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Sample records for pulse electron spin

  1. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance spectroscopy between a high-spin Mn(2+) ion and a nitroxide spin label.

    PubMed

    Akhmetzyanov, D; Plackmeyer, J; Endeward, B; Denysenkov, V; Prisner, T F

    2015-03-14

    Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR) has attracted considerable attention for biomolecular applications, as it affords precise measurements of distances between pairs of spin labels in the range of 1.5-8 nm. Usually nitroxide moieties incorporated by site-directed spin labelling with cysteine residues are used as spin probes in protein systems. Recently, naturally occurring cofactors and metal ions have also been explored as paramagnetic spin species for such measurements. In this work we investigate the performance of PELDOR between a nitroxide spin label and a high-spin Mn(2+) ion in a synthetic model compound at Q-band (34 GHz) and G-band (180 GHz). We demonstrate that the distances obtained with high-frequency PELDOR are in good agreement with structural predictions. At Q-band frequencies experiments have been performed by probing either the high-spin Mn(2+) ion or the nitroxide spin label. At G-band frequencies we have been able to detect changes in the dipolar oscillation frequency, depending on the pump-probe positions across the g-tensor resolved nitroxide EPR spectrum. These changes result from the restricted mobility of the nitroxide spin label in the model compound. Our results demonstrate that the high-spin Mn(2+) ion can be used for precise distance measurements and open the doors for many biological applications, as naturally occurring Mg(2+) sites can be readily exchanged for Mn(2+). PMID:25669744

  2. Pulsed Electron Double Resonance in Structural Studies of Spin-Labeled Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, O. S.; Tsvetkov, Yu. D.

    2013-01-01

    This review deals with the application of the pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) method to studies of spin-labeled DNA and RNA with complicated spatial structures, such as tetramers, aptamers, riboswitches, and three- and four-way junctions. The use of this method for studying DNA damage sites is also described. PMID:23556128

  3. Boosting the electron spin coherence in binuclear Mn complexes by multiple microwave pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaripov, R.; Vavilova, E.; Miluykov, V.; Bezkishko, I.; Sinyashin, O.; Salikhov, K.; Kataev, V.; Büchner, B.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate a possibility to enhance the coherence time of electron spins in magnetic molecular complexes by application of the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple microwave pulse sequence. Our theoretical analysis shows that the CPMG sequence can efficiently suppress the spin decoherence channel arising due to spectral diffusion induced by a random modulation of the hyperfine interaction which is an important source of the spin dephasing in molecular magnets. We confirm this by employing the CPMG protocol in pulse electron spin resonance experiments on model binuclear 1,2-diphosphacyclopentadienyl manganese complexes. We show that, compared to the standardly used two-pulse primary spin-echo technique, the CPMG experiment can boost the phase memory time up to one order of magnitude, bringing it to above 10 μs at low temperatures. This finding may be important for the implementation of quantum computation protocols on molecular magnets. We discuss a possible interesting analogy with the Zeno's paradox in quantum theory (the Zeno quantum effect), which could be implicit in the CPMG experiment.

  4. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-11-07

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10{sup -6} that is below the error threshold of 10{sup -4} required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  5. Phospholipid bilayer relaxation dynamics as revealed by the pulsed electron-electron double resonance of spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamina, V. N.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in the form of pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) was applied to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayers containing lipids that were spin-labeled at different carbon positions along the lipid acyl chain. Pulsed ELDOR detects motionally induced spin flips of nitrogen nuclei in the nitroxide spin labels, which manifests itself as magnetization transfer (MT) in the nitroxide EPR spectrum. The MT effect was observed over a wide temperature range (100-225 K) on a microsecond time scale. In line with a previous study on molecular glasses [N. P. Isaev and S. A. Dzuba, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 094508 (2011), 10.1063/1.3633241], the motions that induce MT effect were suggested to have the same nature as those in dielectric secondary (β) Johari-Goldstein fast relaxation. The results were compared with literature dielectric relaxation data for POPC bilayers, revealing some common features. Molecular motions resulting in MT are faster for deeper spin labels in the membrane interior. The addition of cholesterol to the bilayer suppresses the lipid motions near the steroid nucleus and accelerates the lipid motions beyond the steroid nucleus, in the bilayer interior. This finding was attributed to the lipid acyl chains being more ordered near the steroid nucleus and less ordered in the bilayer interior. The motions are absent in dry lipids, indicating that the motions are determined by intermolecular interactions in the bilayer.

  6. 5- and 6-pulse electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) of multi-nuclear spin systems.

    PubMed

    Kasumaj, B; Stoll, S

    2008-02-01

    In 3-pulse ESEEM and the original 4-pulse HYSCORE, nuclei with large modulation depth (k approximately 1) suppress spectral peaks from nuclei with weak modulations (k approximately 0). This cross suppression can impede the detection of the latter nuclei, which are often the ones of interest. We show that two extended pulse sequences, 5-pulse ESEEM and 6-pulse HYSCORE, can be used as experimental alternatives that suffer less strongly from the cross suppression and allow to recover signals of k approximately 0 nuclei in the presence of k approximately 1 nuclei. In the extended sequences, modulations from k approximately 0 nuclei are strongly enhanced. In addition, multi-quantum transitions are absent which simplifies the spectra. General analytical expressions for the modulation signals in these sequences are derived and discussed. Numerical simulations and experimental spectra that demonstrate the higher sensitivity of the extended pulse sequences are presented. PMID:18035567

  7. Fourier-transform electron spin resonance with bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Electron spin echo experiments using chirp pulses at X-band around 9 GHz have been performed with a home-built spectrometer based on an arbitrary waveform generator. Primary echoes without phase dispersion were obtained by employing the Böhlen-Bodenhausen scheme with the refocusing pulse being half as long as the coherence-generating pulse. To account for physical bandwidth limitation by the resonator, the instantaneous sweep rate of the chirps was adapted to the spectrometer’s frequency response function, which can be recorded from the sample under study within a few minutes. Such bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses are experimentally shown to achieve an almost uniform excitation bandwidth that exceeds the resonator bandwidth. This uniform excitation allows for computing frequency-domain spectra by Fourier-transformation (FT) of the echo signal. For a nitroxide in dilute solid solution with a spectral width of 200 MHz, the FT EPR spectrum agrees remarkably well with a field-swept echo-detected EPR spectrum. The overall spectral perturbation for operation far beyond the resonator bandwidth was characterized by acquiring a 700 MHz wide spectral range of a copper (II) EPR spectrum with nearly uniform amplitude with excitation and refocusing pulses of 200 and 100 ns, respectively. Furthermore, peculiarities were observed in solid-state FT EPR spectra of disordered systems. To understand these peculiarities two-dimensional data sets were acquired that correlate the FT EPR spectrum to inversion recovery or nuclear modulation. The echo envelope modulation experiments reveal echo decay rates increased by enhanced instantaneous diffusion and passage-specific effects in the nuclear modulations. The latter effect can be suppressed by nuclear modulation averaging. Apparent longitudinal relaxation times for a given subset of orientations are influenced by nuclear modulation effects. Proper extraction of orientation-dependent relaxation times thus requires an experimental

  8. Fourier-transform electron spin resonance with bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses.

    PubMed

    Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Electron spin echo experiments using chirp pulses at X-band around 9GHz have been performed with a home-built spectrometer based on an arbitrary waveform generator. Primary echoes without phase dispersion were obtained by employing the Böhlen-Bodenhausen scheme with the refocusing pulse being half as long as the coherence-generating pulse. To account for physical bandwidth limitation by the resonator, the instantaneous sweep rate of the chirps was adapted to the spectrometer's frequency response function, which can be recorded from the sample under study within a few minutes. Such bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses are experimentally shown to achieve an almost uniform excitation bandwidth that exceeds the resonator bandwidth. This uniform excitation allows for computing frequency-domain spectra by Fourier-transformation (FT) of the echo signal. For a nitroxide in dilute solid solution with a spectral width of 200MHz, the FT EPR spectrum agrees remarkably well with a field-swept echo-detected EPR spectrum. The overall spectral perturbation for operation far beyond the resonator bandwidth was characterized by acquiring a 700MHz wide spectral range of a copper (II) EPR spectrum with nearly uniform amplitude with excitation and refocusing pulses of 200 and 100ns, respectively. Furthermore, peculiarities were observed in solid-state FT EPR spectra of disordered systems. To understand these peculiarities two-dimensional data sets were acquired that correlate the FT EPR spectrum to inversion recovery or nuclear modulation. The echo envelope modulation experiments reveal echo decay rates increased by enhanced instantaneous diffusion and passage-specific effects in the nuclear modulations. The latter effect can be suppressed by nuclear modulation averaging. Apparent longitudinal relaxation times for a given subset of orientations are influenced by nuclear modulation effects. Proper extraction of orientation-dependent relaxation times thus requires an experimental setup

  9. Ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser pulses: Transfer of angular momentum from the electronic system to magnetoelastic spin-phonon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsoulis, T.; Illg, C.; Haag, M.; Mueller, B. Y.; Zhang, L.; Fähnle, M.

    2016-04-01

    During ultrafast demagnetization after the excitation of ferromagnetic films with femtosecond laser pulses, the angular momentum of the electronic system is transferred to the lattice via electron-phonon scatterings. The actual amount of transfer is calculated for Ni and Fe by considering spin-phonon eigenmodes, which have a sharp angular momentum. Because the considered Hamiltonian is not isotropic, the total angular momentum is not conserved.

  10. Effects of finite pulse width on two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhichun; Crepeau, Richard H; Freed, Jack H

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ESR techniques, such as 2D-ELDOR, have considerably improved the resolution of ESR in studies of molecular dynamics in complex fluids such as liquid crystals and membrane vesicles and in spin labeled polymers and peptides. A well-developed theory based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) has been successfully employed to analyze these experiments. However, one fundamental assumption has been utilized to simplify the complex analysis, viz. the pulses have been treated as ideal non-selective ones, which therefore provide uniform irradiation of the whole spectrum. In actual experiments, the pulses are of finite width causing deviations from the theoretical predictions, a problem that is exacerbated by experiments performed at higher frequencies. In the present paper we provide a method to deal with the full SLE including the explicit role of the molecular dynamics, the spin Hamiltonian and the radiation field during the pulse. The computations are rendered more manageable by utilizing the Trotter formula, which is adapted to handle this SLE in what we call a "Split Super-Operator" method. Examples are given for different motional regimes, which show how 2D-ELDOR spectra are affected by the finite pulse widths. The theory shows good agreement with 2D-ELDOR experiments performed as a function of pulse width. PMID:16150620

  11. Spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in retinal rod outer segment membranes studied by spin-labeling and pulsed electron double resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Hara, Hideyuki; Tokunaga, Fumio; Arata, Toshiaki

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of spin labeling and PELDOR to measure inter-rhodopsin distance in ROS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong decay of PELDOR signal indicated a high density (mM range) of rhodopsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decay was modeled by rhodopsin monomers dispersed in a planar membrane. -- Abstract: We have determined the spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in the retinal rod outer segment (ROS) membrane by measuring the distances between rhodopsin molecules in which native cysteines were spin-labeled at {approx}1.0 mol/mol rhodopsin. The echo modulation decay of pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) from spin-labeled ROS curved slightly with strong background decay. This indicated that the rhodopsin was densely packed in the retina and that the rhodopsin molecules were not aligned well. The curve was simulated by a model in which rhodopsin is distributed randomly as monomers in a planar membrane.

  12. Pulsed electron spin nutation spectroscopy of weakly exchange-coupled biradicals: a general theoretical approach and determination of the spin dipolar interaction.

    PubMed

    Ayabe, Kazuki; Sato, Kazunobu; Nishida, Shinsuke; Ise, Tomoaki; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Morita, Yasushi; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Masahiro; Takui, Takeji

    2012-07-01

    Weakly exchange-coupled biradicals have attracted much attention in terms of their DNP application in NMR spectroscopy for biological systems or the use of synthetic electron-spin qubits. Pulse-ESR based electron spin nutation (ESN) spectroscopy applied to biradicals is generally treated as transition moment spectroscopy from the theoretical side, illustrating that it is a powerful and facile tool to determine relatively short distances between weakly exchange-coupled electron spins. The nutation frequency as a function of the microwave irradiation strength ω(1) (angular frequency) for any cases of weakly exchange-coupled systems can be classified into three categories; D(12) (spin dipolar interaction)-driven, Δg-driven and ω(1)-driven nutation behaviour with the increasing strength of ω(1). For hetero-spin biradicals, Δg effects can be a dominating characteristic in the biradical nutation spectroscopy. Two-dimensional pulse-based electron spin nutation (2D-ESN) spectroscopy operating at the X-band can afford to determine small values of D(12) in weakly exchange-coupled biradicals in rigid glasses. The analytical expressions derived here for ω(1)-dependent nutation frequencies are based on only four electronic spin states relevant to the biradicals, while real biradical systems often have sizable hyperfine interactions. Thus, we have evaluated nuclear hyperfine effects on the nutation frequencies to check the validity of the present theoretical treatment. The experimental spin dipolar coupling of a typical TEMPO-based biradical 1, (2,2,6,6-tetra[((2)H(3))methyl]-[3,3-(2)H(2),4-(2)H(1),5,5-(2)H(2)]piperidin-N-oxyl-4-yl)(2,2,6,6-tetra[((2)H(3))methyl]-[3,3-(2)H(2),4-(2)H(1),5,5-(2)H(2),(15)N]piperidin-(15)N-oxyl-4-yl) terephthalate in a toluene glass, with a distance of 1.69 nm between the two spin sites is D(12) = -32 MHz (the effect of the exchange coupling J(12) is vanishing due to the homo-spin sites of 1, i.e.Δg = 0), while 0 < |J(12)|≦ 1.0 MHz as

  13. Conformationally restricted isoindoline-derived spin labels in duplex DNA: distances and rotational flexibility by pulsed electron-electron double resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gophane, Dnyaneshwar B; Endeward, Burkhard; Prisner, Thomas F; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th

    2014-11-24

    Three structurally related isoindoline-derived spin labels that have different mobilities were incorporated into duplex DNA to systematically study the effect of motion on orientation-dependent pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) measurements. To that end, a new nitroxide spin label, (ExIm)U, was synthesized and incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides. (ExIm)U is the first example of a conformationally unambiguous spin label for nucleic acids, in which the nitroxide N-O bond lies on the same axis as the three single bonds used to attach the otherwise rigid isoindoline-based spin label to a uridine base. Continuous-wave (CW) EPR measurements of (ExIm)U confirm a very high rotational mobility of the spin label in duplex DNA relative to the structurally related spin label (Im)U, which has restricted mobility due to an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The X-band CW-EPR spectra of (ExIm)U can be used to identify mismatches in duplex DNA. PELDOR distance measurements between pairs of the spin labels (Im)U, (Ox)U, and (ExIm)U in duplex DNA showed a strong angular dependence for (Im)U, a medium dependence for (Ox)U, and no orientation effect for (ExIm)U. Thus, precise distances can be extracted from (ExIm)U without having to take orientational effects into account. PMID:25296640

  14. Pulsed electron-electron double-resonance determination of spin-label distances and orientations on the tetrameric potassium ion channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Endeward, Burkhard; Butterwick, Joel A; MacKinnon, Roderick; Prisner, Thomas F

    2009-10-28

    Pulsed electron-electron double-resonance (PELDOR) measurements are presented from the potassium ion channel KcsA both solubilized in detergent and reconstituted in lipids. Site-directed spin-labeling using (1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolin-3-yl)methyl methanethiosulfonate was performed with a R64C mutant of the protein. The orientations of the spin-labels in the tetramer were determined by PELDOR experiments performed at two magnetic field strengths (0.3 T/X-band and 1.2 T/Q-band) and variable probe frequency. Quantitative simulation of the PELDOR data supports a strongly restricted nitroxide, oriented at an angle of 65 degrees relative to the central channel axis. In general, poorer quality PELDOR data were obtained from membrane-reconstituted preparations compared to soluble proteins or detergent-solubilized samples. One reason for this is the reduced transverse spin relaxation time T(2) of nitroxides due to crowding of tetramers within the membrane that occurs even at low protein to lipid ratios. This reduced T(2) can be overcome by reconstituting mixtures of unlabeled and labeled proteins, yielding high-quality PELDOR data. Identical PELDOR oscillation frequencies and their dependencies on the probe frequency were observed in the detergent and membrane-reconstituted preparations, indicating that the position and orientation of the spin-labels are the same in both environments. PMID:19919160

  15. Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance Determination of Spin Label Distances and Orientations on the Tetrameric Potassium Ion Channel KcsA

    PubMed Central

    Endeward, Burkhard; Butterwick, Joel A.; MacKinnon, Roderick; Prisner, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR) measurements are presented from the potassium ion channel KcsA both solubilized in detergent and reconstituted in lipids. Site-directed spin labeling using MTSL was performed with a R64C mutant of the protein. The orientations of the spin labels in the tetramer were determined by PELDOR experiments performed at two magnetic field strengths (0.3 T / X-band and 1.2 T / Q-band) and variable probe frequency. Quantitative simulation of the PELDOR data supports a strongly restricted nitroxide, oriented at an angle of 65 degrees relative to the central channel axis. In general, poorer quality PELDOR data was obtained from membrane-reconstituted preparations compared to soluble proteins or detergent-solubilized samples. One reason for this is the reduced transverse spin relaxation time T2 of nitroxides due to crowding of tetramers within the membrane that occurs even at low protein to lipid ratios. This reduced T2 can be overcome by reconstituting mixtures of unlabeled and labeled proteins, yielding high-quality PELDOR data. Identical PELDOR oscillation frequencies and their dependencies on the probe frequency were observed in the detergent and membrane-reconstituted preparations indicating that the position and orientation of the spin labels are the same in both environments. PMID:19919160

  16. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  17. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  18. PREFACE: Spin Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Sousa, R.; Prejbeanu, L.

    2007-04-01

    Conventional electronics has in the past ignored the spin on the electron, however things began to change in 1988 with the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in metallic thin film stacks which led to the development of a new research area, so called spin-electronics. In the last 10 years, spin-electronics has achieved a number of breakthroughs from the point of view of both basic science and application. Materials research has led to several major discoveries: very large tunnel magnetoresistance effects in tunnel junctions with crystalline barriers due to a new spin-filtering mechanism associated with the spin-dependent symmetry of the electron wave functions new magnetic tunnelling barriers leading to spin-dependent tunnelling barrier heights and acting as spin-filters magnetic semiconductors with increasingly high ordering temperature. New phenomena have been predicted and observed: the possibility of acting on the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure with a spin-polarized current. This effect, due to a transfer of angular momentum between the spin polarized conduction electrons and the local magnetization, can be viewed as the reciprocal of giant or tunnel magnetoresistance. It can be used to switch the magnetization of a magnetic nanostructure or to generate steady magnetic excitations in the system. the possibility of generating and manipulating spin current without charge current by creating non-equilibrium local accumulation of spin up or spin down electrons. The range of applications of spin electronics materials and phenomena is expanding: the first devices based on giant magnetoresistance were the magnetoresistive read-heads for computer disk drives. These heads, introduced in 1998 with current-in plane spin-valves, have evolved towards low resistance tunnel magnetoresistice heads in 2005. Besides magnetic recording technology, these very sensitive magnetoresistive sensors are finding applications in other areas, in particular in biology. magnetic

  19. Identification of gamma-ray irradiated medicinal herbs using pulsed photostimulated luminescence, thermoluminescence, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukdeb; Kim, Byeong Keun; Kim, Won Young; Kim, Min Jung; Ki, Hyeon A; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Kang, Woo Suk; Kang, In Ho; Kang, Shin Jung; Song, Joon Myong

    2009-08-01

    Dried herbal samples consisting of root, rhizome, cortex, fruit, peel, flower, spike, ramulus, folium, and whole plant of 20 different medicinal herbs were investigated using pulsed photostimulated luminescence (PPSL), thermoluminescence (TL), and electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) to identify gamma-ray irradiation treatment. Samples were irradiated at 0-50 kGy using a 60Co irradiator. PPSL measurement was applied as a rapid screening method. Control samples of 19 different herbs had photon counts less than the lower threshold value (700 counts 60 s(-1)). The photon counts of non-irradiated clematidis radix and irradiated evodia and gardenia fruits were between the lower and upper threshold values (700-5,000 counts 60 s(-1)). TL ratios, i.e., integrated areas of the first glow (TL1)/the second glow (TL2), were found to be less than 0.1 in all non-irradiated samples and higher than 0.1 in irradiated ones providing definite proof of radiation treatment. ESR spectroscopy was applied as an alternative rapid method. In most of the irradiated samples, mainly radiation-induced cellulosic, sugar, and relatively complicated carbohydrate radical ESR signals were detected. No radiation-specific ESR signal, except one intense singlet, was observed for irradiated scrophularia and scutellaria root and artemisiae argyi folium. PMID:19529925

  20. Study of a DNA Duplex by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Validation of Pulsed Dipolar Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Distance Measurements Using Triarylmethyl-Based Spin Labels.

    PubMed

    Lomzov, Alexander A; Sviridov, Eugeniy A; Shernuykov, Andrey V; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-06-16

    Pulse dipole-dipole electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy (double electron-electron resonance [DEER] or pulse electron-electron double resonance [PELDOR] and double quantum coherence [DQC]) allows for measurement of distances in biomolecules and can be used at low temperatures in a frozen solution. Recently, the possibility of distance measurement in a nucleic acid at a physiological temperature using pulse EPR was demonstrated. In these experiments, triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals with long memory time of the electron spin served as a spin label. In addition, the duplex was immobilized on modified silica gel particles (Nucleosil DMA); this approach enables measurement of interspin distances close to 4.5 nm. Nevertheless, the possible influence of TAM on the structure of a biopolymer under study and validity of the data obtained by DQC are debated. In this paper, a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods was used for verification of interspin distances measured by the X-band DQC method. NMR is widely used for structural analysis of biomolecules under natural conditions (room temperature and an aqueous solution). The ultraviolet (UV) melting method and thermal series (1)H NMR in the range 5-95 °C revealed the presence of only the DNA duplex in solution at oligonucleotide concentrations 1 μM to 1.1 mM at temperatures below 40 °C. The duplex structures and conformation flexibility of native and TAM-labeled DNA complexes obtained by MD simulation were the same as the structure obtained by NMR refinement. Thus, we showed that distance measurements at physiological temperatures by the X-band DQC method allow researchers to obtain valid structural information on an unperturbed DNA duplex using terminal TAM spin labels. PMID:27195671

  1. Control of electron spin decoherence caused by electron nuclear spin dynamics in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ren-Bao; Yao, Wang; Sham, L. J.

    2007-07-01

    Control of electron spin decoherence in contact with a mesoscopic bath of many interacting nuclear spins in an InAs quantum dot is studied by solving the coupled quantum dynamics. The nuclear spin bath, because of its bifurcated evolution predicated on the electron spin up or down state, measures the which-state information of the electron spin and hence diminishes its coherence. The many-body dynamics of the nuclear spin bath is solved with a pair-correlation approximation. In the relevant timescale, nuclear pair-wise flip flops, as elementary excitations in the mesoscopic bath, can be mapped into the precession of non-interacting pseudo-spins. Such mapping provides a geometrical picture for understanding the decoherence and for devising control schemes. A close examination of nuclear bath dynamics reveals a wealth of phenomena and new possibilities of controlling the electron spin decoherence. For example, when the electron spin is flipped by a π-pulse at τ, its coherence will partially recover at \\sqrt{2}\\tau as a consequence of quantum disentanglement from the mesoscopic bath. In contrast to the re-focusing of inhomogeneously broadened phases by conventional spin-echoes, the disentanglement is realized through shepherding quantum evolution of the bath state via control of the quantum object. A concatenated construction of pulse sequences can eliminate the decoherence with arbitrary accuracy, with the nuclear nuclear spin interaction strength acting as the controlling small parameter.

  2. Pulsed nuclear pumping and spin diffusion in a single charged quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Ladd, Thaddeus D; Press, David; De Greve, Kristiaan; McMahon, Peter L; Friess, Benedikt; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2010-09-01

    We report the observation of a feedback process between the nuclear spins in a single charged quantum dot under coherently pulsed optical excitation and its trion transition. The optical pulse sequence intersperses resonant narrow-band pumping for spin initialization with off-resonant ultrafast pulses for coherent electron-spin rotation. A hysteretic sawtooth pattern in the free-induction decay of the single electron spin is observed; a mathematical model indicates a competition between optical nuclear pumping and nuclear spin-diffusion. This effect allows dynamic tuning of the electron Larmor frequency to a value determined by the pulse timing, potentially allowing more complex coherent control operations. PMID:20867546

  3. Fast electron spin resonance controlled manipulation of spin injection into quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, Andreas Siller, Jan; Schittny, Robert; Krämmer, Christoph; Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael

    2014-06-23

    In our spin-injection light-emitting diodes, electrons are spin-polarized in a semimagnetic ZnMnSe spin aligner and then injected into InGaAs quantum dots. The resulting electron spin state can be read out by measuring the circular polarization state of the emitted light. Here, we resonantly excite the Mn 3d electron spin system with microwave pulses and perform time-resolved measurements of the spin dynamics. We find that we are able to control the spin polarization of the injected electrons on a microsecond timescale. This electron spin resonance induced spin control could be one of the ingredients required to utilize the quantum dot electrons or the Mn spins as qubits.

  4. Electron Spin and Its History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commins, Eugene D.

    2012-11-01

    The history of electron spin is summarized. Topics include the discovery of electron spin, the birth of quantum electrodynamics, the invention of magnetic resonance, the invention of renormalization, the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron in experiment and theory, and searches for the electron electric dipole moment.

  5. Coherent pump pulses in Double Electron Electron Resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tait, Claudia E; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-07-21

    The recent introduction of shaped pulses to Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy has led to significant enhancements in sensitivity through increased excitation bandwidths and improved control over spin dynamics. The application of DEER has so far relied on the presence of an incoherent pump channel to average out most undesired coherent effects of the pump pulse(s) on the observer spins. However, in fully coherent EPR spectrometers that are increasingly used to generate shaped pulses, the presence of coherent pump pulses means that these effects need to be explicitly considered. In this paper, we examine the effects of coherent rectangular and sech/tanh pump pulses in DEER experiments with up to three pump pulses. We show that, even in the absence of significant overlap of the observer and pump pulse excitation bandwidths, coherence transfer pathways involving both types of pulses generate spin echoes of considerable intensity. These echoes introduce artefacts, which, if not identified and removed, can easily lead to misinterpretation. We demonstrate that the observed echoes can be quantitatively modelled using a simple spin quantum dynamics approach that includes instrumental transfer functions. Based on an analysis of the echo crossing artefacts, we propose efficient phase cycling schemes for their suppression. This enables the use of advanced DEER experiments, characterized by high sensitivity and increased accuracy for long-distance measurements, on novel fully coherent EPR spectrometers. PMID:27339858

  6. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth in a series of contracts and grants exploring the advanced particulate pollution control technology of electron beam precipitation. The chief goal of the current contract is to develop a laboratory scale electron beam precharger using a pulsed electric field to the proof-of-concept stage. Contract tasks leading to the achievement of this goal are generally divided up into two categories: tasks required to bring the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) test system up to an operational level for the contract work, and tasks concerning the actual experimental and analytical phase of the study. Not unexpectedly, the early portion of the contract duration will be devoted to the commissioning of the EBP and its many subsystems, while the latter portion will devote itself to testing the new pulsed electron beam precharger.

  7. Pulsed Electron Spin Resonance Resolves the Coordination Site of Cu2+ Ions in α1-Glycine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ruthstein, Sharon; Stone, Katherine M.; Cunningham, Timothy F.; Ji, Ming; Cascio, Michael; Saxena, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we identify the coordination environment of Cu2+ in the human α1-glycine receptor (GlyR). GlyRs are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily (pLGIC) that mediate fast signaling at synapses. Metal ions like Zn2+ and Cu2+ significantly modulate the activity of pLGICs, and metal ion coordination is essential for proper physiological postsynaptic inhibition by GlyR in vivo. Zn2+ can either potentiate or inhibit GlyR activity depending on its concentration, while Cu2+ is inhibitory. To better understand the molecular basis of the inhibitory effect we have used electron spin resonance to directly examine Cu2+ coordination and stoichiometry. We show that Cu2+ has one binding site per α1 subunit, and that five Cu2+ can be coordinated per GlyR. Cu2+ binds to E192 and H215 in each subunit of GlyR with a 40 μM apparent dissociation constant, consistent with earlier functional measurements. However, the coordination site does not include several residues of the agonist/antagonist binding site that were previously suggested to have roles in Cu2+ coordination by functional measurements. Intriguingly, the E192/H215 site has been proposed as the potentiating Zn2+ site. The opposing modulatory actions of these cations at a shared binding site highlight the sensitive allosteric nature of GlyR. PMID:20959090

  8. Generation and coherent control of pure spin currents via terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schüler, Michael Berakdar, Jamal

    2014-04-21

    We inspect the time and spin-dependent, inelastic tunneling in engineered semiconductor-based double quantum well driven by time-structured terahertz pulses. An essential ingredient is an embedded spin-active structure with vibrational modes that scatter the pulse driven carriers. Due to the different time scales of the charge and spin dynamics, the spin-dependent electron-vibron coupling may result in pure net spin current (with negligible charge current). Heating the vibrational site may affect the resulting spin current. Furthermore, by controlling the charge dynamics, the spin dynamics and the generated spin current can be manipulated and switched on and off coherently.

  9. ELECTRONIC PULSE SCALING CIRCUITS

    DOEpatents

    Cooke-Yarborough, E.H.

    1958-11-18

    Electronic pulse scaling circults of the klnd comprlsing a serles of bi- stable elements connected ln sequence, usually in the form of a rlng so as to be cycllcally repetitive at the highest scallng factor, are described. The scaling circuit comprises a ring system of bi-stable elements each arranged on turn-off to cause, a succeeding element of the ring to be turned-on, and one being arranged on turn-off to cause a further element of the ring to be turned-on. In addition, separate means are provided for applying a turn-off pulse to all the elements simultaneously, and for resetting the elements to a starting condition at the end of each cycle.

  10. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, W. C.

    A short review of electron beam particle precharging using a pulsed electric field is presented. The design and installation is detailed of a remote focusing gear train which will allow much greater control over the particle charge measurement capability of the charge vs. radius apparatus. Progress on the electrical shielding of the rotating spark gap power supply using a large Faraday cage is described. Efforts to prevent RFI interference from adversely affecting the Climet particle counter and the MicroMac current measurement device using a variety of techniques are also presented. The basic effort is to optimize the removal efficiency for fly ash particles.

  11. Spin flip probability of electron in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2012-03-19

    The probability that an electromagnetic wave can flip the spin of an electron is calculated. It is assumed that the electron resides in a uniform magnetic field and interacts with an incoming electromagnetic pulse. The scattering matrix is constructed and the time needed to flip the spin is calculated.

  12. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  13. Electron spin decoherence in nuclear spin baths and dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, N.; Yang, W.; Ho, S. W.; Hu, J. L.; Wan, J. T. K.; Liu, R. B.

    2011-12-23

    We introduce the quantum theory of the electron spin decoherence in a nuclear spin bath and the dynamical decoupling approach for protecting the electron spin coherence. These theories are applied to various solid-state systems, such as radical spins in molecular crystals and NV centers in diamond.

  14. Development of a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A V; Roy, Arnab; Kumar, P S Anil; Kirschner, J

    2016-02-01

    We have designed and constructed a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system working in the reflected electron pulse counting mode. This system is capable of measuring asymmetries due to spin-orbit and exchange interactions. Photoemission from a strained GaAs/GaAsP super lattice is used as the source of spin polarized electrons. Spin-orbit asymmetry is evaluated for Ir(100) single crystal at various energies. Subsequently, exchange asymmetry has been evaluated on 40 monolayer Fe deposited on Ir(100). This instrument proves to be useful in understanding structure and magnetism at surfaces. PMID:26931865

  15. Development of a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, A. V.; Roy, Arnab; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Kirschner, J.

    2016-02-01

    We have designed and constructed a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system working in the reflected electron pulse counting mode. This system is capable of measuring asymmetries due to spin-orbit and exchange interactions. Photoemission from a strained GaAs/GaAsP super lattice is used as the source of spin polarized electrons. Spin-orbit asymmetry is evaluated for Ir(100) single crystal at various energies. Subsequently, exchange asymmetry has been evaluated on 40 monolayer Fe deposited on Ir(100). This instrument proves to be useful in understanding structure and magnetism at surfaces.

  16. Electron spin decoherence in silicon carbide nuclear spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping

    In this paper, we study the electron spin decoherence of single defects in silicon carbide (SiC) nuclear spin bath. We find that, although the natural abundance of 29Si (4.7 counter-intuitive result, is the suppression of heteronuclear-spin flip-flop process in finite magnetic field. Our results show that electron spin of defect centers in SiC are excellent candidates for solid state spin qubit in quantum information processing.

  17. Dynamical Decoupling with pulse errors for ensembles of interacting spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, E. S.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a well-known approach for decoupling quantum (spin) systems from their environments. Theoretically, the performance of DD pulse sequences is often analyzed using a single spin approximation in which environmental noise is included through single spin operators. This approach has successfully analyzed the effectiveness of many popular DD pulse sequences (like CPMG and XY4) to cancel environmental noise even in the presence of unavoidable pulse errors. However, this methodology does not describe the effect of DD on the spin-spin interactions present in experiments involving large numbers of spins. Here, we go beyond the usual single-spin model, extending the analysis of DD sequences to include such spin-spin interactions. We find that when using certain popular DD sequences (like CPMG), coherence times of ensembles with dipolar interactions between spins can be drastically influenced by pulse errors. While sequences with ideal pulses do not decouple the spin-spin interactions, the presence of even small pulse errors can partially (or even greatly) decouple the spin-spin interactions thus leading to longer coherence times. Furthermore, the extent that these interactions are decoupled is highly dependent on the type of DD sequence used, and not necessarily the number of pulses involved. These calculations explain results of past experiments (Tyryshkin et al., arxiv: 1011.1903).

  18. Stark Tuning of Donor Electron Spins of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Forrest R.; Tyryshkin, Alexei M.; Sabouret, Guillaume; Bokor, Jeff; Schenkel, Thomas; Lyon, Stephen A.

    2006-03-23

    We report Stark shift measurements for {sup 121}Sb donor electron spins in silicon using pulsed electron spin resonance. Interdigitated metal gates on top of a Sb-implanted {sup 28}Si epi-layer are used to apply electric fields. Two Stark effects are resolved: a decrease of the hyperfine coupling between electron and nuclear spins of the donor and a decrease in electron Zeeman g-factor. The hyperfine term prevails at X-band magnetic fields of 0.35T, while the g-factor term is expected to dominate at higher magnetic fields. A significant linear Stark effect is also resolved presumably arising from strain.

  19. Phase-locking of oscillating images using laser-induced spin-polarized pulse TEM.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Makoto; Nambo, Yoshito; Kusunoki, Soichiro; Jin, Xiuguang; Saitoh, Koh; Asano, Hidefumi; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Pulse-mode operation was realized in spin-polarized transmission electron microscopy (SP-TEM) using a laser-driven electron gun with a GaAs-GaAsP strained-layer-superlattice photocathode. TEM images were acquired with a pulsed electron beam with a 5-μs pulse duration. Phase locking of wobbling TEM images was demonstrated using a pulsed beam with a 1-kHz repetition frequency, which matched the image wobbling frequency. It was found that in composite images formed by superimposing 2 × 10(4) separate single-pulse exposures, the amount of image blurring due to wobbling was a linear function of the pulse duration. These results suggest the possibility of pump-probe measurements in SP-TEM using the pulsed electron beam as a probe, allowing nanometer-scale time-resolved spin mapping. PMID:23797969

  20. Complete quantum control of a single quantum dot spin using ultrafast optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Press, David; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Zhang, Bingyang; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2008-11-13

    A basic requirement for quantum information processing systems is the ability to completely control the state of a single qubit. For qubits based on electron spin, a universal single-qubit gate is realized by a rotation of the spin by any angle about an arbitrary axis. Driven, coherent Rabi oscillations between two spin states can be used to demonstrate control of the rotation angle. Ramsey interference, produced by two coherent spin rotations separated by a variable time delay, demonstrates control over the axis of rotation. Full quantum control of an electron spin in a quantum dot has previously been demonstrated using resonant radio-frequency pulses that require many spin precession periods. However, optical manipulation of the spin allows quantum control on a picosecond or femtosecond timescale, permitting an arbitrary rotation to be completed within one spin precession period. Recent work in optical single-spin control has demonstrated the initialization of a spin state in a quantum dot, as well as the ultrafast manipulation of coherence in a largely unpolarized single-spin state. Here we demonstrate complete coherent control over an initialized electron spin state in a quantum dot using picosecond optical pulses. First we vary the intensity of a single optical pulse to observe over six Rabi oscillations between the two spin states; then we apply two sequential pulses to observe high-contrast Ramsey interference. Such a two-pulse sequence realizes an arbitrary single-qubit gate completed on a picosecond timescale. Along with the spin initialization and final projective measurement of the spin state, these results demonstrate a complete set of all-optical single-qubit operations. PMID:19005550

  1. Pulsed Spin Locking in Spin-1 NQR: Broadening Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a branch of magnetic resonance physics that allows for the detection of spin I > 1/2 nuclei in crystalline and semi-crystalline materials. Through the application of a resonant radio frequency (rf) pulse, the nuclei's response is to create an oscillating magnetic moment at a frequency unique to the target substance. This creates the NQR signal, which is typically weak and rapidly decaying. The decay is due to the various line broadening mechanisms, the relative strengths of which are functions of the specific material, in addition to thermal relaxation processes. Through the application of a series of rf pulses the broadening mechanisms can be refocused, narrowing the linewidth and extending the signal in time. Three line broadening mechanisms are investigated to explain the NQR signal's linewidth and behavior. The first, electric field gradient (EFG) inhomogeneity, is due to variations in the local electric environment among the target nuclei, for instance from crystal imperfections. While EFG inhomogeneity can vary between samples of the same chemical composition and structure, the other broadening mechanisms of homonuclear and heteronuclear dipolar coupling are specific to this composition and structure. Simple analytical models are developed that explain the NQR signal response to pulse sequences by accounting for the behavior of each broadening mechanism. After a general theoretical introduction, a model of pairs of spin-1 nuclei is investigated, and the refocusing behaviors of EFG and homonuclear dipolar coupling are analyzed. This reveals the conditions where EFG is refocused but homonuclear dipolar coupling is not. In this case the resulting signal shows a rapid decay, the rate of which becomes a measure of interatomic distances. This occurs even in the more complex case of a powder sample with its many randomly oriented crystallites, under particular pulsing conditions. Many target NQR compounds are rich in hydrogen

  2. Resonant spin amplification in nanostructures with anisotropic spin relaxation and spread of the electronic g factor

    SciTech Connect

    Glazov, M. M. Ivchenko, E. L.

    2008-08-15

    Spin dynamics of electrons in semiconductors and structures with quantum wells under conditions where pumping and probing are performed in the form of a periodical series of pulses is theoretically studied. It is shown that, at a fixed delay between the pump and probe pulses, the signal of spin amplification as a function of the magnetic field consists of a series of narrow peaks conditioned by commensurability of the period of spin precession and pulse repetition interval. In the case of anisotropic spin relaxation, the peak centered at the zero magnetic field is suppressed compared with the neighboring peaks. The role of inhomogeneous broadening of the frequency of the Larmor precession in the formation of the spin amplification signal is analyzed.

  3. Designing electron spin textures and spin interferometers by shape deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zu-Jian; Gentile, Paola; Ortix, Carmine; Cuoco, Mario

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spin orientation of an electron propagating in a one-dimensional nanostructure with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling can be manipulated on demand by changing the geometry of the nanosystem. Shape deformations that result in a nonuniform curvature give rise to complex three-dimensional spin textures in space. We employ the paradigmatic example of an elliptically deformed quantum ring to unveil the way to get an all-geometrical and all-electrical control of the spin orientation. The resulting spin textures exhibit a tunable topological character with windings around the radial and the out-of-plane directions. We show that these topologically nontrivial spin patterns affect the spin interference effect in the deformed ring, thereby resulting in different geometry-driven ballistic electronic transport behaviors. Our results establish a deep connection between electronic spin textures, spin transport, and the nanoscale shape of the system.

  4. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  5. Highly efficient spin filtering of ballistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmuller, S. J.; Trypiniotis, T.; Cho, W. S.; Hirohata, A.; Lew, W. S.; Vaz, C. A.; Bland, J. A.

    2004-04-01

    Spin dependent electron transport in hybrid Au/Co/Cu/NiFe/n-GaAs spin valve Schottky barrier structures was investigated using photoexcitation at various wavelengths. For excitation with the photon energy well above the Schottky barrier height we found a ˜2400% increase in helicity dependent photocurrent on switching the spin valve from parallel to antiparallel alignment. Our observations provide clear evidence for highly efficient spin filtering of spin polarized ballistic electrons.

  6. Spin Electronics in Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Felipe Tijiwa

    2011-12-01

    The work described in this thesis reflects a through investigation of spin-dependent transport through metallic nanoparticles, via tunnel junctions. Our devices consist of metallic nanoparticles embedded in an insulating matrix tunnel coupled to two metallic electrodes. At low temperatures, the small dimensions of the particles provide the necessary conditions to study the role played by discrete energy levels in the transport properties of these devices. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction to some of the relevant background topics related to this work, will be presented. Chapter 2 gives a detailed description of measurement procedures used on the experiments, and the adopted techniques for sample fabrication. In some of the devices presented here, the electrodes are made of ferromagnetic materials, which are used as source of spin-polarized current. The case where both electrodes are ferromagnetic, in a spin-valve configuration, will be discussed in Chapter 3, showing that spin accumulation mechanisms are responsible for the observed spin-polarized current. It will also be shown that the effect of an applied perpendicular magnetic field, relative to the magnetization orientation of the electrodes, indicates the suppression of spin precession in such small particles. Moreover, in the presence of an external non-collinear magnetic field, it is the local field "felt" by the particle that determines the character of the tunnel current. Even in samples where only one of the electrodes is ferromagnetic, spin-polarization of the tunnel current due to spin accumulation in the particle is observed. Asymmetries in the current-voltage (IV) characteristics as well as in the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of these devices will be presented in Chapter 4. Another type of device, which will be addressed in Chapter 5, consists of ferromagnetic nanoparticles coupled to normal-metal electrodes. The rich electronic structure as well as a complex set of relaxation mechanisms in these

  7. Electron spin from self interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Spavieri, G. |

    1992-06-01

    The author explores the possibility that the electron self-interaction is the origin of the spin and of the radiative effects of QED. The electron is conceived as a charged, massless, point particle with a quantum or stochastic, internal motion about its center of mass and bound by a self-interaction potential. The hydrodynamic equations of motion describing the electron in its center of mass frame are related to non-Markovian stochastic equations recently used to derive the Schroedinger equation. By averaging over this stochastic internal motion and identifying the energy with the rest mass energy, the angular momentum exhibits properties characteristic of spin. The electromagnetic self-interactions added to the Hamiltonian of the particle correct the g factor to yield the anomalous value (g{minus}2)/2 {approx} 1159.7(2.3) X 10{sup {minus}6} in agreement with experiment. Calculations of other {open_quotes}radiative{close_quotes} effects including the Lamb shift are presented. The results obtained are finite and suggest that the QED corrections attributed to radiative effects could be obtained classically, i.e., without second quantization and renormalization, by complementing the Dirac theory with this self-interaction mechanism. The g factor dependence on the external magnetic field of this and other spin models is compared with that of QED, showing that these theories can be tested by the present precision measurements of the g factor. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  9. Pseudospin, real spin, and spin polarization of photoemitted electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rui; Weng, Hongming; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the connections between pseudospin, real spin of electrons in a material, and spin polarization of photoemitted electrons out of a material. By investigating these three spin textures for Bi2Se3 and SmB6 compounds, we find that the spin orientation of photoelectrons for SmB6 has a different correspondence to pseudospin and real spin compared to Bi2Se3 , due to the different symmetry properties of the photoemission matrix between the initial and final states. We calculate the spin polarization and circular dichroism spectra of photoemitted electrons for both compounds, which can be detected by spin-resolved and circular dichroism angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments.

  10. Spin-Echo Modulation Experiments with Soft Gaussian Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xijia; Freeman, Ray

    An analysis is presented for a homonuclear spin-echo experiment in which refocusing and spin inversion are implemented by simultaneous soft 180° pulses applied to two weakly coupled spins. It is shown that for this experiment, simple pulses of short duration (for example, Gaussian pulses) are preferable to more complex shapes such as BURP pulses or Gaussian cascades, since this limits the generation of undesirable multiple-quantum coherence. An expression is derived for the optimum delay between excitation and detection for the generation of anti-phase magnetization at the two sites. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiment. The doubly selective spin-echo technique is shown to be useful for the determination of small unresolved spin-spin splittings, and this is illustrated with results from the 400 MHz proton spectrum of strychnine.

  11. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  12. Electron-spin dynamics induced by photon spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauke, Heiko; Ahrens, Sven; Keitel, Christoph H.; Grobe, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    Strong rotating magnetic fields may cause a precession of the electron's spin around the rotation axis of the magnetic field. The superposition of two counterpropagating laser beams with circular polarization and opposite helicity features such a rotating magnetic field component but also carries spin. The laser's spin density, which can be expressed in terms of the laser's electromagnetic fields and potentials, couples to the electron's spin via a relativistic correction to the Pauli equation. We show that the quantum mechanical interaction of the electron's spin with the laser's rotating magnetic field and with the laser's spin density counteract each other in such a way that a net spin rotation remains with a precession frequency that is much smaller than the frequency one would expect from the rotating magnetic field alone. In particular, the frequency scales differently with the laser's electric field strength depending on whether relativistic corrections are taken into account or not. Thus, the relativistic coupling of the electron's spin to the laser's spin density changes the dynamics not only quantitatively but also qualitatively as compared to the nonrelativistic theory. The electron's spin dynamics are a genuine quantum mechanical relativistic effect.

  13. Impurities and electron spin relaxations in nanodiamonds studied by multi-frequency electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Franklin; Takahashi, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Nano-sized diamond or nanodiamond is a fascinating material for potential applications of fluorescence imaging and magnetic sensing of biological systems via nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamonds. Sensitivity of the magnetic sensing strongly depends on coupling to surrounding environmental noises, thus understanding of the environment is critical to realize the application. In the present study, we employ multi-frequency (X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz) continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to investigate impurity contents and spin relaxation properties in various sizes of nanodiamonds. Spectra taken with our home-built 230/115 GHz cw/pulsed ESR spectrometer shows presence of two major impurity contents; single substitutional nitrogen impurities (P1) also common in bulk diamonds and paramagnetic impurities (denoted as X) unique to nanodiamonds. The ESR measurement also shows a strong dependence of the population ratio between P1 and X on particle size. Furthermore, we will discuss the nature of spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of nanodiamonds studied by pulsed ESR measurements at X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz.

  14. Electron Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Marie, X.; Belhadj, T.; Urbaszek, B.; Amand, T.; Krebs, O.; Lemaitre, A.; Voisin, P.

    2011-07-15

    An electron spin confined to a semiconductor quantum dot is not subject to the classical spin relaxation mechanisms known for free carriers but it strongly interacts with the nuclear spin system via the hyperfine interaction. We show in time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy experiments on ensembles of self assembled InAs quantum dots in GaAs that this interaction leads to strong electron spin dephasing.

  15. Measuring spin relaxation with standard pulse sequences in the singlet-triplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevers, T. L.; McCamey, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    Pulsed electrically and optically-detected magnetic resonance are extremely sensitive to changes in the permutation symmetry of weakly-coupled spin pairs, and are well-suited for investigating devices with a small number of spins. However, the change in observable from conventional electron spin resonance modifies the results of standard inductively-detected pulse sequences which are routinely used to obtain phase coherence and lifetimes. Whilst these effects have been discussed for single-pulse experiments, their role in multi-pulse sequences is less clear. Here, we investigate this effect in Hahn echo and inversion-recovery sequences, and show a second set of narrower echoes are produced that distort measurement outcomes. We demonstrate that phase cycling is able to deconvolve the additional echo signals, allowing spin relaxation times to be reliably extracted.

  16. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  17. Spin-spin and spin-orbit interaction effects of two-electron quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseghi, B.; Rezaei, G.; Taghizadeh, S. F.; Shahedi, Z.

    2014-09-01

    Simultaneous effects of spin-spin and spin-orbit interactions on the energy spectrum of a two-electron spherical quantum dot with parabolic confinement and under the influence of external electric and magnetic fields are investigated. We have calculated energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system for different spin states. Results show that effects of spin-spin interactions are negligible in comparison with those of the spin-orbit interactions. Spin-orbit interaction splits energy levels and removes degeneracy of different spin states. Moreover it is seen that energy eigenvalues and levels splitting strongly depend on the external magnetic field and the dot dimensions.

  18. Stark tuning of donor electron spins in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, F.R.; Tyryshkin, A.M.; Sabouret, G.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.; Lyon, S.A.

    2006-03-12

    We report Stark shift measurements for 121Sb donor electronspins in silicon using pulsed electron spin resonance. Interdigitatedmetal gates on top of a Sb-implanted 28Si epi-layer are used to applyelectric fields. Two Stark effects are resolved: a decrease of thehyperfine coupling between electron and nuclear spins of the donor and adecrease in electron Zeeman g-factor. The hyperfine term prevails atX-band magnetic fields of 0.35T, while the g-factor term is expected todominate at higher magnetic fields. A significant linear Stark effect isalso resolved presumably arising from strain.

  19. Intramembrane Polarity by Electron Spin Echo Spectroscopy of Labeled Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, Rosa; Guzzi, Rita; Marsh, Derek; Sportelli, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    The association of water (D2O) with phospholipid membranes was studied by using pulsed-electron spin resonance techniques. We measured the deuterium electron spin echo modulation of spin-labeled phospholipids by D2O in membranes of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine with and without 50 mol% of cholesterol. The Fourier transform of the relaxation-corrected two-pulse echo decay curve reveals peaks, at one and two times the deuterium NMR frequency, that arise from the dipolar hyperfine interaction of the deuterium nucleus with the unpaired electron spin of the nitroxide-labeled lipid. For phosphatidylcholine spin-labeled at different positions down the sn-2 chain, the amplitude of the deuterium signal decreases toward the center of the membrane, and is reduced to zero from the C-12 atom position onward. At chain positions C-5 and C-7 closer to the phospholipid headgroups, the amplitude of the deuterium signal is greater in the presence of cholesterol than in its absence. These results are in good agreement with more indirect measurements of the transmembrane polarity profile that are based on the 14N-hyperfine splittings in the conventional continuous-wave electron spin resonance spectrum. PMID:12547783

  20. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  1. Ultrafast optical control of electron spins in quantum wells and quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Samuel G.; Economou, Sophia E.; Shabaev, Andrew; Kennedy, Thomas A.; Bracker, Allan S.; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Chen, Zhigang; Cundiff, Steven T.

    2010-02-01

    Using two-color time-resolved Faraday rotation and ellipticity, we demonstrate ultrafast optical control of electron spins in GaAs quantum wells and InAs quantum dots. In quantum wells, a magnetic-field induced electron spin polarization is manipulated by off-resonant pulses. By measuring the amplitude and phase of the spin polarization as a function of pulse detuning, we observe the two competing optical processes: real excitation, which generates a spin polarization through excitation of electron-hole pairs; and virtual excitation, which can manipulate a spin polarization through a stimulated Raman process without exciting electron-hole pairs. In InAs quantum dots, the spin coherence time is much longer, so that the effect of many repetitions of the pump pulses is important. Through real excitation, the pulse train efficiently polarizes electron spins that precess at multiples of the laser repetition frequency, leading to a "mode-locking" phenomenon. Through virtual excitation, the spins can be partially rotated toward the magnetic field direction, leading to a sensitive dependence of the spin orientation on the precession frequency and detuning. The electron spin dynamics strongly influence the nuclear spin dynamics as well, leading to directional control of the nuclear polarization distribution.

  2. Optoelectronic spin memories of electrons in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2016-03-01

    We optically generate electron spins in semiconductors and apply an external magnetic field perpendicularly to them. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements, pumped with a circularly polarized light, are performed to study the spin polarization and spin memory times in the semiconducting host. The measured spin polarization is found to be an exponential decay with the time delay of the probe. It is also found that the spin memory times, extracted from the polarization decays, enhance with the strength of the external magnetic field. However, at higher fields, the memory times get saturated to sub- μs because of the coupling for interacting electrons with the local nuclear field.

  3. Quantum logic readout and cooling of a single dark electron spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fazhan; Zhang, Qi; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Du, Jiangfeng; Reinhard, Friedemann; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2013-05-01

    We study a single dark N2 electron spin defect in diamond, which is magnetically coupled to a nearby nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. We perform pulsed electron spin resonance on this single spin by mapping its state to the NV center spin and optically reading out the latter. Moreover, we show that the NV center's spin polarization can be transferred to the electron spin by combined two decoupling control-NOT gates. These two results allow us to extend the NV center's two key properties—optical spin polarization and detection—to any electron spin in its vicinity. This enables dark electron spins to be used as local quantum registers and engineerable memories.

  4. Versatile spin-polarized electron source

    DOEpatents

    Jozwiak, Chris; Park, Cheol -Hwan; Gotlieb, Kenneth; Louie, Steven G.; Hussain, Zahid; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2015-09-22

    One or more embodiments relate generally to the field of photoelectron spin and, more specifically, to a method and system for creating a controllable spin-polarized electron source. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for creating a controllable spin-polarized electron source comprising the following steps: providing one or more materials, the one or more materials having at least one surface and a material layer adjacent to said surface, wherein said surface comprises highly spin-polarized surface electrons, wherein the direction and spin of the surface electrons are locked together; providing at least one incident light capable of stimulating photoemission of said surface electrons; wherein the photon polarization of said incident light is tunable; and inducing photoemission of the surface electron states.

  5. Electron spin polarization in strong-field ionization of xenon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Alexander; Morales, Felipe; Kunitski, Maksim; Henrichs, Kevin; Laucke, Alina; Richter, Martin; Jahnke, Till; Kalinin, Anton; Schöffler, Markus; Schmidt, Lothar Ph. H.; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga; Dörner, Reinhard

    2016-08-01

    As a fundamental property of the electron, the spin plays a decisive role in the electronic structure of matter, from solids to molecules and atoms, for example, by causing magnetism. Yet, despite its importance, the spin dynamics of the electrons released during the interaction of atoms with strong ultrashort laser pulses has remained experimentally unexplored. Here, we report the experimental detection of electron spin polarization by the strong-field ionization of xenon atoms and support our results with theoretical analysis. We found up to 30% spin polarization changing its sign with electron energy. This work opens the new dimension of spin to strong-field physics. It paves the way to the production of sub-femtosecond spin-polarized electron pulses with applications ranging from probing the magnetic properties of matter at ultrafast timescales to testing chiral molecular systems with sub-femtosecond temporal and sub-ångström spatial resolutions.

  6. Charge and spin current oscillations in a tunnel junction induced by magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartora, C. A.; Nobrega, K. Z.; Cabrera, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    Usually, charge and spin transport properties in tunnel junctions are studied in the DC bias regime and/or in the adiabatic regime of time-varying magnetic fields. In this letter, the temporal dynamics of charge and spin currents in a tunnel junction induced by pulsed magnetic fields is considered. At low bias voltages, energy and momentum of the conduction electrons are nearly conserved in the tunneling process, leading to the description of the junction as a spin-1/2 fermionic system coupled to time-varying magnetic fields. Under the influence of pulsed magnetic fields, charge and spin current can flow across the tunnel junction, displaying oscillatory behavior, even in the absence of DC bias voltage. A type of spin capacitance function, in close analogy to electric capacitance, is predicted.

  7. Calculation of spin-lattice relaxation during pulsed spin locking in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time has been calculated for dipolar solids in the case where the spins are locked by an RF pulse sequence with pulses of arbitrary angle and finite width. Expressions are given for the homonuclear case in general and for the heteronuclear case in the delta-function limit. The results for the homonuclear case are experimentally confirmed using solid C6F12. The analysis shows that for small pulse angles, at which the direct spin heating effect is known to be small, the relaxation behavior will be identical to the CW irradiation case.

  8. Randomized benchmarking of quantum gates implemented by electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel K; Feng, Guanru; Rahimi, Robabeh; Baugh, Jonathan; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    Spin systems controlled and probed by magnetic resonance have been valuable for testing the ideas of quantum control and quantum error correction. This paper introduces an X-band pulsed electron spin resonance spectrometer designed for high-fidelity coherent control of electron spins, including a loop-gap resonator for sub-millimeter sized samples with a control bandwidth ∼40MHz. Universal control is achieved by a single-sideband upconversion technique with an I-Q modulator and a 1.2GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. A single qubit randomized benchmarking protocol quantifies the average errors of Clifford gates implemented by simple Gaussian pulses, using a sample of gamma-irradiated quartz. Improvements in unitary gate fidelity are achieved through phase transient correction and hardware optimization. A preparation pulse sequence that selects spin packets in a narrowed distribution of static fields confirms that inhomogeneous dephasing (1/T2(∗)) is the dominant source of gate error. The best average fidelity over the Clifford gates obtained here is 99.2%, which serves as a benchmark to compare with other technologies. PMID:27131777

  9. Randomized benchmarking of quantum gates implemented by electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Daniel K.; Feng, Guanru; Rahimi, Robabeh; Baugh, Jonathan; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    Spin systems controlled and probed by magnetic resonance have been valuable for testing the ideas of quantum control and quantum error correction. This paper introduces an X-band pulsed electron spin resonance spectrometer designed for high-fidelity coherent control of electron spins, including a loop-gap resonator for sub-millimeter sized samples with a control bandwidth ∼40 MHz. Universal control is achieved by a single-sideband upconversion technique with an I-Q modulator and a 1.2 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. A single qubit randomized benchmarking protocol quantifies the average errors of Clifford gates implemented by simple Gaussian pulses, using a sample of gamma-irradiated quartz. Improvements in unitary gate fidelity are achieved through phase transient correction and hardware optimization. A preparation pulse sequence that selects spin packets in a narrowed distribution of static fields confirms that inhomogeneous dephasing (1 / T2∗) is the dominant source of gate error. The best average fidelity over the Clifford gates obtained here is 99.2 % , which serves as a benchmark to compare with other technologies.

  10. A single-atom electron spin qubit in silicon.

    PubMed

    Pla, Jarryd J; Tan, Kuan Y; Dehollain, Juan P; Lim, Wee H; Morton, John J L; Jamieson, David N; Dzurak, Andrew S; Morello, Andrea

    2012-09-27

    A single atom is the prototypical quantum system, and a natural candidate for a quantum bit, or qubit--the elementary unit of a quantum computer. Atoms have been successfully used to store and process quantum information in electromagnetic traps, as well as in diamond through the use of the nitrogen-vacancy-centre point defect. Solid-state electrical devices possess great potential to scale up such demonstrations from few-qubit control to larger-scale quantum processors. Coherent control of spin qubits has been achieved in lithographically defined double quantum dots in both GaAs (refs 3-5) and Si (ref. 6). However, it is a formidable challenge to combine the electrical measurement capabilities of engineered nanostructures with the benefits inherent in atomic spin qubits. Here we demonstrate the coherent manipulation of an individual electron spin qubit bound to a phosphorus donor atom in natural silicon, measured electrically via single-shot read-out. We use electron spin resonance to drive Rabi oscillations, and a Hahn echo pulse sequence reveals a spin coherence time exceeding 200 µs. This time should be even longer in isotopically enriched (28)Si samples. Combined with a device architecture that is compatible with modern integrated circuit technology, the electron spin of a single phosphorus atom in silicon should be an excellent platform on which to build a scalable quantum computer. PMID:22992519

  11. Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum hydrodynamics of degenerated electrons: Spin-electron acoustic wave appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-03-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model of charged spin-1/2 particles contains physical quantities defined for all particles of a species including particles with spin-up and with spin-down. Different populations of states with different spin directions are included in the spin density (the magnetization). In this paper I derive a QHD model, which separately describes spin-up electrons and spin-down electrons. Hence electrons with different projections of spins on the preferable direction are considered as two different species of particles. It is shown that the numbers of particles with different spin directions do not conserve. Hence the continuity equations contain sources of particles. These sources are caused by the interactions of the spins with the magnetic field. Terms of similar nature arise in the Euler equation. The z projection of the spin density is no longer an independent variable. It is proportional to the difference between the concentrations of the electrons with spin-up and the electrons with spin-down. The propagation of waves in the magnetized plasmas of degenerate electrons is considered. Two regimes for the ion dynamics, the motionless ions and the motion of the degenerate ions as the single species with no account of the spin dynamics, are considered. It is shown that this form of the QHD equations gives all solutions obtained from the traditional form of QHD equations with no distinction of spin-up and spin-down states. But it also reveals a soundlike solution called the spin-electron acoustic wave. Coincidence of most solutions is expected since this derivation was started with the same basic equation: the Pauli equation. Solutions arise due to the different Fermi pressures for the spin-up electrons and the spin-down electrons in the magnetic field. The results are applied to degenerate electron gas of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metals in the external magnetic field. The dispersion of the spin-electron acoustic waves in the partially spin

  12. Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum hydrodynamics of degenerated electrons: Spin-electron acoustic wave appearance.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2015-03-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model of charged spin-1/2 particles contains physical quantities defined for all particles of a species including particles with spin-up and with spin-down. Different populations of states with different spin directions are included in the spin density (the magnetization). In this paper I derive a QHD model, which separately describes spin-up electrons and spin-down electrons. Hence electrons with different projections of spins on the preferable direction are considered as two different species of particles. It is shown that the numbers of particles with different spin directions do not conserve. Hence the continuity equations contain sources of particles. These sources are caused by the interactions of the spins with the magnetic field. Terms of similar nature arise in the Euler equation. The z projection of the spin density is no longer an independent variable. It is proportional to the difference between the concentrations of the electrons with spin-up and the electrons with spin-down. The propagation of waves in the magnetized plasmas of degenerate electrons is considered. Two regimes for the ion dynamics, the motionless ions and the motion of the degenerate ions as the single species with no account of the spin dynamics, are considered. It is shown that this form of the QHD equations gives all solutions obtained from the traditional form of QHD equations with no distinction of spin-up and spin-down states. But it also reveals a soundlike solution called the spin-electron acoustic wave. Coincidence of most solutions is expected since this derivation was started with the same basic equation: the Pauli equation. Solutions arise due to the different Fermi pressures for the spin-up electrons and the spin-down electrons in the magnetic field. The results are applied to degenerate electron gas of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metals in the external magnetic field. The dispersion of the spin-electron acoustic waves in the partially spin

  13. Spin-wave activation by spin-polarized current pulse in magnetic nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoncello, Federico; Giovannini, Loris; Nizzoli, Fabrizio; Zivieri, Roberto; Consolo, Giancarlo; Gubbiotti, Gianluca

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the role of spin-polarized current pulse in activating only a subset of spin-wave normal modes in laterally confined magnetic systems. In order to derive selection rules based on geometrical considerations, the study was carried out by comparing the results of two different micromagnetic frameworks (a classical finite-difference time-domain scheme and the dynamical matrix method) and considering nanopillar devices of elliptical and circular cross-sections in different magnetic ground states (onion, S, and vortex states). The analogies and the differences existing between the mode activation process driven by spin-torque and that obtained by a magnetic field pulse are also addressed.

  14. Manipulating single electron spins and coherence in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awschalom, David

    2008-05-01

    The non-destructive detection of a single electron spin in a quantum dot (QD) is demonstrated using a time- averaged magneto-optical Kerr rotation measurementootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, O. Gywat, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Science 314, 1916 (2006).. This technique provides a means to directly probe the spin off- resonance, thus minimally disturbing the system. Furthermore, the ability to sequentially initialize, manipulate, and read out the state of a qubit, such as an electron spin in a quantum dot, is necessary for virtually any scheme for quantum information processing. In addition to the time-averaged measurements, we have extended the single dot KR technique into the time domain with pulsed pump and probe lasers, allowing the observation of the coherent evolution of an electron spin stateootnotetextM. H. Mikkelsen, J. Berezovsky, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Nature Physics 3, 770 (2007).. The dot is formed by interface fluctuations of a GaAs quantum well and embedded in a diode structure to allow controllable gating/charging of the QD. To enhance the small single spin signal, the QD is positioned within a vertical optical cavity. Observations of coherent single spin precession in an applied magnetic field allow a direct measurement of the electron g-factor and transverse spin lifetime. These measurements reveal information about the relevant spin decoherence mechanisms, while also providing a sensitive probe of the local nuclear spin environment. Finally, we have recently eveloped a scheme for high speed all-optical manipulation of the spin state that enables multiple operations within the coherence timeootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, accepted for publication (2008).. The results represent progress toward the control and coupling of single spins and photons for quantum information processingootnotetextS. Ghosh, W.H. Wang, F. M. Mendoza, R. C

  15. Nanomechanical detection of itinerant electron spin flip.

    PubMed

    Zolfagharkhani, Guiti; Gaidarzhy, Alexei; Degiovanni, Pascal; Kettemann, Stefan; Fulde, Peter; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2008-12-01

    Electrons and other fundamental particles have an intrinsic angular momentum called spin. A change in the spin state of such a particle is therefore equivalent to a mechanical torque. This spin-induced torque is central to our understanding of experiments ranging from the measurement of the angular momentum of photons and the g-factor of metals to magnetic resonance and magnetization reversal in magnetic multilayers. When a spin-polarized current passes through a metallic nanowire in which one half is ferromagnetic and the other half is nonmagnetic, the spins of the itinerant electrons are 'flipped' at the interface between the two regions to produces a torque. Here, we report direct measurement of this mechanical torque in an integrated nanoscale torsion oscillator, and measurements of the itinerant electron spin polarization that could yield new information on the itinerancy of the d-band electrons. The unprecedented torque sensitivity of 1 x 10(-22) N-m Hz(-1/2) may have applications in spintronics and precision measurements of charge-parity-violating forces, and might also enable experiments on the untwisting of DNA and torque-generating molecules. PMID:19057590

  16. Pulsed ESR dipolar spectroscopy for distance measurements in immobilized spin labeled proteins in liquid solution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongyu; Liu, Yangping; Borbat, Peter; Zweier, Jay L.; Freed, Jack H.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) dipolar spectroscopy (PDS) in combination with site-directed spin labeling is unique in providing nanometer- range distances and distributions in biological systems. To date, most of the pulsed ESR techniques require frozen solutions at cryogenic temperatures to reduce the rapid electron spin relaxation rate and to prevent averaging of electron-electron dipolar interaction due to the rapid molecular tumbling. To enable measurements in liquid solution, we are exploring a triarylmethyl (TAM)-based spin label with a relatively long relaxation time where the protein is immobilized by attachment to a solid support. In this preliminary study, TAM radicals were attached via disulfide linkages to substituted cysteine residues at positions 65 and 80 or 65 and 76 in T4 lysozyme immobilized on Sepharose. Interspin distances determined using double quantum coherence (DQC) in solution are close to those expected from models, and the narrow distance distribution in each case indicates that the TAM-based spin label is relatively localized. PMID:22676043

  17. Single-electron pulses for ultrafast diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Aidelsburger, M.; Kirchner, F. O.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of atomic-scale structural motion by ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy requires electron packets of shortest duration and highest coherence. We report on the generation and application of single-electron pulses for this purpose. Photoelectric emission from metal surfaces is studied with tunable ultraviolet pulses in the femtosecond regime. The bandwidth, efficiency, coherence, and electron pulse duration are investigated in dependence on excitation wavelength, intensity, and laser bandwidth. At photon energies close to the cathode’s work function, the electron pulse duration shortens significantly and approaches a threshold that is determined by interplay of the optical pulse width and the acceleration field. An optimized choice of laser wavelength and bandwidth results in sub-100-fs electron pulses. We demonstrate single-electron diffraction from polycrystalline diamond films and reveal the favorable influences of matched photon energies on the coherence volume of single-electron wave packets. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the physics of the photoelectric effect and for applications of single-electron pulses in ultrafast 4D imaging of structural dynamics. PMID:21041681

  18. Sub-fs electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fill, Ernst; Veisz, Laszlo; Apolonski, Alexander; Krausz, Ferenc

    2006-11-01

    We present a new concept for an electron gun generating subrelativistic electron pulses with a duration down to the attosecond range. It is based on a cylindrical RF cavity (a so-called pill-box cavity) oscillating in its TM010 eigenmode with a photocathode triggered by a fs-laser pulse. Injecting electrons at an appropriate phase of the RF cycle compensates for their initial velocities and time delays and makes the electrons arrive at a target in a sub-fs temporal window. Such electron pulses will allow nuclear motion and electronic dynamics to be studied on an attosecond time scale.

  19. Anisotropic spin dephasing of impurity-bound electron spins in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jieun; Sih, Vanessa; Venugopal, Aneesh

    2015-01-05

    We investigate the electron spin dynamics of n-type c-axis oriented bulk zinc oxide (ZnO) by using time-resolved Kerr rotation and resonant spin amplification measurements. Calculating resonant spin amplification using an anisotropic spin dephasing model reveals that there are two species involved in the spin dynamics, which we attribute to conduction and impurity-bound electron spins, respectively. We find that the impurity-bound electron spin dephasing mechanism is strongly anisotropic due to anisotropic exchange interactions. The identification of the two spin species and their dephasing mechanisms is further supported by the temperature, power, and wavelength dependence of the spin coherence measurements.

  20. Coupling and control in coherently driven and asymmetrically synchronized hybrid electron-nuclear spin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berec, V.

    2016-02-01

    We study the coupling and control adaptation of a hybrid electron-nuclear spin system using the laser mediated proton beam in MeV energy regime. The asymmetric control mechanism is based on exact optimization of both: the measure of exchange interaction and anisotropy of the hyperfine interaction induced in the resonance with optimal channeled protons (CP) superfocused field, allowing manipulation over arbitrary localized spatial centers while addressing only the electron spin. Using highly precise and coherent proton channeling regime we have obtained efficient pulse shaping separator technique aimed for spatio-temporal engineering of quantum states, introducing a method for control of nuclear spins, which are coupled via anisotropic hyperfine interactions in isolated electron spin manifold, without radio wave (RW) pulses. The presented method can be efficiently implemented in synchronized spin networks with the purpose to facilitate preservation and efficient transfer of experimentally observed quantum particle states, contributing to the overall background noise reduction.

  1. Dispersion compensation for attosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Peter; Baumgarten, Cory; Batelaan, Herman; Centurion, Martin

    2012-08-20

    We propose a device to compensate for the dispersion of attosecond electron pulses. The device uses only static electric and magnetic fields and therefore does not require synchronization to the pulsed electron source. Analogous to the well-known optical dispersion compensator, an electron dispersion compensator separates paths by energy in space. Magnetic fields are used as the dispersing element, while a Wien filter is used for compensation of the electron arrival times. We analyze a device with a size of centimeters, which can be applied to ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy, and fundamental studies.

  2. A pulsed electron gun for ultrafast electron diffraction at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Janzen, A; Krenzer, B; Heinz, O; Zhou, P; Thien, D; Hanisch, A; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, F-J; von der Linde, D; Horn von Hoegen, M

    2007-01-01

    The construction of a pulsed electron gun for ultrafast reflection high-energy electron diffraction experiments at surfaces is reported. Special emphasis is placed on the characterization of the electron source: a photocathode, consisting of a 10 nm thin Au film deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Electron pulses are generated by the illumination of the film with ultraviolet laser pulses of femtosecond duration. The photoelectrons are emitted homogeneously across the photocathode with an energy distribution of 0.1 eV width. After leaving the Au film, the electrons are accelerated to kinetic energies of up to 15 keV. Focusing is accomplished by an electrostatic lens. The temporal resolution of the experiment is determined by the probing time of the electrons traveling across the surface which is about 30 ps. However, the duration of the electron pulses can be reduced to less than 6 ps. PMID:17503932

  3. Ultrafast spin-transfer torque driven by femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Bert

    A hot topic in the field of ultrafast laser-induced manipulation of the magnetic state is that of the role and exploitation of laser-induced spin currents. Intense debate has been triggered by claims that such a spin-transfer, e.g. in the form of super-diffusive spin currents over tens of nanometers, might be a main contributor to the demagnetization process in ferromagnetic thin films after femtosecond laser excitation. In this presentation the underlying concepts will be introduced and recent developments reviewed. Particularly we demonstrate the possibility to apply a laser-induced spin transfer torque on a free magnetic layer, using a non-collinear multilayer configuration consisting of a free in-plane layer on top of a perpendicularly magnetized injection layer, as separated by a nonmagnetic spacer. Interestingly, this approach allows for a quantitative measurement of the amount of spin transfer. Moreover, it might provide access to novel device architectures in which the magnetic state is controlled by fs laser pulses. Careful analysis of the resulting precession of the free layer allows us to quantify the applied torque, and distinguish between driving mechanisms based on laser-induced transfer of hot electrons versus a spin Seebeck effect due to the large thermal gradients. Further engineering of the layered structures in order to gain fundamental understanding and optimize efficiencies will be reported. A simple model that treats local non-equilibrium magnetization dynamics to spin transport effects via a spin-dependent chemical potential will be introduced.

  4. Detection and Control of Individual Nuclear Spins Using a Weakly Coupled Electron Spin

    SciTech Connect

    Taminiau, T.H.; Wagenaar, J.J.T.; van der Sar, T.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav V.; Hanson, R.

    2012-09-28

    We experimentally isolate, characterize, and coherently control up to six individual nuclear spins that are weakly coupled to an electron spin in diamond. Our method employs multipulse sequences on the electron spin that resonantly amplify the interaction with a selected nuclear spin and at the same time dynamically suppress decoherence caused by the rest of the spin bath. We are able to address nuclear spins with interaction strengths that are an order of magnitude smaller than the electron spin dephasing rate. Our results provide a route towards tomography with single-nuclear-spin sensitivity and greatly extend the number of available quantum bits for quantum information processing in diamond.

  5. Undergraduate Electron-Spin-Resonance Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, James S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the basic procedures for use of an electron-spin resonance spectrometer and potassium azide (KN3) in an experiment which extends from the phase of sample preparation (crystal growth, sample mounting, and orientation) through data taking to the stages of calculation and theoretical explanation. (Author/DS)

  6. Spin Structure Functions from Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seonho Choi

    2012-09-01

    The spin structure of the nucleon can play a key testing ground for Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD) at wide kinematic ranges from smaller to large four momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The pioneering experiments have confirmed several QCD sum rules at high Q{sup 2} where a perturbative picture holds. For a full understanding of QCD at various scales, various measurements were made at intermediate and small Q{sup 2} region and their interpretation would be a challenging task due to the non-perturbative nature. Jefferson Lab has been one of the major experimental facilities for the spin structure with its polarized electron beams and various polarized targets. A few QCD sum rules have been compared with the measured spin structure functions g{sub 1}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 2}(x, Q{sup 2}) at low Q{sup 2} and surprising results have been obtained for the spin polarizabilities, {gamma}{sub 0} and {delta}{sub LT} . As for the proton spin structure functions, the lack of data for g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure functions has been complemented with a new experiment at Jefferson Lab, SANE. The results from SANE will provide a better picture of the proton spin structure at a wide kinematic range in x and Q{sup 2}.

  7. Electron trajectories in pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Einwohner, T.; Lippmann, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    The work reported here analyzes the dynamical behavior of an electron, initially at rest, when subjected to a radiation pulse of arbitrary, but integrable, shape. This is done by a general integration procedure that has been programmed in VAXIMA. Upon choosing a specific shape for the pulse, VAXIMA finds both the space-time trajectory and the four-momentum of the electron. These are obtained in analytic or numerical form - or both - at the choice of the user. Several examples of analytical and numerical solutions, for different pulse shapes, are given.

  8. Dynamics of entanglement of two electron spins interacting with nuclear spin baths in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragar, Igor; Cywiński, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    We study the dynamics of entanglement of two electron spins in two quantum dots, in which each electron is interacting with its nuclear spin environment. Focusing on the case of uncoupled dots, and starting from either Bell or Werner states of two qubits, we calculate the decay of entanglement due to the hyperfine interaction with the nuclei. We mostly focus on the regime of magnetic fields in which the bath-induced electron spin flips play a role, for example, their presence leads to the appearance of entanglement sudden death at finite time for two qubits initialized in a Bell state. For these fields, the intrabath dipolar interactions and spatial inhomogeneity of hyperfine couplings are irrelevant on the time scale of coherence (and entanglement) decay, and most of the presented calculations are performed using the uniform-coupling approximation to the exact hyperfine Hamiltonian. We provide a comprehensive overview of entanglement decay in this regime, considering both free evolution of the qubits, and an echo protocol with simultaneous application of π pulses to the two spins. All the currently relevant for experiments bath states are considered: the thermal state, narrowed states (characterized by diminished uncertainty of one of the components of the Overhauser field) of two uncorrelated baths, and a correlated narrowed state with a well-defined value of the z component of the Overhauser field interdot gradient. While we mostly use concurrence to quantify the amount of entanglement in a mixed state of the two electron spins, we also show that their entanglement dynamics can be reconstructed from measurements of the currently relevant for experiments entanglement witnesses and the fidelity of quantum teleportation, performed using a partially disentangled state as a resource.

  9. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Luyi

    2013-05-17

    suppressed by electron-electron interactions, leading to remarkable resistance to diffusive spreading of the drifting pulse of spin polarization. Finally, we show that spin helices continue propagate at the same speed as the Fermi sea even when the electron drift velocity exceeds the Fermi velocity of 107 cm s-1.

  10. Pulsed EPR Distance Measurements in Soluble Proteins by Site-directed Spin-labeling (SDSL)

    PubMed Central

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Blackburn, Mandy E.; Galiano, Luis; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in structural biology centers on recent improvements in distance measurements using the double electron-electron resonance (DEER) technique. This unit focuses on EPR-based distance measurements by site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL) of engineered cysteine residues in soluble proteins, with HIV-1 protease used as a model. To elucidate conformational changes in proteins, experimental protocols were optimized and existing data analysis programs were employed to derive distance distribution profiles. Experimental considerations, sample preparation and error analysis for artifact suppression are also outlined here. PMID:24510645

  11. Spin filtration of unpolarized electrons by impurity centers in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bobin, E. G.; Berdinskiy, V. L.

    2011-11-15

    It is shown that unpolarized paramagnetic centers can implement the spin filtration of unpolarized conduction electrons in semiconductors. This ability of paramagnetic centers is caused by the difference in the spin evolution of the states of electron-paramagnetic-center pairs and by the spin selectivity of electron capture exclusively from singlet pairs. The electron spin polarization should be opposite to the paramagneticcenter polarization. To implement spin filtration, an external magnetic field is necessary. The polarization can attain the largest values ({approx}10%) if the probability of spin-selective electron capture from singlet pairs exceeds the pair-decay rate by a factor of 5-7.

  12. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  13. Electronic spin working mechanically (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhter, R. I.; Gorelik, L. Y.; Krive, I. V.; Kiselev, M. N.; Kulinich, S. I.; Parafilo, A. V.; Kikoin, K.; Jonson, M.

    2014-07-01

    A single-electron tunneling (SET) device with a nanoscale central island that can move with respect to the bulk source- and drain electrodes allows for a nanoelectromechanical (NEM) coupling between the electrical current through the device and mechanical vibrations of the island. Although an electromechanical "shuttle" instability and the associated phenomenon of single-electron shuttling were predicted more than 15 years ago, both theoretical and experimental studies of NEM-SET structures are still carried out. New functionalities based on quantum coherence, Coulomb correlations and coherent electron-spin dynamics are of particular current interest. In this article we present a short review of recent activities in this area.

  14. Electron-Spin Filters Would Offer Spin Polarization Greater than 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2009-01-01

    A proposal has been made to develop devices that would generate spin-polarized electron currents characterized by polarization ratios having magnitudes in excess of 1. Heretofore, such devices (denoted, variously, as spin injectors, spin polarizers, and spin filters) have typically offered polarization ratios having magnitudes in the approximate range of 0.01 to 0.1. The proposed devices could be useful as efficient sources of spin-polarized electron currents for research on spintronics and development of practical spintronic devices.

  15. Universal Pulse Sequence to Minimize Spin Dephasing in the Central Spin Decoherence Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.; Witzel, W. M.; Das Sarma, S.

    2008-04-01

    We present a remarkable finding that a recently discovered [G. S. Uhrig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 100504 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.100504] series of pulse sequences, designed to optimally restore coherence to a qubit in the spin-boson model of decoherence, is in fact completely model independent and generically valid for arbitrary dephasing Hamiltonians given sufficiently short delay times between pulses. The series maximizes qubit fidelity versus number of applied pulses for sufficiently short delay times because the series, with each additional pulse, cancels successive orders of a time expansion for the fidelity decay. The “magical” universality of this property, which was not appreciated earlier, requires that a linearly growing set of “unknowns” (the delay times) must simultaneously satisfy an exponentially growing set of nonlinear equations that involve arbitrary dephasing Hamiltonian operators.

  16. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  17. Inverse spin Hall effect from pulsed spin current in organic semiconductors with tunable spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dali; van Schooten, Kipp J.; Kavand, Marzieh; Malissa, Hans; Zhang, Chuang; Groesbeck, Matthew; Boehme, Christoph; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Exploration of spin currents in organic semiconductors (OSECs) induced by resonant microwave absorption in ferromagnetic substrates is appealing for potential spintronics applications. Owing to the inherently weak spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of OSECs, their inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) response is very subtle; limited by the microwave power applicable under continuous-wave (cw) excitation. Here we introduce a novel approach for generating significant ISHE signals in OSECs using pulsed ferromagnetic resonance, where the ISHE is two to three orders of magnitude larger compared to cw excitation. This strong ISHE enables us to investigate a variety of OSECs ranging from π-conjugated polymers with strong SOC that contain intrachain platinum atoms, to weak SOC polymers, to C60 films, where the SOC is predominantly caused by the curvature of the molecule’s surface. The pulsed-ISHE technique offers a robust route for efficient injection and detection schemes of spin currents at room temperature, and paves the way for spin orbitronics in plastic materials.

  18. Inverse spin Hall effect from pulsed spin current in organic semiconductors with tunable spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dali; van Schooten, Kipp J; Kavand, Marzieh; Malissa, Hans; Zhang, Chuang; Groesbeck, Matthew; Boehme, Christoph; Valy Vardeny, Z

    2016-08-01

    Exploration of spin currents in organic semiconductors (OSECs) induced by resonant microwave absorption in ferromagnetic substrates is appealing for potential spintronics applications. Owing to the inherently weak spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of OSECs, their inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) response is very subtle; limited by the microwave power applicable under continuous-wave (cw) excitation. Here we introduce a novel approach for generating significant ISHE signals in OSECs using pulsed ferromagnetic resonance, where the ISHE is two to three orders of magnitude larger compared to cw excitation. This strong ISHE enables us to investigate a variety of OSECs ranging from π-conjugated polymers with strong SOC that contain intrachain platinum atoms, to weak SOC polymers, to C60 films, where the SOC is predominantly caused by the curvature of the molecule's surface. The pulsed-ISHE technique offers a robust route for efficient injection and detection schemes of spin currents at room temperature, and paves the way for spin orbitronics in plastic materials. PMID:27088233

  19. Increase of spin dephasing times in a 2D electron system with degree of initial spin polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, D.; Korn, T.; Schulz, R.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Schüller, C.

    2008-03-01

    We report on time-resolved Faraday/Kerr rotation measurements on a high-mobility 2D electron system. A variable initial spin polarization is created in the sample by a circularly polarized pump pulse, and the spin polarization is tracked by measuring the Faraday/Kerr rotation of a time-delayed probe pulse. By varying the pump intensity, the initial spin polarization is changed from the low-polarization limit to a polarization degree of several percent. The observed spin dephasing time increases from less than 20 ps to more than 200 ps as the initial spin polarization is increased. To exclude sample heating effects, additional measurements with constant pump intensity and variable degree of circular polarization are performed. The results confirm the theoretical prediction by Weng and Wu [Phys. Rev. B 68 (2003) 075312] that the spin dephasing strongly depends on the initial spin polarization degree. The microscopic origin for this is the Hartree-Fock term in the Coulomb interaction, which acts as an effective out-of plane magnetic field.

  20. Induction-detection electron spin resonance with spin sensitivity of a few tens of spins

    SciTech Connect

    Artzi, Yaron; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-23

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a spectroscopic method that addresses electrons in paramagnetic materials directly through their spin properties. ESR has many applications, ranging from semiconductor characterization to structural biology and even quantum computing. Although it is very powerful and informative, ESR traditionally suffers from low sensitivity, requiring many millions of spins to get a measureable signal with commercial systems using the Faraday induction-detection principle. In view of this disadvantage, significant efforts were made recently to develop alternative detection schemes based, for example, on force, optical, or electrical detection of spins, all of which can reach single electron spin sensitivity. This sensitivity, however, comes at the price of limited applicability and usefulness with regard to real scientific and technological issues facing modern ESR which are currently dealt with conventional induction-detection ESR on a daily basis. Here, we present the most sensitive experimental induction-detection ESR setup and results ever recorded that can detect the signal from just a few tens of spins. They were achieved thanks to the development of an ultra-miniature micrometer-sized microwave resonator that was operated at ∼34 GHz at cryogenic temperatures in conjunction with a unique cryogenically cooled low noise amplifier. The test sample used was isotopically enriched phosphorus-doped silicon, which is of significant relevance to spin-based quantum computing. The sensitivity was experimentally verified with the aid of a unique high-resolution ESR imaging approach. These results represent a paradigm shift with respect to the capabilities and possible applications of induction-detection-based ESR spectroscopy and imaging.

  1. Induction-detection electron spin resonance with spin sensitivity of a few tens of spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artzi, Yaron; Twig, Ygal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a spectroscopic method that addresses electrons in paramagnetic materials directly through their spin properties. ESR has many applications, ranging from semiconductor characterization to structural biology and even quantum computing. Although it is very powerful and informative, ESR traditionally suffers from low sensitivity, requiring many millions of spins to get a measureable signal with commercial systems using the Faraday induction-detection principle. In view of this disadvantage, significant efforts were made recently to develop alternative detection schemes based, for example, on force, optical, or electrical detection of spins, all of which can reach single electron spin sensitivity. This sensitivity, however, comes at the price of limited applicability and usefulness with regard to real scientific and technological issues facing modern ESR which are currently dealt with conventional induction-detection ESR on a daily basis. Here, we present the most sensitive experimental induction-detection ESR setup and results ever recorded that can detect the signal from just a few tens of spins. They were achieved thanks to the development of an ultra-miniature micrometer-sized microwave resonator that was operated at ˜34 GHz at cryogenic temperatures in conjunction with a unique cryogenically cooled low noise amplifier. The test sample used was isotopically enriched phosphorus-doped silicon, which is of significant relevance to spin-based quantum computing. The sensitivity was experimentally verified with the aid of a unique high-resolution ESR imaging approach. These results represent a paradigm shift with respect to the capabilities and possible applications of induction-detection-based ESR spectroscopy and imaging.

  2. A compact high current pulsed electron gun with subnanosecond electron pulse widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetically-collimated, double-pulsed electron gun capable of generating electron pulses with a peak instantaneous current of approximately 70 microamps and a temporal width of 0.35 ns (FWHM) has been developed. Calibration is accomplished by measuring the lifetime of the well known 2(1P)-to-1(1S) transition in helium (58.4nm) at a near-threshold electron-impact energy by use of the delayed-coincidence technique.

  3. Implanted bismuth donors in 28-Si: Process development and electron spin resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, C. D.; Lo, C. C.; Lang, V.; George, R. E.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Bokor, J.; Lyon, S. A.; Morton, J. J. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2012-02-01

    Spins of donor atoms in silicon are excellent qubit candidates. Isotope engineered substrates provide a nuclear spin free host environment, resulting in long spin coherence times [1,2]. The capability of swapping quantum information between electron and nuclear spins can enable quantum communication and gate operation via the electron spin and quantum memory via the nuclear spin [2]. Spin properties of donor qubit candidates in silicon have been studied mostly for phosphorous and antimony [1-3]. Bismuth donors in silicon exhibit a zero field splitting of 7.4 GHz and have attracted attention as potential nuclear spin memory and spin qubit candidates [4,5] that could be coupled to superconducting resonators [4,6]. We report on progress in the formation of bismuth doped 28-Si epi layers by ion implantation, electrical dopant activation and their study via pulsed electron spin resonance measurements showing narrow linewidths and good coherence times. [4pt] [1] A. M. Tyryshkin, et al. arXiv: 1105.3772 [2] J. J. L. Morton, et al. Nature (2008) [3] T. Schenkel, et al APL 2006; F. R. Bradbury, et al. PRL (2006) [4] R. E. George, et al. PRL (2010) [5] G. W. Morley, et al. Nat Mat (2010) [6] M. Hatridge, et al. PRB (2011), R. Vijay, et al. APL (2010) This work was supported by NSA (100000080295) and DOE (DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  4. Optimization of spin-torque switching using AC and DC pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Tom; Kamenev, Alex

    2014-06-21

    We explore spin-torque induced magnetic reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions using combined AC and DC spin-current pulses. We calculate the optimal pulse times and current strengths for both AC and DC pulses as well as the optimal AC signal frequency, needed to minimize the Joule heat lost during the switching process. The results of this optimization are compared against numeric simulations. Finally, we show how this optimization leads to different dynamic regimes, where switching is optimized by either a purely AC or DC spin-current, or a combination AC/DC spin-current, depending on the anisotropy energies and the spin-current polarization.

  5. Spintronics: a spin-based electronics vision for the future.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S A; Awschalom, D D; Buhrman, R A; Daughton, J M; von Molnár, S; Roukes, M L; Chtchelkanova, A Y; Treger, D M

    2001-11-16

    This review describes a new paradigm of electronics based on the spin degree of freedom of the electron. Either adding the spin degree of freedom to conventional charge-based electronic devices or using the spin alone has the potential advantages of nonvolatility, increased data processing speed, decreased electric power consumption, and increased integration densities compared with conventional semiconductor devices. To successfully incorporate spins into existing semiconductor technology, one has to resolve technical issues such as efficient injection, transport, control and manipulation, and detection of spin polarization as well as spin-polarized currents. Recent advances in new materials engineering hold the promise of realizing spintronic devices in the near future. We review the current state of the spin-based devices, efforts in new materials fabrication, issues in spin transport, and optical spin manipulation. PMID:11711666

  6. Electron Spin Dephasing and Decoherence by Interaction with Nuclear Spins in Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Klimeck, Gerhard; Whale, K. Birgitta

    2004-01-01

    Electron spin dephasing and decoherence by its interaction with nuclear spins in self-assembled quantum dots are investigated in the framework of the empirical tight-binding model. Electron spin dephasing in an ensemble of dots is induced by the inhomogeneous precession frequencies of the electron among dots, while electron spin decoherence in a single dot arises from the inhomogeneous precession frequencies of nuclear spins in the dot. For In(x)Ga(1-x) As self-assembled dots containing 30000 nuclei, the dephasing and decoherence times are predicted to be on the order of 100 ps and 1 (micro)s.

  7. Manipulating femtosecond spin-orbit torques with laser pulse sequences to control magnetic memory states and ringing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingos, P. C.; Wang, J.; Perakis, I. E.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) coherent control of collective order parameters is important for nonequilibrium phase dynamics in correlated materials. Here, we propose such control of ferromagnetic order based on using nonadiabatic optical manipulation of electron-hole (e -h ) photoexcitations to create fs carrier-spin pulses with controllable direction and time profile. These spin pulses are generated due to the time-reversal symmetry breaking arising from nonperturbative spin-orbit and magnetic exchange couplings of coherent photocarriers. By tuning the nonthermal populations of exchange-split, spin-orbit-coupled semiconductor band states, we can excite fs spin-orbit torques that control complex magnetization pathways between multiple magnetic memory states. We calculate the laser-induced fs magnetic anisotropy in the time domain by using density matrix equations of motion rather than the quasiequilibrium free energy. By comparing to pump-probe experiments, we identify a "sudden" out-of-plane magnetization canting displaying fs magnetic hysteresis, which agrees with switchings measured by the static Hall magnetoresistivity. This fs transverse spin-canting switches direction with magnetic state and laser frequency, which distinguishes it from the longitudinal nonlinear optical and demagnetization effects. We propose that sequences of clockwise or counterclockwise fs spin-orbit torques, photoexcited by shaping two-color laser-pulse sequences analogous to multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, can be used to timely suppress or enhance magnetic ringing and switching rotation in magnetic memories.

  8. Spin current swapping and Hanle spin Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ka; Raimondi, R.; Vignale, G.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the effect known as "spin current swapping" (SCS) due to electron-impurity scattering in a uniform spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas. In this effect a primary spin current Jia (lower index for spatial direction, upper index for spin direction) generates a secondary spin current Jai if i ≠a , or Jjj, with j ≠i , if i =a . Contrary to naive expectation, the homogeneous spin current associated with the uniform drift of the spin polarization in the electron gas does not generate a swapped spin current by the SCS mechanism. Nevertheless, a swapped spin current will be generated, if a magnetic field is present, by a completely different mechanism, namely, the precession of the spin Hall spin current in the magnetic field. We refer to this second mechanism as Hanle spin Hall effect, and we notice that it can be observed in an experiment in which a homogeneous drift current is passed through a uniformly magnetized electron gas. In contrast to this, we show that an unambiguous observation of SCS requires inhomogeneous spin currents, such as those that are associated with spin diffusion in a metal, and no magnetic field. An experimental setup for the observation of the SCS is therefore proposed.

  9. Exploration method using electron spin resonance signals from hydrocarbon crude

    SciTech Connect

    Nicksic, S.W.; Starke, G.W.

    1986-08-19

    An exploration method is described for mapping the subsurface course of crude petroleum accumulated in a producible subsurface reservoir by distinguishing crude petroleum based electron spin resonance signals from electron spin resonance signals from other constituent materials in earth formation samples. The method consists of: (a) collecting samples of subsurface earth formation materials from known positions within a formation from wells having known locations; (b) subjecting the earth formation samples to suitable conditions for the establishment of electron spin resonance of electrons present in the samples, and detecting electron spin resonance from the samples; (c) selecting those earth formation samples from which the electron spin resonance signals were detected and contacting the selected samples with a solution containing iodine; (d) subjecting the selected and contacted samples to the suitable conditions for establishment of electron spin resonance of electrons present in the samples, and detecting electron spin resonance signals from the selected samples; (e) identifying from the first selected samples those earth formation samples from which enhanced electron spin resonance signals were detected attributable to the contacting with the solution containing iodine as samples containing electrons associated with crude petroleum; (f) mapping the presence of the crude petroleum materials; (g) producing a representation of potential migration paths of hydrocarbon crudes within the formation; and (h) locating the origin of the identified samples demonstrating the enhanced electron spin resonance signals in distance, direction and depth with respect to the subsurface reservoir by using the mapped potential migration paths.

  10. Spin-orbit coupling in tungsten by spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, S.; Artamonov, O. M.; Sergeant, A. D.; Kirschner, J.; Morozov, A.; Williams, J. F.

    2004-08-01

    We present experimental results on low-energy spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy of W(100) and W(110). A combination of a coincidence technique with the time-of-flight energy analysis was used to record angular and energy distributions of correlated electron pairs excited by spin-polarized low-energy primary electrons from a single crystal of tungsten. These distributions depend strongly on the polarization and the angle of incidence of the incident electron beam. Experimental data are discussed in terms of the symmetry properties, spin-dependent scattering dynamics, and spin-resolved electronic structure of the sample.

  11. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    by electron-electron interactions, leading to remarkable resistance to diffusive spreading of the drifting pulse of spin polarization. Finally, we show that spin helices continue propagate at the same speed as the Fermi sea even when the electron drift velocity exceeds the Fermi velocity of 107 cm s-1. We also use this phase-resolved Doppler velocimetry technique to perform the first simultaneous measurements of drift and diffusion of electron-hole packets in the same two-dimensional electron gas. The results that we obtain strongly violate the picture of electron-hole transport that is presented in the classic textbook treatments of ambipolar dynamics. We find that the rates of transport are controlled almost entirely by the intrinsic frictional force exerted between electrons and holes, rather than the interaction of carriers with phonons or impurities. From the experimental data we obtain the first measurement of the "Coulomb drag" friction between electrons and holes coexisting in the same two-dimensional layer. Moreover, we show that the frictional force thus obtained is in quantitative agreement with theoretically predicted values, which follow entirely from electron density, temperature and fundamental constants, i.e. no adjustable parameters. The understanding of ambipolar transport that we have achieved is an essential prerequisite to the design of those spintronic devices in which spin current is carried by the drift of polarized electrons and holes.

  12. Spin dynamics and relaxation in graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance probing.

    PubMed

    Rao, Singamaneni S; Stesmans, Andre; van Tol, Johan; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Higginbotham-Duque, A; Lu, Wei; Sinitskii, Alexander; Tour, James M

    2012-09-25

    Here we report the results of a multifrequency (~9, 20, 34, 239.2, and 336 GHz) variable-temperature continuous wave (cw) and X-band (~9 GHz) pulse electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement performed at cryogenic temperatures on potassium split graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Important experimental findings include the following: (a) The multifrequency cw ESR data infer the presence of only carbon-related paramagnetic nonbonding states, at any measured temperature, with the g value independent of microwave frequency and temperature. (b) A linear broadening of the ESR signal as a function of microwave frequency is noticed. The observed linear frequency dependence of ESR signal width points to a distribution of g factors causing the non-Lorentzian line shape, and the g broadening contribution is found to be very small. (c) The ESR process is found to be characterized by slow and fast components, whose temperature dependences could be well described by a tunneling level state model. This work not only could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge spin (or magnetic)-based properties of GNRs but also pave the way to GNR-based spin devices. PMID:22901098

  13. Kerr-Newman Electron as Spinning Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Measurable parameters of the electron indicate that its background should be described by the Kerr-Newman (KN) solution. The spin/mass ratio of the electron is extreme large, and the black hole horizons disappear, opening a topological defect of space-time - the Kerr singular ring of Compton size, which may be interpreted as a closed fundamental string of low energy string theory. The singular and two-sheeted structure of the corresponding Kerr space has to be regularised, and we consider the old problem of regularising the source of the KN solution. As a development of the earlier Keres-Israel-Hamity-López model, we describe the model of smooth and regular source forming a gravitating and relativistically rotating soliton based on the chiral field model and the Higgs mechanism of broken symmetry. The model reveals some new remarkable properties: (1) the soliton forms a relativistically rotating bubble of Compton radius, which is filled by the oscillating Higgs field in a pseudo-vacuum state; (2) the boundary of the bubble forms a domain wall which interpolates between the internal flat background and the external exact Kerr-Newman (KN) solution; (3) the phase transition is provided by a system of chiral fields; (4) the vector potential of the external the KN solution forms a closed Wilson loop which is quantised, giving rise to a quantised spin of the soliton; (5) the soliton is bordered by a closed string, which is a part of the general complex stringy structure.

  14. ELECTRON SPIN RESONANCE STUDIES ON MELANIN.

    PubMed

    BLOIS, M S; ZAHLAN, A B; MALING, J E

    1964-11-01

    Electron spin resonance (e.s.r.) observations of squid melanin have been conducted over the temperature range 500 degrees K to 4.2 degrees K, and the effect of various chemical treatments of the melanin upon the e.s.r. spectrum has been studied. The findings have shown that the paramagnetism of this melanin follows the Curie Law from 500 degrees K to 4.2 degrees K, that the spin signal can be eliminated by the addition of Cu(++) to the melanin, and that the optical and e.s.r. absorptions of melanin are independent since either can be reduced or eliminated without affecting the other. Similar studies on synthetic melanins produced by autoxidation or by enzymatic oxidation of a number of biphenols were carried out. It was found that the e.s.r. signals of these synthetic melanins were strikingly similar (with respect to line width, line shape, and g-value) with those of squid melanin. It is concluded that the unpaired electrons observed are associated with trapped free radicals in the melanin polymer, that the biosynthesis of melanin may involve a free radical mechanism, and that these physical data are in accord with the concept of Nicolaus that melanin is a highly irregular, three-dimensional, polymer. PMID:14232133

  15. Pi topology and spin alignment in unique photoexcited triplet and quintet states arising from four unpaired electrons of an organic spin system.

    PubMed

    Teki, Yoshio; Toichi, Tetuya; Nakajima, Satoru

    2006-03-01

    Syntheses, electronic structures in the ground state, unique photoexcited states, and spin alignment are reported for novel biradical 1, which was designed as an ideal model compound to investigate photoinduced spin alignment in the excited state. Electron spin resonance (ESR), time-resolved ESR (TRESR), and laser-excitation pulsed ESR experiments were carried out. The magnetic properties were examined with a SQUID magnetometer. In the electronic ground state, two radical moieties interact very weakly (almost no interaction) with each other through the closed-shell diphenylanthracene spin coupler. On photoirradiation, a novel lowest photoexcited state with the intermediate spin (S = 1) arising from four unpaired electrons with low-lying quintet (S = 2) photoexcited state was detected. The unique triplet state has an interesting electronic structure, the D value of which is reduced by antiferromagnetic spin alignment between two radical spins through the excited triplet spin coupler. The general theoretical predictions of the spin alignment and the reduction of the fine-structure splitting of the triplet bis(radical) systems are presented. The fine-structure splitting of the unique photoexcited triplet state of 1, as well as the existence of the low-lying quintet state, is interpreted well on the basis of theoretical predictions. Details of the spin alignment in the photoexcited states are discussed. PMID:16372362

  16. Few electron quantum dot coupling to donor implanted electron spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Neilson, Erik; Gamble, John; Muller, Richard; Jacobson, Toby; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Donor-based Si qubits are receiving increased interest because of recent demonstrations of high fidelity electron or nuclear spin qubits and their coupling. Quantum dot (QD) mediated interactions between donors are of interest for future coupling of two donors. We present experiment and modeling of a polysilicon/Si MOS QD, charge-sensed by a neighboring many electron QD, capable of coupling to one or two donor implanted electron spins (D) while tuned to the few electron regime. The unique design employs two neighboring gated wire FETs and self-aligned implants, which supports many configurations of implanted donors. We can access the (0,1) ⇔(1,0) transition between the D and QD, as well as the resonance condition between the few electron QD and two donors ((0,N,1) ⇔(0,N +1,0) ⇔(1,N,0)). We characterize capacitances and tunnel rate behavior combined with semi-classical and full configuration interaction simulations to study the energy landscape and kinetics of D-QD transitions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Single-electron Spin Resonance in a Quadruple Quantum Dot

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Ito, Takumi; Sugawara, Retsu; Noiri, Akito; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are good candidates of quantum bits for quantum information processing. Basic operations of the qubit have been realized in recent years: initialization, manipulation of single spins, two qubit entanglement operations, and readout. Now it becomes crucial to demonstrate scalability of this architecture by conducting spin operations on a scaled up system. Here, we demonstrate single-electron spin resonance in a quadruple quantum dot. A few-electron quadruple quantum dot is formed within a magnetic field gradient created by a micro-magnet. We oscillate the wave functions of the electrons in the quantum dots by applying microwave voltages and this induces electron spin resonance. The resonance energies of the four quantum dots are slightly different because of the stray field created by the micro-magnet and therefore frequency-resolved addressable control of each electron spin resonance is possible. PMID:27550534

  18. Enhanced electron spin rotation in CdS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Yasuaki; Umino, Hikaru; Sun, Jianhui; Suzumura, Eri

    2015-10-14

    We studied the spin rotation of electrons in CdS quantum dots (QDs) and CdS QDs with charge acceptors by means of time-resolved Faraday rotation (TRFR) at room temperature. The electron spin rotation had an oscillatory component in the TRFR signal and the oscillation frequency proportional to the magnetic field gave a g-factor of the electrons of 1.965 ± 0.006. The non-oscillatory component came from the population of excitons and showed an additional decay in CdS QDs with hole acceptors. The electron spin rotation signal was largely enhanced and lasted for a spin coherence time of T2* = 450 ps in CdS QDs tethered to TiO2 electron acceptors, where the spin initialization was triggered by the positive trion transition. These results give clear evidence that the electron spin rotation signal in QDs can be enhanced by transient p-doping. PMID:26352679

  19. Single-electron Spin Resonance in a Quadruple Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Ito, Takumi; Sugawara, Retsu; Noiri, Akito; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are good candidates of quantum bits for quantum information processing. Basic operations of the qubit have been realized in recent years: initialization, manipulation of single spins, two qubit entanglement operations, and readout. Now it becomes crucial to demonstrate scalability of this architecture by conducting spin operations on a scaled up system. Here, we demonstrate single-electron spin resonance in a quadruple quantum dot. A few-electron quadruple quantum dot is formed within a magnetic field gradient created by a micro-magnet. We oscillate the wave functions of the electrons in the quantum dots by applying microwave voltages and this induces electron spin resonance. The resonance energies of the four quantum dots are slightly different because of the stray field created by the micro-magnet and therefore frequency-resolved addressable control of each electron spin resonance is possible. PMID:27550534

  20. Design and implementation of an FPGA-based timing pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Savory, Joshua J.; Warncke, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The design, construction and implementation of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) -based pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments is described. The FPGA pulse programmer offers advantages in design flexibility and cost over previous pulse programmers, that are based on commercial digital delay generators, logic pattern generators, and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designs. The FPGA pulse progammer features a novel transition-based algorithm and command protocol, that is optimized for the timing structure required for most pulsed magnetic resonance experiments. The algorithm was implemented by using a Spartan-6 FPGA (Xilinx), which provides an easily accessible and cost effective solution for FPGA interfacing. An auxiliary board was designed for the FPGA-instrument interface, which buffers the FPGA outputs for increased power consumption and capacitive load requirements. Device specifications include: Nanosecond pulse formation (transition edge rise/fall times, ≤3 ns), low jitter (≤150 ps), large number of channels (16 implemented; 48 available), and long pulse duration (no limit). The hardware and software for the device were designed for facile reconfiguration to match user experimental requirements and constraints. Operation of the device is demonstrated and benchmarked by applications to 1-D electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and 2-D hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) experiments. The FPGA approach is transferrable to applications in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR; magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), and to pulse perturbation and detection bandwidths in spectroscopies up through the optical range. PMID:25076864

  1. Design and implementation of an FPGA-based timing pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Savory, Joshua J; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-08-01

    The design, construction and implementation of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) -based pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments is described. The FPGA pulse programmer offers advantages in design flexibility and cost over previous pulse programmers, that are based on commercial digital delay generators, logic pattern generators, and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designs. The FPGA pulse progammer features a novel transition-based algorithm and command protocol, that is optimized for the timing structure required for most pulsed magnetic resonance experiments. The algorithm was implemented by using a Spartan-6 FPGA (Xilinx), which provides an easily accessible and cost effective solution for FPGA interfacing. An auxiliary board was designed for the FPGA-instrument interface, which buffers the FPGA outputs for increased power consumption and capacitive load requirements. Device specifications include: Nanosecond pulse formation (transition edge rise/fall times, ≤3 ns), low jitter (≤150 ps), large number of channels (16 implemented; 48 available), and long pulse duration (no limit). The hardware and software for the device were designed for facile reconfiguration to match user experimental requirements and constraints. Operation of the device is demonstrated and benchmarked by applications to 1-D electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and 2-D hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) experiments. The FPGA approach is transferrable to applications in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR; magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), and to pulse perturbation and detection bandwidths in spectroscopies up through the optical range. PMID:25076864

  2. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Stesmans, Andre; van Tol, Johan; Kosynkin, D. V.; Tour, James M.

    2014-04-01

    Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element) spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW), pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs) with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH3 adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns) and fast (39 ns) components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and 13C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and 13C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic)-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  3. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Stesmans, Andre; Tol, Johan van; Kosynkin, D. V.; Tour, James M.

    2014-04-15

    Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element) spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW), pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs) with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH{sub 3} adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns) and fast (39 ns) components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and {sup 13}C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and {sup 13}C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic)-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  4. Compression of Electron Pulses for Femtosecond Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Our goal is to improve the temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments to 100 fs by compressing the electron pulses using a time-varying electric field. The compressed pulse can be used for a better understanding of the dynamics of molecules under study. A bunch of 3 million electrons is generated at a photocathode by femtosecond UV laser pulses and accelerated to 100 keV in a static electric field. Then, the longitudinal component of the electric field of a microwave cavity is employed to compress the bunch. The cavity's frequency and phase are accurately tuned in such a way that the electric field is parallel to the bunch motion at its arrival and antiparallel to it at its exit. Compression in the transverse directions is done by magnetic lenses. Simulations have been done to predict the bunch profile at different positions and times by General Particle Tracer code. A streak camera has been built to measure the duration of the pulses. It uses the electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor to rotate the bunch so that angular spreading of the bunch is proportional to its duration. The capacitor is discharged by a laser pulse incident on a photo switch.

  5. Klein paradox with spin-resolved electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Krekora, P.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2005-12-15

    Using numerical solutions to relativistic quantum field theory with space-time resolution, we illustrate how an incoming electron wave packet with a definite spin scatters off a supercritical potential step. We show that the production rate is reduced of only those electrons that have the same spin as the incoming electron is reduced. This spin-resolved result further clarifies the importance of the Pauli-exclusion principle for the Klein paradox.

  6. Shaped electric fields for fast optimal manipulation of electron spin and position in a double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budagosky, J. A.; Khomitsky, D. V.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Castro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We use quantum optimal control theory algorithms to design external electric fields that drive the coupled spin and orbital dynamics of an electron in a double quantum dot, subject to the spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman magnetic fields. We obtain time profiles of multifrequency electric field pulses which increase the rate of spin-flip transitions by several orders of magnitude in comparison with monochromatic fields, where the spin Rabi oscillations were predicted to be very slow. This precise (with fidelity higher than 1 ×10-4 ) and fast (at the time scale of the order of 0.1 ns, comparable with the Zeeman spin rotation and the interdot tunneling time) simultaneous control of the spin and position is achieved while keeping the electron in the four lowest tunneling- and Zeeman-split levels through the duration of the pulse. The proposed algorithms suggest effective applications in spintronics and quantum information devices.

  7. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian; Dery, Hanan

    2015-06-01

    At low temperatures, electrons in semiconductors are bound to shallow donor impurity ions, neutralizing their charge in equilibrium. Inelastic scattering of other externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions within the manifold of these localized states. Promotion of the bound electron into highly spin-orbit-mixed excited states drives a strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interactions, reminiscent of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process where exchange occurs with valence band hole states. Through low-temperature experiments with silicon spin transport devices and complementary theory, we reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold.

  8. Electronic measurement and control of spin transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Huang, Biqin; Monsma, Douwe J.

    2007-05-01

    The spin lifetime and diffusion length of electrons are transport parameters that define the scale of coherence in spintronic devices and circuits. As these parameters are many orders of magnitude larger in semiconductors than in metals, semiconductors could be the most suitable for spintronics. So far, spin transport has only been measured in direct-bandgap semiconductors or in combination with magnetic semiconductors, excluding a wide range of non-magnetic semiconductors with indirect bandgaps. Most notable in this group is silicon, Si, which (in addition to its market entrenchment in electronics) has long been predicted a superior semiconductor for spintronics with enhanced lifetime and transport length due to low spin-orbit scattering and lattice inversion symmetry. Despite this promise, a demonstration of coherent spin transport in Si has remained elusive, because most experiments focused on magnetoresistive devices; these methods fail because of a fundamental impedance mismatch between ferromagnetic metal and semiconductor, and measurements are obscured by other magnetoelectronic effects. Here we demonstrate conduction-band spin transport across 10μm undoped Si in a device that operates by spin-dependent ballistic hot-electron filtering through ferromagnetic thin films for both spin injection and spin detection. As it is not based on magnetoresistance, the hot-electron spin injection and spin detection avoids impedance mismatch issues and prevents interference from parasitic effects. The clean collector current shows independent magnetic and electrical control of spin precession, and thus confirms spin coherent drift in the conduction band of silicon.

  9. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J; Fay, Michael W; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn(2+) spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn-Mn interactions and minimization of Mn-nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin-lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn(2+) ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  10. Electron-spin dynamics in elliptically polarized light waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauke, Heiko; Ahrens, Sven; Grobe, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the coupling of the spin angular momentum of light beams with elliptical polarization to the spin degree of freedom of free electrons. It is shown that this coupling, which is of similar origin as the well-known spin-orbit coupling, can lead to spin precession. The spin-precession frequency is proportional to the product of the laser field's intensity and its spin density. The electron-spin dynamics is analyzed by employing exact numerical methods as well as time-dependent perturbation theory based on the fully relativistic Dirac equation and on the nonrelativistic Pauli equation that is amended by a relativistic correction that accounts for the light's spin density.

  11. Ultrafast Coherent Control of a Single Electron Spin in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2009-03-01

    Practical quantum information processing schemes require fast single-qubit operations. For spin-based qubits, this involves performing arbitrary coherent rotations of the spin state on timescales much faster than the spin coherence time. While we recently demonstrated the ability to initialize and monitor the evolution of single spins in quantum dots (QDs)ootnotetextM. H. Mikkelsen, J. Berezovsky, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, D. D. Awschalom, Nature Physics 3, 770 (2007); J. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, O. Gywat, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, and D. D. Awschalom, Science 314, 1916 (2006)., here we present an all-optical scheme for ultrafast manipulation of these states through arbitrary angles. The GaAs QDs are embedded in a diode structure to allow controllable charging of the QDs and positioned within a vertical optical cavity to enhance the small single spin signal. By applying off-resonant optical pulses, we coherently rotate a single electron spin in a QD up to π radians on picosecond timescales ootnotetextJ. Berezovsky, M. H. Mikkelsen, N. G. Stoltz, L. A. Coldren, D. D. Awschalom, Science 320, 349 (2008)..We directly observe this spin manipulation using time-resolved Kerr rotation spectroscopy at T=10K. Measurements of the spin rotation as a function of laser detuning and intensity confirm that the optical Stark effect is the operative mechanism and the results are well-described by a model including the electron-nuclear spin interaction. Using short tipping pulses, this technique enables one to perform a large number of operations within the coherence time. This ability to perform arbitrary single-qubit operations enables sequential all-optical initialization, ultrafast control and detection of a single electron spin for quantum information purposes.

  12. Pumped Spin-Current in Single Quantum Dot with Spin-Dependent Electron Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Song; Du, Xiaohong

    2016-05-01

    Spin-dependent electron temperature effect on the spin pump in a single quantum dot connected to Normal and/or Ferromagnetic leads are investigated with the help of master equation method. Results show that spin heat accumulation breaks the tunneling rates balance at the thermal equilibrium state thus the charge current and the spin current are affected to some extent. Pure spin current can be obtained by adjusting pumping intensity or chemical potential of the lead. Spin heat accumulation of certain material can be detected by measuring the charge current strength in symmetric leads architectures. In practical devices, spin-dependent electron temperature effect is quite significant and our results should be useful in quantum information processing and spin Caloritronics.

  13. Pumped Spin-Current in Single Quantum Dot with Spin-Dependent Electron Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Song; Du, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Spin-dependent electron temperature effect on the spin pump in a single quantum dot connected to Normal and/or Ferromagnetic leads are investigated with the help of master equation method. Results show that spin heat accumulation breaks the tunneling rates balance at the thermal equilibrium state thus the charge current and the spin current are affected to some extent. Pure spin current can be obtained by adjusting pumping intensity or chemical potential of the lead. Spin heat accumulation of certain material can be detected by measuring the charge current strength in symmetric leads architectures. In practical devices, spin-dependent electron temperature effect is quite significant and our results should be useful in quantum information processing and spin Caloritronics.

  14. Controlling the Spins Angular Momentum in Ferromagnets with Sequences of Picosecond Acoustic Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Wan; Vomir, Mircea; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the angular momentum of spins with very short external perturbations is a key issue in modern magnetism. For example it allows manipulating the magnetization for recording purposes or for inducing high frequency spin torque oscillations. Towards that purpose it is essential to modify and control the angular momentum of the magnetization which precesses around the resultant effective magnetic field. That can be achieved with very short external magnetic field pulses or using intrinsically coupled magnetic structures, resulting in a transfer of spin torque. Here we show that using picosecond acoustic pulses is a versatile and efficient way of controlling the spin angular momentum in ferromagnets. Two or three acoustic pulses, generated by femtosecond laser pulses, allow suppressing or enhancing the magnetic precession at any arbitrary time by precisely controlling the delays and amplitudes of the optical pulses. A formal analogy with a two dimensional pendulum allows us explaining the complex trajectory of the magnetic vector perturbed by the acoustic pulses. PMID:25687970

  15. Hole Surface Trapping Dynamics Directly Monitored by Electron Spin Manipulation in CdS Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Feng, Donghai; Tong, Haifang; Jia, Tianqing; Deng, Li; Sun, Zhenrong; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-12-18

    A new detection technique, pump-spin orientation-probe ultrafast spectroscopy, is developed to study the hole trapping dynamics in colloidal CdS nanocrystals. The hole surface trapping process spatially separates the electron-hole pairs excited by the pump pulse, leaves the core negatively charged, and thus enhances the electron spin signal generated by the orientation pulse. The spin enhancement transients as a function of the pump-orientation delay reveal a fast and a slow hole trapping process with respective time constants of sub-10 ps and sub-100 ps, orders of magnitude faster than that of carrier recombination. The power dependence of hole trapping dynamics elucidates the saturation process and relative number of traps, and suggests that there are three subpopulations of nanoparticles related to hole surface trapping, one with the fast trapping pathway only, another with the slow trapping pathway only, and the third with both pathways together. PMID:26273979

  16. Giant titanium electron wave function in gallium oxide: A potential electron-nuclear spin system for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentink-Vigier, Frédéric; Binet, Laurent; Vignoles, Gerard; Gourier, Didier; Vezin, Hervé

    2010-11-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the unpaired electron with eight surrounding G69a and G71a nuclei in Ti-doped β-Ga2O3 were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies. They are dominated by strong isotropic hyperfine couplings due to a direct Fermi contact interaction with Ga nuclei in octahedral sites of rutile-type chains oriented along b axis, revealing a large anisotropic spatial extension of the electron wave function. Titanium in β-Ga2O3 is thus best described as a diffuse (Ti4+-e-) pair rather than as a localized Ti3+ . Both electron and G69a nuclear spin Rabi oscillations could be observed by pulsed EPR and pulsed ENDOR, respectively. The electron spin decoherence time is about 1μs (at 4 K) and an upper bound of 520μs (at 8 K) is estimated for the nuclear decoherence time. Thus, β-Ga2O3:Ti appears to be a potential spin-bus system for quantum information processing with a large nuclear spin quantum register.

  17. Study of electronic structure and spin polarization of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Mund, H. S.

    2015-06-24

    In this paper, I have presented the spin-dependent momentum density of ferromagnetic dysprosium using spin polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method. A fully relativistic approach has been used to determine the magnetic Compton profile. The density of state in term of majority-spin and minority-spin of Dy also calculated using SPR-KKR. The magnetic Compton profile discussed in term of 4f and diffused electrons.

  18. Nonlinear induction detection of electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachar, Gil; Suchoi, Oren; Shtempluck, Oleg; Blank, Aharon; Buks, Eyal

    2012-07-01

    We present an approach to the induction detection of electron spin resonance (ESR) signals exploiting the nonlinear properties of a superconducting resonator. Our experiments employ a yttrium barium copper oxide superconducting stripline microwave (MW) resonator integrated with a microbridge. A strong nonlinear response of the resonator is thermally activated in the microbridge when exceeding a threshold in the injected MW power. The responsivity factor characterizing the ESR-induced change in the system's output signal is about 100 times larger when operating the resonator near the instability threshold, compared to the value obtained in the linear regime of operation. Preliminary experimental results, together with a theoretical model of this phenomenon are presented. Under appropriate conditions, nonlinear induction detection of ESR can potentially improve upon the current capabilities of conventional linear induction detection ESR.

  19. Bulk Quantum Computation with Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Simulations of Single-Qubit Error Correction Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmuratov, I. K.; Baibekov, E. I.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the possibility to restore transient nutations of electron spin centers embedded in the solid using specific composite pulse sequences developed previously for the application in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We treat two types of systematic errors simultaneously: (i) rotation angle errors related to the spatial distribution of microwave field amplitude in the sample volume, and (ii) off-resonance errors related to the spectral distribution of Larmor precession frequencies of the electron spin centers. Our direct simulations of the transient signal in erbium- and chromium-doped CaWO4 crystal samples with and without error corrections show that the application of the selected composite pulse sequences can substantially increase the lifetime of Rabi oscillations. Finally, we discuss the applicability limitations of the studied pulse sequences for the use in solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  20. Millisecond Coherence Time in a Tunable Molecular Electronic Spin Qubit.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Joseph M; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg G; Freedman, Danna E

    2015-12-23

    Quantum information processing (QIP) could revolutionize areas ranging from chemical modeling to cryptography. One key figure of merit for the smallest unit for QIP, the qubit, is the coherence time (T 2), which establishes the lifetime for the qubit. Transition metal complexes offer tremendous potential as tunable qubits, yet their development is hampered by the absence of synthetic design principles to achieve a long T 2. We harnessed molecular design to create a series of qubits, (Ph4P)2[V(C8S8)3] (1), (Ph4P)2[V(β-C3S5)3] (2), (Ph4P)2[V(α-C3S5)3] (3), and (Ph4P)2[V(C3S4O)3] (4), with T 2s of 1-4 μs at 80 K in protiated and deuterated environments. Crucially, through chemical tuning of nuclear spin content in the vanadium(IV) environment we realized a T 2 of ∼1 ms for the species (d 20-Ph4P)2[V(C8S8)3] (1') in CS2, a value that surpasses the coordination complex record by an order of magnitude. This value even eclipses some prominent solid-state qubits. Electrochemical and continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data reveal variation in the electronic influence of the ligands on the metal ion across 1-4. However, pulsed measurements indicate that the most important influence on decoherence is nuclear spins in the protiated and deuterated solvents utilized herein. Our results illuminate a path forward in synthetic design principles, which should unite CS2 solubility with nuclear spin free ligand fields to develop a new generation of molecular qubits. PMID:27163013

  1. Millisecond Coherence Time in a Tunable Molecular Electronic Spin Qubit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing (QIP) could revolutionize areas ranging from chemical modeling to cryptography. One key figure of merit for the smallest unit for QIP, the qubit, is the coherence time (T2), which establishes the lifetime for the qubit. Transition metal complexes offer tremendous potential as tunable qubits, yet their development is hampered by the absence of synthetic design principles to achieve a long T2. We harnessed molecular design to create a series of qubits, (Ph4P)2[V(C8S8)3] (1), (Ph4P)2[V(β-C3S5)3] (2), (Ph4P)2[V(α-C3S5)3] (3), and (Ph4P)2[V(C3S4O)3] (4), with T2s of 1–4 μs at 80 K in protiated and deuterated environments. Crucially, through chemical tuning of nuclear spin content in the vanadium(IV) environment we realized a T2 of ∼1 ms for the species (d20-Ph4P)2[V(C8S8)3] (1′) in CS2, a value that surpasses the coordination complex record by an order of magnitude. This value even eclipses some prominent solid-state qubits. Electrochemical and continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data reveal variation in the electronic influence of the ligands on the metal ion across 1–4. However, pulsed measurements indicate that the most important influence on decoherence is nuclear spins in the protiated and deuterated solvents utilized herein. Our results illuminate a path forward in synthetic design principles, which should unite CS2 solubility with nuclear spin free ligand fields to develop a new generation of molecular qubits. PMID:27163013

  2. Strong-field Breit-Wheeler pair production in short laser pulses: Relevance of spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M. J. A.; Kamiński, J. Z.; Krajewska, K.; Müller, C.

    2016-07-01

    Production of electron-positron pairs in the collision of a high-energy photon with a high-intensity few-cycle laser pulse is studied. By utilizing the frameworks of laser-dressed spinor and scalar quantum electrodynamics, a comparison between the production of pairs of Dirac and Klein-Gordon particles is drawn. Positron energy spectra and angular distributions are presented for various laser parameters. We identify conditions under which predictions from Klein-Gordon theory either closely resemble or largely differ from those of the proper Dirac theory. In particular, we address the question to which extent the relevance of spin effects is influenced by the short duration of the laser pulse.

  3. Spin relaxation in bilayer graphene: the role of electron-electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Saurabh; Ghosh, Bahniman; Salimath, Akshay Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the influence of electron-electron scattering on spin relaxation length in bilayer graphene using semiclassical Monte Carlo simulation. Both D'yakonov-P'erel and Elliot-Yafet mechanisms are considered for spin relaxation. It is shown that spin relaxation length decreases by 17 % at 300 K on including electron-electron scattering. The reason of this variation in spin relaxation length is that the ensemble spin is modified upon an e-e collision, and also e-e scattering rate is greater than phonon scattering rate which causes change in spin transport profile.

  4. Torque for electron spin induced by electron permanent electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Senami, Masato E-mail: akitomo@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fukuda, Masahiro E-mail: akitomo@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ogiso, Yoji E-mail: akitomo@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tachibana, Akitomo E-mail: akitomo@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-06

    The spin torque of the electron is studied in relation to the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron. The spin dynamics is known to be given by the spin torque and the zeta force in quantum field theory. The effect of the EDM on the torque of the spin brings a new term in the equation of motion of the spin. We study this effect for a solution of the Dirac equation with electromagnetic field.

  5. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    In the Bir-Aronov-Pikus depolarization process affecting conduction electrons in p-type cubic semiconductors, spin relaxation is driven by exchange with short-lived valence band hole states. We have identified an analogous spin relaxation mechanism in nominally undoped silicon at low temperatures, when many electrons are bound to dilute dopant ion potentials. Inelastic scattering with externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions into highly spin-orbit-mixed bound excited states, driving strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interaction. We reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold, where conventional charge and spin transport are restored. Based upon: Lan Qing, Jing Li, Ian Appelbaum, and Hanan Dery, Phys Rev. B 91, 241405(R) (2015). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  6. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thai; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-05-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining such NV spin systems with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for many novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centers in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this novel system, we also investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect.

  7. Adapting a compact Mott spin polarimeter to a large commercial electron energy analyzer for spin-polarized electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Di-Jing; Lee, Jae-Yong; Suen, Jih-Shih; Mulhollan, G. A.; Andrews, A. B.; Erskine, J. L.

    1993-12-01

    A modified Rice University-type compact Mott spin polarimeter operating at 20 kV is adapted to a large commerical hemispherical electron energy analyzer. Normal energy analyzer functions are preserved via a retractable channeltron in the polarimeter acceleration column. In the spin-detection mode, the polarimeter permits analysis of two orthogonal transverse spin-polarization components. Electron trajectory analysis is used to optimize polarimeter lens column voltages in both normal and spin-detection modes. Performance levels are established by experiments and significantly improved spin-detection efficiency is shown to be accessible by changes in the polarimeter collection solid angle.

  8. Electronic Spin Tunneling in the Binding of Carbon - to Hemoglobin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstman, Bernard Scott

    1981-11-01

    A non-adiabatic quantum tunneling process is investigated as the mechanism for effecting the electronic spin change of the hemoglobin's iron upon the binding of carbon monoxide. As the carbon monoxide approaches there is a spin state change in the Fe('2+) from S = 2 to S = 0. The Born -Oppenheimer approximation can be used to separate the recombination of the CO to the iron in the heme at low temperatures into a nuclear tunneling and an electronic tunneling. Based upon the spin change of the Fe as well as the size of the tunneling matrix element and the energy splitting of the two states in the transition region, we assume the reaction to be a non-adiabatic electronic Landau-Zener state to state tunneling. The tunneling involves a spin change of the Fe and thus a spin-orbit interaction is used as the perturbation that couples the S = 2 and S = 0 manifolds. Since the matrix element for the transition is due to spin-orbit coupling the size of the matrix element can be changed, and hence the tunneling rate, by changing the spin magnetic sublevel of the initially CO unbound Fe. This is accomplished by applying a strong magnetic field of approximately 100 000 gauss which will tend to align the Fe spin at low enough temperature. The L vector will be affected only slightly by the external magnetic field since the Zeeman effect on the orbital levels is much smaller (10('-2)) than that of the internal crystal field of the molecule. Hence the crystal field of the heme determines the L quantization axis in each local heme coordinate system. Thus in a random oriented distribution of hemes frozen in place we expect faster CO recombination for those hemes who have their L vector aligned in the direction of the magnetic field than for those hemes whose L vector is perpendicular to the magnetic field. Hemoglobin has a strong absorption band at 436 nm when CO is bound. This absorption is also orientation dependent for the absorption is predominantly for light polarized in the plane

  9. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  10. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously-a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK. PMID:26133831

  11. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  12. Understanding and controlling spin-systems using electron spin resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Mathew

    Single molecule magnets (SMMs) posses multi-level energy structures with properties that make them attractive candidates for implementation into quantum information technologies. However there are some major hurdles that need to be overcome if these systems are to be used as the fundamental components of an eventual quantum computer. One such hurdle is the relatively short coherence times these systems display which severely limits the amount of time quantum information can remain encoded within them. In this dissertation, recent experiments conducted with the intent of bringing this technology closer to realization are presented. The detailed knowledge of the spin Hamiltonian and mechanisms of decoherence in SMMs are absolutely essential if these systems are to be used in technologies. To that effect, experiments were done on a particularly promising SMM, the complex K6[VIV15AsIII 6O42(H2O)] · 8H2O, known as V15. High-field electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were performed on this system at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The resulting spectra allowed for detailed analysis of the V15 spin Hamiltonian which will be presented as well as the most precise values yet reported for the g-factors of this system. Additionally, the line widths of the ESR spectra are studied in depth and found to reveal that fluctuations within the spin-orbit interaction are a mechanism for decoherence in V15. A new model for decoherence is presented that describes very well both the temperature and field orientation dependences of the measured ESR line widths. Also essential is the ability to control spin-states of SMMs. Presented in this dissertation as well is the demonstration of the coherent manipulation of the multi-state spin system Mn2+ diluted in MgO by means of a two-tone pulse drive. Through the detuning between the excitation and readout radio frequency pulses it is possible to select the number of photons involved in a Rabi oscillation as well as increase

  13. All-optical control and metrology of electron pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealhofer, C.; Schneider, W.; Ehberger, D.; Ryabov, A.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2016-04-01

    Short electron pulses are central to time-resolved atomic-scale diffraction and electron microscopy, streak cameras, and free-electron lasers. We demonstrate phase-space control and characterization of 5-picometer electron pulses using few-cycle terahertz radiation, extending concepts of microwave electron pulse compression and streaking to terahertz frequencies. Optical-field control of electron pulses provides synchronism to laser pulses and offers a temporal resolution that is ultimately limited by the rise-time of the optical fields applied. We used few-cycle waveforms carried at 0.3 terahertz to compress electron pulses by a factor of 12 with a timing stability of <4 femtoseconds (root mean square) and measure them by means of field-induced beam deflection (streaking). Scaling the concept toward multiterahertz control fields holds promise for approaching the electronic time scale in time-resolved electron diffraction and microscopy.

  14. All-optical control and metrology of electron pulses.

    PubMed

    Kealhofer, C; Schneider, W; Ehberger, D; Ryabov, A; Krausz, F; Baum, P

    2016-04-22

    Short electron pulses are central to time-resolved atomic-scale diffraction and electron microscopy, streak cameras, and free-electron lasers. We demonstrate phase-space control and characterization of 5-picometer electron pulses using few-cycle terahertz radiation, extending concepts of microwave electron pulse compression and streaking to terahertz frequencies. Optical-field control of electron pulses provides synchronism to laser pulses and offers a temporal resolution that is ultimately limited by the rise-time of the optical fields applied. We used few-cycle waveforms carried at 0.3 terahertz to compress electron pulses by a factor of 12 with a timing stability of <4 femtoseconds (root mean square) and measure them by means of field-induced beam deflection (streaking). Scaling the concept toward multiterahertz control fields holds promise for approaching the electronic time scale in time-resolved electron diffraction and microscopy. PMID:27102476

  15. Spin orbit torque based electronic neuron

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Abhronil Choday, Sri Harsha; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-04-06

    A device based on current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) that functions as an electronic neuron is proposed in this work. The SOT device implements an artificial neuron's thresholding (transfer) function. In the first step of a two-step switching scheme, a charge current places the magnetization of a nano-magnet along the hard-axis, i.e., an unstable point for the magnet. In the second step, the SOT device (neuron) receives a current (from the synapses) which moves the magnetization from the unstable point to one of the two stable states. The polarity of the synaptic current encodes the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the neuron input and determines the final orientation of the magnetization. A resistive crossbar array, functioning as synapses, generates a bipolar current that is a weighted sum of the inputs. The simulation of a two layer feed-forward artificial neural network based on the SOT electronic neuron shows that it consumes ∼3× lower power than a 45 nm digital CMOS implementation, while reaching ∼80% accuracy in the classification of 100 images of handwritten digits from the MNIST dataset.

  16. Spin orbit torque based electronic neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Choday, Sri Harsha; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2015-04-01

    A device based on current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) that functions as an electronic neuron is proposed in this work. The SOT device implements an artificial neuron's thresholding (transfer) function. In the first step of a two-step switching scheme, a charge current places the magnetization of a nano-magnet along the hard-axis, i.e., an unstable point for the magnet. In the second step, the SOT device (neuron) receives a current (from the synapses) which moves the magnetization from the unstable point to one of the two stable states. The polarity of the synaptic current encodes the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the neuron input and determines the final orientation of the magnetization. A resistive crossbar array, functioning as synapses, generates a bipolar current that is a weighted sum of the inputs. The simulation of a two layer feed-forward artificial neural network based on the SOT electronic neuron shows that it consumes ˜3× lower power than a 45 nm digital CMOS implementation, while reaching ˜80% accuracy in the classification of 100 images of handwritten digits from the MNIST dataset.

  17. Narrow high power microwave pulses from a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Zhang, T.B.

    1995-11-01

    The authors have explored high power microwave ({lambda} = 1.5mm) pulse amplification along a tapered undulator FEL using the 1D Compton FEL equations with slippage. For an appropriate taper, sideband instabilities are suppressed and a short ({approximately}50psec) Gaussian pulse will propagate in a nearly self-similar way as it grows in power, slipping through a much longer electron pulse (beam energy, 750kV; current, 100A; radius = 2mm; length = 200 radiation periods). This is in contrast to the example of pulse propagation in a constant parameter undulator, where the Gaussian pulse breaks up into irregularities identified with sidebanding. Variation of initial pulse width shows convergence to a 50psec wide output pulse. Because of the slippage of the radiation pulse through the electron pulse, the peak microwave pulse intensity, {approximately}3GW/cm2, is about three times the kinetic energy density of the electron beam.

  18. Dynamic field-frequency lock for tracking magnetic field fluctuations in electron spin resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Abraham; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen

    Global magnetic field fluctuations present significant challenges to pulsed electron spin resonance experiments on systems with long spin coherence times. We will discuss results from experiments in which we follow instantaneous changes in magnetic field by locking to the free induction decay of a proton NMR signal using a phase-locked loop. We extend conventional field-frequency locking techniques used in NMR to follow slow magnetic field drifts by using a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence in which the phase of the pi-pulses follows the phase of the proton spins at all times. Hence, we retain the ability of the CPMG pulse sequence to refocus local magnetic field inhomogeneities without refocusing global magnetic field fluctuations. In contrast with conventional field-frequency locking techniques, our experiments demonstrate the potential of this method to dynamically track global magnetic field fluctuations on timescales of about 2 seconds and with rates faster than a kHz. This frequency range covers the dominant noise frequencies in our electron spin resonance experiments as previously reported.

  19. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  20. Electron spin relaxation in carbon nanotubes: Dyakonov-Perel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yuriy; Zavada, John; Kim, Ki Wook

    2010-03-01

    The long standing problem of unaccountable short spin relaxation in carbon nanotubes (CNT) meets a disclosure in terms of curvature-mediated spin-orbital interaction that leads to spin fluctuating precession analogous to Dyakonov-Perel mechanism. Strong anisotropy imposed by arbitrary directed magnetic field has been taken into account in terms of extended Bloch equations. Especially, stationary spin current through CNT can be controlled by spin-flip processes with relaxation time as less as 150 ps, the rate of transversal polarization (i.e. decoherence) runs up to 1/(70 ps) at room temperature while spin interference of the electrons related to different valleys can be responsible for shorter spin dephasing. Dependencies of spin-relaxation parameters on magnetic field strength and orientation, CNT curvature and chirality have been analyzed.

  1. Coherent electron-spin-resonance manipulation of three individual spins in a triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noiri, A.; Yoneda, J.; Nakajima, T.; Otsuka, T.; Delbecq, M. R.; Takeda, K.; Amaha, S.; Allison, G.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum dot arrays provide a promising platform for quantum information processing. For universal quantum simulation and computation, one central issue is to demonstrate the exhaustive controllability of quantum states. Here, we report the addressable manipulation of three single electron spins in a triple quantum dot using a technique combining electron-spin-resonance and a micro-magnet. The micro-magnet makes the local Zeeman field difference between neighboring spins much larger than the nuclear field fluctuation, which ensures the addressable driving of electron-spin-resonance by shifting the resonance condition for each spin. We observe distinct coherent Rabi oscillations for three spins in a semiconductor triple quantum dot with up to 25 MHz spin rotation frequencies. This individual manipulation over three spins enables us to arbitrarily change the magnetic spin quantum number of the three spin system, and thus to operate a triple-dot device as a three-qubit system in combination with the existing technique of exchange operations among three spins.

  2. Optical electron spin pumping in n-doped quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Ungier, W; Buczko, R

    2009-01-28

    A theoretical model for optical spin pumping of electrons in a quantum well with low intrinsic electron density is presented. A system of electrons under continuous-wave illumination by circularly polarized light tuned to the electron-trion resonance is considered. The simultaneous off-resonant creation of excitons is also taken into account. The spin flip of trions and their radiative decay as the basic processes which allow the electronic spin pumping, as well as other processes, such as the formation of trions from excitons and electrons, are accounted for in the appropriate kinetic equations. The results obtained for CdTe and GaAs quantum wells indicate that significant electron spin polarization can be achieved in a time range of a few nanoseconds. PMID:21715824

  3. Spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet light pulses from high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Plötzing, M; Adam, R; Weier, C; Plucinski, L; Eich, S; Emmerich, S; Rollinger, M; Aeschlimann, M; Mathias, S; Schneider, C M

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental mechanism responsible for optically induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films has been under intense debate since almost two decades. Currently, numerous competing theoretical models are in strong need for a decisive experimental confirmation such as monitoring the triggered changes in the spin-dependent band structure on ultrashort time scales. Our approach explores the possibility of observing femtosecond band structure dynamics by giving access to extended parts of the Brillouin zone in a simultaneously time-, energy- and spin-resolved photoemission experiment. For this purpose, our setup uses a state-of-the-art, highly efficient spin detector and ultrashort, extreme ultraviolet light pulses created by laser-based high-order harmonic generation. In this paper, we present the setup and first spin-resolved spectra obtained with our experiment within an acquisition time short enough to allow pump-probe studies. Further, we characterize the influence of the excitation with femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses by comparing the results with data acquired using a continuous wave light source with similar photon energy. In addition, changes in the spectra induced by vacuum space-charge effects due to both the extreme ultraviolet probe- and near-infrared pump-pulses are studied by analyzing the resulting spectral distortions. The combination of energy resolution and electron count rate achieved in our setup confirms its suitability for spin-resolved studies of the band structure on ultrashort time scales. PMID:27131684

  4. Spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using femtosecond extreme ultraviolet light pulses from high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plötzing, M.; Adam, R.; Weier, C.; Plucinski, L.; Eich, S.; Emmerich, S.; Rollinger, M.; Aeschlimann, M.; Mathias, S.; Schneider, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The fundamental mechanism responsible for optically induced magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films has been under intense debate since almost two decades. Currently, numerous competing theoretical models are in strong need for a decisive experimental confirmation such as monitoring the triggered changes in the spin-dependent band structure on ultrashort time scales. Our approach explores the possibility of observing femtosecond band structure dynamics by giving access to extended parts of the Brillouin zone in a simultaneously time-, energy- and spin-resolved photoemission experiment. For this purpose, our setup uses a state-of-the-art, highly efficient spin detector and ultrashort, extreme ultraviolet light pulses created by laser-based high-order harmonic generation. In this paper, we present the setup and first spin-resolved spectra obtained with our experiment within an acquisition time short enough to allow pump-probe studies. Further, we characterize the influence of the excitation with femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses by comparing the results with data acquired using a continuous wave light source with similar photon energy. In addition, changes in the spectra induced by vacuum space-charge effects due to both the extreme ultraviolet probe- and near-infrared pump-pulses are studied by analyzing the resulting spectral distortions. The combination of energy resolution and electron count rate achieved in our setup confirms its suitability for spin-resolved studies of the band structure on ultrashort time scales.

  5. Investigation of Very Slowly Tumbling Spin Labels by Nonlinear Spin Response Techniques: Theory and Experiment for Stationary Electron Electron Double Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Smigel, Murray D.; Dalton, Larry R.; Hyde, James S.; Dalton, Lauraine A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation of very slowly tumbling spin labels by nonlinear electron spin response techniques is discussed. Such techniques permit characterization of rotational processes with correlation times from 10-3 to 10-7 sec even though the linear spin response (ESR) technique is insensitive to motion in this region. Nonlinear techniques fall into two categories: (a) Techniques (referred to as passage techniques) in which the distribution of saturation throughout the spin system is determined both by the applied magnetic field modulation of the resonance condition and by the modulation of the resonance frequency induced by the molecular motion. The time dependence of this distribution produces phase and amplitude changes in the observed signals. (b) Techniques that measure the integral of the distribution function of the time required for saturated spin packets to move between pumped and observed portions of the spectrum [stationary and pulsed electron electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques]. Quantitative analysis of passage ESR and stationary ELDOR techniques can be accomplished employing a density matrix treatment that explicitly includes the interaction of the spins with applied radiation and modulation fields. The effect of molecular motion inducing a random modulation of the anisotropic spin interactions can be calculated by describing the motion by the diffusion equation appropriate to the motional model assumed. For infinitesimal steps the eigen-functions of the diffusion operator are known analytically, while for random motion of arbitrary step size they are determined by diagonalizing the transition matrix appropriate for the step model used. The present communication reports investigation of the rotational diffusion of the spin label probes 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinol-1-oxyl and 17β-hydroxy-4′,4′-dimethylspiro-[5α-androstane-3,2′-oxazolidin]-3′-oxyl in sec-butylbenzene. Experimental spectra are compared with computer simulations of

  6. Current-Controlled Spin Precession of Quasistationary Electrons in a Cubic Spin-Orbit Field.

    PubMed

    Altmann, P; Hernandez, F G G; Ferreira, G J; Kohda, M; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Salis, G

    2016-05-13

    Space- and time-resolved measurements of spin drift and diffusion are performed on a GaAs-hosted two-dimensional electron gas. For spins where forward drift is compensated by backward diffusion, we find a precession frequency in the absence of an external magnetic field. The frequency depends linearly on the drift velocity and is explained by the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction, for which drift leads to a spin precession angle twice that of spins that diffuse the same distance. PMID:27232032

  7. Current-Controlled Spin Precession of Quasistationary Electrons in a Cubic Spin-Orbit Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, P.; Hernandez, F. G. G.; Ferreira, G. J.; Kohda, M.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Salis, G.

    2016-05-01

    Space- and time-resolved measurements of spin drift and diffusion are performed on a GaAs-hosted two-dimensional electron gas. For spins where forward drift is compensated by backward diffusion, we find a precession frequency in the absence of an external magnetic field. The frequency depends linearly on the drift velocity and is explained by the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction, for which drift leads to a spin precession angle twice that of spins that diffuse the same distance.

  8. Electron acceleration by a laser pulse in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Startsev, E.A.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of an electron by a circularly polarized laser pulse in a plasma is studied. It appears possible to increase significantly the energy of a preaccelerated electron. Although the pulse tends to generate a plasma wake, to which it loses energy, one can eliminate the wake by choosing the duration of the pulse judiciously. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Suppression of ghost distances in multiple-spin double electron-electron resonance.

    PubMed

    von Hagens, Tona; Polyhach, Yevhen; Sajid, Muhammad; Godt, Adelheid; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2013-04-28

    Distance measurements by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance techniques are increasingly applied to multiple-spin systems. In the double electron-electron resonance experiment, more than two dipolar coupled spins manifest in an increased total modulation depth and in sum and difference dipolar frequency contributions that give rise to additional peaks appearing in the distance distribution, which do not correspond to the real interspin distances of the system and are hence referred to as ghost contributions. These ghost contributions may be so prominent that they might be mistaken for real distance peaks or that real distance peaks shift their position or disappear. We present a simple approximate procedure to suppress ghost distances to a great extent by manipulating the experimentally obtained form factor during data analysis by a simple power scaling with a scaling exponent ζ(N) = 1/(1-N), with N being the number of coupled spins in the system. This approach requires neither further experimental effort nor exact knowledge about labelling and inversion efficiency. This should enable routine application to biological systems. The approach is validated on simulated test cases for up to five spins and applied to synthetic model samples. The suppression of ghost distances with the presented approach works best for symmetric geometries and rigid molecules which, at the same time, are the cases where ghost contributions are most disturbing. The distance distributions obtained by power scaling are consistent with distributions that were obtained with previously obtained alternative approaches and agree, in some cases, strikingly well with the expectations for the true interspin distance distributions. PMID:23487036

  10. Study on nanosecond pulsed electron beam generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, D.; Kholodnaya, G.; Remnev, G.; Kaikanov, M.; Sazonov, R.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the findings of an investigation on volt-ampere characteristics of the diode with explosive emission cathodes of different constructions (blade metal-dielectric (MD-cathode) and solid graphite cathodes) under the change of the anode-cathode gap in wide ranges. The investigations were carried out using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The total current of the electron beam was measured using the Faraday cup (FC). A 0.5-mm foiled glass fiber laminate was used as an emitting edge of the cathode in the experimental study with the explosive emission blade MD-cathode. Based on the obtained results, the conclusion was made that the graphite cathode has the most effective efficiency factor.

  11. Dependence of distance distributions derived from double electron-electron resonance pulsed EPR spectroscopy on pulse-sequence time.

    PubMed

    Baber, James L; Louis, John M; Clore, G Marius

    2015-04-27

    Pulsed double electron-electron resonance (DEER) provides pairwise P(r) distance distributions in doubly spin labeled proteins. We report that in protonated proteins, P(r) is dependent on the length of the second echo period T owing to local environmental effects on the spin-label phase memory relaxation time Tm . For the protein ABD, this effect results in a 1.4 Å increase in the P(r) maximum from T=6 to 20 μs. Protein A has a bimodal P(r) distribution, and the relative height of the shorter distance peak at T=10 μs, the shortest value required to obtain a reliable P(r), is reduced by 40 % relative to that found by extrapolation to T=0. Our results indicate that data at a series of T values are essential for quantitative interpretation of DEER to determine the extent of the T dependence and to extrapolate the results to T=0. Complete deuteration (99 %) of the protein was accompanied by a significant increase in Tm and effectively abolished the P(r) dependence on T. PMID:25757985

  12. Enhancement of electron spin coherence by optical preparation of nuclear spins.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Dimitrije; Burkard, Guido; Giedke, Geza; Imamoglu, Atac

    2006-04-01

    We study a large ensemble of nuclear spins interacting with a single electron spin in a quantum dot under optical excitation and photon detection. At the two-photon resonance between the two electron-spin states, the detection of light scattering from the intermediate exciton state acts as a weak quantum measurement of the effective magnetic (Overhauser) field due to the nuclear spins. In a coherent population trapping state without light scattering, the nuclear state is projected into an eigenstate of the Overhauser field operator, and electron decoherence due to nuclear spins is suppressed: We show that this limit can be approached by adapting the driving frequencies when a photon is detected. We use a Lindblad equation to describe the driven system under photon emission and detection. Numerically, we find an increase of the electron coherence time from 5 to 500 ns after a preparation time of 10 micros. PMID:16712008

  13. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  14. Diagnostic Potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trebeschi, Stefano; Riederer, Isabelle; Preibisch, Christine; Bohn, Karl P.; Förster, Stefan; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Valentinitsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Although the underlying pathology is still not completely understood, several diagnostic methods are available. Frequently, the most accurate methods are also the most invasive. The present work investigates the diagnostic potential of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling (PASL) for AD: a non-invasive, MRI-based technique for the quantification of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In particular, we propose a pilot computer aided diagnostic (CAD) procedure able to discriminate between healthy and diseased subjects, and at the same time, providing visual informative results. This method encompasses the creation of a healthy model, the computation of a voxel-wise likelihood function as comparison between the healthy model and the subject under examination, and the correction of the likelihood function via prior distributions. The discriminant analysis is carried out to maximize the accuracy of the classification. The algorithm has been trained on a dataset of 81 subjects and achieved a sensitivity of 0.750 and a specificity of 0.875. Moreover, in accordance with the current pathological knowledge, the parietal lobe, and limbic system are shown to be the main discriminant factors. PMID:27147946

  15. A new spin on electron liquids: Phenomena in systems with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernevig, B. Andrei

    Conventional microelectronic devices are based on the ability to store and control the flow of electronic charge. Spin-based electronics promises a radical alternative, offering the possibility of logic operations with much lower power consumption than equivalent charge-based logic operations. Our research suggests that spin transport is fundamentally different from the transport of charge. The generalized Ohm's law that governs the flow of spins indicates that the generation of spin current by an electric field can be reversible and non-dissipative. Spin-orbit coupling and spin currents appear in many other seemingly unrelated areas of physics. Spin currents are as fundamental in theoretical physics as charge currents. In strongly correlated systems such as spin-chains, one can write down the Hamiltonian as a spin-current - spin-current interaction. The research presented here shows that the fractionalized excitations of one-dimensional spin chains are gapless and carry spin current. We present the most interesting example of such a chain, the Haldane-Shastry spin chain, which is exactly solvable in terms of real-space wavefunctions. Spin-orbit coupling can be found in high-energy physics, hidden under a different name: non-trivial fibrations. Particles moving in a space which is non-trivially related to an (iso)spin space acquire a gauge connection (the condensed-matter equivalent of a Berry phase) which can be either abelian or non-abelian. In most cases, the consequences of such gauge connection are far-reaching. We present a problem where particles move on an 8-dimensional manifold and posses an isospin space with is a 7-sphere S 7. The non-trivial isospin space gives the Hamiltonian SO (8) landau-level structure, and the system exhibits a higher-dimensional Quantum Hall Effect.

  16. Changing the Electron Count in Spin Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Zachary; McQueen, Tyrel

    Materials which possess the resonating valence bond (RVB) ``spin-liquid'' state have been long sought after by scientists due to their predicted exotic properties. Several materials have been identified as potential spin liquid candidates and laboratory studies have only just begun to provide insight into the properties of these materials and their theoretical description. Recently theoretical calculations predict doping of a spin liquid could lead to a rich and unique phase diagram including complex magnetic states, Dirac metal behavior, and superconductivity. We report the results of structural and physical property characterizations of newly synthesized doped candidate spin liquids. This work was supported by a Cottrell Scholar Award.

  17. Controlling electron injection in laser plasma accelerators using multiple pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Plateau, G. R.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.; Bruhwiler, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Chen, M.; Yu, L.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    Use of counter-propagating pulses to control electron injection in laser-plasma accelerators promises to be an important ingredient in the development of stable devices. We discuss the colliding pulse scheme and associated diagnostics.

  18. Long-lived spin plasmons in a spin-polarized two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Amit; Polini, Marco; Vignale, Giovanni; Flatté, Michael E.

    2014-10-01

    Collective charge-density modes (plasmons) of the clean two-dimensional unpolarized electron gas are stable, for momentum conservation prevents them from decaying into single-particle excitations. Collective spin-density modes (spin plasmons) possess no similar protection and rapidly decay by production of electron-hole pairs. Nevertheless, if the electron gas has a sufficiently high degree of spin polarization (P >1/7, where P is the ratio of the equilibrium spin density and the total electron density, for a parabolic single-particle spectrum) we find that a long-lived spin plasmon—a collective mode in which the densities of up and down spins oscillate with opposite phases—can exist within a "pseudogap" of the single-particle excitation spectrum. The ensuing collectivization of the spin excitation spectrum is quite remarkable and should be directly visible in Raman-scattering experiments. The predicted mode could dramatically improve the efficiency of coupling between spin-wave-generating devices, such as spin-torque oscillators.

  19. Deterministic coherent writing of a long-lived semiconductor spin qubit using one ultrafast optical pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, I.; Cogan, D.; Schmidgall, E. R.; Gantz, L.; Don, Y.; Zieliński, M.; Gershoni, D.

    2015-11-01

    We use one single, few-picosecond-long, variably polarized laser pulse to deterministically write any selected spin state of a quantum dot confined dark exciton whose life and coherence time are six and five orders of magnitude longer than the laser pulse duration, respectively. The pulse is tuned to an absorption resonance of an excited dark exciton state, which acquires nonnegligible oscillator strength due to residual mixing with bright exciton states. We obtain a high-fidelity one-to-one mapping from any point on the Poincaré sphere of the pulse polarization to a corresponding point on the Bloch sphere of the spin of the deterministically photogenerated dark exciton.

  20. Dephasing time of an electron accelerated by a laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Startsev, E.A.

    1997-08-01

    The trajectory and dephasing time of an electron accelerated by a circularly polarized laser pulse are determined analytically. The dephasing time is proportional to {gamma}{sub P}{sup 2}l, where {gamma}{sub P} is the Lorentz factor associated with the pulse speed and l is the pulse length. The residual dependence of the dephasing time on pulse intensity and electron injection energy is studied in detail. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Spin-orbit induced two-electron spin relaxation in double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borhani, Massoud; Hu, Xuedong

    2011-03-01

    We study the spin decay of two electrons confined in a double quantum dots via the spin-orbit interaction and acoustic phonons. We have obtained a generic form for the spin Hamiltonian for two electrons confined in (elliptic) harmonic potentials in doubles dots and in the presence of an arbitrary applied magnetic field. Our focus is on the interdot bias regime where singlet-triplet splitting is small, in contrast to the spin-blockade regime. Our results clarify the spin-orbit mediated two-spin relaxation in lateral/nanowire quantum dots, particularly when the confining potentials are different in each dot. We thank support by NSA/LPS thorugh ARO.

  2. Relativistic electrons spin states and spin light in dense neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantsev, Ilya; Studenikin, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Relativistic electrons can produce electromagnetic radiation in moving background composed of neutrinos, that is the “spin light of electron in neutrino flux” (SLev ) [1, 2]. In this paper we further specify the electron quantum states in moving neutrino background by introdusing the electron spin operator that enables one to define the electron wave function in an exact and close form. This justifies our previous studies of SLev in dense neutrino fluxes and derivations of the electron energy spectrum, the radiation rate and power, and also the emitted photon energy. We argue that the SLev can have important consequences in different astrophysical settings.

  3. Ballistic electron magnetic microscopy on epitaxial spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindl, E.; Vancea, J.; Back, C. H.

    2007-02-01

    The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope has been used as an injector of hot electrons or hot holes into a spin valve epitaxially grown on n-GaAs67P33 . Spin-dependent transport of injected and hole excited electrons has been studied in an external magnetic field at room temperature. Significant variations in the collector current due to the spin-dependent inelastic decay of the hot charge carriers have been measured for parallel and antiparallel configurations of the magnetization of the individual layers. We found magnetocurrent effects on the order of 600% and relative large transmission values compared to other ballistic electron magnetic microscopy studies. In addition, we investigated the excitation of electron-hole pairs with its subsequent electron transport in the spin valve and found a magnetocurrent effect with positive sign.

  4. Maximal charge injection of consecutive electron pulses with uniform temporal pulse separation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. L.; Zhang, P.; Chen, S. H.; Ang, L. K.

    2015-08-15

    A charge sheet model is proposed for the study of the space-charge limited density of consecutive electron pulses injected to in a diode with uniform temporal pulse separation. Based on the model, an analytical formula is derived for expressing the dependency of the charge density limit on the gap spacing, gap voltage, and pulse separation. The theoretical results are verified by numerical solutions up to electron energy of a few MeV, including relativistic effects. The model can be applied to the design of multiple-pulse electron beams for time resolved electron microscopy and free electron lasers.

  5. Spin fluctuations of nonequilibrium electrons and excitons in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Effects that are related to deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium have a special place in modern physics. Among these, nonequilibrium phenomena in quantum systems attract the highest interest. The experimental technique of spin-noise spectroscopy has became quite widespread, which makes it possible to observe spin fluctuations of charge carriers in semiconductors under both equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. This calls for the development of a theory of spin fluctuations of electrons and electron-hole complexes for nonequilibrium conditions. In this paper, we consider a range of physical situations where a deviation from equilibrium becomes pronounced in the spin noise. A general method for the calculation of electron and exciton spin fluctuations in a nonequilibrium state is proposed. A short review of the theoretical and experimental results in this area is given.

  6. Electron spin changes during general anesthesia in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Luca; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.; Horsfield, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the general anesthetics xenon, sulfur hexafluoride, nitrous oxide, and chloroform cause rapid increases of different magnitude and time course in the electron spin content of Drosophila. With the exception of CHCl3, these changes are reversible. Anesthetic-resistant mutant strains of Drosophila exhibit a different pattern of spin responses to anesthetic. In two such mutants, the spin response to CHCl3 is absent. We propose that these spin changes are caused by perturbation of the electronic structure of proteins by general anesthetics. Using density functional theory, we show that general anesthetics perturb and extend the highest occupied molecular orbital of a nine-residue α-helix. The calculated perturbations are qualitatively in accord with the Meyer–Overton relationship and some of its exceptions. We conclude that there may be a connection between spin, electron currents in cells, and the functioning of the nervous system. PMID:25114249

  7. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thai M; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining NV spins with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centres in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this system, we investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centres, indicating potential applications of NV centres in oxygen gas sensing. Our results pave the way towards a levitated spin-optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27432560

  8. Nanoscale magnetic imaging of individual electron spins under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinolds, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The detection of ensembles of spins under ambient conditions has revolutionized the biological, chemical, and physical sciences through magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pushing sensing capabilities to the individual-spin level would enable unprecedented applications such as single molecule structural imaging; however, the weak magnetic fields from single spins are undetectable by conventional methods. Recently, there has been significant theoretical and experimental research into using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond as a new type of magnetometer capable of detecting individual spins. In this talk I present measurements using such an NV-based magnetometer to detect and image the magnetic fields from individual electron spins under ambient conditions. Magnetic imaging is achieved by either spatially mapping a target spin's magnetic field using a scanning magnetometer, or by performing magnetic resonance imaging via scanning magnetic field gradients. These results in imaging individual electron spins makes NV-based magnetometry immediately applicable to diverse systems including imaging spin chains, readout of individual spin-based quantum bits, and determining the precise location of spin labels in biological systems.

  9. Long-lived Spin Relaxation and Spin Coherence of Electrons in Monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    Monolayer MoS2 and related transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct-gap semiconductors in which strong spin-orbit coupling and a lack of structural inversion symmetry give rise to new coupled spin-valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom have been inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) studies of excitons, PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short (3-100 ps) electron-hole recombination. Direct probes of spin/valley dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole)-doped TMDs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are still at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin-valley dynamics of resident electrons in n-type monolayer MoS2 using optical Kerr-rotation spectroscopy, and reveal very long spin lifetimes exceeding 3ns at 5K (orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton lifetimes). In contrast with conventional III-V or II-VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. This suggests a novel mechanism of electron spin dephasing in monolayer TMDs, driven by rapidly-fluctuating internal spin-orbit fields due to fast intervalley scattering. Additionally, a small but very long-lived oscillatory signal is observed, indicating spin coherence of localized states. These studies provide direct insight into the physics underpinning the spin and valley dynamics of electrons in monolayer TMDs. In collaboration with S.A. Crooker & N.A. Sinitsyn (Los Alamos), W. Chen, J. Yuan, J. Zhang & J. Lou (Rice University), K.M. McCreary & B.T. Jonker (Naval Research Lab), and supported by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  10. Resolving the role of femtosecond heated electrons in ultrafast spin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mendil, J.; Nieves, P.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Walowski, J.; Santos, T.; Pisana, S.; Münzenberg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetization manipulation is essential for basic research and applications. A fundamental question is, how fast can the magnetization be reversed in nanoscale magnetic storage media. When subject to an ultrafast laser pulse, the speed of the magnetization dynamics depends on the nature of the energy transfer pathway. The order of the spin system can be effectively influenced through spin-flip processes mediated by hot electrons. It has been predicted that as electrons drive spins into the regime close to almost total demagnetization, characterized by a loss of ferromagnetic correlations near criticality, a second slower demagnetization process takes place after the initial fast drop of magnetization. By studying FePt, we unravel the fundamental role of the electronic structure. As the ferromagnet Fe becomes more noble in the FePt compound, the electronic structure is changed and the density of states around the Fermi level is reduced, thereby driving the spin correlations into the limit of critical fluctuations. We demonstrate the impact of the electrons and the ferromagnetic interactions, which allows a general insight into the mechanisms of spin dynamics when the ferromagnetic state is highly excited, and identifies possible recording speed limits in heat-assisted magnetization reversal. PMID:24496221

  11. Quantum Computing in Silicon with Donor Electron Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Extremely long electron and nuclear spin coherence times have recently been demonstrated in isotopically pure Si-28 making silicon one of the most promising semiconductor materials for spin based quantum information. The two level spin state of single electrons bound to shallow phosphorus donors in silicon in particular provide well defined, reproducible qubits and represent a promising system for a scalable quantum computer in silicon. An important challenge in these systems is the realisation of an architecture, where we can position donors within a crystalline environment with approx. 20-50nm separation, individually address each donor, manipulate the electron spins using ESR techniques and read-out their spin states. We have developed a unique fabrication strategy for a scalable quantum computer in silicon using scanning tunneling microscope hydrogen lithography to precisely position individual P donors in a Si crystal aligned with nanoscale precision to local control gates necessary to initialize, manipulate, and read-out the spin states. During this talk I will focus on demonstrating electronic transport characteristics and single-shot spin read-out of precisely-positioned P donors in Si. Additionally I will report on our recent progress in performing single spin rotations by locally applying oscillating magnetic fields and initial characterization of transport devices with two and three single donors. The challenges of scaling up to practical 2D architectures will also be discussed.

  12. Pulse requirements for electron diffraction imaging of single biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Chapman, H

    2004-10-20

    The pulse requirements for electron diffraction imaging of single biological molecules are calculated. We find that the electron fluence and pulse length requirements imposed by the damage limit and by the need to classify the diffraction patterns according to their angular orientation cannot be achieved with today's electron beam technology. A simple analytical model shows that the pulse requirements cannot be achieved due to beam broadening due to spacecharge effects.

  13. Electron spin manipulation and readout through an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, I V; Doronina-Amitonova, L V; Voronin, A A; Levchenko, A O; Zibrov, S A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Fedotov, A B; Velichansky, V L; Zheltikov, A M

    2014-01-01

    The electron spin of nitrogen--vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offers a solid-state quantum bit and enables high-precision magnetic-field sensing on the nanoscale. Implementation of these approaches in a fiber format would offer unique opportunities for a broad range of technologies ranging from quantum information to neuroscience and bioimaging. Here, we demonstrate an ultracompact fiber-optic probe where a diamond microcrystal with a well-defined orientation of spin quantization NV axes is attached to the fiber tip, allowing the electron spins of NV centers to be manipulated, polarized, and read out through a fiber-optic waveguide integrated with a two-wire microwave transmission line. The microwave field transmitted through this line is used to manipulate the orientation of electron spins in NV centers through the electron-spin resonance tuned by an external magnetic field. The electron spin is then optically initialized and read out, with the initializing laser radiation and the photoluminescence spin-readout return from NV centers delivered by the same optical fiber. PMID:25028257

  14. Electron spin manipulation and readout through an optical fiber

    PubMed Central

    Fedotov, I. V.; Doronina-Amitonova, L. V.; Voronin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Zibrov, S. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Velichansky, V. L.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The electron spin of nitrogen--vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offers a solid-state quantum bit and enables high-precision magnetic-field sensing on the nanoscale. Implementation of these approaches in a fiber format would offer unique opportunities for a broad range of technologies ranging from quantum information to neuroscience and bioimaging. Here, we demonstrate an ultracompact fiber-optic probe where a diamond microcrystal with a well-defined orientation of spin quantization NV axes is attached to the fiber tip, allowing the electron spins of NV centers to be manipulated, polarized, and read out through a fiber-optic waveguide integrated with a two-wire microwave transmission line. The microwave field transmitted through this line is used to manipulate the orientation of electron spins in NV centers through the electron-spin resonance tuned by an external magnetic field. The electron spin is then optically initialized and read out, with the initializing laser radiation and the photoluminescence spin-readout return from NV centers delivered by the same optical fiber. PMID:25028257

  15. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The 'non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2 K, 77 K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2 mum at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent. PMID:17632544

  16. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The `non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2K, 77K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2μm at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent.

  17. Wavelength-selected Neutron Pulses Formed by a Spatial Magnetic Neutron Spin Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gösselsberger, C.; Bacak, M.; Gerstmayr, T.; Gumpenberger, S.; Hawlik, A.; Hinterleitner, B.; Jericha, E.; Nowak, S.; Welzl, A.; Badurek, G.

    We present a novel type of spatial magnetic neutron spin resonator whose time and wavelength resolution can be de- coupled from each other by means of a travelling wave mode of operation. Combined with a pair of highly efficient polarisers such a device could act simultaneously as monochromator and chopper, able to produce short neutron pulses, whose wavelength, spectral width and duration could be varied almost instantaneously by purely electronic means with- out any mechanical modification of the experimental setup. To demonstrate the practical feasibility of this technique we have designed and built a first prototype resonator consisting of ten individually switchable modules which allows to produce neutron pulses in the microsecond regime. It was installed at a polarised 2.6 Å neutron beamline at the 250 kW TRIGA research reactor of the Vienna University of Technology where it could deliver pulses of 55 μs duration, which is about three times less than the passage time of the neutrons through the resonator itself. In order to further improve the achievable wavelength resolution to about 3% a second prototype resonator, consisting of 48 individual modules with optimised field homogeneity and enlarged beam cross-section of 6 × 6 cm2 was developed. We present the results of first measurements which demonstrate the successful operation of this device.

  18. Nanometer-scale probing of spin waves using single electron spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sar, Toeno; Casola, Francesco; Walsworth, Ronald; Yacoby, Amir

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a new approach to exploring magnetic excitations in correlated-electron systems, based on single electronic spins in atom-like defects diamond known as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers. We demonstrate the power of this approach by detecting spin-wave excitations in a ferromagnetic microdisc with nanoscale spatial sensitivity over a broad range of frequencies and magnetic fields. We show how spin-wave resonances can be exploited for on-chip amplification of microwave magnetic fields, allowing strongly increased spin manipulation rates and single-spin magnetometry with enhanced sensitivity. Finally, we show the possibility to detect the magnetic spin noise produced by a thin (~ 30 nm) layer of a patterned ferromagnet. For the interpretation of our results, we develop a general framework describing single-spin stray field detection in terms of a filter function sensitive mostly to spin fluctuations with wavevector ~ 1 / d , where d is the NV-ferromagnet distance. Our results pave the way towards quantitative and non-perturbative detection of spectral properties in nanomagnets, establishing NV center magnetometry as an emergent probe of collective spin dynamics in condensed matter.

  19. Foucault's pendulum, a classical analog for the electron spin state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linck, Rebecca A.

    Spin has long been regarded as a fundamentally quantum phenomena that is incapable of being described classically. To bridge the gap and show that aspects of spin's quantum nature can be described classically, this work uses a classical Lagrangian based on the coupled oscillations of Foucault's pendulum as an analog for the electron spin state in an external magnetic field. With this analog it is possible to demonstrate that Foucault's pendulum not only serves as a basis for explaining geometric phase, but is also a basis for reproducing a broad range of behavior from Zeeman-like frequency splitting to precession of the spin state. By demonstrating that unmeasured electron spin states can be fully described in classical terms, this research opens the door to using the tools of classical physics to examine an inherently quantum phenomenon.

  20. Comparison of pulse sequences for R1-based electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen imaging.

    PubMed

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J

    2015-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) oxygen imaging has proven to be an indispensable tool for assessing oxygen partial pressure in live animals. EPR oxygen images show remarkable oxygen accuracy when combined with high precision and spatial resolution. Developing more effective means for obtaining SLR rates is of great practical, biological and medical importance. In this work we compared different pulse EPR imaging protocols and pulse sequences to establish advantages and areas of applicability for each method. Tests were performed using phantoms containing spin probes with oxygen concentrations relevant to in vivo oxymetry. We have found that for small animal size objects the inversion recovery sequence combined with the filtered backprojection reconstruction method delivers the best accuracy and precision. For large animals, in which large radio frequency energy deposition might be critical, free induction decay and three pulse stimulated echo sequences might find better practical usage. PMID:25828242

  1. Comparison of pulse sequences for R1-based electron paramagnetic resonance oxygen imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-05-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) oxygen imaging has proven to be an indispensable tool for assessing oxygen partial pressure in live animals. EPR oxygen images show remarkable oxygen accuracy when combined with high precision and spatial resolution. Developing more effective means for obtaining SLR rates is of great practical, biological and medical importance. In this work we compared different pulse EPR imaging protocols and pulse sequences to establish advantages and areas of applicability for each method. Tests were performed using phantoms containing spin probes with oxygen concentrations relevant to in vivo oxymetry. We have found that for small animal size objects the inversion recovery sequence combined with the filtered backprojection reconstruction method delivers the best accuracy and precision. For large animals, in which large radio frequency energy deposition might be critical, free induction decay and three pulse stimulated echo sequences might find better practical usage.

  2. Comparison of Pulse Sequences for R1–based Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Oxygen Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) oxygen imaging has proven to be an indispensable tool for assessing oxygen partial pressure in live animals. EPR oxygen images show remarkable oxygen accuracy when combined with high precision and spatial resolution. Developing more effective means for obtaining SLR rates is of great practical, biological and medical importance. In this work we compared different pulse EPR imaging protocols and pulse sequences to establish advantages and areas of applicability for each method. Tests were performed using phantoms containing spin probes with oxygen concentrations relevant to in vivo oxymetry. We have found that for small animal size objects the inversion recovery sequence combined with the filtered backprojection reconstruction method delivers the best accuracy and precision. For large animals, in which large radio frequency energy deposition might be critical, free induction decay and three pulse stimulated echo sequences might find better practical usage. PMID:25828242

  3. Generalized theory of spin fluctuations in itinerant electron magnets: Crucial role of spin anharmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solontsov, A.

    2015-06-01

    The paper critically overviews the recent developments of the theory of spatially dispersive spin fluctuations (SF) in itinerant electron magnetism with particular emphasis on spin-fluctuation coupling or spin anharmonicity. It is argued that the conventional self-consistent renormalized (SCR) theory of spin fluctuations is usually used aside of the range of its applicability actually defined by the constraint of weak spin anharmonicity based on the random phase approximation (RPA) arguments. An essential step in understanding SF in itinerant magnets beyond RPA-like arguments was made recently within the soft-mode theory of SF accounting for strong spin anharmonicity caused by zero-point SF. In the present paper we generalize it to apply for a wider range of temperatures and regimes of SF and show it to lead to qualitatively new results caused by zero-point effects.

  4. Spin flips in cyclotron emission by an electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Russell, K.

    2002-01-01

    The spin dependence of cyclotron emission is treated using the non-relativistic limit of the Dirac equation; the Schrödinger-Pauli theory is inadequate because of the importance of spin-orbit coupling, which is an intrinsically relativistic effect. Only the choice of the magnetic moment as the spin operator is physically acceptable; all other spin operators precess at a rate comparable with or in excess of cyclotron transition rates. The spin-flip (s = 1 → -1) transition rate is smaller than the non-spin-flip of the order B/Bc (Bc = 4.4 × 109 T), and the reverse spin-flip (s = -1 → +1) transition rate is smaller by a further factor of order (B/Bc)2, implying that it is strongly forbidden. It is shown that there is a preference for electrons with spin s = 1 initially in a high Landau level, n ≫ 1, to relax to the ground state, s = -1, n = 0, by stepwise jumps to the lowest Landau level for s = 1 and then making the spin-flip transition to s = -1, rather than making the spin-flip transition from a higher Landau level, and that this preference increases with decreasing B/Bc.

  5. Spin-dependent electron transport in nanoscale samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yaguang

    In this thesis, we describe the research in which we use metallic nanoparticles to explore spin-dependent electron transport at nanometer scale. Nanoscale samples were fabricated by using a state of the art electron beam lithography and shadow evaporation technique. We have investigated spin relaxation and decoherence in metallic grains as a function of bias voltage and magnetic field at low temperatures (down to ˜30mK). At low temperatures, the discrete energy levels within a metallic nanoparticle provides a new means to study the physics of the spin-polarized electron tunneling. We describe measurements of spin-polarized tunneling via discrete energy levels of single Aluminum grain. Spin polarized current saturates quickly as a function of bias voltage, which demonstrates that the ground state and the lowest excited states carry spin polarized current. The ratio of electron-spin relaxation time (T1) to the electron-phonon relaxation rate is in quantitative agreement with the Elliot-Yafet scaling, an evidence that spin-relaxation in Al grains is driven by the spin-orbit interaction. The spin-relaxation time of the low-lying excited states is T1 ≈ 0.7 mus and 0.1 mus in two samples, showing that electron spin in a metallic grain could be a potential candidate for quantum information research. We also present measurements of mesoscopic resistance fluctuations in cobalt nanoparticles at low temperature and study how the fluctuations with bias voltage, bias fingerprints, respond to magnetization-reversal processes. Bias fingerprints rearrange when domains are nucleated or annihilated. The domain wall causes an electron wave function-phase shift of ˜5 pi. The phase shift is not caused by the Aharonov-Bohm effect; we explain how it arises from the mistracking effect, where electron spins lag in orientation with respect to the moments inside the domain wall. The dephasing length at low temperatures is only 30 nm, which is attributed to the large magnetocrystalline

  6. Ponderomotive acceleration of electrons by a self focused laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Sharma, A. K.

    2010-12-15

    Ponderomotive acceleration of electrons by a short laser pulse undergoing relativistic self-focusing in a plasma is investigated. The saturation in nonlinear plasma permittivity causes periodic self-focusing of the laser. The periodicity lengths are different for different axial segments of the pulse. As a result, pulse shape is distorted. An electron initially on the laser axis and at the front of the self-focusing pulse gains energy from the pulse until it is run over by the pulse peak. By the time electron reaches the tail, if pulse begins diverging, the deceleration of the electron is slower and the electron is left with net energy gain. The electrons slightly off the laser axis see a radial ponderomotive force too. Initially, when they are accelerated by the pulse front the acceleration is strong as they are closer to the axis. When they see the tail of the pulse (after being run by the pulse), they are farther from the axis and the retardation ponderomotive force is weaker. Thus, there is net energy gain.

  7. High-resolution spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM).

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Konoto, Makoto; Koike, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We have developed spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) with a 5-nm resolution. The secondary electron optics is very important, as it needs to transfer a sufficient number of secondary electrons to the spin polarimeter, due to the low efficiency of the polarimeter. The optics was designed using a three-dimensional (3D) simulation program of the secondary electron trajectories, and it achieves highly efficient collection and transport of the secondary electrons even though the distance between the sample and the objective lens exit of the electron gun remains short. Moreover, the designed optics enables us to obtain clear SEM images in the spin SEM measurement and to precisely adjust the probe beam shape. These functions lead to images with high spatial resolution and sufficient signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. This optics has been installed in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) spin SEM chamber with a Schottky-type electron gun for the probe electron beam. We observed recorded bits on a perpendicular magnetic recording medium and visualized small irregularities in the bit shapes around the track edges and bit boundaries. The high resolution of 5 nm was demonstrated by observing the smallest domain composed by a single grain in the recording medium. PMID:19840986

  8. Electron spin control of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thai M.; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    Electron spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres are important quantum resources for nanoscale sensing and quantum information. Combining NV spins with levitated optomechanical resonators will provide a hybrid quantum system for novel applications. Here we optically levitate a nanodiamond and demonstrate electron spin control of its built-in NV centres in low vacuum. We observe that the strength of electron spin resonance (ESR) is enhanced when the air pressure is reduced. To better understand this system, we investigate the effects of trap power and measure the absolute internal temperature of levitated nanodiamonds with ESR after calibration of the strain effect. We also observe that oxygen and helium gases have different effects on both the photoluminescence and the ESR contrast of nanodiamond NV centres, indicating potential applications of NV centres in oxygen gas sensing. Our results pave the way towards a levitated spin–optomechanical system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27432560

  9. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Effects of Rapid Spin on the Spectra and Pulse Profiles of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Baubock, Michi; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Morsink, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    A large number of sources that are prime targets for determining neutron star masses and radii spin at 300-700 Hz. At these high spin frequencies, neutron stars become oblate and their spacetime acquires a significant quadrupole moment. In this talk, I will present the rotational broadening and distortion of thermal and line spectra due to these effects. I will also discuss the asymmetry and the energy dependence introduced by the stellar spin to X-ray pulse profiles. I will conclude by describing ways to mitigate and/or exploit these rapid spin effects when measuring neutron star radii.

  11. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  12. Visualization of Distance Distribution from Pulsed Double Electron-Electron Resonance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Michael K.; Maryasov, Alexander G.; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2004-01-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER), also known as pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR), is a time-domain electron paramagnetic resonance method that can measure the weak dipole-dipole interactions between unpaired electrons. DEER has been applied to discrete pairs of free radicals in biological macromolecules and to clusters containing small numbers of free radicals in polymers and irradiated materials. The goal of such work is to determine the distance or distribution of distances between radicals, which is an underdetermined problem. That is, the spectrum of dipolar interactions can be readily calculated for any distribution of free radicals, but there are many, quite different distributions of radicals that could produce the same experimental dipolar spectrum. This paper describes two methods that are useful for approximating the distance distributions for the large subset of cases in which the mutual orientations of the free radicals are uncorrelated and the width of the distribution is more than a few percent of its mean. The first method relies on a coordinate transformation and is parameter free, while the second is based on iterative least-squares with Tikhonov regularization. Both methods are useful in DEER studies of spin labeled biomolecules containing more than two labels.

  13. Electron spin echo envelope modulation of molecular motions of deuterium nuclei.

    PubMed

    Syryamina, V N; Maryasov, A G; Bowman, M K; Dzuba, S A

    2015-12-01

    Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the study of hyperfine interactions between an unpaired electron and nearby nuclei in solids, and is employed in quantitative structural studies. Here, we describe the use of ESEEM to study the slow motion of deuterium nuclei using their nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) line shapes. Two ESEEM techniques were employed: the conventional three-pulse ESEEM experiment, π/2 - τ - π/2 - T- π/2 - τ - echo, and the four-pulse ESEEM, π/2 - τ - π/2 - T/2 - π - T/2 - π/2 - τ - echo, with the time variable T scanned in both cases. The nitroxide free radical 4-tert-butyliminomethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl(d12)-3-imidazoline-1-oxyl with four deuterated methyl groups was investigated in a glassy ortho-terphenyl matrix over a wide temperature range. It was shown that four-pulse ESEEM allowed measurement of the nearly pure (2)H NQR line shape. Between 90K and 120K, the ESEEM spectra change drastically. At low temperatures, four-pulse ESEEM spectra show a Pake-like pattern, which evolves into a single line at higher temperatures, which is typical for NQR of rotating methyl CD3 groups. Comparison with literature data on NQR allows estimation of the reorientation rate, k. At ∼100K, where the spectral changes are most pronounced, k was found to be ∼10(5)s(-1). The spectral linewidths for the three-pulse ESEEM were found to decrease similarly with increasing temperature; so the three-pulse technique is also capable to detect motion of this type. The ESEEM approach, along with site-directed spin labeling, may be useful for detection of motional transitions near the spin labels in biological systems, when information on motion is required in a wide temperature range. PMID:26583529

  14. Electron spin echo envelope modulation of molecular motions of deuterium nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamina, V. N.; Maryasov, A. G.; Bowman, M. K.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the study of hyperfine interactions between an unpaired electron and nearby nuclei in solids, and is employed in quantitative structural studies. Here, we describe the use of ESEEM to study the slow motion of deuterium nuclei using their nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) line shapes. Two ESEEM techniques were employed: the conventional three-pulse ESEEM experiment, π/2 - τ - π/2 - T- π/2 - τ - echo, and the four-pulse ESEEM, π/2 - τ - π/2 - T/2 - π - T/2 - π/2 - τ - echo, with the time variable T scanned in both cases. The nitroxide free radical 4-tert-butyliminomethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl(d12)-3-imidazoline-1-oxyl with four deuterated methyl groups was investigated in a glassy ortho-terphenyl matrix over a wide temperature range. It was shown that four-pulse ESEEM allowed measurement of the nearly pure 2H NQR line shape. Between 90 K and 120 K, the ESEEM spectra change drastically. At low temperatures, four-pulse ESEEM spectra show a Pake-like pattern, which evolves into a single line at higher temperatures, which is typical for NQR of rotating methyl CD3 groups. Comparison with literature data on NQR allows estimation of the reorientation rate, k. At ∼100 K, where the spectral changes are most pronounced, k was found to be ∼105 s-1. The spectral linewidths for the three-pulse ESEEM were found to decrease similarly with increasing temperature; so the three-pulse technique is also capable to detect motion of this type. The ESEEM approach, along with site-directed spin labeling, may be useful for detection of motional transitions near the spin labels in biological systems, when information on motion is required in a wide temperature range.

  15. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Lee, P B; Wurtele, J S; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    1999-05-01

    A proposed laser-plasma-based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997)] using laser-triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses. PMID:11969588

  16. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Lee, P. B.; Wurtele, J. S.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    1999-07-12

    A proposed laser-plasma based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997)] using laser triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counter-propagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses.

  17. Quantum and classical correlations in electron-nuclear spin echo

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    The quantum properties of dynamic correlations in a system of an electron spin surrounded by nuclear spins under the conditions of free induction decay and electron spin echo have been studied. Analytical results for the time evolution of mutual information, classical part of correlations, and quantum part characterized by quantum discord have been obtained within the central-spin model in the high-temperature approximation. The same formulas describe discord in both free induction decay and spin echo although the time and magnetic field dependences are different because of difference in the parameters entering into the formulas. Changes in discord in the presence of the nuclear polarization β{sub I} in addition to the electron polarization β{sub S} have been calculated. It has been shown that the method of reduction of the density matrix to a two-spin electron-nuclear system provides a qualitatively correct description of pair correlations playing the main role at β{sub S} ≈ β{sub I} and small times. At large times, such correlations decay and multispin correlations ensuring nonzero mutual information and zero quantum discord become dominant.

  18. The Boersch effect in a picosecond pulsed electron beam emitted from a semiconductor photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Makoto; Nambo, Yoshito; Aoki, Kota; Sameshima, Kensuke; Jin, Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Asano, Hidefumi; Saitoh, Koh; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2016-07-01

    The space charge effect has been clearly observed in the energy distributions of picosecond pulse beams from a spin-polarized electron microscope, and was found to depend upon the quantity of charge per pulse. The non-linear phenomena associated with this effect have also been replicated in beam simulations that take into account of a three-dimensional space charge. The results show that a charge of 500 aC/pulse provides the highest brightness with a 16-ps pulse duration, a 30-keV beam energy, and an emission spot of 1.8 μm. Furthermore, the degeneracy of the wave packet of the pulsed electron beam has been evaluated to be 1.6 × 10-5 with a charge of 100 aC/pulse, which is higher than that for a continuously emitted electron beam despite the low beam energy of 30 keV. The high degeneracy and high brightness contribute to the realization of high temporal and energy resolutions in low-voltage electron microscopy, which will serve to reduce radiolysis damage and enhance scattering contrast.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic spin waves in degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Maroof, R.; Ahmad, Zulfiaqr; Qamar, A.

    2012-05-15

    Low frequency magnetosonic waves are studied in magnetized degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas with spin effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, and spin magnetization energy, a generalized dispersion relation for oblique magnetosonic waves is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. For three different values of angle {theta}, the generalized dispersion relation is reduced to three different relations under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effect of quantum corrections in the presence of positron concentration significantly modifies the dispersive properties of these modes. The importance of the work relevant to compact astrophysical bodies is pointed out.

  20. Electron spin coherence near room temperature in magnetic quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Fabrizio; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Wilman, James; Fielding, Alistair J.; Fay, Michael W.; Granwehr, Josef; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-01-01

    We report on an example of confined magnetic ions with long spin coherence near room temperature. This was achieved by confining single Mn2+ spins in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and by dispersing the QDs in a proton-spin free matrix. The controlled suppression of Mn–Mn interactions and minimization of Mn–nuclear spin dipolar interactions result in unprecedentedly long phase memory (TM ~ 8 μs) and spin–lattice relaxation (T1 ~ 10 ms) time constants for Mn2+ ions at T = 4.5 K, and in electron spin coherence observable near room temperature (TM ~ 1 μs). PMID:26040432

  1. Manipulation of the nuclear spin ensemble in a quantum dot with chirped magnetic resonance pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsch, Mathieu; Wüst, Gunter; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Xue, Fei; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Poggio, Martino; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear spins in nanostructured semiconductors play a central role in quantum applications. The nuclear spins represent a useful resource for generating local magnetic fields but nuclear spin noise represents a major source of dephasing for spin qubits. Controlling the nuclear spins enhances the resource while suppressing the noise. NMR techniques are challenging: the group III and V isotopes have large spins with widely different gyromagnetic ratios; in strained material there are large atom-dependent quadrupole shifts; and nanoscale NMR is hard to detect. We report NMR on 100,000 nuclear spins of a quantum dot using chirped radiofrequency pulses. Following polarization, we demonstrate a reversal of the nuclear spin. We can flip the nuclear spin back and forth a hundred times. We demonstrate that chirped NMR is a powerful way of determining the chemical composition, the initial nuclear spin temperatures and quadrupole frequency distributions for all the main isotopes. The key observation is a plateau in the NMR signal as a function of sweep rate: we achieve inversion at the first quantum transition for all isotopes simultaneously. These experiments represent a generic technique for manipulating nanoscale inhomogeneous nuclear spin ensembles and open the way to probe the coherence of such mesoscopic systems.

  2. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.

  3. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-10-26

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonancemore » can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. As a result, the method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.« less

  4. Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe

    PubMed Central

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Jelezko, F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10–100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. The method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems. PMID:26497777

  5. Optically-pumped spin-exchange polarized electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirbhai, Munir Hussein

    Polarized electron beams are an indispensable probe of spin-dependent phenomena in fields of atomic and molecular physics, magnetism and biophysics. While their uses have become widespread, the standard source based on negative electron affinity gallium arsenide (GaAs) remains technically complicated. This has hindered progress on many experiments involving spin-polarized electrons, especially those using target gas loads, which tend to adversely affect the performance of GaAs sources. A robust system based on an alternative way to make polarized electron beams has been devised in this study, which builds on previous work done in our lab. It involves spin-exchange collisions between free, unpolarized electrons and oriented rubidium atoms in the presence of a quenching gas. This system has less stringent vacuum requirements than those of GaAs sources, and is capable of operating in background pressures of ~1mTorr. Beams with ~24% polarization and 4μA of current have been recorded, which is comparable to the performance obtained with the earlier version built in our lab. The present system is however not as unstable as in the previous work, and has the potential to be developed into a "turn-key" source of polarized electron beams. It has also allowed us to undertake a study to find factors which affect the beam polarization in this scheme of producing polarized electrons. Such knowledge will help us to design better optically-pumped spin-exchange polarized electron sources.

  6. George E. Pake Prize Lecture: Pulsed Laser Deposition and the Oxide Electronics Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) Process at Bellcore was followed by a stream of advances in the epitaxial growth of oxides and a variety of heterostructures and interfaces. Today Oxide Electronics is a fascinating field with a great deal of new Science and potential for applications. Following a discussion of these events, my talk will focus on the adventure involved in creating a new company, Neocera, and, at the same time, pushing ahead in the evolving field of oxide electronics. There, electron spin, pairing, and alignment to create superconductivity and magnetism have opened up new frontiers for research and materials development.

  7. Resonant spin Hall effect in two dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shun-Qing

    2005-03-01

    Remarkable phenomena have been observed in 2DEG over last two decades, most notably, the discovery of integer and fractional quantum Hall effect. The study of spin transport provides a good opportunity to explore spin physics in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with spin-orbit coupling and other interaction. It is already known that the spin-orbit coupling leads to a zero-field spin splitting, and competes with the Zeeman spin splitting if the system is subjected to a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of 2DEG. The result can be detected as beating of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillation. Very recently the speaker and his collaborators studied transport properties of a two-dimensional electron system with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a perpendicular magnetic field. The spin-orbit coupling competes with the Zeeman splitting to generate additional degeneracies between different Landau levels at certain magnetic fields. It is predicted theoretically that this degeneracy, if occurring at the Fermi level, gives rise to a resonant spin Hall conductance, whose height is divergent as 1/T and whose weight is divergent as -lnT at low temperatures. The charge Hall conductance changes by 2e^2/h instead of e^2/h as the magnetic field changes through the resonant point. The speaker will address the resonance condition, symmetries in the spin-orbit coupling, the singularity of magnetic susceptibility, nonlinear electric field effect, the edge effect and the disorder effect due to impurities. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong under Grant No.: HKU 7088/01P. *S. Q. Shen, M. Ma, X. C. Xie, and F. C. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 256603 (2004) *S. Q. Shen, Y. J. Bao, M. Ma, X. C. Xie, and F. C. Zhang, cond-mat/0410169

  8. Ultrafast spin-transfer torque driven by femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, A J; Kuiper, K C; de Wit, R R J C; Koopmans, B

    2014-01-01

    Spin currents have an important role in many proposed spintronic devices, as they govern the switching process of magnetic bits in random access memories or drive domain wall motion in magnetic shift registers. The generation of these spin currents has to be fast and energy efficient for realization of these envisioned devices. Recently it has been shown that femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation of thin magnetic films creates intense and ultrafast spin currents. Here we utilize this method to change the orientation of the magnetization in a magnetic bilayer by spin-transfer torque on sub-picosecond timescales. By analysing the dynamics of the magnetic bilayer after laser excitation, the rich physics governing ultrafast spin-transfer torque are elucidated opening up new pathways to ultrafast magnetization reversal, but also providing a new method to quantify optically induced spin currents generated on femtosecond timescales. PMID:25007881

  9. Surface spin-electron acoustic waves in magnetically ordered metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.; Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2016-05-01

    Degenerate plasmas with motionless ions show existence of three surface waves: the Langmuir wave, the electromagnetic wave, and the zeroth sound. Applying the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics to half-space plasma, we demonstrate the existence of the surface spin-electron acoustic wave (SSEAW). We study dispersion of the SSEAW. We show that there is hybridization between the surface Langmuir wave and the SSEAW at rather small spin polarization. In the hybridization area, the dispersion branches are located close to each other. In this area, there is a strong interaction between these waves leading to the energy exchange. Consequently, generating the Langmuir waves with the frequencies close to hybridization area we can generate the SSEAWs. Thus, we report a method of creation of the spin-electron acoustic waves.

  10. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, R; Cook, J A; Devasahayam, N; Afeworki, M; Subramanian, S; Tschudin, R; Larsen, J A; Mitchell, J B; Russo, A; Krishna, M C

    1997-09-01

    Imaging of free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using time domain acquisition as in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has not been attempted because of the short spin-spin relaxation times, typically under 1 microsecond, of most biologically relevant paramagnetic species. Recent advances in radiofrequency (RF) electronics have enabled the generation of pulses of the order of 10-50 ns. Such short pulses provide adequate spectral coverage for EPR studies at 300 MHz resonant frequency. Acquisition of free induction decays (FID) of paramagnetic species possessing inhomogenously broadened narrow lines after pulsed excitation is feasible with an appropriate digitizer/averager. This report describes the use of time-domain RF EPR spectrometry and imaging for in vivo applications. FID responses were collected from a water-soluble, narrow line width spin probe within phantom samples in solution and also when infused intravenously in an anesthetized mouse. Using static magnetic field gradients and back-projection methods of image reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the spin-probe distribution were obtained in phantom samples as well as in a mouse. The resolution in the images was better than 0.7 mm and devoid of motional artifacts in the in vivo study. Results from this study suggest a potential use for pulsed RF EPR imaging (EPRI) for three-dimensional spatial and spectral-spatial imaging applications. In particular, pulsed EPRI may find use in vivo studies to minimize motional artifacts from cardiac and lung motion that cause significant problems in frequency-domain spectral acquisition, such as in continuous wave (cw) EPR techniques. PMID:9339442

  11. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  12. Optical Generation of Hot Spin-Polarized Electrons from a Ferromagnetic Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Ellguth, Martin; Tusche, Christian; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2015-12-31

    Linearly polarized light with an energy of 3.1 eV has been used to excite highly spin-polarized electrons in an ultrathin film of face-centered-tetragonal cobalt to majority-spin quantum well states (QWS) derived from an sp band at the border of the Brillouin zone. The spin-selective excitation process has been studied by spin- and momentum-resolved two-photon photoemission. Analyzing the photoemission patterns in two-dimensional momentum planes, we find that the optically driven transition from the valence band to the QWS acts almost exclusively on majority-spin electrons. The mechanism providing the high spin polarization is discussed by the help of a density-functional theory calculation. Additionally, a sizable effect of spin-orbit coupling for the QWS is evidenced. PMID:26765012

  13. Electron-Spin Filters Based on the Rashba Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier; McGill, Thomas C.; Moon, Jeong S.; Chow, David H.; Schulman, Joel N.; Smith, Darryl L.

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor electron-spin filters of a proposed type would be based on the Rashba effect, which is described briefly below. Electron-spin filters more precisely, sources of spin-polarized electron currents have been sought for research on, and development of, the emerging technological discipline of spintronics (spin-based electronics). There have been a number of successful demonstrations of injection of spin-polarized electrons from diluted magnetic semiconductors and from ferromagnetic metals into nonmagnetic semiconductors. In contrast, a device according to the proposal would be made from nonmagnetic semiconductor materials and would function without an applied magnetic field. The Rashba effect, named after one of its discoverers, is an energy splitting, of what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. The present proposal evolved from recent theoretical studies that suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling. Accordingly, a device according to the proposal would be denoted an asymmetric resonant interband tunneling diode [a-RITD]. An a-RITD could be implemented in a variety of forms, the form favored in the proposal being a double-barrier heterostructure containing an asymmetric quantum well. It is envisioned that a-RITDs would be designed and fabricated in the InAs/GaSb/AlSb material system for several reasons: Heterostructures in this material system are strong candidates for pronounced Rashba spin splitting because InAs and GaSb exhibit large spin-orbit interactions and because both InAs and GaSb would be available for the construction of highly asymmetric

  14. Foucault's Pendulum, Analog for an Electron Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linck, Rebecca

    2012-11-01

    The classical Lagrangian that describes the coupled oscillations of Foucault's pendulum presents an interesting analog to an electron's spin state in an external magnetic field. With a simple modification, this classical Lagrangian yields equations of motion that directly map onto the Schrodinger-Pauli Equation. This analog goes well beyond the geometric phase, reproducing a broad range of behavior from Zeeman-like frequency splitting to precession of the spin state. By demonstrating that unmeasured spin states can be fully described in classical terms, this research opens the door to using the tools of classical physics to examine an inherently quantum phenomenon.

  15. Quantum description and properties of electrons emitted from pulsed nanotip electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, Pavel; Batelaan, Herman

    2011-08-15

    We present a quantum calculation of the electron degeneracy for electron sources. We explore quantum interference of electrons in the temporal and spatial domain and demonstrate how it can be utilized to characterize a pulsed electron source. We estimate effects of Coulomb repulsion on two-electron interference and show that currently available pulsed nanotip electron sources operate in the regime where the quantum nature of electrons can be made dominant.

  16. Pulse-shaping assisted multidimensional coherent electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Yuseff; Frei, Franziska; Cannizzo, Andrea Feurer, Thomas

    2015-06-07

    Understanding nuclear and electronic dynamics of molecular systems has advanced considerably by probing their nonlinear responses with a suitable sequence of pulses. Moreover, the ability to control crucial parameters of the excitation pulses, such as duration, sequence, frequency, polarization, slowly varying envelope, or carrier phase, has led to a variety of advanced time-resolved spectroscopic methodologies. Recently, two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with ultrashort pulses has become a more and more popular tool since it allows to obtain information on energy and coherence transfer phenomena, line broadening mechanisms, or the presence of quantum coherences in molecular complexes. Here, we present a high fidelity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy setup designed for molecular systems in solution. It incorporates the versatility of pulse-shaping methods to achieve full control on the amplitude and phase of the individual exciting and probing pulses. Selective and precise amplitude- and phase-modulation is shown and applied to investigate electronic dynamics in several reference molecular systems.

  17. Pulse Splitting in Short Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Labat, M.; Couprie, M. E.; Joly, N.; Bruni, C.

    2009-12-31

    We investigate a fundamental limitation occurring in vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet seeded free electron lasers (FELs). For a given electron beam and undulator configuration, an increase of the FEL output energy at saturation can be obtained via an increase of the seed pulse duration. We put in evidence a complex spatiotemporal deformation of the amplified pulse, leading ultimately to a pulse splitting effect. Numerical studies of the Colson-Bonifacio FEL equations reveal that slippage length and seed laser pulse wings are core ingredients of the dynamics.

  18. Strong mechanical driving of a single electron spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfuss, A.; Teissier, J.; Neu, E.; Nunnenkamp, A.; Maletinsky, P.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum devices for sensing and computing applications require coherent quantum systems, which can be manipulated in fast and robust ways. Such quantum control is typically achieved using external electromagnetic fields, which drive the system’s orbital, charge or spin degrees of freedom. However, most existing approaches require complex and unwieldy gate structures, and with few exceptions are limited to the regime of weak coherent driving. Here, we present a novel approach to coherently drive a single electronic spin using internal strain fields in an integrated quantum device. Specifically, we employ time-varying strain in a diamond cantilever to induce long-lasting, coherent oscillations of an embedded nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre spin. We perform direct spectroscopy of the phonon-dressed states emerging from this drive and observe hallmarks of the sought-after strong-driving regime, where the spin rotation frequency exceeds the spin splitting. Furthermore, we employ our continuous strain driving to significantly enhance the NV’s spin coherence time. Our room-temperature experiments thereby constitute an important step towards strain-driven, integrated quantum devices and open new perspectives to investigate unexplored regimes of strongly driven multilevel systems and exotic spin dynamics in hybrid spin-oscillator devices.

  19. Electron spin resonance of spin-labeled lipid assemblies and proteins.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Rita; Bartucci, Rosa

    2015-08-15

    Spin-label electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a valuable means to study molecular mobility and interactions in biological systems. This paper deals with conventional, continuous wave ESR of nitroxide spin-labels at 9-GHz providing an introduction to the basic principles of the technique and applications to self-assembled lipid aggregates and proteins. Emphasis is given to segmental lipid chain order and rotational dynamics of lipid structures, environmental polarity of membranes and proteins, structure and conformational dynamics of proteins. PMID:26116378

  20. Local spin dynamics with the electron electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Soga, Kota; Senami, Masato; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    The local spin dynamics of the electron is studied from the viewpoint of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron in the framework of the quantum field theory. The improvements of the computational accuracy of the effective electric field (Eeff) for the EDM and the understanding of spin precession are important for the experimental determination of the upper bound of the EDM. Calculations of Eeff in YbF (2Σ1 /2 ), BaF (2Σ1 /2 ), ThO (3Δ1 ), and HF+ (2Π1 /2 ) are performed on the basis of the restricted active space configuration interaction approach by using the four-component relativistic electronic structure calculation. The spin precession is also discussed from the viewpoint of local spin torque dynamics. We show that a contribution to the torque density for the spin is brought into by the EDM. Distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and torque densities induced by external fields in the above molecules are calculated and a property related with large Eeff is discussed.

  1. Hot electron spin transport in C60 fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, Luis Eduardo; Gobbi, Marco; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Golmar, Federico; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Carbon-based molecular materials are interesting for spin transport application mainly due to their small sources of spin relaxation [1]. However, spin coherence lengths reported in many molecular films do not exceed a few tens of nanometers [2]. In this work we will present results showing how hot spin-polarized electrons injected well above the Fermi level in C60 fullerene films travel coherently for hundreds of nanometers. We fabricated hot-electron vertical transistors, in which the current created across an Al/Al2O3 junction is polarized by a metallic Co/Cu/Py spin valve trilayer and subsequently injected in the molecular thin film. This geometry allows us to determine the energy level alignment at each interface between different materials. Moreover, the collector magnetocurrent excess 85%, even for C60 films thicknesses of 300 nm. We believe these results show the importance of hot spin-polarized electron injection and propagation in molecular materials. [1] V. Dediu, L.E. Hueso, I. Bergenti, C. Taliani, Nature Mater. 8, 707 (2009) [2] M. Gobbi, F. Golmar, R. Llopis, F. Casanova, L.E. Hueso, Adv. Mater. 23, 1609 (2011)

  2. Dispersive measurement of electron spin states in Coulomb-confined silicon double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Matthew; Kobayashi, Takashi; Weber, Bent; Hile, Sam; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle

    2015-03-01

    We use radio frequency reflectometry with a resonant circuit to investigate a double quantum dot device patterned by the placement of phosphorus donors in silicon with scanning tunnelling microscope lithography. The circuit responds to electron tunnelling to and from the quantum dots, the complex admittance of which provides information about the tunnel coupling between the dots and the leads. With four electrons on two dots, the Pauli Exclusion Principle makes tunnelling of one electron between the two dots spin dependent, which we exploit to measure the electronic spin state. We map the ground state transition between singlet and triplet states as a function of electric and magnetic fields, which shows that the exchange energy can be tuned over an order of magnitude (about 10 to 100 μeV) or more in this device. We apply high frequency pulses to induce an excited spin state and observe that the dispersive measurement can detect the excited spin state in addition to the ground state.

  3. Pure quantum dephasing of a solid-state electron spin qubit in a large nuclear spin bath coupled by long-range hyperfine-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cywiński, Łukasz; Witzel, Wayne M.; Das Sarma, S.

    2009-06-01

    We investigate decoherence due to pure dephasing of a localized spin qubit interacting with a nuclear spin bath. Although in the limit of a very large magnetic field the only decoherence mechanism is spectral diffusion due to dipolar flip-flops of nuclear spins, with decreasing field the hyperfine-mediated interactions between the nuclear spins become important. We take advantage of their long-range nature and resum the leading terms in an 1/N expansion of the decoherence time-evolution function ( N , being the number of nuclear spins interacting appreciably with the electron spin, is large). For the case of the thermal uncorrelated bath we show that our theory is applicable down to low magnetic fields ( ˜10mT for a large dot with N=106 ) allowing for comparison with recent experiments in GaAs quantum dot spin qubits. Within this approach we calculate the free induction decay and spin echo decoherence in GaAs and InGaAs as a function of the number of the nuclei in the bath (i.e., the quantum dot size) and the magnetic field. Our theory for free induction decay in a narrowed nuclear bath is shown to agree with the exact solution for decoherence due to hyperfine-mediated interaction which can be obtained when all the nuclei-electron coupling constants are identical. For the spin echo evolution we show that the dominant decoherence process at low fields is due to interactions between nuclei having significantly different Zeeman energies (i.e., nuclei of As and two isotopes of Ga in GaAs), and we compare our results with recent measurements of spin echo signal of a single spin confined in a GaAs quantum dot. For the same set of parameters we perform calculations of decoherence under various dynamical decoupling pulse sequences and predict the effect of these sequences in low- B regime in GaAs.

  4. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOEpatents

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  5. Dynamics of a mesoscopic nuclear spin ensemble interacting with an optically driven electron spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, M. J.; Matthiesen, C.; Hansom, J.; Le Gall, C.; Schulte, C. H. H.; Clarke, E.; Atatüre, M.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to discriminate between simultaneously occurring noise sources in the local environment of semiconductor InGaAs quantum dots, such as electric and magnetic field fluctuations, is key to understanding their respective dynamics and their effect on quantum dot coherence properties. We present a discriminatory approach to all-optical sensing based on two-color resonance fluorescence of a quantum dot charged with a single electron. Our measurements show that local magnetic field fluctuations due to nuclear spins in the absence of an external magnetic field are described by two correlation times, both in the microsecond regime. The nuclear spin bath dynamics show a strong dependence on the strength of resonant probing, with correlation times increasing by a factor of 4 as the optical transition is saturated. We interpret the behavior as motional averaging of both the Knight field of the resident electron spin and the hyperfine-mediated nuclear spin-spin interaction due to optically induced electron spin flips.

  6. Active plasmonic devices via electron spin.

    PubMed

    Baron, C A; Elezzabi, A Y

    2009-04-27

    A class of active terahertz devices that operate via particle plasmon oscillations is introduced for ensembles consisting of ferromagnetic and dielectric micro-particles. By utilizing an interplay between spin-orbit interaction manifesting as anisotropic magnetoresistance and the optical distance between ferromagnetic particles, a multifaceted paradigm for device design is demonstrated. Here, the phase accumulation of terahertz radiation across the device is actively modulated via the application of an external magnetic field. An active plasmonic directional router and an active plasmonic cylindrical lens are theoretically explored using both an empirical approach and finite-difference time-domain calculations. These findings are experimentally supported. PMID:19399088

  7. Realizing Ultrafast Electron Pulse Self-Compression by Femtosecond Pulse Shaping Technique.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yingpeng; Pei, Minjie; Qi, Dalong; Yang, Yan; Jia, Tianqing; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-10-01

    Uncorrelated position and velocity distribution of the electron bunch at the photocathode from the residual energy greatly limit the transverse coherent length and the recompression ability. Here we first propose a femtosecond pulse-shaping method to realize the electron pulse self-compression in ultrafast electron diffraction system based on a point-to-point space-charge model. The positively chirped femtosecond laser pulse can correspondingly create the positively chirped electron bunch at the photocathode (such as metal-insulator heterojunction), and such a shaped electron pulse can realize the self-compression in the subsequent propagation process. The greatest advantage for our proposed scheme is that no additional components are introduced into the ultrafast electron diffraction system, which therefore does not affect the electron bunch shape. More importantly, this scheme can break the limitation that the electron pulse via postphotocathode static compression schemes is not shorter than the excitation laser pulse due to the uncorrelated position and velocity distribution of the initial electron bunch. PMID:26722884

  8. Spin and orbital rotation of electrons and photons via spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, C. C.; Raymer, M. G.; van Enk, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    We show that when an electron or photon propagates in a cylindrically symmetric waveguide, its spin angular momentum (SAM) and its orbital angular momentum (OAM) interact. Remarkably, we find that the dynamics resulting from this spin-orbit interaction are quantitatively described by a single expression applying to both electrons and photons. This leads to the prediction of several rotational effects: the spatial or time evolution of either particle’s spin-polarization vector is controlled by its OAM quantum number or, conversely, its spatial wave function is controlled by its SAM. We show that the common origin of these effects in electrons and photons is a universal geometric phase. We demonstrate how these phenomena can be used to reversibly transfer entanglement between the SAM and OAM degrees of freedom of two-particle states.

  9. Spin and Orbital Rotation of Electrons and Photons via Spin-Orbit Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, Cody; Raymer, Michael; van Enk, Steven

    2010-03-01

    We show that when an electron or photon propagates in a cylindrically symmetric waveguide, its spin angular momentum (SAM) and its orbital angular momentum (OAM) interact. Remarkably, we find that the dynamics resulting from this spin- orbit interaction are quantitatively described by a single expression applying to both electrons and photons. This leads to the prediction of several novel rotational effects: the spatial or time evolution of either particle's spin/polarization vector is controlled by its OAM quantum number, or conversely, its spatial wavefunction is controlled by its SAM. We show that the common origin of these effects in electrons and photons is a universal geometric phase. We demonstrate how these phenomena can be used to reversibly transfer entanglement between the SAM and OAM degrees of freedom of two-particle states.

  10. Pulse propagation and electron acceleration in a corrugated plasma channel.

    PubMed

    Palastro, J P; Antonsen, T M; Morshed, S; York, A G; Milchberg, H M

    2008-03-01

    A preformed plasma channel provides a guiding structure for laser pulses unbound by the intensity thresholds of standard waveguides. The recently realized corrugated plasma channel [Layer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 035001 (2007)] allows for the guiding of laser pulses with subluminal spatial harmonics. These spatial harmonics can be phase matched to high energy electrons, making the corrugated plasma channel ideal for the acceleration of electrons. We present a simple analytic model of pulse propagation in a corrugated plasma channel and examine the laser-electron beam interaction. Simulations show accelerating gradients of several hundred MeV/cm for laser powers much lower than required by standard laser wakefield schemes. PMID:18517531