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Sample records for pulse width analysis

  1. A New Signal Processing Technique for Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement Based on Pulse Width Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, T.; Matsuhashi, T.; Terada, K.; Mizumoto, M.; Hirose, K.; Kimura, A.; Furutaka, K.; Hara, K. Y.; Harada, H.; Hori, J.; Igashira, M.; Kamiyama, T.; Kitatani, F.; Kino, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Koizumi, M.; Nakamura, S.; Oshima, M.; Toh, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A fast data acquisition method based on pulse width analysis was developed for γ-ray spectroscopy with an NaI(Tl) detector. The new method was tested in experiments with standard γ-ray sources and pulsed neutron beam from a spallation neutron source. Pulse height spectra were successfully reconstructed from pulse width distribution by use of an energy calibration curve. The 197Au(n, γ)198Au cross section was measured by this method to test the viability. The obtained experimental cross section showed a good agreement with a calculation using the resonance parameters of JENDL-4.0.

  2. Pulse-width analysis for neutron capture cross-section measurement using an NaI(Tl) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Matsuhashi, Taihei; Terada, Kazushi; Arai, Takuro; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Kaoru Y.; Harada, Hideo; Hirose, Kentaro; Hori, Jun-ichi; Igashira, Masayuki; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kimura, Atsushi; Kino, Koichi; Kitatani, Fumito; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Nakamura, Shoji; Oshima, Masumi; Toh, Yosuke

    2014-11-01

    A fast data acquisition method based on pulse-width analysis was developed for measuring neutron capture cross-sections using an NaI(Tl) detector. The new method was tested by detecting γ-rays from standard γ-ray sources and neutron-induced reactions. Non-linear relation between the γ-ray energy and the pulse width of the detector output signal was studied. The neutron beam experiments were performed using a pulsed neutron beam from a spallation neutron source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. Detector-deposited energy spectra were reconstructed from the pulse-width spectra using the parameterized relation between the pulse width and the γ-ray energy. Time response properties of the pulse-width analysis method were compared with the traditional pulse-height analysis method. Detailed analysis of the experimental results demonstrated that the present method was more resistive to intense γ-ray bursts from the spallation neutron source.

  3. Real-time analysis of two-photon excitation by correlated photons: Pulse-width dependence of excitation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Hisaki

    2010-05-15

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of two-photon excitation by correlated photons with energy anticorrelation in terms of how the excitation efficiency depends on incident pulse width. A three-level atomic system having an intermediate state is used to evaluate the efficiency of two-photon excitation. It is shown that for shorter pulses closer to a monocycle pulse the excitation efficiency by correlated photons is enhanced to become 100 times as large as that by uncorrelated photons.

  4. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slicker, James M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a flyback DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  5. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    DOEpatents

    Slicker, James M.

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  6. Circuit multiplies pulse width modulation, exhibits linear transfer function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Furciniti, A.

    1967-01-01

    Modulation multiplier provides a simple means of multiplying the width modulation of a pulse train by a constant factor. It operates directly on a pulse width modulated input signal to generate an output pulse train having a greater degree of width modulation than the input signal.

  7. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  8. Source duration of stress and water-pressure induced seismicity derived from experimental analysis of P wave pulse width in granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.

    2013-12-01

    -pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity was 0.52. The difference in the scaled source durations between water-pressure and stress induced microseismicity suggests that water-pressure induced microseismicity involves a greater rupture velocity or a more equidimensional fault geometry than stress-induced microseismicity. These results suggest that pulse-width analysis of P waveforms can be used to distinguish water-pressure induced events from those induced by regional stress and to characterize the faulting process.

  9. Three-Level 48-Pulse STATCOM with Pulse Width Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhim; Srinivas, Kadagala Venkata

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new control strategy of a three-level 48-pulse static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) is proposed with a constant dc link voltage and pulse width modulation at fundamental frequency switching. The proposed STATCOM is realized using eight units of three-level voltage source converters (VSCs) to form a three-level 48-pulse STATCOM. The conduction angle of each three-level VSC is modulated to control the ac converter output voltage, which controls the reactive power of the STATCOM. A fuzzy logic controller is used to control the STATCOM. The dynamic performance of the STATCOM is studied for the control of the reference reactive power, the reference terminal voltage and under the switching of inductive and capacitive loads.

  10. Modelling and analysis of a high-performance Class D audio amplifier using unipolar pulse-width-modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zekun; Shi, Yue; Ming, Xin; Zhang, Bo; Li, Zhaoji; Chen, Zao

    2012-02-01

    A high-performance class D audio amplifier using unipolar pulse-width-modulation (PWM) with double-sided natural sampling is presented in this article. In order to comprehend and design the system properly, the class D audio amplifier is modelled and analysed. A wide range triangle-wave signal with good linearity and magnitude proportional to supply voltage is embedded in the proposed class D audio amplifier for maximum output power, high power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) and low total harmonic distortion (THD). Design results based on CSMC 0.5-µm 5-V complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process demonstrate that the proposed class D audio amplifier can operate with supply voltage in the range 2.4-5.5 V and supports 2.8 W output power from a 5.5 V supply; the maximum efficiency is above 95%, the PSRR is -82 dB, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 97 dB and the total harmonic distortion plus noise (THD+N) is less than 0.1% between 20 and 20 kHz with output power 0.4 W; the quiescent current without load is 1.8 mA, and the shutdown current is 0.01 µA. The active area of the class-D audio power amplifier is 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm.

  11. Influence of pulse width and detuning on coherent phonon generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Shikano, Yutaka; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the coherent phonon generation mechanism by irradiation of an ultrashort pulse with a simple two-level model. Our derived formulation shows that both impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) and impulsive absorption (IA) simultaneously occur, and phonon wave packets are generated in the electronic ground and excited states by ISRS and IA, respectively. We identify the dominant process from the amplitude of the phonon oscillation. For short pulse widths, ISRS is very small and becomes larger as the pulse width increases. We also show that the initial phase is dependent on the pulse width and the detuning.

  12. Transient analysis and control of bias magnetic state in the transformer of on-line pulse-width-modulation switching full bridge direct current-direct current converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaxin; Guo, Youguang; Zhu, Jianguo; Wei Lin, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis (FEA) based method for analyzing and controlling the bias magnetic state of the transformer of a pulse-width-modulation (PWM) switching full bridge dc-dc converter. A field-circuit indirect coupling method for predicting the transient bias magnetic state is introduced first. To increase flexibility of the proposed method, a novel transformer model which can address not only its basic input-output characteristic, but also the nonlinear magnetizing inductance, is proposed. Both the asymmetric characteristic and the variable laws of the current flowing through the two secondary windings during the period of PWM switching-off state are highlighted. Finally, the peak magnetizing current controlled method based on the on-line magnetizing current computation is introduced. Analysis results show that this method can address the magnetic saturation at winding ends, and hence many previous difficulties, such as the start-up process and asymmetry of power electronics, can be easily controlled.

  13. Surface roughness from MOLA backscatter pulse-widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, W. D.; Muller, J.-P.; Gupta, S.; Grindrod, P. M.

    2013-09-01

    The time-spread of backscatter laser altimeter pulses, known as pulse-widths, are thought to be capable of being used to infer variations in topography within the footprint of the laser pulse. Here, Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) pulse-widths have been compared to surface roughness and slope, as measured from high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs), over different terrains in order to understand how this dataset can be used in the selection of landing and roving sites, and in inferring surface formation and evolution. The results are varied, and suggest that pulsewidths do not respond consistently to variations in terrain. The results show that over Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) candidate landing sites, the pulse-widths can be used as a rough estimate of surface roughness at baselines much larger than the footprint of the pulse. Over much rougher terrain, these pulse-widths respond best to footprint scale slope, which suggests that an additional slope correction for 75 m baselines slopes is required to infer finer scale roughness. However, this is shown not to be the case, as correcting the pulse-widths for 75 m slopes at the MSL candidate sites, and detrending the DTM data, produced poorer results.

  14. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, Alex M.

    1986-01-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20-50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the DC input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  15. Finite coplanar waveguide width effects in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.L.; Kos, A.B.; Silva, T.J.

    2004-07-12

    The effect of finite coplanar waveguide (CPW) width on the measurement of the resonance frequency in thin ferromagnetic films has been characterized for pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry. A shift in resonant frequency is a linear function of the ratio of sample thickness to CPW width. The proportionality constant is experimentally determined to be 0.74{+-}0.1 times the saturation magnetization of the film. The frequency shift may be modeled as arising from an effective magnetic-anisotropy field.

  16. Pulse-Width-Modulating Driver for Brushless dc Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.

    1991-01-01

    High-current pulse-width-modulating driver for brushless dc motor features optical coupling of timing signals from low-current control circuitry to high-current motor-driving circuitry. Provides high electrical isolation of motor-power supply, helping to prevent fast, high-current motor-driving pulses from being coupled through power supplies into control circuitry, where they interfere with low-current control signals.

  17. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  18. Width-modulated square-wave pulses for ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter R; Cowell, David M J; Freear, Steven

    2013-11-01

    A method of output pressure control for ultrasound transducers using switched excitation is described. The method generates width-modulated square-wave pulse sequences that are suitable for driving ultrasound transducers using MOSFETs or similar devices. Sequences are encoded using an optimized level-shifted, carrier-comparison, pulse-width modulation (PWM) strategy derived from existing PWM theory, and modified specifically for ultrasound applications. The modifications are: a reduction in carrier frequency so that the smallest number of pulses are generated and minimal switching is necessary; alteration of a linear carrier form to follow a trigonometric relationship in accordance with the expected fundamental output; and application of frequency modulation to the carrier when generating frequency-modulated, amplitude- tapered signals. The PWM method permits control of output pressure for arbitrary waveform sequences at diagnostic frequencies (approximately 5 MHz) when sampled at 100 MHz, and is applicable to pulse shaping and array apodization. Arbitrary waveform generation capability is demonstrated in simulation using convolution with a transducer's impulse response, and experimentally with hydrophone measurement. Benefits in coded imaging are demonstrated when compared with fixed-width square-wave (pseudo-chirp) excitation in coded imaging, including reduction in image artifacts and peak side-lobe levels for two cases, showing 10 and 8 dB reduction in peak side-lobe level experimentally, compared with 11 and 7 dB reduction in simulation. In all cases, the experimental observations correlate strongly with simulated data. PMID:24158282

  19. PCF based high power narrow line width pulsed fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Yan, P.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, Y.; Gong, M.

    2012-09-01

    Based on semiconductor diode seeded multi-stage cascaded fiber amplifiers, we have obtained 88-W average power of a 1063-nm laser with high repetition rate of up to 1.5 MHz and a constant 2-ns pulse duration. No stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse or optical damage occurred although the maximum pulse peak power has exceeded 112 kW. The output laser exhibits excellent beam quality (M2x = 1.24 and M2y = 1.18), associated with a spectral line width as narrow as 0.065 nm (FWHM). Additionally, we demonstrate high polarization extinction ratio of 18.4 dB and good pulse stabilities superior to 1.6 % (RMS).

  20. Single event effects in pulse width modulation controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Penzin, S.H.; Crain, W.R.; Crawford, K.B.; Hansel, S.J.; Kirshman, J.F.; Koga, R.

    1996-12-01

    SEE testing was performed on pulse width modulation (PWM) controllers which are commonly used in switching mode power supply systems. The devices are designed using both Set-Reset (SR) flip-flops and Toggle (T) flip-flops which are vulnerable to single event upset (SEU) in a radiation environment. Depending on the implementation of the different devices the effect can be significant in spaceflight hardware.

  1. A high-precision pulse-width modulator source.

    SciTech Connect

    Lenkszus, F.; Laird, R.

    1999-09-30

    A novel high-resolution pulse-width modulator (PWM) is being developed for a new digital regulator for the Advanced Photon Source power converters. The circuit features 82-ps setability over an 80-{micro}s range. Our application requires a 50-{micro}s fill-scale range; therefore the 82-ps setability is equivalent to better than 19 bits. The circuit is presently implemented as a VME module and is an integral part of the digital regulator prototype. The design concept and performance results will be presented.

  2. Fractal Reference Signals in Pulse-Width Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris; Lurie, Helen

    2005-01-01

    A report proposes the use of waveforms having fractal shapes reminiscent of sawteeth (in contradistinction to conventional regular sawtooth waveforms) as reference signals for pulse-width modulation in control systems for thrusters of spacecraft flying in formation. Fractal reference signals may also be attractive in some terrestrial control systems - especially those in which pulse-width modulation is used for precise control of electric motors. The report asserts that the use of fractal reference signals would enable the synchronous control of several variables of a spacecraft formation, such that consumption of propellant would be minimized, intervals between thruster firings would be long (as preferred for performing scientific observations), and delays in controlling large-thrust maneuvers for retargeting would be minimized. The report further asserts that whereas different controllers would be needed for different modes of operation if conventional pulsewidth modulation were used, the use of fractal reference signals would enable the same controller to function nearly optimally in all regimes of operation, so that only this one controller would be needed.

  3. A compact high current pulsed electron gun with subnanosecond electron pulse widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetically-collimated, double-pulsed electron gun capable of generating electron pulses with a peak instantaneous current of approximately 70 microamps and a temporal width of 0.35 ns (FWHM) has been developed. Calibration is accomplished by measuring the lifetime of the well known 2(1P)-to-1(1S) transition in helium (58.4nm) at a near-threshold electron-impact energy by use of the delayed-coincidence technique.

  4. Numerical simulation for influence of pulse width on the temperature field of unidirectional carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Boshi; Jin, Guangyong; Wei, Zhi; Wang, Di; Ma, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The unidirectional carbon fiber material is commonly used in the Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP). The COMSOL Multiphysics finite element analysis software was utilized in this paper. And the 3D anisotropy model, which based on heat conduction equation, was established to simulate the temperature field of the carbon fiber irradiated by pulse laser. The research focused on the influences of the laser width on the material temperature field. The thermal analysis results indicated that during the process of irradiation, the temperature field distribution of the carbon fiber was different from the distribution of laser spot on the surface. The incident laser is Gauss laser, but the temperature field distribution presented oval. It resulted from the heat transfer coefficient of carbon fiber was different in the axial and in the radial. The temperature passed along the fiber axial faster than the radial. Under the condition of the laser energy density constant, and during the laser irradiation time, the depth of the carbon fiber temperature field increased with the pulse width increasing, and the area of the carbon fiber temperature field increased with the pulse width increasing, However, the temperature of the laser irradiated center showed a trend of decrease with the increasing of pulse width. The results showed that when the laser affection was constant, the laser energy affected on the carbon fiber per unit time was increased with the decrease of the pulse width. Due to the limits of the heat transfer coefficient of the material and laser irradiation time, the energy was injected in carbon fiber within a short time. With the reducing of the heat conduction area, the depth and the area of the temperature field would be also decreased. With the increase of pulse width, the time of energy injected in carbon fiber was increased, and the laser energy affected on the carbon fiber per unit time was decrease. With the heat conduction area increasing, the depth and

  5. Compact pulse width modulation circuitry for silicon photomultiplier readout.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2013-08-01

    The adoption of solid-state photodetectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse-width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analogue channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTCs), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal-to-noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analogue switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4 × 4 array 0.9 mm × 0.9 mm × 15 mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for twofold multiplexing. In principle, much larger

  6. Compact Pulse Width Modulation Circuitry for Silicon Photomultiplier Readout

    PubMed Central

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of solid state photo-detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analog channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTC), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal to noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analog switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4×4 array 0.9mm×0.9mm×15mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5mm×5mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for 2-fold multiplexing. In principle, much larger multiplexing ratios are

  7. Compact pulse width modulation circuitry for silicon photomultiplier readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, M. F.; Olcott, P. D.; Levin, C. S.

    2013-08-01

    The adoption of solid-state photodetectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse-width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analogue channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTCs), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal-to-noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analogue switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4 × 4 array 0.9 mm × 0.9 mm × 15 mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for twofold multiplexing. In principle, much larger

  8. Spacecraft attitude pulse-width control at initial, service and emergency modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, Sergey

    2012-11-01

    Problems of nonlinear modeling, dynamic analysis and simulation of spatial motion by a spacecraft with a flexible weak damping structure, are considered. Attitude motion of a flexible spacecraft with pulse-width control, spin-up rotors of six single-gimbal control moment gyros (CMGs) at the initial, service and emergency modes, is studied. Results on analysis of the spacecraft nutation and flexible oscillations, are represented.

  9. Effects of finite pulse width on two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhichun; Crepeau, Richard H; Freed, Jack H

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ESR techniques, such as 2D-ELDOR, have considerably improved the resolution of ESR in studies of molecular dynamics in complex fluids such as liquid crystals and membrane vesicles and in spin labeled polymers and peptides. A well-developed theory based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) has been successfully employed to analyze these experiments. However, one fundamental assumption has been utilized to simplify the complex analysis, viz. the pulses have been treated as ideal non-selective ones, which therefore provide uniform irradiation of the whole spectrum. In actual experiments, the pulses are of finite width causing deviations from the theoretical predictions, a problem that is exacerbated by experiments performed at higher frequencies. In the present paper we provide a method to deal with the full SLE including the explicit role of the molecular dynamics, the spin Hamiltonian and the radiation field during the pulse. The computations are rendered more manageable by utilizing the Trotter formula, which is adapted to handle this SLE in what we call a "Split Super-Operator" method. Examples are given for different motional regimes, which show how 2D-ELDOR spectra are affected by the finite pulse widths. The theory shows good agreement with 2D-ELDOR experiments performed as a function of pulse width. PMID:16150620

  10. A transcranial magnetic stimulator inducing near-rectangular pulses with controllable pulse width (cTMS).

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2008-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near-rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 6 kA, enabling PW control from 5 micros to over 100 micros. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 2%-34% less energy and generate 67%-72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 micros, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications. PMID:18232369

  11. A Novel Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator Inducing Near Rectangular Pulses with Controllable Pulse Width (cTMS)

    PubMed Central

    Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 7 kA, enabling PW control from 5 μs to over 100 μs. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 22–34% less energy and generate 67–72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 μs, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications. PMID:18232369

  12. Programming microbes using pulse width modulation of optical signals.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Eric A; Basu, Amar S; Bayer, Travis S

    2013-11-15

    Cells transmit and receive information via signalling pathways. A number of studies have revealed that information is encoded in the temporal dynamics of these pathways and has highlighted how pathway architecture can influence the propagation of signals in time and space. The functional properties of pathway architecture can also be exploited by synthetic biologists to enable precise control of cellular physiology. Here, we characterised the response of a bacterial light-responsive, two-component system to oscillating signals of varying frequencies. We found that the system acted as a low-pass filter, able to respond to low-frequency oscillations and unable to respond to high-frequency oscillations. We then demonstrate that the low-pass filtering behavior can be exploited to enable precise control of gene expression using a strategy termed pulse width modulation (PWM). PWM is a common strategy used in electronics for information encoding that converts a series of digital input signals to an analog response. We further show how the PWM strategy extends the utility of bacterial optogenetic control, allowing the fine-tuning of expression levels, programming of temporal dynamics, and control of microbial physiology via manipulation of a metabolic enzyme. PMID:23928560

  13. Single event transient pulse width measurement of 65-nm bulk CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suge, Yue; Xiaolin, Zhang; Xinyuan, Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Heavy ion results of a 65-nm CMOS SET pulse width testchip are given. The influences of device threshold voltage, temperature and well separation on pulse width are discussed. Experimental data implied that the low device threshold, high temperature and well speraration would contribute to wider SET. The multi-peak phenomenon in the distribution of SET pulse width was first observed and its dependence on various factors is also discussed.

  14. Minimum-loss vector PWM strategy for three-phase inverters. [Pulse Width Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Trzynadlowski, A.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Legowski, S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    A novel vector Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) method for three-phase voltage-controlled inverters is described. The so-called Minimum-Loss Vector PWM (MLVPWM) strategy is characterized by the minimum amount of switching losses incurred in the inverter switches. Comparative analysis proving superiority of the MLVPWM technique over the existing regular-sampling PWM methods, and results of experimental investigation of a prototype modulator are presented.

  15. Experimental study on the single event effects in pulse width modulators by laser testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhao; Xiaoqiang, Guo; Wei, Chen; Hongxia, Guo; Dongsheng, Lin; Hanning, Wang; Yinhong, Luo; Lili, Ding; Yuanming, Wang

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents single event effect (SEE) characteristics of UC1845AJ pulse width modulators (PWMs) by laser testing. In combination with analysis to map PWM circuitry in the microchip dies, the typical SEE response waveforms for laser pulses located in different circuit blocks of UC1845AJ are obtained and the SEE mechanisms are analyzed. The laser SEE test results show that there are some differences in the SEE mechanisms of different circuit blocks, and phase shifts or changes in the duty cycles of few output pulses are the main SEE behaviors for UC1845AJ. In addition, a new SEE behavior which manifests as changes in the duty cycles of many output pulses is revealed. This means that an SEE hardened design should be considered.

  16. A high voltage nanosecond pulser with independently adjustable output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Carscadden, John; Slobodov, Ilia

    2014-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT) is developing a high voltage nanosecond pulser capable of generating microwaves and non-equilibrium plasmas for plasma medicine, material science, enhanced combustion, drag reduction, and other research applications. The EHT nanosecond pulser technology is capable of producing high voltage (up to 60 kV) pulses (width 20-500 ns) with fast rise times (<10 ns) at high pulse repetition frequency (adjustable up to 100 kHz) for CW operation. The pulser does not require the use of saturable core magnetics, which allows for the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency to be fully adjustable, enabling researchers to explore non-equilibrium plasmas over a wide range of parameters. A magnetic compression stage can be added to improve the rise time and drive lower impedance loads without sacrificing high pulse repetition frequency operation. Work supported in part by the US Navy under Contract Number N00014-14-P-1055 and the US Air Force under Contract Number FA9550-14-C-0006.

  17. Tunable pulse width and multi-megawatt peak-power pulses from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryutarou; Maeda, Kazuo; Watanabe, Goro; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jun; Sumida, Shin

    2016-03-01

    We report on tunable pulse width and high peak power pulse generation from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system. The master seed source employs a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator (MZIM). This seed source has operational flexibility with respect to pulse width, 90 ps to 2 ns and repetition rate, 200 kHz to 2 MHz. The seed pulses are amplified by a monolithic three-stage amplifier system based on polarization maintain Yb-doped fibers. The maximum output power was 32 W at the shortest pulse condition, the pulse width of 90 ps and the repetition rate of 750 kHz. A spectral width after amplification was broadened to 0.73 nm at RMS width. Both of ASE and SRS are not observed in the spectrum. After amplification, we also demonstrated pulse compression with a small piece of chirped volume Bragg-grating (CVBG) which has the dispersion rate of 81 ps/nm. As a result of pulse compression, the shortest pulse width was reduced from 90 ps to 3.5 ps, which brought an increase of the peak power up to 3.2 MW. The compressed pulses are clean with little structure in their wings. We can expand the operation range of the monolithic fiber MOPA system in pulse width, 3.5 ps to 2 ns.

  18. The effects of pulse rate, power, width and coding on signal detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects on the signal detectability of varying the pulse repetition rate (PRF), peak pulse power (p(pk)) and pulse width (tau(p)) (tp) are examined. Both coded and uncoded pulses are considered. The following quantities are assumed to be constant; (1) antenna area, (z)echo reflectivity, (3) Doppler shift, (4) spectral width, (5) spectral resolution, (6) effective sampling rate, and (7) total incoherent spectral averagaing time. The detectability is computed for two types of targets.

  19. Influence of voltage pulse width on the discharge characteristics in an atmospheric dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    We present here the analysis of the discharge characteristics of a He dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma jet operated in the voltage duty ratio of 20 to 80% under the condition of driving voltage frequency 5 kHz. Discharge strength is sensitive to the voltage pulse width, and the pulse width of 70 µs, which corresponds to the duty ratio of 35%, leads to high O optical emission intensity. We also performed time-resolved optical emission measurements in a transient pulse discharge driven by various voltage duty ratios. Two distinct pulse discharges are observed in the rising and falling periods of the positive rectangular voltage, and the first and second discharges have a peak intensity of optical emission at different duty ratio. The observations indicate that an adequate voltage pulse width could ignite a strong discharge both in the rising and falling period of applied voltage, which could produce a large amount of reactive excited O atoms.

  20. Pulse Width Modulation Applied to Olfactory Stimulation for Intensity Tuning.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Patrice; Billot, Pierre-Édouard; Millot, Jean-Louis; Gharbi, Tijani

    2015-01-01

    For most olfactometers described in the literature, adjusting olfactory stimulation intensity involves modifying the dilution of the odorant in a neutral solution (water, mineral, oil, etc.), the dilution of the odorant air in neutral airflow, or the surface of the odorant in contact with airflow. But, for most of these above-mentioned devices, manual intervention is necessary for adjusting concentration. We present in this article a method of controlling odorant concentration via a computer which can be implemented on even the most dynamic olfactometers. We used Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), a technique commonly used in electronic or electrical engineering, and we have applied it to odor delivery. PWM, when applied to odor delivery, comprises an alternative presentation of odorant air and clean air at a high frequency. The cycle period (odor presentation and rest) is 200 ms. In order to modify odorant concentration, the ratio between the odorant period and clean air presentation during a cycle is modified. This ratio is named duty cycle. Gas chromatography measurements show that this method offers a range of mixing factors from 33% to 100% (continuous presentation of odor). Proof of principle is provided via a psychophysical experiment. Three odors (isoamyl acetate, butanol and pyridine) were presented to twenty subjects. Each odor was delivered three times with five values of duty cycles. After each stimulation, the subjects were asked to estimate the intensity of the stimulus on a 10 point scale, ranging from 0 (undetectable) to 9 (very strong). Results show a main effect of the duty cycles on the intensity ratings for all tested odors. PMID:26710120

  1. Pulse Width Modulation Applied to Olfactory Stimulation for Intensity Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Millot, Jean-Louis; Gharbi, Tijani

    2015-01-01

    For most olfactometers described in the literature, adjusting olfactory stimulation intensity involves modifying the dilution of the odorant in a neutral solution (water, mineral, oil, etc.), the dilution of the odorant air in neutral airflow, or the surface of the odorant in contact with airflow. But, for most of these above-mentioned devices, manual intervention is necessary for adjusting concentration. We present in this article a method of controlling odorant concentration via a computer which can be implemented on even the most dynamic olfactometers. We used Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), a technique commonly used in electronic or electrical engineering, and we have applied it to odor delivery. PWM, when applied to odor delivery, comprises an alternative presentation of odorant air and clean air at a high frequency. The cycle period (odor presentation and rest) is 200 ms. In order to modify odorant concentration, the ratio between the odorant period and clean air presentation during a cycle is modified. This ratio is named duty cycle. Gas chromatography measurements show that this method offers a range of mixing factors from 33% to 100% (continuous presentation of odor). Proof of principle is provided via a psychophysical experiment. Three odors (isoamyl acetate, butanol and pyridine) were presented to twenty subjects. Each odor was delivered three times with five values of duty cycles. After each stimulation, the subjects were asked to estimate the intensity of the stimulus on a 10 point scale, ranging from 0 (undetectable) to 9 (very strong). Results show a main effect of the duty cycles on the intensity ratings for all tested odors. PMID:26710120

  2. Generation of an ultra-short electrical pulse with width shorter than the excitation laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Shaoqiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a rare phenomenon that the width of an electrical response is shorter than that of the excitation laser. In this work, generation of an ultrashort electrical pulse is by a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) and the generated electrical pulse width is shorter than that of the excitation laser from diode laser. When the pulse width and energy of the excitation laser are fixed at 25.7 ns and 1.6 μJ respectively, the width of the generated electrical pulse width by 3-mm-gap GaAs PCSS at the bias voltage of 9 kV is only 7.3 ns. The model of photon-activated charge domain (PACD) is used to explain the peculiar phenomenon in our experiment. The ultrashort electrical pulse width is mainly relevant to the time interval of PACD from occurrence to disappearance in the mode. The shorter the time interval is, the narrower the electrical pulse width will become. In more general terms, our result suggests that in nonlinear regime a response signal can have a much short width than the excitation pulses. The result clearly indicates that generating ultrashort electrical pulses can be achieved without the need of ultrashort lasers.

  3. Generation of an ultra-short electrical pulse with width shorter than the excitation laser

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Shaoqiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a rare phenomenon that the width of an electrical response is shorter than that of the excitation laser. In this work, generation of an ultrashort electrical pulse is by a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) and the generated electrical pulse width is shorter than that of the excitation laser from diode laser. When the pulse width and energy of the excitation laser are fixed at 25.7 ns and 1.6 μJ respectively, the width of the generated electrical pulse width by 3-mm-gap GaAs PCSS at the bias voltage of 9 kV is only 7.3 ns. The model of photon-activated charge domain (PACD) is used to explain the peculiar phenomenon in our experiment. The ultrashort electrical pulse width is mainly relevant to the time interval of PACD from occurrence to disappearance in the mode. The shorter the time interval is, the narrower the electrical pulse width will become. In more general terms, our result suggests that in nonlinear regime a response signal can have a much short width than the excitation pulses. The result clearly indicates that generating ultrashort electrical pulses can be achieved without the need of ultrashort lasers. PMID:27273512

  4. Generation of an ultra-short electrical pulse with width shorter than the excitation laser.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Shaoqiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a rare phenomenon that the width of an electrical response is shorter than that of the excitation laser. In this work, generation of an ultrashort electrical pulse is by a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) and the generated electrical pulse width is shorter than that of the excitation laser from diode laser. When the pulse width and energy of the excitation laser are fixed at 25.7 ns and 1.6 μJ respectively, the width of the generated electrical pulse width by 3-mm-gap GaAs PCSS at the bias voltage of 9 kV is only 7.3 ns. The model of photon-activated charge domain (PACD) is used to explain the peculiar phenomenon in our experiment. The ultrashort electrical pulse width is mainly relevant to the time interval of PACD from occurrence to disappearance in the mode. The shorter the time interval is, the narrower the electrical pulse width will become. In more general terms, our result suggests that in nonlinear regime a response signal can have a much short width than the excitation pulses. The result clearly indicates that generating ultrashort electrical pulses can be achieved without the need of ultrashort lasers. PMID:27273512

  5. The Pulse Width Modulator ASIC for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Gregory A.; Wester, Gene W.; Lam, Barbara; Bennett, Johnny; Franco, Lauro; Woo, Erika

    2004-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has started the development of a Pulse Width Modulator Application Specific Integrated Circuit (PWMA). This development is leveraging the previous development of the Switch Control ASIC (SCA). The purpose of the development is to provide the control for a selected range of power converter topologies and to meet the stringent environmental requirements of deep space missions. The PWMA will include several power control functions that are not normally included on the off-the-shelf components available today. One key functional requirement is the ability to implement an N + K redundant power converter with the ability to control the charging of a battery. Other applications will be the typical point of load isolated and non-isolated power converters. The purpose the development is not only to provide a much needed flight part, but also to accelerate the engineering process by using a standard cell library from previous ASIC developments. Under previous developments with Boeing and Lockheed Martin, JPL has produced three ASICs. Each ASIC has been implemented by using an analog standard cell library. One such development was the SCA, which is design to provide a floating power switch control. The functional verification of this ASIC has been completed and the cells used have been targeted for the new development of the PWMA. The primary function of the PWMA is to provide the control function of a point of load power converter. The design is an isolated 60 W converter with a 33 V output. In architecting the design, several functions were left up to the power converter design in order to make the ASIC more generic. The ASIC can be used for several power converter topologies and power levels. Some additional features have been added to the ASIC to provide the interfaces for multi-phase topologies and battery control functions. An N+K fault tolerant strategy has been implemented in order to provide the battery control functions. The PWMA has

  6. Influence of pulse width on ultraviolet laser ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Braren, Bodil

    1988-10-01

    The etching of poly(methyl methacrylate) using pulses of 248 nm laser radiation which had a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 40-100 ns is reported. These pulses were created by combining two identical pulses, each of 40 ns FWHM, with a set time delay. The etch depth/pulse is sensitive to the pulse width and, therefore, the power density in this polymer. It can be explained by the changes in absorptivity during a pulse that have been reported by G. M. Davis and M. C. Gower [J. Appl. Phys. 61, 2090 (1987)]. The shape of the pulse was also found to influence the etch depth/pulse. The etching of polyimide by these extended pulses shows trends that are opposite to those observed in poly(methyl methacrylate). In this instance, the shielding of the latter portion of the incoming pulse by the products that are ablated by the front portion is probably a serious effect.

  7. Numerical simulation of different pulse width of long pulsed laser on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxin; Jin, Guangyong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Guibo; Bi, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Established a physical model to simulate the melt ejection induced by long pulsed laser on aluminum alloy and use the finite element method to simulate the whole process. This simulation is based on the interaction between single pulsed laser with different pulse width and different peak energy and aluminum alloy material. By comparing the theoretical simulation data and the actual test data, we discover that: the theoretical simulation curve is well consistent with the actual experimental curve, this two-dimensional model is with high reliability; when the temperature at the center of aluminum alloy surface increases and evaporation happens after the surface temperature at the center of aluminum alloy surface reaches boiling point and later the aluminum alloy material sustains in the status of equilibrium vaporization; the keyhole appears on the surface of the target, an increment of the keyhole, the maximum temperature at the center of aluminum alloy surface gradually moves inwardly. This research may provide the theoretical references to the understanding of the interaction between millisecond pulsed laser and many kinds of materials, as well as be beneficial to the application of the laser materials processing and military field.

  8. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film.

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-20

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation.

  9. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  10. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1997-11-18

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications. 5 figs.

  11. Pulse-width modulated external resistance increases the microbial fuel cell power output.

    PubMed

    Coronado, J; Perrier, M; Tartakovsky, B

    2013-11-01

    This study describes MFC operation with a pulse-width modulated connection of the external resistor (R-PWM mode) at low and high frequencies. Analysis of the output voltage profiles acquired during R-PWM tests showed the presence of slow and fast dynamic components, which can be described by a simple equivalent circuit model suitable for process control applications. At operating frequencies above 100 Hz a noticeable improvement in MFC performance was observed with the power output increase of 22-43% as compared to MFC operation with a constant external resistance. PMID:23989037

  12. Pulse-width-dependent surface ablation of copper and silver by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayarny, Dmitry A.; Ionin, Andrey A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Kuchmizhak, Alexander A.; Vitrik, Oleg B.; Kulchin, Yury N.

    2016-07-01

    The single-shot spallation thresholds for copper and silver surfaces demonstrate a considerable IR-laser (1030 nm) pulse-width dependent increase over a range of 0.2–12 ps for the former material and a very weak increase for the latter one, while the corresponding thresholds for visible (515 nm) laser pulses remain almost constant. The IR-laser increase of the ablation thresholds is related to two-photon interband (d–s) absorption in copper, contrasting with the linear absorption of visible laser pulses in this material. In silver, common weakly sublinear dependences on the laser pulsewidth were observed, ruling out possible multi-photon—either three(four)-photon in IR, or two-photon in the visible range—interband transitions in this material. Moreover, electron-lattice thermalization times of 1–2 ps were evaluated for these materials in the spallative ablation regime, contrasting strongly with the previously theoretically predicted multi-picosecond thermalization times.

  13. Sub-nanosecond ranging possibilities of optical radar at various signal levels and transmitted pulse widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poultney, S. K.

    1971-01-01

    The behavior of the photomultiplier is considered, as well as the method of derivation of the photomultiplier output pulse and its relation to the reflected light pulse width and amplitude, and the calibration of range precision and accuracy. Pulsed laser radars with light pulse widths of 30, 3, and 0.1 nanosec a considered, with the 0.1 nanosec system capable of highest precision in several modes of operation, including a high repetition rate, single photoelectron reception mode. An alternate calibration scheme using a fast, triggerable light pulser is described in detail.

  14. High-power soliton fiber laser based on pulse width control with chirped fiber Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Fermann, M.E.; Sugden, K.; Bennion, I.

    1995-01-15

    Chirped fiber Bragg gratings control the pulse width and energy in Kerr mode-locked erbium fiber soliton lasers. We create high-energy pulses by providing large amounts of excessive negative dispersion, which increases the pulse width while keeping the nonlinearity of the cavity constant. With a chirped fiber grating of 3.4-ps{sup 2} dispersion, 3-ps pulses with an energy content higher than 1 nJ are generated at a repetition rate of 27 MHz. By controlling the polarization state in the cavity, we obtain a tuning range from 1.550 to 1.562 {mu}m.

  15. Temperature control system with a pulse width modulated bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A temperature control system, which includes a modified wheatstone bridge with a resistive-capacitive (RC) circuit in one leg of the bridge, is disclosed. The RC circuit includes a resistor which provides an effective resistance as a function of its absolute resistance and the on-time to off-time ratio of pulses supplied to a switch connected across it. A sawtooth voltage is produced across the RC circuit. The voltage is compared with the voltage across a temperature sensor with heat being applied during each pulse period portion when the sawtooth voltage exceeds the voltage across the temperature sensor.

  16. Dramatic reduction of read disturb through pulse width control in spin torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Wang, Xiaobin; Gan, Huadong; Jung, Dongha; Satoh, Kimihiro; Lin, Tsann; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho

    2013-09-01

    Magnetizations dynamic effect in low current read disturb region is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Dramatic read error rate reduction through read pulse width control is theoretically predicted and experimentally observed. The strong dependence of read error rate upon pulse width contrasts conventional energy barrier approach and can only be obtained considering detailed magnetization dynamics at long time thermal magnetization reversal region. Our study provides a design possibility for ultra-fast low current spin torque random access memory.

  17. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  18. Pulse self-compression to single-cycle pulse widths a few decades above the self-focusing threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    We identify a physical scenario whereby optical-field waveforms with peak powers several decades above the critical power of self-focusing can self-compress to subcycle pulse widths. With beam breakup, intense hot spots, and optical damage of the material avoided within the pulse compression length by keeping this length shorter than the modulation-instability buildup length, the beam is shown to preserve its continuity at the point of subcycle pulse generation.

  19. Red and blue pulse timing control for pulse width modulation light dimming of light emitting diodes for plant cultivation.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Aoi; Taniguchi, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    A pulse width modulation (PWM) light dimming system containing red and blue light emitting diodes was designed and constructed. Cultivation of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana under various light dimming wave patterns was compared. Control of the pulse timing (phase of wave pattern) between red and blue light in PWM light dimming was examined. Different plant growth was obtained by changing the phase of red and blue pulses. Pulse timing control of PWM light dimming for plant cultivation has the potential to act as a method for probing photosynthesis. PMID:21622005

  20. Capacitor discharge pulse analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Tanner, Danelle Mary

    2013-08-01

    Capacitors used in firing sets and other high discharge current applications are discharge tested to verify performance of the capacitor against the application requirements. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, rise time, pulse width, peak current and current reversal must be verified to ensure that the capacitor will meet the application needs. This report summarizes an analysis performed on the discharge current data to extract these parameters by fitting a second-order system model to the discharge data and using this fit to determine the resulting performance metrics. Details of the theory and implementation are presented. Using the best-fit second-order system model to extract these metrics results in less sensitivity to noise in the measured data and allows for direct extraction of the total series resistance, inductance, and capacitance.

  1. Development of a width-modulated pulse rebalance electronics loop for strapdown gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blalock, T. V.; Kennedy, E. J.; Mcknight, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A new width modulated pulse rebalance electronics loop was developed for use with strapdown gyroscopes. Advantages of the width modulated binary over the ternary loop are the following: (1) The H-switch is easier to implement; (2) torque is applied in finely quantized increments; (3) the analog-to-digital conversion for data generation is inside the loop and is directly determined by the torque pulse; (4) on part of the loop compensation network bypasses the gyroscope; and (5) the torquer is fed constant power.

  2. Characterization of a DBD-Based Plasma Jet Using a Variable Pulse Width Nanosecond Pulser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Picard, Julian; Prager, James; Miller, Kenneth; Carscadden, John

    2015-11-01

    Most high voltage pulsers used to drive dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), produce a single pulse shape (width and voltage), thus making it challenging to assess the effect of pulse shape on the production of different chemical species during a discharge. Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) has developed a high voltage nanosecond pulser that enables independent control of the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency. This pulser has been specifically designed to drive dielectric barrier discharges (DBD). EHT has used this pulser to conduct a parametric investigation of a DBD-based jet utilizing spectroscopic diagnostics. A better understanding of this parameter dependency can allow for more targeted and effective application of plasma in medical, environmental, industrial, and other applications. Results comparing DBD voltage and current waveforms with plasma spectrographic measurements will be presented.

  3. A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Andrzej; Szypłowska, Agnieszka; Kafarski, Marcin; Skierucha, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of electrical conductivity and relaxation time using numerical simulations of a five-rod probe placed in a material with complex dielectric permittivity described by the Debye model with an added electrical conductivity term. The characterization of amplitudes of two pulses of selected widths was done with regard to the dielectric parameters of simulated materials. The required probe parameters were obtained solely from numerical simulations. Verification was performed for the probe placed in aqueous KCl solutions with 14 different electrical conductivity values. The determined relaxation time remained roughly constant and independent of electrical conductivity. The obtained electrical conductivity agreed with the reference values. Our results indicate that the relaxation time, dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the tested solutions can be simultaneously determined using a simple analysis of the amplitude and reflection time of two needle pulses of different widths. PMID:26861318

  4. A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials

    PubMed Central

    Wilczek, Andrzej; Szypłowska, Agnieszka; Kafarski, Marcin; Skierucha, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of electrical conductivity and relaxation time using numerical simulations of a five-rod probe placed in a material with complex dielectric permittivity described by the Debye model with an added electrical conductivity term. The characterization of amplitudes of two pulses of selected widths was done with regard to the dielectric parameters of simulated materials. The required probe parameters were obtained solely from numerical simulations. Verification was performed for the probe placed in aqueous KCl solutions with 14 different electrical conductivity values. The determined relaxation time remained roughly constant and independent of electrical conductivity. The obtained electrical conductivity agreed with the reference values. Our results indicate that the relaxation time, dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the tested solutions can be simultaneously determined using a simple analysis of the amplitude and reflection time of two needle pulses of different widths. PMID:26861318

  5. Pulse width dependence of motor threshold and input–output curve characterized with controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Goetz, Stefan M.; Westin, Gregory G.; Luber, Bruce; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the use of a novel controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device to characterize human corticospinal tract physiology. Methods Motor threshold and input-output (IO) curve of right first dorsal interosseus were determined in 26 and 12 healthy volunteers, respectively, at pulse widths of 30, 60, and 120 μs using a custom-built cTMS device. Strength–duration curve rheobase and time constant were estimated from the motor thresholds. IO slope was estimated from sigmoid functions fitted to the IO data. Results All procedures were well tolerated with no seizures or other serious adverse events. Increasing pulse width decreased the motor threshold and increased the pulse energy and IO slope. The average strength–duration curve time constant is estimated to be 196 μs, 95% CI [181 μs, 210 μs]. IO slope is inversely correlated with motor threshold both across and within pulse width. A simple quantitative model explains these dependencies. Conclusions Our strength–duration time constant estimate compares well to published values and may be more accurate given increased sample size and enhanced methodology. Multiplying the IO slope by the motor threshold may provide a sensitive measure of individual differences in corticospinal tract physiology. Significance Pulse parameter control offered by cTMS provides enhanced flexibility that can contribute novel insights in TMS studies. PMID:23434439

  6. High-power vacuum-tube modulator with pulse-width control

    SciTech Connect

    Manoilo, V.S.; Chebotarev, V.V.; Kulik, N.V.; Lishenko, B.A.; Shevchuk, B.A.; Tereshin, V.I.; Voznyi, V.I.

    1984-03-01

    The authors describe a modulator for shaping square pulses of up to 35 kV and 30 A. The device may be powered from the line or from a storage battery. It will produce 2 pulses of widths from 50 microseconds to 50 milliseconds with rise times of about 10 microseconds. A protections circuit allows voltage to be taken from the load in the presence of breakdown for about 20 microseconds.

  7. Pulse-width-independent low power programmable low temperature poly-Si thin-film transistor shift register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eunji; Song, Seok-Jeong; Nam, Hyoungsik

    2015-05-01

    This paper demonstrates a low power programmable pulse width LTPS TFT shift register which achieves the constant power consumption over various pulse widths with the smaller number of TFTs compared to the previous programmable shift register. The proposed shift register consists of nine n-channel LTPS TFTs and one coupling capacitor. By eliminating the shoot-through current path in a NOT-AND logic, the simulation ensures that the proposed structure reduces the power consumption significantly by 60.5% for two line pulse width and by 88.6% for ten line pulse width from the previous programmable pulse width shift register. The power consumption of 12 shift registers is measured at 0.235 mW, independently of programmed pulse widths.

  8. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1996-01-23

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figs.

  9. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  10. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  11. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1994-02-15

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figures.

  12. Effects of pulse width and coding on radar returns from clear air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    In atmospheric radar studies it is desired to obtain maximum information about the atmosphere and to use efficiently the radar transmitter and processing hardware. Large pulse widths are used to increase the signal to noise ratio since clear air returns are generally weak and maximum height coverage is desired. Yet since good height resolution is equally important, pulse compression techniques such as phase coding are employed to optimize the average power of the transmitter. Considerations in implementing a coding scheme and subsequent effects of an impinging pulse on the atmosphere are investigated.

  13. Pulse-width considerations for nonlinear Raman brain imaging: whither the optimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, A. A.; Stepanov, E. A.; Tikhonov, R. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose simple, yet efficient strategies of pulse-width optimization applicable for nonlinear Raman brain imaging. With the spectral bandwidth of laser pulses accurately matched against the bandwidth of molecular vibrations, the coherent Raman signal is shown to be radically enhanced, enabling higher sensitivities and higher frame rates in nonlinear Raman brain imaging. As a specific example, we show that subpicosecond pulses offer a powerful tool for the detection of brain tumors using stimulated Raman microscopy, as they provide a strong signal without compromising the molecular specificity.

  14. High-resolution width-modulated pulse rebalance electronics for strapdown gyroscopes and accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, E. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Bryan, W. L.; Rush, K.

    1974-01-01

    Three different rebalance electronic loops were designed, implemented, and evaluated. The loops were width-modulated binary types using a 614.4 kHz keying signal; they were developed to accommodate the following three inertial sensors with the indicated resolution values: (1) Kearfott 2412 accelerometer - resolution = 260 micro-g/data pulse, (2) Honeywell GG334 gyroscope - resolution = 3.9 milli-arc-sec/data pulse, (3) Kearfott 2401-009 accelerometer - resolution = 144 milli-g/data pulse. Design theory, details of the design implementation, and experimental results for each loop are presented.

  15. Improvement of deoxidization efficiency of nitric monoxide by shortening pulse width of semiconductor opening switch pulse power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuta, Takatoshi; Yagi, Ippei; Takaki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The deoxidization efficiency of nitric monoxide (NO) was improved by shortening the pulse width of the voltage applied to a corona reactor. The deoxidization efficiency of NO was evaluated as the NO removal efficiency in nitrogen (N2) gas containing 200 ppm NO. The corona reactor had a coaxial geometry and consisted of center high-voltage wire and outer grounded cylinder electrodes. A nanosecond high-voltage pulse was generated using an inductive energy storage pulse power circuit with a semiconductor opening switch and was applied to the center wire electrode in the corona reactor. Fast recovery diodes were utilized as a semiconductor opening switch. The pulse width of the applied voltage was reduced from 21 to 14 ns with the arrester connected in parallel to the reactor. The energy efficiency for NO removal was improved from 8.2 to 35.7 g kW-1 h-1 with the arrester connected. The pulse width was also reduced to 8 ns by optimizing the circuit parameters. It was confirmed from observation with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera that the streamer corona discharge transited to a glowlike discharge after the streamer propagated from the center wire electrode to the outer cylinder electrode. The duration of the glowlike phase was reduced with the arrester connected. The energy consumed in the glowlike phase was also reduced from 15.7 to 4.6 mJ with the arrester connected.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study for shortening laser pulse width by pinhole plasma shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafari, Ebrahim; Kavosh Tehrani, Masoud; Mohammad, Mohammad Malek; Saghafifar, Hossian

    2015-05-01

    In this article, a theoretical model is presented to calculate the laser clipped pulse temporal width by the pinhole plasma shutter, and then the model results are compared with the experimental results of CO2 laser clipped pulses by aluminum and copper pinhole plasma shutters. In this model, it is assumed that the laser clipped pulse width is approximately equal to the sum of the plasma formation time and the plasma propagation time in order to reach from pinhole edges to the pinhole center. Furthermore, we assume that the plasma formation time is approximately equal to the time for the surface temperature of pinhole metal plate to reach the boiling point by absorbing the laser pulse energy. Heat conduction equation is used to calculate the time of plasma formation, and Taylor-Sedov's model is used to calculate the plasma propagation time to reach the pinhole center. By these assumptions, a relationship has been established between the laser clipped pulse width on the one hand, and thermo-dynamical and optical parameters of plasma shutter and the involved laser optical parameters on the other. Results of this model are in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Nonlinearly coupled, gain-switched Nd:YAG second harmonic laser with variable pulse width.

    PubMed

    Ray, Aniruddha; Das, Susanta K; Mishra, Lokanath; Datta, Prasanta K; Saltiel, Soloman M

    2009-02-01

    An all-solid-state, gain-switched, green laser is developed using a side diode-array pumped Nd:YAG laser and a KTiOPO(4) (KTP) crystal as an intracavity frequency doubler. The effect of nonlinear coupling on the pulse width of the fundamental is studied and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental measurement. In this preliminary experiment, a peak power of 40 W at 532 nm corresponding to a pulse width of 409 ns is obtained for an average pump power of 2 W. Compared to a Q-switched laser, it is simple and does not require a high voltage RF driver or saturable absorbers in its operation. The laser may be useful where relatively longer nanosecond pulses are required such as eye surgery, micromachining, and underwater communication. PMID:19183606

  18. Real time pulse width monitor for Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) electro-optic shutters

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    A method is described or controlling and measuring the pulse width of electrical gate pulses used for optical shuttering of image intensifier. The intensifiers are coupled to high frame rate Charge-Coupled-Devices (CCD) or Focus-Projection Scan (FPS) vidicon TV cameras for readout and telemetry of time resolved image sequences. The shutter duration or gate width of individual shutters is measured in real time and encoded in the video frame corresponding to a given shutter interval. The shutter information is updated once catch video frame by strobing new data with each TV camera vertical sync pulse. This circuitry is used in conjunction with commercial video insertion/annotation equipment to provide die shutter width information in alpha numeric text form along with the time resolved video image on a frame-by-frame basis. The measurement technique and circuitry involving a combination of high speed digital counters and analog integrators for measurements in the Ins to 1024 ns range are described. The accuracy obtained is compared with measurements obtained using batch speed DSOs. The measured data are provided in 10-bit Binary (Bi) and four decades of Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) and also displayed on four digit seven segment displays. The control circuitry including digital and analog input means for gate width selection are described. The implementation of both measurement and control circuitry into an Intensified Shuttered CCD (ISCCD) radiometric system for recording fast shuttered images at RS-170 to 4 KHz frame rates is presented.

  19. Method and apparatus for pulse width modulation control of an AC induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Geppert, Steven; Slicker, James M.

    1984-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a micro-processor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .THETA., where .THETA. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands of electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  20. Method and apparatus for pulse width modulation control of an AC induction motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geppert, Steven (Inventor); Slicker, James M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a micro-processor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .THETA., where .THETA. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands of electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a flyback DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  1. Solution of the pulse width modulation problem using orthogonal polynomials and Korteweg-de Vries equations.

    PubMed

    Chudnovsky, D V; Chudnovsky, G V

    1999-10-26

    The mathematical underpinning of the pulse width modulation (PWM) technique lies in the attempt to represent "accurately" harmonic waveforms using only square forms of a fixed height. The accuracy can be measured using many norms, but the quality of the approximation of the analog signal (a harmonic form) by a digital one (simple pulses of a fixed high voltage level) requires the elimination of high order harmonics in the error term. The most important practical problem is in "accurate" reproduction of sine-wave using the same number of pulses as the number of high harmonics eliminated. We describe in this paper a complete solution of the PWM problem using Pade approximations, orthogonal polynomials, and solitons. The main result of the paper is the characterization of discrete pulses answering the general PWM problem in terms of the manifold of all rational solutions to Korteweg-de Vries equations. PMID:10535909

  2. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry Pulse-Widths as an Indicator of Surface Roughness at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, W.; Muller, J.-P.; Gupta, S.

    2012-09-01

    One of the secondary science goals of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) was to investigate surface roughness within the laser footprint using the backscatter pulse-widths of individual pulses [1]. As a pulse is fired, it diverges so that by the time it reaches the Martian surface the footprint diameter is approximately 170 m [1]. The pulse is then reflected back, and the photons are collected by the telescope. The time spread of the returning photons is measured and recorded by the instrument, and, after correcting for instrument and along-track slope effects, what remains is believed to indicate surface roughness within the footprint. At present, the baseline at which this method is thought to respond is 100 m. However, a corrected version of this dataset suggested that the actual response baseline is nearer 35 m, after the footprint diameter had been redefined to 70 m, bad data had been removed, and better slope corrections performed [2]. This work explores at which baseline these pulsewidths actually respond, by comparing pulse-width values to surface roughness estimates from digital terrain models (DTMs) produced from High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) stereo-images [3]. The MOLA instrument has nearglobal coverage, albeit with 300 m along-track spacing and ≈4 km inter-track average spacing at the equator, so the effective calibration of pulse-width data would provide us with a valuable resource for identifying potential landing and roving sites, as well as looking at geology at fine scales relating to different surface processes.

  3. Influence of pulse width on decolorization efficiency of organic dye by discharge inside bubble in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, S.; Wada, K.; Kakuta, T.; Takaki, K.; Satta, N.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-06-01

    Decolorization of an organic dye by discharge in high conductive water using a pulsed power generator and a discharge reactor was investigated. The discharge reactor consisted of a glass tube and a tungsten wire inserted into the glass tube, which was immersed in the water. Room air was injected into the glass tube to generate bubbles in the water. High voltage pulses were generated by an inductive-energy storage system using semiconductor opening switch (SOS) and by a magnetic pulse compression circuit. Fast recovery diodes were used as SOS diode in the inductive-energy storage system. The pulse width was changed in range from 10 to 1200 ns. The high voltage was applied to the tungsten wire. Indigo carmine was employed as a specimen to evaluate decolorization efficiency. Potassium nitrate was used to adjust the solution conductivity. The dye solution was successfully decolorized at 7 mS/cm conductivity. Energy efficiency for decolorization increased from 0.680 to 55.6 mg/Wh with decreasing the pulse width from 1200 to 10 ns owing to the reduction of ohmic loss.

  4. Pulse-width stabilization of a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, S. R.; Roxlo, C. B.; Salour, M. M.; Bebelaar, D.

    1980-06-01

    Using an analog feedback loop acting on the mode-locker frequency of a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser, a substantial decrease of pulse-width variations at frequencies up to 10 kHz at the cost of an increase in higher-frequency noise was observed. A digital loop acting on the cavity length decreased noise at low frequencies. Using these methods, reproducible and stabilized frequency-tunable subpicosecond pulses were generated, and the effects of noise in the mode-locking frequency of the pumping Ar(+) laser and drift in the cavity length of the dye laser were determined.

  5. Pulse-Width Increase of Reflex Triode Vircator Using the Carbon Fibre Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lie; Li, Li-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Wen, Jian-Chun; Wan, Hong

    2006-04-01

    We present the investigation on the reflex triode virtual cathode oscillator in which performances of carbon-fibre and stainless-steel cathodes are compared with each other. The experimental results and analyses show that surface tracking induces the electron emission of the carbon fibre cathode. There are electron emission phenomena observed not only from the top of the carbon fibre but also from its side surface. Compared with the case of the stainless steel cathode, the plasma expansion velocity for the carbon fibre cathode is slower, and using the carbon fibre cathode can widen the pulse width of output microwave. The output microwave pulse width reaches an increase of about 20%. This mechanism is different from the conventional explosive emission of metal cathodes.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics control in single-phase inverter with sinusoidal pulse-width modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyanov, A. I.; Mikhal'tsov, D. Yu

    2016-04-01

    A variant of technical implementation of the control system of a single-phase voltage inverter with sinusoidal pulse-width modulation, based on target-oriented control, which ensures the desired nonlinear dynamic properties of the system, is proposed. The control system under discussion solves the problem of providing a sinusoidal output voltage of the inverter when changing its parameters in a wide range, accompanied by bifurcations. This eliminates unwanted dynamic modes without parametric synthesis of the system. The target-oriented control for managing the dynamics of nonlinear systems with sinusoidal pulse-width modulation is used for the first time and gives a number of advantages compared to other known methods.

  7. Influence of nanorod absorption spectrum width on superluminality effect for laser pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the influence of the finite absorption spectrum width on the soliton formation and superluminality phenomenon at a femtosecond pulse propagation in a medium with noble nanoparticles. These effects take place if a positive phase-amplitude grating is induced by laser radiation. We take into account the two-photon absorption (TPA) of laser radiation by nanorods, and time-dependent nanorod aspect ratio changing due to their melting or reshaping because of laser energy absorption, and the nanorod absorption spectrum width. On the basis of computer simulation we demonstrate these effects in a medium with positive phase-amplitude grating, induced by laser radiation, if a weak laser energy absorption takes place on the laser pulse dispersion length.

  8. A Hybrid Fiber/Solid-State Regenerative Amplifier with Tunable Pulse Widths for Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Barry; Poulios, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    A fiber/solid-state hybrid seeded regenerative amplifier, capable of achieving high output energy with tunable pulse widths, has been developed for satellite laser ranging applications. The regenerative amplifier cavity uses a pair of Nd:YAG zigzag slabs oriented orthogonally to one another in order to make thermal lensing effects symmetrical and simplify optical correction schemes. The seed laser used is a fiber-coupled 1,064-nm narrowband (<0.02 nm) diode laser that is discretely driven in a new short-pulsed mode, enabling continuously tunable seed pulse widths in the 0.2-to-0.4-ns range. The amplifier gain unit consists of a pair of Brewster-cut 6-bounce zigzag Nd:YAG laser slabs, oriented 90deg relative to each other in the amplifier head. This arrangement creates a net-symmetrical thermal lens effect (an opposing singleaxis effect in each slab), and makes thermo-optical corrections simple by optimizing the curvature of the nearest cavity mirror. Each slab is pumped by a single 120-W, pulsed 808-nm laser diode array. In this configuration, the average pump beam distribution in the slabs had a 1-D Gaussian shape, which matches the estimated cavity mode size. A half-wave plate between the slabs reduces losses from Fresnel reflections due to the orthogonal slabs Brewster-cut end faces. Successful "temporal" seeding of the regenerative amplifier cavity results in a cavity Q-switch pulse envelope segmenting into shorter pulses, each having the width of the input seed, and having a uniform temporal separation corresponding to the cavity round-trip time of approx. =10 ns. The pulse energy is allowed to build on successive passes in the regenerative amplifier cavity until a maximum is reached, (when cavity gains and losses are equal), after which the pulse is electro- optically switched out on the next round trip The overall gain of the amplifier is approx. =82 dB (or a factor of 1.26 million). After directing the amplified output through a LBO frequency doubling

  9. A solid-state PWM phase-shifter. [Pulse Width Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, Boon Teck; Dai, Shu Zu; Galiana, F.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The solid-state, pulse width modulated (PWM) phase-shifter is based on gate-turn-off (GTO) thyristors or other valves with force commutation capabilities. Besides serving the phase-shifter function, it offers regulated control over 3 independent quantities: the real power passing through it and the VARs on both sides to which it is connected. The power transferred can be bidirectional and the VARs can be leading or lagging.

  10. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian Cang; Li, Rui; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng

    2015-04-01

    The critical pulse width (τc) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (Ef) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (EBD) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854-857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τc is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (td) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τc: (1) EBD is lower than Ef; (2) td of bulk breakdown is shorter than td of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τc are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τc is expected to increase: (1) factors causing EBD to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower EBD; (2) factors causing Ef to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing EBD and Ef to increase together, but Ef increases faster than EBD, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τc for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τc on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  11. Using Pulse Width Modulation for Wireless Transmission of Neural Signals in Multichannel Neural Recording Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-01-01

    We have used a well-known technique in wireless communication, pulse width modulation (PWM) of time division multiplexed (TDM) signals, within the architecture of a novel wireless integrated neural recording (WINeR) system. We have evaluated the performance of the PWM-based architecture and indicated its accuracy and potential sources of error through detailed theoretical analysis, simulations, and measurements on a setup consisting of a 15-channel WINeR prototype as the transmitter and two types of receivers; an Agilent 89600 vector signal analyzer and a custom wideband receiver, with 36 and 75 MHz of maximum bandwidth, respectively. Furthermore, we present simulation results from a realistic MATLAB-Simulink model of the entire WINeR system to observe the system behavior in response to changes in various parameters. We have concluded that the 15-ch WINeR prototype, which is fabricated in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 4.5 mW from ±1.5 V supplies, can acquire and wirelessly transmit up to 320 k-samples/s to a 75-MHz receiver with 8.4 bits of resolution, which is equivalent to a wireless data rate of ~ 2.26 Mb/s. PMID:19497823

  12. Using pulse width modulation for wireless transmission of neural signals in multichannel neural recording systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2009-08-01

    We have used a well-known technique in wireless communication, pulse width modulation (PWM) of time division multiplexed (TDM) signals, within the architecture of a novel wireless integrated neural recording (WINeR) system. We have evaluated the performance of the PWM-based architecture and indicated its accuracy and potential sources of error through detailed theoretical analysis, simulations, and measurements on a setup consisting of a 15-channel WINeR prototype as the transmitter and two types of receivers; an Agilent 89600 vector signal analyzer and a custom wideband receiver, with 36 and 75 MHz of maximum bandwidth, respectively. Furthermore, we present simulation results from a realistic MATLAB-Simulink model of the entire WINeR system to observe the system behavior in response to changes in various parameters. We have concluded that the 15-ch WINeR prototype, which is fabricated in a 0.5- mum standard CMOS process and consumes 4.5 mW from +/-1.5 V supplies, can acquire and wirelessly transmit up to 320 k-samples/s to a 75-MHz receiver with 8.4 bits of resolution, which is equivalent to a wireless data rate of approximately 2.56 Mb/s. PMID:19497823

  13. New hybrid reverse differential pulse position width modulation scheme for wireless optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Renbo; Liu, Hongzhan; Qiao, Yaojun

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the power efficiency and reduce the packet error rate of reverse differential pulse position modulation (RDPPM) for wireless optical communication (WOC), a hybrid reverse differential pulse position width modulation (RDPPWM) scheme is proposed, based on RDPPM and reverse pulse width modulation. Subsequently, the symbol structure of RDPPWM is briefly analyzed, and its performance is compared with that of other modulation schemes in terms of average transmitted power, bandwidth requirement, and packet error rate over ideal additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels. Based on the given model, the simulation results show that the proposed modulation scheme has the advantages of improving the power efficiency and reducing the bandwidth requirement. Moreover, in terms of error probability performance, RDPPWM can achieve a much lower packet error rate than that of RDPPM. For example, at the same received signal power of -28 dBm, the packet error rate of RDPPWM can decrease to 2.6×10-12, while that of RDPPM is 2.2×10. Furthermore, RDPPWM does not need symbol synchronization at the receiving end. These considerations make RDPPWM a favorable candidate to select as the modulation scheme in the WOC systems.

  14. Calibration approach for fluorescence lifetime determination for applications using time-gated detection and finite pulse width excitation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Scott B; Dudley, Jonathan A; Binzel, Katherine; Jasensky, Joshua; de Pedro, Hector Michael; Frey, Eric W; Urayama, Paul

    2008-10-15

    Time-gated techniques are useful for the rapid sampling of excited-state (fluorescence) emission decays in the time domain. Gated detectors coupled with bright, economical, nanosecond-pulsed light sources like flashlamps and nitrogen lasers are an attractive combination for bioanalytical and biomedical applications. Here we present a calibration approach for lifetime determination that is noniterative and that does not assume a negligible instrument response function (i.e., a negligible excitation pulse width) as does most current rapid lifetime determination approaches. Analogous to a transducer-based sensor, signals from fluorophores of known lifetime (0.5-12 ns) serve as calibration references. A fast avalanche photodiode and a GHz-bandwidth digital oscilloscope is used to detect transient emission from reference samples excited using a nitrogen laser. We find that the normalized time-integrated emission signal is proportional to the lifetime, which can be determined with good reproducibility (typically <100 ps) even for data with poor signal-to-noise ratios ( approximately 20). Results are in good agreement with simulations. Additionally, a new time-gating scheme for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications is proposed. In conclusion, a calibration-based approach is a valuable analysis tool for the rapid determination of lifetime in applications using time-gated detection and finite pulse width excitation. PMID:18798652

  15. Ocular effects of pulsed neodymium laser radiation: variation of threshold with pulse width. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.G.; Thomas, S.J.; Harrison, R.F.; Zuclich, J.A.; Blankenstein, M.F.

    1985-11-01

    This study of retinal damage thresholds in the rhesus monkey investigated the effects of Nd:YAG laser radiation at four pulsewidths: 4, 30, and 200 nansec, and 10 microsecs. The thresholds causing minimal, ophthalmoscopically visible lesions for the four pulsewidths were 158, 326, 170, and 425 micron j respectively, incident at the eye in single-pulse exposures. The data are interpreted to imply a flat trend for thresholds at pulsewidths examined. This agrees with the maximum permissible exposures set by current safety standards. This finding contrasts with the hypothesis of an anomalous trend of increasing threshold with decreasing pulsewidth suggested for pulsewidths ranging from nanosec-microsecs.

  16. Sliding mode pulse-width modulation technique for direct torque controlled induction motor drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounadja, M.; Belarbi, A. W.; Belmadani, B.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a novel pulse-width modulation technique based sliding mode approach for direct torque control of an induction machine drive. Methodology begins with a sliding mode control of machine's torque and stator flux to generate the reference voltage vector and to reduce parameters sensitivity. Then, the switching control of the three-phase inverter is developed using sliding mode concept to make the system tracking reference voltage inputs. The main features of the proposed methodologies are the high tracking accuracy and the much easier implementation compared to the space vector modulation. Simulations are carried out to confirm the effectiveness of proposed control algorithms.

  17. New autocorrelation technique for the IR FEL optical pulse width measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Brau, K.A.; Becker, C.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a new technique for the autocorrelation measurement of optical pulse width at the Vanderbilt University FEL center. This method is based on nonlinear absorption and transmission characteristics of semiconductors such as Ge, Te and InAs suitable for the wavelength range from 2 to over 6 microns. This approach, aside being simple and low cost, removes the phase matching condition that is generally required for the standard frequency doubling technique and covers a greater wavelength range per nonlinear material. In this paper we will describe the apparatus, explain the principal mechanism involved and compare data which have been acquired with both frequency doubling and two-photon absorption.

  18. An IGBT-based High Voltage, Variable Pulse Width Nanosecond Pulser for Plasma Creation Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Prager, James; Carscadden, John

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT) has developed a modular solid state power supply based on IGBT technology, which can support a wide array of applications. The EHT Integrated Power Module (IPM) incorporates fast gate drive technology, high voltage isolation (~30 kV), fiber optic control, and optional crowbar diodes into a single unit. The EHT IPM can be configured to produce variable pulsed width (20 to 1000 ns), high voltage (>20 kV) high repetition frequency (2 MHz) nanosecond pulser. Nanosecond pulser applications include plasma creation for drag reduction, medical applications, water decontamination, fuel mixing and control of flue gas emissions.

  19. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang Li, Rui; Zheng, Lei; Su, Jian Cang; Cheng, Jie; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng; Zeng, Bo

    2015-04-15

    The critical pulse width (τ{sub c}) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (E{sub f}) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (E{sub BD}) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854–857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τ{sub c} is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (t{sub d}) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τ{sub c}: (1) E{sub BD} is lower than E{sub f}; (2) t{sub d} of bulk breakdown is shorter than t{sub d} of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τ{sub c} are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τ{sub c} is expected to increase: (1) factors causing E{sub BD} to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower E{sub BD}; (2) factors causing E{sub f} to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing E{sub BD} and E{sub f} to increase together, but E{sub f} increases faster than E{sub BD}, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τ{sub c} for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τ{sub c} on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  20. A novel approach for pulse width measurements with a high precision (8 ps RMS) TDC in an FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugur, C.; Linev, S.; Michel, J.; Schweitzer, T.; Traxler, M.

    2016-01-01

    High precision time measurements are a crucial element in particle identification experiments, which likewise require pulse width information for Time-over-Threshold (ToT) measurements and charge measurements (correlated with pulse width). In almost all of the FPGA-based TDC applications, pulse width measurements are implemented using two of the TDC channels for leading and trailing edge time measurements individually. This method however, requires twice the number of resources. In this paper we present the latest precision improvements in the high precision TDC (8 ps RMS) developed before [1], as well as the novel way of measuring ToT using a single TDC channel, while still achieving high precision (as low as 11.7 ps RMS). The effect of voltage, generated by a DC-DC converter, over the precision is also discussed. Finally, the outcome of the temperature change over the pulse width measurement is shown and a correction method is suggested to limit the degradation.

  1. Avoiding the hazards of pulse-width modulated adjustable-speed drives

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, B.

    1993-12-31

    Pulse-width modulated (PWM) adjustable-speed drives are taking over the market for ASDs under 200 horsepower because they are less expensive and more reliable than competing technologies and because they provide more precise control of motor acceleration, speed, and torque. Misapplication of PWM drives has led to numerous motor failures, however, which could discourage use of this promising technology. Such problems can be readily prevented by careful specification and installation of the drive, the motor, and the cabling between them. What`s behind these costly and inconvenient technical difficulties? They`re caused by interactions between the extremely rapid voltage pulses from the drive and the motor windings, which can lead to excessive voltages that damage the winding insulation and lead to motor failure. PWM drives can also cause radio frequency interference and excessive heating of conduit systems.

  2. Controllable pulse width of bright similaritons in a tapered graded index diffraction decreasing waveguide.

    PubMed

    Prakash, S Arun; Malathi, V; Mani Rajan, M S; Loomba, Shally

    2016-03-01

    We obtain the bright similariton solutions for generalized inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation (GINLSE) which governs the pulse propagation in a tapered graded index diffraction decreasing waveguide (DDW). The exact solutions have been worked out by employing similarity transformations which involve the mapping of the GINLSE to standard NLSE for the certain conditions of the parameters. By making use of the exact analytical solutions, we have investigated the dynamical behavior of optical similariton pairs and have suggested the methods to control them as they propagate through DDW. Moreover, pulse width of similariton is controlled through various profiles. These results are helpful to understand the similaritons in DDW and can be potentially useful for future experiments in optical communications which involve optical amplifiers and long-haul telecommunication networks. PMID:27036193

  3. Controllable pulse width of bright similaritons in a tapered graded index diffraction decreasing waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, S. Arun; Malathi, V.; Mani Rajan, M. S.; Loomba, Shally

    2016-03-01

    We obtain the bright similariton solutions for generalized inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation (GINLSE) which governs the pulse propagation in a tapered graded index diffraction decreasing waveguide (DDW). The exact solutions have been worked out by employing similarity transformations which involve the mapping of the GINLSE to standard NLSE for the certain conditions of the parameters. By making use of the exact analytical solutions, we have investigated the dynamical behavior of optical similariton pairs and have suggested the methods to control them as they propagate through DDW. Moreover, pulse width of similariton is controlled through various profiles. These results are helpful to understand the similaritons in DDW and can be potentially useful for future experiments in optical communications which involve optical amplifiers and long-haul telecommunication networks.

  4. Design of low-power hybrid digital pulse width modulator with piecewise calibration scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Shaowei; Hou, Sijian; Gan, Wubing; Chen, Jingbo; Luo, Ping; Zhang, Bo

    2015-12-01

    A low-power hybrid digital pulse width modulator (DPWM) is proposed in the paper. Owing to the piecewise calibration scheme, the delay time of delay line is locked to target frequency. The delay line consists of two piecewise lines with different control codes. The delay time of each cell in one sub-delay-line is longer than the last significant bit (LSB) of DPWM, while the delay time of each cell in the other sub-delay-line is shorter than LSB. Optimum linearity is realised with minimum standard cells. Simulation results show that the differential nonlinearity and integral nonlinearity are improved from 5.1 to 0.4 and from 5 to 1.3, respectively. The DPWM is fully synthesised and fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS process. The proposed DPWM occupies a silicon area of 0.01 mm2, with 31.5 μw core power consumption. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate the 2-MHz, 10-bit resolution implementation. Pulse width histogram is firstly introduced to characterise the linearity of the DPWM.

  5. Single Event Effects Testing of the Linfinity SG1525A Pulse Width Modulator Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. W., Jr.; Carts, M. A.; LaBel, K. A.; Forney, J. D.; Irwin, T. L.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse Width Modulator (PWM) Controllers are the heart of switching power supply systems in development today. The PWMs considered here have the same integration advantages as many other controllers but it also includes the interface drivers for the follow-on power Field Effect Transistors (FET). Previous work on these types of devices looked into the required test methodologies [ 11 and the impact of radiation on the soft start and shutdown circuits of typically incorporated in the technology [2]. Taking advantage of this previous work this study was undertaken to determine the single event destructive and transient susceptibility of the Linfinity SG1525A Pulse Width Modulator Controller. The device was monitored for transient interruptions in the output signals and for destructive events induced by exposing it to a heavy ion beam at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Single Event Effects Test Facility. After exposing these devices to the beam, a new upset mode has been identified that can lead to catastrophic power supply system failure if this event would occur while drive power FETs off the two device outputs. The devices and the test methods used will be described first. This will be followed by a brief description of the data collected to date (not all data can be presented with the length constraints of the summary) and a summary of the key results.

  6. Development and performance of pulse-width-modulated static inverter and converter modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, P. F.; Gourash, F.; Birchenough, A. G.; Pittman, P. F.; Ravas, R. J.; Hall, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    Pulse-width-modulated inverter and converter modules are being developed for modular aerospace electrical power systems. The modules, rate 2.5 kilowatts per module and 10-minute - 150-percent overload, operate from 56 volts dc. The converter module provides two output voltages: a nominal link voltage of 200 volts dc when used with the inverter, and 150 volts dc to a load bus when used separately. The inverter module output is 400-hertz, sinusoidal, three-phase, 120/208 volts. Tests of breadboard models with standard parts and integrated circuits show rated power efficiencies of 71.4 and 85.1 percent and voltage regulation of 5 and 3.1 percent for inverter and converter modules, respectively. Sine-wave output distortion is 0.74 percent.

  7. Magnetic hysteresis curve influenced by power-semiconductor characteristics in pulse-width-modulation inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Keisuke; Liu, Sungju

    2014-05-01

    The influence of power semiconductor characteristic in Pulse-width-modulation (PWM) inverter on the magnetic hysteresis curve in silicon steel is discussed through the measured magnetic hysteresis curves. The magnetic hysteresis curve of PWM inverter-fed silicon steel has a lot of minor loops as closed loops and open loops, which make an influence on the iron loss. Two shapes of minor loops are found to be caused by the voltage shifts and they are derived from the on-voltage of the semiconductors in PWM inverter circuit. Therefore, it is concluded that the power-semiconductor characteristic in PWM inverter makes an influence on the magnetic hysteresis curve in silicon steel.

  8. Reconfigurable optofluidic switch for generation of optical pulse width modulation based on tunable reflective interface.

    PubMed

    Mansuori, M; Zareei, G H; Hashemi, H

    2015-10-01

    We present a numerical method for generation of optical pulse width modulation (PWM) based on tunable reflective interface by using a microfluidic droplet. We demonstrate a single layer, planar, optofluidic PWM switch that is driven by excited alternating microbubbles. The main parameters of generation of this PWM such as frequency and speed of switching can be controlled by the mass flow rates of input fluids, and the shape of plug or droplet. Advantages of this design are the reconfigurability in design and the easy control of the switching parameters. The validation of the proposed design is carried out by employing the finite element method (FEM) for the mechanical simulation and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) for the optical simulation. PMID:26479666

  9. Pulse-width modulation in defocused three-dimensional fringe projection.

    PubMed

    Ayubi, Gastón A; Ayubi, Jaime A; Di Martino, J Matías; Ferrari, José A

    2010-11-01

    Shape measurements by fringe projection methods require high-quality sinusoidal fringes. We present a sinusoidal fringe generation technique that utilizes slightly defocused binary fringe projection. The proposed method is a spatial version of the well-known pulse-width modulation (PWM) technique of electrical engineering. PWM is easy to implement using off-the-shelf projectors, and it allows us to overcome the gamma problem (i.e., the nonlinear projector response) in the output light intensity. We will demonstrate that, with a small defocusing level--lower than with other techniques proposed in the literature--a high-quality sinusoidal pattern is obtained. Validation experiments using a commercial video projector are presented. PMID:21042390

  10. Jitter model and signal processing techniques for pulse width modulation optical recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Max M.-K.

    1991-01-01

    A jitter model and signal processing techniques are discussed for data recovery in Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) optical recording. In PWM, information is stored through modulating sizes of sequential marks alternating in magnetic polarization or in material structure. Jitter, defined as the deviation from the original mark size in the time domain, will result in error detection if it is excessively large. A new approach is taken in data recovery by first using a high speed counter clock to convert time marks to amplitude marks, and signal processing techniques are used to minimize jitter according to the jitter model. The signal processing techniques include motor speed and intersymbol interference equalization, differential and additive detection, and differential and additive modulation.

  11. Polar Dunes Resolved by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Gridded Topography and Pulse Widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) polar data have been refined to the extent that many features poorly imaged by Viking Orbiters are now resolved in densely gridded altimetry. Individual linear polar dunes with spacings of 0.5 km or more can be seen as well as sparsely distributed and partially mantled dunes. The refined altimetry will enable measurements of the extent and possibly volume of the north polar ergs. MOLA pulse widths have been recalibrated using inflight data, and a robust algorithm applied to solve for the surface optical impulse response. It shows the surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness at the 75-m-diameter MOLA footprint scale, together with a geological map. While the roughness is of vital interest for landing site safety studies, a variety of geomorphological studies may also be performed. Pulse widths corrected for regional slope clearly delineate the extent of the polar dunes. The MOLA PEDR profile data have now been re-released in their entirety (Version L). The final Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records (MEGDR's) are now provided at up to 128 pixels per degree globally. Densities as high as 512 pixels per degree are available in a polar stereographic projection. A large computational effort has been expended in improving the accuracy of the MOLA altimetry themselves, both in improved orbital modeling and in after-the-fact adjustment of tracks to improve their registration at crossovers. The current release adopts the IAU2000 rotation model and cartographic frame recommended by the Mars Cartography Working Group. Adoption of the current standard will allow registration of images and profiles globally with an uncertainty of less than 100 m. The MOLA detector is still operational and is currently collecting radiometric data at 1064 nm. Seasonal images of the reflectivity of the polar caps can be generated with a resolution of about 300 m per pixel.

  12. Inferences from the Distributions of Fast Radio Burst Pulse Widths, Dispersion Measures, and Fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    The widths, dispersion measures (DMs), dispersion indices, and fluences of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) impose coupled constraints that all models must satisfy. The non-monotonic dependence of burst widths (after deconvolution of instrumental effects) on DMs excludes the intergalactic medium as the location of scattering that broadens the FRBs in time. Temporal broadening far greater than that of pulsars at similar high Galactic latitudes implies that scattering occurs close to the sources where high densities and strong turbulence or heterogeneity are plausible. FRB energetics are consistent with supergiant pulses from young, fast, high-field pulsars at cosmological distances. The distribution of FRB DMs is: (1) inconsistent with that of expanding clouds (such as SNRs); (2) inconsistent with space-limited source populations (such as the local Supercluster); and (3) consistent with intergalactic dispersion of a homogeneous source population at cosmological distances. Finally, the FRB {log}\\N-{log} S relation also indicates a cosmological distribution aside from the anomalously bright Lorimer burst.

  13. On the pulse-width statistics in radio pulsars - I. Importance of the interpulse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciesiak, Krzysztof; Gil, Janusz; Ribeiro, Valério A. R. M.

    2011-06-01

    We performed Monte Carlo simulations of different properties of pulsar radio emission, such as pulsar periods, pulse widths, inclination angles and rates of occurrence of interpulse (IP) emission. We used recently available large data sets of the pulsar periods P, the pulse profile widths W and the magnetic inclination angle α. We also compiled the largest ever data base of pulsars with IP, divided into the double pole (DP-IP) and the single pole (SP-IP) cases. We identified 31 (about 2 per cent) and 13 (about 1 per cent) of the former and the latter, respectively, in the population of 1520 normal pulsars. Their distribution on the ? diagram strongly suggests a secular alignment of the magnetic axis from the originally random orientation. We derived possible parent distribution functions of important pulsar parameters by means of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov significance test using the available data sets (P, W, α and IP), different models of pulsar radio beam ρ=ρ(P) as well as different trial distribution functions of pulsar period P and the inclination angles α. The best suited parent period distribution function is the lognormal distribution, although the gamma function distribution cannot be excluded. The strongest constraint on derived model distribution functions was the requirement that the numbers of IPs generated by means of Monte Carlo simulations (both DP-IP and SP-IP cases) were exactly (within 1σ errors) at the observed level of occurrences. We found that a suitable model distribution function for the inclination angle is the complicated trigonometric function which has two local maxima, one near 0° and the other near 90°. The former and the latter imply the right rates of IP, occurrence, single pole (almost aligned rotator) and double pole (almost orthogonal rotator), respectively. It is very unlikely that the pulsar beam deviates significantly from the circular cross-section. We found that the upper limit for the average beaming factor fb

  14. Cuff width alters the amplitude envelope of wrist cuff pressure pulse waveforms.

    PubMed

    Jilek, Jiri; Stork, Milan

    2010-07-01

    The accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement with any method is affected by cuff width. Measurement with a too narrow cuff overestimates BP and measurement with a too wide cuff underestimates BP. Automatic wrist cuff BP monitors use permanently attached narrow cuffs with bladders about 6 cm wide. Such narrow cuffs should result in under-cuffing for wrist circumferences larger than 15 cm. The objective of this qualitative study was to show that a narrow wrist cuff results in increased BP values when a cuff pulse amplitude ratio algorithm is used. According to the algorithm used in this study, systolic pressure (SBP) corresponds to the point of 50% of maximal amplitude; for diastolic pressure (DBP) the ratio is 70%. Data were acquired from 12 volunteers in the sitting position. The mean wrist circumference was 18 cm. The acquired cuff pulse data were used to compute SBP, mean pressure (MAP) and DBP. The mean values for a 6 cm cuff were SBP = 144 mmHg, MAP = 104 mmHg and DBP = 88 mmHg. The values for a 10 cm cuff were SBP = 128 mmHg, MAP = 93 mmHg and DBP = 78 mmHg. The reference BP values were SBP = 132 mmHg, MAP = 96 mmHg and DBP = 80 mmHg. All narrow (6 cm) cuff BP values were higher than wide (10 cm) cuff or reference BP values. The results indicate that wider wrist cuffs may be desirable for more accurate and reliable BP measurement with wrist monitors. PMID:20505218

  15. Pulse width modulation-based temperature tracking for feedback control of a shape memory alloy actuator

    PubMed Central

    Ayvali, Elif; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a temperature-feedback approach to control the radius of curvature of an arc-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) wire. The nonlinear properties of the SMA such as phase transformation and its dependence on temperature and stress make SMA actuators difficult to control. Tracking a desired trajectory is more challenging than controlling just the position of the SMA actuator since the desired path is continuously changing. Consequently, tracking the desired strain directly or tracking the parameters such as temperature and electrical resistance that are related to strain with a model is a challenging task. Temperature-feedback is an attractive approach when direct measurement of strain is not practical. Pulse width modulation (PWM) is an effective method for SMA actuation and it can be used along with a compensator to control the temperature of the SMA. Using the constitutive model of the SMA, the desired temperature profile can be obtained for a given strain trajectory. A PWM-based nonlinear PID controller with a feed-forward heat transfer model is proposed to use temperature-feedback for tracking a desired temperature trajectory. The proposed controller is used during the heating phase of the SMA actuator. The controller proves to be effective in tracking step-wise and continuous trajectories. PMID:24791130

  16. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-C. K.; Liu, W.-C.; Chan, C.-C.; Ju, M.-S.

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal.

  17. Pulse width modulation-based temperature tracking for feedback control of a shape memory alloy actuator.

    PubMed

    Ayvali, Elif; Desai, Jaydev P

    2014-04-01

    This work presents a temperature-feedback approach to control the radius of curvature of an arc-shaped shape memory alloy (SMA) wire. The nonlinear properties of the SMA such as phase transformation and its dependence on temperature and stress make SMA actuators difficult to control. Tracking a desired trajectory is more challenging than controlling just the position of the SMA actuator since the desired path is continuously changing. Consequently, tracking the desired strain directly or tracking the parameters such as temperature and electrical resistance that are related to strain with a model is a challenging task. Temperature-feedback is an attractive approach when direct measurement of strain is not practical. Pulse width modulation (PWM) is an effective method for SMA actuation and it can be used along with a compensator to control the temperature of the SMA. Using the constitutive model of the SMA, the desired temperature profile can be obtained for a given strain trajectory. A PWM-based nonlinear PID controller with a feed-forward heat transfer model is proposed to use temperature-feedback for tracking a desired temperature trajectory. The proposed controller is used during the heating phase of the SMA actuator. The controller proves to be effective in tracking step-wise and continuous trajectories. PMID:24791130

  18. Determination of the magnetic losses in laminated cores under pulse width modulation voltage supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, N.; Gandarias, K.; Almandoz, G.; Poza, J.

    2015-08-01

    In the laminated ferromagnetic cores employed in transformers and electrical machines energy losses occur resulting in a warming effect and efficiency decrease. Normally, manufacturers only provide iron losses data when a sinusoidal voltage supply is applied, but the actual operating characteristics of electrical machines include non-sinusoidal supplies, in particular pulse-width modulation (PWM). This information can be experimentally obtained, but only measuring systems that have function generators with arbitrarily programmable waveforms allow measurements in the presence of higher harmonics. Therefore, having an analytical tool to obtain the most accurate estimation of the magnetic losses is of great interest in addressing the design of electric machines. This paper validates an analytical-expression-based procedure, which delivers results with acceptable accuracy under all operating conditions for the estimation of losses in laminated cores. In addition, it investigates the influence of the modulation amplitude and the switching frequency of the PWM signals in the magnetic losses of soft magnetic materials. For this purpose, non-oriented fully processed electrical steel strips have been measured in a commercial AC permeameter using a single strip tester.

  19. Open-air type plasma chemical vaporization machining by applying pulse-width modulation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoshiki; Hata, Yuki; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2014-03-01

    Photolithography techniques have been used to enable the low-cost and high-speed transfer of a pattern onto a silicon wafer. However, owing to the high integration of semiconductors, extreme ultraviolet will be increasingly used as the exposure light source and all optics must be reflective to focus light because the wavelength of the light will be so short that it cannot pass through a lens. The form accuracy of reflective optics affects the accuracy of transfer, and a flatness of less than 32 nm on a 6 inch photomask substrate is required according to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors roadmap. Plasma chemical vaporization machining is an ultraprecise figuring technique that enables a form accuracy of nanometre order to be obtained. In our previous study, the removal volume was controlled by changing the scanning speed of the worktable. However, a discrepancy between the theoretical scanning speed and the actual scanning speed occurred owing to the inertia of the worktable when the change in speed was rapid. As an attempt to resolve this issue, we controlled the removal volume by controlling the electric power applied during plasma generation while maintaining a constant scanning speed. The methods that we adapted to control the applied electric power were amplitude-modulation (AM) control and pulse-width modulation (PWM) control. In this work, we evaluate the controllability of the material removal rate in the AM and PWM control modes.

  20. Implementations of artificial neural networks using current-mode pulse width modulation technique.

    PubMed

    El-Masry, E I; Yang, H K; Yakout, M A

    1997-01-01

    The use of a current-mode pulse width modulation (CM-PWM) technique to implement analog artificial neural networks (ANNs) is presented. This technique can be used to efficiently implement the weighted summation operation (WSO) that are required in the realization of a general ANN. The sigmoidal transformation is inherently performed by the nonlinear transconductance amplifier, which is a key component in the current integrator used in the realization of WSO. The CM-PWM implementation results in a minimum silicon area, and therefore is suitable for very large scale neural systems. Other pronounced features of the CM-PWM implementation are its easy programmability, electronically adjustable gains of neurons, and modular structures. In this paper, all the current-mode CMOS circuits (building blocks) required for the realization of CM-PWM ANNs are presented and simulated. Four modules for modular design of ANNs are introduced. Also, it is shown that the CM-PWM technique is an efficient method for implementing discrete-time cellular neural networks (DT-CNNs). Two application examples are given: a winner-take-all circuit and a connected component detector. PMID:18255657

  1. A pulse width modulated picket fence pulser to reduce accelerator start-up transients

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Balmes, Anthony A; Bradley, Joseph T; Netz, Dana; Sandoval, Jacob B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a solid state modulator used to control the input beam to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center 'LANSCE' 800 MeV accelerator. This electrostatic Ground Level Deflector (GLD) chops the beam after the 750 keV injection energy. Two GLD's are utilized, one for the 'H+' beam and another for the 'H-' beam. These modulators are mounted on the vacuum beam pipe and directly operate sets of deflection plates. To minimize the accelerator beam start up transients, the beam is let into the accelerator cavity structures by a pulse width modulated picket fence operating between 0 and 12 kV. As the deflection plate structure appears as a capacitive load, a totem-pole switching network is utilized to facilitate rise and fall times of {approx}50 ns that is able to sink and source current to minimize beam induced sidewall activation. This paper will describe the system design and provides operational results as now presently utilized on the LANSCE accelerator system.

  2. Fuzzy control with amplitude/pulse-width modulation of nerve electrical stimulation for muscle force control.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C K; Liu, W-C; Chan, C-C; Ju, M-S

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to study the performance of fuzzy logic controllers combined with simplified hybrid amplitude/pulse-width (AM/PW) modulation to regulate muscle force via nerve electrical stimulation. The recruitment curves with AM/PW and AM modulations were constructed for the calf muscles of rabbits. Integrated with the modulation methods, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and three fuzzy logic controllers were designed and applied for the electrical stimulation of tibial nerves to control the ankle torque under isometric conditions. The performance of the two modulation methods combined with the four controllers was compared when the ankle was fixed at three positions for both in vivo experiments and model simulations using a nonlinear muscle model. For the animal experiments, AM/PW modulation performed better than AM modulation alone. The fuzzy PI controller performed marginally better and was resistant to external noises, though it tended to have a larger overshoot. The performance of the controllers had a similar trend in the three different joint positions, and the simulation results with the nonlinear model matched the experimental results well. In conclusion, AM/PW modulation improved controller performance, while the contribution of fuzzy logic was only marginal. PMID:22422279

  3. Research of narrow pulse width, high repetition rate, high output power fiber lasers for deep space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-feng; Li, Hong-zuo; Wang, Yan; Hao, Zi-qiang; Xiao, Dong-Ya

    2013-08-01

    As human beings expand the research in unknown areas constantly, the deep space exploration has become a hot research topic all over the world. According to the long distance and large amount of information transmission characteristics of deep space exploration, the space laser communication is the preferred mode because it has the advantages of concentrated energy, good security, and large information capacity and interference immunity. In a variety of laser source, fibre-optical pulse laser has become an important communication source in deep space laser communication system because of its small size, light weight and large power. For fiber lasers, to solve the contradiction between the high repetition rate and the peak value power is an important scientific problem. General Q technology is difficult to obtain a shorter pulse widths, This paper presents a DFB semiconductor laser integrated with Electro-absorption modulator to realize the narrow pulse width, high repetition rate of the seed source, and then using a two-cascaded high gain fiber amplifier as amplification mean, to realize the fibre-optical pulse laser with pulse width 3ns, pulse frequency 200kHz and peak power 1kW. According to the space laser atmospheric transmission window, the wavelength selects for 1.06um. It is adopted that full fibre technology to make seed source and amplification, pumping source and amplification of free-space coupled into fiber-coupled way. It can overcome that fibre lasers are vulnerable to changes in external conditions such as vibration, temperature drift and other factors affect, improving long-term stability. The fiber lasers can be modulated by PPM mode, to realize high rate modulation, because of its peak power, high transmission rate, narrow pulse width, high frequency stability, all technical indexes meet the requirements of the exploration of deep space communication technology.

  4. Experimental investigations on spectrum width of square-wave pulses in passively mode-locked figure-8 fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Li; Xu, Lixin; Chen, Guoliang; Gu, Chun; Zhang, Xianming; Sun, Biao; Lin, Jian; Wang, Anting

    2014-10-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a nanosecond square-wave fiber laser working in the 1060nm band. The passively mode-locked fiber laser based on the nonlinear optical loop mirror has a peak power clamping effect which leads to the generation of nanosecond square-wave pulses. To investigate the spectrum width of the nanosecond square-wave pulse laser, we added couplers with different coupling ratio to the bidirectional ring of the figure-8 fiber laser and analyzed the laser output. The results show that a higher output coupling ratio leads to stronger peak power clamping effect, and the peak power of the square-wave pulse gets lower and the corresponding spectrum band width is narrower.

  5. Application of arbitrary pulse width and position trains for the correlation sidelobes reduction for narrowband transducers.

    PubMed

    Svilainis, Linas; Aleksandrovas, Arturas

    2013-09-01

    Novel excitation technique is suggested which allows to reduce the correlation function sidelobes in case of narrowband channel. Application is planned for time of flight estimation using air coupled narrowband transducers. Time of flight is estimated by using the correlation function peak position. Narrowband signal has high level of correlation function sidelobes and therefore large signal to noise ratio cannot be fully exploited. Our investigation aimed to reduce the sidelobes by optimizing the signal. Novelty of the approach is that trains of arbitrary width and position square pulses are used. Such signals are easy to generate and to simulate in digital domain. The excitation signal spectrum was allowed to span beyond the passband, improving the envelope bandwidth in such way. The signal energy loss is caused by the attenuation of the out-of-band portion of the signal. Optimal balance between the energy loss and the sidelobes reduction had to be found. To predict the signal performance, the AC response of the transmission channel was measured and then used in simulation to predict the candidate signal's performance: the expected sidelobes' level and the energy. Monte Carlo technique was used to generate the candidate signals' parameters for the simulation. The relative noise margin was suggested as optimum criteria to balance the loss of the energy and the sidelobes reduction. Performance of the optimal signals obtained in simulation was verified experimentally. It was concluded that reduction of the sidelobes' is possible even for narrowband channel if some energy loss can be tolerated. An increase of 40% in relative noise margin, compared to the same length CW burst signals was achieved. PMID:23648211

  6. Liquid mixing enhanced by pulse width modulation in a Y-shaped jet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qingfeng; Zhong, Shan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, mixing between two fluid streams, which are injected into a planar mixing channel via a Y-shaped confluence section at the same volume flow rate, is studied experimentally. The injection of the two fluid streams is controlled by two separate solenoid valves, which are operated with a phase difference of 180°, using pulse width modulation. The experiments are conducted using water at a mean Reynolds number between 83 and 250, a range of pulsation frequencies and two duty cycles (25 and 50%). Both particle-image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence technique are used to visualize the flow patterns and to quantify the mixing degree in the mixing channel. This experiment shows that the pulsation of each jet produces vortical structures, which promotes mixing via vortex entrainment and vortex breakup, and at the same time the mixing is also greatly enhanced by sequential segmentation produced by a 180° out-of-phase pulsation of the two jets. This mixing enhancement method is effective at a Reynolds number greater than 125 with a mixing degree of 0.9 being achieved. For the Reynolds numbers studied in the present experiments, an optimal frequency exists, which corresponds to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.5-2. Furthermore, at a given mean Reynolds number a lower duty cycle is found to produce a better mixing due to the resultant higher instantaneous Reynolds number in the jet flow. It is also found that pulsation of only one jet can produce a similar mixing effect.

  7. Note: A rectangular pulse generator for 50 kV voltage, 0.8 ns rise time, and 10 ns pulse width based on polymer-film switch.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanyu; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Zeng, Zhengzhong; Cong, Peitian; Zhang, Shaoguo

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we describe a rectangular pulse generator, consisting of a polymer-film switch, a tri-plate transmission line, and parallel post-shaped ceramic resistor load, for 50-kV voltage, 0.8-ns rise time, and 10-ns width. The switch and resistors are arranged in atmospheric air and the transmission line can work in atmospheric air or in transformer oil to change the pulse width from 6.7 ns to 10 ns. The fast switching and low-inductance characteristics of the polymer-film switch ensure the fast rising wavefront of <1 ns. This generator can be applied in the calibration of nanosecond voltage dividers and used for electromagnetic pulse tests as a fast-rising current injection source. PMID:26521006

  8. Note: A rectangular pulse generator for 50 kV voltage, 0.8 ns rise time, and 10 ns pulse width based on polymer-film switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hanyu; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Zeng, Zhengzhong; Cong, Peitian; Zhang, Shaoguo

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we describe a rectangular pulse generator, consisting of a polymer-film switch, a tri-plate transmission line, and parallel post-shaped ceramic resistor load, for 50-kV voltage, 0.8-ns rise time, and 10-ns width. The switch and resistors are arranged in atmospheric air and the transmission line can work in atmospheric air or in transformer oil to change the pulse width from 6.7 ns to 10 ns. The fast switching and low-inductance characteristics of the polymer-film switch ensure the fast rising wavefront of <1 ns. This generator can be applied in the calibration of nanosecond voltage dividers and used for electromagnetic pulse tests as a fast-rising current injection source.

  9. ENERGY-DEPENDENT GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE WIDTH DUE TO THE CURVATURE EFFECT AND INTRINSIC BAND SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z. Y.; Ma, L.; Zhao, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Bao, Y. Y.

    2012-06-20

    Previous studies have found that the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulse is energy dependent and that it decreases as a power-law function with increasing photon energy. In this work we have investigated the relation between the energy dependence of the pulse and the so-called Band spectrum by using a sample including 51 well-separated fast rise and exponential decay long-duration GRB pulses observed by BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory). We first decompose these pulses into rise and decay phases and find that the rise widths and the decay widths also behave as a power-law function with photon energy. Then we investigate statistically the relations between the three power-law indices of the rise, decay, and total width of the pulse (denoted as {delta}{sub r}, {delta}{sub d}, and {delta}{sub w}, respectively) and the three Band spectral parameters, high-energy index ({alpha}), low-energy index ({beta}), and peak energy (E{sub p} ). It is found that (1) {alpha} is strongly correlated with {delta}{sub w} and {delta}{sub d} but seems uncorrelated with {delta}{sub r}; (2) {beta} is weakly correlated with the three power-law indices, and (3) E{sub p} does not show evident correlations with the three power-law indices. We further investigate the origin of {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha}. We show that the curvature effect and the intrinsic Band spectrum could naturally lead to the energy dependence of the GRB pulse width and also the {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha} correlations. Our results hold so long as the shell emitting gamma rays has a curved surface and the intrinsic spectrum is a Band spectrum or broken power law. The strong {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} correlation and inapparent correlations between {delta}{sub r} and the three Band spectral parameters also suggest that the rise and decay phases of the GRB pulses have different origins.

  10. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  11. Short pulse width UV laser at 355 nm based on pulse LD side-pumped ceramic Nd:YAG and BBO electro-optical Q-switched

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Chen, X. M.; Lu, B. L.; Ren, Z. Y.; Bai, J. T.

    2012-02-01

    355 nm UV laser was obtained with a pulse width of less than 5 ns and a peak power at megawatt level by adopting the 808 nm pulse laser diode (LD) side-pumped ceramic Nd:YAG and BBO crystal electrooptical Q-switched. The single-pulse energy was measured to be 24.3 mJ with 4.86 ns pulse width and 5.11 MW peak power at a repetition rate of 1Hz under a 120 A pump current. Using a volume of beam splitting mirrors, wavelength outputs at 1064, 532, and 355 nm pulse laser was obtained simultaneously with a respective average output power of 656.6, 357.1, and 260.5 mW, the beam quality factor M 2 are ( M {/x - 1064 2} = 5.83, M {/y - 1064 2} = 5.61), ( M {/x - 532 2} = 4.25, M {/y - 532 2} = 4.08) and ( M {/x - 355 2} = 6.32, M {/y - 355 2} = 6.15), corresponding to a conversion efficiency at 11% from 1064 to 355 nm.

  12. Pulse-width and pulse-shape dependencies of laser-induced damage threshold to transparent optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldunov, M. F.; Manenkov, Alexander A.; Pokotilo, I. L.

    1996-05-01

    Theory of pulsewidth dependence of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) in transparent solids is presented. The damage is supposed to be initiated by thermal explosion of absorbing inclusions. The investigation of thermal explosion is based on an analysis of the heat transfer equation and a new approach to solving this equation is developed allowing to study kinetics of thermal explosion without any modeling presentation of an absorption mechanism. It is shown that the key parameter determining a dependence of LIDT upon a laser pulsewidth, (tau) p, is the heat transfer time, (tau) , from an inclusion to a surrounding medium. At (tau) p >> (tau) a damage threshold is characterized by a laser radiation intensity, whereas at (tau) p << (tau) --by an energy density. The pulsewidth dependence of the LIDT has been investigated for rectangular and gaussian shapes of laser pulses and it has been established that the dependencies considerably differ in these two cases in a range of (tau) p approximately (tau) . An effect of damage statistics, connected with a random spatial distribution of inclusions in a material, is also investigated. For the case of one-type inclusions (single-(tau) inclusions) it is shown: the statistics does not change a functional form of the pulsewidth dependence of the LIDT and correct only the LIDT values by a spot-size factor. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data published by different research groups for the laser damage in a nanosecond-picosecond region.

  13. Analyzing the effectiveness of flare dispensing programs against pulse width modulation seekers using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Š.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared guided missile seekers utilizing pulse width modulation in target tracking is one of the threats against air platforms. To be able to achieve a "soft-kill" protection of own platform against these type of threats, one needs to examine carefully the seeker operating principle with its special electronic counter-counter measure (ECCM) capability. One of the cost-effective ways of soft kill protection is to use flare decoys in accordance with an optimized dispensing program. Such an optimization requires a good understanding of the threat seeker, capabilities of the air platform and engagement scenario information between them. Modeling and simulation is very powerful tool to achieve a valuable insight and understand the underlying phenomenology. A careful interpretation of simulation results is crucial to infer valuable conclusions from the data. In such an interpretation there are lots of factors (features) which affect the results. Therefore, powerful statistical tools and pattern recognition algorithms are of special interest in the analysis. In this paper, we show how self-organizing maps (SOMs), which is one of those powerful tools, can be used in analyzing the effectiveness of various flare dispensing programs against a PWM seeker. We perform several Monte Carlo runs for a typical engagement scenario in a MATLAB-based simulation environment. In each run, we randomly change the flare dispending program and obtain corresponding class: "successful" or "unsuccessful", depending on whether the corresponding flare dispensing program deceives the seeker or not, respectively. Then, in the analysis phase, we use SOMs to interpret and visualize the results.

  14. Dependence of the phase-coherence time in CdS1-xSex on the laser pulse width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, H.; Klingshirn, C.

    1992-03-01

    We performed degenerate-four-wave-mixing (DFWM) experiments in CdS1-xSex mixed crystals with laser pulses of different duration. It was found that the measured phase-coherence times (T2) are critically dependent on the spectral width and by that on the temporal half-width (τlaser) of the exciting laser. In an experiment with 10-ps pulses we find values for T2 of up to 3 ns. Under the same conditions in the same sample, the maximum observed value for T2 is 100 ps for τlaser=1 ps. With even shorter pulses, the phase-coherence time drops below 80 fs, which is the temporal resolution of our experiment. In addition, the line shape of the dephasing curves as well as the density dependence of T2 are substantially changed. The reason for these findings is based on the structure of these crystals. The compositional disorder leads to the formation of localized states. Within the same spectral region, one also finds extended excitons. The interaction of carriers of both kinds is then responsible for the observed effects.

  15. Analysis and synthesis of a fluid sonic pulse system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boita, M.

    1974-01-01

    A nonlinear sonic system is described that includes a delay line. Short-lived pulses with a high repetition frequency circulate through the system. The analysis was carried out by defining the reflection factor at the load and then dividing the input pulse according to duration into sections of appropriate width. The response was determined for each section, the response to the whole pulse being given by the sum of the responses at the sections. This makes it possible to broach the synthesis of a sonic system that will give an output pulse of the desired form.

  16. The theory and implementation of a high quality pulse width modulated waveform synthesiser applicable to voltage FED inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lower, Kim Nigel

    1985-03-01

    Modulation processes associated with the digital implementation of pulse width modulation (PWM) switching strategies were examined. A software package based on a portable turnkey structure is presented. Waveform synthesizer implementation techniques are reviewed. A three phase PWM waveform synthesizer for voltage fed inverters was realized. It is based on a constant carrier frequency of 18 kHz and a regular sample, single edge, asynchronous PWM switching scheme. With high carrier frequencies, it is possible to utilize simple switching strategies and as a consequence, many advantages are highlighted, emphasizing the importance to industrial and office markets.

  17. Characterization of a Surface-Flashover Ion Source with 10 - 250 ns Pulse Width

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P L; Meyer, G A; Sampayan, S E; Tang, V; Morse, J D

    2008-08-05

    As a step towards developing an ultra compact D-D neutron source for various defense and homeland security applications, a compact ion source is needed. Towards that end, we are testing a pulsed, surface flashover source, with deuterated titanium films deposited on alumina substrates as the electrodes. An electrochemically-etched mask was used to define the electrode areas on the substrate during the sputtered deposition of the titanium films. Deuterium loading of the films was performed in an all metal-sealed vacuum chamber containing a heated stage. Deuterium ion current from the source was determined by measuring the neutrons produced when the ions impacted a deuterium-loaded target held at -90 kV. As the duration of the arc current is varied, it was observed that the integrated deuteron current per pulse initially increases rapidly, then reaches a maximum near a pulse length of 100 ns.

  18. Vertical Roughness of the Polar Regions of Mars from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Pulse-Width Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, J. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2000-08-01

    The sub-kilometer scale vertical roughness of the martian surface in the polar regions can be investigated using calibrated, optical pulse width data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Garvin and others have previously discussed initial observations of what we have called "total vertical roughness" or TVR, as derived from MOLA optical pulse width observations acquired during the pre-mapping phases of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission. Here we present the first assessment of the Mars polar region properties of the TVR parameter from more than nine months of continuous mapping by MOLA as part of the MGS mapping mission. Other than meter-scale surface properties directly inferred from Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images, MOLA measurements of footprint-scale TVR represent the only direct measurements of the local vertical structure of the martian surface at approx. 150 m length scales. These types of data have previously been shown to correlate with geologic process histories for terrestrial desert surfaces on the basis of Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) observations. Additional information is obtained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Vertical Roughness of the Polar Regions of Mars from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Pulse-Width Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, J. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The sub-kilometer scale vertical roughness of the martian surface in the polar regions can be investigated using calibrated, optical pulse width data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Garvin and others have previously discussed initial observations of what we have called "total vertical roughness" or TVR, as derived from MOLA optical pulse width observations acquired during the pre-mapping phases of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission. Here we present the first assessment of the Mars polar region properties of the TVR parameter from more than nine months of continuous mapping by MOLA as part of the MGS mapping mission. Other than meter-scale surface properties directly inferred from Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images, MOLA measurements of footprint-scale TVR represent the only direct measurements of the local vertical structure of the martian surface at approx. 150 m length scales. These types of data have previously been shown to correlate with geologic process histories for terrestrial desert surfaces on the basis of Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) observations. Additional information is obtained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Pulse width modulated push-pull driven parallel resonant converter with active free-wheel

    DOEpatents

    Reass, William A.; Schrank, Louis

    2004-06-22

    An apparatus and method for high frequency alternating power generation to control kilowatts of supplied power in microseconds. The present invention includes a means for energy storage, push-pull switching means, control electronics, transformer means, resonant circuitry and means for excess energy recovery, all in electrical communication. A push-pull circuit works synchronously with a force commutated free-wheel transistor to provide current pulses to a transformer. A change in the conduction angle of the push-pull circuit changes the amount of energy coupled into the transformer's secondary oscillating circuit, thereby altering the induced secondary resonating voltage. At the end of each pulse, the force commutated free-wheel transistor causes residual excess energy in the primary circuit to be transmitted back to the storage capacitor for later use.

  1. On an assessment of surface roughness estimates from lunar laser altimetry pulse-widths for the Moon from LOLA using LROC narrow-angle stereo DTMs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jan-Peter; Poole, William

    2013-04-01

    Neumann et al. [1] proposed that laser altimetry pulse-widths could be employed to derive "within-footprint" surface roughness as opposed to surface roughness estimated from between laser altimetry pierce-points such as the example for Mars [2] and more recently from the 4-pointed star-shaped LOLA (Lunar reconnaissance Orbiter Laser Altimeter) onboard the NASA-LRO [3]. Since 2009, the LOLA has been collecting extensive global laser altimetry data with a 5m footprint and ?25m between the 5 points in a star-shape. In order to assess how accurately surface roughness (defined as simple RMS after slope correction) derived from LROC matches with surface roughness derived from LOLA footprints, publicly released LROC-NA (LRO Camera Narrow Angle) 1m Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) were employed to measure the surface roughness directly within each 5m footprint. A set of 20 LROC-NA DTMs were examined. Initially the match-up between the LOLA and LROC-NA orthorectified images (ORIs) is assessed visually to ensure that the co-registration is better than the LOLA footprint resolution. For each LOLA footprint, the pulse-width geolocation is then retrieved and this is used to "cookie-cut" the surface roughness and slopes derived from the LROC-NA DTMs. The investigation which includes data from a variety of different landforms shows little, if any correlation between surface roughness estimated from DTMs with LOLA pulse-widths at sub-footprint scale. In fact there is only any perceptible correlation between LOLA and LROC-DTMs at baselines of 40-60m for surface roughness and 20m for slopes. [1] Neumann et al. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter pulse width measurements and footprint-scale roughness. Geophysical Research Letters (2003) vol. 30 (11), paper 1561. DOI: 10.1029/2003GL017048 [2] Kreslavsky and Head. Kilometer-scale roughness of Mars: results from MOLA data analysis. J Geophys Res (2000) vol. 105 (E11) pp. 26695-26711. [3] Rosenburg et al. Global surface slopes and roughness of the

  2. Influence of pulse width on the laser ablation of zinc in nitrogen ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smijesh, N.; Rao, Kavya H.; Philip, Reji

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of expanding plasma plumes generated by irradiating a solid zinc target with laser pulses of 7 ns and 100 fs durations are carried out in the ambient pressure range of 0.05-200 Torr of nitrogen. At the relatively high input fluence of ~16 J/cm2, fast and slow atomic species are found to appear at different times in the optical time-of-flight (OTOF) spectra, the dynamics of which is primarily determined by the pulse duration of the excitation laser. In fs LPP, the average speed of fast species is unaffected by an increase in ambient pressure, while in ns LPP, the speed is found to reduce with pressure. The slow species shows a sharp peak in the OTOF spectra with a narrow velocity distribution for fs LPP, indicating a large number density and low electron temperature, which is consistent with optical emission spectroscopic (OES) studies. On the other hand, for ns LPP, the OTOF of slow species shows a more broadened profile which can be attributed to strong plume-laser interaction. The dynamics of slow species is heavily influenced by the presence of shock waves, which leads to the occurrence of much slower species at larger pressures.

  3. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronicmore » states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.« less

  4. Modern optical signal processing experiments demonstrating intensity and pulse-width modulation using an acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting-Chung; McNeill, Mark D.; Moore, Daniel J.

    1997-09-01

    Two experiments are presented to introduce undergraduate students in electrical engineering or physics to modern optical signal processing. Both experiments use an acousto-optic (AO) Bragg cell together with additional electronics to modify the intensity of a laser beam. Specifically, we show how an AO feedback system operating in the Bragg regime can be configured to produce amplitude modulated (AM) and pulse-width modulated optical signals. The basic components of the AO feedback system include a laser, an AO Bragg cell, an electronic AM modulator, a photodetector, an amplifier, and an electronic adder. Except for the laser, the AM modulator, and the Bragg cell, each of these components can be constructed with low cost electronics. A tutorial outlining the principles of acousto-optics is included to provide sufficient understanding of the Bragg cell. The project described in the paper has been used as a demonstration for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students in electrical engineering communications and optics classes.

  5. Impact Of The Pulse Width Modulation On The Temperature Distribution In The Armature Of A Solenoid Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goraj, R.

    2015-12-01

    In order to estimate the inductive power set in the armature of the high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) during the open loop control (OLC) using pulse width modulation (PWM) an analytical explicit formula has been derived. The simplifications taken both in the geometry and in the physical behavior of the HSV were described. The inductive power was calculated for different boundary conditions and shown as a function of the frequency of the coil current. The power set in the armature was used as an input to the thermal calculation. The thermal calculation had an objective to estimate the time dependent temperature distribution in the armature of the HSV. All the derivation steps were presented and the influence of different boundary conditions was shown and discussed. The increase of the temperature during the heating with inductive power has been evaluated both in the core and on the side surface of the HSV.

  6. Experimental Effects of Laser Power on the Writability and Pulse Width in a Heat Assisted Longitudinal Recording System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Tim; Bain, James A.; Stancil, Daniel D.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.; Challener, William A.; McDaniel, Terry; Deeman, Neil; Brucker, Charles

    2003-02-01

    In this paper the effects of increasing laser power on the writability and pulse width at half max (PW50) were experimentally measured on a longitudinal CoCrPt recording medium in a heat assisted magnetic recording system. The dynamic coercivity, quantified by spin stand measurements, was found to decrease linearly with laser power. Furthermore, it was found that careful optimization of laser power and write current are required to minimize the PW50. By choosing an optimal combination of write current and laser power it was possible to achieve a PW50 with heat assistance that could not otherwise have been reached. The results of this study help to establish the viability of heat assisted magnetic recording technology as a potential solution to density limits set by superparamagnetism.

  7. Pulse width modulation electro-acupuncture on cardiovascular remodeling and plasma nitric oxide in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xuan; You, Chao; Feng, Qiu-Chao; Yin, Ting; Chen, Zhong-Ben; Ball, Patrick; Wang, Le-Xin

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of pulse width modulation electro-acupuncture (PWM-EA) on cardiovascular remodeling and nitric oxide (NO) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Thirty-four male SHR were randomly divided into control, captopril, and two PWM-EA groups, which were treated with 350 Hz (SHR-350 Hz) and whole audio bandwith electro-acupuncture (SHR-WAB group) respectively, on the ST 36 point located on the outside of the hind leg. Systolic blood pressure (BP), plasma and myocardial NO were measured. Histological studies were also performed on the aortic wall and the left ventricle. The BP in the SHR-350 Hz, SHR-WAB and the captopril groups was lower than in the control group following the treatment (P < .05). The average aortic media wall thickness in the two electro-acupuncture groups was less than in the control group (P < .05). The left ventricle/heart weight ratio in the captopril and SHR-350 Hz groups was less than in the control group (P < .01), but was similar between the SHR-WAB and the control group (P > .05). The plasma and myocardium NO levels were elevated in the captopril and the SHR-350 Hz group (P < .05 and .01, resp.). The plasma level of NO in the SHR-WAB group was also higher than in the control group (P < .05). We concluded that pulse width modulation electro-acupuncture on the ST 36 point prevents the progression of hypertension and diminishes the cardiovascular remodeling in SHR. It also elevates plasma and cardiac NO in this animal model. PMID:21785633

  8. Short pulse-width gain-switched Ho:YAG ceramic laser at ∼2.09  μm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianing; Liu, QiYao; Shen, Deyuan; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Dingyuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents a short pulse-width gain-switched Ho:YAG ceramic laser at 2089 nm resonantly pumped by a homemade Q-switched Tm:fiber laser at ∼1908  nm. We generated stable pulses of 44-103 ns duration and 0.13-2 kW peak power at 20 kHz of pulse repetition frequency when the incident pump pulse energy increased from ∼0.1 to 0.3 mJ. We also obtained an average output power of 1.76 W under an incident pump power of 6 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 41.8%. Finally, this paper discusses the prospects to further improve the results with even a shorter pulse-width and higher peak power. PMID:26974778

  9. High-peak-power, short-pulse-width, LD end-pumped, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG 946 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renpeng; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Yu, Junhua

    2012-10-01

    High-peak-power, short-pulse-width diode pumped 946 nm Nd:YAG laser in passively Q-switching operation with Cr4+:YAG is reported. The highest average output power reaches 3.4 W using the Cr4+:YAG with initial transmissivity T0=95%. When the T0=90% Cr4+:YAG is employed, the maximum peak power of 31.4 kW with a pulse width of 8.3 ns at 946 nm is generated.

  10. Robust integral variable structure controller and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated input shaper design for flexible spacecraft with mismatched uncertainty/disturbance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a dual-stage control system design method for the flexible spacecraft attitude maneuvering control by use of on-off thrusters and active vibration control by input shaper. In this design approach, attitude control system and vibration suppression were designed separately using lower order model. As a stepping stone, an integral variable structure controller with the assumption of knowing the upper bounds of the mismatched lumped perturbation has been designed which ensures exponential convergence of attitude angle and angular velocity in the presence of bounded uncertainty/disturbances. To reconstruct estimates of the system states for use in a full information variable structure control law, an asymptotic variable structure observer is also employed. In addition, the thruster output is modulated in pulse-width pulse-frequency so that the output profile is similar to the continuous control histories. For actively suppressing the induced vibration, the input shaping technique is used to modify the existing command so that less vibration will be caused by the command itself, which only requires information about the vibration frequency and damping of the closed-loop system. The rationale behind this hybrid control scheme is that the integral variable structure controller can achieve good precision pointing, even in the presence of uncertainties/disturbances, whereas the shaped input attenuator is applied to actively suppress the undesirable vibrations excited by the rapid maneuvers. Simulation results for the spacecraft model show precise attitude control and vibration suppression. PMID:17706218

  11. Reducing, by pulse width modulation, the curing temperature of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ta-Ko; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Tsai, Chi-Cheng

    2006-06-01

    Third-generation LEDs have high irradiance and efficiency, but the associated temperature rise is potentially hazardous to the pulp of teeth. We evaluated, during composite polymerization, the irradiance and temperature rise of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit (LCU) with optimal pulse width modulation (PWM), and then compared the results with four off-the-shelf high-power LCUs. A cavity was prepared in a tooth, and a composite resin layer was applied and cured. For each LCU, the irradiance and temperature changes at the pulp-dentin junction were measured. Microhardness (Vickers hardness) of cured composite samples was measured for each LCU. Our prototype had a final temperature of 36.4 +/- 1.3 degrees C and irradiance of 1,182 +/- 1 mW/cm2. The unit with the highest temperature had a temperature of 48.7 +/- 1.2 degrees C and an irradiance of 1,194 +/- 1 mW/cm2. Based on the results of the present study, it was shown that PWM technology reduced the curing temperature while retaining the polymerization effectiveness of a high-power LED LCU. PMID:16916235

  12. Resolution enhancement using pulse width modulation in digital micromirror device-based point-array scanning pattern exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hung-Fei; Huang, Yi-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Digital-mask lithography systems, with a digital micromirror device (DMD) as their central piece, have been widely used for defining patterns on printed circuit board (PCB). This study designed optical module parameters for point-array projection lithography based on field tracing technique to improve the quality of the aerial image on the exposure plane. In the realized optical module for the point-array projection lithography, a DMD was used as the dynamic digital-mask, and a 405-nm-wavelength laser was used to illuminate the DMD. The laser was then focused through the micro-lens array in the optical module to form a point array and was projected onto a dynamic scanning stage. By calculating the beam-overlapping rate, stage velocity, spot diameter, and DMD frame rate and programming them into the stage- and DMD-synchronized controller, the point array formed line patterns on the photoresist. Furthermore, using pulse width modulation (PWM) technique to operate the activation periods of the DMD mirrors effectively controlled the exposure and achieved a feature linewidth of less than 10 μm.

  13. Analysis of multiple pulse NMR in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Elleman, D. D.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The general problems associated with the removal of the effects of dipolar broadening from solid-state NMR spectra are analyzed. The effects of finite pulse width and H sub 1 inhomogeneity are shown to have limited the resolution of previous pulse cycles, and a new eight-pulse cycle designed to minimize these problems is discussed. Spectra for F-19 in CaF2 taken with this cycle are presented which show residual linewidth near 10 Hz. The feasibility of measuring proton chemical shift tensors is discussed.

  14. A frequency and pulse-width co-modulation strategy for transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation based on sEMG time-domain features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Xuan; Wang, Hai-Peng; Bao, Xue-Liang; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Gong

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is often used as a control signal in neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) systems to enhance the voluntary control and proprioceptive sensory feedback of paralyzed patients. Most sEMG-controlled NMES systems use the envelope of the sEMG signal to modulate the stimulation intensity (current amplitude or pulse width) with a constant frequency. The aims of this study were to develop a strategy that co-modulates frequency and pulse width based on features of the sEMG signal and to investigate the torque-reproduction performance and the level of fatigue resistance achieved with our strategy. Approach. We examined the relationships between wrist torque and two stimulation parameters (frequency and pulse width) and between wrist torque and two sEMG time-domain features (mean absolute value (MAV) and number of slope sign changes (NSS)) in eight healthy volunteers. By using wrist torque as an intermediate variable, customized and generalized transfer functions were constructed to convert the two features of the sEMG signal into the two stimulation parameters, thereby establishing a MAV/NSS dual-coding (MNDC) algorithm. Wrist torque reproduction performance was assessed by comparing the torque generated by the algorithms with that originally recorded during voluntary contractions. Muscle fatigue was assessed by measuring the decline percentage of the peak torque and by comparing the torque time integral of the response to test stimulation trains before and after fatigue sessions. Main Results. The MNDC approach could produce a wrist torque that closely matched the voluntary wrist torque. In addition, a smaller decay in the wrist torque was observed after the MNDC-coded fatigue stimulation was applied than after stimulation using pulse-width modulation alone. Significance. Compared with pulse-width modulation stimulation strategies that are based on sEMG detection, the MNDC strategy is more effective for both voluntary muscle

  15. Pulse-Width Saturation and Kelly-Sideband Shift in a Graphene-Nanosheet Mode-Locked Fiber Laser with Weak Negative Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Yu; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chung-Lun; Lo, Jui-Yung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-04-01

    The optimized soliton mode locking of the erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) and its pulse-shortening dynamic with the graphene nanosheet is demonstrated by precisely detuning the weakly negative group-delay dispersion (GDD) and maintaining strong self-phase-modulation (SPM), to obtain the shortest pulse width of 449 fs with a spectral linewidth of 6.02 nm. The pulse evolution with the mode-locking mechanism changing from the self-amplitude-modulation of the saturable absorber, to the soliton compression caused by the GDD and SPM is experimentally and numerically investigated in detail. Under high pumping powers, the enlarged up-chirp inside the EDFL cavity can induce a significant Kelly-sideband shift of up to 0.5 nm. The passively-mode-locked EDFL pulse width is controllable by detuning the GDD and SPM parameters, so that the pulse width can be compressed from 642 to 449 fs while reducing the negative GDD from -0.354 to -0.154 ps2 . The compression ratio can be also improved by strengthening the SPM at this stage.

  16. An optical pulse width modulation generator based on the injection-locking property of single mode FP-LD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Quoc Hoai; Nakarmi, Bikash; Won, Yong Hyub

    2013-03-01

    A novel simple optical pulse width modulation generator (OPWMG) based on injection-locking property of a single mode FP-LD (SMFP-LD) has been proposed and experimentally verified. The OPWMG consists of a SMFP-LD (which acts as comparator), an optical sinusoidal wave source (analog input), and a continuous optical beam (control signal). The power required for fully injection-locking the SMFP-LD acts as the referent power whereas the combination power of continuous optical beam and analog optical sinusoidal signals work as control signals for changing the duty cycle of the proposed OPWMG. The presence of only continuous optical beam is not sufficient to suppress the dominant mode of SMFP-LD with high ON/OFF contrast ratio; however, the application of additional sinusoidal wave of constant amplitude and frequency, the dominant mode of SMFP-LD can be suppressed for the certain time window. Since, injection-locking power is dependent with the combined power of input injected continuous beam and sinusoidal optical wave, the time window of injection-locking can be varied by changing input beam power which provides different duty cycle of 13% to 68% at the output. Current available schemes for generating PWM signals are in electrical domain, hence, they need to convert electrical signals into optical domain by using expensive O/E converters for application in optical control and signal processing. The proposed OPWMG scheme has several advantages, such as low cost, low power consumption (~0.5 mW) which can be used for various applications where the effect of EMI/EMR is considered as an important factor such as control circuit for high voltage converters in power plant and electrical vehicles.

  17. HRS Pulse Height Analysis - 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1991-07-01

    This test performs a pulse height analysis to determine individual diode response as a function of threshold for HRS detector 2. Based on this evaluation new thresholds may be determined for optimal HRS operation. Command blocks ZCTFLIT1 and ZCTFLIT2 will be updated accordingly. This test will run once during the year. Also included is one ion test which is a PHA of twice normal threshold to look for ion events (which accelerate back up the 22 kV potential of the tube, liberate electrons from the phocathode, and produce events of twice normal energy (this should be a very low, stable rate).

  18. The influence of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser ablation with variable pulse width on morphology and microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ricardo Scarparo; Gouw-Soares, Sheila; Cassoni, Alessandra; Haypek, Patricia; Zezell, Denise Maria; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of various pulse widths with different energy parameters of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (2.94 mum) on the morphology and microleakage of cavities restored with composite resin. Identically sized class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 54 bovine teeth by high-speed drill (n = 6, control, group 1) and prepared by Er:YAG laser (Fidelis 320A, Fotona, Slovenia) with irradiation parameters of 350 mJ/ 4 Hz or 400 mJ/2 Hz and pulse width: group 2, very short pulse (VSP); group 3, short pulse (SP); group 4, long pulse (LP); group 5, very long pulse (VLP). All cavities were filled with composite resin (Z-250-3 M), stored at 37 degrees C in distilled water, polished after 24 h, and thermally stressed (700 cycles/5-55 degrees C). The teeth were impermeabilized, immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution for 8 h, sectioned longitudinally, and exposed to Photoflood light for 10 min to reveal the stain. The leakage was evaluated under stereomicroscope by three different examiners, in a double-blind fashion, and scored (0-3). The results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test (P > 0.05) and showed that there was no significant differences between the groups tested. Under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the morphology of the cavities prepared by laser showed irregular enamel margins and dentin internal walls, and a more conservative pattern than that of conventional cavities. The different power settings and pulse widths of Er:YAG laser in cavity preparation had no influence on microleakage of composite resin restorations. PMID:19802717

  19. Dependence of light pulse propagation on its temporal width: Transition from group velocity to c-propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignesti, Emilio; Tommasi, Federico; Fini, Lorenzo; Cavalieri, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    We show how the velocity of an optical pulse propagating through a dispersive medium depends on the pulse duration. A transition from the group velocity for long pulses to the in-vacuum velocity for short pulses is shown both in experimental results and in theoretical predictions. The temporal duration of the experimental pulses are 150 ps and 3.5 ns. A description of the pulse propagation in terms of the time "center of mass" of the energy flow allows an intuitive overview of the results.

  20. Pump-beam-induced optical damage depended on repetition frequency and pulse width in 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukawa, Takeshi; Nawata, Kouji; Notake, Takashi; Qi Feng; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2013-07-08

    We investigated the dependence of optical damage to an organic nonlinear optical crystal of 4-dimethylamino-N Prime -methyl-4 Prime -stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) on the repetition frequency and pulse width of the pump beam used to cause the thermal damage. For a pump beam with a pulse width of 15 ns at a wavelength of 1064 nm, the highest damage threshold of 8.0 J/cm{sup 2} was measured for repetition frequencies in the range from 10 to 40 Hz. On the other hand, DAST crystals were easily damaged under the repetition rates from 50 to 100 Hz. For 600-ps pulses, a higher damage threshold that was a factor of 11 to 28 times higher in terms of peak intensity was obtained compared with that of 15-ns pulses. In both the cases of 15-ns pulse duration and 600-ps duration, we demonstrated that the thermal effects in DAST crystals dominated the optical damage, which depended on thermal accumulation and dissipation.

  1. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train are shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  2. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.; Packman, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio were examined in the frequency domain analysis and pulse shape deconvolution was developed for use in the time domain analysis. Comparisons of the relative performance of each analysis technique are made for the characterization of acoustic emission pulses recorded by a measuring system. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameter values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emission associated with (a) crack propagation, (b) ball dropping on a plate, (c) spark discharge, and (d) defective and good ball bearings. Deconvolution of the first few micro-seconds of the pulse train is shown to be the region in which the significant signatures of the acoustic emission event are to be found.

  3. Experimental investigations and statistical analysis of pulsed laser bending of AISI 304 stainless steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Kuntal; Pratihar, D. K.; Nath, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents experimental investigations on pulsed laser bending of sheet metal and statistical analysis to study the effects of process parameters. Laser power, scan speed, spot diameter and pulsed duration were taken as input variables and bending angle was considered as the output. Response surface methodology was used for modeling and optimization of the pulsed laser bending process. The performance of the developed model was validated through the experiments. All the input variables were found to have significant influence on the bending angle. Bending angle increased with the increase of laser power and pulse duration and decreased with the increase of scan speed and spot diameter. The optimum process parameters for the maximum bending angle were also found and verified with experimental data. The effects of pulse frequency, pulse width and pulse energy on bending angle were also investigated through experiments. Bending angle was found to be the maximum for a certain value of pulse frequency. With the increase of pulse width, bending angle increased at constant laser power but decreased at constant pulse energy. Bending angle was seen to increase with the increase of spatial overlapping and decrease with the increase of gap at constant laser power, but it showed optimal values for both the cases at constant line energy. A comparative study between continuous and pulsed laser bending was carried out to study the process efficiency in terms of energy input and produced deformation.

  4. Wavelet transforms for optical pulse analysis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Javier Molina; Mazilu, Michael; Miller, Alan; Galbraith, Ian

    2005-12-01

    An exploration of wavelet transforms for ultrashort optical pulse characterization is given. Some of the most common wavelets are examined to determine the advantages of using the causal quasi-wavelet suggested in Proceedings of the LEOS 15th Annual Meeting (IEEE, 2002), Vol. 2, p. 592, in terms of pulse analysis and, in particular, chirp extraction. Owing to its ability to distinguish between past and future pulse information, the causal quasi-wavelet is found to be highly suitable for optical pulse characterization. PMID:16396051

  5. Extraction and analysis of the width, gray scale and radian in Chinese signature handwriting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohong

    2015-10-01

    Forensic handwriting examination is a relevant identification process in forensic science. This research obtained ideas from the process of features detection and analysis in forensic handwriting examination. A Chinese signature database was developed and comprised original signatures, freehand imitation forgeries, random forgeries and tracing imitation forgeries. The features of width, gray scale and radian combined with stroke orders were automatically extracted after image processing. A correlation coefficient was used to precisely characterize and express the similarities between signatures. To validate the differences between writers, a multivariate analysis of the variance was employed. The canonical discriminant analysis was performed between the original and non-original signatures; the cross-validation estimated the discriminating power of the width, gray scale and radian data. It is suggested that the extraction and analysis of these properties in Chinese signatures is reasonable. Meanwhile, forensic handwriting examination using the quantitative feature extraction and statistical analysis methods in this research could be performed with a satisfactory result in the discriminant analysis. PMID:26209129

  6. Radiation hardness evaluations of 65 nm fully depleted silicon on insulator and bulk processes by measuring single event transient pulse widths and single event upset rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Jun; Sonezaki, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazutoshi

    2015-04-01

    We measure single event transient (SET) pulse widths on inverter chains and single event upset (SEU) rates on flip-flops (FFs) fabricated in 65 nm fully depleted silicon on insulator (FD-SOI) and bulk processes. The layout designs of test chips are strictly identical between their processes besides buried oxide (BOX) layers. Experimental results show that neutron-induced SEU and SET rates in the FD-SOI process are 230× and 450× lower than those in the bulk process, respectively.

  7. Effects of long pulse width and high pulsing frequency on surface superhydrophobicity of polytetrafluoroethylene in quasi-direct-current plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Wang Huaiyu; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Chu, Paul K.; Zhang Yumei

    2009-03-01

    Long pulse, high frequency quasi-direct-current (dc) oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is utilized to create a superhydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface with a water contact angle of over 150 deg. This technique allows the use of a high duty cycle without deleterious effects such as extensive sample heating encountered in conventional PIII. Scanning electron microscopy images review submicrometer-nanometer structures on the PTFE surface after long pulse, high frequency PIII indicative of ion implantation. On the other hand, plasma modification is the dominant effect in short pulse, low frequency PIII. Quasi-dc PIII is demonstrated to offer adjustable synergistic plasma and ion beam effects.

  8. Single-pulse laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass for pulse widths of 500  fs, 10  ps, 20  ns.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Arines, Justo; O'Connor, Gerard M; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-10

    In this work, we report a comparative study of the laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass as a function of the pulse width and for IR laser wavelengths. We determine the ablation threshold for three different pulse durations: τ=500  fs, 10 ps, and 20 ns. Experiments have been performed using a single laser pulse per shot in an ambient (air) environment. The results show a significant difference, of two orders of magnitude, between the group of ablation thresholds obtained for femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond pulses. This difference is reduced to 1 order of magnitude in the soda-lime substrate with tin impurities, pointing out the importance of the incubation effect. The morphology of the marks generated over the different glass materials by one single pulse of different pulse durations has been analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (FESEM ULTRA Plus). Our results are important for practical purposes, providing the ablation threshold data of four commonly used substrates at three different pulse durations in the infrared regime (1030-1064 nm) and complete data for increasing the understanding of the differences in the mechanism's leading ablation in the nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond regimes. PMID:26479792

  9. Men’s Facial Width-to-Height Ratio Predicts Aggression: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haselhuhn, Michael P.; Ormiston, Margaret E.; Wong, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has identified men’s facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior. Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust. In the current paper, we synthesize existing work by conducting a meta-analysis to estimate whether and how fWHR predicts aggression. Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men’s fWHR and aggression. PMID:25849992

  10. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Sen, P. N.; Schwartz, L. M.; Patz, S.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects.

  11. Tortuosity measurement and the effects of finite pulse widths on xenon gas diffusion NMR studies of porous media.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Hürlimann, M D; Sen, P N; Schwartz, L M; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2001-01-01

    We have extended the utility of NMR as a technique to probe porous media structure over length scales of approximately 100-2000 microm by using the spin 1/2 noble gas 129Xe imbibed into the system's pore space. Such length scales are much greater than can be probed with NMR diffusion studies of water-saturated porous media. We utilized Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo NMR measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(t), of the xenon gas filling the pore space to study further the measurements of both the pore surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V(p), and the tortuosity (pore connectivity) of the medium. In uniform-size glass bead packs, we observed D(t) decreasing with increasing t, reaching an observed asymptote of approximately 0.62-0.65D(0), that could be measured over diffusion distances extending over multiple bead diameters. Measurements of D(t)/D(0) at differing gas pressures showed this tortuosity limit was not affected by changing the characteristic diffusion length of the spins during the diffusion encoding gradient pulse. This was not the case at the short time limit, where D(t)/D(0) was noticeably affected by the gas pressure in the sample. Increasing the gas pressure, and hence reducing D(0) and the diffusion during the gradient pulse served to reduce the previously observed deviation of D(t)/D(0) from the S/V(p) relation. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate between the long and short time limits in D(t). While the short time D(t) points lay above the interpolation line in the case of small beads, due to diffusion during the gradient pulse on the order of the pore size, it was also noted that the experimental D(t) data fell below the Pade line in the case of large beads, most likely due to finite size effects. PMID:11445310

  12. Power Law Regression Analysis of Heat Flux Width in Type I ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, C. D.; Makowski, M. A.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-10-01

    In this project, a database of Type I ELM characteristics has been assembled and will be used to investigate possible dependencies of the heat flux width on physics and engineering parameters. At the edge near the divertor, high impulsive heat loads are imparted onto the surface. The impact of these ELMs can cause a reduction in divertor lifetime if the heat flux is great enough due to material erosion. A program will be used to analyze data, extract relevant, measurable quantities, and record the quantities in the table. Care is taken to accurately capture the complex space/time structure of the ELM. Then correlations between discharge and equilibrium parameters will be investigated. Power law regression analysis will be used to help determine the dependence of the heat flux width on these various measurable quantities and parameters. This will enable us to better understand the physics of heat flux at the edge. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US DOE under DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  13. Electrical system for pulse-width modulated control of a power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals and related operating methods

    DOEpatents

    Welchko, Brian A.

    2012-02-14

    Systems and methods are provided for pulse-width modulated control of power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals. An electrical system comprises an energy source and a motor. The motor has a first set of windings and a second set of windings, which are electrically isolated from each other. An inverter module is coupled between the energy source and the motor and comprises a first set of phase legs coupled to the first set of windings and a second set of phase legs coupled to the second set of windings. A controller is coupled to the inverter module and is configured to achieve a desired power flow between the energy source and the motor by modulating the first set of phase legs using a first carrier signal and modulating the second set of phase legs using a second carrier signal. The second carrier signal is phase-shifted relative to the first carrier signal.

  14. Comparison of a synergetic battery pack drive system to a pulse width modulated AC induction motor drive for an electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Salameh, Z.M.; Eaves, S.S.

    1999-06-01

    A new battery configuration technique and accompanying control circuitry, termed a Synergetic Battery Pack (SBP), is designed to work with Lithium batteries, and can be used as both an inverter for an electric vehicle AC induction motor drive and as a battery charger. In this paper, the performance of a Synergetic Battery Pack during motor drive operation is compared via computer simulation with a conventional motor drive which uses sinusoidal pulse width modulation (SPWM) to determine its effectiveness as a motor drive. The study showed that the drive efficiency was compatible with the conventional system, and offered a significant advantage in the lower frequency operating ranges. The voltage total harmonic distortion (THD) of the SBP was significantly lower than the PWM drive output, but the current THD was slightly higher due to the shape of the harmonic spectrum. In conclusion, the SBP is an effective alternative to a conventional drive, but the real advantage lies in its battery management capabilities and charger operation.

  15. Analytical modeling of eddy-current losses caused by pulse-width-modulation switching in permanent-magnet brushless direct-current motors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, F.; Nehl, T.W.

    1998-09-01

    Because of their high efficiency and power density the PM brushless dc motor is a strong candidate for electric and hybrid vehicle propulsion systems. An analytical approach is developed to predict the inverter high frequency pulse width modulation (PWM) switching caused eddy-current losses in a permanent magnet brushless dc motor. The model uses polar coordinates to take curvature effects into account, and is also capable of including the space harmonic effect of the stator magnetic field and the stator lamination effect on the losses. The model was applied to an existing motor design and was verified with the finite element method. Good agreement was achieved between the two approaches. Hence, the model is expected to be very helpful in predicting PWM switching losses in permanent magnet machine design.

  16. Flow Cytometry Pulse Width Data Enables Rapid and Sensitive Estimation of Biomass Dry Weight in the Microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Chioccioli, Maurizio; Hankamer, Ben; Ross, Ian L.

    2014-01-01

    Dry weight biomass is an important parameter in algaculture. Direct measurement requires weighing milligram quantities of dried biomass, which is problematic for small volume systems containing few cells, such as laboratory studies and high throughput assays in microwell plates. In these cases indirect methods must be used, inducing measurement artefacts which vary in severity with the cell type and conditions employed. Here, we utilise flow cytometry pulse width data for the estimation of cell density and biomass, using Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as model algae and compare it to optical density methods. Measurement of cell concentration by flow cytometry was shown to be more sensitive than optical density at 750 nm (OD750) for monitoring culture growth. However, neither cell concentration nor optical density correlates well to biomass when growth conditions vary. Compared to the growth of C. vulgaris in TAP (tris-acetate-phosphate) medium, cells grown in TAP + glucose displayed a slowed cell division rate and a 2-fold increased dry biomass accumulation compared to growth without glucose. This was accompanied by increased cellular volume. Laser scattering characteristics during flow cytometry were used to estimate cell diameters and it was shown that an empirical but nonlinear relationship could be shown between flow cytometric pulse width and dry weight biomass per cell. This relationship could be linearised by the use of hypertonic conditions (1 M NaCl) to dehydrate the cells, as shown by density gradient centrifugation. Flow cytometry for biomass estimation is easy to perform, sensitive and offers more comprehensive information than optical density measurements. In addition, periodic flow cytometry measurements can be used to calibrate OD750 measurements for both convenience and accuracy. This approach is particularly useful for small samples and where cellular characteristics, especially cell size, are expected to vary during growth. PMID

  17. Spatial analysis of hypocenter to fault relationships for determining fault process zone width in Japan.

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Roberts, Barry L.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C. (Abilene Christian University, Abilene, TX)

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary investigation areas (PIA) for a potential repository of high-level radioactive waste must be evaluated by NUMO with regard to a number of qualifying factors. One of these factors is related to earthquakes and fault activity. This study develops a spatial statistical assessment method that can be applied to the active faults in Japan to perform such screening evaluations. This analysis uses the distribution of seismicity near faults to define the width of the associated process zone. This concept is based on previous observations of aftershock earthquakes clustered near active faults and on the assumption that such seismic activity is indicative of fracturing and associated impacts on bedrock integrity. Preliminary analyses of aggregate data for all of Japan confirmed that the frequency of earthquakes is higher near active faults. Data used in the analysis were obtained from NUMO and consist of three primary sources: (1) active fault attributes compiled in a spreadsheet, (2) earthquake hypocenter data, and (3) active fault locations. Examination of these data revealed several limitations with regard to the ability to associate fault attributes from the spreadsheet to locations of individual fault trace segments. In particular, there was no direct link between attributes of the active faults in the spreadsheet and the active fault locations in the GIS database. In addition, the hypocenter location resolution in the pre-1983 data was less accurate than for later data. These pre-1983 hypocenters were eliminated from further analysis.

  18. Fiber-solid, hybrid, single-frequency laser (100 W) with a 100 MHz repetition rate and 1 ns pulse width from a spherical aberration compensated four-stage Nd:YVO₄ amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yi; Liu, Bin; Wang, Chunhua; Xiang, Zhen; Liu, Chong

    2014-08-01

    A pulsed laser for laser guide stars with a 100 MHz repetition rate and 1 ns pulse width was achieved by external modulation of a continuous wave (CW) laser with a 70 kHz spectrum width. The laser is amplified first by two fiber pre-amplifiers and then by four solid-state power amplifiers. The laser achieves gains as high as 36 dB in the fiber pre-amplifiers due to the long gain medium length. The output power from the fiber amplifiers is 2.1 W. The laser receives further amplification in the solid-state amplifiers and retains good beam quality by aberration compensation. The final output average power is 102.9 W, and the beam quality factor M² is 1.46. The laser reaches high power without spectrum width and pulse width broadening at the 100 MHz repetition rate. The spectrum width of the pulsed laser is less than 0.8 GHz, which is close to the Fourier transform limit. Such a laser with single-frequency, high-repetition, and high-power features along with good beam quality will be valuable for many research areas. PMID:25090340

  19. Quantitative trait locus analysis for kernel width using maize recombinant inbred lines.

    PubMed

    Hui, G Q; Wen, G Q; Liu, X H; Yang, H P; Luo, Q; Song, H X; Wen, L; Sun, Y; Zhang, H M

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) kernel width is one of the most important traits that is related to yield and appearance. To understand its genetic mechanisms more clearly, a recombinant inbred line (RIL) segregation population consisting of 239 RILs was used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for kernel width. We found four QTLs on chromosomes 3 (one), 5 (two), and 10 (one). The QTLs were close to their adjacent markers, with a range of 0-23.8 cM, and explained 6.2-19.7% of the phenotypic variation. The three QTLs on chromosomes 3 and 5 had positive additive effects, and to a certain extent increased kernel width, whereas the one on chromosome 10 exhibited negative additive effects and decreased kernel width. These results can be used for gene cloning and marker-assisted selection in maize-breeding programs. PMID:26600508

  20. Distance-based standard deviation analysis method for line width roughness data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzik, Thomas J.; Rao, Madhukar B.; Zhang, Peng

    2005-05-01

    Linewidth roughness (LWR) is a major challenge for 90nm node and below. As feature sizes decrease, the reliable measurement, statistical comparison and interpretation of LWR data become increasingly important. The reliability of all LWR statistical analysis methods are strongly impacted by the architecture of LWR data being analyzed. Some of the key structural aspects of the collected data include: measurement box size, distance between neighboring measurements and whether measurement boxes have been "stitched" together for analysis. Additionally, the true nature of underlying line width variation, including both cyclical and non-cyclical trends, impacts how reliable a given interpretation will be. Current statistical methodologies for linewidth data are oriented at estimation of the frequency and scale of cyclical variation in linewidth components. Fourier analysis is traditionally applied for this purpose. Such analyses assume both that there is a cyclical component (e.g., sinusoidal) or components in the data to be modeled, as well as implicitly assuming a Gaussian error distribution for the linewidth variation that remains after modeling. The assumption that Fourier analysis is appropriate for LWR data often not met in practice by the LWR data undergoing analysis. A more model-independent approach, distance-based standard deviations, is proposed for use as part of an LWR statistical analysis methodology. It is based on the calculation of local standard deviations of linewidth for all possible distances between measured points. This methodology permits the statistical comparison of linewidth roughness over any distance of interest and makes efficient use of all data for a given measurement box length. It can determine the minimum measurement box length required to capture all linewidth variation. In addition, the method can confirm the validity of line stitching to increase measurement box size, and locate the sources of variance in the overall LWR value (e

  1. Analysis of shock pulses for environmental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Specifications for shock testing of components that will be used on the Space Shuttle vehicles require very high acceleration levels. A special shock machine was built for testing of rocket components to determine if they can meet the specified accelerations. Calibrations of transducers and methods to monitor the shock tests raised several signature-analysis questions. In this report, calibration capabilities of shock accelerometers are found to be limited to 10,000g. Equivalency of the mechanical shock test and the rocket pyrotechnic shock are examined, and two simple relationships for equivalency are proposed. Five different pulse signature-analysis techniques are tested on analytical and experimental pulse data and recommendations are made for the signature technique which most clearly identifies the magnitude of the impulse applied to the test specimen.

  2. An adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system controlled space cector pulse width modulation based HVDC light transmission system under AC fault conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay Kumar, M.; Srikanth, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    In HVDC Light transmission systems, converter control is one of the major fields of present day research works. In this paper, fuzzy logic controller is utilized for controlling both the converters of the space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) based HVDC Light transmission systems. Due to its complexity in the rule base formation, an intelligent controller known as adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) controller is also introduced in this paper. The proposed ANFIS controller changes the PI gains automatically for different operating conditions. A hybrid learning method which combines and exploits the best features of both the back propagation algorithm and least square estimation method is used to train the 5-layer ANFIS controller. The performance of the proposed ANFIS controller is compared and validated with the fuzzy logic controller and also with the fixed gain conventional PI controller. The simulations are carried out in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. The results reveal that the proposed ANFIS controller is reducing power fluctuations at both the converters. It also improves the dynamic performance of the test power system effectively when tested for various ac fault conditions.

  3. Development of microheaters for gas sensor with an AT-Mega 8535 temperature controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megayanti, Meti; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made

    2016-03-01

    Microheater is the main component in gas sensor characterized by their sensitivity, selectivity, and time response of gas sensor which is depend on the microheater temperature stability. A Cu microheater was developed and utilized AT-Mega 8535 controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method. This control system is interfaced to the PC to observe the real time temperature response of the microheater. Three initial resistance (R0) variations of microheater were developed in an open loop control system. The power characteristic of designed microheater depends on the specified microheater initial resistance. The smaller R0, the less power required to reach a temperature setting value. The developed microheater was designed to reach a temperature setting value of 250°C having resistance 0.531 Ω for 1.979 Watt and 0.265 Ω for 1.072 Watt respectively. The results of the investigation on the control performances shows microheater-control system achieved operating temperature up to 250°C. The response of the temperature control shows smallest R0 resulted in a high stability with short settling time, short delay time and small ripple for temperature setting values higher than 150°C. The obtained error of microheater temperature with R0 = 0.265 is 8.596 %. It is concluded that the developed microheater can be utilized as a component of a gas sensor.

  4. Doppler-width thermodynamic thermometry by means of line-absorbance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castrillo, A.; De Vizia, M. D.; Gianfrani, L.; Moretti, L.; Galzerano, G.; Laporta, P.; Merlone, A.

    2011-09-15

    A clean and effective implementation of Doppler-width thermometry is described. Exploiting the relationship between line-center absorbance and integrated absorbance, the Doppler width of a molecular spectral line can be retrieved from a set of profiles resulting from different gas pressures. The method is validated by its application to numerically simulated spectra. Preliminary experiments, in water vapor samples, turn out to be successful, demonstrating Doppler-widths' retrieval in the near-infrared with a precision of 8x10{sup -5}, at the water triple point temperature. The direct link to the Boltzmann constant makes the proposed method very attractive for temperature metrology as a tool for the realization of a new thermodynamic temperature scale.

  5. In vivo diffusion analysis with quantum dots and dextrans predicts the width of brain extracellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Robert G.; Nicholson, Charles

    2006-04-01

    Diffusion within the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is necessary for chemical signaling and for neurons and glia to access nutrients and therapeutics; however, the width of the ECS in living tissue remains unknown. We used integrative optical imaging to show that dextrans and water-soluble quantum dots with Stokes-Einstein diameters as large as 35 nm diffuse within the ECS of adult rat neocortex in vivo. Modeling the ECS as fluid-filled "pores" predicts a normal width of 38-64 nm, at least 2-fold greater than estimates from EM of fixed tissue. ECS width falls below 10 nm after terminal ischemia, a likely explanation for the small ECS visualized in electron micrographs. Our results will improve modeling of neurotransmitter spread after spillover and ectopic release and establish size limits for diffusion of drug delivery vectors such as viruses, liposomes, and nanoparticles in brain ECS. drug delivery | integrative optical imaging | nanoparticles | restricted diffusion | somatosensory cortex

  6. Theoretical Analysis of a Pulse Tube Regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Kashani, Ali; Lee, J. M.; Cheng, Pearl L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the behavior of a typical pulse tube regenerator has been carried out. Assuming simple sinusoidal oscillations, the static and oscillatory pressures, velocities and temperatures have been determined for a model that includes a compressible gas and imperfect thermal contact between the gas and the regenerator matrix. For realistic material parameters, the analysis reveals that the pressure and, velocity oscillations are largely independent of details of the thermal contact between the gas and the solid matrix. Only the temperature oscillations depend on this contact. Suggestions for optimizing the design of a regenerator are given.

  7. Pulse waveform analysis as a bridge between pulse examination in Chinese medicine and cardiology.

    PubMed

    de Sá Ferreira, Arthur; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2013-04-01

    Pulse examination was probably the earliest attempt to distinguish between health and illnesses. Starting at the pre-Hippocratic era, Chinese medicine practitioners developed techniques for pulse examination and defined pulse images based on their perceptions of pulse waveforms at the radial artery. Pulse images were described using basic variables (frequency, rhythm, wideness, length, deepness, and qualities) developed under philosophical trends such as Taoism and Confucianism. Recent advances in biomedical instrumentation applied to cardiology opened possibilities to research on pulse examination based on ancient Chinese medical theories: the pulse wave analysis. Although strongly influenced by philosophy, some characteristics used to describe a pulse image are interpretable as parameters obtained by pulse waveform analysis such as pulse wave velocity and augmentation index. Those clinical parameters reflect concepts unique to Chinese medicine - such as yinyang - while are based on wave reflection and resonance theories of fluids mechanics. Major limitations for integration of Chinese and Western pulse examination are related to quantitative description of pulse images and pattern differentiation based on pulse examination. Recent evidence suggests that wave reflection and resonance phenomena may bridge Chinese medicine and cardiology to provide a more evidence-based medical practice. PMID:23546634

  8. Identification and characterization of EX1 kinetics in H/D exchange mass spectrometry by peak width analysis.

    PubMed

    Weis, David D; Wales, Thomas E; Engen, John R; Hotchko, Matthew; Ten Eyck, Lynn F

    2006-11-01

    Proteins that undergo cooperative unfolding events display EX1 kinetic signatures in hydrogen exchange mass spectra. The hallmark bimodal isotope pattern observed for EX1 kinetics is distinct from the binomial isotope pattern for uncorrelated exchange (EX2), the normal exchange regime for folded proteins. Detection and characterization of EX1 kinetics is simple when the cooperative unit is large enough that the isotopic envelopes in the bimodal pattern are resolved in the m/z scale but become complicated in cases where the unit is small or there is a mixture of EX1 and EX2 kinetics. Here we describe a data interpretation method involving peak width analysis that makes characterization of EX1 kinetics simple and rapid. The theoretical basis for EX1 and EX2 isotopic signatures and the effects each have on peak width are described. Modeling of EX2 widening and analysis of empirical data for proteins and peptides containing purely EX2 kinetics showed that the amount of widening attributable to stochastic forward- and back exchange in a typical experiment is small and can be quantified. Proteins and peptides with both obvious and less obvious EX1 kinetics were analyzed with the peak width method. Such analyses provide the half-life for the cooperative unfolding event and the relative number of residues involved. Automated analysis of peak width was performed with custom Excel macros and the DEX software package. Peak width analysis is robust, capable of automation, and provides quick interpretation of the key information contained in EX1 kinetic events. PMID:16875839

  9. Study of the Effect of the Pulse Width of the Excitation Source on the Two-Photon Absorption and Two-Photon Circular Dichroism Spectra of Biaryl Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vesga, Yuly; Hernandez, Florencio E

    2016-09-01

    Herein we report on the expanded theoretical calculations and the experimental measurements of the two-photon absorption (TPA) and two-photon circular dichroism (TPCD) spectra of a series of optically active biaryl derivatives (R-BINOL, R-VANOL, and R-VAPOL) using femtosecond pulses. The comparative analysis of the experimental TPCD spectra obtained with our tunable amplified femtosecond system with those previously measured in our group on the same series of compounds in the picosecond regime reveals a decrease in the amplitude of the signal and an improvement in matching with the theory in the former. These results can be explained based on the negligible contribution of excited state absorption (ESA) using femtosecond pulses compared to the picosecond regime. We show how ESA affects both the strength of the signal and the shape of the TPA and TPCD spectra. TPA and TPCD spectra were obtained using the double L-scan technique over a broad spectral range (450-750 nm) using 90 fs pulses at 50 Hz repetition rate produced by an amplified femtosecond system. The theoretical calculations were performed using modern analytical response theory within the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach using CAM-B3LYP and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. PMID:27525702

  10. Progress in Using the Generalized Wigner Distribution in the Analysis of Terrace-Width Distributions of Vicinal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S. D.; Richards, Howard L.; Einstein, T. L.

    2000-03-01

    The so-called generalized Wigner distribution (GWD) may provide at least as good a description of terrace width distributions (TWDs) on vicinal surfaces as the standard Gaussian fit.(T.L. Einstein and O. Pierre-Louis, Surface Sci. 424), L299 (1999). It works well for weak elastic repulsion strengths A between steps (where the latter fails), as illustrated explicitly(S.D. Cohen, H.L. Richards, TLE, and M. Giesen, cond- mat/9911319.) for vicinal Pt(110).( K. Swamy, E. Bertel, and I. Vilfan, Surface Sci. 425), L369 (1999). Applications to vicinal copper surfaces confirms the general viability of the new analysis procedure.(M. Giesen and T.L. Einstein, submitted to Surface Sci.) For troublesome data, we can treat the GWD as a two-parameter fit that allows the terrace widths to be scaled by an optimal effective mean width.^3 With Monte Carlo simulations we show that for physical values of A, the GWD provides a better overall estimate than the Gaussian models. We quantify how a GWD approaches a Gaussian for large A and present a convenient but accurate new expression relating the variance of the TWD to A.^3 We also mention how discreteness of terrace widths impacts the standard continuum analysis.^3

  11. PNPN tunnel FET with controllable drain side tunnel barrier width: Proposal and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Dawit Burusie; Jagadesh Kumar, M.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed study of a technique to realize a PNPN tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) with a controllable tunnel barrier width on the drain side is reported in this paper. By using the charge plasma concept on a doped N+/P- starting structure, we have demonstrated the possibility of realizing the PNPN TFET without the need for any additional chemically doped junctions. We have showed that using electrostatic doping on the drain side of TFETs provides a new design parameter, the gate-drain electrode gap. This gate-drain electrode gap can be used to control the ambipolar current in TFETs by controlling the tunneling barrier width at the channel-drain junction.

  12. Regeneration and Fixed-Width Analysis of Markov Chain Monte Carlo Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latuszynski, Krzysztof

    2009-07-01

    In the thesis we take the split chain approach to analyzing Markov chains and use it to establish fixed-width results for estimators obtained via Markov chain Monte Carlo procedures (MCMC). Theoretical results include necessary and sufficient conditions in terms of regeneration for central limit theorems for ergodic Markov chains and a regenerative proof of a CLT version for uniformly ergodic Markov chains with E_{π}f^2< infty. To obtain asymptotic confidence intervals for MCMC estimators, strongly consistent estimators of the asymptotic variance are essential. We relax assumptions required to obtain such estimators. Moreover, under a drift condition, nonasymptotic fixed-width results for MCMC estimators for a general state space setting (not necessarily compact) and not necessarily bounded target function f are obtained. The last chapter is devoted to the idea of adaptive Monte Carlo simulation and provides convergence results and law of large numbers for adaptive procedures under path-stability condition for transition kernels.

  13. Dual-Pulse Pulse Position Modulation (DPPM) for Deep-Space Optical Communications: Performance and Practicality Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Hylton, Alan; Budinger, James; Nappier, Jennifer; Downey, Joseph; Raible, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Due to its simplicity and robustness against wavefront distortion, pulse position modulation (PPM) with photon counting detector has been seriously considered for long-haul optical wireless systems. This paper evaluates the dual-pulse case and compares it with the conventional single-pulse case. Analytical expressions for symbol error rate and bit error rate are first derived and numerically evaluated, for the strong, negative-exponential turbulent atmosphere; and bandwidth efficiency and throughput are subsequently assessed. It is shown that, under a set of practical constraints including pulse width and pulse repetition frequency (PRF), dual-pulse PPM enables a better channel utilization and hence a higher throughput than it single-pulse counterpart. This result is new and different from the previous idealistic studies that showed multi-pulse PPM provided no essential information-theoretic gains than single-pulse PPM.

  14. Theoretical analysis of direct CP violation and differential decay width in in phase space around the resonances and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Song, Ren; Su, Yu-Mo; Lü, Gang; Zheng, Bo

    2015-09-01

    We perform a theoretical study on direct CP violation in in phase space around the intermediate states and . The possible interference between the amplitudes corresponding to the two resonances is taken into account, and the relative strong phase of the two amplitudes is treated as a free parameter. Our analysis shows that by a properly chosen strong phase, both the CP violation strength and the differential decay width accommodate the experimental results.

  15. Power Analysis of Soliton Pulse for ROF-OFDM System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kulwinder; Bhatia, Kamaljit Singh; Ryait, Hardeep Singh; Kaur, Amandeep

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, propagation behavior of Soliton pulse in optical fiber communication is analyzed. Ultra high speed transmission of data over optical fiber is possible by choosing appropriate pulse shape. Soliton pulse transmission using different modulation formats is performed to minimize jitter. Also analysis is done to calculate optical power, electrical power and average peak electrical power at different frequencies.

  16. Rapid riparian buffer width and quality analysis using lidar in South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akturk, Emre

    The importance of protecting water quality and aquatic resources are increasing because of harmful human impacts within and around waterways. Establishing or restoring functional riparian areas protect water quality and are a good mechanism to conserve aquatic systems, plants, and wildlife. Laser-based remote sensing technology offers a high resolution approach to both characterize and document changes in riparian buffer zones (RBZs). The objectives of this study were to build a model to calculate riparian buffer width on both sides of a stream using a LiDAR-derived slope variable, to classify riparian buffers and determine their quality, and to evaluate the appropriateness of using LiDAR in riparian buffer assessment. For this purpose, RBZs were delineated for Hunnicutt and King Creek, which are located in Oconee and Pickens counties, in South Carolina. Results show that LiDAR was effective in delineating required riparian buffer widths based on the topography slope of upstream areas, and to calculate the ratio of tree cover in those riparian buffer zones to qualify them. Furthermore, the riparian buffer assessment model that was created in this research has potential for use in different sites and different studies.

  17. Image reconstruction from Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendahan, Joseph; Feinstein, Leon; Keeley, Doug; Loveman, Rob

    1999-06-01

    Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) has been demonstrated to detect drugs and explosives in trucks and large cargo containers. PFNA uses a collimated beam of nanosecond-pulsed fast neutrons that interact with the cargo contents to produce gamma rays characteristic to their elemental composition. By timing the arrival of the emitted radiation to an array of gamma-ray detectors a three-dimensional elemental density map or image of the cargo is created. The process to determine the elemental densities is complex and requires a number of steps. The first step consists of extracting from the characteristic gamma-ray spectra the counts associated with the elements of interest. Other steps are needed to correct for physical quantities such as gamma-ray production cross sections and angular distributions. The image processing includes also phenomenological corrections that take into account the neutron attenuation through the cargo, and the attenuation of the gamma rays from the point they were generated to the gamma-ray detectors. Additional processing is required to map the elemental densities from the data acquisition system of coordinates to a rectilinear system. This paper describes the image processing used to compute the elemental densities from the counts observed in the gamma-ray detectors.

  18. Image reconstruction from Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bendahan, Joseph; Feinstein, Leon; Keeley, Doug; Loveman, Rob

    1999-06-10

    Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) has been demonstrated to detect drugs and explosives in trucks and large cargo containers. PFNA uses a collimated beam of nanosecond-pulsed fast neutrons that interact with the cargo contents to produce gamma rays characteristic to their elemental composition. By timing the arrival of the emitted radiation to an array of gamma-ray detectors a three-dimensional elemental density map or image of the cargo is created. The process to determine the elemental densities is complex and requires a number of steps. The first step consists of extracting from the characteristic gamma-ray spectra the counts associated with the elements of interest. Other steps are needed to correct for physical quantities such as gamma-ray production cross sections and angular distributions. The image processing includes also phenomenological corrections that take into account the neutron attenuation through the cargo, and the attenuation of the gamma rays from the point they were generated to the gamma-ray detectors. Additional processing is required to map the elemental densities from the data acquisition system of coordinates to a rectilinear system. This paper describes the image processing used to compute the elemental densities from the counts observed in the gamma-ray detectors.

  19. Pulse wave analysis and pulse wave velocity: a critical review of their strengths and weaknesses.

    PubMed

    Davies, Justine Ina; Struthers, Allan D

    2003-03-01

    The study of the pulse using the technique of applanation tonometry is undergoing a resurgence with the development of new computerized equipment. We aim here to present a critical review of the uses, potential uses, strengths and weaknesses of the technique of applanation tonometry for the assessment of augmentation index and pulse wave velocity. We will review the technique of applanation tonometry, the physiological factors affecting pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis, the changes in pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis with pharmacological interventions, and the use of the technique of applanation tonometry as a prognostic tool. We conclude that, although the technique of applanation tonometry initially seems promising, several pertinent issues need to be addressed before it can be used reliably as a clinical or research tool. Importantly, use of the technique of applanation tonometry to derive the central waveform from non-invasively acquired peripheral data needs to be validated prospectively. PMID:12640232

  20. Comparison of the Width of Peritumoral Surgical Margin in Open and Robotic Partial Nephrectomy: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jong Jin; Lee, Jung Keun; Kim, Kwangmo; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare the surgical margin status after open partial nephrectomy (OPN) and robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) performed in patients with T1a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods This was a propensity score-matched study including 702 patients with cT1a RCC treated with partial nephrectomy (PN) between May 2003 and July 2015. Perioperative parameters, including surgical margin width after PN, were compared between two surgical methods. After determining propensity score for tumor size and location, the width of peritumoral surgical margin was investigated. Multivariate logistic analysis to predict peritumoral surgical margin less than 1mm was analyzed. Results The mean width of peritumoral surgical margin was 2.61 ± 2.15 mm in OPN group (n = 385), significantly wider than the 2.29 ± 2.00 mm of RPN group (n = 317) (p = 0.042). The multivariate analysis showed surgical methods was significant factors to narrow surgical margin less than 1mm (p = 0.031). After propensity score matching, the surgical margin width was significantly longer in OPN (2.67 ± 2.14 mm) group than RPN (2.25 ± 2.03 mm) group (p = 0.016). A positive resection margin occurred in 7 (1.8%) patients in the OPN group and 4 (1.3%) in the RPN group. During the median follow-up of 48.3 months, two patients who underwent OPN had tumor bed recurrence. Conclusions RPN may result in a narrower peritumoral surgical margin than OPN. Further investigation on the potential impact of such a phenomenon should be performed in a larger-scale study. PMID:27336438

  1. Analysis of pulse detonation turbojet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutthivithayarak, Ronnachai

    2011-12-01

    Research over the last two decades has shown the potential advantages of pulse detonation engines (PDEs) over existing aero-engines in terms of improved thermodynamics efficiency, improved thrust performance, simplicity of design, and flexibility to operate over a wide speed range. The inherently unsteady characteristic of PDEs makes it difficulty to analyze and evaluate their performance. The conventional method that relies on steady-state assumptions cannot be directly applied. PDE studies have to employ unsteady gasdynamics behavior. In this study, the thermodynamic cycle of a PDE, which can be called the ZND cycle, is theoretically analyzed. A parametric analysis of turbojet PDEs is considered for both ideal and non-ideal cases. The conventional turbojet with a Brayton cycle is brought in the comparison to verify that PDEs can provide better performance.

  2. Analysis of multiple pulse NMR in solids. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Rhim, W. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper introduces principles which greatly simplify the process of designing and analyzing compound pulse cycles. These principles are demonstrated by applying them to the design and analysis of several cycles, including a 52-pulse cycle; this pulse cycle combines six different REV-8 cycles and has substantially more resolving power than previously available techniques. Also, a new 24-pulse cycle is introduced which combines three different REV-8 cycles and has a resolving ability equivalent to that of the 52-pulse cycle. The principle of pulse-cycle decoupling provides a method for systematically combining pulse groups into compound cycles in order to achieve enhanced performance. This method is illustrated by a logical development from the two-pulse solid echo sequence to the WAHUHA (Waugh et al., 1968), the REV-8, and the new 24-pulse and 52-pulse cycles, along with the 14-pulse and 12-pulse cycles. Proton chemical shift tensor components for several organic solids, measured by using the 52-pulse cycle, are reported without detailed discussion.

  3. Pulse analysis of acoustic emission signals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the signature analysis of pulses in the frequency domain and the time domain is presented. Fourier spectrum, Fourier transfer function, shock spectrum and shock spectrum ratio are examined in the frequency domain analysis, and pulse shape deconvolution is developed for use in the time domain analysis. To demonstrate the relative sensitivity of each of the methods to small changes in the pulse shape, signatures of computer modeled systems with analytical pulses are presented. Optimization techniques are developed and used to indicate the best design parameters values for deconvolution of the pulse shape. Several experiments are presented that test the pulse signature analysis methods on different acoustic emission sources. These include acoustic emissions associated with: (1) crack propagation, (2) ball dropping on a plate, (3) spark discharge and (4) defective and good ball bearings.

  4. Analysis of full-waveform LiDAR pulse properties for vegetation discrimination and characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieber, K.; Davenport, I.; Ferryman, J.; Gurney, R.; Walker, J.; Hacker, J.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate information about vegetation/forest structure, health and growth is needed in many fields of forest management, environmental planning, resource management, fire risk assessment and soil moisture retrievals. Airborne laser scanning has proven over the last nearly two decades to be an invaluable tool in describing vegetation and providing 3D information about its structure. In particular, the new generation full-waveform laser scanners offer an excellent source of not only accurate XYZ information, but also allow the extraction of additional parameters in the process of light curve analysis and interpretation. This analysis was carried out on full-waveform airborne LiDAR data that was collected with a Riegl LMS-Q560 instrument in the Yanco area (NSW) in Australia. The initial analysis was performed on the data acquired in 2006 during the National Airborne Field Experiment. The way the waveform data was extracted made it impossible for the targets included in the footprint to be geo-coded accurately. Nevertheless it was still possible to analyse the waveforms' shapes. For the purpose of this experiment two test sites were chosen - one very small site covering only a single Eucalyptus tree, and the second over an orange orchard (218m by 110m). Analysis included peaks detection, pulse width calculation and waveforms classification according to the number of peaks present within them. Subsequently, an amplitude-width analysis was carried out, including two-tailed t-tests, histograms and scatter plots. Based on the assumption that the first and middle returns were from vegetation (due to specifics of the sites), it was concluded from the analysis that vegetation returns are wide and weak (wider than emitted pulse). The scatter plots of amplitude versus width according to the pulse type played a crucial role in the analysis - they clearly indicated different 'fingerprints' of vegetation and last return (assumed to be a mixture of vegetation and ground returns

  5. Modeling and analysis of pulse electrochemical machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bin

    Pulse Electrochemical Machining (PECM) is a potentially cost effective technology meeting the increasing needs of precision manufacturing of superalloys, like titanium alloys, into complex shapes such as turbine airfoils. This dissertation reports: (1) an assessment of the worldwide state-of-the-art PECM research and industrial practice; (2) PECM process model development; (3) PECM of a superalloy (Ti-6Al-4V); and (4) key issues in future PECM research. The assessment focuses on identifying dimensional control problems with continuous ECM and how PECM can offer a solution. Previous research on PECM system design, process mechanisms, and dimensional control is analysed, leading to a clearer understanding of key issues in PECM development such as process characterization and modeling. New interelectrode gap dynamic models describing the gap evolution with time are developed for different PECM processes with an emphasis on the frontal gaps and a typical two-dimensional case. A 'PECM cosine principle' and several tool design formulae are also derived. PECM processes are characterized using concepts such as quasi-equilibrium gap and dissolution localization. Process simulation is performed to evaluate the effects of process inputs on dimensional accuracy control. Analysis is made on three types (single-phase, homogeneous, and inhomogeneous) of models concerning the physical processes (such as the electrolyte flow, Joule heating, and bubble generation) in the interelectrode gap. A physical model is introduced for the PECM with short pulses, which addresses the effect of electrolyte conductivity change on anodic dissolution. PECM of the titanium alloy is studied from a new perspective on the pulsating currents influence on surface quality and dimension control. An experimental methodology is developed to acquire instantaneous currents and to accurately measure the coefficient of machinability. The influence of pulse parameters on the surface passivation is explained based

  6. Analysis of the spectral width and validation of the LHBEAM code

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N.; Maj, O.; Poli, E.; Pereverzev, G. V.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2008-11-01

    A crucial point of the theoretical study of lower-hybrid (LH) current drive in a tokamak plasma is the spectral gap problem, i.e., the fact that the parallel (to the magnetic field) refractive index spectrum generated at the plasma edge does not appear to be wide enough for the interaction of the wave with a large number of electrons. This is in contrast with experimental observations. Diffraction is one of the mechanisms that can lead to the observed wave spectrum broadening and solve the spectral gap problem. For this reason, a new beam tracing code, LHBEAM, has been developed in order to study the diffraction effects on the propagation and the absorption of LH waves in tokamak plasma. In this work, the parallel spectral width is addressed on the basis of the beam tracing approximate solution. A preliminary implementation of the results is done in LHBEAM which has been also compared with the ray tracing code C3PO for the assessment of the trajectory of the central ray and of the evolution of the parallel refractive index on this ray.

  7. Theoretical analysis of surface stress for a microcantilever with varying widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-Fang; Peng, Xu-Long

    2008-03-01

    A theoretical model of surface stress is developed in this paper for a microcantilever with varying widths, and a method for calculating the surface stress via static deflection, slope angle or radius at curvature of the cantilever beam is presented. This model assumes that surface stresses are uniformly distributed on one surface of the cantilever beam. Based on this stressor model and using the small deformation Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, a fourth-order ordinary differential governing equation with varying coefficients or an equivalent second-order integro-differential equation is derived. A simple approach is then proposed to determine the solution of the resulting equation, and a closed-form approximate solution with high accuracy can be obtained. For rectangular and V-shaped microfabricated cantilevers, the dependences of transverse deflection, slope and curvature of the beam on the surface stresses are given explicitly. The obtained results indicate that the zeroth order approximation of the stressor model reduces to the end force model with a linear curvature for a rectangular cantilever. For larger surface stresses, the curvature exhibits a non-linear behaviour. The predictions through the stressor model give higher accuracy than those from the end moment and end force models and satisfactorily agree with experimental data. The derived closed-form solution can serve as a theoretical benchmark for verifying numerically obtained results for microcantilevers as atomic force microscopy and micromechanical sensors.

  8. Vascular Pedicle Width on Chest Radiograph as a Measure of Volume Overload: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Shi, Runhua; Mahler, Simon; Gaspard, Joseph; Gorchynski, Julie; D'Etienne, James; Arnold, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Vascular pedicle width (VPW), a measurement obtained from a chest radiograph (CR), is thought to be an indicator of circulating blood volume. To date there are only a handful of studies that demonstrate a correlation between high VPW and volume overload, each utilizing different VPW values and CR techniques. Our objective was to determine a mean VPW measurement from erect and supine CRs and to determine whether VPW correlates with volume overload. Methods MEDLINE database, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched electronically for relevant articles. References from the original and review publications selected electronically were manually searched for additional relevant articles. Two investigators independently reviewed relevant articles for inclusion criteria and data extraction. Mean VPW measurements from both supine and erect CRs and their correlation with volume overload were calculated. Results Data from 8 studies with a total of 363 subjects were included, resulting in mean VPW measurements of 71 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 64.9–77.3) and 62 mm (95% CI 49.3–75.1) for supine and erect CRs, respectively. The correlation coefficients for volume overload and VPW were 0.81 (95% CI 0.74–0.86) for both CR techniques and 0.81 (95% CI 0.72–0.87) for supine CR and 0.80 (95% CI 0.69–0.87) for erect CR, respectively. Conclusion There is a clinical and statistical correlation between VPW and volume overload. VPW may be used to evaluate the volume status of a patient regardless of the CR technique used. PMID:22224132

  9. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  10. Pulse Detonation Engine Air Induction System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, R. J.; Hunter, L. G.; Couch, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    A preliminary mixed-compression inlet design concept for potential pulse-detonation engine (PDE) powered supersonic aircraft was defined and analyzed. The objectives of this research were to conceptually design and integrate an inlet/PDE propulsion system into a supersonic aircraft, perform time-dependent CFD analysis of the inlet flowfield, and to estimate the installed PDE cycle performance. The study was baselined to a NASA Mach 5 Waverider study vehicle in which the baseline over/under turboramjet engines were replaced with a single flowpath PDE propulsion system. As much commonality as possible was maintained with the baseline configuration, including the engine location and forebody lines. Modifications were made to the inlet system's external ramp angles and a rotating cowl lip was incorporated to improve off-design inlet operability and performance. Engines were sized to match the baseline vehicle study's ascent trajectory thrust requirement at Mach 1.2. The majority of this study was focused on a flight Mach number of 3.0. The time-dependent Navier Stokes CFD analyses of a two-dimensional approximation of the inlet was conducted for the Mach 3.0 condition. The Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems-developed FALCON CFD code with a two equation 'k-1' turbulence model was used. The downstream PDE was simulated by an array of four sonic nozzles in which the flow areas were rapidly varied in various opening/closing combinations. Results of the CFD study indicated that the inlet design concept operated successfully at the Mach 3.0 condition, satisfying mass capture, total pressure recovery, and operability requirements. Time-dependent analysis indicated that pressure and expansion waves from the simulated valve perturbations did not effect the inlet's operability or performance.

  11. Pulse spreading and range correction analysis for satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Jon A.

    1990-01-01

    The pulse spreading resulting from light detection and ranging measurements of the range to earth-orbiting satellites is described. An analysis quantifying this pulse spreading and the calculation of corrections to be applied to the lidar range determination of satellites is detailed.

  12. Pulse spreading and range correction analysis for satellite laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J A

    1990-09-01

    The pulse spreading resulting from light detection and ranging measurements of the range to earth-orbiting satellites is described. An analysis quantifying this pulse spreading and the calculation of corrections to be applied to the lidar range determination of satellites is detailed. PMID:20567459

  13. One-Dimensional Analysis Techniques for Pulsed Blowing Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Frank

    2005-11-01

    Pulsed blowing offers reductions in bleed air requirements for aircraft flow control. Efficient pulsed blowing systems require careful design to minimize bleed air use while distributing blowing to multiple locations. Pulsed blowing systems start with a steady flow supply and process it to generate a pulsatile flow. The fluid-acoustic dynamics of the system play an important role in overall effectiveness. One-dimensional analysis techniques that in the past have been applied to ventilation systems and internal combustion engines have been adapted to pulsed blowing. Pressure wave superposition and reflection are used with the governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy to determine particle velocities and pressures through the flow field. Simulations have been performed to find changes in the amplitude and wave shape as pulses are transmitted through a simple pulsed blowing system. A general-purpose code is being developed to simulate wave transmission and allow the determination of blowing system dynamic parameters.

  14. Arterial stiffness estimation based photoplethysmographic pulse wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huotari, Matti; Maatta, Kari; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2010-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is one of the indices of vascular healthiness. It is based on pulse wave analysis. In the case we decompose the pulse waveform for the estimation and determination of arterial elasticity. Firstly, optically measured with photoplethysmograph and then investigating means by four lognormal pulse waveforms for which we can find very good fit between the original and summed decomposed pulse wave. Several studies have demonstrated that these kinds of measures predict cardiovascular events. While dynamic factors, e.g., arterial stiffness, depend on fixed structural features of the vascular wall. Arterial stiffness is estimated based on pulse wave decomposition analysis in the radial and tibial arteries. Elucidation of the precise relationship between endothelial function and vascular stiffness awaits still further study.

  15. GEOS-1 laser pulse return shape analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felsentreger, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt has been made to predict the shape of the laser return pulse from the corner cube retroreflectors on the GEOS-1 spacecraft. The study is geometrical only, and neglects factors such as optical interference, atmospheric perturbations, etc. A function giving the intensity of the return signal at any given time has been derived. In addition, figures are given which show the predicted return pulse shape as a function of time, the angle between the beam and the spin axis, and an in-plane angle (designating the orientation of the intersection of the planar waves with the plane of the corner cubes).

  16. SETI Pulse Detection Algorithm: Analysis of False-alarm Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, B. K.

    1983-01-01

    Some earlier work by the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Science Working Group (SWG) on the derivation of spectrum analyzer thresholds for a pulse detection algorithm based on an analysis of false alarm rates is extended. The algorithm previously analyzed was intended to detect a finite sequence of i periodically spaced pulses that did not necessarily occupy the entire observation interval. This algorithm would recognize the presence of such a signal only if all i-received pulse powers exceeded a threshold T(i): these thresholds were selected to achieve a desired false alarm rate, independent of i. To simplify the analysis, it was assumed that the pulses were synchronous with the spectrum sample times. This analysis extends the earlier effort to include infinite and/or asynchronous pulse trains. Furthermore, to decrease the possibility of missing an extraterrestrial intelligence signal, the algorithm was modified to detect a pulse train even if some of the received pulse powers fall below the threshold. The analysis employs geometrical arguments that make it conceptually easy to incorporate boundary conditions imposed on the derivation of the false alarm rates. While the exact results can be somewhat complex, simple closed form approximations are derived that produce a negligible loss of accuracy.

  17. Micro-Pulse Lidar Signals: Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems are small, autonomous, eye-safe lidars used for continuous observations of the vertical distribution of cloud and aerosol layers. Since the construction of the first MPL in 1993, procedures have been developed to correct for various instrument effects present in MPL signals. The primary instrument effects include afterpulse, laser-detector cross-talk, and overlap, poor near-range (less than 6 km) focusing. The accurate correction of both afterpulse and overlap effects are required to study both clouds and aerosols. Furthermore, the outgoing energy of the laser pulses and the statistical uncertainty of the MPL detector must also be correctly determined in order to assess the accuracy of MPL observations. The uncertainties associated with the afterpulse, overlap, pulse energy, detector noise, and all remaining quantities affecting measured MPL signals, are determined in this study. The uncertainties are propagated through the entire MPL correction process to give a net uncertainty on the final corrected MPL signal. The results show that in the near range, the overlap uncertainty dominates. At altitudes above the overlap region, the dominant source of uncertainty is caused by uncertainty in the pulse energy. However, if the laser energy is low, then during mid-day, high solar background levels can significantly reduce the signal-to-noise of the detector. In such a case, the statistical uncertainty of the detector count rate becomes dominant at altitudes above the overlap region.

  18. Analysis and mitigation of systematic errors in spectral shearing interferometry of pulses approaching the single-cycle limit [Invited

    SciTech Connect

    Birge, Jonathan R.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2008-06-15

    We derive an analytical approximation for the measured pulse width error in spectral shearing methods, such as spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER), caused by an anomalous delay between the two sheared pulse components. This analysis suggests that, as pulses approach the single-cycle limit, the resulting requirements on the calibration and stability of this delay become significant, requiring precision orders of magnitude higher than the scale of a wavelength. This is demonstrated by numerical simulations of SPIDER pulse reconstruction using actual data from a sub-two-cycle laser. We briefly propose methods to minimize the effects of this sensitivity in SPIDER and review variants of spectral shearing that attempt to avoid this difficulty.

  19. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  20. Laser drilling of via micro-holes in single-crystal semiconductor substrates using a 1070nm fibre laser with millisecond pulse widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Jessica O.; Hodson, Jonathan R.; Voisey, K. T.

    2015-07-01

    Micro-machining of semiconductors is relevant to fabrication challenges within the semiconductor industry. For via holes for solar cells, laser drilling potentially avoids deep plasma etching which requires sophisticated equipment and corrosive, high purity gases. Other applications include backside loading of cold atoms into atom chips and ion traps for quantum physics research, for which holes through the semiconductor substrate are needed. Laser drilling, exploiting the melt ejection material removal mechanism, is used industrially for drilling hard to machine materials such as superalloys. Lasers of the kind used in this work typically form holes with diameters of 100's of microns and depths of a few millimetres in metals. Laser drilling of semiconductors typically uses short pulses of UV or long wavelength IR to achieve holes as small as 50 microns. A combination of material processes occurs including laser absorption, heating, melting, vaporization with vapour and dust particle ejection and resolidification. An investigation using materials with different fundamental material parameters allows the suitability of any given laser for the processing of semiconductors to be determined. We report results on the characterization of via holes drilled using a 2000 W maximum power 1070 nm fibre laser with 1-20 ms pulses using single crystal silicon, gallium arsenide and sapphire. Holes were characterised in cross-section and plan view. Significantly, relatively long pulses were effective even for wide bandgap substrates which are nominally transparent at 1070 nm. Examination of drilled samples revealed holes had been successfully generated in all materials via melt ejection.

  1. Thermoacoustic analysis of a pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biwa, T.

    2012-12-01

    Thermoacoustic devices use acoustic gas oscillations in place of pistons. They execute mutual energy conversion between work flow and heat flow through the heat exchange between the gas and the channel walls. Understanding of the acoustic field is necessary to control the resulting energy flows in thermoacoustic devices. We will present from experimental point of view the physical mechanism of a pulse tube refrigerator that is one of the travelling wave thermoacoustic heat engines.

  2. Retinal Arteriolar Morphometry Based on Full Width at Half Maximum Analysis of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yu Hua; Zhu, Tie Pei; Zhao, Ze Lin; Zhan, Hai Jing; Jiang, Fang Zheng; Lian, Heng Li

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we develop a microdensitometry method using full width at half maximum (FWHM) analysis of the retinal vascular structure in a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) image and present the application of this method in the morphometry of arteriolar changes during hypertension. Methods Two raters using manual and FWHM methods measured retinal vessel outer and lumen diameters in SD-OCT images. Inter-rater reproducibility was measured using coefficients of variation (CV), intraclass correlation coefficient and a Bland-Altman plot. OCT images from forty-three eyes of 43 hypertensive patients and 40 eyes of 40 controls were analyzed using an FWHM approach; wall thickness, wall cross-sectional area (WCSA) and wall to lumen ratio (WLR) were subsequently calculated. Results Mean difference in inter-rater agreement ranged from -2.713 to 2.658 μm when using a manual method, and ranged from -0.008 to 0.131 μm when using a FWHM approach. The inter-rater CVs were significantly less for the FWHM approach versus the manual method (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, the wall thickness, WCSA and WLR of retinal arterioles were increased in the hypertensive patients, particular in diabetic hypertensive patients. Conclusions The microdensitometry method using a FWHM algorithm markedly improved inter-rater reproducibility of arteriolar morphometric analysis, and SD-OCT may represent a promising noninvasive method for in vivo arteriolar morphometry. PMID:26650940

  3. Theoretical analysis of planar pulse microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Qing-Xiang Liu |; Yong Xu

    1995-12-31

    The Magnetic field distributions of a planar pulse microwiggler are studied analytically and numerically. Exact solutions of two-dimensional magnetic fields are derived, which show that along the electron axis the fields have a variation close enough to a sine wave. We also investigate wiggler field errors due to machining tolerance and effects of the field errors on trajectories of electron with the help numerical simulations. The results are critical for successful operation of CAEP compact free-electron laser experiment under preparation.

  4. Importance of the Correlation between Width and Length in the Shape Analysis of Nanorods: Use of a 2D Size Plot To Probe Such a Correlation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhihua; Zheng, Zhiqin; Roux, Clément; Delmas, Céline; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Kahn, Myrtil L; Mingotaud, Christophe

    2016-08-22

    Analysis of nanoparticle size through a simple 2D plot is proposed in order to extract the correlation between length and width in a collection or a mixture of anisotropic particles. Compared to the usual statistics on the length associated with a second and independent statistical analysis of the width, this simple plot easily points out the various types of nanoparticles and their (an)isotropy. For each class of nano-objects, the relationship between width and length (i.e., the strong or weak correlations between these two parameters) may suggest information concerning the nucleation/growth processes. It allows one to follow the effect on the shape and size distribution of physical or chemical processes such as simple ripening. Various electron microscopy pictures from the literature or from the authors' own syntheses are used as examples to demonstrate the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed 2D plot combined with a multivariate analysis. PMID:27460632

  5. Scanning-electron-microscope image processing for accurate analysis of line-edge and line-width roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Nishida, Akio

    2012-03-01

    The control of line-edge or line-width roughness (LER/LWR) is a challenge especially for future devices that are fabricated using extreme-ultraviolet lithography. Accurate analysis of the LER/LWR plays an essential role in this challenge and requires the noise involved in scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) images to be reduced by appropriate image processing prior to analyses. In order to achieve this, the authors simulated SEM images using the Monte-Carlo method and detected line edges in experimental and these theoretical images after noise filtering using new imageanalysis software. The validity of these simulation and software was confirmed by a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. In the case when the image pixels aligned perpendicular (crosswise) to line edges were averaged, the variance var(φ) that was additionally induced by the image noise decreased with the number NPIX,X of averaged pixels but turned to increase for relatively large NPIX,X's. Real LER/LWR, however, remained unaffected. On the other hand, averaging image pixels aligned parallel (longitudinal) to line edges not only reduced var(φ) but smoothed the real LER/LWR. As a result, the nominal variance of the real LWR, obtained using simple arithmetic, monotonically decreased with the number NPIX,L of averaged pixels. Artifactual oscillations were additionally observed in power spectral densities. var(φ) in this case decreased in an inverse proportion to the square root of NPIX,L according to the statistical mechanism clarified here. In this way, image processing has a marked effect on the LER/LWR analysis and needs to be much more cared and appropriately applied. All the aforementioned results not only constitute a solid basis of but improve previous empirical instructions for accurate analyses. The most important instruction is to avoid the longitudinal averaging and to crosswise average an optimized number of image pixels consulting the equation derived in this

  6. Elemental Characterization Using Pulsed Fast/Thermal Neutron Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    P. C. Womble; G. Vourvopoulos; M. Belbot; S. Hui; J. Paschal

    2000-11-12

    Several Pulsed Fast/Thermal Neutron Analysis (PFTNA) systems are currently under development at Western Kentucky University. One system is a multiparameter coal analyzer, and another is an explosive detection system called PELAN (Pulsed ELemental Analysis with Neutrons). Finally, two systems for the inspection of cargo for contraband are under consideration: Portable Drug Probe (PDP), and a Neutron ELemental Inspection System (NELIS). All of these systems utilize the elemental content within the interrogated object to reach some decision or calculate some quantity that is then reported to the user.

  7. External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP) Analysis Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joesph A.; Morton, P. Jeff; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP) systems are at the stage of engineering infancy with evolving paradigms for application. performance and general characteristics. Recent efforts have focused on an approach that employs existing technologies with near term EPPP development for usage in interplanetary exploration and asteroid/comet deflection. if mandated. The inherent advantages of EPPP are discussed and its application to a variety of propulsion concepts is explored. These include, but are not limited to, utilizing energy sources such as fission. fusion and antimatter, as well as, improved chemical explosives. A mars mission scenario is presented as a demonstration of its capability using existing technologies. A suggested alternate means to improve EPPP efficiencies could also lead to a heavy lift (non-nuclear) launch vehicle capability. Conceivably, true low-cost, access to space is possible using advanced explosive propellants and/or coupling the EPPP vehicle to a "beam propellant" concept. EPPP systems appear to offer an approach that can potentially cover ETO through interstellar transportation capability. A technology roadmap is presented that shows mutual benefits pertaining to a substantial number of existing space propulsion and research areas.

  8. Noise filtering of scanning-electron-microscope images for accurate analysis of line-edge and line-width roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Nishida, Akio

    2012-10-01

    The control of line-edge or line-width roughness (LER/LWR) is a challenge, especially for future devices that are fabricated using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Accurate analysis of the LER/LWR plays an essential role in this challenge and requires the noise involved in scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) images to be reduced by appropriate noise filtering prior to analysis. To achieve this, we simulated the SEM images using a Monte Carlo method, and detected line edges in both experimental and theoretical images after noise filtering using new image-analysis software. The validity of this software and these simulations was confirmed by a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. In the case when the image pixels aligned perpendicular (crosswise) to line edges were averaged, the variance var(φ) that was additionally induced by the image noise decreased with a number N of averaged pixels, with exceptions when N was relatively large, whereupon the variance increased. The optimal N to minimize var(φ) was formulated based on a statistical mechanism of this change. LER/LWR statistics estimated using the crosswise filtering remained unaffected when N was smaller than the aforementioned optimal value, but monotonically changed when N was larger contrary to expectations. This change was possibly caused by an asymmetric scan-signal profile at edges. On the other hand, averaging image pixels aligned parallel (longitudinal) to line edges not only reduced var(φ) but smoothed real LER/LWR. As a result, the nominal variance of real LWR, obtained using simple arithmetic, monotonically decreased with a number N of averaged pixels. Artifactual oscillations were additionally observed in power spectral densities. Var(φ) in this case decreased in inverse proportion to the square root of N according to the statistical mechanism clarified here. In this way, the noise filtering has a marked effect on the LER/LWR analysis and needs to be appropriately

  9. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  10. Wavelet Analysis on Detecting Pulse-Like Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bosi, Anna; Mariano, Paolo Maria; Mollaioli, Fabrizio

    2008-07-08

    A quantitative approach for identifying pulse-like ground motions is proposed herein. It is based on the use of the wavelet transform which has the peculiarity to detect sudden jumps in time histories by separating the contributions of different levels of frequency. Moreover, it has the advantage of low computational cost. Three different wavelet-based signal processing procedures are considered here in order to detect large pulses in near-fault ground motions. The first one is based on the direct decomposition of velocity time histories in frequency level and has been exploited elsewhere in the scientific literature. The other two are introduced here and take into account energy and power spectra. It is shown that wavelet analysis of the energy allows one to put in evidence even pulses that can be hardly recognized in the analysis of velocity time-histories. The proposed procedure permits also to distinguish the various energy contributions in different frequency ranges. By analyzing the wavelet coefficients, in fact, it is possible to verify if the mechanical energy release rate associated with a certain earthquake is due to a few severe events or to a series of 'small' events. It is also possible to evidence the frequency contents of a specific pulse (let say the one with highest amount of energy and corresponding power), isolating its analysis from the rest of the ground motion.

  11. Experimental verification and analysis of wavelength effect on pulse stretching and compressing in mid-IR chirped-pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Haizhe; Yuan, Peng; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lifu; Ma, Jingui; Li, Ying; Fan, Dianyuan

    2016-02-01

    As a consequence of the general experimental challenge to detect signals in mid-IR range, taking dispersive chirped near-IR laser pulses as the injected signal source seems to be an artistic route avoiding the daunting mid-IR stretcher and constantly was applied in moderate energy mid-IR optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifications (OPCPA) systems. In this paper we study the wavelength effect on pulse stretching and compressing in detail. Beginning with the theoretical analysis on each dispersion term of grating pairs, we evaluate the residual dispersions when pulse stretcher and compressor work at distinct wavelengths, which shows that this wavelength effect will result in poorly compressed pulses far from transform-limited. Via proof-of-principle experiments based on mid-IR OPCPAs and corresponding numerical simulations, we show that this artful configuration led to un-compressible pulses of ∼2 ps with a time-bandwidth product of ∼ 10 when the chirped-pulse duration is ∼400 ps. To overcome this effect, we demonstrate a simple design of pulse stretcher and compressor. The presented design consisted of a reflection grism-pair compressor can simultaneously cancel the quadric and cubic dispersions of conventional grating based stretcher, showing a potential ability of supporting high-contrast, sub-100-fs pulse-duration and 10,000× of pulse expansion.

  12. Analysis and comparison of real-time sine-wave generation for PWM circuits. [Pulse Width Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkazemi-Moud, M.; Green, T.C.; Williams, B.W. . Dept. of Computing and Electrical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    The paper presented four methods for hardware and software generation in real time of sine waves suitable for PWM circuits. The sine waves are derived from a truncated modified cosine Taylor series, wt([pi]-wt) function, a digitally filtered trapezoid, and a second-order differential equation. Triple injection is incorporated by the addition of a defined magnitude triangular waveform of three times the fundamental frequency. Each sine wave generating technique is implemented, as applicable, in a programmable logic cell array and/or in microprocessor-based software. In each case, the output spectra and total harmonic distortion are compared with computer-simulated results.

  13. Clusters in the distribution of pulsars in period, pulse-width, and age. [statistical analysis/statistical distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    The question of whether pulsars form a single group or whether pulsars come in two or more different groups is discussed. It is proposed that such groups might be related to several factors such as the initial creation of the neutron star, or the orientation of the magnetic field axis with the spin axis. Various statistical models are examined.

  14. Analysis of Pulsed Flow Modification Alternatives, Lower Missouri River, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    The graphical, tabular, and statistical data presented in this report resulted from analysis of alternative flow regime designs considered by a group of Missouri River managers, stakeholders, and scientists during the summer of 2005. This plenary group was charged with designing a flow regime with increased spring flow pulses to support reproduction and survival of the endangered pallid sturgeon. Environmental flow components extracted from the reference natural flow regime were used to design and assess performance of alternative flow regimes. The analysis is based on modeled flow releases from Gavins Point Dam (near Yankton, South Dakota) for nine design alternatives and two reference scenarios; the reference scenarios are the run-of-the-river and the water-control plan implemented in 2004. The alternative designs were developed by the plenary group with the goal of providing pulsed spring flows, while retaining traditional social and economic uses of the river.

  15. Pulse-width-modulated attenuator for AGC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconnell, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Automatic-gain-control (AGC) circuit regulates gain of intermediate-frequency and radio-frequency signals over wide dynamic range with high linearity and very low phase shift. Device has potential uses in radio and television receivers, signal distribution systems, and test and measurement instruments.

  16. Quantitative analysis of dose distribution to determine optimal width of respiratory gating window using Gafchromic EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Kim, Kum Bae; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Hyung-Jun; Park, Seungwoo; Jung, Haijo; Ji, Young Hoon; Yi, Chul-Young

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dependence of the dose distribution on the width of the respiratory gating window by using radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film. An in-house three-dimensional breathing simulator was used with a 4-s cycle and a 3-cm movement. The gamma index and the 50, 95, and 20-80% dose distributions were individually analyzed with regard to static, 100 (full motion), 60, 40, 30, 20, and 15% respiratory gating windows. In addition, dose differences based on the different extents of exposure were compared and analyzed along with total beam delivery time. Dose distributions became increasingly similar to the static value with decreasing respiratory gating window width. The extent differences from the static case for the low-dose region were not significant; neither were the extent differences for the high-dose region and 30, 20, and 15% gating windows (P = 0.388, 0.275, respectively). However, the 40% gating window showed a significant difference (P = 0.001). Moreover, the treatment time for the 30% gating window was reduced by more than half compared to that for the 15% gating window. Thus, the 30% window would be a reasonable choice for maximizing the range of the gating window while markedly decreasing the dose difference and the treatment time.

  17. Selection of neutrino burst candidates by pulse spatial distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryasny, V. G.

    1996-02-01

    The method of analysis and possibilities of identification of neutrino bursts from collapsing stars using a spatial distribution of pulses in the multimodular installations, like the Large Volume Detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory, Liquid Scintillation Detector (Mont Blanc) and Baksan Scintillation Telescope, are discussed. The method could be applicable for any position sensitive detector. By the spatial distribution analysis the burst imitation probability can be decreased by at least 2 orders of magnitude, without significant loss of sensitivity, for currently predicted number of the neutrino interactions.

  18. Cargo inspection system based on pulsed fast neutron analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. R.; Gozani, T.

    1995-05-01

    Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) is a technique which uses a collimated pulsed beam of fast neutrons to excite the nuclei of common elements in bulk materials. Direct imaging of the elemental contents of the material is accomplished by using time-of-flight analysis to identify the position of the interactions and gamma-ray spectroscopy to identify the elemental gamma-rays. From the ratios and absolute measurements of elemental abundances the identification of the material can be deduced. The PFNA cargo inspection system uses a volume type negative ion source and a double drift bunching system to create an intense beam of nano-second bunched negative deuterium ions which, after acceleration to around 6 MeV, impinge on a deuterium gas target producing pulsed neutrons. A unique high speed data acquisition system digitizes and analyzes the time-energy data in real time. Experimental studies and computer simulations were extensively employed to characterize and optimize the design parameters of the system.

  19. Application of pulsed fast neutrons analysis to cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. R.; Gozani, T.; Loveman, R.; Bendahan, J.; Ryge, P.; Stevenson, J.; Liu, F.; Sivakumar, M.

    1994-12-01

    Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) is a technique which uses a collimated pulsed beam of fast neutrons to excite the nuclei of common elements in bulk materials. Direct imaging of the elemental contents of the material is accomplished by using time-of-flight analysis to identify the position of the interactions and gamma-ray spectroscopy to identify the elemental gamma rays. From the ratios and absolute measurements of elemental abundances the identification of the material can be deduced. The PFNA Cargo Inspection System uses a volume type negative ion source and a double drift bunching system to create an intense beam of nano-second bunched negative deuterium ions which, after acceleration to around 6 MeV, impinge on a deuterium gas target producing pulsed neutrons. A unique high speed data acquisition system digitizes and analyzes the time-energy data in real time. Experimental studies and computer simulations were extensively employed to characterize and optimize the design parameters of the system. The system described is scheduled for full scale laboratory testing in the fall of 1994 and for field testing at a Government Testbed in Tacoma, WA in 1995.

  20. VISUALIZATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF PULSE DIAGNOSIS IN AYURVEDA – IIND REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Uebaba, K.; Fenghao, XU; Ishiyama, H.; Kasahara, H.; Amano, K.; Ishii, H.

    1993-01-01

    The findings of Nadi Vijnana of 53 asymptomatic adult males were compared with the results of the blood examinations and the radial pulse pressure wave analysis conducted concomitantly. K pulse had elongated fatty pulse wave contour which is opposite to the slime V one, on the other hand, P pulse had the vibratory contour as the basic principles of Ayurveda. K pulse or K/P pulse had the largest inertia resistance. All these results were characterstic circulatory conditions and sympathetic tones for each pulse. PMID:22556630

  1. Comparative analysis of visual censuses using different width strip-transects for a fish assemblage in a seagrass bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinouchi, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yohei; Sano, Mitsuhiko

    2005-10-01

    Fish counts obtained from visual censuses using strip-transects of different transect widths (i.e., 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 m) in a seagrass ( Zostera marina) bed at Moroiso Bay, Miura Peninsula, Japan, were compared. The different width transects provided similar estimates of mean species numbers of the cryptic fish, while the estimate of non-cryptic species number increased in the wider transects and the narrowest transects provided the lowest total species numbers in most cases. In all cases, 0.5 and 1.0 m wide transects provided very similar fish density estimates. Compared with narrower transects, 1.5 and 2.0 m wide transects provided significantly lower cryptic-species densities, resulting in lower estimates of total fish density. This suggests that fishes, cryptic or otherwise, were seldom overlooked by the observer when they were within a 0.5 m range in the seagrass bed. Although the mean species numbers obtained from the seine were higher than those from the visual censuses in most cases, which may be due to the great differences in a coverage area of a replicate, all of the species collected by the seine were also recorded by the visual censuses. The seine provided lower density estimates of benthic or fast-swimming species, compared with the visual census with 1.0 m wide transects. With carefully designed visual census strategies, not only cryptic species, but also bottom-dwellers and fast-swimmers in the seagrass bed can be evaluated well.

  2. Multi-Level Analysis of Pulsed Detonation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebrahimi, Houshang B.; Mohanraj, Rajendran; Merkle, Charles L.

    2001-01-01

    The present study explores some issues concerning the operational performance of pulsed detonation engines. Zero-, one- and two-dimensional, transient models are employed in a synergistic manner to elucidate the various characteristics that can be expected from each level of analysis. The zero-dimensional model provides rapid parametric trends that help to identify the global characteristics of pulsed detonation engines. The one-dimensional model adds key wave propagation issues that are omitted in the zero-dimensional model and helps to assess its limitations. Finally, the two-dimensional model allows estimates of the first-order multi-dimensional effects and provides an initial multi-dimensional end-correction for the one-dimensional model. The zero-dimensional results indicate that the pulsed detonation engine is competitive with a rocket engine when exhausting to vacuum conditions. At finite back pressures, the PDE out-performs the rocket if the combustion pressure rise from the detonation is added to the chamber pressure in the rocket. If the two peak pressures are the same, the rocket performance is higher. Two-dimensional corrections added to the one-dimensional model result in a modest improvement in predicted specific impulse over the constant pressure boundary condition.

  3. RFX x-ray pulse height analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, L.; Valisa, M.

    1990-10-01

    The x-ray pulse height analysis diagnostic designed and built for the RFX reversed field pinch experiment is presented. The system is designed so as to be sensitive over a wide range of RFX operational conditions (100 eV ≤Te ≤ 2 keV). An array of three liquid N2 cooled Si(Li) detectors looks at the plasma through an equatorial port of the torus and can be tilted ±20° off the plane in order to scan over the central half of the minor diameter on a shot-to-shot basis. A second windowless single detector views the plasma along a fixed chord through a second equatorial port and is sensitive to x-ray energies as low as 500 eV. Commercial electronics are mostly used. The throughput is limited only by the shaping amplifier and pulse pileup rejector. Software simulation of the x-ray flux, including the pulse pileup rejection procedure of the electronic chain, was used to dimension the diagnostic, i.e., number of detectors, size of the apertures, and filter combinations. Preliminary tests indicate 20 ms as a realistic target for the electron temperature time resolution, reducible to 5 ms when all of the four detectors are addressed to the same properly chosen x-ray energy region.

  4. Analysis, design, and fabrication of GaAlAs/GaAs DFB lasers with modulated stripe width structure for complete single longitudinal mode oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yoshiaki; Tada, Kunio

    1988-10-01

    Complete single longitudinal mode operation of a GaAlAs/GaAs distributed-feedback (DFB) laser has been accomplished by making use of a modulated stripe width (MSW) structure, which is characterized by its simple configuration and versatility, compared with equivalent schemes. The coupled-mode equations are transformed into the characteristic equation for the DFB laser with arbitrary index modulation which has a form convenient for numerical analysis. Two specific examples of the stripe width modulation, namely, stepped and symmetric linear modulations, are then analyzed by making use of the equations. Optimum design of the stripe shape is subsequently carried out by assuming a particular waveguide structure. A GaAlAs/GaAs DFB laser having stepped-width modulation was fabricated by using a double-channel planar buried heterostructure. As an improved version, an MSW device having a symmetric linear modulation scheme and antireflecting film on the facets was also fabricated by introducing several techniques, including reactive ion etching.

  5. Multispectrum analysis of the v9 band of 12C2H6: Positions, intensities, self- and N2-broadened half-width coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, V. Malathy; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Benner, D. C.; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2010-06-01

    Line positions, intensities, Lorentz self- and N2-broadened half-width coefficients have been measured for PQ3, PQ2, PQ1, RQ0,RQ1, RQ2, and RQ3 sub-band transitions in the 9 fundamental band of 12C2H6. A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique was used to fit up to 17 high-resolution (~0.00156 cm-1), room temperature absorption spectra of pure (99.99% chemical purity) natural sample of ethane and lean mixtures of the high-purity ethane diluted with N2. A Bruker IFS 120HR Fourier transform spectrometer located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in Richland, Washington was used to record the data. A standard Voigt line shape was assumed to fit all the data since no line mixing or other non Voigt line shapes were required to fit any of the spectra used in the analysis. Short spectral intervals (~2 to 2.5 cm-1) of all 17 spectra covering a specific PQ or RQ sub band were fit simultaneously. For the first time in an ethane band, pressure-broadened half-width coefficients were determined for each of the torsional-split components. Constraints were used such that the half-width coefficients of both torsional-split components were identical for a specific broadening gas. No pressure-induced shift coefficients were necessary to fit the spectra to their noise level. The present study revealed for the first time the dependence of self- and N2-broadened half-width coefficients upon the J, K quantum numbers of the transitions in ethane. A number of transitions belonging to the 9+ 4- 4 and the 9+2 4-2 4 hot bands were also observed in the fitted regions and measurements were made when possible.

  6. GHRS Side 2 Pulse Height Analysis/ion - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1994-01-01

    This test performs a pulse height analysis to determine individual diode response as a function of threshold for HRS detector 2. Based on this evaluation new thresholds may be determined for optimal HRS operation. Command blocks ZCTFLIT1 and ZCTFLIT2 will be updated accordingly. This test will run once during the year. Also included is one ion test which is a PHA of twice normal threshold to look for ion events (which accelerate back up the 22 kV potential of the tube, liberate electrons from the phocathode, and produce events of twice normal energy (this should be a very low, stable rate)).

  7. GHRS Side 1 Pulse Height Analysis/ion - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1994-01-01

    This test performs a pulse height analysis to determine individual diode response as a function of threshold for HRS detector 1. Based on this evaluation new thresholds may be determined for optimal HRS operation. Command block ZCTFLIT1 (PLCP threshold file PZTHR1) will be updated accordingly. This test will run once during the cycle. Also included is one ion test which is a PHA of twice normal threshold to look for ion events (which accelerate back up the 22 kV potential of the tube, liberate electrons from the phocathode, and produce events of twice normal energy (this should be a very low, stable rate)).

  8. Innovative uses for conventional radiation detectors via pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beckedahl, D; Blair, J; Friensehner, A; Kammeraad, J E; Schmid, G

    1999-03-03

    In this report we have discussed two applications for digital pulse shape analysis in Ge detectors: Compton suppression and {gamma}-ray imaging. The Compton suppression aspect has been thoroughly studied during the past few years, and a real-time, laboratory-prototype system has been fielded. A summary of results from that set up have been discussed here. The {gamma}-ray imaging aspect, while not yet developed experimentally, looks very promising theoretically as the simulations presented here have shown. Experimental work currently underway at Berkeley (as discussed in section 4.3) should help further guide us towards the proper developmental path.

  9. [Intracranial volume reserve assessment based on ICP pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Berdyga, J; Czernicki, Z; Jurkiewicz, J

    1994-01-01

    ICP waves were analysed in the situation of expanding intracranial mass. The aim of the study was to determine how big the intracranial added volume has to be in order to produce significant changes of harmonic disturbances index (HFC) of ICP pulse waves. The diagnostic value of HFC and other parameters was compared. The following other parameters were studied: intracranial pressure (ICP), CSF outflow resistance (R), volume pressure response (VPR) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). It was found that ICP wave analysis very clearly reflects the intracranial volume-pressure relation changes. PMID:8028705

  10. Nanosecond pulsed fast neutron analysis - a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, T.

    1994-12-31

    The status of the nanosecond Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) at the time of the conference will be given. PFNA is a new technique researched and developed over the last several years to detect non-intrusively, a large variety of materials in containers as small as luggage or as large as trucks. The first full sized truck/container inspection system is being assembled at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Santa Clara facility for test and evaluation. Following this, the system will be operationally field tested at a designated government test bed in the Port of Tacoma, Washington.