice metering errors including gage line shift, electromagnetic flowmeters, mass flow measurements on the flue of a woodburning stove, fluid excitation forces acting on a tube array, and a numerical analysis of pulsating laminar flow through a pipe orifice.

  3. Flow and heat transfer of petal shaped double tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Kawashima, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Koichi; Ando, Toshitake

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the flow and heat transfer characteristics of petal-shaped double tube with 6 petals are examined experimentally for a compact heat exchanger. As results, the heat transfer rate, Q, of the 6 petal shaped double tube (6-p tube) is much larger than that, Qp, of conventional circular double tube in all Reynolds number Rein,h (where, the reference length is hydraulic diameter) ranges. For example, at Rein,h =(0.5~1.0)× 104 it is about 4 times of Qp. The heat transfer enhancement of 6-p tube is by the increase of heat transfer area, wetting perimeter, and a highly fluctuating flow, and Q of the 6-p tube can be expressed by Q [kW/m] = 0.54Rein,h + 2245.

  4. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  5. Development of pulsating twin jets mechanism for mixing flow heat transfer analysis.

    PubMed

    Gitan, Ali Ahmed; Zulkifli, Rozli; Abdullah, Shahrir; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Pulsating twin jets mechanism (PTJM) was developed in the present work to study the effect of pulsating twin jets mixing region on the enhancement of heat transfer. Controllable characteristics twin pulsed jets were the main objective of our design. The variable nozzle-nozzle distance was considered to study the effect of two jets interaction at the mixing region. Also, the phase change between the frequencies of twin jets was taken into account to develop PTJM. All of these factors in addition to the ability of producing high velocity pulsed jet led to more appropriate design for a comprehensive study of multijet impingement heat transfer problems. The performance of PTJM was verified by measuring the pulse profile at frequency of 20 Hz, where equal velocity peak of around 64 m/s for both jets was obtained. Moreover, the jet velocity profile at different pulsation frequencies was tested to verify system performance, so the results revealed reasonable velocity profile configuration. Furthermore, the effect of pulsation frequency on surface temperature of flat hot plate in the midpoint between twin jets was studied experimentally. Noticeable enhancement in heat transfer was obtained with the increasing of pulsation frequency. PMID:24672370

  6. Development of Pulsating Twin Jets Mechanism for Mixing Flow Heat Transfer Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Shahrir

    2014-01-01

    Pulsating twin jets mechanism (PTJM) was developed in the present work to study the effect of pulsating twin jets mixing region on the enhancement of heat transfer. Controllable characteristics twin pulsed jets were the main objective of our design. The variable nozzle-nozzle distance was considered to study the effect of two jets interaction at the mixing region. Also, the phase change between the frequencies of twin jets was taken into account to develop PTJM. All of these factors in addition to the ability of producing high velocity pulsed jet led to more appropriate design for a comprehensive study of multijet impingement heat transfer problems. The performance of PTJM was verified by measuring the pulse profile at frequency of 20 Hz, where equal velocity peak of around 64 m/s for both jets was obtained. Moreover, the jet velocity profile at different pulsation frequencies was tested to verify system performance, so the results revealed reasonable velocity profile configuration. Furthermore, the effect of pulsation frequency on surface temperature of flat hot plate in the midpoint between twin jets was studied experimentally. Noticeable enhancement in heat transfer was obtained with the increasing of pulsation frequency. PMID:24672370

  7. Test flow disturbances in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The operation of an expansion tube is investigated theoretically with emphasis on the factors that have limited the utility of the expansion tube in the past. It is shown why the window of steady test conditions is narrow and how this window can be expanded so that these facilities can be used in a variety of hypersonic research. The theoretical predictions are supported by centerline Pitot pressure measurements using air as the test gas.

  8. A numerical investigation of the effects of flow pulsations over a cylinder on dynamic forces and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'herde, Eric J.

    Flow over a fixed circular cylinder is a fundamental fluid mechanics problem that involves a simple geometry; yet, as the Reynolds number is incremented, increasingly complex flow patterns emerge. Most notably, when the Reynolds number exceeds a value of about 46, a Benard-von Karman vortex street pattern appears. It is associated with a characteristic natural vortex shedding frequency. The objectives of this study are to numerically investigate the effects of an incoming free-stream velocity pulsation with a mean Reynolds number of 100 on the dynamic forces acting on a fixed circular cylinder, on the flow regimes behind the cylinder, and on heat transfer between the cylinder and surrounding fluid. Sinusoidal free-stream pulsations with velocity amplitude Av values of 25%, 50% and 75% that of the mean free-stream velocity, and selected frequencies in the range of one fourth the natural shedding frequency fs to five times fs were considered. Of particular interest, is the interaction between forced pulsating frequencies and the natural vortex shedding frequency. At frequencies close to the natural frequency, and to twice the natural frequency, sudden reductions in the mean value of the drag coefficient are observed, as the imposed frequency increases. These sudden reductions are accompanied by complex changes in flow regimes and vortex shedding patterns. The complexity of flow regimes as a function of the imposed pulsation variables was compiled into a frequency-amplitude map. This original map enables one to correlate changes in flow regimes to both dynamic forces and heat transfer characteristics. No net mean drag reduction was observed in the range of dimensionless amplitudes and frequencies considered, at a Reynolds number of 100. Local heat transfer enhancements of up to 86% were achieved for a specific frequency-amplitude pair. A particular finding is the appearance, for a narrow range of frequencies, of a non-zero mean lift coefficient, despite the overall

  9. Reevaluation of compressible-flow Preston tube calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Revised zero-pressure-gradient, adiabatic wall skin-friction-balance data covering a Mach number range from 1.6 to 4.6 led to a reevaluation of existing compressible flow Preston tube calibration equations.

  10. Subcooled choked flow through steam generator tube cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Brian J.

    The work presented here describes an experimental investigation into the choked flow of initially subcooled water through simulated steam generator tube cracks at pressures up to 6.9 MPa. The study of such flow is relevant to the prediction of leak flow rates from a nuclear reactor primary side to secondary side through cracks in steam generator tubes. An experimental approach to measuring such flow is de- scribed. Experimental results from data found in literature as well as the data collected in this work are compared with predictions from presented models as well as predictions from the thermal-hydraulic system code RELAP5. It is found that the homogeneous equilibrium model underpredicts choked flow rates of subcooled water through slits and artificial steam generator tube cracks. Additional modeling of thermal non-equilibrium improves the predictibility of choking mass flux for homogeneous models, however they fail to account for the characteristics of the two-phase pressure drop. An integral modeling approach is enhanced using a correlation developed from the data herein. Also, an assessment of the thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5 is performed and it’s applicability to predict choking flow rates through steam generator tube cracks is addressed. This assessment determined that the Henry & Fauske model, as coded in RELAP5, is best suited for modeling choked flow through steam generator tube cracks. Finally, an approach to applying choked flow data that is not at the same thermo-dynamic conditions as a prototype is developed.

  11. Unexpected water flow through Nafion-tube punctures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Colin; Klyuzhin, Ivan; Park, Ji Sun; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2011-05-01

    When a Nafion tube is immersed in water and a small hole is punched in the tube's wall, an unexpected phenomenon occurs: Water flows continuously into the tube through the hole. The phenomenon has proved repeatable, and dynamic aspects were therefore explored, including the effects of altered pH and introduction of a second hole. It appears that the flow is closely tied to the recently discovered “exclusion zone” that forms as an annulus inside the Nafion tube. These zones generate protons in the core of the tube, which exert pressure on the menisci; once a hole is punched, the pressure is relieved by sucking water through the hole. This hypothesis is consistent with the observed experimental evidence and may be relevant to the mechanism of water transport in trees.

  12. Unexpected water flow through Nafion-tube punctures.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Colin; Klyuzhin, Ivan; Park, Ji Sun; Pollack, Gerald H

    2011-05-01

    When a Nafion tube is immersed in water and a small hole is punched in the tube's wall, an unexpected phenomenon occurs: Water flows continuously into the tube through the hole. The phenomenon has proved repeatable, and dynamic aspects were therefore explored, including the effects of altered pH and introduction of a second hole. It appears that the flow is closely tied to the recently discovered "exclusion zone" that forms as an annulus inside the Nafion tube. These zones generate protons in the core of the tube, which exert pressure on the menisci; once a hole is punched, the pressure is relieved by sucking water through the hole. This hypothesis is consistent with the observed experimental evidence and may be relevant to the mechanism of water transport in trees. PMID:21728645

  13. A Computational Study for the Utilization of Jet Pulsations in Gas Turbine Film Cooling and Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the second part of a three-part final report of research performed under an NRA cooperative Agreement contract. The first part is NASA/CR-2012-217415. The third part is NASA/CR-2012-217417. Jets have been utilized in various turbomachinery applications in order to improve gas turbines performance. Jet pulsation is a promising technique because of the reduction in the amount of air removed from compressor. In this work two areas of pulsed jets applications were computationally investigated using the commercial code Fluent (ANSYS, Inc.); the first one is film cooling of High Pressure Turbine (HPT) blades and second one is flow separation control over Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoil using Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ). Using pulsed jets for film cooling purposes can help to improve the effectiveness and thus allow higher turbine inlet temperature. Effects of the film hole geometry, blowing ratio and density ratio of the jet, pulsation frequency and duty cycle of blowing on the film cooling effectiveness were investigated. As for the low-pressure turbine (LPT) stages, the boundary layer separation on the suction side of airfoils can occur due to strong adverse pressure gradients. The problem is exacerbated as airfoil loading is increased. Active flow control could provide a means for minimizing separation under conditions where it is most severe (low Reynolds number), without causing additional losses under other conditions (high Reynolds number). The effects of the jet geometry, blowing ratio, density ratio, pulsation frequency and duty cycle on the size of the separated region were examined in this work. The results from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation computational approaches were compared with the experimental data.

  14. Superhydrophobic copper tubes with possible flow enhancement and drag reduction.

    PubMed

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Zhang, Yong

    2009-06-01

    The transport of a Newtonian liquid through a smooth pipe or tube is dominated by the frictional drag on the liquid against the walls. The resistance to flow against a solid can, however, be reduced by introducing a layer of gas at or near the boundary between the solid and liquid. This can occur by the vaporization of liquid at a surface at a temperature above the Leidenfrost point, by a cushion of air (e.g. below a hovercraft), or by producing bubbles at the interface. These methods require a continuous energy input, but a more recent discovery is the possibility of using a superhydrophobic surface. Most reported research uses small sections of lithographically patterned surfaces and rarely considers pressure differences or varying flow rates. In this work we present a method for creating a uniform superhydrophobic nanoribbon layer on the inside of round copper tubes of millimetric internal radius. Two types of experiments are described, with the first involving a simultaneous comparison of four tubes with different surface finishes (as received, as received with hydrophobic coating, nanoribbon, and nanoribbon with a hydrophobic coating) under constant flow rate conditions using water and water-glycerol mixtures. The results show that the superhydrophobic nanoribbon with a hydrophobic coating surface finish allows greater flow at low pressure differences but that the effect disappears as the pressure at the inlet of the tube is increased. The second experiment is a simple visual demonstration of the low-pressure behavior using two nominally identical tubes in terms of length and cross-section, but with one tube possessing a superhydrophobic internal surface finish. In this experiment a reservoir is allowed to feed the two tubes with open ends via a T-piece and it is observed that, once flow commences, it preferentially occurs down the superhydrophobic tube. PMID:20355928

  15. Stokes flow through a tube with bumpy wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.

    2006-07-01

    The Stokes flow through a tube with a bumpy wall is solved through a perturbation in the small amplitude of the three-dimensional bumps. The solution can be expressed in terms of modified Bessel functions. For given area or volume of a bump, there exists an optimum circumferential wave number and an optimum aspect ratio for which the flow rate is maximized.

  16. Driver gas flow with fluctuations. [shock tube turbulent bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Jones, W. R.; Santiago, J.

    1980-01-01

    A shock tube's driver gas can apparently provide flow with turbulent bursts. The fluctuations are interpreted using a boundary layer model of contact surface flow and results form a kinetic theory of turbulence. With this, a lower limit of 4 on the ratio of maximum to minimum turbulent intensities in contact surface instabilities has been estimated.

  17. Numerical simulation of transient hypervelocity flow in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Several numerical simulations of the transient flow of helium in an expansion tube are presented. The aim of the exercise is to provide further information on the operational problems of the NASA Langley expansion tube. The calculations were performed with an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code based on a finite-volume formulation and upwinding techniques. Although laminar flow and ideal bursting of the diaphragms was assumed, the simulations showed some of the important features seen in the experiments. In particular, the discontinuity in the tube diameter at the primary diaphragm station introduced a transverse perturbation to the expanding driver gas, and this perturbation was seen to propagate into the test gas under some flow conditions. The disturbances seen in the test flow can be characterized as either 'small-amplitude' noise possibly introduced during shock compression or 'large-amplitude' noise associated with the passage of the reflected head of the unsteady expansion.

  18. Unexpected water flow through Nafion-tube punctures

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Colin; Klyuzhin, Ivan; Park, Ji Sun; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2011-01-01

    When a Nafion tube is immersed in water and a small hole is punched in the tube’s wall, an unexpected phenomenon occurs: Water flows continuously into the tube through the hole. The phenomenon has proved repeatable, and dynamic aspects were therefore explored, including the effects of altered pH and introduction of a second hole. It appears that the flow is closely tied to the recently discovered “exclusion zone” that forms as an annulus inside the Nafion tube. These zones generate protons in the core of the tube, which exert pressure on the menisci; once a hole is punched, the pressure is relieved by sucking water through the hole. This hypothesis is consistent with the observed experimental evidence and may be relevant to the mechanism of water transport in trees. PMID:21728645

  19. Detection of Anisotropic Pulsating Flow and Its Velocity-Fluctuation Rate in Fertilized Bird Eggs by NMR Microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görke, U.; Kimmich, R.; Weis, J.

    1996-06-01

    Coherent and incoherent flows in fertilized quail and bantam eggs have been studied with the aid of NMR microimaging techniques in the course of incubation until the end of the sixth day. The methods employed were multiplane tagging NMR imaging and a NMR gradient-echo imaging pulse sequence supplemented by bipolar gradient pulses in the coherence-evolution interval. The latter technique is suited for recording of velocity maps as well as for localizing of regions with enhanced echo attenuation by incoherent motions. Slight coherent displacements in the middle of the upper part of the egg white were found after the fourth day of incubation with the aid of both pulse schemes. The maximum velocity was estimated to be 1 mm/s. More pronounced effects revealed themselves in the examination of incoherent motions. After the same time of incubation and in a somewhat more restricted area of the upper part of the egg white, distinct motions could be localized consistently with either technique. It is shown that these motions are directed to and from the yolk. Furthermore, the analysis of the time fluctuations of the local signals with the aid of a Fourier transformation showed that the flow is largely of a pulsating nature. The pulsation frequency was found to be 0.4 Hz.

  20. Blood viscosity in tube flow: dependence on diameter and hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Pries, A R; Neuhaus, D; Gaehtgens, P

    1992-12-01

    Since the original publications by Martini et al. (Dtsch. Arch. Klin. Med. 169: 212-222, 1930) and Fahraeus and Lindqvist (Am. J. Physiol. 96: 562-568, 1931), it has been known that the relative apparent viscosity of blood in tube flow depends on tube diameter. Quantitative descriptions of this effect and of the dependence of blood viscosity on hematocrit in the different diameter tubes are required for the development of hydrodynamic models of blood flow through the microcirculation. The present study provides a comprehensive data base for the description of relative apparent blood viscosity as a function of tube diameter and hematocrit. Data available from the literature are compiled, and new experimental data obtained in a capillary viscometer are presented. The combined data base comprises measurements at high shear rates (u > or = 50 s-1) in tubes with diameters ranging from 3.3 to 1,978 microns at hematocrits of up to 0.9. If corrected for differences in suspending medium viscosity and temperature, the data show remarkable agreement. Empirical fitting equations predicting relative apparent blood viscosity from tube diameter and hematocrit are presented. A pronounced change in the hematocrit dependence of relative viscosity is observed in a range of tube diameters in which viscosity is minimal. While a linear hematocrit-viscosity relationship is found in tubes of < or = 6 microns, an overproportional increase of viscosity with hematocrit prevails in tubes of > or = 9 microns. This is interpreted to reflect the hematocrit-dependent transition from single- to multifile arrangement of cells in flow. PMID:1481902

  1. Three-dimensional freezing of flowing water in a tube cooled by air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2015-05-01

    The 3-D freezing of flowing water in a copper tube cooled by air flow is investigated by means of a numerical analysis. The air flows normal to the tube axis. Several parameters as inlet water mean velocity w m , inlet water temperature T iℓ t , air flow temperature T a and air flow velocity u a are selected in the calculations to adapt it to a winter season actually encountered. The numerical results present the development of the ice layer mean thickness and its 3-D morphologies as well as the critical ice layer thickness in the tube choked by the ice layer.

  2. Gas flow between coaxial tubes: impedance to gas flow in an endotracheal tube increases with a catheter within.

    PubMed

    Magee, Patrick T

    2012-06-01

    The insertion of a suction catheter or a bronchoscope down an endotracheal tube increases the resistance to gas flow down the tube. The extent to which this occurs depends on the relative diameters of the endotracheal tube and the coaxially introduced catheter. This study utilises a laboratory model to quantify this effect, using a steady flow down an annulus between two tubes whose long axes lie co-axially. Two diameters of an endotracheal tube were modelled to represent flow down adult and neonatal endotracheal tubes; these were of internal diameter (d(o)) 6.3 mm and 3.2 mm, and of length (L) 555 mm. A steady flow of air was generated to pass through the model 'endotracheal' tube. Flowrates were calculated to give Re of approximately 5000 for the larger endotracheal tube, and of approximately 1300 for the smaller. These values correspond to clinically appropriate flowrates in adult and neonatal patients, respectively. The pressure drop deltaPo down the endotracheal tube was measured initially without any obstruction, using a calibrated pressure transducer. Catheters of diameter (d(i)) 0.8 mm, 1.6 mm, and 3.2 mm were introduced into the larger diameter endotracheal tube, while catheters of 0.8 mm and 1.6 mm were introduced into the smaller one, and flow was restored to its original value. The pressure drops deltaP down the endotracheal tubes were measured with the catheters introduced a length 'x' into the tube, to x = L/2 and to x = L. Results are compared with a theoretical calculation on the basis of laminar flow for concentric tubes. If a sampling tube or suction catheter is used down the length of an infant's endotracheal tube, the results show that for most values of do/di, there is a significant rise in deltaP/deltaPo. Where a flexible bronchoscope is used down an endotracheal tube or a telescope down a rigid bronchoscope, the value of deltaP/deltaP(o) may also increase unacceptably where d(o)/d(i) is low. The results show that for equal d(o)/d(i), and

  3. Slow viscous flow of two particles in a cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin; Wong, Teck Neng; Marcos, -

    2015-11-01

    The slow viscous flow around two particles in a cylindrical tube is obtained theoretically. We employ the Lamb's general solution based on spherical harmonics and cylindrical harmonics to solve the flow field around the particles and the flow within the tube, respectively. We compute the drag and torque coefficients of the particles which are dependent on the distance among the cylinder wall and the two particles. The hydrodynamic forces are also a function of particle velocities and background velocity. Our results are in agreement with the existing theory of a single particle traveling in the tube when the distance between the two particles increases. We found that particle-particle interactions can be neglected when the separation distance is three times larger than the sum of particles radii. Furthermore, such analysis can give us insights to understand the mechanisms of collision and aggregation of particles.

  4. Vortex tubes in turbulent flows: Identification, representation, reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, David C.; Singer, Bart A.

    1994-01-01

    In many cases the structure of a fluid flow is well-characterized by its vortices, especially for the purpose of visualization. In this paper we present a new algorithm for identifying vortices in complex flows. The algorithm produces a skeleton line along the center of a vortex by using a two-step predictor-corrector scheme. The vorticity vector field serves as the predictor and the pressure gradient (in the perpendicular plane) serves as the corrector. We describe an economical description of the vortex tube's cross-section: a 5-term truncated Fourier series is generally sufficient, and it compresses the representation of the flow by a factor of 4000 or more. We reconstruct the vortex tubes as generalized cylinders, providing a polygonal mesh suitable for display on a graphics workstation. We show how the reconstructed geometry of vortex tubes can be enhanced to help visualize helical motion in a static image.

  5. Viscous effects in tube flow initiated by an expansion wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, K.-O.; Russell, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    An examination is made of the effect of the turbulent boundary layer on the uniformity of the flow initiated by a nonsteady expansion wave traveling in a long, constant-area tube. Closed-form expressions for the flow perturbations first are obtained from the linearized equations of motion. Measured static pressure histories for both lowand high-tube Mach numbers are used for comparison. Detailed discussions of the limitations of the linearized model and its extension to high-tube Mach numbers are given. Agreement is shown between a modified version of the linearized model and the experimental results. A model of viscous nonsteady pipe flow is used to explain the nonlinear pressure decay observed at very large length-to-diameter ratios.

  6. Experimental research on heat transfer of pulsating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Yan, Li

    2008-06-01

    Experimental research was conducted to understand heat transfer characteristic of pulsating heat pipe in this paper, and the PHP is made of high quality glass capillary tube. Under different fill ratio, heat transfer rate and many other influence factors, the flow patterns were observed in the start-up, transition and stable stage. The effects of heating position on heat transfer were discussed. The experimental results indicate that no annular flow appears in top heating condition. Under different fill ratios and heat transfer rate, the flow pattern in PHP is transferred from bulk flow to semi-annular flow and annular flow, and the performance of heat transfer is improved for down heating case. The experimental results indicate that the total heat resistant of PHP is increased with fill ratio, and heat transfer rate achieves optimum at filling rate 50%. But for pulsating heat pipe with changing diameters the thermal resistance is higher than that with uniform diameters.

  7. Stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yuji; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2011-11-01

    The stability of a helical vortex tube with axial flow is studied analytically. The base flow is obtained by solving the Euler equation perturbatively assuming small ratio of core to curvature radius, which is denoted by ɛ, and Rankine vortex with uniform axial flow at the leading order. We apply both local and modal stability analysis. By local stability analysis we show that the flow is subject to not only curvature instability but also Coriolis instability, both having the same resonance condition. The unstable growth rate is O(ɛ) and given by the magnitude of a sum of the complex numbers corresponding to the two instabilities. Combined effects of the axial flow and the torsion of the helical vortex tube appear as O(ɛ2) modification. These results are confirmed by the modal stability analysis.

  8. Numerical simulation of transient hypervelocity flow in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Several numerical simulations of the transient flow of helium in an expansion tube are presented in an effort to identify some of the basic mechanisms which cause the noisy test flows seen in experiments. The calculations were performed with an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code based on a finite volume formulation and upwinding techniques. Although laminar flow and ideal bursting of the diaphragms was assumed, the simulations showed some of the important features seen in experiments. In particular, the discontinuity in tube diameter of the primary diaphragm station introduced a transverse perturbation to the expanding driver gas and this perturbation was seen to propagate into the test gas under some flow conditions. The disturbances seen in the test flow can be characterized as either small amplitude, low frequency noise possibly introduced during shock compression or large amplitude, high frequency noise associated with the passage of the reflected head of the unsteady expansion.

  9. Unsteady turbulent shear flow in shock tube discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Ramaiah, R.; Lin, I.

    1981-01-01

    A pressure-ruptured shock tube and an arc driven shock tube, have been used to study the evolution of turbulent fluctuations at contact surfaces with N2O4-2NO2 mixtures and at ionizing shock fronts in argon. The study has focused on point density diagnostics derived from crossed light beam correlations and electric probes. Turbulent bursts are found for which dynamical and spectral analyses suggest a particle-like evolution of fluctuation segments with a unique and characteristic frequency, independent of flow history and overall flow conditions.

  10. Period variations in pulsating X-ray sources. I - Accretion flow parameters and neutron star structure from timing observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Shaham, J.; Pines, D.

    1978-01-01

    Torque fluctuations which can lead to variations in the periods of pulsating X-ray sources are examined. A description of torque variations in terms of noise processes is developed, and the resulting noise models are applied to observations of several pulsating X-ray sources. It is shown that fluctuations in accretion torque could account for the observed period variations and spindown episodes in Her X-1 and Cen X-3. The values of the torque noise strengths inferred from either a nonresonant response or, in the case of Her X-1, a Tkachenko-mode interpretation of the data are found to be consistent with those expected from processes at the magnetospheric boundary of an accreting neutron star. Ways to distinguish among the various interpretations of the period variations are considered. It is noted that fluctuating mass-flow rates may be responsible for other phenomena observed in compact X-ray sources, such as wobble with zero initial amplitude and binary period variations in close binary systems experiencing mass transfer.

  11. Draft tube discharge fluctuation during self-sustained pressure surge: fluorescent particle image velocimetry in two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.; Dreyer, M.; Andreini, N.; Avellan, F.

    2013-04-01

    Hydraulic machines play an increasingly important role in providing a secondary energy reserve for the integration of renewable energy sources in the existing power grid. This requires a significant extension of their usual operating range, involving the presence of cavitating flow regimes in the draft tube. At overload conditions, the self-sustained oscillation of a large cavity at the runner outlet, called vortex rope, generates violent periodic pressure pulsations. In an effort to better understand the nature of this unstable behavior and its interaction with the surrounding hydraulic and mechanical system, the flow leaving the runner is investigated by means of particle image velocimetry. The measurements are performed in the draft tube cone of a reduced scale model of a Francis turbine. A cost-effective method for the in-house production of fluorescent seeding material is developed and described, based on off-the-shelf polyamide particles and Rhodamine B dye. Velocity profiles are obtained at three streamwise positions in the draft tube cone, and the corresponding discharge variation in presence of the vortex rope is calculated. The results suggest that 5-10 % of the discharge in the draft tube cone is passing inside the vortex rope.

  12. Computations of Axisymmetric Flows in Hypersonic Shock Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    A time-accurate two-dimensional fluid code is used to compute test times in shock tubes operated at supersonic speeds. Unlike previous studies, this investigation resolves the finer temporal details of the shock-tube flow by making use of modern supercomputers and state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamic solution techniques. The code, besides solving the time-dependent fluid equations, also accounts for the finite rate chemistry in the hypersonic environment. The flowfield solutions are used to estimate relevant shock-tube parameters for laminar flow, such as test times, and to predict density and velocity profiles. Boundary-layer parameters such as bar-delta(sub u), bar-delta(sup *), and bar-tau(sub w), and test time parameters such as bar-tau and particle time of flight t(sub f), are computed and compared with those evaluated by using Mirels' correlations. This article then discusses in detail the effects of flow nonuniformities on particle time-of-flight behind the normal shock and, consequently, on the interpretation of shock-tube data. This article concludes that for accurate interpretation of shock-tube data, a detailed analysis of flowfield parameters, using a computer code such as used in this study, must be performed.

  13. Numerical computation of transient coaxial entry tube flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieber, P. R.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical program was developed to compute transient laminar flows in two dimensions including multicomponent mixing and chemical reaction. The program can compute both incompressible flows and compressible flows at all speeds, and it is applied to describe transient and steady state solutions for low subsonic, coaxial entry, tue flows. Single component, nonreacting flows comprise most of the solutions, but one steady state solution is presented for trace concentration constituents engaging in a second order reaction. Numerical stability was obtained by adding at each calculation point a correction for numerical diffusion errors caused by truncation of the Taylor series used to finite difference the conservation equations. Transient computations were made for fluids initially at rest, then subjected to step velocity inputs that were uniform across each region of the entry plane and were held constant throughout the computation period. For center tube to annulus velocity ratios of 0.5 and 2.0, the bulk fluid in the tube initially moved in plug flow, but strong radial flows developed near the injection plane which moved the fluid into the high shear region between the jets and away from the tube wall.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Fluid Flow and Heating in Various Resonance Tube Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Back, L. H.; Roschke, E. J.; Pathasarathy, S. P.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study resonance phenomena in tubes excited by underexpanded jet flows. This investigation comprised the following: Study of the various resonance tube modes under a wide range of nozzle pressure, spacing between nozzle and tube mouth, and different tube length; the effects of these modes on the endwall pressure and gas temperature; flow visualization of both jet and tube flows by spark shadowgraph technique; and measurement of wave speed inside the tube by the laser-schlieren techniques. An extensive study of the free-jet flow was undertaken to explain important aspects of various modes of operation of resonance tube flows.

  15. Flow tube used to cool solar-pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A flow tube has been designed and constructed to provide two major functions in the application of a laser beam for transmission of both sound and video. It maintains the YAG laser at the proper operating temperature of 300 degrees K under solar pumping conditions, and it serves as a pump cavity for the laser crystal.

  16. RAPID COMMUNICATION Time-resolved measurements with a vortex flowmeter in a pulsating turbulent flow using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurantzon, F.; Örlü, R.; Segalini, A.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Vortex flowmeters are commonly employed in technical applications and are obtainable in a variety of commercially available types. However their robustness and accuracy can easily be impaired by environmental conditions, such as inflow disturbances and/or pulsating conditions. Various post-processing techniques of the vortex signal have been used, but all of these methods are so far targeted on obtaining an improved estimate of the time-averaged bulk velocity. Here, on the other hand, we propose, based on wavelet analysis, a straightforward way to utilize the signal from a vortex shedder to extract the time-resolved and thereby the phase-averaged velocity under pulsatile flow conditions. The method was verified with hot-wire and laser Doppler velocimetry measurements.

  17. Flow chemistry: intelligent processing of gas-liquid transformations using a tube-in-tube reactor.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, Martin; O'Brien, Matthew; Ley, Steven V; Polyzos, Anastasios

    2015-02-17

    reactive gas in a given reaction mixture. We have developed a tube-in-tube reactor device consisting of a pair of concentric capillaries in which pressurized gas permeates through an inner Teflon AF-2400 tube and reacts with dissolved substrate within a liquid phase that flows within a second gas impermeable tube. This Account examines our efforts toward the development of a simple, unified methodology for the processing of gaseous reagents in flow by way of development of a tube-in-tube reactor device and applications to key C-C, C-N, and C-O bond forming and hydrogenation reactions. We further describe the application to multistep reactions using solid-supported reagents and extend the technology to processes utilizing multiple gas reagents. A key feature of our work is the development of computer-aided imaging techniques to allow automated in-line monitoring of gas concentration and stoichiometry in real time. We anticipate that this Account will illustrate the convenience and benefits of membrane tube-in-tube reactor technology to improve and concomitantly broaden the scope of gas/liquid/solid reactions in organic synthesis. PMID:25611216

  18. Margination of leukocytes in blood flow through small tubes.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, H L; Spain, S

    1984-03-01

    Leukocyte margination in the vessels of the microcirculation has been attributed to a flow-dependent interaction with red cells. To determine the extent of this effect, experiments with human blood were done in 100- to 180-micron tubes to detect changes in cell distribution as a function of hematocrit and flow rate. Using a flow visualization technique, the leukocyte concentration distribution was determined in 45% ghost cell suspensions. Migration of cells toward the wall was observed at centerline velocities greater than 1 mm sec-1 and increased with increasing flow rate. The effect was probably due to a more rapid inward migration of ghosts than leukocytes because of fluid inertia and cell density differences. Experiments were therefore carried out in whole blood at hematocrits from 20 to 60%, measuring the number concentration of leukocytes and erythrocytes within the tube, nt, and comparing it to that in the infusing reservoir, no, (Fahraeus effect). At mean tube shear rates G less than 100 sec-1, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes showing net migration of cells away from the wall, although at nearly all hematocrits there was an enrichment of leukocytes relative to erythrocytes in the tubes. At G less than 50 sec-1, nt/no remained less than 1 for erythrocytes but increased to greater than 1 for leukocytes showing migration toward the wall, the increase being greatest at 20% hematocrit in the 100-micron tubes. The nature of the effect was revealed by cine films which showed that, as the flow rate decreased, erythrocytes formed rouleaux which migrated inward creating a core and displacing leukocytes to the periphery. In control experiments using washed blood cells in phosphate buffer-albumin, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes at all G and hematocrits, and leukocytes were now distributed. Cine films of washed blood confirmed that, in the absence of rouleaux, no significant inward migration of erythrocytes occurred. PMID

  19. Modeling expiratory flow from excised tracheal tube laws.

    PubMed

    Aljuri, N; Freitag, L; Venegas, J G

    1999-11-01

    Flow limitation during forced exhalation and gas trapping during high-frequency ventilation are affected by upstream viscous losses and by the relationship between transmural pressure (Ptm) and cross-sectional area (A(tr)) of the airways, i.e., tube law (TL). Our objective was to test the validity of a simple lumped-parameter model of expiratory flow limitation, including the measured TL, static pressure recovery, and upstream viscous losses. To accomplish this objective, we assessed the TLs of various excised animal tracheae in controlled conditions of quasi-static (no flow) and steady forced expiratory flow. A(tr) was measured from digitized images of inner tracheal walls delineated by transillumination at an axial location defining the minimal area during forced expiratory flow. Tracheal TLs followed closely the exponential form proposed by Shapiro (A. H. Shapiro. J. Biomech. Eng. 99: 126-147, 1977) for elastic tubes: Ptm = K(p) [(A(tr)/A(tr0))(-n) - 1], where A(tr0) is A(tr) at Ptm = 0 and K(p) is a parametric factor related to the stiffness of the tube wall. Using these TLs, we found that the simple model of expiratory flow limitation described well the experimental data. Independent of upstream resistance, all tracheae with an exponent n < 2 experienced flow limitation, whereas a trachea with n > 2 did not. Upstream viscous losses, as expected, reduced maximal expiratory flow. The TL measured under steady-flow conditions was stiffer than that measured under expiratory no-flow conditions, only if a significant static pressure recovery from the choke point to atmosphere was assumed in the measurement. PMID:10562643

  20. Leakage flow-induced vibrations for variations of a tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Variations in the design of a specific slip joint separating two cantilevered, telescoping tubes conveying water were studied to determine their effect upon the leakage flow-induced vibration self-excitation mechanism known to exist for the original slip joint geometry. The important parameters controlling the self-excitation mechanism were identified, which, along with previous results, allowed the determination of a comprehensive set of design rules to avoid unstable vibrations. This was possible even though a new self-excitation mechanism was found when the engagement of the two tubes was small. 9 refs.

  1. Evaluation of compressible-flow Preston tube calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been made of the accuracy of various Preston tube calibration equations to determine local skin friction in two-dimensional supersonic and low-hypersonic flows. Experimental Preston tube calibration data from the present and previous studies were used to evaluate the calibration equations. The maximum value of the calibration parameters of the present data is more than an order of magnitude larger than that previously obtained; thereby, the evaluation of the various calibration equations is facilitated. The Preston tube technique was found to be very inaccurate in the low range of the calibration parameters. Above this range, there was a steady increase in accuracy with increasing values of the calibration parameters. No critical maximum tube diameter was found even with tubes about twice as large as the theoretical maximum allowable diameter. Of the two forms of the calibration equation previously existing, the logarithmic laws gave more accurate results than the power laws over an extended range of the calibration parameters in supersonic adiabatic flow.

  2. Choked flow mechanism of HFC-134a flowing through short-tube orifices

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2011-02-15

    This paper is a continuation of the author's previous work. New experimental data on the occurrence of choked flow phenomenon and mass flow rate of HFC-134a inside short-tube orifices under choked flow condition are presented. Short-tube orifices diameters ranging from 0.406 mm to 0.686 mm with lengths ranging from 1 mm to 3 mm which can be applied to a miniature vapour-compression refrigeration system are examined. The experimental results indicated that the occurrence of choked flow phenomena inside short-tube orifices is different from that obtained from short-tube orifice diameters of greater than 1 mm, which are typically used in air-conditioner. The beginning of choked flow is dependent on the downstream pressure, degree of subcooling, and length-to-diameter ratio. Under choked flow condition, the mass flow rate is greatly varied with the short-tube orifice dimension, but it is slightly affected by the operating conditions. A correlation of mass flow rate through short-tube orifices is proposed in terms of the dimensionless parameters. The predicted results show good agreement with experimental data with a mean deviation of 4.69%. (author) transfer coefficient was also proposed. (author)

  3. Properties of a constricted-tube air-flow levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, J. E.; Stephens, W. K.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of a constricted-tube gas flow levitator first developed by Berge et al. (1981) have been investigated experimentally in order to predict its behavior in a gravity-free environment and at elevated temperatures. The levitator consists of a constricted (quartz) tube fed at one end by a source of heated air or gas. A spherical sample is positioned by the air stream on the downstream side of the constriction, where it can be melted and resolidified without touching the tube. It is shown experimentally that the kinematic viscosity is the important fluid parameter for operation in thermal equilibrium at high temperatures. If air is heated from room temperature to 1200 C, the kinematic viscosity increases by a factor of 14. To maintain a given value of the Reynolds number, the flow rate would have to be increased by the same factor for a specific geometry of tube and sample. Thus, to maintain stable equilibrium, the flow rate should be increased as the air or other gas is heated. The other stability problem discussed is associated with changes in the shape of a cylindrical sample as it melts.

  4. Axisymmetric Time-Dependent Computations of Expansion Tube Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this work is to add insight about the flow within expansion tubes by using computational fluid dynamics. This is accomplished by comparing the results of axisymmetric numerical simulations with finite-rate chemistry to data from the HYPULSE expansion tube facility which was previously the NASA Langley expansion tube. The numerical simulations begin at the opening of the primary diaphragm and compute the flow throughout the whole facility and, thus, are able to follow and assess the effect of many of the flow features created during operation of the facility. One particular issue that will be investigated is the effect of boundary layer formation in the acceleration tube on the test gas volume and test gas conditions. Both laminar and turbulent boundary layers will be implemented. The effect of momentary shock reflection off the secondary diaphragm will also be investigated. There is concern that such a reflection will stagnate the test gas and create high levels of dissociated molecules. This is particularly important in propulsion experiments where a freestream composition different from flight conditions may influence ignition and burning data. Several different models of diaphragm rupture will be implemented in order to help understand the importance of this issue.

  5. Limestone calcination during pulsating combustion

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.E. III ); Richards, G.A. )

    1992-01-01

    METC is currently conducting research on enhanced calcination during pulsating combustion as part of the Heat Engines program. It has been shown elsewhere that rapid, high temperature calcination will result in a calcined product with relatively large surface area, as desired for sulfur capture. It is proposed that such a process may occur during pulsating combustion where the oscillating pressure/velocity field around a particle increases the heat/mass transfer to and from the particle. To test this hypothesis, calcination tests in progress at METC use a novel form of pulse combustion called thermal'' pulse combustion, operating at 60000 BTUH, 100 Hz, and 5--15 psig peak-to- peak amplitude. Two configurations are being studied during the testing: one configuration is injection of sorbent into a refractory lined drop tube being heated by the pulse combustor, and the other configuration is injection of the sorbent into the pulse combustor through its centerbody and along the tailpipe at various positions. To understand the observed behavior, a characterization study of the pulse combustor is being conducted. Different flow rates, equivalence ratios, and injection positions are being tested.

  6. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  7. Steady flow through a curved tube with wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Sean D.

    2010-02-01

    The problem of fully developed steady flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid through a mildly curved tube with wavy walls of small amplitude-to-wavelength ratio around the tube circumference is solved via a perturbation solution. Dean's original solution for tubes with circular cross-section is used as the foundation to solve the current regular perturbation problem. In general, the wavy walls are found to mitigate the effect of a given term in Dean's expansion. For instance, the first order effect of the wavy walls is to reduce the strength of the secondary flow vortices and minimize the reduction of the volumetric flow rate caused by the curvature. A related effect is a general reduction in the average axial and circumferential wall shear stresses. The local wall shear stress, however, increases at the points of maximum incursion of the protrusions into the flow and decreases in the valleys between the protuberances. The general form of the solution for an arbitrary number of protuberances is presented to first order in the geometric perturbation and to fourth order in the Dean number.

  8. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  9. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. V - Radiative flows with variable ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Steady siphon flows in arched isolated magnetic flux tubes in the solar atmosphere are calculated here including radiative transfer between the flux tube and its surrounding and variable ionization of the flowing gas. It is shown that the behavior of a siphon flow is strongly determined by the degree of radiative coupling between the flux tube and its surroundings in the superadiabatic layer just below the solar surface. Critical siphon flows with adiabatic tube shocks in the downstream leg are calculated, illustrating the radiative relaxation of the temperature jump downstream of the shock. For flows in arched flux tubes reaching up to the temperature minimum, where the opacity is low, the gas inside the flux tube is much cooler than the surrounding atmosphere at the top of the arch. It is suggested that gas cooled by siphon flows contribute to the cool component of the solar atmosphere at the height of the temperature minimum implied by observations of the infrared CO bands at 4.6 and 2.3 microns.

  10. Visualising Plasma Flow in Current-carrying Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    Laboratory experiments at Caltech [1], designed to study the formation and dynamics of spheromaks, solar prominences [2] and astrophysical jets, have motivated a theory for plasma flow within current-carrying magnetic flux tubes [3]. The spheromak and jet plasmas studied are formed by the merging of several plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes. These flux tubes ingest gas puffed in by pulsed gas valves and have current driven along a bias field. The apparatus is now being modified to permit injection of two different gas species into the same flux tube from different ports, corresponding to opposite footpoints of the flux tube. The new gas delivery system allows for simultaneous injection of various combinations of gas species (H, D, He, N, Ne, Ar, Kr) through various gas nozzle locations (inner or outer gun electrodes, left hand side or right hand side series). During the discharge, the multi-species plasmas are to be imaged with high speed, single- and multiple-frame, intensified CCD cameras and will be differentiated by narrow band optical filters. Other diagnostics include a magnetic probe array, soft x-ray diodes and an optical multichannel analyser to monitor the magnetic field evolution, particle velocities and energies. [1] S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 334, 257-261 (2000). [2] J. F. Hansen and P. M. Bellan, Astrophys. J., 563, L183-L186, (2001). [3] P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas, 10, 1999-2008 (2003).

  11. Flow separation in a straight draft tube, particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquesne, P.; Maciel, Y.; Ciocan, G. D.; Deschênes, C.

    2014-03-01

    As part of the BulbT project, led by the Consortium on Hydraulic Machines and the LAMH (Hydraulic Machine Laboratory of Laval University), the efficiency and power break off in a bulb turbine has been investigated. Previous investigations correlated the break off to draft tube losses. Tuft visualizations confirmed the emergence of a flow separation zone at the wall of the diffuser. Opening the guide vanes tends to extend the recirculation zone. The flow separations were investigated with two-dimensional and two-component particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements designed based on the information collected from tuft visualizations. Investigations were done for a high opening blade angle with a N11 of 170 rpm, at best efficiency point and at two points with a higher Q11. The second operating point is inside the efficiency curve break off and the last operating point corresponds to a lower efficiency and a larger recirculation region in the draft tube. The PIV measurements were made near the wall with two cameras in order to capture two measurement planes simultaneously. The instantaneous velocity fields were acquired at eight different planes. Two planes located near the bottom wall were parallel to the generatrix of the conical part of the diffuser, while two other bottom planes diverged more from the draft tube axis than the cone generatrix. The last four planes were located on the draft tube side and diverged more from the draft tube axis than the cone generatrix. By combining the results from the various planes, the separation zone is characterized using pseudo-streamlines of the mean velocity fields, maps of the Reynolds stresses and maps of the reverse-flow parameter. The analysis provides an estimation of the separation zone size, shape and unsteady character, and their evolution with the guide vanes opening.

  12. Numerical simulations of the flow in the HYPULSE expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Sussman, Myles A.; Bakos, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric numerical simulations with finite-rate chemistry are presented for two operating conditions in the HYPULSE expansion tube. The operating gas for these two cases is nitrogen and the computations are compared to experimental data. One test condition is at a total enthalpy of 15.2 MJ/Kg and a relatively low static pressure of 2 kPa. This case is characterized by a laminar boundary layer and significant chemical nonequilibrium in the acceleration gas. The second test condition is at a total enthalpy of 10.2 MJ/Kg and a static pressure of 38 kPa and is characterized by a turbulent boundary layer. For both cases, the time-varying test gas pressure predicted by the simulations is in good agreement with experimental data. The computations are also found to be in good agreement with Mirels' correlations for shock tube flow. It is shown that the nonuniformity of the test gas observed in the HYPULSE expansion tube is strongly linked to the boundary layer thickness. The turbulent flow investigated has a larger boundary layer and greater test gas nonuniformity. In order to investigate possibilities of improving expansion tube flow quality by reducing the boundary layer thickness, parametric studies showing the effect of density and turbulent transition point on the test conditions are also presented. Although an increase in the expansion tube operating pressure level would reduce the boundary layer thickness, the simulations indicate that the reduction would be less than what is predicted by flat plate boundary layer correlations.

  13. Leakage flow-induced vibration of an unconstricted tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    The conditions are given for which the more flexible of two cantilevered, telescoping tubes conveying fluid can be self-excited by flow leaking from an unconstricted slip joint. Also, a physical explanation of the excitation mechanism is discussed, and a design rule to avoid the mechanism is presented. In addition, the results for the unconstricted slip joint are shown to be similar to those for slip joints having annulus constrictions at very short engagement lengths.

  14. Leakage flow-induced vibration of an unconstricted tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1986-12-01

    The conditions are given for which the more flexible of two cantilevered, telescoping tubes conveying fluid can be self-excited by flow leaking from an unconstricted slip joint. Also, a physical explanation of the excitation mechanism is discussed, and a design rule to avoid the mechanism is presented. In addition, the results for the unconstricted slip joint are shown to be similar to those for slip joints having annulus constrictions at very short engagement lengths.

  15. Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. B.; Yang, J.; Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

  16. Holographic flow visualization at the Langley Expansion Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, W. K.; Burner, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic system used for flow visualization at the Langley Expansion Tube is described. A ruby laser which can be singly or doubly pulsed during the short run time of less than 300 microns is used as the light source. With holography, sensitivity adjustments can be optimized after a run instead of before a run as with conventional flow visualization techniques. This results in an increased reliability of the flow visualization available for the study of real-gas effects on flow about models. Holographic techniques such as single-plate schlieren and shadowgraph, two plate interferometry, double pulse interferometry for perfect infinite-fringe interferograms, and double-pulse interferometry used to examine changes in the flow over a short time period are described and examples presented.

  17. Draft tube flow phenomena across the bulb turbine hill chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquesne, P.; Fraser, R.; Maciel, Y.; Aeschlimann, V.; Deschênes, C.

    2014-03-01

    In the framework of the BulbT project launched by the Consortium on Hydraulic Machines and the LAMH (Hydraulic Machine Laboratory of Laval University) in 2011, an intensive campaign to identify flow phenomena in the draft tube of a model bulb turbine has been done. A special focus was put on the draft tube component since it has a particular importance for recuperation in low head turbines. Particular operating points were chosen to analyse flow phenomena in this component. For each of these operating points, power, efficiency and pressure were measured following the IEC 60193 standard. Visualizations, unsteady wall pressure and efficiency measurements were performed in this component. The unsteady wall pressure was monitored at seven locations in the draft tube. The frequency content of each pressure signal was analyzed in order to characterize the flow phenomena across the efficiency hill chart. Visualizations were recorded with a high speed camera using tufts and cavitation bubbles as markers. The predominant detected phenomena were mapped and categorized in relation to the efficiency hill charts obtained for three runner blade openings. At partial load, the vortex rope was detected and characterized. An inflection in the partial load efficiency curves was found to be related to complex vortex rope instabilities. For overload conditions, the efficiency curves present a sharp drop after the best efficiency point, corresponding to an inflection on the power curves. This break off is more severe towards the highest blade openings. It is correlated to a flow separation at the wall of the draft tube. Also, due to the separation occurring in these conditions, a hysteresis effect was observed on the efficiency curves.

  18. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. III - The equilibrium path of the flux-tube arch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinos, Benjamin

    1990-01-01

    It is shown how to calculate the equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere when the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The equilbrium path of a static thin flux tube in an infinite stratified atmosphere generally takes the form of a symmetric arch of finite width, with the flux tube becoming vertical at either end of the arch. A siphon flow within the flux tube increases the curvature of the arched equilibrium path in order that the net magnetic tension force can balance the inertial force of the flow, which tries to straighten the flux tube. Thus, a siphon flow reduces the width of the arched equilibrium path, with faster flows producing narrower arches. The effect of the siphon flow on the equilibrium path is generally greater for flux tubes of weaker magnetic field strength. Examples of the equilibrium are shown for both isothemal and adiabatic siphon flows in thin flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere.

  19. Transitional flow in thin tubes for space station freedom radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loney, Patrick; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1995-01-01

    A two dimensional finite volume method is used to predict the film coefficients in the transitional flow region (laminar or turbulent) for the radiator panel tubes. The code used to perform this analysis is CAST (Computer Aided Simulation of Turbulent Flows). The information gathered from this code is then used to augment a Sinda85 model that predicts overall performance of the radiator. A final comparison is drawn between the results generated with a Sinda85 model using the Sinda85 provided transition region heat transfer correlations and the Sinda85 model using the CAST generated data.

  20. Regional platelet concentration in blood flow through capillary tubes.

    PubMed

    Corattiyl, V; Eckstein, E C

    1986-09-01

    Platelet concentration was measured in samples from the various components of a bloodflow circuit, including the reservoir, the tube (with i.d. between 50 and 210 micron), and the discharge. The tube sample was collected by halting the flow and then flushing out a length of tube; thus, this sample collected equally from all radial locations. As the discharge sample was well mixed, it reflected the velocity field in the tube. Each reservoir sample was a traditional bulk collection. To ensure that the results represented the physical effects of flow on regional platelet concentration and could be interpreted with simple mass balance relationships, strong anticoagulation (sodium citrate and heparin) and platelet inhibition (prostaglandin E1) were used. Results for all tube diameters and for reservoir hematocrits from 5.5 to 77% and wall shear rates from 80 to 8000 sec-1 show that tubular platelet concentration is greater than reservoir or discharge platelet concentrations, which are equal. For platelet-rich plasma the tubular platelet concentration is decreased compared to the reservoir or discharge values. Mass balances show that the elevated tubular platelet concentration is due to an excess of platelets in radial locations with below average speeds; coupled with the need for red cells, this suggests that excess platelets have a near-wall location. Nonparametric statistical tests show that wall shear rate is a significant variable at a 0.05 confidence level; inner diameter is not found to be a significant variable, probably because of the limited diameter range studied and the experimental errors involved in determining platelet concentrations. PMID:3762431

  1. Wind tunnel experiments on chaotic dynamics of a flexible tube row in a cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Muntean, G.; Moon, F.C.

    1994-12-31

    Flow visualization and dynamics measurements of flexible cylindrical tubes in a cross-flow are described. Five tubes mounted on flexible supports were subjected to cross flow in a low turbulence wind tunnel. Dynamic measurements of the tube motion are presented. The data suggests that a low dimensional attractor exists for tube flutter under impact constraints using fractal dimension calculations. There is also qualitative evidence for single tube flutter in-line with the flow. In another set of experiments, a flow visualization technique is used to examine the flow behind the vibrating cylinders. Four different configurations of the jet flow behind the cylinders are observed. Coupling of the jet dynamics and tube motion seems apparent from the video data. These experiments are being used to try and construct a low order nonlinear model for the tube-flow dynamics.

  2. A proposal to induce pulsating aurora by injecting ions from a rocket at the magnetic conjugate ionosphere to modify the flowing cyclotron maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernouss, S.; Mogilevsky, M.; Trakhtengerts, V.; Deehr, C.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.

    2005-08-01

    There is experimental evidence for the artificial induction of Flowing Cyclotron Maser (FCM) by reflection coefficient modification. It is the close correlation of auroral pulsations and auroral VLF emissions that is the experimental basis of the theory. We review experiments with ionospheric barium vapor releases, when auroral pulsations were apparently triggered. This effect has been observed during a Ba-release rocket campaign in Alaska. In this experiment, the stimulation of auroral pulsations generated by a Ba-release during special auroral activity was clearly observed. Similar results were obtained during a Russian rocket campaign to release barium vapor in the ionosphere over the North Atlantic. It seems that changing the reflection coefficient is a main reason for the generation of auroral pulsations in both Ba release experiments. Thus, the apparent dependence of the cyclotron instability increment on the reflection coefficient of the FCM foot point parameters give us the possibility of modifying FCM by creating ion clouds in the ionosphere. It is proposed as a part of the RESONANCE satellite project to create an artificial ion cloud at the magnetic conjugate point of the satellite from Poker Flat Research Range during the satellite passage over Alaska. The details of the proposed experiment and the necessary geophysical situation are still under discussion.

  3. Particle seeding flow system for horizontal shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Stephen; Garcia, Nicolas J.; Martinez, Adam A.; Orlicz, Gregory C.; Prestridge, Katherine P.

    2012-08-01

    The Extreme Fluids Team in P-23, Physics Division, studies fluid dynamics at high speeds using high resolution diagnostics. The unsteady forces on a particle driven by a shock wave are not well understood, and they are difficult to model. A horizontal shock tube (HST) is being modified to collect data about the behavior of particles accelerated by shocks. The HST has been used previously for studies of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), diagnostics that measure density and velocity. The purpose of our project is to design a flow system that will introduce particles into the HST. The requirements for this particle flow system (PFS) are that it be non-intrusive, be able to introduce either solid or liquid particles, have an exhaust capability, not interfere with existing diagnostics, and couple with the existing HST components. In addition, the particles must flow through the tube in a uniform way. We met these design criteria by first drawing the existing shock tube and diagnostics and doing an initial design of the ducts for the PFS. We then estimated the losses through the particle flow system from friction and researched possible fans that could be used to drive the particles. Finally, the most challenging component of the design was the coupling to the HST. If we used large inlets, the shock would lose strength as it passed by the inlet, so we designed a novel coupling inlet and outlet that minimize the losses to the shock wave. Our design was reviewed by the Extreme Fluids Team, and it is now being manufactured and built based upon our technical drawings.

  4. Stabilization of the turbulent flows in anisotropic viscoelastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilova, N.; Hamadiche, M.

    Flow around the aircrafts and marine vehicles is turbulized that increases the skin-friction drag and fuel consumption. Here stability of the fully developed turbulent flow of an incompressible fluid in the viscoelastic tube is considered. The eddy viscosity concept is considered to be adequate and the flow velocity, wall displacement and pressures in the fluid and solid wall are timeaveraged quantities. Continuity conditions for the components of the velocity and stress tensor at the fluid-wall interface and no displacement condition at the outer wall of the tube are considered. Solution of the coupled system has been found in the form of the normal mode and the obtained system has been studied using the numerical technique described in [1,2]. The temporal and spatial eigenvalues and the dependencies of the temporal and spatial amplification rates on the rheological parameters of the wall have been computed. It was shown stability of the modes can be increased by a proper choice of the wall parameters. Successful combinations of the wall thickness, elasticity and viscosity have been found for a large variety of materials. It was shown a substantial reduction in the viscous wall shear stress accompanied by a decrease in the turbulence production or Reynolds stress can be reached via using the viscoelastic coating on the rigid surface. The obtained results are in a good agreement with recent direct numerical computations [3].

  5. Sieve Tube Geometry in Relation to Phloem Flow

    PubMed Central

    Mullendore, Daniel L.; Windt, Carel W.; Van As, Henk; Knoblauch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Sieve elements are one of the least understood cell types in plants. Translocation velocities and volume flow to supply sinks with photoassimilates greatly depend on the geometry of the microfluidic sieve tube system and especially on the anatomy of sieve plates and sieve plate pores. Several models for phloem translocation have been developed, but appropriate data on the geometry of pores, plates, sieve elements, and flow parameters are lacking. We developed a method to clear cells from cytoplasmic constituents to image cell walls by scanning electron microscopy. This method allows high-resolution measurements of sieve element and sieve plate geometries. Sieve tube–specific conductivity and its reduction by callose deposition after injury was calculated for green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), bamboo (Phyllostachys nuda), squash (Cucurbita maxima), castor bean (Ricinus communis), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Phloem sap velocity measurements by magnetic resonance imaging velocimetry indicate that higher conductivity is not accompanied by a higher velocity. Studies on the temporal development of callose show that small sieve plate pores might be occluded by callose within minutes, but plants containing sieve tubes with large pores need additional mechanisms. PMID:20354199

  6. The ALE Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Simulatio of Air Flow Through Pulsating Human Vocal Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistauer, Miloslav; Kučera, Václav; Prokopová, Jaroslav; Horáček, Jaromír

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this work is the simulation of viscous compressible flows in human vocal folds during phonation. The computational domain is a bounded subset of IR2, whose geometry mimics the shape of the human larynx. During phonation, parts of the solid impermeable walls are moving in a prescribed manner, thus simulating the opening and closing of the vocal chords. As the governing equations we take the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in ALE form. Space semidiscretization is carried out by the discontinuous Galerkin method combined with a linearized semi-implicit approach. Numerical experiments are performed with the resulting scheme.

  7. Pulsating blood-flow monitoring in developing fish embryos and rat mesentery by laser Doppler microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkulova, K. F.; Lapteva, N. B.; Levenko, Borislav A.; Polyakova, Marina S.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Proskurin, Sergei G.; Romanovsky, Yuri A.; Sokolova, Irina A.

    1993-07-01

    Laser Doppler (LD) microscopy is a technique, providing high-resolution noninvasive measurements of microstructures dynamics. It can be used in different fields of biophysics and biomedicine. This technique yields quantitative information on diffusion coefficients, velocities, and velocity profiles of dynamic microstructures in vivo and in vitro. LD microscopy is an alternative method of velocity measurement to such methods as computer- aided microphotography and imaging, diffraction grating microscopy, FRAP, etc. In this paper we describe the results of our LDM measurements of one of the main hemodynamic parameters -- the blood-flow velocities in the microvessels of Salmo salar and Danio rerio fish embryos, as well as of the rat mesentery.

  8. Lava tube morphology on Etna and evidence for lava flow emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, Sonia; Pinkerton, Harry

    1999-06-01

    Lava tubes play a pivotal role in the formation of many lava flow fields. A detailed examination of several compound `a`a lava flow fields on Etna confirmed that a complex network of tubes forms at successively higher levels within the flow field, and that tubes generally advance by processes that include flow inflation and tube coalescence. Flow inflation is commonly followed by the formation of major, first-order ephemeral vents which, in turn, form an arterial tube network. Tube coalescence occurs when lava breaks through the roof or wall of an older lava tube; this can result in the unexpected appearance of vents several kilometers downstream. A close examination of underground features allowed us to distinguish between ephemeral vent formation and tube coalescence, both of which are responsible for abrupt changes in level or flow direction of lava within tubes on Etna. Ephemeral vent formation on the surface is frequently recorded underground by a marked increase in size of the tube immediately upstream of these vents. When the lining of an inflated tube has collapsed, `a`a clinker is commonly seen in the roof and walls of the tube, and this is used to infer that inflation has taken place in the distal part of an `a`a lava flow. Tube coalescence is recognised either from the compound shape of tube sections, or from breached levees, lava falls, inclined grooves or other structures on the walls and roof. Our observations confirm the importance of lava tubes in the evolution of extensive pahoehoe and `a`a flow fields on Etna.

  9. Separation phenomena for gaseous mixture flowing through a long tube into vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, Felix; Kalempa, Denize

    2005-12-01

    A gaseous mixture flow through a long tube into vacuum is considered assuming the pressure to be arbitrary at the tube entrance. Thus, the flow regime can vary from hydrodynamic at the entrance to free molecular at the tube exit. The distributions of density and concentration along the tube were obtained for the mixture helium-xenon at various values of the concentration and rarefaction at the tube entrance. It was shown that the variation of the concentration along the tube can be significant. The flow rates of both species determining the chemical composition in the down flow container were calculated. An analysis of these data shows that the chemical composition in the down flow container can be different from that in the up flow one, i.e., the separation phenomenon takes place. The results presented in the article can be used in practice to avoid the separation phenomenon or to intensify it if necessary.

  10. Investigation on the Oscillating Gas Flow Along AN Inertance Tube by Experimental and Cfd Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houlei; Zhao, Miguang; Yang, Luwei; Cai, Jinghui; Hong, Guotong; Liang, Jingtao

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the oscillating gas flow along an inertance tube used in pulse tube coolers, a CFD model is set up for FLUENT and an experimental measuring cell is designed and optimized by CFD results. Some characteristics of oscillating flow are demonstrated and discussed. Then, the flow status along an inertance tube is measured by the optimized measuring cell. The experimental results validate the simulating results.

  11. INVESTIGATION ON THE OSCILLATING GAS FLOW ALONG AN INERTANCE TUBE BY EXPERIMENTAL AND CFD METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Houlei; Zhao Miguang; Yang Luwei; Cai Jinghui; Hong Guotong; Liang Jingtao

    2010-04-09

    To investigate the oscillating gas flow along an inertance tube used in pulse tube coolers, a CFD model is set up for FLUENT and an experimental measuring cell is designed and optimized by CFD results. Some characteristics of oscillating flow are demonstrated and discussed. Then, the flow status along an inertance tube is measured by the optimized measuring cell. The experimental results validate the simulating results.

  12. Hypervelocity flows of argon produced in a free piston driven expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure, and flat plate heat transfer rates are used to confirm the presence of quasi-steady flow, and comparisons are made with predictions for the equilibrium flow of an ideal, ionizing, monatomic gas. The results of this work indicate that expansion tubes can be used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon at speeds in excess of Earth orbital velocity.

  13. Controlling methods of a newly developed extra aortic counter-pulsation device using shape memory alloy fibers.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed O; Yamada, A; Tsuboko, Y; Muira, H; Homma, D; Shiraishi, Y; Yambe, T

    2013-01-01

    Diastolic counter-pulsation has been used to provide circulatory augmentation for short term cardiac support. The success of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) therapy has generated interest in long term counter-pulsation strategies to treat heart failure patients. The authors have been developing a totally implantable extra aortic pulsation device for the circulatory support of heart failure patients, using 150 µm Ni-Ti anisotropic shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers. These fibers contract by Joule heating with an electric current supply. The special features of our design are as follow: non blood contacting, extra aortic pulsation function synchronizing with the native heart, a wrapping mechanical structure for the aorta in order to achieve its assistance as the aortomyoplsty and the extra aortic balloon pump. The device consisted of rubber silicone wall plates, serially connected for radial contraction. We examined the contractile function of the device, as well as it controlling methods; the phase delay parameter and the pulse width modulation, in a systemic mock circulatory system, with a pneumatically driven silicone left ventricle model, arterial rubber tubing, a peripheral resistance unit, and a venous reservoir. The device was secured around the aortic tubing with a counter-pulsation mode of 1:4 against the heartbeat. Pressure and flow waveforms were measured at the aortic outflow, as well as its driving condition of the contraction phase width and the phase delay. The device achieved its variable phase control for co-pulsation or counter-pulsation modes by changing the phase delay of the SMA fibers. Peak diastolic pressure significantly augmented, mean flow increased (p<0.05) according to the pulse width modulation. Therefore the newly developed extra aortic counter-pulsation device using SMA fibers, through it controlling methods indicated its promising alternative extra aortic approach for non-blood contacting cardiovascular circulatory support. PMID

  14. Automated library synthesis of cyclopropyl boronic esters employing diazomethane in a tube-in-tube flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Koolman, Hannes F; Kantor, Stanislaw; Bogdan, Andrew R; Wang, Ying; Pan, Jeffrey Y; Djuric, Stevan W

    2016-07-01

    The efficient synthesis of cyclopropyl boronic esters in library format using a diazomethane flow reactor has been achieved. A pivotal component of the system is a fully automated tube-in-tube reactor allowing for safe handling of hazardous diazomethane on repeated small scale and for the generation of larger quantities of product. The setup enables the repeated execution of Pd-catalyzed cyclopropanation reactions without compromising its operation over time. PMID:27314279

  15. Program and charts for determining shock tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program in FORTRAN 4 language was written to determine shock tube, expansion tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real-air test gas. This program permits, as input data, a number of possible combinations of flow quantities generally measured during a test. The versatility of the program is enhanced by the inclusion of such effects as a standing or totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm, thermochemical-equilibrium flow expansion and frozen flow expansion for the expansion tube and expansion tunnel, attenuation of the flow in traversing the acceleration section of the expansion tube, real air as the acceleration gas, and the effect of wall boundary layer on the acceleration section air flow. Charts which provide a rapid estimation of expansion tube performance prior to a test are included.

  16. Electropolishing the bore of metal capillary tubes: A technique for adjusting the critical flow.

    PubMed

    Stoffels, J J; Ells, D R

    1979-12-01

    A technique has been developed for electropolishing the bore of metal capillary tubes. Although developed specifically for stainless-steel tubes, the technique should be directly applicable to other metals. Tubes with inside diameter as small as 0.20 mm and 110 mm long have been successfully electropolished. The electropolishing technique can be used to increase the critical flow of a capillary tube in a controllable way. PMID:18699437

  17. Surface reaction and pore diffusion in flow-tube reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Leon F.; Moore, Steven B.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of gas diffusion with surface reaction in porous solids is discussed and applied specifically to heterogeneous rate measurements in flow-tube reactors. External diffusion to the outer surface of a reactive solid, internal diffusion within the pores, surface reaction, and laminar flow are considered. A procedure is developed to correct observed surface rate constants for the interaction of these processes. Measured surface areas and bulk densities are used to construct a semiempirical model for porous diffusion in vapor-formed HNO3-H2O ices which are used to simulate polar stratospheric cloud surfaces. The model is tested experimentally by varying the thickness of these ices from about 15 to 120 microns. The results are consistent with the model predictions and show that the HNO3-H2O ices used are highly porous, and the internal surface must be considered in calculating kinetic parameters from observed loss rates. The best fit of the data yields a tortuosity factor of 3.3 +/-1.1 for the ice substrates.

  18. Flow of superfluid helium in tubes with heated walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.; Mord, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The equations for superfluid helium flowing through a straight tube with heated walls are integrated. The model equations are based on those of Landau as modified for superfluid turbulence by Gorter and Mellink (1949). The model is implemented by the program SUPERFLOW which runs on a personal computer. The effect of the heating level on the mass flux, the energy flux, and the pressure and temperature profiles is investigated. The four types of profiles which occur without sidewall heating are also found with heated walls. The progression through these four types is shown to depend primarily on the dimensionless parameter, defined previously to characterize the unheated profiles, and a dimensionless ratio of heat fluxes. The pressure and temperature maxima which rise well above the boundary values increase significantly with sidewall heating. Approximate design equations for estimating the mass flux and the profiles are presented. The physical basis of the results is discussed. These results are useful in the design of optimal cooling loops and other superfluid flow systems.

  19. Study on the burnout with variations of flow twisting over tube length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pometko, R. S.; Gorban, L. M.

    Results of experimental investigation into regularities of heat transfer intensification in tubes with transition from untwisting flows to twisting ones and vice versa are given. Experiments were conducted on flowing freon-12 in a tube 10 mm in dia with two zones of independent heating at 1.06 MPa pressure, 500 to 3000 kg/m(2)s flow rate, 80 mm screw twisting pitch. Characteristic specific features of interaction processes of flow core with the screw and untwisting band. Main trends of changing critical heat flux in tubes with varied, in length, flow twisting are qualitatively explained.

  20. Study on flow instability and countermeasure in a draft tube with swirling flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, T.; Matsuzaka, R.; Miyagawa, K.; Yonezawa, K.; Tsujimoto, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The swirling flow in the draft tube of a Francis turbine can cause the flow instability and the cavitation surge and has a larger influence on hydraulic power operating system. In this paper, the cavitating flow with swirling flow in the diffuser was studied by the draft tube component experiment, the model Francis turbine experiment and the numerical simulation. In the component experiment, several types of fluctuations were observed, including the cavitation surge and the vortex rope behaviour by the swirling flow. While the cavitation surge and the vortex rope behaviour were suppressed by the aeration into the diffuser, the loss coefficient in the diffuser increased by the aeration. In the model turbine test the aeration decreased the efficiency of the model turbine by several percent. In the numerical simulation, the cavitating flow was studied using Scale-Adaptive Simulation (SAS) with particular emphasis on understanding the unsteady characteristics of the vortex rope structure. The generation and evolution of the vortex rope structures have been investigated throughout the diffuser using the iso-surface of vapor volume fraction. The pressure fluctuation in the diffuser by numerical simulation confirmed the cavitation surge observed in the experiment. Finally, this pressure fluctuation of the cavitation surge was examined and interpreted by CFD.

  1. Industrial application of ultrasound based in-line rheometry: From stationary to pulsating pipe flow of chocolate suspension in precrystallization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriev, Boris; Windhab, Erich; Braun, Peter; Birkhofer, Beat

    2004-10-01

    In-line visualization and on-line characterization of nontransparent fluids becomes an important subject for process development in food and nonfood industries. In our work, a noninvasive Doppler ultrasound-based technique is introduced. Such a technique is applied for investigation of nonstationary flow in the chocolate precrystallization process. Unstable flow conditions were induced by abrupt flow interruption and were followed up by strong flow pulsations in the piping system. While relying on available process information, such as absolute pressures and temperatures, no analyses of flow conditions or characterization of suspension properties could possibly be done. It is obvious that chocolate flow properties are sensitive to flow boundary conditions. Therefore, it becomes essential to perform reliable structure state monitoring and particularly in application to nonstationary flow processes. Such flow instabilities in chocolate processing can often lead to failed product quality with interruption of the mainstream production. As will be discussed, a combination of flow velocity profiles, on-line fit into flow profiles, and pressure difference measurement are sufficient for reliable analyses of fluid properties and flow boundary conditions as well as monitoring of the flow state. Analyses of the flow state and flow properties of chocolate suspension are based on on-line measurement of one-dimensional velocity profiles across the flow channel and their on-line characterization with the power-law model. Conclusions about flow boundary conditions were drawn from a calculated velocity standard mean deviation, the parameters of power-law fit into velocity profiles, and volumetric flow rate information.

  2. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-06-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

  3. ANGULAR FLOW INSENSITIVE PITOT TUBE SUITABLE FOR USE WITH STANDARD STACK TESTING EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five pitot tube designs were tested under various gas flow conditions for accuracy in measuring static and total pressure. The static- and impact-pressure measuring tubes least affected by angular flow were combined and then evaluated in the presence of standard particulate sampl...

  4. The effect of asymmetric heating on flow stability and heat transfer for flow in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, C.H.

    1987-11-01

    This study presents experimental results of combined free and forced convection heat transfer in a vertical tube with a circumferentially nonuniform constant wall heat flux. The effect of an asymmetric wall heat flux on flow stability and on the rate of heat transfer for water flowing downward in a vertical tube was investigated. Experimental results were used to develop two stability maps which identify various flow regimes, corresponding to different thermal and hydraulic conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were also determined. Experimental results in the present investigation were compared to those with uniform heating in horizontal and vertical tube flow situations discussed in the literature. 23 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Experimental study of the interaction of pulsations of the neutron flux and the coolant flow in a boiling-water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Leppik, P.A.

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents results of a study designed to confirm that the interaction of the neutron flux and the coolant flow plays an important role in the mechanism of high-frequency (HF) resonant instability of the VK-50 boiling water reactor. To do this and to check the working model, signals from probes measuring the flow rate of the coolant and the neutron flux were recorded simultaneously (with the help of a magnetograph) in experiments performed in 1981 on driving the VK-50 reactor into the HF reonant instability regimes. Estimates were then obtained for the statistical characteristics of the pulsations of the flow rate and of the neutron flux, including the cross-correlation functions and coherence functions. The basic results of these studies are reported here.

  6. Visualization and void fraction measurement of decompressed boiling flow in a capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, H.; Murakawa, H.; Takenaka, N.; Takiguchi, K.; Okamoto, M.; Tsuchiya, T.; Kitaide, Y.; Maruyama, N.

    2011-09-01

    A capillary tube is often used as a throttle for a refrigerating cycle. Subcooled refrigerant usually flows from a condenser into the capillary tube. Then, the refrigerant is decompressed along the capillary tube. When the static pressure falls below the saturation pressure for the liquid temperature, spontaneous boiling occurs. A vapor-liquid two-phase mixture is discharged from the tube. In designing a capillary tube, it is necessary to calculate the flow rate for given boundary conditions on pressure and temperature at the inlet and exit. Since total pressure loss is dominated by frictional and acceleration losses during two-phase flow, it is first necessary to specify the boiling inception point. However, there will be a delay in boiling inception during decompressed flow. This study aimed to clarify the boiling inception point and two-phase flow characteristics of refrigerant in a capillary tube. Refrigerant flows in a coiled copper capillary tube were visualized by neutron radiography. The one-dimensional distribution of volumetric average void fraction was measured from radiographs through image processing. From the void fraction distribution, the boiling inception point was determined. Moreover, a simplified CT method was successfully applied to a radiograph for cross-sectional measurements. The experimental results show the flow pattern transition from intermittent flow to annular flow that occurred at a void fraction of about 0.45.

  7. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    Dispersion in porous media flows has been the subject of much experimental, theoretical and numerical study. Here we consider a wavy-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media, where constrictions represent pore throats and expansions pore bodies. A theoretical model for effective (macroscopic) longitudinal dispersion in this system has been developed by volume averaging the microscale velocity field. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re = 449 for which unsteady flow was observed. Dispersion values were computed using both the volume averaging solution and a random walk particle tracking method, and results of the two methods were shown to be consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for the low-Re, Stokes flow regime. In the steady inertial regime we observe an power-law increase in effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re, consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). For the unsteady case (Re = 449), the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion.

  8. Shear thinning effects on blood flow in straight and curved tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Erica M.; Eaton, John K.

    2013-07-01

    Simulations were performed to determine the magnitude and types of errors one can expect when approximating blood in large arteries as a Newtonian fluid, particularly in the presence of secondary flows. This was accomplished by running steady simulations of blood flow in straight and curved tubes using both Newtonian and shear-thinning viscosity models. In the shear-thinning simulations, the viscosity was modeled as a shear rate-dependent function fit to experimental data. Simulations in straight tubes were modeled after physiologically relevant arterial flows, and flow parameters for the curved tube simulations were chosen to examine a variety of secondary flow strengths. The diameters ranged from 1 mm to 10 mm and the Reynolds numbers from 24 to 1500. Pressure and velocity data are reported for all simulations. In the straight tube simulations, the shear-thinning flows had flattened velocity profiles and higher pressure gradients compared to the Newtonian simulations. In the curved tube flows, the shear-thinning simulations tended to have blunted axial velocity profiles, decreased secondary flow strengths, and decreased axial vorticity compared to the Newtonian simulations. The cross-sectionally averaged pressure drops in the curved tubes were higher in the shear-thinning flows at low Reynolds number but lower at high Reynolds number. The maximum deviation in secondary flow magnitude averaged over the cross sectional area was 19% of the maximum secondary flow and the maximum deviation in axial vorticity was 25% of the maximum vorticity.

  9. Internal thermal coupling in direct-flow coaxial vacuum tube collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Glembin, J.; Rockendorf, G.; Scheuren, J.

    2010-07-15

    This investigation covers the impact of low flow rates on the efficiency of coaxial vacuum tube collectors. Measurements show an efficiency reduction of 10% if reducing the flow rate from 78 kg/m{sup 2} h to 31 kg/m{sup 2} h for a collector group with 60 parallel vacuum tubes with a coaxial flow conduit at one-sided connection. For a more profound understanding a model of the coaxial tube was developed which defines the main energy fluxes including the internal thermal coupling. The tube simulations show a non-linear temperature profile along the tube with the maximum temperature in the outer pipe. Due to heat transfer to the entering flow this maximum is not located at the fluid outlet. The non-linearity increases with decreasing flow rates. The experimentally determined flow distribution allows simulating the measured collector array. The simulation results confirm the efficiency decrease at low flow rates. The flow distribution has a further impact on efficiency reduction, but even at an ideal uniform flow, a considerable efficiency reduction at low flow rates is to be expected. As a consequence, low flow rates should be prevented for coaxial tube collectors, thus restricting the possible operation conditions. The effect of constructional modifications like diameter or material variations is presented. Finally the additional impact of a coaxial manifold design is discussed. (author)

  10. Flow of Supercritical Hydrogen in a Uniformly Heated Circular Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow of supercritical hydrogen through a uniformly heated circular tube has been investigated using numerical methods, for the range of 4 x 10(exp 5) less than Re less than 3 x 10(exp 6), 5 less than or equal to q(sub W) less than or equal to 10 MW/sq m, 30 less than or equal to T(sub in) less than or equal to 90 K, and 5 less than or equal to P(sub in) less than or equal to 15 MPa. The purpose is to validate a turbulence model and calculation method for the design of active cooling systems of hydrogen-fueled hypersonic aircraft, where the hydrogen fuel a used as coolant. The PHOENICS software package was used for the computations, which required special provision for evaluation of the thermophysical properties of the supercritical hydrogen, and a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Pressure drop and heat transfer data were compared with experiment and existing correlations and good agreement was demonstrated. For the pressure range considered here a "thermal spike" was observed and shown to be due to the secondary peak in specific heat, rather than the primary peak.

  11. Uncertainty Analysis of the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to identify the measurement uncertainty of NASA Langley s Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) over its operating range, and to identify the parameters that most significantly contribute to the acoustic impedance prediction. Two acoustic liners are used for this study. The first is a single-layer, perforate-over-honeycomb liner that is nonlinear with respect to sound pressure level. The second consists of a wire-mesh facesheet and a honeycomb core, and is linear with respect to sound pressure level. These liners allow for evaluation of the effects of measurement uncertainty on impedances educed with linear and nonlinear liners. In general, the measurement uncertainty is observed to be larger for the nonlinear liners, with the largest uncertainty occurring near anti-resonance. A sensitivity analysis of the aerodynamic parameters (Mach number, static temperature, and static pressure) used in the impedance eduction process is also conducted using a Monte-Carlo approach. This sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the impedance eduction process is virtually insensitive to each of these parameters.

  12. Analysis of single phase flow pressure drop and heat transfer in a horizontal rifled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Soo Poey; Wahab, Abas Abdul; Ariffin, Saparudin; Kiow, Lee Woon

    2012-06-01

    Analysis by using Fluent® has been carried out to investigate the pressure drop and heat transfer of single phase flow (Reynolds number ranging from 2.0×104 - 1.4×105) in a 2 meter long of rifled tube and smooth tube which are heated at the outer wall at constant temperature. The rifled tube or also known as spiral internally ribbed tube which is used in this investigation has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside equivalent diameter of 33.1 mm while the smooth tube has an outside diameter 45.0 mm and inside diameter 34.1 mm. The working fluid that is used in this investigation is water. In this analysis, realizable k-epsilon model has been chosen to solve the fully developed turbulence flow in both the tubes. The result from simulation shows that the pressure drop in rifled tube is about 1.69-2.0 times higher than in the smooth tube while the heat transfer coefficient of water in the rifle tube is 0.97-1.27 times than in the smooth tube. The high pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in rifled tube comparing to smooth tube is due to the helical rib in the rifled tube which not only acted as rough surface, but also causes swirling effect near the wall which enhance heat transfer. The present study has proved that although the rifled tube produces high pressure drop but it is good in heat transfer enhancement through the ratio of heat flux to the pumping power. Correlations have been proposed for the single phase friction factor and Nusselt number of the rifled tube.

  13. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O.; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-01

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  14. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-29

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  15. Synchronization Model for Pulsating Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Morikawa, M.

    2013-12-01

    A simple model is proposed, which describes the variety of stellar pulsations. In this model, a star is described as an integration of independent elements which interact with each other. This interaction, which may be gravitational or hydrodynamic, promotes the synchronization of elements to yield a coherent mean field pulsation provided some conditions are satisfied. In the case of opacity driven pulsations, the whole star is described as a coupling of many heat engines. In the case of stochastic oscillation, the whole star is described as a coupling of convection cells, interacting through their flow patterns. Convection cells are described by the Lorentz model. In both models, interactions of elements lead to various pulsations, from irregular to regular. The coupled Lorenz model also describes a light curve which shows a semi-regular variability and also shows a low-frequency enhancement proportional to 1/f in its power spectrum. This is in agreement with observations (Kiss et al. 2006). This new modeling method of ‘coupled elements’ may provide a powerful description for a variety of stellar pulsations.

  16. Avoiding leakage flow-induced vibration by a tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    Parameters and operating conditions (a stability map) were determined for which a specific slip-joint design did not cause self-excited lateral vibration of the two cantilevered, telescoping tubes forming the joint. The joint design featured a localized annular constriction. Flowrate, modal damping, tube engagement length, and eccentric positioning were among the parameters tested. Interestingly, all self-excited vibrations could be avoided by following a simple design rule: place constrictions only at the downstream end of the annular region between the tubes. Also, overall modal damping decreased with increased flowrate, at least initially, for upstream constrictions while the damping increased for downstream constrictions.

  17. Avoiding leakage flow-induced vibration by a tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1984-10-01

    Parameters and operating conditions (a stability map) were determined for which a specific slip-joint design did not cause self-excited lateral vibration of the two cantilevered, telescoping tubes forming the joint. The joint design featured a localized annular constriction. Flowrate, modal damping, tube engagement length, and eccentric positioning were among the parameters tested. Interestingly, all self-excited vibrations could be avoided by following a simple design rule: place constrictions only at the downstream end of the annular region between the tubes. Also, overall modal damping decreased with increased flowrate, at least initially, for upstream constrictions while the damping increased for downstream constrictions.

  18. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Verma, M K S; Kumaran, V

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012)]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude. PMID:25974574

  19. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M. K. S.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2011.55]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude.

  20. Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Tubes in an Advective Flow around a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Giri, Kinsuk

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields cannibalized by an accretion flow would very soon have a dominant toroidal component. Without changing the topology, we study the movements of these flux tubes inside a geometrically thick advective disk which undergo centrifugal pressure supported shocks. We also consider the effects of the flux tubes on the flow. We use a finite element method (Total Variation Diminishing) for this purpose and specifically focussed whether the flux tubes contribute to changes in outflow properties in terms of its collimation and outflow rates. It is seen that depending upon the cross sectional radius of the flux tubes (which control the drag force), these field lines may move towards the central object or oscillate vertically before eventually escaping out of the funnel wall (pressure zero surface). These interesting results obtained with and without flux tubes point to the role the flux tubes play in collimation of jets and outflows.

  1. Effect of Non-Uniform Inlet Temperature on Flow Stagnation in a Pumped Fluid Tube Radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reavis, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a non-uniform inlet temperature on the panel fluid tube flow stagnation point is examined using a spacecraft radiator panel model with 20 fluid tubes constructed in Thermal Desktop®. Fluid temperature variations due to panel edge effect and localized hot and cold spots in the flow path were simulated by varying the fluid inlet temperature on one or more tubes. Results show that a large fluid inlet temperature difference between tubes can decrease the fluid system stability and increase the possibility of fluid stagnation with the coldest fluid tube initiating stagnation. Conversely, a small fluid inlet temperature difference between tubes can, in some cases, increase the fluid system stability and decrease the possibility of fluid stagnation. A uniform fluid inlet temperature provides for a near optimization of the stagnation point as compared to fluid temperature gradients across the panel.

  2. High enthalpy, hypervelocity flows of air and argon in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J; Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1991-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon and air at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes, and it has been found that this can be avoided by attention to the interaction between the test gas accelerating expansion and the contact surface in the primary shock tube. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure and flat plate heat transfer are reported. An approximate analytical theory has been developed for predicting the velocities achieved in the unsteady expansion of the ionizing or dissociating test gas.

  3. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow in smooth and longitudinal grooved tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitschke, P.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent flow in tubes with and without longitudinal grooves is examined. The discovery of fine grooves forming a sort of streamline pattern on the body of sharks led to the expectation that the grooves on a surface reduce the momentum change, and thus the drag. To test this thesis, drag law, velocity profile and the profile of the velocity fluctuation were determined. Results show that for moderate Reynolds numbers the drag coefficient for grooved tubes is about 3 percent smaller than that of the smooth tubes. At higher Reynolds numbers, however, the drag coefficient for grooved tubes becomes larger than that for smooth tubes. No significant differences in the velocity profiles between grooved tubes and smooth tubes are found.

  4. Gas flow and thermal mixing in a helically wound tube bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Chiger, H.D.

    1980-07-01

    The thermal dissipation of a hot gas streak flowing across a segment of a helically wound tube bundle and the bypass flow streaming between the tubes and the bundle wall were investigated experimentally in the range of 8000 < Re < 50,000. Two different modes of creating a hot streak were employed. A planar hot streak was (1) injected at the entrance to the tube bundle and (2) generated by electrically heating several tubes past the bundle inlet. In the first case the mixing occurs in a region of lower turbulence since it occurs near the bundle inlet. In the second case the mixing occurs in a region of higher turbulence since the flow has already passed over several tube rows before the hot streak is generated.

  5. Dissipative heating effects and end corrections for viscous Newtonian flow in high shear capillary tube viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakobsen, J.; Winer, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of dissipation heating on the apparent viscosity measured in capillary tube viscometry is described in this paper. Conditions of low Reynolds number and high shear are assumed. End corrections to the tube flow are incorporated. The flow curves show decreasing apparent viscosity when the shear stress increases. The configuration of the flow curves plotted in logarithmic presentation are found to be identical for fluids with Newtonian behavior. Convection is the predominant mechanism in removal of the heat in short capillary tube. The estimated upper bound for the shear stress obtainable in short length capillary tubes appears to be of the order of magnitude of 10 MPa limited primarily by the pressure drop associated with the constant end correction from the flat ended inlet and exit of the tube.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of transitional flow in a staggered tube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, D.; Thornber, B.

    2016-02-01

    A series of Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of the flow through a staggered tube bundle has been performed over the range 1030 ≤ Rem ≤ 5572 to capture the flow transition that occurs at the matrix transition point of Rem ≈ 3000. The matrix transition is the point at which a second frequency becomes prominent in tube bundles. To date, this is the highest published Reynolds number at which a DNS has been performed on cross-flow over a tube bundle. This study describes the flow behaviour in terms of: the mean flow field, Strouhal numbers, vortex shedding, 3-D flow features, and turbulence properties. These results support the hypothesis that the transition in the vortex shedding behaviour at Rem ≈ 3000 is similar to that which occurs in single cylinder flow at the equivalent Reynolds number. The visualisations presented also demonstrate the nature of the shedding mechanisms before and after the matrix transition point.

  7. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we consider a sinusoidal-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re=449 for which unsteady flow was observed. The longitudinal dispersion observed for the flow was computed using a random walk particle tracking method, and this was compared to the longitudinal dispersion predicted from a volume-averaged macroscopic mass balance using the method of volume averaging; the results of the two methods were consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for both the low-Re, Stokes flow regime and for values of Re representing the steady inertial regime. In the steady inertial regime, a power-law increase in the effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re was found, and this is consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). One unsteady (but non-turbulent) flow case (Re=449) was also examined. For this case, the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion. The observed tailing was further explored through analysis of concentration skewness (third moment) and its assymptotic convergence to conventional advection-dispersion behavior (skewness = 0). The method of volume averaging was

  8. Lava Tube Flow Models at Alba Patera, Mars: Topographic Constraints on Eruption Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, S. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Bradley, B. A.; DeWet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Alba Patera has some of the longest lava tubes over some of the shallowest slopes on Mars. We use Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography to model eruption rates for several Alba Patera lava tubes and compare them within Alba and with flows from other martian volcanic regions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. TWO-PHASE FLOW OF TWO HFC REFRIGERANT MIXTURES THROUGH SHORT-TUBE ORIFICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental investigation to develop an acceptable flow model for short tube orifice expansion devices used in heat pumps. The refrigerants investigated were two hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) mixtures considered hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)-22 replacem...

  10. CFD simulation of the gas flow in a pulse tube cryocooler with two pulse tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, in order to instruct the next optimization work, a two-dimension Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to simulate temperature distribution and velocity distribution of oscillating fluid in the DPTC by individual phase-shifting. It is found that the axial temperature distribution of regenerator is generally uniform and the temperatures near the center at the same cross setion of two pulse tubes are obviously higher than their near wall temperatures. The wall temperature difference about 0-7 K exists between the two pulse tubes. The velocity distribution near the center of the regenerator is uniform and there is obvious injection stream coming at the center of the pulse tubes from the hot end. The formation reason of temperature distribution and velocity distribution is explained.

  11. Methods for numerical study of tube bundle vibrations in cross-flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longatte, E.; Bendjeddou, Z.; Souli, M.

    2003-11-01

    In many industrial applications, mechanical structures like heat exchanger tube bundles are subjected to complex flows causing possible vibrations and damage. Part of fluid forces are coupled with tube motion and the so-called fluid-elastic forces can affect the structure dynamic behaviour generating possible instabilities and leading to possible short term failures through high amplitude vibrations. Most classical fluid force identification methods rely on structure response experimental measurements associated with convenient data processes. Owing to recent improvements in Computational Fluid Dynamics, numerical simulation of flow-induced vibrations is now practicable for industrial purposes. The present paper is devoted to the numerical identification of fluid-elastic effects affecting tube bundle motion in presence of fluid at rest and one-phase cross-flows. What is the numerical process? When fluid-elastic effects are not significant and are restricted to added mass effects, there is no strong coupling between structure and fluid motions. The structure displacement is not supposed to affect flow patterns. Thus it is possible to solve flow and structure problems separately by using a fixed nonmoving mesh for the fluid dynamic computation. Power spectral density and time record of lift and drag forces acting on tube bundles can be computed numerically by using an unsteady fluid computation involving for example a large Eddy simulation. Fluid force spectra or time record can then be introduced as inlet conditions into the structure code providing the tube dynamic response generated by flow. Such a computation is not possible in presence of strong flow structure coupling. When fluid-elastic effects cannot be neglected, in presence of tube bundles subjected to cross-flows for example, a coupling between flow and structure computations is required. Appropriate numerical methods are investigated in the present work. The purpose is to be able to provide a numerical

  12. Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux tubes in almost helical plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L.C.

    2006-02-15

    Riemannian geometry of curves applied recently by Ricca [Fluid Dyn. Res 36, 319 (2005)] in the case of inflectional disequilibrium of twisted magnetic flux tubes is used here to compute the magnetic helicity force-free field case. Here the application of Lorentz force-free to the magnetic flux tube in tokamaks allows one to obtain an equation that generalizes the cylindrical tokamak equation by a term that contains the curvature of the magnetic flux tube. Another example of the use of the magnetic flux tube is done by taking the electron magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluid model (EMHD) of plasma physics that allows one to compute the velocity of the fluid in helical and almost helical flows in terms of the Frenet torsion of thin magnetic flux tubes. The cases of straight and curved twisted tubes are examined. Second-order effects on the Frenet torsion arise on the poloidal component of the magnetic field, while curvature effects appear in the toroidal component. The magnetic fields are computed in terms of the penetration depth used in superconductors. The ratio between poloidal and toroidal components of the magnetic field depends on the torsion and curvature of the magnetic flux tube. It is shown that the rotation of the almost helical plasma flow contributes to the twist of the magnetic flux tube through the total Frenet torsion along the tube.

  13. Experiments on vibration of heat-exchanger tube arrays in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.; Gibert, R.J.; Villard, B.

    1981-04-01

    A series of tests has been made at the Commissariat a L Energie Atomique, Saclay, France, in cooperation with General Atomic Company, San Diego, on flow-induced vibration of simulated heat exchanger tube bundles in a cross flow of air. The tests were of two types. In the first type, a tube instrumented with pressure transducers was inserted at various locations in a tube bundle. Measurements were made of pressure spectra, coherence, and lift force. It was found that the turbulence-induced pressures rise from a low value at the bundle entrance to a relatively high value within the bundle. In the second type of test, tube bundles were fabricated from flexible plastic tubes, cantilevered off a tube sheet, and the vibration induced by cross flow was observed. An investigation was made of the effect of tube-to-tube frequency difference and spacing on the onset of instability. It was found that while present theory often qualitatively predicts the correct trends, it may not be quantitatively accurate in many cases.

  14. Investigation of an innovative method for DC flow suppression of double-inlet pulse tube coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Luo, E. C.; Wu, Z. H.; Dai, W.; Zhu, S. L.

    2007-05-01

    The use of double-inlet mode in the pulse tube cooler opens up a possibility of DC flow circulating around the regenerator and the pulse tube. The DC flow sometimes deteriorates the performance of the cryocooler because such a steady flow adds an unwanted thermal load to the cold heat exchanger. It seems that this problem is still not well solved although a lot of effort has been made. Here we introduce a membrane-barrier method for DC flow suppression in double-inlet pulse tube coolers. An elastic membrane is installed between the pulse tube cooler inlet and the double-inlet valve to break the closed-loop flow path of DC flow. The membrane is acoustically transparent, but would block the DC flow completely. Thus the DC flow is thoroughly suppressed and the merit of double-inlet mode is remained. With this method, a temperature reduction of tens of Kelvin was obtained in our single-stage pulse tube cooler and the lowest temperature reached 29.8 K.

  15. Pressure drop and temperature rise in He II flow in round tubes, Venturi flowmeters and valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walstrom, P. L.; Maddocks, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Pressure drops in highly turbulent He II flow were measured in round tubes, valves, and Venturi flowmeters. Results are in good agreement with single-phase flow correlations for classical fluids. The temperature rise in flow in a round tube was measured, and found to agree well with predictions for isenthalpic expansion. Cavitation was observed in the venturis under conditions of low back pressure and high flow rate. Metastable superheating of the helium at the venturi throat was observed before the helium made a transition to saturation pressure.

  16. Evaluation of hydro-mechanical pulsation for rocket injector research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew B.

    The Propulsion Research Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville has designed and built a hydro-mechanical pulsator to simulate the pressure fluctuations created by high frequency combustion instability. The pressure response characteristics were evaluated in an atmospheric test rig using filtered de-ionized water as the working fluid. The outlet of the pulsator was connected to a swirl injector post to provide downstream flow resistance. Previous low pressure and mass flow experimental data revealed a complex relationship between the control parameters and the pulsation response. For each test, the average mass flow rates of the waste water, water lost through the seals, and injector mass flow rates are measured. A dynamic pressure transducer at the pulsator exit measures and records the pressure waveform. Pulsation magnitude, reliability, repeatability, pulsation effects, and detailed variable control are examined. The data shows the pulsator is capable of generating 30% pulsation at 1575 Hz input. The repeatability of the pulsator is questionable because the standard deviations exceeded 40% of the average. The detailed data obtained during this research provides is sufficient to develop a pulsator tuning procedure for future applications.

  17. Effects of Red Blood Cell Aggregation on the Apparent Viscosity of Blood Flow in Tubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1996-11-01

    In arterioles and venules (20-200μ diameter), the low shear rates enable red blood cells to form aggregate structures of varying sizes and morphology. The size and distribution of the aggregates affect the flow impedance within a microvascular network; this effect may be characterized by an "apparent viscosity". In this study, we measure the apparent viscosity of blood flow in 50μ glass tubes as a function of shear rate and red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit); for a fixed tube geometry and an imposed flow rate, the viscosity is determined by measuring the pressure drop across the tube. To correlate the apparent viscosity with the size and spatial distribution of the aggregates in the flow, video images of the flow are recorded and analyzed using power spectral techniques. Pig blood and sheep blood are used as the models for aggregating and non-aggregating blood, respectively. Supported by NSF PFF Award CTS-9253633

  18. Investigation of an anomalous flow condition of the Langley pilot model expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Free-stream flow velocity measurements were made in the Langley pilot model expansion tube during the test flow interval. During this interval, an anomalous dip in pitot pressure occurs for the expansion tube operating conditions employed. Within the test flow interval, the main conclusions reached from comparison of the measured flow velocity, pitot pressure, and tube wall pressure are: the variations which occur in velocity and wall pressure are small compared with the variations in pitot pressure; a corresponding dip in the derived flow density is associated with the dip in pitot pressure; and the value of the average density over the interval, which results from the expansion from the shocked intermediate chamber condition, is approximately one-half of the value that can result from only an isentropic process.

  19. Effects of tangential velocity distribution on flow stability in a draft tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Huashu; Niu, Lin; Cao, Shuliang

    2014-10-01

    Numerical simulations of the flow in the draft tube of a Francis turbine are carried out in order to elucidate the effects of tangential velocity on flow stability. Influence of the location of the maximum tangential velocity is explored considering the equality of the total energy at the inlet of the draft tube. It is found that the amplitude of the pressure fluctuation decreases when the location of the maximum of the tangential velocity moves from the centre to the wall on the cross section. Thus, the stability of the flow in the draft tube increases with the moving of the location of the maximum tangential velocity. However, the relative hydraulic loss increases and the recovery coefficient of the draft tube decreases slightly.

  20. Kinetic theory and turbulent discontinuities. [shock tube flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; I, L.; Li, Y.; Ramaian, R.; Santigo, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Shock tube discontinuities were used to test and extend a kinetic theory of turbulence. In shock wave and contact surface fluctuations, coherent phenomena were found which provide new support for the microscopic nonempirical approach to turbulent systems, especially those with boundary layer-like instabilities.

  1. An experimental study of fluidelastic instability and draf force on a tube in two-phase cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Youngcheol

    1994-12-31

    Two-phase cross flow over heat exchanger tubes creates vibrations which contribute greatly to the wear on the tubes. Fluidelastic instability is a major mechanism by which tubes can fail. In this work, the fluidelastic instability of a tube placed in an array subjected to two-phase cross flow has been studied. For the determination of fluidelastic instability, a triangular tube array was used. The tubes were made of acrylic and were 2.2 cm or 2.37 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length. Eighteen tubes and 4 half tubes formed 5 rows with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.4. All of the tubes except the test tube were rigidly supported at the text section wall. The test tube was flexibly supported with two cantilever beams. By installing cantilever beams horizontally and vertically, drag and lift direction tube vibration were studied. Parameters of tube mass, structural stiffness, natural frequency, and pitch to diameter ratio were varied. The drag coefficients on a rigidly held tube in an array subjected to two-phase cross flow were measured. The tube in an array was located at displaced positions as well as at the normal position in order to study the variation of fluid force as the tube vibrates. In the experiments, gap Reynolds numbers up to 1 x 10{sup 5} were obtained, while void fraction was varied from zero to 0.5. The drag coefficients in two-phase flow are much higher than those in single phase flow. The ratio of two-phase to single phase drag coefficient decreases as Reynolds number increases. The drag coefficient on a tube in an array increases as the tube is displaced in the direction of flow. The drag coefficient increases rapidly when the tube is displaced more than a certain critical distance.

  2. Condensation of refrigerants flowing inside smooth and corrugated tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, D.L.; Conklin, J.C.; Vineyard, E.A.

    1995-07-01

    Because heat exchanger thermal performance has a direct fluence on the overall cycle performance of vapor-compression refrigeration machinery,enhanced heat transfer surfaces are of interest to improve the efficiency of heat pumps and air conditioners. We investigated R-22 and a nonazeotropic refrigerant mixture (NARM) of 75% R-143a and 25% R-124 (by mass) to study their thermal performance in a condenser made of conventional smooth tubes and another condenser made of corrugated, or spirally indented, tubes. We investigated the condensing heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in an experimental test loop model of a domestic beat pump system employing a variable speed compressor. The refrigerant circulates inside the central tube and the water circulates in the annulus. At refrigerant mass fluxes of approximately 275--300 kg/m{sup 2}s, the measured irreversible pressure drop of the corrugated surface was 23% higher than that of the smooth surface for the R-22. At refrigerant mass fluxes of 350-370 kg/m{sup 2}s, the irreversible pressure drop of the corrugated surface was 36% higher than that of the smooth surface for the NARM. The average heat transfer coefficient for the corrugated surface for R-22 was roughly 40% higher than that for the smooth tube surface at refrigerant mass fluxes of 275--295 kg/m{sup 2}s. The average heat transfer coefficient for the corrugated surface for the NARM was typically 70% higher than that for the smooth tube surface at refrigerant mass fluxes of 340--385 kg/m{sup 2}s.

  3. Study of junction flows in louvered fin round tube heat exchangers using the dye injection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Huisseune, H.; Willockx, A.; De Paepe, M.; T'Joen, C.; De Jaeger, P.

    2010-11-15

    Detailed studies of junction flows in heat exchangers with an interrupted fin design are rare. However, understanding these flow structures is important for design and optimization purposes, because the thermal hydraulic performance of heat exchangers is strongly related to the flow behaviour. In this study flow visualization experiments were performed in six scaled-up models of a louvered fin round tube heat exchanger. The models have three tube rows in a staggered layout and differ only in their fin spacing and louver angle. A water tunnel was designed and built and the flow visualizations were carried out using dye injection. At low Reynolds numbers the streakline follows the tube contours, while at higher Reynolds numbers a horseshoe vortex is developed ahead of the tubes. The two resulting streamwise vortex legs are destroyed by the downstream louvers (i.e. downstream the turnaround louver), especially at higher Reynolds numbers, smaller fin pitches and larger louver angles. Increasing the fin spacing results in a larger and stronger horseshoe vortex. This illustrates that a reduction of the fin spacing results in a dissipation of vortical motion by mechanical blockage and skin friction. Furthermore it was observed that the vortex strength and number of vortices in the second tube row is larger than in the first tube row. This is due to the thicker boundary layer in the second tube row, and the flow deflection, which is typical for louvered fin heat exchangers. Visualizations at the tube-louver junction showed that in the transition part between the angled louver and the flat landing a vortex is present underneath the louver surface which propagates towards the angled louver. (author)

  4. Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1985-08-01

    Eccentricity of a specific slip-joint design separating two cantilevered, telescoping tubes did not create any self-excited lateral vibrations that had not been observed previously for a concentric slip joint. In fact, the eccentricity made instabilities less likely to occur, but only marginally. Most important, design rules previously established to avoid instabilities for the concentric slip joint remain valid for the eccentric slip joint. 6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Numerical study on coupled fluid flow and heat transfer process in parabolic trough solar collector tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.B.; He, Y.L.

    2010-10-15

    A unified two-dimensional numerical model was developed for the coupled heat transfer process in parabolic solar collector tube, which includes nature convection, forced convection, heat conduction and fluid-solid conjugate problem. The effects of Rayleigh number (Ra), tube diameter ratio and thermal conductivity of the tube wall on the heat transfer and fluid flow performance were numerically analyzed. The distributions of flow field, temperature field, local Nu and local temperature gradient were examined. The results show that when Ra is larger than 10{sup 5}, the effects of nature convection must be taken into account. With the increase of tube diameter ratio, the Nusselt number in inner tube (Nu{sub 1}) increases and the Nusselt number in annuli space (Nu{sub 2}) decreases. With the increase of tube wall thermal conductivity, Nu{sub 1} decreases and Nu{sub 2} increases. When thermal conductivity is larger than 200 W/(m K), it would have little effects on Nu and average temperatures. Due to the effect of the nature convection, along the circumferential direction (from top to down), the temperature in the cross-section decreases and the temperature gradient on inner tube surface increases at first. Then, the temperature and temperature gradients would present a converse variation at {theta} near {pi}. The local Nu on inner tube outer surface increases along circumferential direction until it reaches a maximum value then it decreases again. (author)

  6. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Critical Flow with the Phase Change in the Nozzle Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Two-phase critical flow in the nozzle tube is analyzed numerically by the best estimate code TRACE and the CFD code FLUENT, and the performance of the mass flow rate estimation by the numerical codes is discussed. For the best estimate analysis by the TRACE code, the critical flow option is turned on. The mixture model is used with the cavitation model and the evaporation-condensation model for the numerical simulation by the FLUENT code. Two test cases of the two-phase critical flow are analyzed. One case is the critical flashing flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle (Super Moby Dick experiment), and the other case is the break nozzle flow for a steam generator tube rupture experiment of pressurized water reactors at Large Scale Test Facility of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The calculation results of the mass flow rates by the numerical simulations show good agreements with the experimental results.

  7. Pulsating incinerator hearth

    SciTech Connect

    Basic, J.N. Sr.

    1984-10-09

    A pulsating hearth for an incinerator wherein the hearth is suspended on a fixed frame for movement in a limited short arc to urge random size particles burning in a pile on the hearth in a predetermined path intermittently across the surface of the heart. Movement is imparted to the hearth in periodic pulses preferably by inflating sets of air bags mounted on the frame, which stroke the hearth to move it a short distance from an initial position and jar it against the frame, thus impelling the burning particles a short distance by inertia and concurrently stoking the burning pile upon each stroke, and then returning the hearth to its initial position. The hearth may also have a plurality of nozzles connected to a source of air for delivering gently flowing air to the burning pile on the hearth.

  8. Development of a compact laminar flow heat exchanger with stainless steel micro-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, N.; Nagai, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Asakura, H.; Obata, M.

    2001-05-01

    The present paper describes the design concept and manufacturing of a new compact laminar flow heat exchanger with stainless-steel micro-tubes for helium refrigerators. In the temperature range of less than 20 K, aluminum plate fin type heat exchangers exhibit a remarkable fall of performance characteristics as a compact heat exchanger. We presented in a previous paper that some compact heat exchangers with good performance in the temperature range of less than 4 K are required for a subcooled He II refrigerator cycle to be worked with 3He turbo-compressors (F. Doty, et al., A new look at the closed brayton cycle, Proceedings, IECEC-90 Reno, NV, 1991, p. 116). For this requirement, we developed a micro-tube strip counter flow type heat exchanger, which consists of 12 elements with a total of 4800 stainless steel micro-tubes. Each element is formed with 400 tubes and a newly developed vacuum brazing method was applied for the bonding to the side plate. Each tube has an inner diameter of 0.5 mm, an outer diameter of 0.7 mm and is 310 mm long. We developed a cladding plate with two layers of gold brazing sheet sandwiched inside. In aerodynamic and thermal design of the element, the laminar flow conditions were adopted for the flows of inner and outer tubes to keep a high heat transfer rate and a low pressure loss.

  9. Exact solution of cilia induced flow of a Jeffrey fluid in an inclined tube.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, K; Shaheen, S; Mann, A B

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cilia induced flow of MHD Jeffrey fluid through an inclined tube. This study is carried out under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Exact solutions for the velocity profile, pressure rise, pressure gradient, volume flow rate and stream function are obtained. Effects of pertinent physical parameters on the computational results are presented graphically. PMID:27610298

  10. RECOMMENDED PRACTICE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENT IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS WITH VENTURI TUBES AND VENTURI NOZZLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Venturi tubes and venturi nozzles are suitable for in-plant flow measurement of raw influent, treated effluent, return activated sludge, certain digested sludges, and for air and gas flows. However, they are not generally recommended for measurement of raw primary sludge. For cla...

  11. Active Learning in Fluid Mechanics: Youtube Tube Flow and Puzzling Fluids Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrenya, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Active-learning exercises appropriate for a course in undergraduate fluid mechanics are presented. The first exercise involves an experiment in gravity-driven tube flow, with small groups of students partaking in a contest to predict the experimental flow rates using the mechanical energy balance. The second exercise takes the form of an…

  12. A file of red blood cells in tube flow: A three-dimensional numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-09-01

    The rheology of a file of red blood cells (RBCs) in a tube flow is investigated based on a three-dimensional (3D) computational model using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. The 3D model consists of a discrete RBC model to describe the RBC deformation, a Morse potential model to characterize the cell-cell interaction, and a DPD model to provide all the relevant information on the suspension flow. Three important features of the suspension flow are simulated and analyzed, (i) the effect of the tube hematocrit, (ii) the effect of the cell spacing, and (iii) the effect of the flow velocity. We first study the cell deformation and the rheology of suspension at different tube hematocrit. The results show that the cell deformation decreases with increasing tube hematocrit, and a good agreement between the simulation and available experiments is found for the discharge hematocrit and relative apparent viscosity of RBC suspension. We then analyze the effect of non-uniform cell spacing, where the cell-cell interaction goes into effect, showing that a non-uniform cell spacing has a slight effect on the cell deformation, and almost has no effect on the rheology of suspension. We finally study the effect of the flow velocity and show that a typical plug-flow velocity profile is observed. The results also show that the cell deformation increases with increasing flow velocity, as expected. The discharge hematocrit also increases, but the relative apparent viscosity decreases, with increasing flow velocity.

  13. Pressure drop and pumping power for fluid flow through round tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, D.

    1973-01-01

    Program, written for Hewlett-Packard 9100A electronic desk computer provides convenient and immediate solution to problem of calculating pressure drop and fluid pumping power for flow through round tubes. Program was designed specifically for steady-state analysis and assumes laminar flow.

  14. Modeling flow through inline tube bundles using an adaptive immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chunlei; Luo, Xiaoyu; Griffith, Boyce

    2007-11-01

    Fluid flow and its exerted forces on the tube bundle cylinders are important in designing mechanical/nuclear heat exchanger facilities. In this paper, we study the vortex structure of the flow around the tube bundle for different tube spacing. An adaptive, formally 2^nd order immersed boundary (IB) method is used to simulate the flow. One advantage of the IB method is its great flexibility and ease in positioning solid bodies in the fluid domain. Our IB approach uses a six-point regularized delta function and is a type of continuous forcing approach. Validation results obtained using the IB method for two-in-tandem cylinders compare well with those obtained using the finite volume or spectral element methods on unstructured grids. Subsequently, we simulated flow through six-row inline tube bundles with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 2.1, 3.2, and 4, respectively, on structured adaptively refined Cartesian grids. The IB method enables us to study the critical tube spacing when the flow regime switches from the vortex reattachment pattern to alternative individual vortex shedding.

  15. Effects of the geometry of the exit of a tube in an oscillating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverría, Elia; Málaga, Carlos; Czitrom, Steven; Olvera, Arturo; Stern, Catalina

    2014-11-01

    The problem of optimizing the performance of a wave-driven seawater pump - comprising a resonant duct and an exhaust duct joined by a variable volume air-compression chamber - it is explored by studying oscillating flows at the exit of a tube. It is known that the performance of this pump depends on the geometry of the mouth of its intake tube. An inspection of the integral expression of the Navier-Stokes equation along a central streamline of this flow shows that changing the shape of the tube's mouth modifies only the inertia and energy losses terms because both depend on the flow field at the chosen streamline. These changes must be such that the integral relation is preserved. Therefore, by measuring the inertial term (known as added mass), the term for losses can be measured indirectly. We developed a method to measure the added mass for oscillating flows in tubes with different mouth shapes and compared these measurements with those obtained for a model of the flow through the pump. Our results suggest a way to find a criterion for choosing the geometry of the mouth of the tubes in order to minimize dissipation and improve efficiency of the pump. This work was supported by funds provided by DGAPA-UNAM (Project PAPITT-IN1188608).

  16. Numerical simulation of pressure pulsations in Francis turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoli, M. V.; Schilling, R.

    2012-11-01

    In the last decades, hydraulic turbines have experienced the increase of their power density and the extension of their operating range, leading the fluid and mechanical dynamic effects to become significantly more pronounced. The understanding of the transient fluid flow and of the associated unsteady effects is essential for the reduction of the pressure pulsation level and improvement of the machine dynamic behaviour. In this study, the instationary fluid flow through the complete turbine was numerically calculated for an existing Francis machine with high specific speed. The hybrid turbulence models DES (detached eddy simulation) and SAS (scale adaptive simulation) allowed the accurate simulation of complex dynamic flow effects, such as the rotor-stator-interaction and the draft tube instabilities. Different operating conditions, as full load, part load, higher part load and deep part load, were successfully simulated and showed very tight agreement with the experimental results from the model tests. The transient pressure field history, obtained from the CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulation and stored for each time step, was used as input for the full instationary FEA (finite element analysis) of turbine components. The assessment of the machine dynamic motion also offered the possibility to contribute to the understanding of the pressure pulsation effects and to further increase the turbine stability. This research project was developed at the Institute of Fluid Mechanics of the TU München.

  17. Conveyor belt effect in the flow through a tube of a viscous fluid with spinning particles.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2012-04-28

    The extended Navier-Stokes equations describing the steady-state hydrodynamics of a viscous fluid with spinning particles are solved for flow through a circular cylindrical tube. The flow caused by an applied torque density in the azimuthal direction and linear in the radial distance from the axis is compared with the flow caused by a uniform applied force density directed along the axis of the tube. In both cases the flow velocity is of Poiseuille type plus a correction. In the first case the flow velocity is caused by the conveyor belt effect of spinning particles. The corrections to the Poiseuille flow pattern in the two cases differ only by a proportionality factor. The spin velocity profiles in the two cases are also proportional. PMID:22559504

  18. Flow of two immiscible fluids in a periodically constricted tube: Transitions to stratified, segmented, churn, spray, or segregated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraggedakis, D.; Kouris, Ch.; Dimakopoulos, Y.; Tsamopoulos, J.

    2015-08-01

    We study the flow of two immiscible, Newtonian fluids in a periodically constricted tube driven by a constant pressure gradient. Our volume-of-fluid algorithm is used to solve the governing equations. First, the code is validated by comparing its predictions to previously reported results for stratified and pulsing flow. Then, it is used to capture accurately all the significant topological changes that take place. Initially, the fluids have a core-annular arrangement, which is found to either remain the same or change to a different arrangement depending on the fluid properties, the pressure driving the flow, or the flow geometry. The flow-patterns that appear are the core-annular, segmented, churn, spray, and segregated flow. The predicted scalings near pinching of the core fluid concur with similarity predictions and earlier numerical results [I. Cohen et al., "Two fluid drop snap-off problem: Experiments and theory," Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1147-1150 (1999)]. Flow-pattern maps are constructed in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. Our result provides deeper insights into the mechanism of the pattern transitions and is in agreement with previous studies on core-annular flow [Ch. Kouris and J. Tsamopoulos, "Core-annular flow in a periodically constricted circular tube, I. Steady state, linear stability and energy analysis," J. Fluid Mech. 432, 31-68 (2001) and Ch. Kouris et al., "Comparison of spectral and finite element methods applied to the study of interfacial instabilities of the core-annular flow in an undulating tube," Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 39(1), 41-73 (2002)], segmented flow [E. Lac and J. D. Sherwood, "Motion of a drop along the centreline of a capillary in a pressure-driven flow," J. Fluid Mech. 640, 27-54 (2009)], and churn flow [R. Y. Bai et al., "Lubricated pipelining—Stability of core annular-flow. 5. Experiments and comparison with theory," J. Fluid Mech. 240, 97-132 (1992)].

  19. VFLOW2D - A Vorte-Based Code for Computing Flow Over Elastically Supported Tubes and Tube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    WOLFE,WALTER P.; STRICKLAND,JAMES H.; HOMICZ,GREGORY F.; GOSSLER,ALBERT A.

    2000-10-11

    A numerical flow model is developed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow past immersed, elastically supported tube arrays. This work is motivated by the objective of predicting forces and motion associated with both deep-water drilling and production risers in the oil industry. This work has other engineering applications including simulation of flow past tubular heat exchangers or submarine-towed sensor arrays and the flow about parachute ribbons. In the present work, a vortex method is used for solving the unsteady flow field. This method demonstrates inherent advantages over more conventional grid-based computational fluid dynamics. The vortex method is non-iterative, does not require artificial viscosity for stability, displays minimal numerical diffusion, can easily treat moving boundaries, and allows a greatly reduced computational domain since vorticity occupies only a small fraction of the fluid volume. A gridless approach is used in the flow sufficiently distant from surfaces. A Lagrangian remap scheme is used near surfaces to calculate diffusion and convection of vorticity. A fast multipole technique is utilized for efficient calculation of velocity from the vorticity field. The ability of the method to correctly predict lift and drag forces on simple stationary geometries over a broad range of Reynolds numbers is presented.

  20. Transition to Non-Newtonian behavior of blood suspensions flowing in small tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caswell, Bruce; Lei, Huan; Fedosov, Dmitry; Karniadakis, George

    2011-11-01

    Blood flow in tubes is widely considered to be Newtonian down to diameters of about 200 microns. We have employed a multi-scale, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) model of the red blood cell (RBC) to investigate suspensions driven through small tubes (diameters 20-150 microns). The cross-stream stress gradient induces radial migration of the suspended RBCs resulting in the formation of a hematocrit (H) peak at the centerline, and at the wall a cell-free layer (CFL) whose edge is the point of maximum RBC distortion. This suggests that hard-sphere suspension theories will not capture well blood flow in tubes. For the larger tubes the velocity profiles beyond the CFL are essentially parabolic even though the core H is non-uniform. As the diameter decreases: (1) the CFL moves inward and the central H peak grows, but for the smallest (20 microns) the H peak is shifted off-center, (2) the bulk velocity profiles become similar to those of a shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid. However, accurate modeling of the velocity field of the bulk flow in small tubes as a homogeneous non-Newtonian fluid can only be achieved if model parameters are taken to depend on tube diameter and pressure drop.

  1. Coalescence phenomena of droplets with suspended particles in a tube flow at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Ueno, Ichiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Kamiyama, Toshihiko; Wada, Takuma

    Coalescence phenomena of droplets in a tube flow at low Reynolds number are expected to be useful for fluid handling technique, controlling chemical reaction and so on. In the case of motion of droplets with suspended particles, Drug delivery system can be cited as one of applications. The coalescence phenomena are also underlying basis on analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media. Such phenomena can be seen, for instance, in enhanced oil recovery, breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers and so on. In this experiment, a glass tube of 2.0 mm in inner diameter, 7.0 mm in outer diameter, and 1500 mm in length is used as a test tube. Silicones oil is employed as the test fluid for the droplet. Mixture fluid of glycerol and pure water is used for a surrounding fluid in the tube flow. The density of the droplets is matched to that of the surrounding fluid by adding carbon tetrachloride. An over flow tank is used to keep the flow in the tube steady at a designated averaged velocity. The test tube is surrounded by a tank filled with a temperature-controlled water to keep the temperature of the system constant. Droplets are injected into the test tube using micro-syringes in front of inlet of the test tube. Behaviors of droplets and suspended particles are monitored by a digital video camera and high speed cameras placed on a sliding stage. The motion of the stage is electrically controlled to follow the travelling droplets in the test tube. Coalescence time of two droplets is measured. The coalescence time indicates a period between the instant when relative velocity of two droplets becomes zero after their apparent contact and the instant when the coalescence takes place. The coalescence time is compared with semi-theoretical formulas obtained using resistance exerted on liquid droplet in a tube creeping flow. When relative velocity of two droplets becomes zero after their apparent contact, clearance diameter of clearance area between droplets is

  2. Prediction of refrigerant void fraction in horizontal tubes using probabilistic flow regime maps

    SciTech Connect

    Jassim, E.W.; Newell, T.A.; Chato, J.C.

    2008-04-15

    A state of the art review of two-phase void fraction models in smooth horizontal tubes is provided and a probabilistic two-phase flow regime map void fraction model is developed for refrigerants under condensation, adiabatic, and evaporation conditions in smooth, horizontal tubes. Time fraction information from a generalized probabilistic two-phase flow map is used to provide a physically based weighting of void fraction models for different flow regimes. The present model and void fraction models in the literature are compared to data from multiple sources including R11, R12, R134a, R22, R410A refrigerants, 4.26-9.58 mm diameter tubes, mass fluxes from 70 to 900 kg/m{sup 2} s, and a full quality range. The present model has a mean absolute deviation of 3.5% when compared to the collected database. (author)

  3. Analytical comparison of condensing flows inside tubes under earth-gravity and space environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshock, E. G.; Sadeghipour, M. S.

    1981-09-01

    The heat transfer behavior of flow condensation inside horizontal tubes under conditions of zero gravity and earth gravity is modeled and analyzed. For earth conditions for wetting fluids, the annular flow region changes to a stratified flow pattern as a result of gravity drainage of the condensate from the upper portion of the tube. The stratified condensate layer is considered inactive in the heat transfer process; its magnitude is determined along the tube length from the analytical results of Rufer and Kezios (1966). Under zero-gravity conditions, where no such gravity drainage is observed, the flow is considered to be annular along the complete length of the tube. The analytical approach of Bae (1970) is used to evaluate the heat transfer rates under zero-gravity conditions. The results suggest a substantially poorer condensing performance under zero-gravity conditions. It is pointed out that these results can be simply explained in terms of the smaller condensate film thickness over the upper portion of the tube periphery at any axial location under earth-gravity conditions because of gravity drainage of the condensate.

  4. Flow properties in expansion tube with helium, argon, air, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Test flow velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec were generated in a 6-in. expansion tube using helium, argon, air, and CO2 test gases. Pitot pressure profiles across the flow at the test section are presented for the four test gases, and measured flow quantities are compared to computer predicted values. Comparison of predicted and measured flow quantities suggests the expansion to be near thermochemical equilibrium for all test gases and implies the existence of a totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm. Argon, air, and CO2 flows were observed to attenuate while traversing the acceleration section, whereas no attenuation was observed for helium.

  5. Free-stream temperature, density, and pressure measurements in an expansion tube flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, K. V.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine test-flow conditions in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. Measurements of temperature, density, wall pressure, pitot pressure, and shock and interface velocities were compared with theoretical calculations based on various models of the flow cycle. The vibrational temperature and integrated density of the molecular oxygen component of the flow were measured by use of vacuum ultraviolet absorption techniques. These measurements indicate both the presence and possible degree of nonequilibrium in the flow. Data are compared with several simplified models of the flow cycle, and data trends are discussed.

  6. Fluid-elastic Instability of Helical Tubes Subjected to Single-Phase External Flow and Two-Phase Internal Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Jong Chull Jo; Myung Jo Jhung; Woong Sik Kim; Hho Jung Kim

    2004-07-01

    This study investigates the fluid-elastic instability characteristics of steam generator helical type tubes in operating nuclear power plants. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted by a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and participation factor, modal analyses are performed for helical type tubes with various conditions. Investigated are the effects of the helix angle, the number of supports and the status of the inner fluid on the modal, and fluid-elastic instability characteristics of the tubes, which are expressed in terms of the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape, and stability ratio. (authors)

  7. Flow Rate Driven by Peristaltic Movement in Plasmodial Tube of Physarum Polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyasu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2008-07-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of protoplasmic streaming driven by peristaltic movement in an elastic tube of an amoeba-like organism. The Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, a true slime mold, is a large amoeboid organism that adopts a sheet-like form with a tubular network. The network extends throughout the Plasmodium and enables the transport and circulation of chemical signals and nutrients. This tubular flow is driven by periodically propagating waves of active contraction of the tube cortex, a process known as peristaltic movement. We derive the relationship between the phase velocity of the contraction wave and the flow rate, and we discuss the physiological implications of this relationship.

  8. Pressure maxima in the flow of superfluid [sup 4]He in tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.L.; Mord, A.J.; Snyder, H.A. University of Colorado, Campus Box 429, Boulder, Colorado 80309 )

    1994-01-01

    Calculations based on the standard equations for the flow He II in tubes predict large pressure and moderate temperature maxima when the tube is long and narrow. This effect has not, to our knowledge, been previously observed. Experimental data are presented that confirm the existence of the pressure maxima in capillaries of diameter 0.3 [mu]m. The measured data are in good agreement with predictions. The data validate the model equations for flow in capillaries and porous media using the bulk value of the Gorter-Mellink parameter. This effect may impact interpretations of experimental searches for size effects.

  9. A historical pyroclastic flow emplaced within a pre-existing Pleistocene lava tube: Silidong, Tianchi Volcano, Changbaishan, northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengquan; Wei, Haiquan; Liu, Yongshun; Tilling, Robert I.; Xu, Jiandong; Wu, Chengzhi; Nie, Baofeng

    2015-06-01

    Pyroclastic flow deposits recently found within a pre-existing lava tube at Tianchi Volcano represent, to the best of our knowledge, the only such reported occurrence worldwide. In this case, pyroclastic flow of Tianchi's "Millennium eruption" (~1 ka) traveled about 18 km from the summit eruptive source and poured successively into the ~560-m-long accessible segment of Silidong lava tube. Mapping of tube morphology, combined with detailed characterization of the features associated with the pumice flow deposits (e.g., adhering of pyroclastic materials on tube walls, fumarole pipes, rootless vents, and flow fronts of the deposit surface) has enabled plausible inferences regarding the original within-tube conditions and dynamic flow regime during emplacement. We propose a model of an aggrading pyroclastic flow which locally varies its sedimentation rate. The pyroclastic deposit is thicker in locations of reduced flow mobility, and the resultant variations in deposit thickness appear to control the distribution of fumarole pipes and rootless vents.

  10. Blood flow in small tubes: quantifying the transition to the non-continuum regime

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Huan; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-01-01

    In small vessels blood is usually treated as a Newtonian fluid down to diameters of ~200 μm. We investigate the flow of red blood cell (RBC) suspensions driven through small tubes (diameters 10–150 μm) in the range marking the transition from arterioles and venules to the largest capillary vessels. The results of the simulations combined with previous simulations of uniform shear flow and experimental data show that for diameters less than ~100 μm the suspension’s stress cannot be described as a continuum, even a heterogeneous one. We employ the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model, which has been successfully used to predict human blood bulk viscosity in homogeneous shear flow. In tube flow the cross-stream stress gradient induces an inhomogeneous distribution of RBCs featuring a centreline cell density peak, and a cell-free layer (CFL) next to the wall. For a neutrally buoyant suspension the imposed linear shear-stress distribution together with the differentiable velocity distribution allow the calculation of the local viscosity across the tube section. The viscosity across the section as a function of the strain rate is found to be essentially independent of tube size for the larger diameters and is determined by the local haematocrit (H) and shear rate. Other RBC properties such as asphericity, deformation, and cell-flow orientation exhibit similar dependence for the larger tube diameters. As the tube size decreases below ~100 μm in diameter, the viscosity in the central region departs from the large-tube similarity function of the shear rate, since H increases significantly towards the centreline. The dependence of shear stress on tube size, in addition to the expected local shear rate and local haematocrit, implies that blood flow in small tubes cannot be described as a heterogeneous continuum. Based on the analysis of the DPD simulations and on available experimental results, we propose a simple velocity-slip model that can be used in

  11. Excitation condition analysis of guided wave on PFA tubes for ultrasonic flow meter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Xiao, Xufeng; Cao, Li

    2016-12-01

    Impurity accumulation, which decreases the accuracy of flow measurement, is a critical problem when applying Z-shaped or U-shaped ultrasonic flow meters on straight PFA tubes. It can be expected that the guided wave can be used to implement flow measurement on straight PFA tubes. In this paper, the propagation of guided wave is explained by finite element simulations for the flow meter design. Conditions of guided wave generation, including the excitation frequency and the wedge structure, are studied in the simulations. The wedge is designed as a cone which is friendly to be manufactured and installed. The cone angle, the piezoelectric wafer's resonant frequency and the vibration directions are studied in the simulations. The simulations shows that the propagation of guided wave in thin PFA tubes is influenced by the piezoelectric wafers' resonant frequency and the vibration direction when the mode is on the 'water line'. Based on the results of the simulations, an experiment is conducted to verify the principles of excitation conditions, which performs flow measurement on a straight PFA tube well. PMID:27529137

  12. A Hands-on Exercise in Building Darcy Tubes to Improve Student Understanding of Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Teaching undergraduate students about sustainability typically includes discussions of water resources and the flow of groundwater in aquifers. Understanding the flow of groundwater is a fundamental step for students, but one that can easily get mired in equations (e.g., Darcy's Law). In an effort to transform Darcy's Law, which describes flow of fluid through a porous medium, from an abstract concept to a hands-on experiment, I had undergraduate students build working "Darcy tubes" and calculate hydraulic conductivity during a three-hour lab period. At the beginning of the lab period, I presented the students with the materials: three pairs of plastic soda bottles with straight sides, glass tubing, pantyhose (for screens), rubber hosing, sieved sand in three grain sizes (1-2 mm, 0.5-1.0 mm, and 0.25-0.5 mm), and various types of tape and adhesive. After we discussed the basic design of a Darcy tube (inlet and outlet, with two piezometers), the students went to work. Real-time problem-solving was an integral (and exciting) part of the exercise. Within two hours, they had built three Darcy tubes, each filled with a different sand size. The students determined the cross-sectional area of each tube (A) and the distance between the two piezometers (L). We then ran the experiments, using tinted water so that we could more easily tell when the sand in the tubes was saturated. We measured discharge (Q) through the tube and marked the height of the water in each piezometer to calculate difference in hydraulic head (Δh). With the data we had collected, the students were able to calculate hydraulic conductivity (K) using a simple form of Darcy's Law: Q = -KA (Δh/L). Despite the simplicity of the Darcy tubes, the students' K values were reasonable for the sediment types that we used. Student comments on the Darcy tube exercise were overwhelmingly positive. The Darcy tubes could be used in a subsequent lab period for exploration of more advanced concepts, such as

  13. Effect of draft tube size on the performance of a cross-flow turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, H.; Seshadri, V.; Kothari, D.P.

    1996-03-01

    The cross-flow turbine has attracted the attention of several investigators working in the area of microhydroelectric power generation. This type of turbine, although primarily an impulse type, is suitable for operation at low and medium heads. This article describes the effect of using different sizes of draft tubes on the performance of a 5-kW cross-flow turbine. An effort is made to arrive at an optimum size for the particular turbine tested, as the existing draft tube (203 mm) had an adverse effect on the performance at higher heads. The study involved variation of different performance parameters such as output, efficiency, runaway speed, and speed ratio for four different cases, viz., without the draft tube and with three different sizes of draft tubes (203, 250, and 300 mm) in the head range 3--9 m. The investigation shows that a properly sized draft tube enhances the efficiency of a cross-flow turbine over the entire space of its operation.

  14. The motion of magnetic flux tube at the dayside magnetopause under the influence of solar wind flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.X.; Hu, Y.D.; Li, F. ); Pu, Z.Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose that flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are formed by fluid vortices in the flow field. According to the view of vortex-induced reconnection a FTE tube is a magnetic fluid vortex tube (MF vortex tube). The motion of a FTE tube can be represented by that of a MF vortex in the formation region located in the dayside magnetopause region. This study deals with the internal and external influences governing the motion of MF vortex tubes. The equations of motion of a vortex tube are established and solved. It is found that a FTE tube moves frm low latitude to high latitude with a certain speed. However, the motional path is not a straight line but oscillates about the northward direction for the northern hemisphere. The motional velocity, amplitude and period of the oscillation depend on the flow field and magnetic field in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere as well as the size of the FTE tube.

  15. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate damping and fluidelastic instability in tube arrays subjected to two-phase cross-flow. The purpose of this research was to improve our understanding of these phenomena and how they are affected by void fraction and flow regime. The model tube bundle had 10 cantilevered tubes in a parallel-triangular configuration, with a pitch ratio of 1.49. The two-phase flow loop used in this research utilized Refrigerant 11 as the working fluid, which better models steam-water than air-water mixtures in terms of vapour-liquid mass ratio as well as permitting phase changes due to pressure fluctuations. The void fraction was measured using a gamma densitometer, introducing an improvement over the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in terms of void fraction, density and velocity predictions. Three different damping measurement methodologies were implemented and compared in order to obtain a more reliable damping estimate. The methods were the traditionally used half-power bandwidth, the logarithmic decrement and an exponential fitting to the tube decay response. The decay trace was obtained by "plucking" the monitored tube from outside the test section using a novel technique, in which a pair of electromagnets changed their polarity at the natural frequency of the tube to produce resonance. The experiments showed that the half-power bandwidth produces higher damping values than the other two methods. The primary difference between the methods is caused by tube frequency shifting, triggered by fluctuations in the added mass and coupling between the tubes, which depend on void fraction and flow regime. The exponential fitting proved to be the more consistent and reliable approach to estimating damping. In order to examine the relationship between the damping ratio and mass flux, the former was plotted as a function of void fraction and pitch mass flux in an iso-contour plot. The results showed that damping is not independent of mass

  16. Influence of the gas-flow Reynolds number on a plasma column in a glass tube

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Dong Jun; Uhm, Han S.; Cho, Guangsup

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric-plasma generation inside a glass tube is influenced by gas stream behavior as described by the Reynolds number (Rn). In experiments with He, Ne, and Ar, the plasma column length increases with an increase in the gas flow rate under laminar flow characterized by Rn < 2000. The length of the plasma column decreases as the flow rate increases in the transition region of 2000 < Rn < 4000. For a turbulent flow beyond Rn > 4000, the length of the plasma column is short in front of the electrode, eventually leading to a shutdown.

  17. Evidence for siphon flows with shocks in solar magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenhardt, D.; Solanki, S. K.; Montesinos, B.; Thomas, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    We synthesize profiles of the infrared line Fe I 15648.5 A (g = 3) for a recently developed theoretical model of siphon flows along photospheric magnetic loops. The synthesized line profiles are compared with the observations from which Rueedi et al. (1992) deduced the presence of such flows across the neutral line of an active region plage. This comparison supports the interpretation of Rueedi et al. (1992). It also suggests that the average footpoint separation of the observed loops carrying the siphon flow is 8-15 sec and that the siphon flow experiences a standing tube shock in the downstream leg near the top of the arch.

  18. Numerical study of shock tube flows with homogeneous and heterogeneous condensations in rarefaction wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Junji; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2010-08-01

    Shock tubes are devices in which the state of a gas is changed suddenly from one uniform state to another by the passage of shock and expansion waves. In the theory of ideal shock tube flow, it is customarily assumed that the unsteady expansion and shock waves generated by diaphragm rupture are a perfectly centered plane wave. However, such waves are generally not centered, or may not even by plane in practice. In the present research, the time-dependent behavior of homogeneous and heterogeneous condensation of moist air in the shock tube is investigated by using a computational fluid dynamics work. Further, the numerical and experimental studies were carried out in order to investigate the effect of the diaphragm rupture process on the flow characteristics of expansion and shock waves generated near the diaphragm.

  19. Hydrodynamic chromatography using flow of a highly concentrated dextran solution through a coiled tube.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Yoichi; Morisada, Shintaro; Ohto, Keisuke; Hidetaka, Kawakita

    2016-08-01

    Separation of colloidal particles in non-Newtonian fluid is important in food engineering. Using hydrodynamic chromatography, colloidal particles and starch granules originating from corn were individually injected into dextran solutions (Mw 2,000,000g/mol) flowing through a coiled tube for efficient size separation. Rheological properties of dextran solutions ranging from 50 to 250g/L were determined, revealing pseudoplastic fluid behavior. Velocity profiles for dextran solution flow in coiled tubes were obtained from rheological power law parameters. Suspensions of colloidal particles of diameters 1.0 and 20μm were individually injected into the dextran flows, demonstrating that dextran solutions at high concentration separated colloidal particles. Starch granules were separated by size using a dextran solution flow (250g/L). Thus, we expect to obtain efficient separation of colloidal particles in foods using highly concentrated dextran solutions. PMID:27112856

  20. Diagnostic suite for study of corpuscular flow dynamics in ion-optical system of neutron tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, A. N.; Markov, V. G.; Kanshin, I. A.; Prokhorovich, D. E.; Sadilkin, A. G.; Vizgalov, I. V.; Rashchikov, V. I.; Mamedov, N. V.; Kolodko, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we developed a combined approach based on the experimental investigation of corpuscular flow at the outlet of an ion source and the computer simulations of beam transport inside ion-optical system that enabled us to recover the parameters of neutron tube operation.

  1. Transfer of heat by self-induced flow in a rotating tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilham, S.; Ivey, P. C.; Owen, J. M.

    1994-04-01

    This paper provides a review of recently published research on self-induced flow and heat transfer in a rotating tube, together with additional theoretical work on heat transfer to the cylindrical wall of the tube. Earlier work has shown that self-induced flow can occur when a tube, with one end open and the other sealed, is rotated about its axis: Fluid flows along the axis toward the sealed end and returns in an annular layer on the cylindrical wall. The flow and heat transfer on the end wall are similar to those associated with the so-called free disk, and measured velocity distributions in the tube and Nusselt numbers for the end wall are in good agreement with those computed from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations. The Reynolds analogy is used in this paper to provide a correlation for the computed Nusselt numbers for the cylindrical wall, and design correlations are provided to enable the results to be applied to anti-icing systems for the nose bullets of aero-engines.

  2. Flow field for an underexpanded, supersonic nozzle exhausting into an expansive launch tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. R.; Bertin, J. J.; Batson, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Static pressure distributions along the launcher wall and pitot pressure measurements from the annular region between the rocket and the launcher were made as an underexpanded supersonic nozzle exhausted into an expansive launch tube. The flow remained supersonic along the entire length of the launcher for all nozzle locations studied.

  3. Uniformity of Ludwieg tube flows. [temperature variations behind nonsteady expansion wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Knoke, G. S.; Wai, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Pressure and speed of sound measurements are used to obtain averaged gas properties in a Ludwieg combustion tube in which the gas is burned just prior to use. Absorption of a laser beam in the exit flow is used to check the predicted temperature uniformity. The burning process and the heat transfer to the cold walls are modeled. Interferograms of Ludwieg tube boundary layers are utilized to develop a new semiempirical boundary layer expression referred to as the integral density thickness, which is then applied to a recently developed linearized analysis of the effects of this layer. Pressure-time histories are determined for a wide range of tube flow Mach number and aspect ratio. Viscous and nonviscous effects are considered. It is shown that although the influence of the integral density thickness on the flow can be large, a modified linear theory can be used to estimate the effects for arbitrary tube flow Mach number and values of the aspect ratio that include cases where the boundary layers have merged.

  4. Analysis of the flow rate characteristics of valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianhui; Wang, Shouyin; Liu, Weidong

    2014-05-01

    Microchannel heat sink with high heat transfer coefficients has been extensively investigated due to its wide application prospective in electronic cooling. However, this cooling system requires a separate pump to drive the fluid transfer, which is uneasy to minimize and reduces their reliability and applicability of the whole system. In order to avoid these problems, valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes is proposed. Fractal-like Y-shape branching tube used in microchannel heat sinks is exploited as no-moving-part valve of the valveless piezoelectric pump. In order to obtain flow characteristics of the pump, the relationship between tube structure and flow rate of the pump is studied. Specifically, the flow resistances of fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes and flow rate of the pump are analyzed by using fractal theory. Then, finite element software is employed to simulate the flow field of the tube, and the relationships between pressure drop and flow rate along merging and dividing flows are obtained. Finally, valveless piezoelectric pumps with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes with different fractal dimensions of diameter distribution are fabricated, and flow rate experiment is conducted. The experimental results show that the flow rate of the pump increases with the rise of fractal dimension of the tube diameter. When fractal dimension is 3, the maximum flow rate of the valveless pump is 29.16 mL/min under 100 V peak to peak (13 Hz) power supply, which reveals the relationship between flow rate and fractal dimensions of tube diameter distribution. This paper investigates the flow characteristics of valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes, which provides certain references for valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes in application on electronic chip cooling.

  5. Effects of axial flow on the stability of a helical vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Y.; Fukumoto, Y.

    2012-05-01

    The effects of axial flow on the stability of a helical vortex tube are studied by short-wavelength stability analysis. By axial flow we mean the flow along the helical tube inside the vortex core. At the leading order the base flow is set to the Rankine vortex with uniform velocity along the helical tube. The exponential growth rate is obtained analytically as the magnitude of the sum of three O(ɛ) and five O(ɛ2) complex numbers, where ɛ is the ratio of the core to curvature radius. At O(ɛ) the effect of axial flow can be regarded as the effect of the Coriolis force; as a result the instability is the superposition of the curvature instability and the Coriolis or precessional instability since the two instabilities occur under the same resonance condition. At O(ɛ2) combined effects of the axial flow and the torsion appear; the maximum growth rate increases when the period of particle motion increases.

  6. Ultrasonic observation of blood disturbance in a stenosed tube: effects of flow acceleration and turbulence downstream.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Choi, Min Joo; Shung, K Kirk

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is known to be highly dependent on hemodynamic parameters such as shear rate, flow turbulence and flow acceleration under pulsatile flow. The effects of all three hemodynamic parameters on RBC aggregation and echogenicity of porcine whole blood were investigated downstream of an eccentric stenosis in a mock flow loop using B-mode images with Doppler spectrograms of a commercial ultrasonic system. A hyperechoic parabolic profile appeared downstream during flow acceleration, yielding another piece of evidence suggesting that the enhancement of rouleaux formation may be caused by flow acceleration. It was also found that echogenicity increased locally at a distance of three tube diameters downstream from the stenosis. The local increase of echogenicity is thought to be mainly due to flow turbulence. The hypoechoic "black hole" was also seen at the center of the tube downstream of the stenosis where blood flow was disturbed, and this may be caused by the compound effect of flow turbulence and shear rate. PMID:17900794

  7. A correlation method for determining the number of sampling cycles required for pulsating flow analysis using a LDA.

    PubMed

    Jin, W; Clark, C

    1994-09-01

    A correlation method has been developed for pulsatile flow analysis, which allows justification of the minimum number of cycles for ensemble averaging, to satisfy ergodicity. It can also be used to identify cycles with excessive fluctuations caused by artefact or incidental errors and, hence, enhance the accuracy of analysis. PMID:7929467

  8. Investigation of DC flow effects on a 4K two-stage pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, A.; Xu, M. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) has been continuously developing 4K GM-type pulse tube cryocoolers for cooling superconducting magnets and pre-cooling ultra-low temperature refrigerators, such as dilution refrigerators, etc. In a double-inlet or a 4-valve GM-type pulse tube cryocooler, there is a gas circulation, called DC flow, generated by the pulse tube, the regenerator and the orifice. The performance of a pulse tube cryocooler is strongly dependent on the rate of such kind of flow. It is possible to improve the performance by optimizing the rate. In order to optimize the rate, a bypass line with a small valve is installed between the warm end of the pulse tube and the low pressure side of the compressor. The second stage cooling capacity at 4.2 K was improved by about 0.25 W after optimization of the rate by adjusting the opening of the valve. The details of the experiment results will be reported in this paper.

  9. Creeping motion of single droplet and mixing behaviour of coalescing droplets in a tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Ueno, Ichiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Toshihiko, Kamiyama; Wada, Takuma

    2012-07-01

    Creeping motion of single droplet and coalescence of droplets in a tube flow is expected to be useful for fluid handling technique, controlling chemical reaction and so on. In the case of motion of droplets with suspended particles, Drug delivery system can be cited as one of applications. The problem is also underlying basis on analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media. Such phenomena can be seen, for instance, in enhanced oil recovery, breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers and so on. Regarding examples of studies of creeping motion of droplets in a tube flow, Hetsroni G. et al[1] considered motion of droplets and bubbles with small d/D(d:undeformed diameter of droplet or bubble, D: tube diameter)theoretically. Higdon et al[2] obtained resistance functions for spherical particles, droplets and bubbles numerically. Olbricht at al.[3,4] investigated mainly coalescence time of coalescence phenomena of droplets. There exists little information, however, on mixing behaviour of coalescing droplets and effects of suspended particles in the droplets concerned on their coalescence. In this experiment, a glass tube of 2.0 mm in inner diameter, 7.0 mm in outer diameter, and 1500 mm in length is used as a test tube. Silicones oil of 50, 1000 and 6000cSt are employed as the test fluid for the droplet. Mixture fluid of glycerol and pure water is used for a surrounding fluid in the tube flow. The density of the droplets is matched to that of the surrounding fluid by adding carbon tetrachloride. An over flow tank is used to keep the flow in the tube steady at a designated averaged velocity V. The test tube is surrounded by a tank filled with a temperature-controlled water to keep the temperature of the system constant. Droplets are injected into the test tube using micro-syringes in front of inlet of the tube. Behaviours of droplets and suspended particles are monitored by a digital video camera and high speed cameras placed on a sliding stage. The motion

  10. Operation of the ISL transonic shock tube in a high subsonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, F.; Havermann, M.; Boller, F.; Mangold, P.; Takayama, K.

    The transonic flow regime plays an important role in experimental aerodynamic research. Modern civil aircraft fly up to a Mach number of M ≈ 0.9 in the high subsonic speed regime, as, for example, the Boeing or Airbus passenger aircraft. Nearly sonic Mach numbers are foreseen for innovative airplane concepts like the sonic cruiser by Boeing. In the military domain, guided missiles like the cruise missile also fly in the high subsonic flow regime. For testing purposes, transonic wind tunnels are mainly used for sub- as well as supersonic design applications. These wind tunnels have normally very large dimensions, which makes their operation quite expensive. If only small scale tests are required, a cheap working facility turns out to be more beneficial. For this purpose, a conventional shock tube operated at transonic flow conditions has been put into operation at the ISL. In the transonic flow regime, however, the reduction of the tube cross section by the model can produce severe distortions followed by a choking of the shock tube flow in the test section. Extensive experimental investigations were performed to determine the subsonic choking Mach number as a function of the model size. These results are compared with theoretical estimations and, more in detail, with CFD calculations.

  11. Pseudocompressible approximation and statistical turbulence modeling: application to shock tube flows.

    PubMed

    Soulard, Olivier; Griffond, Jérôme; Souffland, Denis

    2012-02-01

    In this work, a pseudocompressible approximation relevant for turbulent mixing flows encountered in shock tubes is derived. The asymptotic analysis used for this purpose puts forward the role played by four dimensionless numbers on the flow compressibility, namely, the turbulent, deformation, stratification, and buoyancy force Mach numbers. The existence of rapid distortion and diffusion-dissipation regimes is also accounted for in the analysis. Some consequences of the derived pseudocompressible approximation on statistical turbulence models are discussed. In particular, the evolutions of the density variance and flux are examined, as well as the turbulent transport of energy. The different aspects of this study are assessed by performing a direct numerical simulation of a shock tube flow configuration. PMID:22463317

  12. Properties of Longitudinal Flux Tube Waves. III; Wave Propagation in Solar and Stellar Wind Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the analytic properties of longitudinal tube waves taking into account ambient wind flows. This is an extension of the studies of Papers I and II, which assumed a mean flow speed of zero and also dealt with a simplified horizontal pressure balance. Applications include the study of longitudinal flux tube waves in stars with significant mass loss and heating and dynamics of plumes in the solar wind. Slow magnetosonic waves, also called longitudinal waves, have been observed in solar plumes and are likely an important source of heating. We show that the inclusion of ambient wind flows considerably alters the limiting shock strength as well as the energy damping length of waves.

  13. Properties of Longitudinal Flux Tube Waves. III; Wave Propagation in Solar and Stellar Wind FLows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the analytic properties of longitudinal tube waves taking into account ambient wind flows. This is an extension of the studies of Papers I and II, which assumed a mean flow speed of zero and also dealt with a simplified horizontal pressure balance. Applications include the study of longitudinal flux tube waves in stars with significant mass loss and the heating and dynamics of plumes in the solar wind. Slow magnetosonic waves, also called longitudinal waves, have been observed in solar plumes and are likely an important source of heating. We show that the inclusion of ambient wind flows considerably alters the limiting shock strength as well as the energy damping length of the waves.

  14. Pressure Drop Correlations of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Flow in Rolling Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xia-xin Cao; Chang-qi Yan; Pu-zhen Gao; Zhong-ning Sun

    2006-07-01

    A series of experimental studies of frictional pressure drop for single phase and two-phase bubble flow in smooth rolling tubes were carried out. The tube inside diameters were 15 mm, 25 mm and 34.5 mm respectively, the rolling angles of tubes could be set as 10 deg. and 20 deg., and the rolling periods could be set as 5 s, 10 s and 15 s. Combining with the analysis of single-phase water motion, it was found that the traditional correlations for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient were not suitable for the rolling condition. Based on the experimental data, a new correlation for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient under rolling condition was presented, and the calculations not only agreed well with the experimental data, but also could display the periodically dynamic characteristics of frictional coefficients. Applying the new correlation to homogeneous flow model, two-phase frictional pressure drop of bubble flow in rolling tubes could be calculated, the results showed that the relative error between calculation and experimental data was less than {+-} 25%. (authors)

  15. Application of program LAURA to perfect gas shock tube flows: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitterer, K. F.; Mitcheltree, R. A.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) was originally developed to solve steady-flow problems. The desire to validate the algorithm with shock tube experimental data motivated the development of a time-accurate version of the LAURA code. The current work presents a test of the Algorithm. Computational results are compared with the exact solution for a simple shock tube case. The parameters examined are Courant number, relaxation sweeps, grid spacing, and the inviscid relaxation factor. The results of the study indicate that LAURA is capable of producing accurate solutions when appropriate values are used for each parameter.

  16. Thermocapillary flow in glass tubes coated with photoresponsive layers.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Velázquez-Benítez, A M; Hernández-Cordero, J

    2014-05-13

    Thermocapillary flow has proven to be a good alternative to induce and control the motion of drops and bubbles in microchannels. Temperature gradients are usually established by implanting metallic heaters adjacent to the channel or by including a layer of photosensitive material capable of absorbing radiative energy. In this work we show that single drops can be pumped through capillaries coated with a photoresponsive composite (PDMS + carbon nanopowder) and irradiated with a light source via an optical fiber. Maximum droplet speeds achieved with this approach were found to be ~300 μm/s, and maximum displacements, around 120% of the droplet length. The heat generation capacity of the coatings was proven having either a complete coating over the capillary surface or a periodic array of pearls of the photoresponsive material along the capillary produced by the so-called Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The effect of the photoresponsive layer thickness and contact angle hysteresis of the solid-liquid interface were found to be important parameters in the photoinduced thermocapillary effect. Furthermore, a linear relationship between the optical intensity I(o) and droplet velocity v was found for a wide range of the former, allowing us to analyze the results and estimate response times for heat transfer using heat conduction theory. PMID:24731004

  17. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  18. Pulsating Heat pipe Only for Space (PHOS): results of the REXUS 18 sounding rocket campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Guidi, G. M.; Belfi, F.; Cicero, G.; Fioriti, D.; Di Prizio, D.; Piacquadio, S.; Becatti, G.; Orlandini, G.; Frigerio, A.; Fontanesi, S.; Nannipieri, P.; Rognini, M.; Morganti, N.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Fanucci, L.; Baronti, F.; Mameli, M.; Manzoni, M.; Marengo, M.

    2015-11-01

    Two Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes (CLPHPs) are tested on board REXUS 18 sounding rocket in order to obtain data over a relatively long microgravity period (approximately 90 s). The CLPHPs are partially filled with FC-72 and have, respectively, an inner tube diameter larger (3 mm) and slightly smaller (1.6 mm) than the critical diameter evaluated in static Earth gravity conditions. On ground, the small diameter CLPHP effectively works as a Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP): the characteristic slug and plug flow pattern forms inside the tube and the heat exchange is triggered by thermally driven self-sustained oscillations of the working fluid. On the other hand, the large diameter CLPHP works as a two- phase thermosyphon in vertical position and doesn't work in horizontal position: in this particular condition, the working fluid stratifies within the device as the surface tension force is no longer able to balance buoyancy. Then, the idea to test the CLPHPs in reduced gravity conditions: as the gravity reduces the buoyancy forces becomes less intense and it is possible to recreate the typical PHP flow pattern also for larger inner tube diameters. This allows to increase the heat transfer rate and, consequently, to decrease the overall thermal resistance. Even though it was not possible to experience low gravity conditions due to a failure in the yoyo de-spin system, the thermal response to the peculiar acceleration field (hyper-gravity) experienced on board are thoroughly described.

  19. PHOS Experiment: Thermal Response of a Large Diameter Pulsating Heat Pipe on Board REXUS-18 Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Guidi, G. M.; Belfi, F.; Cicero, G.; Fioriti, D.; Di Prizio, D.; Piacquadio, S.; Becatti, G.; Orlandini, G.; Frigerio, A.; Fontanesi, S.; Nannipieri, P.; Rognini, M.; Morganti, N.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Fanucci, L.; Baronti, F.; Mameli, M.; Marengo, M.; Manzoni, M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the results of two Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes (CLPHPs) tested on board REXUS-1 8 sounding rocket in order to get experimental data over a relatively broad reduced gravity period (about 90 s) are thoroughly discussed. The CLPHPs are partially filled with refrigerant FC-72 and have, respectively, an inner tube diameter larger (3 .0 mm) and slightly smaller (1 .6 mm) than a critical diameter defined on Earth gravity conditions. On ground, the small diameter CLPHP works as a real Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP): the typical capillary slug flow pattern forms inside the device and the heat exchange is triggered by self-sustained thermally driven oscillations of the working fluid. Conversely, the large diameter CLPHP behaves like a two-phase thermosyphon in vertical position while does not operate in horizontal position as the working fluid stratifies within the tube and surface tension is not able to balance buoyancy. Then, the idea to test the CLPHPs under reduced gravity conditions: as soon as gravity reduces, buoyancy becomes less intense and the typical capillary slug flow pattern can also forms within a tube with a larger diameter. Moreover, this allows to increase the heat transfer rate and, consequently, to decrease the overall thermal resistance. Even though it was not possible to experience the expected reduced gravity conditions due to a failure of the yo-yo de-spin system, the thermal response to the peculiar acceleration field (hyper-gravity) experienced on board are thoroughly described.

  20. Visualization of longitudinal vortex flow in an enhanced heat transfer tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-wei; Yan, Huan; Meng, Ji-an; Li, Zhi-xin

    2007-05-15

    Longitudinal vortex flow was visualized in an enlarged DDIR tube (discrete double inclined ribs on the inner surface). The experiments were conducted in a water tunnel using dye injection. Two kinds of ribs with different widths were investigated. The visualizations showed counter rotating longitudinal vortex pairs formed by the discrete double inclined ribs. The vortex intensity increased with increasing Reynolds numbers while the length over which the vortices were observed along the flow direction decreased with increasing Reynolds numbers for Re = 1000-2000. The vortex intensity and vortex flow length were also strongly affected by the rib dimensions. (author)

  1. Thermal Management Using Pulsating Jet Cooling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, S.; Dinneen, P.; Persoons, T.; Murray, D. B.

    2014-07-01

    The existing methods of heat removal from compact electronic devises are known to be deficient as the evolving technology demands more power density and accordingly better cooling techniques. Impinging jets can be used as a satisfactory method for thermal management of electronic devices with limited space and volume. Pulsating flows can produce an additional enhancement in heat transfer rate compared to steady flows. This article is part of a comprehensive experimental and numerical study performed on pulsating jet cooling technology. The experimental approach explores heat transfer performance of a pulsating air jet impinging onto a flat surface for nozzle-to-surface distances 1 <= H/D <= 6, Reynolds numbers 1,300 <= Re <= 2,800 pulsation frequency 2Hz <= f <= 65Hz, and Strouhal number 0.0012 <= Sr = fD/Um <= 0.084. The time-resolved velocity at the nozzle exit is measured to quantify the turbulence intensity profile. The numerical methodology is firstly validated using the experimental local Nusselt number distribution for the steady jet with the same geometry and boundary conditions. For a time-averaged Reynolds number of 6,000, the heat transfer enhancement using the pulsating jet for 9Hz <= f <= 55Hz and 0.017 <= Sr <= 0.102 and 1 <= H/D <= 6 are calculated. For the same range of Sr number, the numerical and experimental methods show consistent results.

  2. The effect of air injection on the parameters of swirling flow in a Turbine-99 draft tube model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripkin, S. G.; Kuibin, P. A.; Shtork, S. I.

    2015-07-01

    Results of experimental modeling of a swirling flow in a Turbine-99 draft tube prototype are presented. The influence of gas phase injection into the flow has been studied. Experiments were performed on a closed hydrodynamic setup containing a working stage with the Turbine-99 draft tube geometry. It is established that the gas content affects the flow structure. Gas injection leads to a change in the frequency of precession of the vortex core formed in the draft tube cone, which is not related to an increase in the gas-liquid mixture flow rate.

  3. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (a) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (b) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. In this 12th quarter of performance, program activities are concluded for Task 2 and continuing for Tasks 3, 4 and

  4. Perturbation of red blood cell flow in small tubes by white blood cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, T N; La Celle, P L; Cokelet, G R

    1989-02-01

    The flow of blood in the microcirculation is facilitated by the dynamic reduction in viscosity (Fahraeus-Lindquist effect) resulting from the axial flow of deforming erythrocytes (RBCs) and from the decrease in the ratio of cell to vessel diameter. RBC velocity exceeds that of average fluid velocity; however the slower moving white blood cells (WBC) perturb flow velocity and the ratio of cell to vessel diameter by obstructing red cell flow through formation of "trains" of red cells collecting behind the white cell. This effect of white cells was studied quantitatively in a model in vitro tubes less than 10 microns in diameter with the demonstration that flow resistance increases linearly with white cell numbers up to 1,000 WBC/mm3 at tube hematocrit of 17.7%. The increase in resistance exceeds the flow resistance of WBC and appears to relate directly to train formation. A mechanical model of train formation developed to predict WBC influence in flow resistance over the range of WBC studied reasonably fits observed WBC effects. PMID:2928089

  5. Transition of oscillatory flow in tubes - An empirical model for application to Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Ibrahim, M.; Kannapareddy, M.; Johnson, T.; Friedman, G.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to an empirical model for transition to turbulence in oscillatory flows in straight tubes. Designed after a correlation for transition of a boundary layer on a flat plate, the model yields the laminar flow momentum thickness Reynolds number that must be met before transition to turbulence will occur. The transition point is located by comparing this to the actual momentum thickness Reynolds number. A scheme is proposed for estimating the momentum thickness Reynolds number in terms of the position within the cycle, the maximum value of the diameter Reynolds within the cycle, Re(max), and the dimensionless frequency, Valensi number. Results from an experimental study of oscillatory flow in a tube are employed to develop the model. When the flow is determined to be turbulent, it is proposed that a fully-developed, steady flow friction coefficient be applied. When the flow is laminar, the assumption of fully developed flow cannot be made; thus, a method is suggested for estimating the friction factor.

  6. Flow of two immiscible fluids in a periodically constricted tube: Transitions to stratified, segmented, churn, spray or segregated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamopoulos, John; Fraggedakis, Dimitris; Dimakopoulos, Yiannis

    2015-11-01

    We study the flow of two immiscible, Newtonian fluids in a periodically constricted tube driven by a constant pressure gradient. Our Volume-of-Fluid algorithm is used to solve the governing equations. First the code is validated by comparing its predictions to previously reported results for stratified and pulsing flow. Then it is used to capture accurately all the significant topological changes that take place. Initially, the fluids have a core-annular arrangement, which is found to either remain the same or change to a different arrangement depending on the fluid properties, the pressure driving the flow or the flow geometry. The flow-patterns that appear are the core-annular, segmented, churn, spray and segregated flow. The predicted scalings near pinching of the core fluid concur with similarity predictions and earlier numerical results (Cohen et al. (1999)). Flow-pattern maps are constructed in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. Our results provide deeper insights in the mechanism of the pattern transitions and are in agreement with previous studies on core-annular flow (Kouris & Tsamopoulos (2001 & 2002)), segmented flow (Lac & Sherwood (2009)) and churn flow (Bai et al. (1992)). GSRT of Greece through the program ``Excellence'' (Grant No. 1918, entitled ``FilCoMicrA'').

  7. Numerical evaluation of laminar heat transfer enhancement in nanofluid flow in coiled square tubes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer can be enhanced by changing flow geometry and/or by enhancing thermal conductivity of the fluid. This study proposes simultaneous passive heat transfer enhancement by combining the geometry effect utilizing nanofluids inflow in coils. The two nanofluid suspensions examined in this study are: water-Al2O3 and water-CuO. The flow behavior and heat transfer performance of these nanofluid suspensions in various configurations of coiled square tubes, e.g., conical spiral, in-plane spiral, and helical spiral, are investigated and compared with those for water flowing in a straight tube. Laminar flow of a Newtonian nanofluid in coils made of square cross section tubes is simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD)approach, where the nanofluid properties are treated as functions of particle volumetric concentration and temperature. The results indicate that addition of small amounts of nanoparticles up to 1% improves significantly the heat transfer performance; however, further addition tends to deteriorate heat transfer performance. PMID:21711901

  8. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses. PMID:26583448

  9. Characteristics of Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberset, B. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Mann, I. R.; Samara, M.; Michell, R.

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated the spatiotemporal characteristics of pulsating auroral patches observed with an all-sky imager located at Poker Flat, Alaska. Pulsating aurora often covers the entire sky with intermixed large and small-scale patches that vary in intensity or disappear and reappear on different time scales and timings. The broad definition of pulsating aurora covers patches and bands from tens to several tens of km which have a quasi-periodic temporal variation from 1 s to tens of seconds. In this paper we examine >15 patches from different events. We analyze all-sky movies (557.7 nm, 3.31 Hz) with a simple, yet robust, technique that allows us to determine the scale size dependent variability of the >15 individual patches. A spatial 2D Fourier Transform is used to separate the aurora into different horizontal scale sizes, and by correlating each patch for all image separations and available scale sizes smaller than the patch itself, we reveal what scale sizes are pulsating and their variability. The patches are found to be persistent, meaning that we can follow them for typically 5 minutes. The period of the pulsations is often remarkably variable and it seems that only certain scale sizes pulsate (typically the size of the patch). The patches drift with the background ExB plasma drift indicating that the magnetospheric source mechanism drifts with the field lines.

  10. Experimental investigation of heat transfer performance coefficient in tube bundle of shell and tube heat exchanger in two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaś, Marcin; Zając, Daniel; Ulbrich, Roman

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the results of studies in two phase gasliquid flow around tube bundle in the model of shell tube heat exchanger. Experimental investigations of heat transfer coefficient on the tubes surface were performed with the aid of electrochemical technique. Chilton-Colburn analogy between heat and mass transfer was used. Twelve nickel cathodes were mounted on the outside surface of one of the tubes. Measurement of limiting currents in the cathodic reduction of ferricyanide ions on nickel electrodes in aqueous solution of equimolar quantities of K3Fe(CN)6 and K4Fe(CN)6 in the presence of NaOH basic solution were applied to determine the mass transfer coefficient. Controlled diffusion from ions at the electrode was observed and limiting current plateau was measured. Measurements were performed with data acquisition equipment controlled by software created for this experiment. Mass transfer coefficient was calculated on the basis of the limiting current measurements. Results of mass transfer experiments (mass transfer coefficient) were recalculated to heat transfer coefficient. During the experiments, simultaneously conducted was the the investigation of two-phase flow structures around tubes with the use of digital particle image velocimetry. Average velocity fields around tubes were created with the use of a number of flow images and compared with the results of heat transfer coefficient calculations.

  11. A numerical investigation of the 3-D flow in shell and tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Prithiviraj, M.; Andrews, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    A three-dimensional computer program for simulation of the flow and heat transfer inside Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers has been developed. The simulation of shell and tube heat exchangers is based on a distributed resistance method that uses a modified two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model along with non-equilibrium wall functions. Volume porosities and non-homogeneous surface permeabilities account for the obstructions due to the tubes and arbitrary arrangement of baffles. Sub-models are described for baffle-shell and baffle-tube leakage, shellside and tubeside heat transfer, with geometry generators for tubes, baffles, and nozzle inlets and outlets. The sub-models in HEATX use parameters that have not been altered from their published values. Computed heat transfer and pressure drop are compared with experimental data from the Delaware project (Bell, 1963). Numerically computed pressure drops are also compared for different baffle cuts, and different number of baffles with the experiments of Halle et al. (1984) which were performed in an industrial sized heat exchanger at Argonne National Labs. Discussion of the results is given with particular reference to global and local properties such as pressure drop, temperature variation, and heat transfer coefficients. Good agreement is obtained between the experiments and HEATX computations for the shellside pressure drop and outlet temperatures for the shellside and tubeside streams.

  12. Investigation of Flow Nonuniformities in a Large 50 K Pulse Tube Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Taylor, R. P.; Radebaugh, R.; Garaway, I.; Bradley, P. E.

    2010-04-01

    A single-stage pulse tube cryocooler was optimized to provide 50 W of net refrigeration power at 50 K when driven by a pressure oscillator that can produce up to 2.8 kW of acoustic power at 60 Hz. The cryocooler was designed with the ability to provide rapid cooldown. The rapid cooling technique makes use of a resonant phenomenon in the inertance tube and reservoir system to decrease the flow impedance and thereby increase the acoustic power and refrigeration power in the system when the cold end is near room temperature. Initial experimental data produced no-load temperatures of about 100 K and showed large azimuthal non-uniformities in temperature profiles around the center plane of both the regenerator and the pulse tube. Inadequate diffusion bonding in the initial aftercooler resulted in non-uniform temperatures in the aftercooler and regenerator warm end where temperatures were as high as 350 K. Jetting into the pulse tube through both the warm and cold heat exchangers also contributed to the poor performance. This paper discusses the performance after an improved aftercooler and pulse tube modifications are added. The steps taken to eliminate the non-uniformities and their effect on the cooler performance are discussed.

  13. Investigation of the flow field inside flat-plate collector tube using PIV technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sookdeo, Steven; Siddiqui, Kamran

    2010-06-15

    The thermofluid process inside the tube of flat-plate collectors is complex because the non-uniform heating of the tube results in the formation of stably and unstably stratified layers of fluid that interact with each other. The measurement and investigation of the flow behaviour inside the collector tube is very challenging. We report on a novel application of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique to remotely measure the velocity field inside the collector tube. The two-dimensional velocity fields were measured in the midplane of a collector tube for the Reynolds number range of 150-900 at unheated and four different heating conditions. We have presented and discussed in detail the technique implementation and the associated challenges. The results have shown that the collector heating significantly alters the structure and magnitude of the mean velocity field and influences the heat transfer to the fluid. It is observed that the collector heating causes a significant asymmetry in the mean velocity profiles over the given range of Reynolds numbers and heating conditions. (author)

  14. Steady and unsteady flow computation in an elbow dr aft tube with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, T. C.; Devals, C.; Zhang, Y.; Nennemann, B.; Guibault, F.

    2010-08-01

    Steady state computations are routinely used by design engineers to evaluate and compare losses in hydraulic components. In the case of the draft tube diffuser, however, experiments have shown that while a significant number of operating conditions can adequately be evaluated using steady state computations, a few operating conditions require unsteady simulations to accurately evaluate losses. This paper presents a study that assesses the predictive capacity of a combination of steady and unsteady RANS numerical computations to predict draft tube losses over the complete range of operation of a Francis turbine. For the prediction of the draft tube performance using k-epsilon turbulence model, a methodology has been proposed to average global performance indicators of steady flow computation such as the pressure recovery factor over an adequate number of periods to obtain correct results. The methodology will be validated using two distinct flow solvers, CFX and OpenFOAM, and through a systematic comparison with experimental results obtained on the FLINDT model draft tube.

  15. The Flow and Pressure Relationships in Different Tubes Commonly Used for Semi-occluded Vocal Tract Exercises.

    PubMed

    Amarante Andrade, Pedro; Wistbacka, Greta; Larsson, Hans; Södersten, Maria; Hammarberg, Britta; Simberg, Susanna; Švec, Jan G; Granqvist, Svante

    2016-01-01

    This experimental study investigated the back pressure (P(back)) versus flow (U) relationship for 10 different tubes commonly used for semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, that is, eight straws of different lengths and diameters, a resonance tube, and a silicone tube similar to a Lax Vox tube. All tubes were assessed with the free end in air. The resonance tube and silicone tube were further assessed with the free end under water at the depths from 1 to 7 cm in steps of 1 cm. The results showed that relative changes in the diameter of straws affect P(back) considerably more compared with the same amount of relative change in length. Additionally, once tubes are submerged into water, P(back) needs to overcome the pressure generated by the water depth before flow can start. Under this condition, only a small increase in P(back) was observed as the flow was increased. Therefore, the wider tubes submerged into water produced an almost constant P(back) determined by the water depth, whereas the thinner straws in air produced relatively large changes to P(back) as flow was changed. These differences may be taken advantage of when customizing exercises for different users and diagnoses and optimizing the therapy outcome. PMID:25873546

  16. Two-equation turbulence modeling of pulsatile flow in a stenosed tube.

    PubMed

    Ryval, J; Straatman, A G; Steinman, D A

    2004-10-01

    The study of pulsatile flow in stenosed vessels is of particular importance because of its significance in relation to blood flow in human pathophysiology. To date, however, there have been few comprehensive publications detailing systematic numerical simulations of turbulent pulsatile flow through stenotic tubes evaluated against comparable experiments. In this paper, two-equation turbulence modeling has been explored for sinusoidally pulsatile flow in 75% and 90% area reduction stenosed vessels, which undergoes a transition from laminar to turbulent flow as well as relaminarization. Wilcox's standard k-omega model and a transitional variant of the same model are employed for the numerical simulations. Steady flow through the stenosed tubes was considered first to establish the grid resolution and the correct inlet conditions on the basis of comprehensive comparisons of the detailed velocity and turbulence fields to experimental data. Inlet conditions based on Womersley flow were imposed at the inlet for all pulsatile cases and the results were compared to experimental data from the literature. In general, the transitional version of the k-omega model is shown to give a better overall representation of both steady and pulsatile flow. The standard model consistently over predicts turbulence at and downstream of the stenosis, which leads to premature recovery of the flow. While the transitional model often under-predicts the magnitude of the turbulence, the trends are well-described and the velocity field is superior to that predicted using the standard model. On the basis of this study, there appears to be some promise for simulating physiological pulsatile flows using a relatively simple two-equation turbulence model. PMID:15648815

  17. Convective heat transfer from a pulsating radial jet reattachment (PRJR) nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.Y.; James, D.L.; Parameswaran, S.

    1999-07-01

    Impinging jets of fluid have been used to cool, heat or dry surfaces in many industries including high temperature gas turbines, paper and glass manufacturing, textile drying, and electronic components. Jets may be broadly classified as either inline or radial. Inline jets typically have some type of circular or planer opening through which the fluid exits. The circular opening may be converging, well rounded, or of the same diameter as the nozzle or tube through which the fluid is delivered. Here, a numerical investigation for air exiting a Pulsating Radial Jet Reattachment (PRJR) nozzle was performed with various flow and geometric conditions. The transient ensemble averaged Navier-Stokes equation with the standard {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model and the standard transient turbulent energy equation were solved to predict the velocity, pressure, and temperature distributions as a function of the pulsation rate, nondimensionalized nozzle-to-plate spacing, amplitude ratio, exit angle and gap Reynolds number. Sinusoidal profile, square and triangular pulsation profiles were simulated to determine the effect on the convective heat transfer during pulsation of nozzle. Grid movement is coupled to the flow field in a manner by a grid convection. Calculated reattachment radii for various conditions correlated well with previously obtained experimental results. Calculated convective heat transfer coefficients and surface pressure profiles for various geometric and flow conditions were compared with experimental results. Convective heat transfer coefficient calculations matched the experimental values very well outside the reattachment regions and underpredicted the convective heat transfer data underneath the nozzle in the dead water region and on the reattachment radius.

  18. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal Kad

    2007-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program were to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined was iterative and intended to systematically (i) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, to be (ii) evaluated at 'in-service' loads at service temperatures and environments. Our report outlines the significant hoop creep enhancements possible via secondary cross-rolling and/or flow-forming operations. Each of the

  19. Magnetic field effect on flow parameters of blood along with magnetic particles in a cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shashi; Singh, Uaday; Katiyar, V. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of external uniform magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles is reported through a mathematical model using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approach. The fluid is acted upon by a varying pressure gradient and an external uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylindrical tube. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations were solved numerically and found that flow parameters are affected by the influence of magnetic field. Further, artificial blood (75% water+25% Glycerol) along with iron oxide magnetic particles were prepared and transported into a glass tube with help of a peristaltic pump. The velocity of artificial blood along with magnetic particles was experimentally measured at different magnetic fields ranging from 100 to 600 mT. The model results show that the velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under the influence of magnetic field, which is supported by our experimental results.

  20. Experimental perfect-gas study of expansion-tube flow characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Miller, C. G., III

    1978-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of expansion tube flow characteristics performed with helium test gas and acceleration gas are presented. The use of helium, eliminates complex real gas chemistry in the comparison of measured and predicted flow quantities. The driver gas was unheated helium at a nominal pressure of 33 MN sq m. The quiescent test gas pressure and quiescent acceleration gas pressure were varied from 0.7 to 50 kN/sq m and from 2.5 to 53 N/sq m, respectively. The effects of tube-wall boundary layer growth and finite secondary diaphragm opening time were examined through the variation of the quiescent gas pressures and secondary diaphragm thickness. Optimum operating conditions for helium test gas were also defined.

  1. Loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture and steam line break thermohydraulic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mendler, O J; Takeuchi, K; Young, M Y

    1986-10-01

    The Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, was reinstrumented and modified for performing a series of tests simulating steam generator accident transients. The transients simulated were: loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break events. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the tests performed, and (3) the analyses of the test results.

  2. Unsteady fluid flow and heat transfer over a bank of flat tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benarji, N.; Balaji, C.; Venkateshan, S. P.

    2008-02-01

    Transient numerical simulations of fluid flow and heat transfer over a bank of flat tubes have been carried for both in-line and staggered configurations for the following boundary conditions: (a) isothermal and (b) isoflux. The effect of Reynolds number, Prandtl number, length ratio, and the height ratio, on the Nusselt number, and the dimensionless pressure drop are elucidated. Correlations are proposed for both pressure drop and Nusselt number and optimum configurations have been determined.

  3. A quiet-flow Ludwieg tube for experimental study of high speed boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1992-01-01

    A new low Reynolds number quiet-flow Ludwieg tube facility, now under construction, is briefly described, and its advantages outlined. The facility is characterized by good optical access and may be particularly useful for the development of optical instrumentation for the generation and measurement of instability waves. Initial research plans also include work on hot-wire instrumentation, wave generation techniques, roughness and receptivity effects, and suction distribution effects.

  4. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-06-27

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  5. On the use of the periodicity condition in cross-flow tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beladjine, Boumedienne; Aounallah, Mohammed; Belkadi, Mustapha; Aadjlout, Lahouari; Imine, Omar

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements and numerical predictions of turbulent cross-flow through an in-line 7×7 bundle configuration with a constant transverse and longitudinal pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.44. The experiments are conducted to measure the pressure around tubes, using DPS differential pressure scanner with air flow, in square channel at a Reynolds number of 35000 based on the gap velocity and the tube diameter. The commercial ANSYS FLUENT is used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The primary aim of the present study is to search for a turbulent model that could serve as an engineering design tool at a relatively low computational cost. The performances of the Spalart-Allmaras, the RNG k-ɛ, the Shear Stress Transport k-ω and the second moment closure RSM models are evaluated by comparing their simulation results against experimental data. The second objective is to verify the validity of the periodicity assumption taken account in the most previous numerical works by considering the filled bundle geometry. The CFD results show that the Spalart-Allmaras model on the fine mesh are comparable to the experiments while the periodicity statement did not produce consistently the flow behavior in the 7×7 tube bundle configuration.

  6. Effect of attack and cone angels on air flow characteristics for staggered wing shaped tubes bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed E.; Ibrahiem, Emad Z.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2014-12-01

    An experimental and numerical study has been conducted to clarify fluid flow characteristics and pressure drop distributions of a cross-flow heat exchanger employing staggered wing-shaped tubes at different angels of attack. The water-side Rew and the air-side Rea were at 5 × 102 and at from 1.8 × 103 to 9.7 × 103, respectively. Three cases of the tubes arrangements with various angles of attack, row angles of attack and 90° cone angles were employed at the considered Rea range. Correlation of pressure drop coefficient Pdc in terms of Rea, design parameters for the studied cases were presented. The flow pattern around the staggered wing-shaped tubes bundle were predicted using the commercial CFD FLUENT 6.3.26 software package. Results indicated that the values of Pdc increased with the angle of attack from 0° to 45°, while the opposite was true for angles of attack from 135° to 180°. The values of Pdc for the arrangements of (θ1,2,3 = 45°), (θ1 = 45°, θ2 = 0°, θ3 = 45°), and (θ1,2,3 = 0°) were lower than those for the arrangement of (ϕ1 = ϕ2 = ϕ3 = 90°) by about 33, 53, and 91 %, respectively. Comparisons between the experimental and numerical results of the present study and those obtained by similar previous studies showed good agreements.

  7. Two-phase flow behavior in a spiral tube under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsusaburo; Muragishi, Osamu

    1990-10-01

    An experimental visualization of the two-phase flow of ethyl alcohol and R113 in a spiral tube under microgravity is reported, and a flow pattern map which takes the effects of centrifugal force into account is presented. The experimental technique, which uses a 10-m class drop tower to maintain a gravity level of 0.001 G for about 0.9 sec, is described. The results support the prediction that the effect of liquid surface tension becomes especially important under microgravity conditions. Models explaining the findings are developed.

  8. A quiet flow Ludwieg tube for study of transition in compressible boundary layers: Design and feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1990-01-01

    Since Ludwieg tubes have been around for many years, and NASA has already established the feasibility of creating quiet-flow wind tunnels, the major question addressed was the cost of the proposed facility. Cost estimates were obtained for major system components, and new designs which allowed fabrication at lower cost were developed. A large fraction of the facility cost comes from the fabrication of the highly polished quiet-flow supersonic nozzle. Methods for the design of this nozzle were studied at length in an attempt to find an effective but less expensive design. Progress was sufficient to show that a quality facility can be fabricated at a reasonable cost.

  9. Numerical simulation of transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. Y.; Lombard, C. K.; Nagaraj, N.; Bershader, D.

    1985-01-01

    Time-dependent upwind high resolution schemes for solving the Euler equations were developed and applied to simulate 1-D and 2-D transient inviscid gas flows in a shock tube. Using obstacles of different geometries, a series of calculations were carried out to investigate the transient complex shock-wave diffraction phenomena. Shock-wave and objects interactions with shock Mach-number Ms ranging from 2 to 20 were considered. Comparison with analytical and available experimental results indicate good agreement. Display of detailed flow structures including multiple Mach shocks, slip surfaces, and vortex are also given.

  10. Numerical simulation of cross-flow in a bank of tubes with three rows in the subcritical region of Reynolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzairin; Faizal, Mohd; Raghavan, V. R.; Ambri, Zainal

    2013-12-01

    The present work focused on 2-dimensional unsteady numerical simulation in predicting hydrodynamics and thermal characteristics of air flow across circular tube banks with integral wake splitters. The tube banks studied consist of three rows of tubes in staggered arrangement. The lengths of the splitter are 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 times the tube diameter. The range of Reynolds number investigated is in the range of 1000 to 10000, which is in the sub-critical region of Reynolds number. The flow condition within this range is incompressible since the maximum Mach number is less than 0.3. The numerical approach was validated against the experimental works of Zukauskas (1985) and Anderson (1997). Local pressure coefficient for flow around a single tube with integral wake splitter is also presented for comparison. It was found that the present of the wake splitters was able to improve the overall heat transfer of the system.

  11. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  12. Two phase choke flow in tubes with very large L/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Data were obtained for two phase and gaseous choked flow nitrogen in a long constant area duct of 16200 L/D with a diverging diffuser attached to the exit. Flow rate data were taken along five isotherms (reduced temperature of 0.81, 0.96, 1.06, 1.12, and 2.34) for reduced pressures to 3. The flow rate data were mapped in the usual manner using stagnation conditions at the inlet mixing chamber upstream of the entrance length. The results are predictable by a two phase homogeneous equilibrium choking flow model which includes wall friction. A simplified theory which in essence decouples the long tube region from the high acceleration choking region also appears to predict the data resonably well, but about 15 percent low.

  13. Two phase choke flow in tubes with very large L/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Two phase and gaseous choked flow data for fluid nitrogen were obtained for a test section which was a long constant area duct of 16 200 L/D with a diverging diffuser attached to the exit. Flow rate data were taken along five isotherms (reduced temperature of 0.81, 0.96, 1.06, 1.12, and 2.34) for reduced pressures to 3. The flow rate data were mapped in the usual manner using stagnation conditions at the inlet mixing chamber upstream of the entrance length. The results are predictable by a two-phase homogeneous equilibrium choking flow model which includes wall fraction. A simplified theory which in essence decouples the long tube region from the high acceleration choking region also appears to predict the data reasonably well, but about 15 percent low.

  14. Cyclostrophic adjustment in swirling gas flows and the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnik, M. V.; Visheratin, K. N.

    2008-04-01

    A theoretical analysis of cyclostrophic adjustment is presented; i.e., adjustment to balance between pressure gradient and centrifugal force in axisymmetric flow of an inviscid gas is examined. The solution to the problem is represented as the sum of a time-independent (balanced) and time-dependent (wave) components. It is shown that the wave component of the flow in an unbounded domain decays with time, and the corresponding solution reduces to the balanced component. In a bounded domain, the balanced flow component exists against the background of undamped acoustic waves. It is found that the balanced flow is thermally stratified at Mach numbers close to unity, with a substantial decrease in gas temperature (to between -50 and -100°C) in the axial region. This finding, combined with the results of special experiments, is used to explain the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube effect.

  15. Design and Operation of a Cryogenic Nitrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Fonseca, Luis; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2015-12-01

    We report the design, experimental setup and successful test results using an innovative passive cooling system called a “Pulsating Heat Pipe” (PHP) operating at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 80 K and using nitrogen as the working fluid. PHPs, which transfer heat by two phase flow mechanisms through a closed loop tubing have the advantage that no electrical pumps are needed to drive the fluid flow. In addition, PHPs have an advantage over copper straps and thermal conductors since they are lighter in weight, exhibit lower temperature gradients and have higher heat transfer rates. PHPs consist of an evaporator section, thermally anchored to a solid, where heat is received at the saturation temperature where the liquid portion of the two-phase flow evaporates, and a condenser where heat is rejected at the saturation temperature where the vapor is condensed. The condenser section in our experiment has been thermally interfaced to a CT cryocooler from SunPower that has a cooling capacity of 10 W at 77 K. Alternating regions of liquid slugs and small vapor plugs fill the capillary tubing, with the vapor regions contracting in the condenser section and expanding in the evaporator section due to an electric heater that will generate heat loads up to 10 W. This volumetric expansion and contraction provides the oscillatory flow of the fluid throughout the capillary tubing thereby transferring heat from one end to the other. The thermal performance and temperature characteristics of the PHP will be correlated as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill liquid ratio, and evaporator heat load. The experimental data show that the heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections can produce an effective thermal conductivity up to 35000 W/m-K at a 3.5 W heat load.

  16. Combustor with two stage primary fuel tube with concentric members and flow regulating

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David Marchant; Whidden, Graydon Lane; Zolyomi, Wendel

    1999-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having a centrally located fuel nozzle and inner, middle and outer concentric cylindrical liners, the inner liner enclosing a primary combustion zone. The combustor has an air inlet that forms two passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air to be supplied to the primary combustion zone. Each of the pre-mixing passages has a circumferential array of swirl vanes. A plurality of primary fuel tube assemblies extend through both pre-mixing passages, with each primary fuel tube assembly located between a pair of swirl vanes. Each primary fuel tube assembly is comprised of two tubular members. The first member supplies fuel to the first pre-mixing passage, while the second member, which extends through the first member, supplies fuel to the second pre-mixing passage. An annular fuel manifold is divided into first and second chambers by a circumferentially extending baffle. The proximal end of the first member is attached to the manifold itself while the proximal end of the second member is attached to the baffle. The distal end of the first member is attached directly to the second member at around its mid-point. The inlets of the first and second members are in flow communication with the first and second manifold chambers, respectively. Control valves separately regulate the flow of fuel to the two chambers and, therefore, to the two members of the fuel tube assemblies, thereby allowing the flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages to be separately controlled.

  17. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-02-28

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  18. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-08-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  19. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-11-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  20. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-03-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  1. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2004-05-31

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  2. Numerical study of chemical reactions in a surface microdischarge tube with mist flow based on experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Nishiyama, H.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a water treatment method of spraying solution into a discharge region has been developed and shows high energy efficiency. In this study, a simulation model of a water treatment method using a surface microdischarge (SMD) tube with mist flow is proposed for further understanding the detailed chemical reactions. Our model has three phases (plasma, gas and liquid) and three simulation steps. The carrier gas is humid air including 2% or 3% water vapour. The chemical species diffusion characteristics in the SMD tube and the concentrations in a droplet are clarified in a wide pH interval. The simulation results show that the chemical species generated on the SMD tube inner wall are diffused to the central axis and dissolved into fine droplets. Especially, OH radicals dissolve into droplets a few mm away from the SMD tube wall because of acidification of the droplets. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide density, which is the most important indicator of a radical reaction in water, is influenced by the initial solution pH. This pH dependence results from ozone self-decomposition in water.

  3. Thermal and fluid flow characteristics in a tube equipped with peripherally-cut dual twisted tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changcharoen, W.; Somravysin, P.; Eiamsa-ard, S.

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an experimental analysis of the turbulent flow of water in a heat exchanger tube fitted with peripherally-cut dual twisted tapes (PDTs) under a constant wall heat-flux condition. The peripherallycut dual twisted tapes with different cutting pitch ratios (l/y = 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0) were tested for Reynolds numbers in the range of 5400 to 14,000. The experimental results showed thatNusselt number and friction factor of the tubes fitted with PDTswere considerably higher than those of the plain tube and those of the tubes with single twisted tape (ST) and dual twisted tapes (DTs). It was found that PDTs with l/y = 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 gave higher heat transfer rate than the typical DTs, with average Nusselt numbers greater by 12.1%, 7.8% and 3.8%, respectively. For the range investigated, PDTs with the smallest l/y ratio offered the highest thermal performance factor of 1.14.

  4. The development of asymmetry for oscillatory flow within a tube containing sharp edge periodic baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mingzhi; Li, Jie; Mackley, M. R.; Tao, Jianjun

    2007-11-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of asymmetric patterns for oscillatory flow in a baffled tube. A numerical simulation for three-dimensional flows in an axisymmetric geometry was developed and compared with experimental results obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Sharp edged baffles were used for both numerical simulations and experiments. From the numerical simulation, a stability map of the flow symmetry was obtained as a function of Reynold-Strouhal numbers. The simulations show that for all Strouhal numbers, the flow was axisymmetric at Reynolds numbers less than 100 and asymmetric at Reynolds numbers larger than 225. The flow was less stable to asymmetric disturbances at small or large Strouhal numbers when compared to St =1.0. In particular, the flow in the region St <0.5 and Re >100 was asymmetric. Two mechanisms for vortex instability transition into three dimensions has been identified. At small Strouhal numbers, the primary mechanism is a shear (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability. At larger Strouhal numbers, the axisymmetry of the flow is broken because of the collision of travelling eddies that have been shed from opposite baffles. The numerical results are in general in agreement quantitatively with the experimental observations and both experiment and simulation assist in understanding the development of unsteadiness in periodic reversing flows.

  5. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part I: Experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    Two-phase flow pattern and heat transfer characteristics of refrigerant-oil mixture flow boiling inside small tubes with inside diameters of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm are investigated experimentally. The test condition of nominal oil concentration is from 0% to 5%, mass flux from 200 to 400 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, heat flux from 3.2 to 14 kW m{sup -2}, evaporation temperature of 5 C, inlet quality from 0.1 to 0.8, and quality change from 0.1 to 0.2. Wavy, wavy-annular, annular and mist-annular flow pattern in 6.34 mm tube are observed, while only slug-annular and annular flow pattern are observed in 2.50 mm tube. Oil presence can make annular flow to form early and to retard to diminish in quality direction at nominal oil concentration {>=}3%. Augmentation effect of oil on heat transfer coefficient becomes weakened or even diminishes for small diameter tube while detrimental effect of oil on small tube performance becomes more significant than large tube. For both test tubes, variation of heat transfer coefficient and enhanced factor with oil concentration is irregular. Two-phase heat transfer multiplier with refrigerant-oil mixture properties increases consistently and monotonically with local oil concentration at different vapor quality. (author)

  6. Numerical modeling of condensation from vapor-gas mixtures for forced down flow inside a tube

    SciTech Connect

    Yuann, R Y; Schrock, V E; Chen, Xiang

    1995-09-01

    Laminar film condensation is the dominant heat transfer mode inside tubes. In the present paper direct numerical simulation of the detailed transport process within the steam-gas core flow and in the condensate film is carried out. The problem was posed as an axisymmetric two dimensional (r, z) gas phase inside an annular condensate film flow with an assumed smooth interface. The fundamental conservation equations were written for mass, momentum, species concentration and energy in the gaseous phase with effective diffusion parameters characterizing the turbulent region. The low Reynolds number two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} model was employed to determine the eddy diffusion coefficients. The liquid film was described by similar formulation without the gas species equation. An empirical correlation was employed to correct for the effect of film waviness on the interfacial shear. A computer code named COAPIT (Condensation Analysis Program Inside Tube) was developed to implement numerical solution of the fundamental equations. The equations were solved by a marching technique working downstream from the entrance of the condensing section. COAPIT was benchmarked against experimental data and overall reasonable agreement was found for the key parameters such as heat transfer coefficient and tube inner wall temperature. The predicted axial development of radial profiles of velocity, composition and temperature and occurrence of metastable vapor add insight to the physical phenomena.

  7. Condensation of Forced Convection Two-Phase Flow in a Miniature Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begg, E.; Faghri, A.; Krustalev, D.

    1999-01-01

    A physical/mathematical model of annular film condensation at the inlet of a miniature tube has been developed. In the model, the liquid flow is coupled with the vapor flow along the liquid-vapor interface through the interfacial temperature, heat flux, shear stress, and pressure jump conditions due to surface tension effects. The model predicts the shape of the liquid-vapor interface along the condenser and leads to the conclusion that there is complete condensation at a certain distance from the condenser inlet. The numerical results show that complete condensation of the incoming vapor is possible at comparatively low heat loads and that this is a special case of a more general condensation regime with two-phase bubbly flow downstream of the initial annular film condensation region. Observations from the flow visualization experiment confirm the existence and qualitative features of annular film condensation leading to the complete condensation phenomenon in a small diameter (3.25 mm) circular tube condenser.

  8. Sound of silo's: An experimental investigation into sound emissions from granular flows in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porte, Elze; Masen, Marc; Vriend, Nathalie; de Boer, Andre

    2015-11-01

    When large storage silo's containing granular material are discharged, a loud sound emits from the silo. The noise causes disturbances for people working on site and for nearby residential areas. Insufficient knowledge exists to solve the problem efficiently and adequately. An experimental study using a scaled silo setup shows that the particle flow dynamics and system characteristics are both actors in determining the occurrence of the sound and its frequency. The extensive use of frequency analysis provides new insights into the complexity of the related parameters. The particle flow and tube characteristics are manipulated by changing the outflow rate, bulk material, wall material, wall pressure and tube dimensions. Frequency analysis of the recorded sound shows that the frequency depends on both the externally forced parameter changes and internal changes during flow. The latter indicates that during the flow, characteristic properties such as the packing fraction and sound speed change. As a result, the frequency changes as well. However, the external parameters that are manipulated as an initial condition are equally important in describing the frequency response.

  9. A Local Condensation Analysis Representing Two-phase Annular Flow in Condenser/radiator Capillary Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Amir

    1991-01-01

    NASA's effort for the thermal environmental control of the Space Station Freedom is directed towards the design, analysis, and development of an Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). A two phase, flow through condenser/radiator concept was baselined, as a part of the ATCS, for the radiation of space station thermal load into space. The proposed condenser rejects heat through direct condensation of ATCS working fluid (ammonia) in the small diameter radiator tubes. Analysis of the condensation process and design of condenser tubes are based on the available two phase flow models for the prediction of flow regimes, heat transfer, and pressure drops. The prediction formulas use the existing empirical relationships of friction factor at gas-liquid interface. An attempt is made to study the stability of interfacial waves in two phase annular flow. The formulation is presented of a stability problem in cylindrical coordinates. The contribution of fluid viscosity, surface tension, and transverse radius of curvature to the interfacial surface is included. A solution is obtained for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability problem which can be used to determine the critical and most dangerous wavelengths for interfacial waves.

  10. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-11-23

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in crossrolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to

  11. Experimental study on flow boiling heat transfer of LNG in a vertical smooth tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Shi, Yumei

    2013-10-01

    An experimental apparatus is set up in this work to study the upward flow boiling heat transfer characteristics of LNG (liquefied natural gas) in vertical smooth tubes with inner diameters of 8 mm and 14 mm. The experiments were performed at various inlet pressures from 0.3 to 0.7 MPa. The results were obtained over the mass flux range from 16 to 200 kg m-2 s-1 and heat fluxes ranging from 8.0 to 32 kW m-2. The influences of quality, heat flux and mass flux, tube diameter on the heat transfer characteristic are examined and discussed. The comparisons of the experimental heat transfer coefficients with the predicted values from the existing correlations are analyzed. The correlation by Zou et al. [16] shows the best accuracy with the RMS deviation of 31.7% in comparison with the experimental data.

  12. Evaporation heat transfer and friction characteristics of R-134a flowing downward in a vertical corrugated tube

    SciTech Connect

    Aroonrat, Kanit; Wongwises, Somchai

    2011-01-15

    Differently from most previous studies, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the pure refrigerant HFC-134a during evaporation inside a vertical corrugated tube are experimentally investigated. The double tube test sections are 0.5 m long with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and heating water flowing in the annulus. The inner tubes are one smooth tube and two corrugated tubes, which are constructed from smooth copper tube of 8.7 mm inner diameter. The test runs are performed at evaporating temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 C, heat fluxes of 20, 25, and 30 kW/m{sup 2}, and mass fluxes of 200, 300, and 400 kg/m{sup 2} s. The quality of the refrigerant in the test section is calculated using the temperature and pressure obtained from the experiment. The pressure drop across the test section is measured directly by a differential pressure transducer. The effects of heat flux, mass flux, and evaporation temperature on the heat transfer coefficient and two-phase friction factor are also discussed. It is found that the percentage increases of the heat transfer coefficient and the two-phase friction factor of the corrugated tubes compared with those of the smooth tube are approximately 0-10% and 70-140%, respectively. (author)

  13. Mixed convection laminar flow and heat transfer of liquids in horizontal internally finned tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shome, B.

    1998-01-01

    Energy and material savings, as well as economic incentives, have led to concentrated efforts over the past several decades in the field of heat transfer enhancement to produce more efficient and compact heat exchangers. Internally finned tubes are widely used for heat transfer enhancement, particularly in chemical process and petroleum industries. A finned tube heat exchanger with optimum geometry could offer 35--40% increase in heat duty for equal pumping power and size over a smooth tube heat exchanger or a comparable decrease in the heat exchanger size for a given heat duty. Developing mixed convection flow in internally finned tubes with variable viscosity was numerically investigated for a fin geometry range of 8 {le} N {le} 24, 0.1 {le} H {le} 0.3 and an operating condition range of 50 {le} Pr{sub in} {le} 1,250, 0 {le} Ra{sub in} {le} 10{sup 7}, and 0 {le} q{sub w}d/k{sub in} {le} 2,000. The numerical model was validated by comparison with existing numerical and experimental data. Internal finning was found to produce a complex two-cell, buoyancy-induced vortex structure. The results show that coring (retarded velocity in the interfin region) leads to poor heat transfer performance of tubes with large numbers of fins or with tall fins. The overall results indicated that large enhancement in the heat transfer can be obtained in the entrance region. Furthermore, variable viscosity effects are seen to have a pronounced effect on the friction factor and Nusselt number predictions.

  14. Enhancement of critical heat flux in tubes using staged tangential flow injection: (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Dhir, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of the enhancement in single and two phase heat transfer from tubes subjected to tangential flow injection have been continuing. Investigations using water as the test liquid have been focused on: single phase heat transfer coefficients; two phase heat transfer coefficients under subcooled boiling conditions; subcooled critical heat fluxes; and modeling of the enhancement under swirl flow conditions. With tangential injection up to four fold increase in the average heat transfer coefficient has been observed. During subcooled boiling the enhancement is relatively small. However swirl induced centripetal force increases vapor escape velocity and as a result higher critical heat fluxes can be accommodated. In the range of flow parameters studied up to 40% enhancement in critical heat flux has been observed with single stage injection. This enhancement is slightly less than that obtained with Freon-113. The mechanistic reasons for this observation are currently being investigated.

  15. Enhancement of critical heat flux in tubes using staged tangential flow injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, V. K.

    Experimental studies of the enhancement in single and two phase heat transfer from tubes subjected to tangential flow injection have been continuing. Investigations using water as the test liquid have been focused on: single phase heat transfer coefficients; two phase heat transfer coefficients under subcooled boiling conditions; subcooled critical heat fluxes; and modeling of the enhancement under swirl flow conditions. With tangential injection up to four fold increase in the average heat transfer coefficient has been observed. During subcooled boiling the enhancement is relatively small. However swirl induced centripetal force increases vapor escape velocity and as a result higher critical heat fluxes can be accommodated. In the range of flow parameters studied up to 40% enhancement in critical heat flux has been observed with single stage injection. This enhancement is slightly less than that obtained with Freon-113. The mechanistic reasons for this observation are currently being investigated.

  16. A rapid response 64-channel photomultiplier tube camera for high-speed flow velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecker, Tobias; Lowe, K. Todd; Ng, Wing F.

    2015-02-01

    In this technical design note, the development of a rapid response photomultiplier tube camera, leveraging field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) for high-speed flow velocimetry at up to 10 MHz is described. Technically relevant flows, for example, supersonic inlets and exhaust jets, have time scales on the order of microseconds, and their experimental study requires resolution of these timescales for fundamental insight. The inherent rapid response time attributes of a 64-channel photomultiplier array were coupled with two-stage amplifiers on each anode, and were acquired using a FPGA-based system. Application of FPGA allows high data acquisition rates with many channels as well as on-the-fly preprocessing techniques. Results are presented for optical velocimetry in supersonic free jet flows, demonstrating the value of the technique in the chosen application example for determining supersonic shear layer velocity correlation maps.

  17. The Effect of Fin Pitch on Fluid Elastic Instability of Tube Arrays Subjected to Cross Flow of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Sandeep Rangrao; Pavitran, Sampat

    2016-07-01

    Failure of tubes in shell and tube exchangers is attributed to flow induced vibrations of such tubes. There are different excitations mechanisms due to which flow induced vibration occurs and among such mechanisms, fluid elastic instability is the most prominent one as it causes the most violent vibrations and may lead to rapid tube failures within short time. Fluid elastic instability is the fluid-structure interaction phenomenon which occurs when energy input by the fluid force exceeds energy expended in damping. This point is referred as instability threshold and corresponding velocity is referred as critical velocity. Once flow velocity exceeds critical flow velocity, the vibration amplitude increases very rapidly with flow velocity. An experimental program is carried out to determine the critical velocity at instability for plain and finned tube arrays subjected to cross flow of water. The tube array geometry is parallel triangular with cantilever end condition and pitch ratios considered are 2.6 and 2.1. The objective of research is to determine the effect of increase in pitch ratio on instability threshold for plain tube arrays and to assess the effect of addition of fins as well as increase in fin density on instability threshold for finned tube arrays. Plain tube array with two different pitch ratios; 2.1 and 2.6 and finned tube arrays with same pitch ratio; 2.6 but with two different fin pitches; such as fine (10 fpi) and coarse (4 fpi) are considered for the experimentation. Connors' equation that relates critical velocity at instability to different parameters, on which instability depends, has been used as the basis for analysis and the concept of effective diameter is used for the present investigation. The modal parameters are first suitably modified using natural frequency reduction setup that is already designed and developed to reduce natural frequency and hence to achieve experimental simulation of fluid elastic instability within the limited

  18. Benefit of pulsation in soft corals

    PubMed Central

    Kremien, Maya; Shavit, Uri; Mass, Tali; Genin, Amatzia

    2013-01-01

    Soft corals of the family Xeniidae exhibit a unique, rhythmic pulsation of their tentacles (Movie S1), first noted by Lamarck nearly 200 y ago. However, the adaptive benefit of this perpetual, energetically costly motion is poorly understood. Using in situ underwater particle image velocimetry, we found that the pulsation motions thrust water upward and enhance mixing across the coral–water boundary layer. The induced upward motion effectively prevents refiltration of water by neighboring polyps, while the intensification of mixing, together with the upward flow, greatly enhances the coral’s photosynthesis. A series of controlled laboratory experiments with the common xeniid coral Heteroxenia fuscescens showed that the net photosynthesis rate during pulsation was up to an order of magnitude higher than during the coral’s resting, nonpulsating state. This enhancement diminished when the concentration of oxygen in the ambient water was artificially raised, indicating that the enhancement of photosynthesis was due to a greater efflux of oxygen from the coral tissues. By lowering the internal oxygen concentration, pulsation alleviates the problem of reduced affinity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO) to CO2 under conditions of high oxygen concentrations. The photosynthesis–respiration ratio of the pulsating H. fuscescens was markedly higher than the ratios reported for nonpulsating soft and stony corals. Although pulsation is commonly used for locomotion and filtration in marine mobile animals, its occurrence in sessile (bottom-attached) species is limited to members of the ancient phylum Cnidaria, where it is used to accelerate water and enhance physiological processes. PMID:23610420

  19. Pressure-driven flow past spheres moving in a circular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheard, G. J.; Ryan, K.

    A computational investigation, supported by a theoretical analysis, is performed to investigate a pressure-driven flow around a line of equispaced spheres moving at a prescribed velocity along the axis of a circular tube. This fundamental study underpins a range of applications including physiological circulation research. A spectral-element formulation in cylindrical coordinates is employed to solve for the incompressible fluid flow past the spheres, and the flows are computed in the reference frame of the translating spheres.Both the volume flow rate relative to the spheres and the forces acting on each sphere are computed for specific sphere-to-tube diameter ratios and sphere spacing ratios. Conditions at which zero axial force on the spheres are identified, and a region of unsteady flow is detected at higher Reynolds numbers (based on tube diameter and sphere velocity). A regular perturbation analysis and the reciprocal theorem are employed to predict flow rate and drag coefficient trends at low Reynolds numbers. Importantly, the zero drag condition is well-described by theory, and states that at this condition, the sphere velocity is proportional to the applied pressure gradient. This result was verified for a range of spacing and diameter ratios. Theoretical approximations agree with computational results for Reynolds numbers up to O(100).The geometry dependence of the zero axial force condition is examined, and for a particular choice of the applied dimensionless pressure gradient, it is found that this condition occurs at increasing Reynolds numbers with increasing diameter ratio, and decreasing Reynolds number with increasing sphere spacing.Three-dimensional simulations and predictions of a Floquet linear stability analysis independently elucidate the bifurcation scenario with increasing Reynolds number for a specific diameter ratio and sphere spacing. The steady axisymmetric flow first experiences a small region of time-dependent non

  20. Interaction Between Convection and Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdek, Günter; Dupret, Marc-Antoine

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews our current understanding of modelling convection dynamics in stars. Several semi-analytical time-dependent convection models have been proposed for pulsating one-dimensional stellar structures with different formulations for how the convective turbulent velocity field couples with the global stellar oscillations. In this review we put emphasis on two, widely used, time-dependent convection formulations for estimating pulsation properties in one-dimensional stellar models. Applications to pulsating stars are presented with results for oscillation properties, such as the effects of convection dynamics on the oscillation frequencies, or the stability of pulsation modes, in classical pulsators and in stars supporting solar-type oscillations.

  1. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen's work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille's solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  2. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen`s work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille`s solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  3. Exchange flow of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varges, Priscilla; Nascentes, Fernanda; Fonseca, Bruno; de Souza Mendes, Paulo Roberto; Naccache, Monica

    2015-11-01

    Plug cementing is an essential operation performed under a variety of well conditions. The cement plugs are rarely placed at the intended depth because the cement slurry usually is heavier than the well fluid. Failures are due primarily to migration of the denser fluid downward through the drilling fluid at the top of which it is discharged. The aim of the research is to better understand the process of plugging operation in vertical wells. To this end, we performed an experimental and theoretical study of the buoyancy-driven flow of two immiscible Newtonian fluids in a vertical tube such that the heavier and more viscous fluid is placed on top. Since both fluids are Newtonian, the situation is always unstable, i.e. the fluid on top will always flow downward and displace the bottom fluid upwards, so that the relative positioning tends to invert. The influence of the governing parameters on the speed of inversion was investigated. Flow visualization was performed with a digital camera, and inversion velocities were obtained through image analysis. Preliminary results show that inversion speed decreases as the tube diameter is increased, increases as the viscosity ratio is increased, and also increases as the density ratio is increased.

  4. Nanofluid heat transfer under mixed convection flow in a tube for solar thermal energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Y Raja; Sharma, K V; Kamal, Subhash

    2016-05-01

    The solar flat plate collector operating under different convective modes has low efficiency for energy conversion. The energy absorbed by the working fluid in the collector system and its heat transfer characteristics vary with solar insolation and mass flow rate. The performance of the system is improved by reducing the losses from the collector. Various passive methods have been devised to aid energy absorption by the working fluid. Also, working fluids are modified using nanoparticles to improve the thermal properties of the fluid. In the present work, simulation and experimental studies are undertaken for pipe flow at constant heat flux boundary condition in the mixed convection mode. The working fluid at low Reynolds number in the mixed laminar flow range is undertaken with water in thermosyphon mode for different inclination angles of the tube. Local and average coefficients are determined experimentally and compared with theoretical values for water-based Al2O3 nanofluids. The results show an enhancement in heat transfer in the experimental range with Rayleigh number at higher inclinations of the collector tube for water and nanofluids. PMID:26593731

  5. Flow-establishment times for blunt bodies in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Moore, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Flow establishment results are presented as obtained from shock standoff distance, pressure, and heat transfer measurements in the Langley expansion tube. The models tested were flat-faced cylinders with varying radius and a sphere with a constant radius, and they were positioned at the acceleration section exit and tested in the open jet at zero angle of attack. The experimental results were obtained as spinoff from various studies using helium, air, and CO2 test gases at freestream velocities in the range 5-7 km/sec. Time histories of shock detachment distance illustrate that the shock formation about the smaller-radii flat-faced cylinders and the sphere is symmetrical, whereas a complex, asymmetric formation is observed for the larger-radii cylinders. Flow is shown to establish more readily about the sphere than a flat-faced cylinder of the same diameter. A quasi-steady flow exists about relatively large blunt models during two-thirds of the approximate 250-microsec expansion tube test period.

  6. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  7. Sustained inertial-capillary oscillations and jet formation in displacement flow in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yi; Spelt, Peter D. M.

    2011-12-01

    We study inertial effects in the displacement of a fluid in a capillary by a more viscous fluid, using a numerical method. A level-set approach is employed to track the meniscus, and a Navier slip boundary condition is imposed in order to alleviate a stress singularity at the moving contact line. Various flow regimes are identified with a Reynolds number and a capillary number as the main parameters. At relatively low Reynolds number, the meniscus forms a steady shape, and the interfacial curvature at the tube centre can change from being concave to convex upon increasing the Reynolds number if the displacing fluid is wetting to the tube surface. For wetting displacing fluids, beyond a critical Reynolds number, a quasi-steady solution is no longer found: instead, the interface undergoes non-dampened periodic oscillations and, at even larger values of the Reynolds number, quasi-periodically, and the interface evolves from simple wavy shapes to complex shapes with multiple wavy units. This oscillating state is observed for sufficiently small contact angle values defined from the displacing fluid (<80°). Beyond a second critical Reynolds number, the displacing fluid forms a jet and the meniscus advances with a nearly constant speed which decreases with Re. This is also observed at large contact angle values. In a developing jet, however, the interface shape remains partially quasi-steady, near the contact line region and the tube centre. The flow behaviour is shown to be robust over a range of other governing parameters, including the capillary number and the slip length. The potential implications of the work on network models of two-phase flow through porous media are discussed.

  8. Pulsating aurora: Source region & morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, Allison

    Pulsating aurora, a common phenomenon in the polar night sky, offers a unique opportunity to study the precipitating particle populations responsible for this subtle yet fascinating display of lights. The conjecture that the source of these electrons originates near the equator, made decades ago, has now been confirmed using in-situ measurements. In this thesis, we present these results that compare the frequencies of equatorial electron flux pulsations and pulsating aurora luminosity fluctuations at the ionospheric footprint. We use simultaneous satellite-based data from GOES 13 and ground-based data from the THEMIS allsky imager array to show that there is a direct correlation between luminosity fluctuations near the ground and particle pulsations in equatorial space; the source region of the pulsating aurora. Pulsating aurora almost exclusively occurs embedded within a region of diffuse aurora. By studying the two particle populations, one can contribute to the theory behind auroral pulsations. The interplay between the two auroral types, and the systems that control them, are not yet well known. We analyze ground optical observations of pulsating aurora events to attempt to characterize the relationship between the two types of auroral precipitation. Pulsating aurora is a significant component of energy transfer within the framework of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Further study of the morphology, total energy deposition, and the pulsation mechanism of pulsating aurora is key to a better understanding of our earth-sun system.

  9. Dual tube, counter-flow heat exchange for turkey barns. First quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    A prototype of the dual tube, counter-flow heat exchanger for turkey barns is presently built and installed in a turkey barn at Molly Creek Turkey Farm, Swanville, Minnesota. Phase 1 of the project selecting cooperator barn, and taking survey information, is now complete. Drawing existing barn for the design, is now complete; building test model is now complete; and building of prorotype is almost completed. The prototype is now ready for final items, testing and monitoring equipment installed, and to actually run under working conditions.

  10. Flow dynamics of ash deposition in heat-exchanger tube banks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Ekmann, J.; Mathur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate experimental data to describe flow fields in heat-exchanger tube banks. One of the main applications of this data is in the evaluation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models which are an important part of an ash deposition model. The CFD models under evaluation include a large eddy simulation (LES) being developed by Textron Inc. under DOE-PETC funding and the CLEW code developed at the University of California at Berkeley. Various CFD modeling approaches, e.g., implementation of a transition-to-turbulence and modified wall functions, are also being tested using the PHOENICS code.

  11. Flow dynamics of ash deposition in heat-exchanger tube banks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Ekmann, J.; Mathur, M.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to generate experimental data to describe flow fields in heat-exchanger tube banks. One of the main applications of this data is in the evaluation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models which are an important part of an ash deposition model. The CFD models under evaluation include a large eddy simulation (LES) being developed by Textron Inc. under DOE-PETC funding and the CLEW code developed at the University of California at Berkeley. Various CFD modeling approaches, e.g., implementation of a transition-to-turbulence and modified wall functions, are also being tested using the PHOENICS code.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation of unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices in draft tube of low specific speed Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tani, K.; Okamoto, N.

    2014-03-01

    At both partial and full load of Francis turbines, the unsteady behavior of cavitating draft tube vortices occurs and leads to undesirable matters such as power house vibration, noise and power swing in some cases. This paper presents the investigation of the interaction between the flow pattern at runner outlet and the unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices in draft tube with experimental and numerical approaches. On the experimental research, the pressure pulsation in the draft tube is measured and the unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices is taken pictures with a high speed camera in the model test. On the numerical research, by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) adopting a two-phase unsteady analysis, the analysis domain from the guide vane to the draft tube is carried out for investigating the interaction between the runner outlet flow and the vortex pattern. The pressure pulsation at the upper draft tube and the unsteady behavior of cavitating vortices obtained from CFD results are similar to those obtained in the model test. Detailed analysis of CFD results at overload indicates the repeat of expansion and contraction of cavitating vortices, which were shaped helical vortices with opposite direction of runner rotation, and the corresponding flow pattern in every time step of the pressure pulsations.

  13. Bubble motion through a generalized power-law fluid flowing in a vertical tube.

    PubMed

    Mukundakrishnan, Karthik; Eckmann, David M; Ayyaswamy, P S

    2009-04-01

    Intravascular gas embolism may occur with decompression in space flight, as well as during cardiac and vascular surgery. Intravascular bubbles may be deposited into any end organ, such as the heart or the brain. Surface interactions between the bubble and the endothelial cells lining the vasculature result in serious impairment of blood flow and can lead to heart attack, stroke, or even death. To develop effective therapeutic strategies, there is a need for understanding the dynamics of bubble motion through blood and its interaction with the vessel wall through which it moves. Toward this goal, we numerically investigate the axisymmetric motion of a bubble moving through a vertical circular tube in a shear-thinning generalized power-law fluid, using a front-tracking method. The formulation is characterized by the inlet Reynolds number, capillary number, Weber number, and Froude number. The flow dynamics and the associated wall shear stresses are documented for a combination of two different inlet flow conditions (inlet Reynolds numbers) and three different effective bubble radii (ratio of the undeformed bubble radii to the tube radii). The results of the non-Newtonian model are then compared with that of the model assuming a Newtonian blood viscosity. Specifically, for an almost occluding bubble (effective bubble radius = 0.9), the wall shear stress and the bubble residence time are compared for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian cases. Results show that at low shear rates, for a given pressure gradient the residence time for a non-Newtonian flow is higher than that for a Newtonian flow. PMID:19426324

  14. Theoretical research of helium pulsating heat pipe under steady state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Liu, H. M.; Li, L. F.; Huang, R. J.; Wang, W.

    2015-12-01

    As a new-type heat pipe, pulsating heat pipe (PHP) has several outstanding features, such as great heat transport ability, strong adjustability, small size and simple construction. PHP is a complex two-phase flow system associated with many physical subjects and parameters, which utilizes the pressure and temperature changes in volume expansion and contraction during phase changes to excite the pulsation motion of liquid plugs and vapor bubbles in the capillary tube between the evaporator and the condenser. At present time, some experimental investigation of helium PHP have been done. However, theoretical research of helium PHP is rare. In this paper, the physical and mathematical models of operating mechanism for helium PHP under steady state are established based on the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Several important parameters are correlated and solved, including the liquid filling ratio, flow velocity, heat power, temperature, etc. Based on the results, the operational driving force and flow resistances of helium PHP are analysed, and the flow and heat transfer is further studied.

  15. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes for Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-04-10

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (2) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. This research program is being conducted in collaboration with the DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the vested

  16. Circumventing Imprecise Geometric Information and Development of a Unified Modeling Technique for Various Flow Regimes in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Bahman

    2012-11-01

    Owing to their manufacturability and reliability, capillary tubes are the most common expansion devices in household refrigerators. Therefore, investigating flow properties in the capillary tubes is of immense appeal in the said business. The models to predict pressure drop in two-phase internal flows invariably rely upon highly precise geometric information. The manner in which capillary tubes are manufactured makes them highly susceptible to geometric imprecisions, which renders geometry-based models unreliable to the point of obsoleteness. Aware of the issue, manufacturers categorize capillary tubes based on Nitrogen flow rate through them. This categorization method presents an opportunity to substitute geometric details with Nitrogen flow data as the basis for customized models. The simulation tools developed by implementation of this technique have the singular advantage of being applicable across flow regimes. Thus the error-prone process of identifying compatible correlations is eliminated. Equally importantly, compressibility and chocking effects can be incorporated in the same model. The outcome is a standalone correlation that provides accurate predictions, regardless of any particular fluid or flow regime. Thereby, exploratory investigations for capillary tube design and optimization are greatly simplified. Bahman Abbasi, Ph.D., is Lead Advanced Systems Engineer at General Electric Appliances in Louisville, KY. He conducts research projects across disciplines in the household refrigeration industry.

  17. A numerical procedure for simulation of Fanno flows of refrigerants or refrigerant mixtures in capillary tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.

    1998-12-31

    An ordinary differential equation (ODE), particularly suitable for numerical simulations of Fanno flows in capillary tubes, is derived by combining the conservation equations. Taking pressure as the independent variable, better control over design variables is achieved and the singularities involved in the choked flows can be avoided. For refrigerants without temperature glide, such as pure refrigerants or azeotropic refrigerant mixtures, the single ODE can be easily integrated if the saturation thermodynamic properties are given. For nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures (NARMs), iteration in the temperature glide zone is required. As an alternative procedure for the iteration, a system of two ODEs is derived by taking thermodynamic relations into account. The system of ODE is not only in a numerically efficient form but also reveals important physics regarding choking. Sample numerical results for ternary NARM R-407C are presented to show the performance of the proposed procedures.

  18. Analytical modeling of capillary flow in tubes of nonuniform cross section.

    PubMed

    Liou, William W; Peng, Yongqing; Parker, Peter E

    2009-05-01

    The interface rise for the flow in a capillary with a nonuniform cross section distribution along a straight center axis is investigated analytically in this paper. Starting from the Navier-Stokes equations, we derive a model equation for the time-dependent rise of the capillary interface by using an approximated three-dimensional flow velocity profiles. The derived nonlinear, second-order differential equation can be solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta method. The nonuniformity effect is included in the inertial and viscous terms of the proposed model. The present model is validated by comparing the solutions for a circular cylindrical tube, rectangular cylindrical microchannels, and convergent-divergent and divergent-convergent capillaries. The validated model has been applied to capillaries with parabolic varying wall, sinusoidal wall, and divergent sinusoidal wall. The inertial and viscous effects on the dynamic capillary rise and the equilibrium height are investigated in detail. PMID:19232635

  19. Experimental investigation of a bioartificial capsule flowing in a narrow tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risso, Frédéric; Collé-Paillot, Fabienne; Zagzoule, Mokhtar

    This work is an experimental study of the motion and deformation of a bioartificial capsule flowing in a tube of 4 mm diameter. The capsules, initially designed for medical applications, are droplets of salt water surrounded by a thin polymeric membrane. They are immersed in a very viscous Newtonian silicone oil that flows through a tube in the Stokes regime. The properties of the capsules were carefully determined. Two previous experimental papers were devoted to their characterization by osmotic swelling and compression between two plates. The present work also provides a series of tests that allows an accurate definition of the experimental model under investigation. The capsules are buoyant and initially quasi-spherical. Nevertheless, buoyancy and small departures from sphericity are shown to have no significant effects, provided the flowing velocity is large enough for the viscous stress to become predominant. The capsules are also initially slightly over-inflated, but there is no mass transfer through the membrane during the present experiments. Their volume therefore remains constant. The membrane can be described as an elastic two-dimensional material, the elastic moduli of which are independent of the deformation. Far from the tube ends, the capsule reaches a steady state that depends on two parameters: the capillary number, Ca; and the ratio of the radius of the capsule to that of the tube, a/R. The capillary number, which compares the hydrodynamic stresses to the elastic tensions in the membrane, was varied between 0 and 0.125. The radius ratio, which measures the magnitude of the confinement, was varied from 0.75 to 0.95. In the range investigated, the membrane material always remains in the elastic domain. At fixed a/R, the capsule is stretched in the axial direction when Ca is increased. The process of deformation involves two main stages. At small to moderate Ca, the lateral dimension of the capsule decreases whereas its axial length increases. The

  20. Numerical modeling of flow in the Francis-99 turbine with Reynolds stress model and detached eddy simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, A. V.; Sentyabov, A. V.; Platonov, D. V.; Dekterev, A. A.; Gavrilov, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation of flow in Francis-99 water turbine under three operation modes: part load, best efficiency point and high load. Calculations were performed by means of Reynolds stress model and detached eddy simulation based on k-omega SST model. The paper focuses on the flows in the draft tube. The calculated mean velocity components in the draft tube are in close agreement with experimental results. Calculated r.m.s velocity components agree with experimental pulsations qualitatively.

  1. Attenuation of hydrogen radicals traveling under flowing gas conditions through tubes of different materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grubbs, R.K.; George, S.M.

    2006-05-15

    Hydrogen radical concentrations traveling under flowing gas conditions through tubes of different materials were measured using a dual thermocouple probe. The source of the hydrogen radicals was a toroidal radio frequency plasma source operating at 2.0 and 3.3 kW for H{sub 2} pressures of 250 and 500 mTorr, respectively. The dual thermocouple probe was comprised of exposed and covered Pt/Pt13%Rh thermocouples. Hydrogen radicals recombined efficiently on the exposed thermocouple and the energy of formation of H{sub 2} heated the thermocouple. The second thermocouple was covered by glass and was heated primarily by the ambient gas. The dual thermocouple probe was translated and measured temperatures at different distances from the hydrogen radical source. These temperature measurements were conducted at H{sub 2} flow rates of 35 and 75 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) inside cylindrical tubes made of stainless steel, aluminum, quartz, and Pyrex. The hydrogen radical concentrations were obtained from the temperatures of the exposed and covered thermocouples. The hydrogen concentration decreased versus distance from the plasma source. After correcting for the H{sub 2} gas flow using a reference frame transformation, the hydrogen radical concentration profiles yielded the atomic hydrogen recombination coefficient, {gamma}, for the four materials. The methodology of measuring the hydrogen radical concentrations, the analysis of the results under flowing gas conditions, and the determination of the atomic hydrogen recombination coefficients for various materials will help facilitate the use of hydrogen radicals for thin film growth processes.

  2. Numerical simulation of swirling flow in complex hydroturbine draft tube using unsteady statistical turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, Joongcheol; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Sale, Michael J

    2005-06-01

    A numerical method is developed for carrying out unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations and detached-eddy simulations (DESs) in complex 3D geometries. The method is applied to simulate incompressible swirling flow in a typical hydroturbine draft tube, which consists of a strongly curved 90 degree elbow and two piers. The governing equations are solved with a second-order-accurate, finite-volume, dual-time-stepping artificial compressibility approach for a Reynolds number of 1.1 million on a mesh with 1.8 million nodes. The geometrical complexities of the draft tube are handled using domain decomposition with overset (chimera) grids. Numerical simulations show that unsteady statistical turbulence models can capture very complex 3D flow phenomena dominated by geometry-induced, large-scale instabilities and unsteady coherent structures such as the onset of vortex breakdown and the formation of the unsteady rope vortex downstream of the turbine runner. Both URANS and DES appear to yield the general shape and magnitude of mean velocity profiles in reasonable agreement with measurements. Significant discrepancies among the DES and URANS predictions of the turbulence statistics are also observed in the straight downstream diffuser.

  3. Evolution of Bubbles through Gas Injection from a Micro-Tube into Liquid Cross-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Rahimi, Payam; Nobes, David

    2008-11-01

    Generation of small-size bubbles is of importance in many processes such as chemical, medical and food industries. The most common method of bubble generation is injection of gas from an orifice into the liquid phase. In spite of simplicity of this method, appropriate conditions should exist to avoid bubble growth and obtain required small-size bubbles. Thorough understanding of the bubble formation and growth can reveal the required conditions and ensure detachment of the bubbles from the orifice with desired timing to control their size. In this work, evolution of bubbles from a micro-size gas injection tube into liquid cross-flow is investigated. Special attention has been devoted to optimize the conditions to generate micro-size bubbles. Specifically, the influence of gas injection tube size and location, gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and the geometry of the mixing chamber on the bubbles evolution is studied. High-speed shadowgraphy technique is applied to investigate bubbles size and shape. A Particle Tracking Velocimetry algorithm is also applied to calculate bubbles velocity. The velocity field of the liquid flow surrounding the bubbles is also characterized using a Mirco-Stereo-Particle Image Velocimetry technique.

  4. Nonuniform steam generator U-tube flow distribution during natural circulation tests in ROSA-IV large scale test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kukita, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Tasaka, K. ); Chauliac, C. )

    1988-08-01

    Natural circulation experiments were conducted in a large-scale (1/48 scale in volume) full-height simulator of a Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor. This facility has two steam generators each containing 141 full-size U-tubes of 9 different heights. Transition of the natural circulation mode was observed in the experiments as the primary of side mass inventory was decreased. Three major circulation modes were observed: single-phase liquid natural circulation, two-phase natural circulation, and reflux condensation. For all these circulation modes, and during the transitions between the modes, the mass flow distribution among the steam generator U-tubes was significantly nonuniform. The longer U-tubes indicated reversed flow at higher primary side mass inventories and also tended to empty earlier than the shorter U-tubes when the primary side mass inventory was decreased.

  5. Smooth- and enhanced-tube heat transfer and pressure drop : Part II. The role of transition to turbulent flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N. T.; Das, L.; Rabas, T. J.

    2000-11-14

    The objectives of this presentation are two-fold: first, to demonstrate the connection between the attainable coefficients and transition to turbulent flow by using the transition-based corresponding states method to generalize results obtained with smooth tubes and enhanced tubes, and second, to provide guidelines on the calculation of heat transfer coefficients from pressure-drop data and vice versa by using the transition concept or the functional law of corresponding states.

  6. The Herschel-Quincke tube: the attenuation conditions and their sensitivity to mean flow.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mikael; Glav, Ragnar; Abom, Mats

    2008-08-01

    The classic Herschel-Quincke tube is a parallel connection of two ducts yielding multiple noise attenuation maxima via destructive interference. This problem has been discussed to different degrees by a number of authors over the years. This study returns to the basics of the system for the purpose of furthering the understanding of the conditions necessary for noise attenuation and especially their sensitivity to mean flow. First, the transmission loss for an N-duct system with mean flow and arbitrary conditions of state in the different ducts is derived. Next, the two types of conditions yielding the attenuation maxima are studied. In addition to a discussion of the underlying physics, generic expressions for frequencies at which maximum attenuation occur are presented. Experiments without mean flow generally show good agreement with theory based on straight duct elements. However, more detailed models may be required for accurate simulations in the presence of mean flow. A simple model compensating for the losses associated with bends is shown to improve the results significantly for the geometry studied. PMID:18681565

  7. The effect of surfactant on counter-current gas-liquid flows in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2015-11-01

    Counter-current gas-liquid flows in vertical tubes are often accompanied by flow reversal. This so-called ``flooding'' phenomenon could occur for at least a part of the liquid phase from a counter-current to a co-current state, against the action of gravity. This phenomenon is of central importance to the oil-and-gas and nuclear industries, and has received considerable attention experimentally. The large majority of the previous work in this area, however, has considered the case of pure fluids, in the absence of additives; the latter are used frequently in industry in an attempt to control the onset of various flow regimes with little understanding of the mechanisms underlying their influence on the interfacial dynamics. In this study, we address this issue by investigating the dynamics of flooding in the presence of surfactants in a 4 m long, 32.4 mm nominal bore polymethyl methacrylate test section using high-speed shadowgraphy, and axial-view imaging. The system parameters include the superficial gas and liquid velocities, and surfactant concentration. We show that the presence of surfactant can have a dramatic effect on the flow structures and the onset of flooding. The mechanisms responsible for these phenomena are analysed. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  8. Length and time for development of laminar flow in tubes following a step increase of volume flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Rafeed A.; Herrmann, Marcus; Frakes, David H.; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Laminar flows starting up from rest in round tubes are relevant to numerous industrial and biomedical applications. The two most common types are flows driven by an abruptly imposed constant pressure gradient or by an abruptly imposed constant volume flux. Analytical solutions are available for transient, fully developed flows, wherein streamwise development over the entrance length is absent (Szymanski in J de Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées 11:67-107, 1932; Andersson and Tiseth in Chem Eng Commun 112(1):121-133, 1992, respectively). They represent the transient responses of flows in tubes that are very long compared with the entrance length, a condition that is seldom satisfied in biomedical tube networks. This study establishes the entrance (development) length and development time of starting laminar flow in a round tube of finite length driven by a piston pump that produces a step change from zero flow to a constant volume flux for Reynolds numbers between 500 and 3,000. The flows are examined experimentally, using stereographic particle image velocimetry and computationally using computational fluid dynamics, and are then compared with the known analytical solutions for fully developed flow conditions in infinitely long tubes. Results show that step function volume flux start-up flows reach steady state and fully developed flow five times more quickly than those driven by a step function pressure gradient, a 500 % change when compared with existing estimates. Based on these results, we present new, simple guidelines for achieving experimental flows that are fully developed in space and time in realistic (finite) tube geometries. To a first approximation, the time to achieve steady spatially developing flow is nearly equal to the time needed to achieve steady, fully developed flow. Conversely, the entrance length needed to achieve fully developed transient flow is approximately equal to the length needed to achieve fully developed steady flow. Beyond this

  9. Influence of Hydraulic Design on Stability and on Pressure Pulsations in Francis Turbines at Overload, Part Load and Deep Part Load based on Numerical Simulations and Experimental Model Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoli, M. V.; Maiwald, M.

    2014-03-01

    Francis turbines have been running more and more frequently in part load conditions, in order to satisfy the new market requirements for more dynamic and flexible energy generation, ancillary services and grid regulation. The turbines should be able to be operated for longer durations with flows below the optimum point, going from part load to deep part load and even speed-no-load. These operating conditions are characterised by important unsteady flow phenomena taking place at the draft tube cone and in the runner channels, in the respective cases of part load and deep part load. The current expectations are that new Francis turbines present appropriate hydraulic stability and moderate pressure pulsations at overload, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load with high efficiency levels at normal operating range. This study presents series of investigations performed by Voith Hydro with the objective to improve the hydraulic stability of Francis turbines at overload, part load and deep part load, reduce pressure pulsations and enlarge the know-how about the transient fluid flow through the turbine at these challenging conditions. Model test measurements showed that distinct runner designs were able to influence the pressure pulsation level in the machine. Extensive experimental investigations focused on the runner deflector geometry, on runner features and how they could reduce the pressure oscillation level. The impact of design variants and machine configurations on the vortex rope at the draft tube cone at overload and part load and on the runner channel vortex at deep part load were experimentally observed and evaluated based on the measured pressure pulsation amplitudes. Numerical investigations were employed for improving the understanding of such dynamic fluid flow effects. As example for the design and experimental investigations, model test observations and pressure pulsation curves for Francis machines in mid specific speed range, around nqopt = 50 min

  10. Numerical modeling of the shock tube flow fields before and during ignition delay time experiments at practical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamnaouer, Mouna

    An axi-symmetric shock-tube model has been developed to simulate the shock-wave propagation and reflection in both non-reactive and reactive flows. Simulations were performed for the full shock-tube geometry of the high-pressure shock tube facility at Texas A&M University. Computations were carried out in the CFD solver FLUENT based on the finite volume approach and the AUSM+ flux differencing scheme. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm was applied to the time-dependent flow fields to accurately capture and resolve the shock and contact discontinuities as well as the very fine scales associated with the viscous and reactive effects. A conjugate heat transfer model has been incorporated which enhanced the credibility of the simulations. The multi-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations resolved all of the relevant scales, ranging from the size of the system to the reaction zone scale. The robustness of the numerical model and the accuracy of the simulations were assessed through validation with the analytical ideal shock-tube theory and experimental data. The numerical method is first applied to the problem of axi-symmetric inviscid flow then viscous effects are incorporated through viscous modeling. The non-idealities in the shock tube have been investigated and quantified, notably the non-ideal transient behavior in the shock tube nozzle section, heat transfer effects from the hot gas to the shock tube side walls, the reflected shock/boundary layer interactions or what is known as bifurcation, and the contact surface/bifurcation interaction resulting into driver gas contamination. The non-reactive model is shown to be capable of accurately simulating the shock and expansion wave propagations and reflections as well as the flow non-uniformities behind the reflected shock wave. Both the inviscid and the viscous non-reactive models provided a baseline for the combustion model which involves elementary chemical reactions and requires the coupling of the

  11. Prediction of friction factor of pure water flowing inside vertical smooth and microfin tubes by using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çebi, A.; Akdoğan, E.; Celen, A.; Dalkilic, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model of friction factor in smooth and microfin tubes under heating, cooling and isothermal conditions was developed in this study. Data used in ANN was taken from a vertically positioned heat exchanger experimental setup. Multi-layered feed-forward neural network with backpropagation algorithm, radial basis function networks and hybrid PSO-neural network algorithm were applied to the database. Inputs were the ratio of cross sectional flow area to hydraulic diameter, experimental condition number depending on isothermal, heating, or cooling conditions and mass flow rate while the friction factor was the output of the constructed system. It was observed that such neural network based system could effectively predict the friction factor values of the flows regardless of their tube types. A dependency analysis to determine the strongest parameter that affected the network and database was also performed and tube geometry was found to be the strongest parameter of all as a result of analysis.

  12. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of deformation and aggregation of healthy and diseased red blood cells in a tube flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we report simulation results assessing the deformation and aggregation of mixed healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells (RBCs) in a tube flow. A three dimensional particle model based on Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is developed to predict the tube flow containing interacting cells. The cells are also modelled by DPD, with a Morse potential to characterize the cell-cell interaction. As validation tests, a single RBC in a tube flow and two RBCs in a static flow are simulated to examine the cell deformation and intercellular interaction, respectively. The study of two cells, one healthy and the other malaria-infected RBCs in a tube flow demonstrates that the malaria-infected RBC (in the leading position along flow direction) has different effects on the healthy RBC (in the trailing position) at the different stage of parasite development or at the different capillary number. With parasitic development, the malaria-infected RBC gradually loses its deformability, and in turn the corresponding trailing healthy RBC also deforms less due to the intercellular interaction. With increasing capillary number, both the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are likely to undergo an axisymmetric motion. The minimum intercellular distance becomes small enough so that rouleaux is easily formed, i.e., the healthy and malaria-infected RBCs are difficultly disaggregated.

  13. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 7. Single tube tests, critical heat flux test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report deals with critical heat flux (CHF) measurements in vertical down flow of water at low pressures in a round Inconel tube, 96 inches long and 0.62 inch inside diameter. A total of 28 CHF points were obtained. These data were found to correlate linearly with the single variable q, defined as the heat flux required to raise the enthalpy from the inlet value to the saturation value. These results were compared to the published results of Swedish investigators for vertical upflow of water at low pressures in round tubes of similar diameters and various lengths. The parameter q depends on the inlet enthalpy and is a nonlocal variable, thus this correlation is nonlocal unless the coefficients depend upon tube length in a particular prescribed manner. For the low pressure Swedish data, the coefficients are practically independent of length and hence the correlation is nonlocal. In the present investigation only one length was employed, so it is not possible to determine whether the correlation for these data is local or nonlocal, although there is reason to believe that it is local. The same correlation was applied to a large data base (thousands of CHF points) compiled from the published data of a number of groups and found to apply, with reasonable accuracy over a wide range of conditions, yielding sometimes local and sometimes nonlocal correlations. The basic philosophy of data analysis here was not to generate a single correlation which would reproduce all data, but to search for correlations which apply adequately over some range and which might have some mechanistic significance. The tentative conclusion is that at least two mechanisms appear operative, leading to two types of correlations, one local, the other nonlocal.

  14. Prototyping of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Interfaces for Flow Gating, Reagent Mixing, and Tubing Connection in Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiyang; Gong, Maojun

    2014-01-01

    Integrated microfluidic systems coupled with electrophoretic separations have broad application in biological and chemical analysis. Interfaces for the connection of various functional parts play a major role in the performance of a system. Here we developed a rapid prototyping method to fabricate monolithic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) Interfaces for flow-gated injection, online reagent mixing, and tube-to-tube connection in an integrated capillary electrophoresis (CE) system. The basic idea was based on the properties of PDMS: elasticity, transparency, and suitability for prototyping. The molds for these interfaces were prepared by using commercially available stainless steel wires and nylon lines or silica capillaries. A steel wire was inserted through the diameter of a nylon line and a cross format was obtained as the mold for PDMS casting of flow gates and 4-way mixers. These interfaces accommodated tubing connection through PDMS elasticity and provided easy visual trouble shooting. The flow gate used smaller channel diameters thus reducing flow rate by 25 fold for effective gating compared with mechanically machined counterparts. Both PDMS mixers and the tube-to-tube connectors could minimize the sample dead volume by using an appropriate capillary configuration. As a whole, the prototyped PDMS interfaces are reusable, inexpensive, convenient for connection, and robust when integrated with the CE detection system. Therefore, these interfaces could see potential applications in CE and CE-coupled systems. PMID:24331370

  15. Prototyping of poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfaces for flow gating, reagent mixing, and tubing connection in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiyang; Gong, Maojun

    2014-01-10

    Integrated microfluidic systems coupled with electrophoretic separations have broad application in biologic and chemical analysis. Interfaces for the connection of various functional parts play a major role in the performance of a system. Here, we developed a rapid prototyping method to fabricate monolithic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) interfaces for flow-gated injection, online reagent mixing, and tube-to-tube connection in an integrated capillary electrophoresis (CE) system. The basic idea was based on the properties of PDMS: elasticity, transparency, and suitability for prototyping. The molds for these interfaces were prepared by using commercially available stainless steel wires and nylon lines or silica capillaries. A steel wire was inserted through the diameter of a nylon line and a cross format was obtained as the mold for PDMS casting of flow gates and 4-way mixers. These interfaces accommodated tubing connection through PDMS elasticity and provided easy visual trouble shooting. The flow gate used smaller channel diameters, thus reducing flow rate by 25-fold for effective gating compared with mechanically machined counterparts. Both PDMS mixers and the tube-to-tube connectors could minimize the sample dead volume by using an appropriate capillary configuration. As a whole, the prototyped PDMS interfaces are reusable, inexpensive, convenient for connection, and robust when integrated with the CE detection system. Therefore, these interfaces could see potential applications in CE and CE-coupled systems. PMID:24331370

  16. Numerical study of the transient flow in the driven tube and the nozzle section of a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarcik-Polsky, Susan; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1993-01-01

    The initial flow in a shock tunnel was examined numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A finite-volume total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme was used to calculate the transient flow in a shock tunnel. Both viscous and inviscid, chemically nonreacting flows were studied. The study consisted of two parts, the first dealt with the transient flow in the driven-tube/nozzle interface region (inviscid calculations). The effects of varying the geometry in this region was examined. The second part of the study examined the transient flow in the nozzle (viscous calculations). The results were compared to experimental data.

  17. Measurement of the flow properties within a copper tube containing a deflagrating explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Larry G; Morris, John S; Jackson, Scott I

    2009-01-01

    We report on the propagation of deflagration waves in the high explosive (HE) PBX 9501 (95 wt % HMX, 5 wt% binder). Our test configuration, which we call the def1agration cylinder test (DFCT), is fashioned after the detonation cylinder test (DTCT) that is used to calibrate the JWL detonation product equation of state (EOS). In the DFCT, the HE is heated to a uniform slightly subcritical temperature, and is ignited at one end by a hot wire. For some configurations and initial conditions, we observe a quasi-steady wave that flares the tube into a funnel shape, stretching it to the point of rupture. This behavior is qualitatively like the DTCT, such that, by invoking certain additional approximations that we discuss, its behavior can be analyzed by the same methods. We employ an analysis proposed by G.I. Taylor to infer the pressure-volume curve for the burning, expanding flow. By comparing this result to the EOS of HMX product gas alone. we infer that only {approx}20 wt% of the HMX has burned at tube rupture. This result confirms pre-existing observations about the role of convective burning in HMX cookoff explosions.

  18. A numerical method for solving converging flows using a stream tube analysis and a trust region technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clermont, J. R.; de La Lande, M. E.; Dinh, T. Pham; Yassine, A.

    A numerical method based on the concept of stream tubes is presented for flow computations of incompressible fluids in plane or axisymmetric geometries. Under the assumption of noncirculatory flows, the physical domain D1 is transformed into a domain D in which the transformed streamlines are parallel straight lines. This approach makes it possible to compute the flow on successive stream tubes in the transformed domain from the wall to the central region of the flow. The discretization of the relevant equations leads to a nonlinear system of equations of unknowns f (the transformation from D1 into D) and the pressure p. A new algorithm based on optimization methods is applied to this set of equations. Numerical results are presented in the case of axisymmetric converging flows of Newtonian fluids.

  19. Particle concentration and tube size dependence of viscosities of Al2O3-water nanofluids flowing through micro- and minitubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok Pil; Lee, Ji-Hwan; Hwang, Kyo Sik; Choi, Stephen U. S.

    2007-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been performed on the effective viscosity of Al2O3-water nanofluids flowing through micrometer- and millimeter-sized circular tubes in the fully developed laminar flow regime. We have discovered that the effective viscosity of Al2O3-water nanofluids increases nonlinearly with the volume concentration of nanoparticles even in the very low range of 0.02-0.3vol% and strongly depends on the ratio of the nanoparticle diameter to the tube diameter. We have developed a modified Einstein model that accounts for the slip mechanism in nanofluids. The new model captures these new rheological features of nanofluids.

  20. The Effect of Compressibility on the Pressure Reading of a Prandtl Pitot Tube at Subsonic Flow Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walchner, O

    1939-01-01

    Errors arising from yawed flow were also determined up to 20 degrees angle of attack. In axial flow, the Prandtl pitot tube begins at w/a approx. = 0.8 to give an incorrect static pressure reading, while it records the tank pressure correctly, as anticipated, up to sonic velocity. Owing to the compressibility of the air, the Prandtl pitot tube manifests compression shocks when the air speed approaches velocity of sound. This affects the pressure reading of the instrument. Because of the increasing importance of high speed in aviation, this compressibility effect is investigated in detail.

  1. Transition to disorder: the effects of elasticity on thin film flow inside a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Jeffrey; Camassa, Roberto; Forest, G. M.; Ogrosky, H. Reed

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies of non-Newtonian flows driven up a tube by a high volume flux flow of air have suggested that a transition to disordered core-annular wave dynamics occurs when the liquid becomes elastic. Understanding this transition may shed light on the behavior of mucus in the human trachea. We present results from experiments of thin-film liquid flows of a Newtonian fluid and a non-Newtonian, dilute mixture of oligomers. These so-called Boger fluids are elastic, non-thixotropic liquid solutions made by dissolving a non-Newtonian solute in a Newtonian base. We compare, through video analysis, the wave dynamics of the Boger fluid to those of its Newtonian base under identical inflow conditions. We describe observed differences between the Newtonian and non-Newtonian cases. Finally, quantitative comparisons of wave properties and liquid mass transport are discussed. We would like to thank the National Science Foundation (DMS grants 0509423, 1009750, RTG -0943851) and the National Institutes of Health (NIEHS 534197-3411) for supporting this study.

  2. A comparison of avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier tube detectors for flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, William G.; Varadi, Gyula; Entine, Gerald; Podniesinski, Edward; Wallace, Paul K.

    2008-02-01

    Commercial flow cytometers use photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for fluorescence detection. These detectors have high linear gain and broad dynamic range, but have limited sensitivity in the red and near infrared spectral regions. We present a comparison of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and PMTs as detectors in flow cytometry instruments, and demonstrate improved sensitivity and resolution in the red and near infrared spectral regions using the APD. The relative performance of the PMT and APD were evaluated by simultaneously measuring the mean fluorescence intensity and coefficient of variation for emission from light emitting diode pulses, flow cytometry test beads, and fluorescently labeled cells. The relative signal to noise performance of the APD and PMT was evaluated over the 500 nm to 1050 nm wavelength range using pulsed light emitting diode light sources. While APDs have higher quantum efficiency but lower internal gain than PMTs, with appropriate external amplification the APD has signal to noise response that is comparable to PMTs in the 500 nm to 650 nm range and improved response in the 650 nm to 850 nm range The data demonstrates that the APD had performance comparable to the PMT in the spectral region between 500 to 650 nm and improved performance in the range of 650 to 1000 nm, where the PMT performance is quite poor. CD4 positive lymphocyte populations were easily identified in normal human blood both by APD and PMT using phycoerythrin labeled antibodies. In contrast, only the APD detector could resolve CD4 positive populations using 800 nm Quantum dot labeled antibodies.

  3. Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow Distribution in a Multipass Evaporator with Vertical Upward Main Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Manabu; Katasuta, Masafumi

    In this article, a calculation model that enables to predict two-phaseflow distribution in a multipass evaporator is proposed. The model considers the multipass evaporator as the combination of simple elements, i. e. straight pipes and T-junctions, and utilizes the correlations to predict the pressure drop at the elements. For the T-junction, however, we have so little knowledge, especially for the small diameter T-junction, that we make some experiments to evaluate the existing correlations for the junction pressure drop. We also do not have reliable model for predicting the phase separation characteristics, so that we used the empirical equations for liquid division ratio derived in our previous papers. By this model, gas phase flow distribution to each pass is determined as it makes the pressure at the outlet of each pass equal. Calculation results well predict the previously presented experimental data that were obtained under the condition of larger quality at the header inlet. The suitableness of this model suggests that the complexity of the two-phase flow distribution in multipass tube attributes to the phase separation phenomena in dividing two-phase flow at a T-junction

  4. Numerical and experimental visualization of reverse flow in an inclined isothermal tube

    SciTech Connect

    Mare, Thierry; Voicu, Ionut; Miriel, Jacques

    2005-10-01

    Combined forced and free convection in the entrance region of tubes occurs in many engineering installations such as heat exchangers, nuclear reactors, solar collectors, etc. The secondary flow induced by the buoyancy force and its effects on the hydrodynamic and thermal fields have therefore been investigated both experimentally and numerically. The present study considers the three dimensional developing laminar flow of water with constant viscosity and conductivity in an isothermal pipe inclined of 60{sup o} from horizontal. At first, the elliptical partial differential equations modelling mixed convection, have been numerically solved using a control volume based finite difference solver for Re=90, Pr=7 and Gr=3.3x10{sup 5}. The axial evolution of the velocity and fluid temperature profiles has shown that the upstream diffusion has an important effect near the inlet of the heating region. The shape and size of the region with negative velocities are detailed. Secondly, an experimental set up is described. The techniques used are based on PIV technology employing micrometer Nylon particles placed in a laser light-sheet and results are recorded by using a CDD camera. Analysed pictures have confirmed the existence of the reverse flow region in accordance with numerical results as obtained for an inclination of 60{sup o}.

  5. Film stability in a vertical rotating tube with a core-gas flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarma, G. S. R.; Lu, P. C.; Ostrach, S.

    1971-01-01

    The linear hydrodynamic stability of a thin-liquid layer flowing along the inside wall of a vertical tube rotating about its axis in the presence of a core-gas flow is examined. The stability problem is formulated under the conditions that the liquid film is thin, the density and viscosity ratios of gas to liquid are small and the relative (axial) pressure gradient in the gas is of the same order as gravity. The resulting eigenvalue problem is first solved by a perturbation method appropriate to axisymmetric long-wave disturbances. The damped nature (to within the thin-film and other approximations made) of the nonaxisymmetric and short-wave disturbances is noted. In view of the limitations on a truncated perturbation solution when the disturbance wavenumber is not small, an initial value method using digital computer is presented. Stability characteristics of neutral, growing, and damped modes are presented showing the influences of rotation, surface tension, and the core-gas flow. Energy balance in a neutral mode is also illustrated.

  6. Carbon dioxide and R410A flow boiling heat transfer, pressure drop, and flow pattern in horizontal tubes at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Yong

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been seriously considered as an alternate refrigerant for HCFC and HFC fluids, due to the increasing interest of environmentally safe refrigerants in air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. In this study, CO2 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are measured in macro-scale (6.1 and 3.5 mm) tubes at evaporation temperatures of -15 and -30°C. The measured results show that the nucleate boiling is a main heat transfer mechanism in the 6.1 mm tube and the contribution of convective boiling becomes greater with the decrease of tube diameters and the increase of mass fluxes. The surface roughness of the 6.1 and 3.5 mm tube are presented by SEM and AFM images and surface profiles, and it is shown that the rougher surface of the 6.1 mm tube can affect the flow boiling heat transfer. The CO2 heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are measured in a mini-scale (0.89 mm) multi-ported tube at the evaporation temperature of -30°C. Also, R410A and R22 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop in a macro-scale (6.1 mm) tube were measured, and they are compared with CO2. This comparison presents that the CO2 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients are higher than R410A and R22 at low vapor qualities, and CO2 pressure drop is significantly lower than R410A and R22. This advantageous characteristic for CO2 could be explained by properties such as surface tension, reduced pressure, and the density ratio of liquid to vapor. The prediction of heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop was performed by general correlations and the calculation results are compared with measured values. Two-phase flow patterns were visualized for CO2 and R410A in the 6 and 3 mm glass tubes, and they are compared with the Weisman et al. and the Wojtan et al. flow pattern maps. The flow pattern maps can determine the flow patterns relatively well, except the transition from intermittent to annular flow.

  7. Preliminary investigation of heat transfer to water flowing in an electrically heated Inconel tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Samuel J; Isely, Francis D

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with water flowing in an electrically heated Inconel tube with an inside diameter of 0.204 inch and a length-diameter ratio of 50 for ranges of Reynolds number up to 100,000 and of entrance pressure up to 200 inches of mercury gage. Correlation of average heat-transfer coefficients was obtained by use of the familiar Nusselt relation, wherein the physical properties of water were evaluated at an average bulk temperature. For conditions in which no boiling occurred, the data gave a good correlation. Runs made in the nucleate-boiling region, however, gave higher values of heat-transfer coefficient than would be predicted by the Nusselt relation.

  8. Analysis of Transient Heat Flow in a Long Narrow Tube with Convection and Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrizi, A. Abouei; Domairry, G.; Khesali, M. A.; Aghili, A. Latif

    2011-12-01

    In this study, transient heat flow in the tube with convection and radiation investigated using the newly developed analytic method, namely the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) which is one of the modern methods of optimization to solve problems. This method is completely efficient and has good run time to solve problems. By The lumped parameter approach, neglecting and simplify some physical effect, system of equation changes into ordinary differential equation (ODE), and we show the power of HAM method to solve this non linear equation and at the second step, we have been solved the problem with PSO, and Finally The analytical results are compared with PSO and another numerical solution (NS) with 4th Runge-Kutta. The comparison shows a good agreement between them. Also in this case we examine the effect of the various values of some physical dimensionless parameters.

  9. Finite difference analysis for developing laminar flow in circular tubes applied to forced and combined convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. W.

    1980-03-01

    The complete two-dimensional partial differential equations for developing laminar flow in a circular tube have been treated by a finite difference analysis. Property variation with temperature, especially that of viscosity, is allowed for in a flexible manner. The continuity and momentum equations, and then the energy equations, are solved by direct elimination at each axial step, and a marching procedure used in the axial direction. The stepwise energy balance is rigidly satisfied throughout by using it as a constituent equation in place of the 'explicit' wall thermal boundary condition normally used. The analysis predicts the complete developing hydrodynamic and thermal fields, together with friction factors and heat transfer coefficients. It has been tested for a range of fluid velocity and thermal boundary conditions and for various fluids, including high viscosity oils, water and air. Predictions for constant wall temperature presented here are for forced and combined convection and are compared with experimental data of Test and Zeldin and Schmidt.

  10. Status of selected ion flow tube MS: accomplishments and challenges in breath analysis and other areas.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2016-06-01

    This article reflects our observations of recent accomplishments made using selected ion flow tube MS (SIFT-MS). Only brief descriptions are given of SIFT-MS as an analytical method and of the recent extensions to the underpinning analytical ion chemistry required to realize more robust analyses. The challenge of breath analysis is given special attention because, when achieved, it renders analysis of other air media relatively straightforward. Brief overviews are given of recent SIFT-MS breath analyses by leading research groups, noting the desirability of detection and quantification of single volatile biomarkers rather than reliance on statistical analyses, if breath analysis is to be accepted into clinical practice. A 'strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats' analysis of SIFT-MS is made, which should help to increase its utility for trace gas analysis. PMID:27212131

  11. Diurnal variations on a plasmaspheric flux tube - Light ion flows and F region temperature enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiter, S. M.; Gombosi, T. I.; Rasmussen, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the diurnal variations on a plasmaspheric flux tube modeled using a time-dependent multispecies one-stream interhemispheric model for plasma flows. The model takes into account the effects of ionization, charge exchange, recombination, collisions, heat conduction, and allows for external heat sources. The simulation is done for June solstice conditions during solar minimum. Focus is placed on the presence of large downward H(+) velocities at about 320-km altitude in the winter (southern) hemisphere, in early morning when the summer hemisphere is sunlit but the winter hemisphere is dark. In addition, an upward H(+) flux is seen in the Southern Hemisphere at altitudes above 2000 km when the sun rises in the northern end.

  12. Structural isomers of C2N(+) - A selected-ion flow tube study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. S.; Petrie, S. A. H.; Freeman, C. G.; Mcewan, M. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of the structural isomers CCN(+) and CNC(+) were examined in a selected-ion flow tube at 300 + or - 5 K. The less reactive CNC(+) isomer was identified as the product of the reactions of C(+) + HCN and C(+) + C2N2; in these reactions only CNC(+) can be produced because of energy constraints. Rate coefficients and branching ratios are reported for the reactions of each isomer with H2, CH4, NH3, H2O, C2H2, HCN, N2, O2, N2O, and CO2. Ab initio calculations are presented for CCN(+) and CNC(+); a saddle point for the reaction CCN(+) yielding CNC(+) is calculated to be 195 kJ/mol above CNC(+). The results provide evidence that the more reactive CCN(+) isomer is unlikely to be present in measurable densities in interstellar clouds.

  13. Analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow through a spirally fluted tube using a porous substrate approach

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, V.; Vafai, K.; Christensen, R.N. )

    1994-08-01

    An innovative approach was opted for modeling the flow and heat transfer through spirally fluted tubes. The model divided the flow domain into two regions. The flutes were modeled as a porous substrate with direction-dependent permeabilities. This enabled modeling the swirl component in the fluted tube. The properties of the porous substrate such as its thickness, porosity, and ratio of the direction-dependent permeabilities were obtained from the geometry of the fluted tube. Experimental data on laminar Nusselt numbers and friction factors for different types of fluted tubes representing a broad range of flute geometry were available. Experimental data from a few of the tubes tested were used to propose a relationship between the permeability of the porous substrate and the flute parameters, particularly the flute spacing. The governing equations were discretized using the Finite Element Method. The model was verified and applied to the other tubes in the test matrix. Very good agreement was found between the numerical predictions and the experimental data. 20 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Influence of Reynolds number on coalescence of droplets with particle in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Masahiro; Yatagawa, Yuta; Kumagai, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence of droplets in flow through a tube at low Reynolds number is potentially useful for different purposes including the handling of fluids, control of chemical reaction, and in drug delivery systems. The phenomenon is also the basis for analyzing the flow of multiphase fluids through porous media such as in enhanced oil recovery and the breaking of emulsions in porous coalescers. With regard to examples of studies on the creeping motion of droplets in a flow through a tube, Hetsroni G. et al.[1] theoretically examined the motion of a spherical droplet or bubble with small d/D, where d is the undeformed diameter of the droplet or bubble, and D is the tube diameter. Higdon J.J.L. and Muldowney G.P. [2] numerically obtained the resistance functions for a spherical particle, droplet, and bubble. Olbricht, W.L. and Kung D.M.[3] and Aul R.W. and Olbricht, W.L.[4] mainly investigated the coalescence time of droplets. Aul R.W. and Olbricht W.L. proposed a semi-theoretical formula of the coalescence time. Based on the formula by them, Muraoka, M. et al.[5] proposed other semi-theoretical formulas of the coalescence time in terms of the resistance experienced by the liquid droplet in creeping flow through a tube. The latter formulas take the eccentricity of the following droplets into consideration. In the present study, a glass tube of inner diameter 2.0mm, outer diameter 7.0mm, and length 1500 mm was used as the test tube. Silicon oil with a kinematic viscosity of 3000cSt was employed as the test fluid of the droplet. A mixture of glycerol and pure water was used as the surrounding fluid of the creeping flow through a tube. A large volumetric syringe pump was used to maintain steady flow through the tube at a designated average velocity. The test tube was immersed in temperature-controlled water contained in a tank to maintain constant temperature of the system. The droplets were injected into the test tube. The behaviors of the droplets were monitored by a

  15. Measurement of Dean flow in a curved micro-tube using micro digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok; Lee, Sang Joon

    2009-02-01

    Digital micro holographic particle tracking velocimetry (HPTV) was used to measure the three-dimensional (3D) velocity field of a laminar flow in a curved micro-tube with a circular cross-section. The micro HPTV system consists of a high-speed camera and a single laser with an acoustic optical modulator (AOM) chopper. We obtained the temporal evolution of the instantaneous velocity field of water flow within curved micro-tubes with inner diameters of 100 and 300 μm. The 3D mean velocity-field distribution was obtained quantitatively by statistically averaging the instantaneous velocity fields. At low Dean numbers ( De), a secondary flow was not generated in the curved tube; however, with increasing Dean number a secondary flow consisting of two large-scale counter-rotating vortices arose due to enhanced centrifugal force. To reveal the flow characteristics at high Dean numbers, the trajectories of fluid particles were evaluated experimentally from the 3D velocity-field data measured using the HPTV technique. The present experimental results, especially the 3D particle trajectories, are likely to be helpful in understanding mixing phenomena in curved sections of various 3D curved micro-tubes or micro-channels, as well as in the design of such structures.

  16. Pulsation and mass loss in Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of pulsation in the outer layers of a typical Mira variable was studied in the adiabatic and isothermal limits. A shock wave propagates outward once per period and the radial velocity obtained from observations of hydrogen emission lines is identified with the velocity of gas in the post shock region. In the adiabatic case, mass loss in the form of a steady stellar wind was produced. In the isothermal case, no continuous mass loss was produced but occasional ejection of shells occur. Pulsation introduced into a star undergoing steady mass loss as a result of radiation pressure acting on grains caused the mass loss rate to increase by a factor of approximately 40, while the terminal velocity of the flow was almost unaltered.

  17. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part II: Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    The predictive ability of the available state-of-the-art heat transfer correlations of refrigerant-oil mixture is evaluated with the present experiment data of small tubes with inside diameter of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm. Most of these correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer coefficient of 6.34 mm tube, but none of them can predict heat transfer coefficient of 2.50 mm tube satisfactorily. A new correlation of two-phase heat transfer multiplier with local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture is developed. This correlation approaches the actual physical mechanism of flow boiling heat transfer of refrigerant-oil mixture and can reflect the actual co-existing conditions of refrigerant and lubricant oil. More than 90% of the experiment data of both test tubes have less than {+-}20% deviation from the prediction values of the new correlations. (author)

  18. Acoustic radiation from a fluid-filled, subsurface vascular tube with internal turbulent flow due to a constriction

    PubMed Central

    Yazicioglu, Yigit; Royston, Thomas J.; Spohnholtz, Todd; Martin, Bryn; Loth, Francis; Bassiouny, Hisham S.

    2006-01-01

    The vibration of a thin-walled cylindrical, compliant viscoelastic tube with internal turbulent flow due to an axisymmetric constriction is studied theoretically and experimentally. Vibration of the tube is considered with internal fluid coupling only, and with coupling to internal-flowing fluid and external stagnant fluid or external tissue-like viscoelastic material. The theoretical analysis includes the adaptation of a model for turbulence in the internal fluid and its vibratory excitation of and interaction with the tube wall and surrounding viscoelastic medium. Analytical predictions are compared with experimental measurements conducted on a flow model system using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure tube vibration and the vibration of the surrounding viscoelastic medium. Fluid pressure within the tube was measured with miniature hydrophones. Discrepancies between theory and experiment, as well as the coupled nature of the fluid–structure interaction, are described. This study is relevant to and may lead to further insight into the patency and mechanisms of vascular failure, as well as diagnostic techniques utilizing noninvasive acoustic measurements. PMID:16158674

  19. Steady and transient forced convection heat transfer for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, M.; Fukuda, K.; Liu, Q. S.; Hata, K.

    2016-06-01

    Steady and transient heat transfer coefficients for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs were measured. Platinum tubes with inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were used as test tubes, which were mounted vertically in the experimental water loop. In the experiment, the upward flow velocity ranged from 2 to 16 m/s, and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 4.77 × 103 to 9.16 × 104 at the inlet liquid temperatures ranged from 298 to 343 K. The heat generation rate exponentially increased with the function. The period of the heat generation rate ranged from 24 ms to 17.5 s. Experimental results indicate that steady heat transfer coefficients decreased with the increase in the inner diameter of the small tube. Moreover, the ratio of bulk viscosity to near-wall viscosity of water increased with the rise in surface temperature of the vertical tube. From the experimental data, correlations of steady-state heat transfer for inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were obtained. The heat transfer coefficient increased with decreasing the period of the heat generation rate as the flow velocity decreased. Moreover, the Nusselt number under the transient condition was affected by the Fourier number and the Reynolds number.

  20. OGLE and pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    OGLE-IV is currently one of the largest sky variability surveys worldwide, focused on the densest stellar regions of the sky. The survey covers over 3000 square degrees and monitors regularly over a billion sources. The main targets include the inner Galactic bulge and the Magellanic System. Supplementary shallower Galaxy Variability Survey covers the extended Galactic bulge and 2/3 of the whole Galactic disk. The current status, prospects, and the latest results of the OGLE-IV survey focused on pulsating stars, in particular RR Lyrae variables, are presented.

  1. Storing of Extracts in Polypropylene Microcentrifuge Tubes Yields Contaminant Peak During Ultra-flow Liquid Chromatographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Hegde, Harsha; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: This study was designed to understand the effect of storage in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes and glass vials during ultra-flow liquid chromatographic (UFLC) analysis. Materials and Methods: One ml of methanol was placed in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes (PP material, Autoclavable) and glass vials (Borosilicate) separately for 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 20, 40, and 80 days intervals stored at −4°C. Results: Contaminant peak was detected in methanol stored in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes using UFLC analysis. The contaminant peak detected was prominent, sharp detectable at 9.176 ± 0.138 min on a Waters 250–4.6 mm, 4 μ, Nova-Pak C18 column with mobile phase consisting of methanol:water (70:30). Conclusion: It was evident from the study that long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peak. Further, this may mislead in future reporting an unnatural compound by researchers. SUMMARY Long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peakContamination peak with higher area under the curve (609993) was obtained in ultra-flow liquid chromatographic run for methanol stored in PP microcentrifuge tubesContamination peak was detected at retention time 9.113 min with a lambda max of 220.38 nm and 300 mAU intensity on the given chromatographic conditionsGlass vials serve better option over PP microcentrifuge tubes for storing biological samples. Abbreviations used: UFLC: Ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography; LC: Liquid Chromatography; MS: Mass spectrometry; AUC: Area Under Curve. PMID:27563216

  2. A study of the influence of mean flow on the acoustic performance of Herschel-Quincke tubes

    PubMed

    Torregrosa; Broatch; Payri

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, a simple flow model is used in order to assess the influence of mean flow and dissipation on the acoustic performance of the classical two-duct Herschel-Quincke tube. First, a transfer matrix is obtained for the system, which depends on the values of the Mach number in the two branches. These Mach numbers are then estimated separately by means of an incompressible flow calculation. Finally, both calculations are used to study the way in which mean flow affects the position and value of the characteristic attenuation and resonances of the system. The results indicate the nontrivial character of the influence observed. PMID:10790011

  3. Method and tool for controlling fluid flow from a tubing string into a low pressure earth formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, D.G.; Nelson, W.F.

    1981-04-07

    A tool is disclosed for controlling flow of treating fluid from a tubing string into an earth formation, in which the bottom hole pressure is less than the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in the string. In another application, the tool is used in conjunction with a wash tool to wash sediment out of casing perforations and slotted liners. Before the downhole operation is commenced, a slidable piston in this tool closes off fluid outlet ports, to prevent the fluid from ''gravity flowing'' out of the tubing string. The piston is held in the closed position by the co-action of an adjusting bolt and a compression spring. The fluid is released from the tubing string by applying sufficient fluid pressure against the piston to overcome the spring load and thus move the piston downwardly past the fluid outlet port.

  4. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 1. Single tube uniformly heated tests: Part 1, Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate flow instability in circular tubes under vertical down-flow conditions. The test section L/D ratio range was 86 to 270. The maximum test section surface heat flux was one million Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}. Over 1700 data points were obtained. The effect of flowrate, inlet temperature, exit pressure, and heat flux on the initiation of flow instability was determined. In addition, the data was used to evaluate various methods of predicting the onset of flow instability. Using the measured wall temperatures, surface temperatures and heat transfer coefficients have been obtained. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient along the tube under both single and two phase conditions were developed.

  5. Dehumidification: Prediction of Condensate Flow Rate for Plate-Fin Tube Heat Exchangers Using the Latent j Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V.D.; Chen, D.T.; Conklin, J.C.

    1999-03-15

    Condensate flow rate is an important factor in designing dehumidifiers or evaporators. In this paper, the latentj fimtor is used to analyze the dehumidification performance of two plate-fin tube heat exchangers. This latent j factor, analogous to the total j factor, is a flmction of the mass transfa coefllcient, the volumetric air flow rate, and the Schmidt number. This latent j factor did predict condensate flow rate more directly and accurately than any other sensiblej factor method. The Iatentj factor has been used in the present study because the sensible j factor correlations presented in the literature failed to predict the condensate flow rate at high Reynolds numbers. Results show that the latent j i%ctor em be simply correlated as a fhnction of the Reynolds number based on the tube outside diameter and number of rows of the heat exchanger.

  6. A fast iterative discrete velocity method for ternary gas mixtures flowing through long tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalmás, Lajos

    2016-03-01

    An accelerated discrete velocity method is presented for flows of three-component gas mixtures through long tubes. The gas is modeled by the McCormack linearized kinetic equation. Two diffusion equations are derived from the kinetic one. These equations are solved during the kinetic iteration by a linear algebraic approach. Test simulations are performed for flows of He-Ar-Xe mixture driven by pressure or temperature gradients in a wide range of the gas rarefaction. The accelerated method requires fewer number of iterations and smaller computational times than the non-accelerated one in the early transition, slip and near-hydrodynamic domains. The efficiency of the accelerated scheme compared to the standard one increases with increasing rarefaction parameter. The computational performance in terms of the iteration criterion is also analyzed. In typical simulations, the convergent results can be reached in approximately less than two minutes by using the new method in a wide range of the gas rarefaction on a present-day computer.

  7. Dependency of the Reynolds number on the water flow through the perforated tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závodný, Zdenko; Bereznai, Jozef; Urban, František

    2016-06-01

    Safe and effective loading of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of the relationship between the coolant temperature in the fuel assembly outlet, measured by the thermocouple, and the mean coolant temperature profile in the thermocouple plane position. It is not possible to perform the analysis directly in the reactor, so it is carried out using measurements on the physical model, and the CFD fuel assembly coolant flow models. The CFD models have to be verified and validated in line with the temperature and velocity profile obtained from the measurements of the cooling water flowing in the physical model of the fuel assembly. Simplified physical model with perforated central tube and its validated CFD model serve to design of the second physical model of the fuel assembly of the nuclear reactor VVER 440. Physical model will be manufactured and installed in the laboratory of the Institute of Energy Machines, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava.

  8. A program for calculating expansion-tube flow quantities for real-gas mixtures and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1972-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN 4 language is presented which determines expansion-tube flow quantities for real test gases CO2 N2, O2, Ar, He, and H2, or mixtures of these gases, in thermochemical equilibrium. The effects of dissociation and first and second ionization are included. Flow quantities behind the incident shock into the quiescent test gas are determined from the pressure and temperature of the quiescent test gas in conjunction with: (1) incident-shock velocity, (2) static pressure immediately behind the incident shock, or (3) pressure and temperature of the driver gas (imperfect hydrogen or helium). The effect of the possible existence of a shock reflection at the secondary diaphragm of the expansion tube is included. Expansion-tube test-section flow conditions are obtained by performing an isentropic unsteady expansion from the conditions behind the incident shock or reflected shock to either the test-region velocity or the static pressure. Both a thermochemical-equilibrium expansion and a frozen expansion are included. Flow conditions immediately behind the bow shock of a model positioned at the test section are also determined. Results from the program are compared with preliminary experimental data obtained in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube.

  9. AEROSOL NUCLEATION AND GROWTH DURING LAMINAR TUBE FLOW: MAXIMUM SATURATIONS AND NUCLEATION RATES. (R827354C008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approximate method of estimating the maximum saturation, the nucleation rate, and the total number nucleated per second during the laminar flow of a hot vapour–gas mixture along a tube with cold walls is described. The basis of the approach is that the temperature an...

  10. Structure of black aurora associated with pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Bruce A.; Lessard, Marc L.; Blandin, Matthew J.; Fernandes, Philip A.

    2015-11-01

    Morphological behavior of black aurora as it relates to pulsating aurora is investigated by examining a collection of ground-based observations from January 2007 in support of the Rocket Observations of Pulsating Aurora rocket campaign. Images were sampled from video recorded by a Xybion intensified camera (30 fps) at Poker Flat Research Range, AK. The primary observations of black aurora recorded during the substorm recovery phase were between separate patches of pulsating aurora as well as pulsating aurora separated from diffuse aurora. In these observations the black aurora forms an apparent firm boundary between the auroral forms in a new behavior that is in contrast with previously reported observations. Also presented for the first time are black curls in conjunction with pulsating aurora. Curl structures that indicate shear plasma flows in the ionosphere may be used as a proxy for converging/diverging electric fields in and above the ionosphere. This new subset of black auroral behavior may provide visual evidence of black aurora as an ionospheric feedback mechanism as related to pulsating aurora.

  11. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  12. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of the effect of ventilation mode and tracheal tube position on air flow in the large airways.

    PubMed

    Lumb, A B; Burns, A D; Figueroa Rosette, J A; Gradzik, K B; Ingham, D B; Pourkashanian, M

    2015-05-01

    We have used computational fluid dynamic modelling to study the effects of tracheal tube size and position on regional gas flow in the large airways. Using a three-dimensional mathematical model, we simulated flow with and without a tracheal tube, replicating both physiological and artificial breathing. Ventilation through a tracheal tube increased proportional flow to the left lung from 39.5% with no tube to 43.1-47.2%, depending on tube position. Ventilation mode and tube distance from the carina had no effect on flow. Lateral displacement and deflection of the tube increased ventilation to the ipsilateral lung; for example, when deflected 10° to the left of centre, flow to the left lung increased from 43.8 to 53.7%. Because of the small diameter of a tracheal tube relative to the trachea, gas exits a tube at high velocity such that regional ventilation may be affected by changes in the position and angle of the tube. PMID:25581493

  13. a Numerical Study of Unsteady Fluid Flow in In-Line and Staggered Tube Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, S. B.; Spalding, D. B.

    1999-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the results of numerical calculations for transient flow in in-line-square and rotated-square tube banks with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 2:1, in the Reynolds number range of 30-3000. Transient-periodic behaviour is induced by the consideration of two or more modules, with a sinusoidal span-wise perturbation being applied in the upstream module. There is a triode-like effect, whereby the downstream response to the stimulus is amplified, and there is a net gain in the crosswise flow component. When an appropriate feedback mechanism is provided, a stable transient behaviour is obtained, with alternate vortices being shed from each cylinder. Flow visualization studies of the results of the calculations are presented together with quantitative details of pressure drop, lift, drag and heat transfer. For the staggered bank, a wake-switching or Coanda effect was observed as the serpentine-shaped wake attached to alternate sides of the downstream cylinder. The induced response is independent of the amplitude and frequency of the applied disturbance, including the case of spontaneous behaviour with no excitation mechanism. For the in-line case where each cylinder is in the shadow of the previous one, the motion is less pronounced; however, a shear-layer instability associated with the alternating spin of shed vortices was observed. In this case, the response was found to be somewhat dependent on the frequency of the applied disturbance, and a transient motion could not be induced spontaneously in the absence of an explicit feedback mechanism. Calculated Strouhal numbers were in fair agreement with experimental data: for the staggered geometry, they had values of between 0.26 and 0.35, or from -21 to +6% higher than measured values, while for the in-line geometry, the Strouhal numbers ranged between 0.09 and 0.12, or about 20-40% lower than experimental values.

  14. Heat transfer in a turbulent separation region with superimposed stream pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davletshin, I. A.; Mikheev, N. I.; Molochnikov, V. M.

    2008-06-01

    Experimental data on heat transfer in turbulent separation region behind obstacle in a broad frequency range of superimposed free-stream pulsations are reported. The heat-transfer coefficient was determined by solving an inverse non-stationary heat conduction problem based on experimentally measured wall transient temperature. Substantial heat-transfer intensification in the separation region of the pulsating flow was identified.

  15. Characterizing Accreting White Dwarf Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the population, mass distribution, and evolution of accreting white dwarfs impacts the entire realm of binary interaction, including the creation of Type Ia supernovae. We are concentrating on accreting white dwarf pulsators, as the pulsation properties allow us a view of how the accretion affects the interior of the star. Our ground- based photometry on 11 accreting pulsators with corresponding temperatures from HST UV spectra suggest a broad instability strip in the range of 10500 to 16000K. Additionally, tracking a post-outburst heated white dwarf as it cools and crosses the blue edge and resumes pulsation provides an independent method to locate the empirical instability strip. Determining a post-outburst cooling curve yields an estimate of the amount of heating and the accreted mass during the outburst. We request additional photometry of 2 objects that present unique properties: GW Lib which has not yet returned to its pre-outburst pulsation spectrum after 6 yrs, and EQ Lyn which returned to its pre- outburst pulsation after 3 yrs but is now turning on and off without ongoing outbursts. Following the pulsation spectrum changes over stretches of several nights in a row will provide specific knowledge of the stability of the observed modes.

  16. Condensation of refrigerants in horizontal, spirally grooved microfin tubes: Numerical analysis of heat transfer in the annular flow regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nozu, S.; Honda, H.

    2000-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the condensation heat transfer coefficient in a horizontal, spirally grooved microfin tube. Based on the flow observation study performed by the authors, a laminar film condensation model in the annular flow regime is proposed. The model assumes that all the condensate flow occurs through the grooves. The condensate film is segmented into thin and thick film regions. In the thin film region formed on the fin surface, the condensate is assumed to be drained by the combined surface tension and vapor shear forces. In the thick film region formed in the groove, on the other hand, the condensate is assumed to be driven by the vapor shear force. The present and previous local heat transfer data including four fluids (CFC11, HCFC22, HCFC123, and HFCl34a) and three microfin tubes are found to agree with the present predictions to a mean absolute deviation of 15.1%.

  17. Probabilistic determination of two-phase flow regimes in horizontal tubes utilizing an automated image recognition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassim, Emad W.; Newell, Ty A.; Chato, John C.

    2007-04-01

    Probabilistic two-phase flow map data is experimentally obtained for R134a at 25.0, 35.0, and 49.7°C, R410A at 25.0°C, mass fluxes from 100 to 600 kg/m2-s, qualities from 0 to1 in 8.00, 5.43, 3.90, and 1.74 mm I.D. single, smooth, adiabatic, horizontal tubes in order to extend probabilistic two-phase flow map modeling techniques to single tubes. A new web camera based flow visualization technique utilizing an illuminated diffuse striped background was used to enhance images, detect fine films, and aid in the automated image recognition process developed in the present study. This technique has an average time fraction classification error of less than 0.01.

  18. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Downward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    Experiments were performed on boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically downward in a copper smooth tube of 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and quality from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C. Pressure drops were measured and flow patterns were observed at mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s) and quality from 0.1 to 0.9. The characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified by comparing the measurements with the data for the vertically upward flow previously obtained.

  19. Solute uptake through the walls of a pulsating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, S. L.

    2001-04-01

    We investigate the uptake of a passive solute through the walls of a pulsating, fluid-filled channel into an adjacent medium in which the solute diffuses and is consumed at a constant rate. One end of the channel is open to well-mixed fluid containing the solute. The channel walls oscillate periodically in time and this prescribed motion generates steady streaming within the channel. We determine how this flow enhances the overall solute consumption (i.e. the flux of solute into the channel), the solute dispersion along the channel and the quantity of solute in the adjacent medium. The solute disperses in the channel due to the interaction between advection and transverse diffusion. The time-mean solute distribution throughout the channel and the medium is determined for a wide range of parameters. The results are applied to a new surgical technique used to treat patients with severe coronary artery disease, in which narrow tubes are created within ischemic heart muscle in an attempt to reperfuse the area directly with oxygenated blood.

  20. An experimental investigation of flow patterns and liquid entrainment in a horizontal-tube evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, John Steven

    An experimental study of two-phase flow patterns and droplet entrainment in a horizontal-tube evaporator was conducted. Measurements were made with serpentine aluminum and glass evaporators with geometries typical of those used for domestic refrigeration. The refrigerant in the majority of tests was R134a, which will replace R12 for refrigeration and automotive air-conditioning in 1995. The phenomenon of primary interest was the nonequilibrium transport of droplets within superheated vapor at the evaporator exit. Of particular concern were substantial variations in the liquid rate with time, and corresponding fluctuations in exit temperature. These variations are due to the formation of slugs which rapidly transport a surplus of liquid toward the exit. A flow loop was constructed to circulate oil-free refrigerant through the evaporator under widely varying conditions. Liquid carry over (expressed as a dimensionless entrained mass fraction, EMF) was measured as a function of inlet quality, heat flux, mass flux, and exit superheat. A laser-based phase/Doppler particle analyzer was used to measure droplet diameters and velocities at the evaporator exit. Tests with three refrigerants over wide ranges of operating conditions revealed time-averaged EMF's of no more than 0.1 percent. Analysis of variance showed exit superheat to have the strongest effect, followed by mass flux, inlet quality, and heat flux. Time-averaged EMF's varied with operating conditions by several orders of magnitude, decreasing with increasing superheat level (due to lower entrainment rates near the exit and more rapid droplet vaporization) and mass flux and inlet quality (due to reduced slug formation). The incidence of slug flow and its effect on evaporator exit conditions were documented in time-resolved experiments, using techniques such as auto- and cross-correlation and Fourier transform. Time-resolved EMF's as high as one percent were observed, as well as sharp reductions in exit superheat

  1. Secondary flow morphologies due to model stent-induced perturbations in a 180° curved tube during systolic deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-03-01

    Morphological changes in secondary flow structures due to a stent model were investigated under physiological inflow conditions. The stent model was inserted upstream of a 180° curved tube artery model. A carotid artery flow rate with its characteristic systolic and diastolic phases was supplied by a pump to drive a blood-analog working fluid. Phase-averaged, two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimeter measurements revealed the changing morphologies of these secondary flow structures. Continuous wavelet transforms provided an enhanced means to detect coherent secondary flow structures in this bio-inspired experimental study. A two-dimensional Ricker wavelet was used, and the optimal wavelet scale was determined using Shannon entropy as a measure of randomness in the wavelet-transformed vorticity fields. Planar secondary flow vortical structures at the 90° location in the curved tube were observed to exhibit distinct spatio-temporal characteristics different than the baseline flow without the stent. Flow patterns observed at the systolic peak comprised of early Lyne-type, along with a deformed Dean-type pair of ordered, coherent, high-circulation and counter-rotating vortical structures. Systolic deceleration was marked by the breakdown of large-scale coherent vortices into multiple, disordered, low-circulation, coherent vortical structures, indicating new transitional secondary flow morphologies. These multi-scale secondary flow morphologies arise due to the combination of imbalances in centrifugal and pressure forces, and stent-induced flow perturbations. The detailed flow physics associated with the formation of Dean and Lyne vortices are described in previous publications that have been cited in the manuscript. The secondary flow structures reported here are driven by similar fundamental mechanisms, but additionally contain more complicated effects, such as asymmetry and multiple strengths, that cannot be predicted from simple theories.

  2. Heat transfer deterioration in tubes caused by bulk flow acceleration due to thermal and frictional influences

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. D.

    2012-07-01

    Severe deterioration of forced convection heat transfer can be encountered with compressible fluids flowing through strongly heated tubes of relatively small bore as the flow accelerates and turbulence is reduced because of the fluid density falling (as the temperature rises and the pressure falls due to thermal and frictional influence). The model presented here throws new light on how the dependence of density on both temperature and pressure can affect turbulence and heat transfer and it explains why the empirical equations currently available for calculating effectiveness of forced convection heat transfer under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties sometimes fail to reproduce observed behaviour. It provides a criterion for establishing the conditions under which such deterioration of heat transfer might be encountered and enables heat transfer coefficients to be determined when such deterioration occurs. The analysis presented here is for a gaseous fluid at normal pressure subjected strong non-uniformity of fluid properties by the application of large temperature differences. Thus the model leads to equations which describe deterioration of heat transfer in terms of familiar parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number and Prandtl number. It is applicable to thermal power plant systems such as rocket engines, gas turbines and high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. However, the ideas involved apply equally well to fluids at supercritical pressure. Impairment of heat transfer under such conditions has become a matter of growing interest with the active consideration now being given to advanced water-cooled nuclear reactors designed to operate at pressures above the critical value. (authors)

  3. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde onto soil surfaces: a coated-wall flow tube study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Meusel, Hannah; Kuhn, Uwe; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2015-04-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important intermediate molecule and source of HO2 radicals. However, discrepancies exist between model simulated and observed HCHO concentrations, suggesting missing sources or sinks in the HCHO budget. Multiphase processes on the surface of soil and airborne soil-derived particles have been suggested as an important mechanism for the production/removal of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. In this work, the uptake of gaseous HCHO on soil surfaces were investigated through coated-wall flow tube experiments with HCHO concentration ranging from 10 to 40 ppbv. The results show that the adsorption of HCHO occurred on soil surfaces, and the uptake coefficient dropped gradually (i.e., by a factor of 5 after 1 hour) as the reactive surface sites were consumed. The HCHO uptake coefficient was found to be affected by the relative humidity (RH), decreasing from (2.4 ± 0.5) × 10-4 at 0% RH to (3.0 ± 0.08) × 10-5 at 70% RH, due to competition of water molecule absorption on the soil surface. A release of HCHO from reacted soil was also detected by applying zero air, suggesting the nature of reversible physical absorption and the existence of an equilibrium at the soil-gas interface. It implies that soil could be either a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on the ambient HCHO concentration. We also develop a Matlab program to calculate the uptake coefficient under laminar flow conditions based on the Cooney-Kim-Davis method.

  4. Modeling of pulsating heat pipes.

    SciTech Connect

    Givler, Richard C.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a computer model that describes the behavior of pulsating heat pipes (PHP). The purpose of the project was to develop a highly efficient (as compared to the heat transfer capability of solid copper) thermal groundplane (TGP) using silicon carbide (SiC) as the substrate material and water as the working fluid. The objective of this project is to develop a multi-physics model for this complex phenomenon to assist with an understanding of how PHPs operate and to be able to understand how various parameters (geometry, fill ratio, materials, working fluid, etc.) affect its performance. The physical processes describing a PHP are highly coupled. Understanding its operation is further complicated by the non-equilibrium nature of the interplay between evaporation/condensation, bubble growth and collapse or coalescence, and the coupled response of the multiphase fluid dynamics among the different channels. A comprehensive theory of operation and design tools for PHPs is still an unrealized task. In the following we first analyze, in some detail, a simple model that has been proposed to describe PHP behavior. Although it includes fundamental features of a PHP, it also makes some assumptions to keep the model tractable. In an effort to improve on current modeling practice, we constructed a model for a PHP using some unique features available in FLOW-3D, version 9.2-3 (Flow Science, 2007). We believe that this flow modeling software retains more of the salient features of a PHP and thus, provides a closer representation of its behavior.

  5. Enhancement of CHF water subcooled flow boiling in tubes using helically coiled wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, G. P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of an experimental investigation about the occurrence of the critical heat flux (CHF) in subcooled flow boiling of water, carried out to ascertain the influence of thermal hydraulic parameters on CHF under conditions typical of themronuclear fusion divertor thermal hydraulic design. Helically coiled wires were used as turbulence promoters to enhance the CHF with respect to the smooth channel. Geometric characteristics of stainless steel 304 Type test sections were: 6.0 and 8.0 mm i.d., 0.25 mm wal thickness, 0.1 and 0.15 m heated length, horizontal and vertical (upflow) position. Test sections were uniformly heated using d.c. current. A maximum CHF of about 30 MW/sq m was reached with smooth tubes under the following conditions: T(sub in) = 30 C, p = 4.6 MPa, u = 10 m/s, D = 8.0 mm, L = 0.1 m. Helically coiled wires (d = 1.0 mm, pitch = 20.0 mm) allowed an increase of the CHF up to 50%, with reference to smooth channels, coupled with a moderate increase of pressure drop (down to 25%). Pressure revealed a negative effect on the efficiency of turbulence promoters. No observable influence of the channel orientation was detected.

  6. 3D Numerical heat transfer and fluid flow analysis in plate-fin and tube heat exchangers with electrohydrodynamic enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Wen; Jang, Jiin-Yuh

    2005-05-01

    Three-dimensional laminar fluid flow and heat transfer over a four-row plate-fin and tube heat exchanger with electrohydrodynamic (EHD) wire electrodes are studied numerically. The effects of different electrode arrangements (square and diagonal), tube pitch arrangements (in-line and staggered) and applied voltage (VE=0-16 kV) are investigated in detail for the Reynolds number range (based on the fin spacing and frontal velocity) ranging from 100 to 1,000. It is found that the EHD enhancement is more effective for lower Re and higher applied voltage. The case of staggered tube pitch with square wire electrode arrangement gives the best heat transfer augmentation. For VE=16 kV and Re = 100, this study identifies a maximum improvement of 218% in the average Nusselt number and a reduction in fin area of 56% as compared that without EHD enhancement.

  7. Fluid structure interaction modelling for the vibration of tube bundles, part I: analysis of the fluid flow in a tube bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Desbonnets, Quentin; Broc, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that a fluid may strongly influence the dynamic behaviour of a structure. Many different physical phenomena may take place, depending on the conditions: fluid flow, fluid at rest, little or high displacements of the structure. Inertial effects can take place, with lower vibration frequencies, dissipative effects also, with damping, instabilities due to the fluid flow (Fluid Induced Vibration). In this last case the structure is excited by the fluid. Tube bundles structures are very common in the nuclear industry. The reactor cores and the steam generators are both structures immersed in a fluid which may be submitted to a seismic excitation or an impact. In this case the structure moves under an external excitation, and the movement is influence by the fluid. The main point in such system is that the geometry is complex, and could lead to very huge sizes for a numerical analysis. Homogenization models have been developed based on the Euler equations for the fluid. Only inertial effects are taken into account. A next step in the modelling is to build models based on the homogenization of the Navier-Stokes equations. The papers presents results on an important step in the development of such model: the analysis of the fluid flow in a oscillating tube bundle. The analysis are made from the results of simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid. Comparisons are made with the case of the oscillations of a single tube, for which a lot of results are available in the literature. Different fluid flow pattern may be found, depending in the Reynolds number (related to the velocity of the bundle) and the Keulegan Carpenter number (related to the displacement of the bundle). A special attention is paid to the quantification of the inertial and dissipative effects, and to the forces exchanges between the bundle and the fluid. The results of such analysis will be used in the building of models based on the homogenization of the Navier

  8. Boiling Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of a Refrigerant Flowing Vertically Upward in a Small Diameter Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazushi; Mori, Hideo; Ohishi, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu

    In the present study, experiments were performed to examine characteristics of flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop of a refrigerant R410A flowing vertically upward in a copper smooth tube with 1.0 mm inside diameter for the development of a high-performance heat exchanger using small diameter tubes for air conditioning systems. Local heat transfer coefficients were measured in a range of mass fluxes from 30 to 200 kg/(m2•s), heat fluxes from 1 to 16 kW/m2 and qualities from 0.1 to over 1 at evaporation temperature of 10°C, and pressure drops were also measured at mass fluxes of 100 and 200 kg/(m2•s) and qualities from 0.1 to 0.9. Three types of flow pattern were observed in the tube: A slug, a slug-annular and an annular flow. Based on the measurements, the characteristics of frictional pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient and dryout qualities were clarified. The measured pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient were compared with correlations.

  9. Steady Secondary Flows Generated by Periodic Compression and Expansion of an Ideal Gas in a Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    This study establishes a consistent set of differential equations for use in describing the steady secondary flows generated by periodic compression and expansion of an ideal gas in pulse tubes. Also considered is heat transfer between the gas and the tube wall of finite thickness. A small-amplitude series expansion solution in the inverse Strouhal number is proposed for the two-dimensional axisymmetric mass, momentum and energy equations. The anelastic approach applies when shock and acoustic energies are small compared with the energy needed to compress and expand the gas. An analytic solution to the ordered series is obtained in the strong temperature limit where the zeroth-order temperature is constant. The solution shows steady velocities increase linearly for small Valensi number and can be of order I for large Valensi number. A conversion of steady work flow to heat flow occurs whenever temperature, velocity or phase angle gradients are present. Steady enthalpy flow is reduced by heat transfer and is scaled by the Prandtl times Valensi numbers. Particle velocities from a smoke-wire experiment were compared with predictions for the basic and orifice pulse tube configurations. The theory accurately predicted the observed steady streaming.

  10. Experimental consideration of capillary chromatography based on tube radial distribution of ternary mixture carrier solvents under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Naoya; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    A capillary chromatography system has been developed based on the tube radial distribution of the carrier solvents using an open capillary tube and a water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate mixture carrier solution. This tube radial distribution chromatography (TRDC) system works under laminar flow conditions. In this study, a phase diagram for the ternary mixture carrier solvents of water, acetonitrile, and ethyl acetate was constructed. The phase diagram that included a boundary curve between homogeneous and heterogeneous solutions was considered together with the component ratios of the solvents in the homogeneous carrier solutions required for the TRDC system. It was found that the TRDC system performed well with homogeneous solutions having component ratios of the solvents that were positioned near the homogeneous-heterogeneous solution boundary of the phase diagram. For preparing the carrier solutions of water-hydrophilic/hydrophobic organic solvents for the TRDC system, we used for the first time methanol, ethanol, 1,4-dioxane, and 1-propanol, instead of acetonitrile (hydrophilic organic solvent), as well as chloroform and 1-butanol, instead of ethyl acetate (hydrophobic organic solvent). The homogeneous ternary mixture carrier solutions were prepared near the homogeneous-heterogeneous solution boundary. Analyte mixtures of 2,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid and 1-naphthol were separated with the TRDC system using these homogeneous ternary mixture carrier solutions. The pressure change in the capillary tube under laminar flow conditions might alter the carrier solution from homogeneous in the batch vessel to heterogeneous, thus affecting the tube radial distribution of the solvents in the capillary tube. PMID:21415507

  11. Dilute bidispersed tube flow: Role of interclass collisions at increased loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borée, J.; Caraman, N.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents measurements and analysis of a bidispersed two-phase flow system at low (11%) and moderate (110%) mass loadings in a fully developed pipe flow. Our goal is to provide data and analysis showing the role of interclass collisions. The mass distribution of the particles mixture is therefore chosen in order to promote collisions between large 90μm and 60μm glass beads. Velocity statistics up to and including the third-order moments at both mass loadings are presented. The radial turbulent transport of longitudinal and radial fluctuating kinetic stresses is much higher for the particles than for the fluid phase. Dominant effects in the radial balance of the kinetic stresses are discussed. The signature of interparticle collisions is observed by comparing measurements at high- and low-mass loadings. In particular, at higher-mass loading, we measure a decrease of the streamwise kinetic stress of the large particles over the entire section of the tube. On the other hand, the streamwise kinetic stress of the 60μm particles decreases in the high shear region only. The most striking result is the strong increase of the radial fluctuating velocities of the glass beads and of the radial transport of the radial fluctuating kinetic energy. The expected phenomenology is an important contribution of interparticle collisions to the radial variance νp' associated with a damping of the longitudinal kinetic stresses. This damping is more important for the 90μm glass beads than for the 60μm glass beads because the 60μm particles receive kinetic energy from 90μm particles. The redistribution mechanisms via collisions are expected to be largest in the near wall region where the anisotropy of the fluctuating motion is high. An analysis of the collision frequency in different regions of the flow shows that, even at Mj=110%, the mean time scale between collisions is of the order or larger than the particles aerodynamic time constant. Therefore, collisions cannot

  12. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  13. Effect of collisions on the dispersed phase fluctuation in a dilute tube flow: Experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraman, N.; Borée, J.; Simonin, O.

    2003-12-01

    Measurements of particle fluctuation in a fully developed pipe flow at moderate Reynolds number is performed in this study. The present data are obtained by using a two-component phase Doppler anemometer. The radial profiles are measured at a distance of 0.2 diameter downstream the exit of the tube. At this location, the core flow still carries all the properties of the tube turbulence. A low mass loading of partly responsive particles is considered. The Stokes number of these partly responsive particles is of order 3 when the integral turbulent time scale on the axis of the tube flow is used. The velocity statistics are analyzed up to the third-order moments and we show that the radial turbulent transport of fluctuating kinetic energy is much higher for the particles than for the fluid. Radial balances of longitudinal and radial kinetic stresses of the particles are examined. Particle-particle collisions have a negligible direct effect on the evolution of the longitudinal fluctuating velocity. However, even at this low mass loading, we prove that particle-particle collisions and redistribution from the very large streamwise velocity variance to the radial velocity variance in the near wall region strongly influence the radial fluctuation of the particles. In the core region, a quadrant analysis enables the detection of low streamwise velocities focusing toward the axis and the corresponding quadrants are strongly dominant for the glass beads. We expect that the partly responsive particles, because of their inertia, keep some memory of the lower streamwise velocity existing in the near wall region while they fly across the tube. The collisions in the near wall region are, therefore, expected to have a strong indirect influence on the whole kinetic-energy balance in the tube by partly driving the radial transport of the fluctuating kinetic energy of the particles. This effect should be particularly strong in this circular geometry because events from any azimuthal

  14. Controllable preparation of microscale tubes with multiphase co-laminar flow in a double co-axial microdevice.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wenjie; Li, Shaowei; Lu, Yangcheng; Xu, Jianhong; Luo, Guangsheng

    2009-11-21

    This article describes a simple method for the fabrication of microscale polymer tubes. A double co-axial microchannel device was designed and fabricated. Liquid/liquid/liquid multiphase co-laminar flows were realized in a microchannel by choosing working systems. Three kinds of polymeric solutions were selected as the middle phase while a polyethyleneglycol aqueous solution was used as the inner and outer phases in the microfluidic process. The outer and inner phases acted as extractants of the polymer solvent. A stable double core-annular flow was formed by optimizing the composition of the outer and inner phases, and highly uniform tubes were successfully fabricated by the solvent extraction method. Both the outer diameter of the tubes and the wall thickness could be adjusted from 300 microm to 900 microm and from 40 microm to 150 microm by varying the flux of the fluids and the rolling velocity of the collection roller. In addition, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were successfully encapsulated into the polymer tubes with this technique. This technology has the potential to generate hollow fiber membranes for applications in separation and reaction processes. PMID:19865737

  15. Correlation of refrigerant mass flow rate through adiabatic capillary tubes using mixture refrigerant carbondioxide and ethane for low temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasruddin, Syaka, Darwin R. B.; Alhamid, M. Idrus

    2012-06-01

    Various binary mixtures of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons, especially propane or ethane, as alternative natural refrigerants to Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or Hydro fluorocarbons (HFCs) are presented in this paper. Their environmental performance is friendly, with an ozone depletion potential (ODP) of zero and Global-warming potential (GWP) smaller than 20. The capillary tube performance for the alternative refrigerant HFC HCand mixed refrigerants have been widely studied. However, studies that discuss the performance of the capillary tube to a mixture of natural refrigerants, in particular a mixture of azeotrope carbon dioxide and ethane is still undeveloped. A method of empirical correlation to determine the mass flow rate and pipe length has an important role in the design of the capillary tube for industrial refrigeration. Based on the variables that effect the rate of mass flow of refrigerant in the capillary tube, the Buckingham Pi theorem formulated eight non-dimensional parameters to be developed into an empirical equations correlation. Furthermore, non-linear regression analysis used to determine the co-efficiency and exponent of this empirical correlation based on experimental verification of the results database.

  16. CFD analysis of the two-phase bubbly flow characteristics in helically coiled rectangular and circular tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Alamin; Fsadni, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their ease of manufacture, high heat transfer efficiency and compact design, helically coiled heat exchangers are increasingly being adopted in a number of industries. The higher heat transfer efficiency over straight pipes is due to the secondary flow that develops as a result of the centrifugal force. In spite of the widespread use of helically coiled heat exchangers, and the presence of bubbly two-phase flow in a number of systems, very few studies have investigated the resultant flow characteristics. This paper will therefore present the results of CFD simulations for the two-phase bubbly flow in helically coiled heat exchangers as a function of the volumetric void fraction and the tube cross-section design. The CFD results are compared to the scarce flow visualisation experimental results available in the open literature.

  17. Experimental and numerical investigations of flow structure and momentum transport in a turbulent buoyancy-driven flow inside a tilted tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znaien, J.; Hallez, Y.; Moisy, F.; Magnaudet, J.; Hulin, J. P.; Salin, D.; Hinch, E. J.

    2009-11-01

    Buoyancy-driven turbulent mixing of fluids of slightly different densities [At=Δρ/(2⟨ρ⟩)=1.15×10-2] in a long circular tube tilted at an angle θ=15° from the vertical is studied at the local scale, both experimentally from particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence measurements in the vertical diametrical plane and numerically throughout the tube using direct numerical simulation. In a given cross section of the tube, the axial mean velocity and the mean concentration both vary linearly with the crosswise distance z from the tube axis in the central 70% of the diameter. A small crosswise velocity component is detected in the measurement plane and is found to result from a four-cell mean secondary flow associated with a nonzero streamwise component of the vorticity. In the central region of the tube cross section, the intensities of the three turbulent velocity fluctuations are found to be strongly different, that of the streamwise fluctuation being more than twice larger than that of the spanwise fluctuation which itself is about 50% larger than that of the crosswise fluctuation. This marked anisotropy indicates that the turbulent structure is close to that observed in homogeneous turbulent shear flows. Still in the central region, the turbulent shear stress dominates over the viscous stress and reaches a maximum on the tube axis. Its crosswise variation is approximately accounted for by a mixing length whose value is about one-tenth of the tube diameter. The momentum exchange in the core of the cross section takes place between its lower and higher density parts and there is no net momentum exchange between the core and the near-wall regions. A sizable part of this transfer is due both to the mean secondary flow and to the spanwise turbulent shear stress. Near-wall regions located beyond the location of the extrema of the axial velocity (|z|≳0.36 d) are dominated by viscous stresses which transfer momentum toward (from) the wall near the

  18. Toward non-Newtonian effects on secondary flow structures in a 180 degree bent tube model for curved arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Stevin; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Fuchs, Laszlo; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the development of vortical flow structures of blood like fluids in a 180 degree tube bend, analogous to the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are localized to regions of curvature in the arterial tree. The pathology of atherogenesis is widely considered an inflammatory response, hypothesized to be modulated by the interplay between Wall Shear Stress (WSS) variations and particulate transport mechanisms from the bulk fluid core to the near wall. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics as well as the rheological properties of the blood, which in turn are dependent on the bulk secondary flows. In this work, the time dependent fluid flow under various physiological flow conditions are investigated both experimentally and numerically. A Newtonian blood analog fluid model is considered in both studies to validate both methods and thereby study flow structure development during steady as well as pulsatile conditions. Particle image velocimetry (2C - 2D PIV) is used to acquire velocity field data from an acrylic tube bend. The numerical study is extended to consider the non-Newtonian properties of blood according to an empirical model to identify the relative importance of the non-Newtonian behavior. The studies show complex Dean and Lyne vortex interaction that are enhanced with increasing peak Reynolds numbers.

  19. Experimental investigation on heat transfer coefficient during upward flow condensation of R410A in vertical smooth tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunxiao; Jia, Li

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on condensation of R410A upward flow in vertical tubes with the same inner diameter of 8.02mm and different lengths of 300 mm, 400 mm, 500 mm and 600mm. Condensation experiments were performed at mass fluxes of 103-490 kg m-2s-1. The saturation temperatures of experimental condition were 31°C, 38°C and 48°C, alternatively. The average vapor quality in the test section is between 0.91 and 0.98. The effects of tube length, mass flux and condensation temperature on condensation were discussed. Four correlations used for the upward flow condensation were compared with the experimental data obtained from various experimental conditions. A modified correlation was proposed within a ±15% deviation range.

  20. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  1. 3-D solution of flow in an infinite square array of circular tubes by using boundary-fitted coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow over circular tubes have wide applications in the design of heat exchangers and nuclear reactors. However, it is often difficult to accurately calculate the detailed velocity and temperature distributions of the flow because of the complex geometry involved in the analysis, and a lack of an appropriate coordinate system for the analysis. Boundary conditions on the surfaces of the tubes are often interpolated. This interpolation process introduces inaccuracy. To overcome this difficulty, the present study used the technique of the boundary-fitted coordinate system. In this technique, all the physical boundaries are transformed into constant coordinate lines in the transformed coordinates. Therefore, the boundary conditions can be specified on the grid points without interpolation.

  2. Fabrication of carbon nano-tubes decorated with ultra fine superparamagnetic nano-particles under continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Chin, Suk Fun; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Raston, Colin L

    2008-03-01

    Ultra fine (2-3 nm) magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nano-particles are uniformly deposited on single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWCNTs) pre-functionalised with carboxylic acid groups using microwave radiation. The deposition process involves chemical precipitation associated with continuous flow spinning disc processing (SDP), as a rapid, environmentally friendly approach which is readily scalable for large scale synthesis. The resulting decorated SWCNTs are superparamagnetic with specific saturated magnetization of 30 emu g(-1). PMID:18305862

  3. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. IV - Aerodynamic lift on a thin cylinder in convective flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsinganos, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic lift exerted on a long circular cylinder immersed in a convective flow pattern in an ideal fluid is calculated to establish the equilibrium position of the cylinder. The calculations establish the surprising result that the cylinder is pushed out the upwellings and the downdrafts of the convective cell, into a location midway between them. The implications for the intense magnetic flux tubes in the convection beneath the surface of the sun are considered.

  4. Experimental and numerical study of pulsating transversal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorchenko, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.; Timofeev, K. Yu.; Zhakharova, Yu. V.

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents results of joint experimental and numerical investigation of pulsating jet penetration into still air and supersonic flow. Goal of the study is to investigate two-dimensional (2D) Hartmann generator (HG) properties and clear up its possibilities in providing better mixing between air and secondary (injected) gases.

  5. Ensemble phase averaging equations for multiphase flows in porous media, part I: the bundle-of-tubes model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Zhang, Duan; Currier, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A bundle-of-tubes construct is used as a model system to study ensemble averaged equations for multiphase flow in a porous material. Momentum equations for the fluid phases obtained from the method are similar to Darcy's law, but with additional terms. We study properties of the additional terms, and the conditions under which the averaged equations can be approximated by the diffusion model or the extended Darcy's law as often used in models for multiphase flows in porous media. Although the bundle-of-tubes model is perhaps the simplest model for a porous material, the ensemble averaged equation technique developed in this paper assumes the very same form in more general treatments described in Part 2 of the present work (Zhang 2009). Any model equation system intended for the more general cases must be understood and tested first using simple models. The concept of ensemble phase averaging is dissected here in physical terms, without involved mathematics through its application to the idealized bundle-of-tubes model for multiphase flow in porous media.

  6. Design and Evaluation of Modifications to the NASA Langley Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    The need to minimize fan noise radiation from commercial aircraft engine nacelles continues to provide an impetus for developing new acoustic liner concepts. If the full value of such concepts is to be attained, an understanding of grazing flow effects is crucial. Because of this need for improved understanding of grazing flow effects, the NASA Langley Research Center Liner Physics Group has invested a large effort over the past decade into the development of a 2-D finite element method that characterizes wave propagation through a lined duct. The original test section in the Langley Grazing IncidenceTube was used to acquire data needed for implementation of this finite element method. This test section employed a stepper motor-driven axial-traversing bar, embedded in the wall opposite the test liner, to position a flush-mounted microphone at pre-selected locations. Complex acoustic pressure data acquired with this traversing microphone were used to educe the acoustic impedance of test liners using this 2-D finite element method and a local optimization technique. Results acquired in this facility have been extensively reported, and were compared with corresponding results from various U.S. aeroacoustics laboratories in the late 1990 s. Impedance data comparisons acquired from this multi-laboratory study suggested that it would be valuable to incorporate more realistic 3-D aeroacoustic effects into the impedance eduction methodology. This paper provides a description of modifications that have been implemented to facilitate studies of 3-D effects. The two key features of the modified test section are (1) the replacement of the traversing bar and its flush-mounted microphone with an array of 95 fixed-location microphones that are flush-mounted in all four walls of the duct, and (2) the inclusion of a suction device to modify the boundary layer upstream of the lined portion of the duct. The initial results achieved with the modified test section are provided in this

  7. Numerical simulation of a turbulent flow with droplets injection in annular heated air tube using the Reynolds stress model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merouane, H.; Bounif, A.; Abidat, M.

    2013-12-01

    This work presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of single-phase and two-phase flow. The droplets are injected in annular heated air tube. The numerical simulation is performed by using a commercial CFD code witch uses the finite-volume method to discretize the equations of fluid flow. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Reynolds stress model were used in the computation. The governing equations are solved by using a SIMPLE algorithm to treat the pressure terms in the momentum equations. The results of prediction are compared with the experimental data.

  8. Flow sheet development for the dissolution of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes in F-Canyon, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-09-20

    Two dissolution flow sheets were tested for the desorption of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Both the aluminum (from the can, cladding, and fuel core) and the plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) are dissolved simultaneously, i.e., a co-dissolution flow sheet. In the first series of tests, 0.15 and 0.20 molar (M) potassium fluoride (KF) solutions were used and the dissolution extended over several days. In the other series of tests, solutions with higher concentrations of fluoride (0.25 to 0.30 M) were used. Calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) was used in those tests as the fluoride source.

  9. Fluid flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid in an internally finned tube with different fin lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabski, Jakub Krzysztof; Kołodziej, Jan Adam

    2016-06-01

    In the paper an analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer of a power-law fluid in an internally finned tube with different fin length is conducted. Nonlinear momentum equation of a power-law fluid flow and nonlinear energy equation are solved using the Picard iteration method. Then on each iteration step the solution of inhomogeneous equation consists of two parts: the general solution and the particular solution. Firstly the particular solution is obtained by interpolation of the inhomogeneous term by means of the radial basis functions and monomials. Then the general solution is obtained using the method of fundamental solutions and by fulfilling boundary conditions.

  10. Safety of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement in patients with continuous-flow ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Keshmiri, Hesam; Yousuf, Tariq; Issa, Rasha; Kurien, Sudha; Silva, Roeglio

    2016-06-01

    In this retrospective study, the safety of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement was evaluated as maintaining adequate nutritional support for patients with left ventricular assist devices is crucial. Nineteen patients who underwent PEG tube placement were followed for an average of 40 days. Overall, minor complications such as infections, bleeding, and PEG tube malposition occurred in just 19% of patients while the rate of major complications such as perforation was 5%. Further randomized control trials are necessary to validate this assertion that the safety of PEG placement in patients with left ventricular assist devices is similar to that of the general population. PMID:27101842

  11. Ventricular dilation and elevated aqueductal pulsations in a new experimental model of communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Wagshul, M.; Smith, S.; Wagshul, M.; McAllister, J.P.; Rashid, S.; Li, J.; Egnor, M.R.; Walker, M.L.; Yu, M.; Smith, S.D.; Zhang, G.; Chen, J.J.; Beneveniste, H.

    2009-03-01

    In communicating hydrocephalus (CH), explanations for the symptoms and clear-cut effective treatments remain elusive. Pulsatile flow through the cerebral aqueduct is often significantly elevated, but a clear link between abnormal pulsations and ventriculomegaly has yet to be identified. We sought to demonstrate measurement of pulsatile aqueductal flow of CSF in the rat, and to characterize the temporal changes in CSF pulsations in a new model of CH. Hydrocephalus was induced by injection of kaolin into the basal cisterns of adult rats (n = 18). Ventricular volume and aqueductal pulsations were measured on a 9.4 T MRI over a one month period. Half of the animals developed ventricular dilation, with increased ventricular volume and pulsations as early as one day post-induction, and marked chronic elevations compared to intact controls (volume: 130.15 {+-} 83.21 {mu}l vs. 15.52 {+-} 2.00 {mu}l; pulsations: 114.51 nl {+-} 106.29 vs. 0.72 {+-} 0.13 nl). Similar to the clinical presentation, the relationship between ventricular size and pulsations was quite variable. However, the pulsation time-course revealed two distinct sub-types of hydrocephalic animals: those with markedly elevated pulsations which persisted over time, and those with mildly elevated pulsations which returned to near normal levels after one week. These groups were associated with severe and mild ventriculomegaly respectively. Thus, aqueductal flow can be measured in the rat using high-field MRI and basal cistern-induced CH is associated with an immediate change in CSF pulsatility. At the same time, our results highlight the complex nature of aqueductal pulsation and its relationship to ventricular dilation.

  12. Ultra-low-frequency magnetic pulsations in the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian J.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft observations have shown that geomagnetic pulsations originating in magnetospheric processes, in spite of their small amplitude on the ground, have amplitudes in space relative to the local magnetic field of 5-10 percent and occasionally up to about 50 percent. It is noted that by studying geomagnetic pulsations, a detailed comparison can be made between plasma physics theory and observations that are not possible in laboratory experiments. Also geomagnetic pulsations play a role in magnetospheric dynamics and energy transport, and their study forms an integral part of enhancing the knowledge of the magnetosphere. The importance of spacecraft observations are discussed and attention is given to such topics as waves in the magnetosphere, field-line resonances, the quantitative analysis of a dipole field, plasma instabilities, and energy flow.

  13. Ultra-low-frequency magnetic pulsations in the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Spacecraft observations have shown that geomagnetic pulsations originating in magnetospheric processes, in spite of their small amplitude on the ground, have amplitudes in space relative to the local magnetic field of 5-10 percent and occasionally up to about 50 percent. It is noted that by studying geomagnetic pulsations, a detailed comparison can be made between plasma physics theory and observations that are not possible in laboratory experiments. Also geomagnetic pulsations play a role in magnetospheric dynamics and energy transport, and their study forms an integral part of enhancing the knowledge of the magnetosphere. The importance of spacecraft observations are discussed and attention is given to such topics as waves in the magnetosphere, field-line resonances, the quantitative analysis of a dipole field, plasma instabilities, and energy flow. 28 refs.

  14. On the relation between coronal heating, flux tube divergence, and the solar wind proton flux and flow speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Onulf; Leer, Egil; Hansteen, Viggo H.

    1994-01-01

    A one-fluid solar wind model is used to investigate some relations between coronal heating, the flux tube divergence near the Sun, and the solar wind proton flux and flow speed. The effects of energy addition to the supersonic region of the flow are also studied. We allow for a mechanical energy flux that heats the corona, and an Alfven wave energy flux that adds energy, mainly to the supersonic flow, both as momentum and as heat. We find that the mechanical energy flux determines the solar wind mass flux, and in order to keep an almost constant proton flux at the orbit of Earth with changing flow geometry, that the mechanical energy flux must vary linearly with the magnetic field in the inner corona. This thermally driven wind generally has a low asymptotic flow speed. When Alfven waves are added to the thermally driven flow, the asymptotic flow speed is increased and is determined by the ratio of the Alfven wave and the mechanical energy fluxes at the coronal base. Flow speeds characteristic of recurrent high-speed solar wind streams can be obtained only when the Alfven wave energy flux, deposited in the supersonic flow, is larger than the mechanical energy flux heating the corona.

  15. In liver transplantation, T tube bile represents total bile flow: physiological and scintigraphic studies on biliary secretion of organic anions.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, R; Bähr, A; Eichstädt, H; Marschall, U; Bechstein, W O; Neuhaus, P

    1999-01-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the recovery of hepatocellular uptake and the biliary secretion of bile acids during the first 14 days after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and to determine the fraction of bile flow appearing outside through the T tube and entering the duodenum. Therefore, we determined primary and secondary bile acids in bile samples obtained from the T tube at day 5 after OLT, while the T tube was permanently open, and at days 10 and 14 after OLT, i.e., 4 and 9 days after closure of the T tube, respectively, thus restoring enterohepatic bile acid circulation. In addition, we performed hepatobiliary scintigraphy using technetium 99m-labeled [2,4,6 trimethyl-3-bromo]imino-diacetic acid (technetium 99m-BRIDA) in 12 patients between days 4 and 17 after OLT. Chromatographic analyses of biliary bile acids showed no secondary bile acids during the first 5 days after OLT, as opposed to 10 and 14 days after OLT when enterohepatic circulation was restored. Eleven patients with an uncomplicated postoperative course after OLT showed a significantly reduced hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of 99mTc-BRIDA during the first days after OLT with progressive recovery. One patient with an acute allograft rejection episode showed almost no uptake and only minimal secretion. The bile fraction appearing outside through the inserted T tube represented 94.6% +/- 6.2% of the injected 99mTc-BRIDA. We conclude that OLT results in markedly impaired hepatocellular uptake and biliary secretion of organic anions. Simultaneously, bile acid synthesis is significantly reduced, which, in addition, diminishes bile secretion of the graft. We show that T tube bile is a valid tool for bile physiological studies in patients in whom transplantation was successfully performed. PMID:9873086

  16. Estimation of volume flow in curved tubes based on analytical and computational analysis of axial velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkaik, A. C.; Beulen, B. W. A. M. M.; Bogaerds, A. C. B.; Rutten, M. C. M.; van de Vosse, F. N.

    2009-02-01

    To monitor biomechanical parameters related to cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to perform correct volume flow estimations of blood flow in arteries based on local blood velocity measurements. In clinical practice, estimates of flow are currently made using a straight-tube assumption, which may lead to inaccuracies since most arteries are curved. Therefore, this study will focus on the effect of curvature on the axial velocity profile for flow in a curved tube in order to find a new volume flow estimation method. The study is restricted to steady flow, enabling the use of analytical methods. First, analytical approximation methods for steady flow in curved tubes at low Dean numbers (Dn) and low curvature ratios (δ) are investigated. From the results a novel volume flow estimation method, the cos θ-method, is derived. Simulations for curved tube flow in the physiological range (1≤Dn≤1000 and 0.01≤δ≤0.16) are performed with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The asymmetric axial velocity profiles of the analytical approximation methods are compared with the velocity profiles of the CFD model. Next, the cos θ-method is validated and compared with the currently used Poiseuille method by using the CFD results as input. Comparison of the axial velocity profiles of the CFD model with the approximations derived by Topakoglu [J. Math. Mech. 16, 1321 (1967)] and Siggers and Waters [Phys. Fluids 17, 077102 (2005)] shows that the derived velocity profiles agree very well for Dn≤50 and are fair for 50100), no analytical approximation method exists. In the position of the maximum axial velocity, a shift toward the inside of the curve is observed for low Dean numbers, while for high Dean numbers, the position of the maximum velocity is located at the outer curve. When the position of

  17. A study of pressure drop in a Capillary tube-viscometer for a two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ohene, F.; Livingston, C.; Matthews, C.; Rhone, Y.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of pipeline transportation of highly concentrated suspensions such as coal-water slurries, can exhibit several flow characteristics depending on the concentration and the physical parameters of the dispersed phase. Experiments were conducted for coal-water slurries flows in a series of horizontal capillary tubes of diameters 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0 mm and 100 mm in length, in order to investigate the effect of concentration, pressure drop, and the transitional Reynolds number from laminar to turbulent flow in a homogeneous slurry. The solid concentration was varied from 15% to 63% in 0.1% xanthum gum solution. Pressure drop and the volume flow measurement were made using HVA-6 Capillary viscometer. The Reynolds numbers obtained were found to be dependent on the slurry concentration and the viscosity of the slurry mixture, but independent of the capillary diameter.

  18. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  19. The Pulsating White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a summary of what is currently known about the three distinct families of isolated pulsating white dwarfs. These are the GW Vir stars (He/C/O-atmosphere stars with Teff sime 120,000 K), the V777 Her stars (He-atmosphere, Teff sime 25,000 K), and the ZZ Ceti stars (H-atmosphere, Teff sime 12,000 K), all showing multiperiodic luminosity variations caused by low-order and low-degree g-mode instabilities. We also provide, in an Appendix, a very brief overview of the newly found evidence in favor of the existence of a fourth category of oscillating white dwarfs bearing strong similarities with these families of pulsators. We begin our survey with a short historical introduction, followed by a general discussion of pulsating white dwarfs as compact pulsators. We then discuss the class properties of these objects, including an updated census. We next focus on the instability domains for each family of pulsators in the log g - Teff diagram, and present their time-averaged properties in more detail. This is followed by a section on excitation physics, i.e., the causes of the pulsational instabilities, with emphasis on the common properties of the different types of pulsator. We then discuss the time-dependent properties of the pulsating white dwarfs featuring, among other things, a brief "picture tour" across the ZZ Ceti instability strip. We next review the methods used to infer or constrain the angular geometry of a pulsation mode in a white dwarf. These include multicolor photometry and time-resolved spectroscopy, the exploitation of the nonlinear features in the observed light curves, and rotational splitting. We also consider basic adiabatic asteroseismology starting with a discussion of the reaction of the period spectrum to variations of model parameters. We next review the various asteroseismological inferences that have so far been claimed for white dwarfs. We also discuss the potential of exploiting the rates of period change. We finally provide some

  20. [Bachelard and the mathematical pulsation].

    PubMed

    Guitart, René

    2015-01-01

    The working mathematician knows a specific gesture named « mathematical pulsation », a necessary creative moving in diagrams of thoughts and interpretations of mathematical writings. In this perspective the fact of being an object is definitely undecided, and related to the game of relations. The purpose of this paper today is to construct this pulsation, starting from the epistemology of Bachelard, concerning mathematics as well as mathematical physics. On the way, we recover links between ideas of Bachelard and more recent specific propositions by Gilles Ch-let, Charles Alunni, or René Guitart. Also are used authors like Jacques Lacan, Arthur Koestler, Alfred N. Whitehead, Charles S. Peirce. We conclude that the mathematical work consists with pulsative moving in the space of diagrams; we claim that this view is well compatible with the Bachelard's analysis of scientific knowledge: the intellectual or formal mathematical data preceeds the empirical objects, and in some sense these objects result from the pulsative gestures of the thinkers. So we finish with a categorical scheme of the pulsation. PMID:26223414

  1. High latitude pulsating aurorae revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Rosenberg, T.J. )

    1992-01-03

    Dayside auroral pulsations (10-40 s periods) have been studied for different levels of geomagnetic disturbance with N{sub 2}{sup +} 427.8 nm emission data obtained at South Pole station, Antarctica ({minus}74.2{degree} MLAT). The occurrence distribution exhibits a single peak at magnetic noon under geomagnetically quiet conditions (0 {le} Kp < 1). With increased Kp, the distribution shifts to earlier times, the peak occurring at 1000-1030 MLT for 1 {le} Kp < 4. At these higher Kp levels a secondary occurrence peak is evident in the afternoon sector between 1400 and 1600 MLT, occurring earlier as Kp increases. These results are compared with those obtained separately for pre-noon pulsations observed at Ny Alesund and post-noon pulsations observed at Ny Alesund and post-noon pulsations observed at Davis, northern and southern hemisphere sites at approximately the same magnetic latitude as South Pole. South Pole and Ny Alesund observe morning peaks at the same time and with a similar lack of Kp dependence; South Pole and Davis observe afternoon peaks with similar Kp dependence, though the peak occurs earlier at Davis. In contrast to the results from the earlier studies, the South Pole observations show larger pulsation amplitudes in the morning sector and significantly higher occurrence rates overall.

  2. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. I. NUMERICAL METHODS AND ADIABATIC TEST CASES

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2011-04-10

    We are developing a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light and velocity curves. Previous two-dimensional calculations were prevented from doing this because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We remove this difficulty by defining our coordinate system flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remains constant throughout the pulsation cycle. We perform adiabatic test calculations to show that large amplitude solutions repeat over more than 150 pulsation periods. We also verify that the computational method conserves the peak kinetic energy per period, as must be true for adiabatic pulsation models.

  3. The effects of surface tension on flooding in counter-current two-phase flow in an inclined tube

    SciTech Connect

    Deendarlianto; Ousaka, Akiharu; Indarto; Kariyasaki, Akira; Lucas, Dirk; Vallee, Christophe; Vierow, Karen; Hogan, Kevin

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of surface tension on flooding phenomena in counter-current two-phase flow in an inclined tube. Previous studies by other researchers have shown that surface tension has a stabilizing effect on the falling liquid film under certain conditions and a destabilizing or unclear trend under other conditions. Experimental results are reported herein for air-water systems in which a surfactant has been added to vary the liquid surface tension without altering other liquid properties. The flooding section is a tube of 16 mm in inner diameter and 1.1 m length, inclined at 30-60 from horizontal. The flooding mechanisms were observed by using two high-speed video cameras and by measuring the time variation of liquid hold-up along the test tube. The results show that effects of surface tension are significant. The gas velocity needed to induce flooding is lower for a lower surface tension. There was no upward motion of the air-water interfacial waves upon flooding occurrence, even for lower a surface tension. Observations on the liquid film behavior after flooding occurred suggest that the entrainment of liquid droplets plays an important role in the upward transport of liquid. Finally, an empirical correlation for flooding velocities is proposed that includes functional dependencies on surface tension and tube inclination. (author)

  4. The Pulsating Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2015-06-01

    Following the basic principles of a charge-separated pulsar magnetosphere, we consider the magnetosphere to be stationary in space, instead of corotating, and the electric field to be uploaded from the potential distribution on the pulsar surface, set up by the unipolar induction. Consequently, the plasma of the magnetosphere undergoes guiding center drifts of the gyromotion due to the forces transverse to the magnetic field. These forces are the electric force, magnetic gradient force, and field line curvature force. Since these plasma velocities are of drift nature, there is no need to introduce an emf along the field lines, which would contradict the {{E}\\parallel }={\\boldsymbol{E}} \\cdot {\\boldsymbol{B}} =0 plasma condition. Furthermore, there is also no need to introduce the critical field line separating the electron and ion open field lines. We present a self-consistent description where the magnetosphere is described in terms of electric and magnetic fields and also in terms of plasma velocities. The fields and velocities are then connected through the space-charge densities self-consistently. We solve the pulsar equation analytically for the fields and construct the standard steady-state pulsar magnetosphere. By considering the unipolar induction inside the pulsar and the magnetosphere outside the pulsar as one coupled system, and under the condition that the unipolar pumping rate exceeds the Poynting flux in the open field lines, plasma pressure can build up in the magnetosphere, in particular, in the closed region. This could cause a periodic opening up of the closed region, leading to a pulsating magnetosphere, which could be an alternative to pulsar beacons. The closed region can also be opened periodically by the build up of toroidal magnetic field through a positive feedback cycle.

  5. Pulsating aurora: The importance of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.

    1980-05-01

    A number of different, but mainly optical, observations made in pulsating auroras are presented. These observations indicate that active ionospheric processes are likely to play an important role in causing and/or modifying pulsating aurora.

  6. Channel and tube flow features associated with the Twin Craters Lava Flow, Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field, NM: Insights into similar features on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, R.; deWet, A.; Bleacher, J. E.; von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Hamilton, C.; Garry, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field lies near the center of the Jemez lineament that extends from central Arizona to northeastern New Mexico. The Jemez lineament is a result of rifting in the Earth's crust and is associated with volcanic activity that spans the last 16 Ma. The youngest volcanic activity associated with the lineament includes basaltic lava that was erupted 3 ka ago to form the McCartys Flow. The Twin Craters flow is moderately older (18.0 ka), but it also well-preserved and provides an ideal location to investigate volcanic processes and landforms. In this study, we combined detailed field observations and mapping with remote sensing to better understand variations in morphology along the transport system of the flow . The Twin Craters flow is characterized as an aā and tube-fed pāhoehoe flow with braided or branching tubes and channels; and associated aā and pāhoehoe break-outs. It is possible that the variations in morphology along the same transport structure might be related to pre-flow slope, which might have also been variable along flow. Shatter ring features are thought to be related to changes in eruption rate, and therefore, local flux through the system. However, over-pressurization of the tube might also be related to changes in local discharge rate associated with the ponding and release of lava within the transport system that may be due to interactions between the lava and obstacles along the flow's path (see Mallonee et al., this meeting). Many of these features are similar to features present in the Tharsis Montes region of Mars and particularly on the southern apron of Ascraeus Mons. The detailed description of the morphology of the Twin Craters Lava Flow and the understanding of the emplacement mechanisms will be crucial in identifying the processes that formed the Ascraeus flows and channels. This will aid in determining if the lava surface textures are directly related to eruption conditions or if they have been significantly

  7. Theoretical analysis for condensation heat transfer of binary refrigerant mixtures with annular flow in horizontal mini-tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui-Yong; Li, Jun-Ming; Sun, Ji-Liang; Wang, Bu-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed for condensation heat transfer of binary refrigerant mixtures in mini-tubes with diameter about 1.0 mm. Condensation heat transfer of R410A and R32/R134a mixtures at different mass fluxes and saturated temperatures are analyzed, assuming that the phase flow pattern is annular flow. The results indicate that there exists a maximum interface temperature at the beginning of condensation process for azeotropic and zeotropic mixtures and the corresponding vapor quality to the maximum value increases with mass flux. The effects of mass flux, heat flux, surface tension and tube diameter are analyzed. As expected, the condensation heat transfer coefficients increase with mass flux and vapor quality, and increase faster in high vapor quality region. It is found that the effects of heat flux and surface tension are not so obvious as that of tube diameter. The characteristics of condensation heat transfer of zeotropic mixtures are consistent to those of azeotropic refrigerant mixtures. The condensation heat transfer coefficients increase with the concentration of the less volatile component in binary mixtures.

  8. The "black hole" phenomenon in ultrasonic backscattering measurement under pulsatile flow with porcine whole blood in a rigid tube.

    PubMed

    Cao, P J; Paeng, D G; Shung, K K

    2001-01-01

    The "black hole" phenomenon was further investigated with porcine whole blood under pulsatile flow conditions in a straight rigid tube 120 cm long and of 0.95 cm diameter. A modified Aloka 280 commercial scanner with a 7.5 MHz linear array was used to collect the radio frequency (RF) signal of backscattering echoes from the blood inside the tube. The transducer was located downstream from the entrance and parallel to the longitudinal direction of the tube. The experimental results showed that higher hematocrits enhanced the black hole phenomenon, leading to a more apparent and larger diameter black hole. The black hole was not apparent at hematocrits below 23%. The highest hematocrit used in the experiment was 60%. Beat rates of 20, 40 and 60 beats per minute (bpm) were used, and the black hole became weaker in amplitude and smaller in diameter when the peak flow velocity was increased at each beat rate. These results are consistent with the suggestion in previous work that the black hole arises from insufficient aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) at the center of the tube because of the low shear rate. At 20 and 40 bpm, the peak flow velocity ranges were 10 approximately 25 cm/s and 18 approximately 27 cm/s, respectively. The black hole was very clear at the minimal peak flow velocity but almost disappeared at the maximal velocities for each beat rate. At 60 bpm, experiments were only performed at one peak flow velocity of 31 cm/s and the black hole was clear. The results showed that the black hole was more pronounced at higher beat rates when the peak velocity was the same. This phenomenon cannot be explained by previous hypotheses. Acceleration seems to be the only flow parameter that varies at different beat rates when peak velocities are the same. Therefore, the influence of acceleration on the structural organization and orientation of RBC rouleaux might be another factor involved in the formation of the black hole in addition to the shear rate. As the

  9. Heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside a 7 mm straight smooth tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Haitao; Ding, Guoliang; Wei, Wenjian; Wang, Zhence; Wang, Kaijian

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase flow patterns and heat transfer characteristics of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside a straight smooth tube with the outside diameter of 7.0 mm were investigated experimentally. The experimental conditions include the evaporation temperature of 5 C, the mass flux from 200 to 400 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the heat flux from 7.56 to 15.12 kW m{sup -2}, the inlet vapor quality from 0.2 to 0.7, nominal oil concentration from 0% to 5%. The test results show that the heat transfer coefficient of R410A-oil mixture increases with mass flux of refrigerant-oil mixture; the presence of oil enhances the heat transfer at the range of low and intermediate vapor qualities; there is a peak of local heat transfer coefficient at about 2-4% nominal oil concentration at higher vapor qualities, and the peak shifts to lower nominal oil concentration with the increasing of vapor qualities; higher nominal oil concentration gives more detrimental effect at high vapor qualities. The flow pattern map of R410A-oil mixture was developed based on refrigerant-oil mixture properties, and the observed flow patterns match well with the flow pattern map. New correlation to predict the local heat transfer of R410A-oil mixture flow boiling inside the straight smooth tube was developed based on flow patterns and local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture, and it agrees with 90% of the experiment data within the deviation of {+-}25%. (author)

  10. A Mathematical Model for the Flow of a Casson Fluid due to Metachronal Beating of Cilia in a Tube

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A. M.; Farooq, A. A.; Rana, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to study the transport mechanism of a Casson fluid flow inspired by the metachronal coordination between the beating cilia in a cylindrical tube. A two-dimensional system of nonlinear equations governing the flow problem is formulated by using axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates and then simplified by employing the long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. Exact solutions are derived for the velocity components, the axial pressure gradient, and the stream function. However, the expressions for the pressure rise and the volume flow rate are evaluated numerically. The features of the flow characteristics such as pumping and trapping are illustrated and discussed with the help of graphs. It is observed that the volume flow rate is influenced significantly by the width of plug flow region Hp as well as the cilia length parameter ε. The analysis is also applied and compared with the estimated value of the volume flow rate of epididymal fluid in the ductus efferentes of the human male reproductive tract. PMID:25789334

  11. A mathematical model for the flow of a Casson fluid due to metachronal beating of cilia in a tube.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, A M; Farooq, A A; Rana, M A

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to study the transport mechanism of a Casson fluid flow inspired by the metachronal coordination between the beating cilia in a cylindrical tube. A two-dimensional system of nonlinear equations governing the flow problem is formulated by using axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates and then simplified by employing the long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. Exact solutions are derived for the velocity components, the axial pressure gradient, and the stream function. However, the expressions for the pressure rise and the volume flow rate are evaluated numerically. The features of the flow characteristics such as pumping and trapping are illustrated and discussed with the help of graphs. It is observed that the volume flow rate is influenced significantly by the width of plug flow region H p as well as the cilia length parameter ε. The analysis is also applied and compared with the estimated value of the volume flow rate of epididymal fluid in the ductus efferentes of the human male reproductive tract. PMID:25789334

  12. Two-phase flow characteristics of liquid nitrogen in vertically upward 0.5 and 1.0 mm micro-tubes: Visualization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Fu, X.

    2009-10-01

    Application of liquid nitrogen to cooling is widely employed in many fields, such as cooling of the high temperature superconducting devices, cryosurgery and so on, in which liquid nitrogen is generally forced to flow inside very small passages to maintain good thermal performance and stability. In order to have a full understanding of the flow and heat transfer characteristics of liquid nitrogen in micro-tube, high-speed digital photography was employed to acquire the typical two-phase flow patterns of liquid nitrogen in vertically upward micro-tubes of 0.531 and 1.042 mm inner diameters. It was found from the experimental results that the flow patterns were mainly bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow and annular flow. And the confined bubble flow, mist flow, bubble condensation and flow oscillation were also observed. These flow patterns were characterized in different types of flow regime maps. The surface tension force and the size of the diameter were revealed to be the major factors affecting the flow pattern transitions. It was found that the transition boundaries of the slug/churn flow and churn/annular flow of the present experiment shifted to lower superficial vapor velocity; while the transition boundary of the bubbly/slug flow shifted to higher superficial vapor velocity compared to the results of the room-temperature fluids in the tubes with the similar hydraulic diameters. The corresponding transition boundaries moved to lower superficial velocity when reducing the inner diameter of the micro-tubes. Time-averaged void fraction and heat transfer characteristics for individual flow patterns were presented and special attention was paid to the effect of the diameter on the variation of void fraction.

  13. Numerical investigation of forced convection of nano fluid flow in horizontal U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Sahar, A. F. A.; Firas, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical study has been carried out to investigate the heat transfer by laminar forced convection of nanofluid taking Titania (TiO2) and Alumina (Al2O3) as nanoparticles and the water as based fluid in a three dimensional plain and U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger. A Solid WORKS PREMIUM 2012 is used to draw the geometries of plain tube heat exchanger or U-longitudinal copper finned tube heat exchanger. Four U-longitudinal copper fins have 100 cm long, 3.8cm height and 1mm thickness are attached to a straight copper tube of 100 cm length, 2.2 cm inner diameter and 2.39 cm outer diameter. The governing equations which used as continuity, momentum and energy equations under assumptions are utilized to predict the flow field, temperature distribution, and heat transfer of the heat exchanger. The finite volume approach is used to obtain all the computational results using commercial ANSYS Fluent copy package 14.0 with assist of solid works and Gambit software program. The effect of various parameters on the performance of heat exchanger are investigated numerically such as Reynolds' number (ranging from 270 to 1900), volume consternation of nanoparticles (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%), type of nanoparticles, and mass flow rate of nanofluid in the hot region of heat exchanger. For 0.8% consternation of nanoparticles, heat transfer has significant enhancement in both nanofluids. It can be found about 7.3% for TiO2 and about 7.5% for Al2O3 compared with the water only as a working fluid.

  14. Liquid-Nitrogen Test for Blocked Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Nondestructive test identifies obstructed tube in array of parallel tubes. Trickle of liquid nitrogen allowed to flow through tube array until array accumulates substantial formation of frost from moisture in air. Flow stopped and warm air introduced into inlet manifold to heat tubes in array. Tubes still frosted after others defrosted identified as obstructed tubes. Applications include inspection of flow systems having parallel legs.

  15. Flow structure of natural dehumidification over a horizontal finned-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirbodi, Kamran; Yaghoubi, Mahmood

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, structure of water drops formation, growth, coalescence and departure over a horizontal finned-tube during natural dehumidification is investigated experimentally. Starting time of repelling the drops as well as heat transfer rate and the rate of dripping condensates in quasi-steady-state conditions are presented. Furthermore, cold airflow pattern around the horizontal finned-tube is visualized by using smoke generation scheme during natural dehumidification process. The finned-tube has a length of 300 mm, and inner and outer fin diameters, fin thickness and fin spacing are 25.4, 56, 0.4 and 2 mm, respectively. The tests are conducted in an insulated control room with dimensions of 5.8 m × 3 m × 4 m. Ambient air temperature, relative humidity and fin base temperature are selected from 25 to 35 °C, from 40 to 70 % and from 4 to 8 °C, respectively. Observations show that natural condensation from humid air over the test case is completely dropwise. Droplets only form on the edge of the fin and lateral fin surfaces remain almost dry. Dehumidification process over the tested finned-tube is divided into four stages; nucleation, formation, growth and departure of drops. It is also observed that the condensate inundation leaves the tube bottom in the form of droplets. Smoke visualization depicts that humid airflows downward around the cold finned-tube surface without noticeable turbulence and separation in the initial stages of dehumidification process. But the airflow has some disturbances in the intermediate stage and especially during drop departure on the edge of the fins.

  16. Flow structure of natural dehumidification over a horizontal finned-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirbodi, Kamran; Yaghoubi, Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, structure of water drops formation, growth, coalescence and departure over a horizontal finned-tube during natural dehumidification is investigated experimentally. Starting time of repelling the drops as well as heat transfer rate and the rate of dripping condensates in quasi-steady-state conditions are presented. Furthermore, cold airflow pattern around the horizontal finned-tube is visualized by using smoke generation scheme during natural dehumidification process. The finned-tube has a length of 300 mm, and inner and outer fin diameters, fin thickness and fin spacing are 25.4, 56, 0.4 and 2 mm, respectively. The tests are conducted in an insulated control room with dimensions of 5.8 m × 3 m × 4 m. Ambient air temperature, relative humidity and fin base temperature are selected from 25 to 35 °C, from 40 to 70 % and from 4 to 8 °C, respectively. Observations show that natural condensation from humid air over the test case is completely dropwise. Droplets only form on the edge of the fin and lateral fin surfaces remain almost dry. Dehumidification process over the tested finned-tube is divided into four stages; nucleation, formation, growth and departure of drops. It is also observed that the condensate inundation leaves the tube bottom in the form of droplets. Smoke visualization depicts that humid airflows downward around the cold finned-tube surface without noticeable turbulence and separation in the initial stages of dehumidification process. But the airflow has some disturbances in the intermediate stage and especially during drop departure on the edge of the fins.

  17. Experimental investigation of inclination effect on subcritical and supercritical water flows heat transfer in an internally ribbed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taklifi, Alireza; Akhavan-Behabadi, Mohammad Ali; Hanafizadeh, Pedram; Aliabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    The effect of various inclination angles on heat transfer of water at subcritical and supercritical operating pressures is investigated experimentally. The test section was a SA213T12 steel six-headed internally ribbed tube with minimum inner diameter of 19.5 mm. The operating test pressures were 15, 21.5, 22.5, 25 and 28 MPa, the mass flux was 800 kg/m2 s and the heat flux was 400 kW/m2. To keep the mass flux to heat flux ratio equal to 2 kg/kJ. These operating conditions covered subcritical, near critical and supercritical water flows and also refers to low mass flux conditions. The inclination angles were 5, 20, 30, 45 and 90 (vertical) degrees respecting to horizontal plane. The heat flux was kept constant along the test tube by controlling of electric heating. As a result the inner wall temperature and convective heat transfer coefficient variations with respect to heated length and bulk enthalpy of fluid were considered in order to study the heat transfer characteristics of various flows at different inclinations. The corresponding correlation for heat transfer coefficient was developed which is applicable for wide range of inclination angles. The heat transfer enhancement was obvious for inclination angles other than 90°, however, this effect was more obvious in 5° and 20° in some operating conditions. It was also concluded that the effect of inclination on heat transfer of water was more considerable in subcritical flow conditions than supercritical ones. Also, it was observed that angle of 20° seems to be the best for subcritical flows from heat transfer point of view, but for supercritical flows 5 or 45 seem to be more advantageous. These differences could be related to different heat transfer mechanisms of subcritical and supercritical flows.

  18. Flow and Chemistry Pulsations, Monterey: Implications for Stress Transient Modulations of Hydrologic and Geochemical Systems in the Greater San Andreas Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. M.; Fueri, E.; Hilton, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Submarine fluid venting at continental shelf and slope regions has been recognized over the past ten years as an important, yet under-studied process in marine science. Seeps are now known to be a general feature of the hydrogeology of many tectonically active continental margins. The eastern Pacific margin is characterized by a variety of tectonic settings (i.e. convergent and strike-slip) where active venting of fluids and gases has been documented. Reports include vents off Alaska, Costa Rica, Monterey Bay, Eel River basin, and Heceta Bay, OR. Indications of seismic tremor, linked to hydrologic transience in the offshore regions of subduction zones have recently been published elsewhere (see Brown et al, EPSL 2005). We now address here the varying nature of submarine fluid discharges in a San Andreas strike-slip setting. A key element of the proposed work is the combined multidisciplinary measurement of fluid flow, seep temperatures, and dissolved noble gases and chemistry of the Monterey seep sites at Extrovert Cliff. The seeps are situated close to several active strike-slip faults including the Monterey and San Gregorio fault zones. Initial results of 2 week deployments in 2004 of flow meters at Extravert Cliff indicated high flow rates and elevated seep temperatures that vary by as much as a factor of 2 on diurnal time scales with subtle changes over longer periods (>2 weeks). There are also indicative chemical signals of deeply sourced fluids that vary widely with time that show the following signals: 1) Elevated abundances of both mantle derived Helium (3He) as well as 4He and 40Ar of radiogenic crustal relevant trace element components; 2) Altered fluid chemistry (including, Ca Mg, Li and B); 3) The fluid temperature, flow rates, and gas chemistry, in particular, vary with time. We have both long-term and sub-diurnal variations in flow and temperature as well as the 3He/4He ratios, helium concentration, CO2 concentration and d13C values perhaps influenced

  19. Radial diffusion and penetration of gas molecules and aerosol particles through laminar flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes are essential tools for many applications in analytical and physical chemistry and engineering. We derive a new method for determining radial diffusion effects and the penetration or transmission of gas molecules and aerosol particles through cylindrical tubes under laminar flow conditions using explicit analytical equations. In contrast to the traditional Brown method [Brown, R. L. J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. (U. S.) 1978, 83, 1-8] and CKD method (Cooney, D. O.; Kim, S. S.; Davis, E. J. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1974, 29, 1731-1738), the new approximation developed in this study (known as the KPS method) does not require interpolation or numerical techniques. The KPS method agrees well with the CKD method under all experimental conditions and also with the Brown method at low Sherwood numbers. At high Sherwood numbers corresponding to high uptake on the wall, flow entry effects become relevant and are considered in the KPS and CKD methods but not in the Brown method. The practical applicability of the KPS method is demonstrated by analysis of measurement data from experimental studies of rapid OH, intermediate NO3, and slow O3 uptake on various organic substrates. The KPS method also allows determination of the penetration of aerosol particles through a tube, using a single equation to cover both the limiting cases of high and low deposition described by Gormley and Kennedy (Proc. R. Ir. Acad., Sect. A. 1949, 52A, 163-169). We demonstrate that the treatment of gas and particle diffusion converges in the KPS method, thus facilitating prediction of diffusional loss and penetration of gases and particles, analysis of chemical kinetics data, and design of fluid reactors, denuders, and sampling lines. PMID:25744622

  20. High Mach Number Scramjet Test Flows in the X3 Expansion Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildfind, D. E.; Sancho, J.; Morgan, R. G.

    The University of Queensland (UQ) has two free-piston driven expansion tube facilities; X2 has a total length of 23 m and was originally commissioned in 1995 [1]; X3 is much longer at 62 m, and was commissioned in 2001 [2].

  1. The Evolution of North-South Aligned Auroral Forms into Auroral Torch Structures : The Generation of Omega Bands and Ps6 Pulsations via Flow Bursts.

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M. G.; Kepko, L.; Spence, H. E.; Connors, M.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Frank, L. A.; Singer, H. J.; Yumoto, K.

    2002-01-01

    Although auroral torch structures and omega bands have been observed and studied for decades, a satisfactory understanding of how they form has yet to be achieved. Using global auroral imager data, we show conclusively that the equatorward moving north-south (NS) aligned auroral forms that are ejected episodically from the poleward boundary can evolve directly into torch structures which contribute to a well-defined omega-band form. And that as a consequence, omega bands can be produced as a direct result of earthward-directed bursty bulk flows (BBFs).

  2. Experimental results on gravity driven fully condensing flows in vertical tubes, their agreement with theory, and their differences with shear driven flows' boundary-condition sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Jorge H.

    This doctoral thesis presents the experimental results along with a suitable synthesis with computational/theoretical results towards development of a reliable heat transfer correlation for a specific annular condensation flow regime inside a vertical tube. For fully condensing flows of pure vapor (FC-72) inside a vertical cylindrical tube of 6.6 mm diameter and 0.7 m length, the experimental measurements are shown to yield values of average heat transfer coefficient, and approximate length of full condensation. The experimental conditions cover: mass flux G over a range of 2.9 kg/m 2-s ≤ G ≤ 87.7 kg//m2-s, temperature difference DeltaT (saturation temperature at the inlet pressure minus the mean condensing surface temperature) of 5 ºC to 45 ºC, and cases for which the length of full condensation xFC is in the range of 0 < xFC < 0.7 m. The range of flow conditions over which there is good agreement (within 15%) with the theory and its modeling assumptions has been identified. Additionally, the ranges of flow conditions for which there are significant discrepancies (between 15--30% and greater than 30%) with theory have also been identified. The paper also refers to a brief set of key experimental results with regard to sensitivity of the flow to time-varying or quasi-steady (i.e. steady in the mean) impositions of pressure at both the inlet and the outlet. The experimental results support the updated theoretical/computational results that gravity dominated condensing flows do not allow such elliptic impositions.

  3. Detection and quantification of chemical warfare agent precursors and surrogates by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gregory J; Milligan, Daniel B; McEwan, Murray J

    2009-11-01

    The rate coefficients and branching ratios of 15 chemical warfare agent precursor and surrogate compounds reacting with H(3)O(+), NO(+), and O(2)(+) have been measured in the laboratory using the selected ion flow tube (SIFT) technique. Measurement of the relevant kinetic parameters for these agents has enabled quantitative monitoring using the SIFT-MS analytical technique. Thirteen of the 15 compounds studied were found to have real-time detection limits in the parts-per-trillion-by-volume concentration range when measured on a standard commercial Voice100 instrument, with specific compounds having detection limits below 100 parts-per-trillion-by-volume. PMID:19788274

  4. NASA Ames's electric arc-driven shock tube facility and research on nonequilibrium phenomena in low density hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-01-01

    Basic requirements for a ground test facility simulating low density hypersonic flows are discussed. Such facilities should be able to produce shock velocities in the range of 10-17 km/sec in an initial pressure of 0.010 to 0.050 Torr. The facility should be equipped with diagnostics systems to be able to measure the emitted radiation, characteristic temperatures and populations in various energy levels. In the light of these requirements, NASA Ames's electric arc-driven low density shock tube facility is described and available experimental diagnostics systems and computational tools are discussed.

  5. Copper oxide nanoparticles analysis with water as base fluid for peristaltic flow in permeable tube with heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Raza, M; Ellahi, R

    2016-07-01

    The peristaltic flow of a copper oxide water fluid investigates the effects of heat generation and magnetic field in permeable tube is studied. The mathematical formulation is presented, the resulting equations are solved exactly. The obtained expressions for pressure gradient, pressure rise, temperature, velocity profile are described through graphs for various pertinent parameters. It is found that pressure gradient is reduce with enhancement of particle concentration and velocity profile is upturn, beside it is observed that temperature increases as more volume fraction of copper oxide. The streamlines are drawn for some physical quantities to discuss the trapping phenomenon. PMID:27208518

  6. Pulsation effects on the air fuel ratio of carburetor engines

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, M.; Sato, T.; Watanabe, K.

    1986-01-01

    A significant wavewise change of air fuel ratio in line with the engine speed having a long intake pipe was studied experimentally and theoretically. The results show the pulsewise change in fuel flow plays the dominant role in the wavewise change in the air fuel ratio. It is found that this pulsewise fluctuation of the fuel flow forms an oscillation wave with both the amplitude and frequency becoming larger according to the engine speed resulted by the phase change of the pulsation wave in the intake pipe according to the engine speed. A modified frequency ratio of gas vibration in the intake pipe to that of engine intake stroke is proposed to explain this pulsation effect on the fuel flow and an effective simulator for this phenomena is established.

  7. Motion analysis of artery pulsation in neonatal cranial ultrasonogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kubo, Hiroki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki; Yamada, Masayoshi

    1999-05-01

    Using an optical-flow technique, we have quantitatively analyzed tissue motion due to artery pulsation accompanied with blood flow in a neonatal cranial ultrasonogram. The tissue motion vector was successfully calculated at each pixel in a series of echo images (32 frames, 640 X 480 pixels/frame, 8 bits/pixel, 33 ms/frame) taken in the brightness mode by using an ultrasound probe of 5.0 MHz. The optical-flow technique used was a gradient method combined with local optimization for 3 X 3 neighbors. From 2D mappings of tissue motion vectors and their time-sequence variations, it was found that the tissue motion due to artery pulsation revealed periodic to-and-fro motion synchronized with heartbeat (300 - 500 ms), clearly distinguishing from unwanted non-periodic motion due to the sway of neonatal head during diagnosis.

  8. Pulsating ejector refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuzson, J.J.

    1993-08-31

    A process is described for mixing and compressing a primary fluid and a secondary fluid comprising: injecting said primary fluid through a primary fluid nozzle having a discharge end into an inlet end of a mixer; entraining said secondary fluid through an inlet end wall of said mixer having a plurality of openings; inserting longitudinally a partition in said mixer forming a plurality of flow passages; and generating a resonance in said primary fluid alternatingly within each said flow passage.

  9. Theoretical and experimental studies of churn flow in vertical tubes. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-27

    The pattern known as churn flow is a highly unsteady pattern with stochastic features and is extremely complex. However, calculations show that for many geothermal wells the condition of churn flow consists over much of the length of the two phase zone. Furthermore, it frequently exists at the surface so that design of separation equipment and surface piping depends on the accurate modelling of this type of flow. It has been the long term purpose of this project to develop physically based models for churn flow which can be used as a basis for predicting holdup, frictional loss and heat transfer rates for this flow pattern in geothermal systems. To achieve this end, it was necessary to develop new methods for measuring the time dependent characteristics of the flow and thus be able to uncover the basic physics of the flow. Models can then be developed based on this understanding which characterizes the flow and equations for holdup, friction and heat transfer evolved.

  10. Full Field Scalar Measurements in a Pulsating Helium Jet using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.

    2000-01-01

    The flow structure of a pulsating helium jet was investigated using quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry. The operating parameters included the tube inside diameter, the jet Reynolds number and the jet Richardson number. The jet structure was characterized by the frequency spectrum, temporal evolution of the oscillations and mean and root-mean-square profiles of the species mole fraction, which in this case, was helium. Experiments were conducted using a variable nozzle facility. Angular deflection data were obtained using rainbow schlieren deflectometry across full field of color images taken at a temporal resolution of 60Hz. The flicker cycle was analyzed by instantaneous rainbow schlieren images, contour plots of deflection angle and helium mole fraction placed sequentially in time. Two observe the flow downstream, the tube was lowered with respect to the optical setup and images were taken at different axial planes. In this way, the laminar, transition and turbulent regions of the jet flow were observed. Abel inversion algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the refractive index field from the measurements of the beam deflection angle. The concentration field was then generated from the refractive index field. The phenomenon of vortex initiation and propagation in the flicker cycle was described by correlating the ray deflection angle and concentration contour plots. Experiments in the flickering jet reveal global oscillation in the flow field. The effect of jet exit Reynolds number and jet Richardson number on the flickering frequency was analyzed. The effect of jet Richardson number was more pronounced than that of the jet exit Reynolds number. The flow field was studies quantitatively in terms of temporal evolution and statistical description of helium mole fraction.

  11. Mathematical Evaluation of Steady, Laminar Flow by the Use of Continuous-Wave (cw) Doppler and Pitot Tube System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Malek Mansoor

    Investigation, as to the usefulness of spectral analysis of the acoustical signal from the Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter, is being conducted. The hypothesis was that both hematocrit ((')H) and pressure head (H) influence the amplitude of the spectrum (A). Experiments were designed to: (a) evaluate their roles on amplitude; (b) derive the associated functional relationship. Preliminary experiments revealed that: (a) the accuracy of our Doppler flowmeter was satisfactory; (b) the relative weight of (')H on flow velocity was twice that of H. A pitot tube system whose bent tube component was capable of radial movement was developed to measure the instantaneous blood velocity. The bent tube was moved across the lumen of the vessel in steps of 0.1 mm, and particle velocity was measured at each sampling point. The distribution of velocity was parabolic and the agreement between experimental data and the second degree polynomial fit was good ((xi) = .94). An array of small bent tubes, each placed successively deeper within the lumen of the rubber tubing and connected to a small syringe, was constructed to measure the particle profile. The profile was parabolic and (')H, as a function of radius, was expressible in terms of a second degree polynomial. To determine the dependency of ultrasonic energy backscattering on hematocrit, Doppler signals were recorded, digitized, and frequency resolved via the fast Fourier transform for hematocrits ranging from 4.5% to 46.5%. The amplitude corresponding to each given hematocrit was calculated by evaluating the area under the curve fitted to the transformed data. A((')H) was found to be a linear function of hematocrit. A generalized Doppler amplitude function A(H,(')H) was also derived. It was hypothesized that blood viscosity ((mu)) is an exponential function of hematocrit, that is, (mu) = A exp (B(.)(')H). Experimental results using a Falling ball type viscosimeter supported the theory with a high correlation between the data and the

  12. Pc 5 pulsations in the outer dawn magnetosphere seen by ISEE 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Engebretson, M. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Lundin, R.

    1990-01-01

    A long-lasting Pc 5 pulsation at the dawn flank of the magnetosphere is studied using particle and field instrumentation from the ISEE 1 and 2 satellites. Electric field and particle modulation signatures were clearer than magnetic field variations, consistent with the satellites' position in latitude near the equatorial node of a fundamental resonance. Pulsation flow velocities along the ISEE 1 trajectory were calculated from particle characteristics using data from several instruments and from electric and magnetic field data. These flow velocities were all consistent with each other, but the velocities derived from plasma and energetic particle observations were a factor of 2.5 larger than velocities derived from the fields data. In contrast to observations of pulsations during magnetic storms, which often involve resonant or gyrating particle behavior, particles at all energies sampled (10 eV to 200 keV) appeared to respond passively to the pulsation throughout most of the period of interest.

  13. Laboratory measurements in a turbulent, swirling flow. [measurement of soot inside a flame-tube burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoult, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of soot inside a flame-tube burner using a special water-flushed probe are discussed. The soot is measured at a series of points at each burner, and upon occasion gaseous constitutents NO, CO, hydrocarbons, etc., were also measured. Four geometries of flame-tube burners were studied, as well as a variety of different fuels. The role of upstream geometry on the downstream pollutant formation was studied. It was found that the amount of soot formed in particularly sensitive to how aerodynamically clean the configuration of the burner is upstream of the injector swirl vanes. The effect of pressure on soot formation was also studied. It was found that beyond a certain Reynolds number, the peak amount of soot formed in the burner is constant.

  14. Magnetic resonance measurement of fluid dynamics and transport in tube flow of a near-critical fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Joshua M.; Rassi, Erik M.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2014-07-01

    An ability to predict fluid dynamics and transport in supercritical fluids is essential for optimization of applications such as carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, "green" solvents, and supercritical coolant systems. While much has been done to model supercritical velocity distributions, experimental characterization is sparse, owing in part to a high sensitivity to perturbation by measurement probes. Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, however, detect signal noninvasively from the fluid molecules and thereby overcome this obstacle to measurement. MR velocity maps and propagators (i.e., probability density functions of displacement) were acquired of a flowing fluid in several regimes about the critical point, providing quantitative data on the transport and fluid dynamics in the system. Hexafluoroethane (C2F6) was pumped at 0.5 ml/min in a cylindrical tube through an MR system, and propagators as well as velocity maps were measured at temperatures and pressures below, near, and above the critical values. It was observed that flow of C2F6 with thermodynamic properties far above or below the critical point had the Poiseuille flow distribution of an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Flows with thermodynamic properties near the critical point exhibit complex flow distributions impacted by buoyancy and viscous forces. The approach to steady state was also observed and found to take the longest near the critical point, but once it was reached, the dynamics were stable and reproducible. These data provide insight into the interplay between the critical phase transition thermodynamics and the fluid dynamics, which control transport processes.

  15. Experimental and analytical study of inverted annular flow film boiling heat transfer in a vertical tube using R-134a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nakla, Meamer A.

    An experimental investigation of inverted annular film boiling heat transfer has been performed for vertical up-flow in a round tube. The working fluid was R-134a and the flow conditions covered a pressure range of 640 to 2390 kPa (water equivalent range: 4000 to 14000 kPa) and a mass flux range of 500 to 4000 kgm-2s-1 (water equivalent range: 700 to 5700 kgm-2s-1 ). The inlet qualities of the tests ranged from -0.75 to -0.03. The hot-patch technique is used to obtain the subcooled film boiling measurements. The parametric trends of the heat transfer coefficient with respect to mass flux, inlet quality, heat flux and pressure are examined and compared to reported parametric trends from the literature. The comparison shows agreement between observed effects of flow parameters with those reported by other researchers. The heat transfer vs. quality curve is divided into four different regions. It is shown that these regions are dependent on pressure, mass flux and local quality. A two-fluid one-dimensional model has been developed to predict the wall temperature of an internally-heated tube during IAFB. The model is derived using basic conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. To simplify the derivation of the constitutive heat transfer relations, flow between two parallel plates is assumed. The model features shear stress and interfacial relations that make it accurately predicts the parametric effects and heat transfer characteristics of IAFB over a wide range of flow conditions. The model predicts wall temperatures of R-134a-cooled tubes with an average error of -1.21% and an RMS error of 6.37%. This corresponds to average and RMS errors in predicted heat transfer coefficients of 1.33% and 10.07%, respectively. Using water data, the model predicts wall temperatures with an average error of -1.76% and an RMS error of 7.78% which corresponds to average and RMS errors in predicted heat transfer coefficients of 4.16% and 15.06%, respectively.

  16. Enhancement of heat transfer and entropy generation analysis of nanofluids turbulent convection flow in square section tubes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this article, developing turbulent forced convection flow of a water-Al2O3 nanofluid in a square tube, subjected to constant and uniform wall heat flux, is numerically investigated. The mixture model is employed to simulate the nanofluid flow and the investigation is accomplished for particles size equal to 38 nm. An entropy generation analysis is also proposed in order to find the optimal working condition for the given geometry under given boundary conditions. A simple analytical procedure is proposed to evaluate the entropy generation and its results are compared with the numerical calculations, showing a very good agreement. A comparison of the resulting Nusselt numbers with experimental correlations available in literature is accomplished. To minimize entropy generation, the optimal Reynolds number is determined. PMID:21711785

  17. Numerical investigation on boiling flow of liquid nitrogen in a vertical tube using bubble number density approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuefeng; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Rongshun

    2016-04-01

    An average bubble number density (ABND) model was formulated and numerically resolved for the subcooled flow boiling of liquid nitrogen. The effects of bubble coalescence and breakup were taken into account. Some new closure correlations describing bubble nucleation and departure on the heating surface were selected as well. For the purpose of comparison, flow boiling of liquid nitrogen was also numerically simulated using a modified two-fluid model. The results show that the simulations performed by using the ABND model achieve encouraging improvement in accuracy in predicting heat flux and wall temperature of a vertical tube. Moreover, the influence of the bubble coalescence and breakup is shown to be great on predicting overall pressure beyond the transition point.

  18. Quasiparallel flow of a binary gas mixture: the Stefan tube revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2015-11-01

    Placed in the bottom of a vertical tube open at the top, volatile liquid (species 1) evaporates at a rate set by diffusion of vapour through the carrier gas (species 2). In the textbook solution, due to J. Stefan, species 2 is assumed to be stationary, but numerical solutions of the governing equations show that species 2, in fact, recirculates (Mills and Chang 2013; and references therein). But although Stefan's solution is based on an incorrect assumption, the same numerical solutions show that it predicts the evaporation rate to within a few percent (Mills and Chang, below eq.12). Assuming the ratio L / a of tube length to radius to be large, we use lubrication theory to give an elementary solution determining the velocity profiles for each species, including the effect of slip. It is shown that, in the limit as L / a --> ∞ , the Stefan solution correctly determines the total evaporation rate; this conclusion is independent of the precise form of the boundary condition placed on the species velocities at the tube wall.

  19. Coupling an electrospray source and a solids probe/chemical ionization source to a selected ion flow tube apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Melko, Joshua J.; Ard, Shaun G.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Pedder, Randall E.; Taormina, Christopher R.

    2015-08-15

    A new ion source region has been constructed and attached to a variable temperature selected ion flow tube. The source features the capabilities of electron impact, chemical ionization, a solids probe, and electrospray ionization. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated through a series of reactions from ions created in each of the new source regions. The chemical ionization source is able to create H{sub 3}O{sup +}, but not as efficiently as similar sources with larger apertures. The ability of this source to support a solids probe, however, greatly expands our capabilities. A variety of rhenium cations and dications are created from the solids probe in sufficient abundance to study in the flow tube. The reaction of Re{sup +} with O{sub 2} proceeds with a rate constant that agrees with the literature measurements, while the reaction of Re{sub 2}{sup 2+} is found to charge transfer with O{sub 2} at about 60% of the collision rate; we have also performed calculations that support the charge transfer pathway. The electrospray source is used to create Ba{sup +}, which is reacted with N{sub 2}O to create BaO{sup +}, and we find a rate constant that agrees with the literature.

  20. Coupling an electrospray source and a solids probe/chemical ionization source to a selected ion flow tube apparatus.

    PubMed

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Shuman, Nicholas S; Pedder, Randall E; Taormina, Christopher R; Viggiano, Albert A

    2015-08-01

    A new ion source region has been constructed and attached to a variable temperature selected ion flow tube. The source features the capabilities of electron impact, chemical ionization, a solids probe, and electrospray ionization. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated through a series of reactions from ions created in each of the new source regions. The chemical ionization source is able to create H3O(+), but not as efficiently as similar sources with larger apertures. The ability of this source to support a solids probe, however, greatly expands our capabilities. A variety of rhenium cations and dications are created from the solids probe in sufficient abundance to study in the flow tube. The reaction of Re(+) with O2 proceeds with a rate constant that agrees with the literature measurements, while the reaction of Re2(2+) is found to charge transfer with O2 at about 60% of the collision rate; we have also performed calculations that support the charge transfer pathway. The electrospray source is used to create Ba(+), which is reacted with N2O to create BaO(+), and we find a rate constant that agrees with the literature. PMID:26329209

  1. Coupling an electrospray source and a solids probe/chemical ionization source to a selected ion flow tube apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melko, Joshua J.; Ard, Shaun G.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Pedder, Randall E.; Taormina, Christopher R.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2015-08-01

    A new ion source region has been constructed and attached to a variable temperature selected ion flow tube. The source features the capabilities of electron impact, chemical ionization, a solids probe, and electrospray ionization. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated through a series of reactions from ions created in each of the new source regions. The chemical ionization source is able to create H3O+, but not as efficiently as similar sources with larger apertures. The ability of this source to support a solids probe, however, greatly expands our capabilities. A variety of rhenium cations and dications are created from the solids probe in sufficient abundance to study in the flow tube. The reaction of Re+ with O2 proceeds with a rate constant that agrees with the literature measurements, while the reaction of Re22+ is found to charge transfer with O2 at about 60% of the collision rate; we have also performed calculations that support the charge transfer pathway. The electrospray source is used to create Ba+, which is reacted with N2O to create BaO+, and we find a rate constant that agrees with the literature.

  2. Long tube heat exchanger: the facility and some preliminary tests on the down center/up annular flow configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.O.; Johnson, R.W.; Weatherbee, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    A test facility was designed and constructed to study forced flow boiling heat transfer in a closed loop long tube heat exchanger which is a two concentric-tube vertical design. The system consists of a 12 m long heat exchanger which can be operated at pressures to 689.3 kPa with pumped or natural convection flow rates from 0.0631 to 0.631 liters/second and which can be irradiated with a maximum steady heat flux rate of 50 kW/m/sup 2/ by a set of resistive heaters operable at temperatures up to 1250/sup 0/C. The facility was also designed so that other heat exchanger configurations can be tested with minimum difficulty (i.e., little or no modification of the system other than to replace the heat exchanger). The preliminary tests indicate that the system can be operated in a stable mode. This facility was motivated primarily by the magma energy research program where energy is extracted from magma by heat exchangers similar to the configuration in this report.

  3. Radar auroral observations during a burst of irregular magnetic pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Haldoupis, C.I.; Nielsen, E.; Holtet, J.A.; Egeland, A.; Chivers, H.A.

    1982-03-01

    Micropulsation data from an auroral state are compared with concurrent STARE radar observations from the E region above the station during a substorm event. The substorm onset is marked by a strong burst of irregular pulsations, (Pi B) accompanied by abrupt intensifications in the equivalent current, the backscatter intensity, and the riometer absorption. The magnetic Px and Py pulsation components have a reasonable degree of correlation and the polarization properties of the horizontal disturbance vetor exhibit well-defined changes during the first few minutes after onset. The radio signal undergoes deep quasiperiodic fading that is closely related to simultaneous PiB amplitude variations. The radar Dopplar data, which show normal fluctuations in the electron drift velocity, exclude modulation of radio backscatter by directional variations of the electric field. It is argued that the PiB pulsations and the variations seen in the backscatter are reflecting changes of the ionospheric currents due to conductivity modifications dictated by variations in the field-aligned currents flowing in the region. The possibility exists that the Pi B is closely related to precipitation pulsations as reported by Heacock and Hunsucker (1977).

  4. A numerical analysis of three-dimensional turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer in plate-fin and tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jiin-Yuh; Chang, Wen-Jen; Lin, Min-Sheng

    1996-12-31

    Fluid flow and heat transfer over a multi-row (1-5 rows) plate-fin and tube heat exchanger are studied numerically. Flow is incompressible, three-dimensional and turbulent. The effects of tube arrangements and tube row numbers are investigated in detail for the Reynolds number ReH (based on the fin spacing H) ranging from 2000 to 10000. The effects of turbulence are simulated by the k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Stream and isothermal lines through the whole tube bank, local and average Nusselt number and pressure coefficient in the streamwise direction are presented. The numerical results for the average heat transfer coefficient agree well with the previously published experimental data.

  5. Optical noninvasive monitoring of skin blood pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis

    2005-04-01

    Time-resolved detection and analysis of skin backscattered optical signals (remission photoplethysmography or PPG) provide rich information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for reliable cardiovascular assessment. Single- and multiple-channel PPG concepts are discussed. Simultaneous data flow from several locations on the human body allows us to study heartbeat pulse-wave propagation in real time and to evaluate vascular resistance. Portable single-, dual-, and four-channel PPG monitoring devices with special software have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The prototype devices have been clinically studied, and their potential for monitoring heart arrhythmias, drug-efficiency tests, steady-state cardiovascular assessment, body fitness control, and express diagnostics of the arterial occlusions has been confirmed.

  6. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. II. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION IN FULL AMPLITUDE RADIAL PULSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2013-07-10

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

  7. Auroral pulsations from ionospheric winds

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, M.P. )

    1989-11-01

    The possibility that auroral pulsations are due to oscillatory electrical circuits in the ionosphere that are driven by the negative resistance of jet stream winds is examined. For the condenser plates, the highly conducting surfaces above the edges of the jet stream are postulated. The dielectric constant of the plasma between the plates is quite large. The current that is driven perpendicular to and by the jet stream closes along the plates and through Pederson currents in the F region above the stream. This closed loop gives the inductance and resistance for the circuit. Periods of oscillation for this circuit appear to be in the range of Pc 1 to Pc 3. In accord with observations, this circuit appears to be able to limit the brightness of pulsations.

  8. Chaotic pulsations in stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchler, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The irregular behavior of large-amplitude pulsating stars undergoing radial oscillations is examined theoretically, with a focus on hydrodynamic simulations of the W Virginis population II Cepheids (stars which show both regular and RV Tau characteristics). Sequences of models are constructed as one-parameter families (with luminosity, mass, and composition fixed and Teff as the control parameter) and analyzed to derive a systematic map of the bifurcation set; i.e., of the possible types of pulsations. The results are presented graphically, and it is shown that both cascades of period doubling (via destabilization of an overtone through a half-integer-type resonance) and tangent bifurcation are possible routes to chaos in these systems, depending on the stellar parameters. The general robustness of the chaotic behavior and the existence of a 'chaotic blue edge' in stellar-parameter space are demonstrated. 55 refs.

  9. Heat transfer performance evaluation and prediction of correlation for turbulent flow through a tube with helical tape inserts at higher Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiya, Muhammad Mostafa Kamal; Chowdhury, M. S. U.; Ahamed, J. U.; Azad, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    An experimental investigation was accomplished to evaluate the performance of heat transfer for turbulent flow through a tube with helical tape inserts. The mild steel helical tape inserts with different twist ratios of 1.88, 3.13, 4.69, 6.41 and 7.81 were used in the flow field. Heat transfer and pressure drop data were prompted for a wide range of Reynolds number from 7200 to 50,000. The experimental results indicated that the Nusselt number, friction factor and thermal performance factor were increased with decreasing twist ratio. The results also showed that helical tape inserts of different geometries in a circular tube enhanced the heat transfer rate significantly with corresponding increase in friction factor. Nusselt number and friction factor for the tube with inserts were found to be increased up to 260 and 285 %, respectively, than those over the plain tube values at the comparable Reynolds number. The heat transfer performance was evaluated and found to be 44 % higher compared to the plain tube based on the constant blower power. Finally, new correlations were proposed for the twist ratios ranging from 1.88 to 7.81 for predicting the heat transfer, friction factor and thermal performance factor for turbulent flow through a circular tube fitted with helical tape inserts.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Average Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Air Flowing in Circular Tubes Having Square-Thread-Type Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, E. W.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through electrically heated Inconel tubes having various degrees of square-thread-type roughness, an inside diameter of 1/2 inch, and a length of 24 inches. were obtained for tubes having conventional roughness ratios (height of thread/radius of tube) of 0 (smooth tube), 0.016, 0.025, and 0.037 over ranges of bulk Reynolds numbers up to 350,000, average inside-tube-wall temperatures up to 1950deg R, and heat-flux densities up to 115,000 Btu per hour per square foot. Data The experimental data showed that both heat transfer and friction increased with increase in surface roughness, becoming more pronounced with increase in Reynolds number; for a given roughness, both heat transfer and friction were also influenced by the tube wall-to-bulk temperature ratio. Good correlation of the heat-transfer data for all the tubes investigated was obtained by use of a modification of the conventional Nusselt correlation parameters wherein the mass velocity in the Reynolds number was replaced by the product of air density evaluated at the average film temperature and the so-called friction velocity; in addition, the physical properties of air were evaluated at the average film temperature. The isothermal friction data for the rough tubes, when plotted in the conventional manner, resulted in curves similar to those obtained by other investigators; that is, the curve for a given roughness breaks away from the Blasius line (representing turbulent flow in smooth tubes) at some value of Reynolds number, which decreases with increase in surface roughness, and then becomes a horizontal line (friction coefficient independent of Reynolds number). A comparison of the friction data for the rough tubes used herein indicated that the conventional roughness ratio is not an adequate measure of relative roughness for tubes having a square-thread-type element. The present data, as well

  11. Pressure gradients in oscillating flows in regenerators-analysis and application to pulse-tube refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzus, P.; Fang, L.; Deng, X.; Bauwens, L.

    2002-05-01

    Significant pressure drops are typical in the regenerator, and their impact on performance can be significant. It is clear that irreversibilities associated with viscous friction lower efficiency. But in the pulse-tube, this is perhaps not the most crucial issue. Indeed, by virtue of having only one driven element (the compressor), the pulse-tube is a fairly inflexible device from a design standpoint. Pressure and velocity amplitude and phase determine energy fluxes. Impedances depend upon volume distribution, orifice resistances, and viscous friction in the regenerator. While the combined effect of volume distribution and orifice impedance is relatively easy to analyze, the role of the resistance in the regenerator is harder to deal with. An analysis is presented of the regenerator as an arbitrary porous medium, assuming large pressure gradients. Results are readily incorporated within a small amplitude, harmonic, model of the overall device, including the bypass, if any. For simple assumptions with respect to the temperature profile, such as linear and exponential temperature profiles, closed form solutions are obtained. Results from the model are compared with experiments and their relevance is discussed.

  12. Pulsating Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith; Montgomery, Michael H.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Shipman, Harry; Nitta, Atsuko; Whole Earth Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars currently on the main sequence as well as those from earlier generations will or have ended their stellar lives as white dwarf stars. White dwarfs are rich forensic laboratories linking the history and future evolution of our Galaxy. Their structure and atmospheric composition provide evidence of how the progenitors lived, how they evolved, and how they died. This information reveals details of processes governing the behavior of contemporary main sequence stars. Combined with their distribution in luminosity/temperature, white dwarfs strongly constrain models of galactic and cosmological evolution.GD358 is among the brightest (mv =13.7) and best studied of the pulsating white dwarfs. This helium atmoshere pulsator (DBV) has an extensive photometric database spanning 30 years, including nine multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns. GD358 exhibits a range of behaviors, from drastic changes in excited pulsation modes to variable multiplet splittings. We use GD358 as a template for an examination of the DBV class, combining photometric results with recent COS spectroscopy. The results present new questions concerning DB formation and evolution.

  13. The Streaming Potential Generated by Flow of Wet Steam in Capillary Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S.S. Jr.; Tyran, Craig K.

    1986-01-21

    For a constant pressure differential, the flow of wet steam generated electric potentials which increased with time and did not reach equilibrium values. These potentials were found to increase to values greater than 100 volts. The reason for this kind of potential build-up behavior was the presence of tiny flowing water slugs which were interspersed with electrically nonconductive steam vapor slugs. The measured electric potential for wet steam increased with pressure differential, but the relationship was not linear. The increase in potential with pressure drop was attributed both to an increase in fluid flow rate and changes in the wet steam quality.

  14. Fine droplet generation using tunable electrohydrodynamic pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Ba, Zhengyu; Xiong, Zhenhua

    2015-07-01

    High-efficiency generation of fine droplets is significant for many microfluidic chips and sensor applications. To produce fine droplets, nozzles with small diameters are needed, which results in a high cost for nozzles and low efficiency of droplet generation. In this paper, a tunable electrohydrodynamic pulsation method which can generate fine droplets with high frequency and controllable size is presented using low conductivity liquids. The effects of flow rates and voltage parameters with respect to deposition frequency and droplet size are investigated. The influence of these parameters on Taylor cone formation time are also discussed and simple scaling laws are proposed to reveal and guide the droplet generation process. Experimental results show that single cycle deposition frequency decreases with increasing voltage frequency, but is only slightly influenced by the flow rates. The droplet size also decreases with voltage frequency, while large flow rates can make this decline gradual allowing better control. Moreover, the Taylor cone formation time may greatly affect the stability of the deposition frequency when the voltage frequency is larger than 30 Hz. Due to the short cycle time of high voltage frequencies, the hydrodynamic behavior in the emission process may be considerably affected by the increase of volume, which is also related to the flow rates. Tunable micropatterns consisting of fine droplets can be achieved by using this method in combination with motion stages.

  15. The morphology of displays of pulsating auroras.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cresswell, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    An auroral substorm generates displays of pulsating auroras in ways which show a dependence upon both local time and latitude relative to the auroral oval. For several hours after midnight pulsating auroras can be observed in the wake of poleward expansions or within equatorward spreading diffuse envelopes of meridional extent of several hundred kilometers. As the dawn meridian is approached the displays of pulsating auroras tend increasingly to be comprised of distinct eastward drifting patches easily recorded by all-sky cameras.

  16. Very high temperature laminar flow of a gas through the entrance region of a cooled tube - Numerical calculations and experimental results.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The laminar flow equations in differential form are solved numerically on a digital computer for flow of a very high temperature gas through the entrance region of an externally cooled tube. The solution method is described and calculations are carried out in conjunction with experimental measurements. The agreement with experiment is good, with the result indicating relatively large energy and momentum losses in the highly cooled flows considered where the pressure is nearly uniform along the flow and the core flow becomes non-adiabatic a few diameters downstream of the inlet. The effects of a large range of Reynolds number and Mach number (viscous dissipation) are also investigated.

  17. Low-energy ion precipitation structures associated with pulsating auroral patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Nishimura, Y.; Yang, B.; Spanswick, E.; Asamura, K.; Sakanoi, T.; Evans, D.; Redmon, R.

    2015-07-01

    Pulsating auroras often appear in forms of geo-stable or slowly convecting "patches." These patches can maintain their rough shape and size over many sequences of luminosity pulsations, yet they slowly drift with ionospheric E × B convection. Because of these characteristics, there has long been a speculation that the pulsating auroral patch (PAP) is connected to flux tubes filled with enhanced cold plasma. In this study, we perform a survey on pulsating auroral events when the footprints of low-Earth-orbit satellites traversed the PAPs, with a focus on the low-energy particle signatures associated with the PAPs. As a result, we identified, in a majority (~2/3) of events, the existence of a low-energy ion precipitation structure that is collocated with the PAP, with core energies ranging from several tens of eV up to a few hundred eV. This result supports the hypothesis that a PAP connects to flux tubes filled with enhanced cold plasma. We further propose that the plasma outflows from the ionosphere are the origin of such cold plasma flux tubes. We suggest that the PAP is formed by a combination of high-energy electrons of a magnetospheric origin, the low-energy plasma structure of an ionospheric origin, and certain ELF/VLF waves that are intensified and modulated in interactions with both the hot and cold plasma populations.

  18. Dayside Pi 2 pulsations at low altitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, P.R. ); Yumoto, Kiyohumi )

    1989-08-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the occurrence of dayside Pi 2 geomagnetic pulsations at low and mid latitudes. The technique of data adaptive filtering is used to identify Pi 2's concealed by the presence of typical daytime Pc type pulsations. Convincing new evidence is presented demonstrating that Pi 2 pulsations occur simultaneously in both the nightside and dayside hemispheres at low latitudes. Dayside Pi 2's are occasionally identified at mid latitudes. These results have implications with regard to the source mechanism for low latitude Pi 2 pulsations and allude to a global cavity mode.

  19. R1234yf vs. R134a Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Inside a 3.4 mm ID Microfin Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diani, A.; Mancin, S.; Rossetto, L.

    2014-11-01

    The refrigerant charge minimization as well as the use of eco-friendly fluids can be considered two of the most important targets for these applications to cope with the new environmental challenges. This paper compares the R1234yf and R134a flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop measurements inside a small microfin tube with internal diameter at the fin tip of 3.4 mm. This study is carried out in an experimental facility built at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale of the University of Padova especially designed to study both single and two phase heat transfer processes. The microfin tube is brazed inside a copper plate and electrically heated from the bottom. Several T -type thermocouples are inserted in the wall to measure the temperature distribution during the phase change process. In particular, the experimental measurements were carried out at constant saturation temperature of 30 °C, by varying the refrigerant mass velocity between 190 kg m-2 s-1 and 940 kg m-2 s-1, the vapour quality from 0.2 to 0.99, at different imposed heat fluxes. The two refrigerants are compared considering the values of the two-phase heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop.

  20. Average patterns of precipitation and plasma flow in the plasma sheet flux tubes during steady magnetospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Lennartsson, W.; Pellinen, R.; Vallinkoski, M.; Fedorova, N. I.

    1990-01-01

    Average patterns of plasma drifts and auroral precipitation in the nightside auroral zone were constructed during a steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) event on February 19, 1978. By comparing these patterns with the measurements in the midtail plasma sheet made by ISEE-1, and using the corresponding magnetic field model, the following features are inferred: (1) the concentration of the earthward convection in the midnight portion of the plasma sheet (convection jet); (2) the depleted plasma energy content of the flux tubes in the convection jet region; and (3) the Region-1 field-aligned currents generated in the midtail plasma sheet. It is argued that these three elements are mutually consistent features appearing in the process of ionosphere-magnetosphere interaction during SMC periods. These configurational characteristics resemble the corresponding features of substorm expansions (enhanced convection and 'dipolarized' magnetic field within the substorm current wedge) and appear to play the same role in regulating the plasma flow in the flux tubes connected to the plasma sheet.