Science.gov

Sample records for pulsed extraction column

  1. Laboratory studies of the behavior of undissolved solids in both pulsed and packed column extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    1989-04-18

    A substantial fraction of the finely divided undissolved solid material found in nuclear fuel reprocessing dissolver-product solutions is hydrophobic and tends to ``seek`` any organic-aqueous interface existing within countercurrent liquid-liquid extraction systems. While passing through pulsed-type columns this material is swept out of the aqueous phase by the combined surface area of the tiny bubbles of dispersed phase. Because these bubbles have a net velocity towards the end of the column where the nominal interface is located, the solids are swept in that direction too. These solids tend to gather in a three-phase ``crud`` layer at the nominal interface point. At equilibrium, about the same amount breaks off from the crud layer and escapes into the liquid exiting from that end of the column as enters it from the other side. If large enough, the crud layer can even interfere with interface detection and control equipment. In packed-column extraction systems, an additional problem is that feed solids can accumulate within the packing material to the point that the column `` floods`` or even totally plugs. The keys to preventing solids-related problems is the correct choice of interface level, and with packed columns, the addition of a ``pulsing leg`` at the bottom of the column. Pulsing packed column systems not only prevents solids from settling onto packing material but it also increses the number of theoretical stages available for extraction. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Study on the dynamic holdup distribution of the pulsed extraction column

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Chen, J.; Wu, Q.

    2013-07-01

    In the study, a CSTR cascade dynamic hydraulic model was developed to investigate the dynamic holdup distribution of the pulsed extraction column. It is assumed that the dynamic process of the dispersed phase holdup of pulsed extraction column has equal effects with the operational process of multiple cascade CSTRs. The process is consistent with the following assumptions: the holdups vary on different stages but maintain uniform on each stage; the changes of the hydraulic parameters have impact initially on the inlet of dispersed phase, and stability will be reached gradually through stage-by-stage blending. The model was tested and verified utilizing time domain response curves of the average holdup. Nearly 150 experiments were carried out with different capillary columns, various feed liquids, and diverse continuous phases and under different operation conditions. The regression curves developed by the model show a good consistency with the experimental results. After linking parameters of the model with operational conditions, the study further found that the parameters are only linearly correlated with pulse conditions and have nothing to do with flow rate for a specific pulsed extraction column. The accuracy of the model is measured by the average holdup, and the absolute error is 0.01. The model can provide supports for the boundary studies on hydraulics and mass transfer by making simple and reliable prediction of the dynamic holdup distribution, with relatively less accessible hydraulic experimental data. (authors)

  3. Copper extraction from ammoniacal medium in a pulsed sieve-plate column with LIX 84-I.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, M Lurdes F; Machado, Remgio M; Ismael, M Rosinda C; Reis, M Teresa A; Carvalho, Jorge M R

    2010-11-15

    This article reports on a study of copper removal from ammoniacal aqueous solution (1.0 kg m(-3) Cu, pH 9.5) by liquid-liquid extraction using a pulsed sieve-plate column. The extractant tested was the hydroxyoxime LIX 84-I (2-hydroxy-5-nonylacetophenone oxime) in the aliphatic diluent Shellsol D-70. The results of the pilot plant experiments demonstrated the feasibility of operating the extraction process in this type of column, with efficiencies of copper removal in the range of 90.5-99.5%. Several effects on the column performance were examined, namely the aqueous and organic flow rates and the pulse velocity. The axial dispersion model was applied to simulate the concentration profiles, which reasonably predicted the experimental data. The overall mass transfer coefficient was evaluated from the experimental data and was found to be between 910(-6) and 1.210(-5) m s(-1). These data were compared with the ones obtained from the resistances in series model, which indicated that the resistance due to chemical reaction was 84-91% of the overall resistance to mass transfer. The extraction using a hollow fiber contactor was also carried out to compare the membrane process performance with the one of conventional process. PMID:20675049

  4. Installation of the Pulse-Plate Column Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Nick R. Mann

    2009-07-01

    There are three primary types of solvent extraction equipment utilized in the nuclear industry for reprocessing of used nuclear fuel; pulse columns, mixer-settlers, and centrifugal contactors. Considerable research and development has been performed at the INL and throughout the DOE complex on the application of centrifugal contactors for used fuel reprocessing and these contactors offer many significant advantages. However, pulse columns have been used extensively in the past in throughout the world for aqueous separations processes and remain the preferred equipment by many commercial entities. Therefore, a pulse-plate column pilot plant has been assembled as part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support experimentation and demonstration of pulse column operation. This will allow the training of personnel in the operation of pulse columns. Also, this capability will provide the equipment to allow for research to be conducted in the operation of pulse columns with advanced solvents and processes developed as part of the fuel cycle research and development being performed in the AFCI program.

  5. Rapid Column Extraction Methods for Urine

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III

    2000-06-09

    A new fecal analysis method that dissolves plutonium oxide was developed at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site. Diphonix Resin (Eichrom Industries), is used to pre-concentrate the actinides from digested fecal samples. A rapid microwave digestion technique is used to remove the actinides from the Diphonix Resin, which effectively extracts plutonium and americium from acidic solutions containing hydrofluoric acid. After resin digestion, the plutonium and americium are recovered in a small volume of nitric acid that is loaded onto small extraction chromatography columns, TEVA Resin and TRU Resin (Eichrom Industries). The method enables complete dissolution of plutonium oxide and provides high recovery of plutonium and americium with good removal of thorium isotopes such as thorium-228.

  6. Instrument for the measurement and determination of chemical pulse column parameters

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, Norman J.; Morgan, John P.

    1990-01-01

    An instrument for monitoring and measuring pneumatic driving force pulse parameters applied to chemical separation pulse columns obtains real time pulse frequency and root mean square amplitude values, calculates column inch values and compares these values against preset limits to alert column operators to the variations of pulse column operational parameters beyond desired limits.

  7. Theoretical efficiency of pulsed polyurethane foam column separations

    SciTech Connect

    Palagyi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Two experimental arrangements of the pulsed column separation have been described and their maximum theoretical separation efficiency under optimum conditions has been investigated. It has been found that the theoretical maximum attainable separation efficiency in the closed arrangement equals the value obtained in the static (batch) one-stage separation, and in the open arrangement equals the value of the separation efficiency obtained in the dynamic (flow) column operation with a static column bed. These conclusions were confirmed in the separation of radioiodine from water on the polyurethane foam column with immobilized tri-n-alkylamine:iodine reagent. A fairly satisfactory agreement has been found between calculated and experimentally determined values of the separation efficiency under the same conditions. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Using solvent extraction to process nitrate anion exchange column effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.

    1987-10-01

    Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), a new organophosphorous extractant, and a new centrifugal mixer-settler both recently developed at Argonne were evaluated for their potential use in the recovery of actinides from nitrate anion exchange column effluents. The performance of the extractant was evaluated by measuring the extraction coefficient values as a function of acid and salt concentration. Additional performance parameters include extraction coefficient behavior as a function of the total metal concentration in the organic phase, and comparison of different stripping and organic scrubbing techniques. A simulated effluent stream was used to evaluate the performance of the centrifugal mixer-settlers by comparing experimental and calculated interstage concentration profiles. Both the CMPO extractant and the centrifugal mixer-settlers have potential for processing nitrate column effluents, particularly if the stripping behavior can be improved. Details of the proposed process are presented in the flowsheet and contactor design analyses.

  9. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION COLUMN EXPERIMENTS ON GASOLINE CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a technique that is used to remove volatile organic compounds from unsaturated soils. Air is pumped through and from the contaminated zone to remove vapor phase constituents. In the work, laboratory soil column experiments were conducted using a gas...

  10. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION COLUMN EXPERIMENTS ON GASOLINE CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a technique that is used to remove volatile organic compounds from unsaturated soils. ir is pumped through and from the contaminated zone to remove vapor phase constituents. n this work, laboratory soil column experiments were conducted using a gaso...

  11. COLUMN VAPOR EXTRACTION EXPERIMENTS ON GASOLINE CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a technique that is used to remove volatile organic compounds from unsaturated soils. ir is pumped from the contaminated area and the chemicals are removed from the resulting vapor stream. n this work laboratory, soil column experiments were conduct...

  12. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  13. Rapid Column Extraction method for SoilRapid Column Extraction method for Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III; Culligan, Brian K.

    2005-11-07

    The analysis of actinides in environmental soil and sediment samples is very important for environmental monitoring as well as for emergency preparedness. A new, rapid actinide separation method has been developed and implemented that provides total dissolution of large soil samples, high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and DGA-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu) neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. The method combines a rapid fusion step for total dissolution to dissolve refractory analytes and matrix removal using cerium fluoride precipitation to remove the difficult soil matrix. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  14. Prediction of mass transfer and heat evolution of Purex pulsed columns by the DYNAC computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Nabeshima, M. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper proposes empirical correlations of the extractive distribution and overall mass transfer coefficients in the Purex H{sub 2}O-HNO{sub 3}-U(VI)-30% tri- n-butylphosphate/dodecane liquid system that are compared with experimental data. The roles of eddy diffusion and interphase chemical reactions in the transfer kinetics are discussed. These equations are incorporated into the DYNAC computer model and applied to the analysis of a plant-sized pulsed-column connection. The predicted profiles of the uranium concentration and the temperature are in good agreement with the experimental data under steady-state and transient operating conditions. Hence, the kinetic correlations have proven useful in expressing the chemical and diffusional nature of solute tranfer.

  15. Zero-derivative boundary condition for pulsed distributed systems. [column chromatography example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lashmet, P. K.; Woodrow, P. T.

    1975-01-01

    To permit use of experimentally determined Peclet numbers in numerical simulations of pulsed distributed flow systems such as chromatograph columns, substitution of the zero-derivative boundary condition for the infinite boundary condition used in treating data is examined. Moment analysis shows that application of the zero-derivative condition external to the column will yield equivalent numerical results for the two boundary conditions. Criteria for locating this position are provided as a function of the Peclet number.

  16. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  17. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 s and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-m direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-?m IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  18. Comparison of an automated nucleic acid extraction system with the column-based procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Rebecca; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Here, we assessed the extraction efficiency of a deployable bench-top nucleic acid extractor EZ1 in comparison to the column-based approach with complex sample matrices. A total of 48 EDTA blood samples and 81 stool samples were extracted by EZ1 automated extraction and the column-based QIAamp DNA Mini Kit. Blood sample extractions were assessed by two real-time malaria PCRs, while stool samples were analyzed by six multiplex real-time PCR assays targeting bacterial, viral, and parasitic stool pathogens. Inhibition control PCR testing was performed as well. In total, 147 concordant and 13 discordant pathogen-specific PCR results were obtained. The latter comprised 11 positive results after column-based extraction only and two positive results after EZ1 extraction only. EZ1 extraction showed a higher frequency of inhibition. This phenomenon was, however, inconsistent for the different PCR schemes. In case of concordant PCR results, relevant differences of cycle threshold numbers for the compared extraction schemes were not observed. Switches from well-established column-based extraction to extraction with the automated EZ1 system do not lead to a relevantly reduced yield of target DNA when complex sample matrices are used. If sample inhibition is observed, column-based extraction from another sample aliquot may be considered. PMID:25883797

  19. Modeling of a pulsed fluid column and coupled piping with structural finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxon, J. B.; Jones, J. U.; Anderson, F. E.

    1989-01-01

    Structural finite elements have been used to model the coupled fluidic-structural response of a liquid oxygen (LOX) feedline at a rocket engine test facility. The model simulates the effects of Pogo pulsing, a test procedure which uses a piston in a side branch to impart an oscillatory pressure pulse to the LOX column as it feeds the engine. In addition to the feedline's structural characteristics, the model accounts for the mass and axial stiffness of the fluid column, the oscillatory pulse of the piston, and the hydraulic impedance of the rocket engine. The model was used to determine the relations between piston stroke, pressure oscillation at the engine inlet, and structural excitation of the feedline. This paper develops the concepts employed by the model.

  20. Accurate Extraction of Nanometer Distances in Multimers by Pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Valera, Silvia; Ackermann, Katrin; Pliotas, Christos; Huang, Hexian; Naismith, James H; Bode, Bela E

    2016-03-24

    Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is gaining increasing importance in structural biology. The PELDOR (pulsed electron-electron double resonance) method allows extracting distance information on the nanometer scale. Here, we demonstrate the efficient extraction of distances from multimeric systems such as membrane-embedded ion channels where data analysis is commonly hindered by multi-spin effects. PMID:26865468

  1. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction: ultra-short pulse generation as seeded Hawking radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eilenberger, Falk; Kabakova, Irina V.; de Sterke, C. Martijn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Pertsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We show that light trapped in an optical cavity can be extracted from that cavity in an ultrashort burst by means of a trigger pulse. We find a simple analytic description of this process and show that while the extracted pulse inherits its pulse length from that of the trigger pulse, its wavelength can be completely different. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction is thus well suited for the development of ultrashort laser sources in new wavelength ranges. We discuss similarities between this process and the generation of Hawking radiation at the optical analogue of an event horizon with extremely high Hawking temperature. Our analytic predictions are confirmed by thorough numerical simulations. PMID:24060831

  2. Repetitive Regeneration of Media #1 in a Dynamic Column Extraction using Brine #1

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-10-14

    This data is from a regeneration study from a dynamic column extraction experiment where we ran a solution of REE's through a column of media #1 then stripped the REE's off the media using 2M HNO3 solution. We then re-equilibrated the media and repeated the process of running a REE solution through the column and stripping the REE's off the media and comparing the two runs.

  3. Solid-phase extraction of plant thionins employing aluminum silicate based extraction columns.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shah; Güzel, Yüksel; Pezzei, Cornelia; Rainer, Matthias; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2014-08-01

    Thionins belong to a family of cysteine-rich, low-molecular-weight (∼5 KDa) biologically active proteins in the plant kingdom. They display a broad cellular toxicity against a wide range of organisms and eukaryotic cell lines. Thionins protect plants against different pathogens, including bacteria and fungi. A highly selective solid-phase extraction method for plant thionins is reported deploying aluminum silicate (3:2 mullite) powder as a sorbent in extraction columns. Mullite was shown to considerably improve selectivity compared to a previously described zirconium silicate embedded poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic polymer. Due to the presence of aluminum(III), mullite offers electrostatic interactions for the selective isolation of cysteine-rich proteins. In comparison to zirconium(IV) silicate, aluminum(III) silicate showed reduced interactions towards proteins which resulted into superior washings of unspecific compounds while still retaining cysteine-rich thionins. In the presented study, European mistletoe, wheat and barley samples were subjected to solid-phase extraction analysis for isolation of viscotoxins, purothionins and hordothionins, respectively. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy was used for determining the selectivity of the sorbent toward thionins. The selectively retained thionins were quantified by colorimetric detection using the bicinchoninic acid assay. For peptide mass-fingerprint analysis tryptic digests of eluates were examined. PMID:24913248

  4. Effects of pulsed and oscillatory flow on water vapor removal from a laboratory soil column. Final report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, K.E.

    1993-05-01

    Subsurface contamination by volatile organic contaminants (VOC`s) in the vadose zone and groundwater is primarily due to leaking underground storage tanks and industrial spills. Soil vapor extraction is a technique that is being used successfully to remove VOC`s from the subsurface. A flow of air is established through the soil to remove the vapor phase component of the contaminant. Soil vapor extraction will initially remove high levels of contaminant that is already present in the macropores. The concentration will start to decline as the removal from the soil matrix becomes limited by diffusion of contaminant from regions away from the air flow paths. This study examines potential methods of overcoming the diffusion limitation by adding an oscillatory component to the steady air flow and by pulsed flow, which involves turning air flow on and off at predetermined intervals. The study considered only the removal of water from the soil to try to establish general vapor behavior in the soil under the imposed conditions. Based on a statistical analysis, both the oscillatory and pulsed flow showed an improved water removal rate over the steady state flow. The effect of oscillatory flow was only examined at higher frequencies. The literature indicates that oscillations at lower frequencies may be more effective. Pulsed flow showed the most efficient removal of water compared to steady state conditions. The pulsed flow was most efficient because rather than reducing the diffusion limitation, the system would shut down and wait for diffusion to occur. This optimizes energy consumption, but does not reduce treatment time. The oscillatory flow actually reduced the diffusion limitation within the column which could result in a shorter treatment time.

  5. Extreme degree of ionization in homogenous micro-capillary plasma columns heated by ultrafast current pulses.

    PubMed

    Avaria, G; Grisham, M; Li, J; Tomasel, F G; Shlyaptsev, V N; Busquet, M; Woolston, M; Rocca, J J

    2015-03-01

    Homogeneous plasma columns with ionization levels typical of megaampere discharges are created by rapidly heating gas-filled 520-?m-diameter channels with nanosecond rise time current pulses of 40kA. Current densities of up to 0.3??GA?cm^{-2} greatly increase Joule heating with respect to conventional capillary discharge Z pinches, reaching unprecedented degrees of ionization for a high-Z plasma column heated by a current pulse of remarkably low amplitude. Dense xenon plasmas are ionized to Xe^{28+}, while xenon impurities in hydrogen discharges reach Xe^{30+}. The unique characteristics of these hot, ?300:1 length-to-diameter aspect ratio plasmas allow the observation of unexpected spectroscopic phenomena. Axial spectra show the unusual dominance of the intercombination line over the resonance line of He-like Al by nearly an order of magnitude, caused by differences in opacities in the axial and radial directions. These plasma columns could enable the development of sub-10-nm x-ray lasers. PMID:25793819

  6. Extreme Degree of Ionization in Homogenous Micro-Capillary Plasma Columns Heated by Ultrafast Current Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, G.; Grisham, M.; Li, J.; Tomasel, F. G.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Busquet, M.; Woolston, M.; Rocca, J. J.

    2015-03-01

    Homogeneous plasma columns with ionization levels typical of megaampere discharges are created by rapidly heating gas-filled 520 -? m -diameter channels with nanosecond rise time current pulses of 40 kA. Current densities of up to 0.3 GA cm-2 greatly increase Joule heating with respect to conventional capillary discharge Z pinches, reaching unprecedented degrees of ionization for a high-Z plasma column heated by a current pulse of remarkably low amplitude. Dense xenon plasmas are ionized to Xe28 + , while xenon impurities in hydrogen discharges reach Xe30 + . The unique characteristics of these hot, 300 :1 length-to-diameter aspect ratio plasmas allow the observation of unexpected spectroscopic phenomena. Axial spectra show the unusual dominance of the intercombination line over the resonance line of He-like Al by nearly an order of magnitude, caused by differences in opacities in the axial and radial directions. These plasma columns could enable the development of sub-10-nm x-ray lasers.

  7. Cost/performance comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors designed to process Clinch River Breeder Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ciucci, J.A. Jr.

    1983-12-01

    A comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors was made to determine which type of equipment was more advantageous for use in the primary decontamination cycle of a remotely operated fuel reprocessing plant. Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) fuel was chosen as the fuel to be processed in the proposed 1 metric tonne/day reprocessing facility. The pulse columns and centrifugal contactors were compared on a performance and total cost basis. From this comparison, either the pulse columns or the centrifugal contactors will be recommended for use in a fuel reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel. The reliability, solvent exposure to radiation, required time to reach steady state, and the total costs were the primary areas of concern for the comparison. The pulse column units were determined to be more reliable than the centrifugal contactors. When a centrifugal contactor motor fails, it can be remotely changed in less than one eight hour shift. Pulse columns expose the solvent to approximately five times as much radiation dose as the centrifugal contactor units; however, the proposed solvent recovery system adequately cleans the solvent for either case. The time required for pulse columns to reach steady state is many times longer than the time required for centrifugal contactors to reach steady state. The cost comparison between the two types of contacting equipment resulted in centrifugal contactors costing 85% of the total cost of pulse columns when the contactors were stacked on three levels in the module. If the centrifugal contactors were all positioned on the top level of a module with the unoccupied volume in the module occupied by other equipment, the centrifugal contactors cost is 66% of the total cost of pulse columns. Based on these results, centrifugal contactors are recommended for use in a remotely operated reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel.

  8. Mass transfer in countercurrent packed columns: Application to supercritical CO[sub 2] extraction of terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, P.C.; Matos, H.A.; Carmelo, P.J.; Gomes de Azevedo, E.; Nunes da Ponte, M. . Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia)

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is an alternative separation method to more conventional processes such as liquid extraction and distillation. However, up to now, few works have been devoted to the investigation of the efficiency of countercurrent packed columns under supercritical conditions from a mass transfer point of view. Mass transfer in a countercurrent column, filled with structured gauze packing, was measured for the separation of a mixture of terpenes (d-limonene/1,8-cineole) by supercritical carbon dioxide, at 313 and 318 K and pressures up to 9 MPa. The extraction efficiency was determined in terms of the overall mass transfer coefficient. Operating lines for this process had an appreciable curvature due to a high miscibility of the two contacting phases. The real slope of these lines had to be estimated. Available mass transfer models for packed columns predicted efficiencies diverging to a great extent from the experimental results.

  9. Enzyme mass-transfer coefficient in aqueous two-phase systems using static mixer extraction column.

    PubMed

    Rostami, K; Alamshahi, M

    2002-09-01

    Recent technical advances in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) have made this a sound technique for the extraction of biomacromolecules. The extraction of alpha-amylase was investigated using aqueous two-phase systems formed by sodium sulphate-polyethylene glycol (PEG) in water in a 47-mm inner diameter spray column packed with three types of static mixers. The effects of dispersed-phase flow rate, phase composition, column height and diameter were studied. The extraction column was operated in a semi-batch manner. It was found that the hold-up and volumetric mass transfer coefficients increased with an increase in dispersed (PEG-rich) phase velocity and decreased with increasing phase composition. Empirical correlations were developed for fractional dispersed-phase hold-up and volumetric mass transfer coefficients. PMID:14508675

  10. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  11. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Column Abundance Made Using a Pulsed IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anamd; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection IPDA lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier (OPA) pumped by a Nd:YAG laser and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  12. Airborne measurements of atmospheric methane column abundance using a pulsed integrated-path differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anand; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B

    2012-12-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon-counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude, and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations. PMID:23207402

  13. The setup of an extraction system coupled to a hydrogen isotopes distillation column

    SciTech Connect

    Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Balteanu, O.; Bucur, C.

    2008-07-15

    Among the most difficult problems of cryogenic distillation one stands apart: the extraction of the heavy fraction. By an optimal design of the cycle scheme, this problem could be avoided. A 'worst case scenario' is usually occurring when the extracted fraction consists of one prevalent isotope such as hydrogen and small amounts of the other two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). This situation is further complicated by two parameters of the distillation column: the extraction flow rate and the hold-up. The present work proposes the conceptual design of an extraction system associated to the cryogenic distillation column used in hydrogen separation processes. During this process, the heavy fraction (DT, T{sub 2}) is separated, its concentration being the highest at the bottom of the distillation column. From this place the extraction of the gaseous phase can now begin. Being filled with adsorbent, the extraction system is used to temporarily store the heavy fraction. Also the extraction system provides samples for the gas Chromatograph. The research work is focused on the existent pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation from our institute to validate the experiments carried out until now. (authors)

  14. Extraction of negative ions from pulsed electronegative capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ankur; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2012-08-01

    Charge buildup during plasma etching of dielectric features can lead to undesirable effects, such as notching, bowing, and twisting. Pulsed plasmas have been suggested as a method to achieve charge-free plasma etching. In particular, electronegative plasmas are attractive as the collapse of the plasma potential during the after-glow period of pulsed capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) can allow for extraction of negative ions into the feature. The extraction of negative ions in the after-glow of pulsed CCPs sustained in CF{sub 4} containing gas mixtures is computationally investigated. In this paper, the consequences of pulse frequency and gas chemistry on negative ion flux to the wafer are discussed. A low negative ion flux to the wafer was observed only in the late after-glow period of low pulse frequencies. The negative ion flux was found to significantly increase with the addition of highly electronegative gases (such as thermally attaching Cl{sub 2}) even at a high pulse frequency of 10 kHz. As the production of negative ions during the after-glow diminishes, alternative strategies to enhance the flux were also pursued. The flux of negative ions was found to increase by the addition of a pulsed dc voltage on the top electrode that is 180 Degree-Sign out-of-phase with the rf pulse.

  15. Extraction of negative ions from pulsed electronegative capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2012-08-01

    Charge buildup during plasma etching of dielectric features can lead to undesirable effects, such as notching, bowing, and twisting. Pulsed plasmas have been suggested as a method to achieve charge-free plasma etching. In particular, electronegative plasmas are attractive as the collapse of the plasma potential during the after-glow period of pulsed capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) can allow for extraction of negative ions into the feature. The extraction of negative ions in the after-glow of pulsed CCPs sustained in CF4 containing gas mixtures is computationally investigated. In this paper, the consequences of pulse frequency and gas chemistry on negative ion flux to the wafer are discussed. A low negative ion flux to the wafer was observed only in the late after-glow period of low pulse frequencies. The negative ion flux was found to significantly increase with the addition of highly electronegative gases (such as thermally attaching Cl2) even at a high pulse frequency of 10 kHz. As the production of negative ions during the after-glow diminishes, alternative strategies to enhance the flux were also pursued. The flux of negative ions was found to increase by the addition of a pulsed dc voltage on the top electrode that is 180 out-of-phase with the rf pulse.

  16. [Preparation and applications of a supported liquid-liquid extraction column with a composite diatomite material].

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianmin; Ma, Zhishuang; Sun, Ying; Wang, Yongzun; Li, Youxin

    2012-08-01

    A rapid and special supported liquid-liquid extraction (SLE) column was developed with a composite diatomite material. The SLE column was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with acidic, neutral and alkaline compounds dissolved in water. Furthermore, some real complex samples were also analyzed by HPLC with the SLE method. The recoveries of benzoic acid (acidic), p-nitroaniline (alkaline) and 4-hydroxy-benzoic methyl ester (neutral) treated by the SLE column were 90.6%, 98.1% and 97.7%. However, the recoveries of the three compounds treated by traditional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method were 71.9%, 81.9% and 83.9%. The results showed that the SLE technique had higher recoveries than the traditional LLE method. The spiked recoveries of the complex samples, such as benzoic acid in Sprite and dexamethasone acetate, chlorphenamine maleate, indomethacin in bovine serum, were between 80% and 110% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 15%. For biological specimen, the results could be accepted. Meantime, many disadvantages associated with traditional LLE method, such as emulsion formation, didn't occur using SLE column. The SLE column technique is a good sample preparation method with many advantages, such as rapid, simple, robust, easily automated, high recovery and high-throughput, which would be widely used in the future. PMID:23256382

  17. A machine learning approach to extract spinal column centerline from three-dimensional CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caihua; Li, Yuanzhong; Ito, Wataru; Shimura, Kazuo; Abe, Katsumi

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column is one of the most important anatomical structures in the human body and its centerline, that is, the centerline of vertebral bodies, is a very important feature used by many applications in medical image processing. In the past, some approaches have been proposed to extract the centerline of spinal column by using edge or region information of vertebral bodies. However, those approaches may suffer from difficulties in edge detection or region segmentation of vertebral bodies when there exist vertebral diseases such as osteoporosis, compression fracture. In this paper, we propose a novel approach based on machine learning to robustly extract the centerline of the spinal column from threedimensional CT data. Our approach first applies a machine learning algorithm, called AdaBoost, to detect vertebral cord regions, which have a S-shape similar to and close to, but can be detected more stably than, the spinal column. Then a centerline of detected vertebral cord regions is obtained by fitting a spline curve to their central points, using the associated AdaBoost scores as weights. Finally, the obtained centerline of vertebral cord is linearly deformed and translated in the sagittal direction to fit the top and bottom boundaries of the vertebral bodies and then a centerline of the spinal column is obtained. Experimental results on a large CT data set show the effectiveness of our approach.

  18. Regenerated silica gel as stationary phase on vacuum column chromatography to purify temulawak's extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyono, Bambang; Maduwu, Ratna Dewi; Widayat, Suzery, Meiny

    2015-12-01

    Commercial silica gel only used once by many researchers and affected high cost for purification process, also less support the green chemistry program. This research focused in regeneration silica gel that used purification of temulawak's extracts (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb) by vacuum column chromatography. Sample extracts (contains 10.1195±0.5971% of curcuminoids) was purified by vacuum column chromatography (pressure: 45 kPa, column: 100mm on length and 16mm on diameter). Ethanol 96% and acetone were compared as eluent. The amount of solvent and yield of curcuminoids used as indicator purification. The silica gel was regenerated with heating in 600°C for 8 hours The silica gels were analyzed by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Furthermore, regenerated silica gel was used as the stationary phase in vacuum column chromatography under the same conditions with the previous purification. All the purification experiments were performed in three repetitions. Based on regression equation, y=0.132x+0.0011 (r2=0.9997) the yield of curcuminoids on purified products using ethanol as the eluent was improved 4.26% (to 14.3724±0.5749%) and by acetone was improved 3,03% (to 13.1450 ±0.6318%). The IR spectrum of both silica gel showed the same vibration profile and also there were three crystallinity peaks missing on its X-ray diffraction. Regenerated silica gel has the same performance with new silica gel in purification of temulawak's extract: by ethanol has increased 4.08% (14.1947±0.7415%) and 2.93% (13.0447±0.4822) by acetone. In addition, all purification products showed similar TLC profiles. Purification using regenerated silica gel as the adsorbent on vacuum column chromatography has exactly same potential with the new silica gel.

  19. Dynamics of a Finite Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Column in a Pulsed Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Simpson, James; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient paramagnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic field gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. The movement of liquid oxygen is vital to the space program since it one of the primary oxidizers used for propulsion. Transport of liquid oxygen (LOX) via direct interaction of the magnetic fields (B field) with the fluid is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. This method of transporting (i.e. pumping) LOX may have particular advantages on Mars and other reduced gravitational environments, namely safety and reliability. This paper will address transport of a magnetic fluid, LOX, via phased-pulsed electromagnets acting on the edge of the column of fluid. The authors have developed a physical model from first-principles for the motion of a magnetic fluid in a particular U-tube geometry subjected to a pulsed magnetic field from an arbitrary solenoidal electromagnet. Experimental data that have been collected from the analogous geometry correlate well to that of the ab-initio calculations.

  20. Simple, specific analysis of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides in sediments using column extraction and gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belisle, A.A.; Swineford, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    A simple, specific procedure was developed for the analysis of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides in sediment. The wet soil was mixed with anhydrous sodium sulfate to bind water and the residues were column extracted in acetone:methylene chloride (1:l,v/v). Coextracted water was removed by additional sodium sulfate packed below the sample mixture. The eluate was concentrated and analyzed directly by capillary gas chromatography using phosphorus and nitrogen specific detectors. Recoveries averaged 93 % for sediments extracted shortly after spiking, but decreased significantly as the samples aged.

  1. Combined extraction-cleanup column chromatographic procedure for determination of dicofol in avian eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krynitsky, A.J.; Stafford, C.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1988-01-01

    Dicofol in avian eggs was completely oxidized to dichlorobenzophenone (DCBP) when a hexane Soxhlet extraction procedure was used. This degradation did not occur with other avian tissues (muscle and liver). For this reason, a combined extraction-cleanup column chromatographic procedure, without added heat, was developed for the determination of dicofol in avian eggs. Homogenized subsamples of eggs were mixed with sodium sulfate, and the mixture was added as the top layer on a column prepacked with Florisil. The dicofol and other compounds of interest were then eluted with ethyl ether-hexane. The extracts, relatively free from lipids, were quantitated on a gas chromatograph equipped with a 63Ni electron-capture detector and a methyl silicone capillary column. Recoveries from chicken eggs, fortified with dicofol and other DDT-related compounds, averaged 96%. Analysis of eggs of eastern screech-owls, fed a meat diet containing 10 ppm technical Kelthane, showed that both dicofol and DCBP were present. Results were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. This method is rapid and reliable, involves a minimum of sample handling, and is well suited for high volume determination of dicofol in eggs and other avian tissues.

  2. Extraction of a single photon from an optical pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Bechler, Orel; Shomroni, Itay; Lovsky, Yulia; Guendelman, Gabriel; Dayan, Barak

    2016-01-01

    Removing a single photon from a pulse is one of the most elementary operations that can be performed on light, having both fundamental significance and practical applications in quantum communication and computation. So far, photon subtraction, in which the removed photon is detected and therefore irreversibly lost, has been implemented in a probabilistic manner with inherently low success rates using low-reflectivity beam splitters. Here we demonstrate a scheme for the deterministic extraction of a single photon from an incoming pulse. The removed photon is diverted to a different mode, enabling its use for other purposes, such as a photon number-splitting attack on quantum key distribution protocols. Our implementation makes use of single-photon Raman interaction (SPRINT) with a single atom near a nanofibre-coupled microresonator. The single-photon extraction probability in our current realization is limited mostly by linear loss, yet probabilities close to unity should be attainable with realistic experimental parameters.

  3. Continuous aqueous two-phase extraction of human antibodies using a packed column.

    PubMed

    Rosa, P A J; Azevedo, A M; Sommerfeld, S; Bcker, W; Aires-Barros, M R

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a pilot scale packed differential contactor was evaluated for the continuous counter-current aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) from a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells supernatant (CS) enriched with pure protein. Preliminary studies have been firstly performed in order to select the dispersed phase (phosphate-rich or polyethylene glycol 3350 Da (PEG)-rich phase) and the column packing material. The PEG-rich phase has been selected as the dispersed phase and the stainless steel as the preferred material for the column packing bed since it was not wetted preferentially by the selected dispersed phase. Hydrodynamic studies have been also performed, and the experimental results were successfully adjusted to the Richardson-Zaki and Msek equations, typically used for the conventional organic-aqueous two-phase systems. An experimental set-up combining the packed column with a pump mixer-settler stage showed to have the best performance and to be advantageous when compared to the IgG batch extraction. An IgG recovery yield of 85% could be obtained with about 50% of total contaminants and more than 85% of contaminant proteins removal. Mass transfer studies have revealed that the mass transfer was controlled by the PEG-rich phase. A higher efficiency could be obtained when using an extra pump mixer-settler stage and higher flow rates. PMID:22173005

  4. Improving carotenoid extraction from tomato waste by pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Elisa; lvarez, Ignacio; Raso, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, the influence of the application of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of different intensities (3-7?kV/cm and 0-300??s) on the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel and pulp in a mixture of hexane:acetone:ethanol was studied with the aim of increasing extraction yield or reducing the percentage of the less green solvents in the extraction medium. According to the cellular disintegration index, the optimum treatment time for the permeabilization of tomato peel and pulp at different electric field strengths was 90??s. The PEF permeabilization of tomato pulp did not significantly increase the carotenoid extraction. However, a PEF treatment at 5?kV/cm improved the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel by 39% as compared with the control in a mixture of hexane:ethanol:acetone (50:25:25). Further increments of electric field from 5 to 7?kV/cm did not increase significantly the extraction of carotenoids. The presence of acetone in the solvent mixture did not positively affect the carotenoid extraction when the tomato peels were PEF-treated. Response surface methodology was used to determine the potential of PEF for reducing the percentage of hexane in a hexane:ethanol mixture. The application of a PEF treatment allowed reducing the hexane percentage from 45 to 30% without affecting the carotenoid extraction yield. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts obtained from tomato peel was correlated with the carotenoid concentration and it was not affected by the PEF treatment. PMID:25988115

  5. Improving Carotenoid Extraction from Tomato Waste by Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Luengo, Elisa; Álvarez, Ignacio; Raso, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, the influence of the application of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of different intensities (3–7 kV/cm and 0–300 μs) on the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel and pulp in a mixture of hexane:acetone:ethanol was studied with the aim of increasing extraction yield or reducing the percentage of the less green solvents in the extraction medium. According to the cellular disintegration index, the optimum treatment time for the permeabilization of tomato peel and pulp at different electric field strengths was 90 μs. The PEF permeabilization of tomato pulp did not significantly increase the carotenoid extraction. However, a PEF treatment at 5 kV/cm improved the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel by 39% as compared with the control in a mixture of hexane:ethanol:acetone (50:25:25). Further increments of electric field from 5 to 7 kV/cm did not increase significantly the extraction of carotenoids. The presence of acetone in the solvent mixture did not positively affect the carotenoid extraction when the tomato peels were PEF-treated. Response surface methodology was used to determine the potential of PEF for reducing the percentage of hexane in a hexane:ethanol mixture. The application of a PEF treatment allowed reducing the hexane percentage from 45 to 30% without affecting the carotenoid extraction yield. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts obtained from tomato peel was correlated with the carotenoid concentration and it was not affected by the PEF treatment. PMID:25988115

  6. Laser speckle contrast analysis for pulse waveform extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Pedro; Santos, Pedro; Figueiras, Edite; Correia, Carlos; Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Cardoso, João.

    2015-07-01

    The present paper shows a method for pulse waveform extraction using laser speckle contrast analysis. An experimental apparatus was assembled, using a coherent light source and a digital video camera to record time varying speckle patterns emitted from the radial artery. The speckle data were analysed by computing the speckle pattern contrast on a sequence of video frames. The speckle pulse wave signal was then compared with a photoplethysmographic signal both time and frequency domain. A total of thirty data-sets were acquired from 10 individuals. Subjects heart rate was identified with a root mean square error of 1.3 beats per minute. Signals similarity was evaluated using spectral coherence with an overall mean coherence of 0.63. Speckle contrast analysis is a newly commercialized technique to monitor microvascular blood flow. However, these results demonstrate the ability of the same technique to extract pulse waveform information. The inclusion of this feature in the current speckle devices is only associated with a slightly change in the signal processing techniques and video acquisition parameters but can be very useful in clinical context.

  7. Micro-column solid phase extraction to determine uranium and thorium in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Chun-Chih; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2008-08-01

    Extraction chromatographic separation techniques based on U/TEVA and TEVA resins were utilized to separate uranium and thorium isotopes in complex matrices from environmental samples. This approach has the advantages of ease of quantitative analysis, small sample size, an absence of mixed waste solvents, complete separation of U/Th isotopes, acceptable chemical yields and good energy resolution in the alpha spectrum. The procedure for analyzing alpha-emitting isotopes of uranium and thorium in geothermal water from Peito, Taiwan, is illustrated in detail. It involves sample pre-concentration, filtration and separation by highly selective extraction chromatographic resins, followed by electroplating and alpha-spectroscopy. The analytical results show a chemical recovery exceeding 55% for U and 65% for Th, respectively, under optimized conditions. The efficient and cost-effective use of recyclable columns makes the analytical methods simple, accurate, rapid, reliable and robust. PMID:18430577

  8. A rapid column-based ancient DNA extraction method for increased sample throughput.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin; Siedel, Heike; Hofreiter, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Genetic analyses using museum specimens and ancient DNA from fossil samples are becoming increasingly important in phylogenetic and especially population genetic studies. Recent progress in ancient DNA sequencing technologies has substantially increased DNA sequence yields and, in combination with barcoding methods, has enabled large-scale studies using any type of DNA. Moreover, more and more studies now use nuclear DNA sequences in addition to mitochondrial ones. Unfortunately, nuclear DNA is, due to its much lower copy number in living cells compared to mitochondrial DNA, much more difficult to obtain from low-quality samples. Therefore, a DNA extraction method that optimizes DNA yields from low-quality samples and at the same time allows processing many samples within a short time frame is immediately required. In fact, the major bottleneck in the analysis process using samples containing low amounts of degraded DNA now lies in the extraction of samples, as column-based methods using commercial kits are fast but have proven to give very low yields, while more efficient methods are generally very time-consuming. Here, we present a method that combines the high DNA yield of batch-based silica extraction with the time-efficiency of column-based methods. Our results on Pleistocene cave bear samples show that DNA yields are quantitatively comparable, and in fact even slightly better than with silica batch extraction, while at the same time the number of samples that can conveniently be processed in parallel increases and both bench time and costs decrease using this method. Thus, this method is suited for harvesting the power of high-throughput sequencing using the DNA preserved in the millions of paleontological and museums specimens. PMID:21565072

  9. Bonded-phase extraction column isolation of organic compounds in groundwater at a hazardous waste site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Pereira, W.E.; Ratcliff, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure for isolation of hazardous organic compounds from water for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis Is presented and applied to creosote- and pentachlorophenol-contaminated groundwater resulting from wood-treatment processes. This simple procedure involved passing a 50-100-mL sample through a bonded-phase extraction column, eluting the trapped organic compounds from the column with 2-4 mL of solvent, and evaporating the sample to 100 ??L with a stream of dry nitrogen, after which the sample was ready for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Representative compounds indicative of creosote contamination were used for recovery and precision studies from the cyclohexyl-bonded phase. Recovery of these compounds from n-octyl-, n-octadecyl-, cyclohexyl-, and phenyl-bonded phases was compared. The bonded phase that exhibited the best recovery and least bias toward acidic or basic cmpounds was the n-octadecyl phase. Detailed compound Identification Is given for compounds Isolated from creosote- and pentachlorophenol-contaminated groundwater using the cyclohexyl-bonded phase.

  10. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Ramanathan, A.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected ~linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes > 6 km the random errors were ~ 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 1 & 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the signal photon count). Analysis to date shows the decrease in CO2 due to vegetation when flying easterward over the Great Plains as well as the increase in CO2 concentration in the vicinity of the coal-fired power plant in New Mexico. Examples of these and other results will be presented.

  11. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 1 & 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the sigual photon count). Analysis to date shows the decrease in CO2 due to vegetation when flying easterward over the Great Plains as well as the increase in CO2 concentration in the vicinity ofthe coal-fired power plant in New Mexico. Examples of these and other results will be presented.

  12. [Immunoaffinity columns and determination of ochratoxin A in cereals by HPLC. Part II. Evaluation of extraction using acetonitrile/water].

    PubMed

    Czerwiecki, Ludwik; Czyzyk, Kamila; Wilczy?ska, Grazyna; Kwiecie?, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    Ochratoxin A from wheat and rye grain was extracted with acetonitrile:water (60:40). After clean-up of extracts using immunoaffinity columns (IAC), ochratoxin was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography using C18 column and fluorometric detection at 330 nm excitation and 460 nm emission. The mean recovery of ochratoxin A at fortification levels 0.1-100 microg/kg, was 74-89%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.015 and 0.025 microg/kg, respectively. The positive results were confirmed by reaction with BF3 complex in methanol. PMID:15732503

  13. New solvent extraction and column techniques for preconcentration and speciation. I. Flow injection and closed loop solvent extraction of copper and uranium. II. Metal speciation using silica and C18 bonded silica columns

    SciTech Connect

    Atallah, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    A new solvent extraction system and a column extraction technique based on a continuous flow analysis approach are described. First copper and uranium solutions are extracted using a system based on a solvent extraction flow injection analysis (SEFIA). Due to the limited preconcentration factors which did not provide the sensitivity needed to determine uranium in the region of 50 ppB, a new extraction system is developed, Closed Loop Solvent Extraction System, (CLSES). The method is based on the continuous extraction of the analyte in a small volume of organic phase circulating within a closed loop. In this way, the aqueous stream enters the extraction coil and exits to waste, while the organic phase is circulated following phase separation. Equations relating the preconcentration factors to the extraction parameters are derived and verified. Two unique advantage of the present system compared to other continuous flow extraction methods are obtained. The first is the high preconcentration factors that can be easily reached. The second is the ability to include a back extraction step within the same manifold to remove interferences. Using micro-columns packed with silica for on-line preconcentration in flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS, GFAAS), Cu/sup 2 +/ and Pb/sup 2 +/ were determined at the ppB concentration level. Microcolumns of silica gel are used to adsorb trace-free metal ions, and microcolumns of C18 bonded silica gel are used to adsorb neutral metal chelates. Negatively charged forms of copper do not retain on the columns. A method was developed to combine the advantages of on-line preconcentration systems and the high sensitivity of GFAAS.

  14. Development of an analytical method for yam saponins using HPLC with pulsed amperometric detection at different column temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ha-Jeong; Choi, Seung-Hee; Yoo, Chang-Seon; Choi, Hwa-Young; Lee, Soo-Eon; Park, Yong-Duk

    2013-02-01

    Yam saponins (dioscin, gracillin, protodioscin, and protogracillin) were analyzed with three different C18 columns at incremental column temperatures from 15 to 45C to investigate the effect of temperature on the retention and resolution of yam saponins. At low temperature, yam saponins showed decreased retention times and improved resolutions in the C18 columns. In the Kinetex C18 column at 15C, the four saponins achieved baseline separation (Rs > 1.5) within 30 min. Pulsed amperometric detection was used to identify saponins with high sensitivity. The limits of detection and quantification of saponins were 0.11-0.31 and 0.33-0.95 ng, respectively. The correlation coefficients ranged 0.9986-1.0000. Intra- and inter-day precisions were <4.2% of retention times and <9.5% of the calculated contents. Average recoveries ranged from 92.18 to 105.98%. Saponin contents in Dioscorea nipponica tubers and commercial yam foods were determined without sample purification or concentration. Among the ten commercial yam foods investigated, only three showed significant saponin contents. PMID:23303619

  15. Quantitation of promethazine and metabolites in urine samples using on-line solid-phase extraction and column-switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Q.; Putcha, L.; Harm, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A chromatographic method for the quantitation of promethazine (PMZ) and its three metabolites in urine employing on-line solid-phase extraction and column-switching has been developed. The column-switching system described here uses an extraction column for the purification of PMZ and its metabolites from a urine matrix. The extraneous matrix interference was removed by flushing the extraction column with a gradient elution. The analytes of interest were then eluted onto an analytical column for further chromatographic separation using a mobile phase of greater solvent strength. This method is specific and sensitive with a range of 3.75-1400 ng/ml for PMZ and 2.5-1400 ng/ml for the metabolites promethazine sulfoxide, monodesmethyl promethazine sulfoxide and monodesmethyl promethazine. The lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) were 3.75 ng/ml with less than 6.2% C.V. for PMZ and 2.50 ng/ml with less than 11.5% C.V. for metabolites based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 10:1 or greater. The accuracy and precision were within +/- 11.8% in bias and not greater than 5.5% C.V. in intra- and inter-assay precision for PMZ and metabolites. Method robustness was investigated using a Plackett-Burman experimental design. The applicability of the analytical method for pharmacokinetic studies in humans is illustrated.

  16. Determination of Myo-Inositol in Infant, Pediatric, and Adult Formulas by Liquid Chromatography-Pulsed Amperometric Detection with Column Switching: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2011.18.

    PubMed

    Butler-Thompson, Linda D; Jacobs, Wesley A; Schimpf, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    AOAC First Action Method 2011.18, Myo-Inositol (Free and Bound as Phosphatidylinositol) in Infant and Pediatric Formulas and Adult Nutritionals, was collaboratively studied. With this method free myo-inositol and phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol are extracted using two different sample preparation procedures, separated by ion chromatography using a combination of Dionex Carbo Pac PA1 and MA1 columns with column switching, and detected with pulsed amperometry using a gold electrode. Free myo-inositol is extracted from samples with dilute hydrochloric acid and water. Phosphatidylinositol is extracted from samples with chloroform and separated from other fats with silica SPE cartridges. Myo-inositol is then released from the glycerol backbone with concentrated acetic and hydrochloric acids at 120°C. During this collaborative study, nine laboratories from five different countries analyzed blind duplicates of nine infant and pediatric nutritional formulas for both free and phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol, and one additional laboratory only completed the free myo-inositol analyses. The method demonstrated acceptable repeatability and reproducibility and met the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPRs®) for free myo-inositol plus phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol for all the matrixes analyzed. SMPRs for repeatability were ≤5% RSD at myo-inositol concentrations of 2-68 mg/100 g ready-to-feed (RTF) liquid. SMPRs for reproducibility were ≤8% RSD in products with myo-inositol concentrations ranging from 2 to 68 mg/100 g RTF liquid. During this collaborative study, repeatability RSDs ranged from 0.51 to 3.22%, and RSDs ranged from 2.66 to 7.55% for free myo-inositol plus phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol. PMID:26651580

  17. Separation and determination of 4-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in beverages by amino trap column coupled with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian-Bing; Liu, Ding-Bo; Yu, Shu-Juan; Yu, Pei; Zhao, Zhen-Gang

    2015-02-15

    A method for simultaneous determination of 4-methylimidazole (4-MeI), 2-methylimidazole (2-MeI) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in beverages was developed using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and amino trap column coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (AMTC-PAD). A single amino trap column (P/N: 046122) was first applied to separate the targeted analytes in samples after SPE pretreatment. This method demonstrated low limit of quantification (0.030mg/L for methylimidazoles and 0.300mg/L for HMF) and excellent linearity with correlation of determination (R(2)=0.999 for 2-MeI, 0.997 for 4-MeI and 0.998 for HMF). Nearly no 2-MeI was found in all soft drinks. However, 4-MeI could be detected in cola drinks and soft drinks containing caramel colour (ranging from 0.13 to 0.34mg/L), whereas HMF were only found in cola drinks (ranging from 1.07 to 4.47mg/L). Thus, AMTC-PAD technique would be a valid and inexpensive alternative to analysis of 4-MeI, 2-MeI and HMF. PMID:25236220

  18. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  19. Airborne measurements of CO2 column absorption and range using a pulsed direct-detection integrated path differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Abshire, James B; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R; Hasselbrack, William E; Browell, Edward V

    2013-07-01

    We report on airborne CO(2) column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO(2) line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 8-10 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm. PMID:23842238

  20. Effect of pressure pulses at the interface valve on the stability of second dimension columns in online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Talus, Eric S; Witt, Klaus E; Stoll, Dwight R

    2015-01-23

    Users of online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LCxLC) frequently acknowledge that the mechanical instability of HPLC columns installed in these systems, particularly in the second dimension, is a significant impediment to its use. Such instability is not surprising given the strenuous operating environment to which these columns are subjected, including the large number (thousands per day) of fast and large pressure pulses resulting from interface valve switches (on the timescale of tens of milliseconds) associated with very fast second dimension separations. There appear to be no published reports of systematic studies of the relationship between second dimension column lifetime and any of these variables. In this study we focused on the relationship between the lifetimes of commercially available columns and the pressure pulses observed at the inlet of the second dimension column that occur during the switching of the valve that interfaces the two dimensions of a LCxLC system. We find that the magnitude of the pressure drop at the inlet of the second dimension column during the valve switch, which may vary between 10 and 95% of the column inlet pressure, is dependent on valve switching speed and design, and has a dramatic impact on column lifetime. In the worst case, columns fail within the first few hours of use in an LCxLC system. In the best case, using a valve that exhibits much smaller pressure pulses, the same columns exhibit much improved lifetimes and have been used continuously under LCxLC conditions for several days with no degradation in performance. This result represents a first step in understanding the factors that affect second dimension column lifetime, and will significantly improve the usability of the LCxLC technique in general. PMID:25553909

  1. Analysis of Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Weaver, Clark J.; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission [1]. It uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1575 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with the range profile of scattering in the path. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off-line signals via the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. The time of flight of the laser pulses is used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate an early version of the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar stepped the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 wavelength steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a NIR photomultiplier and is recorded on every other reading by a photon counting system [2]. During August 2009 we made a series of 2.5 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over locations in the US, including the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma, central Illinois, north-eastern North Carolina, and over the Chesapeake Bay and the eastern shore of Virginia. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, and in-situ measurements were made using its CO2 sensor and radiosondes. We have conducted an analysis of the ranging and IPDA lidar measurements from these four flights. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We used a cross-correlation approach to process the laser echo records. This was used to estimate the range to the scattering surface, to define the edges of the laser pulses and to determine echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We used a minimum mean square approach to fit an instrument response function and to solve for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape. We then calculated the differential optical depth (DOD) of the fitted CO2 line. We computed its statistics at the various altitude steps, and compare them to the DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column conditions calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The results show the lidar and in-situ measurements have very similar DOD change with altitude and greater than 10 segments per flight where the scatter in the lidar measurements are less than or equal to 1ppm. We also present the results from subsequent CO2 column absorption measurements, which were made with stronger detected signals during three flights on the NASA DC-8 over the southwestern US in during July 2010.

  2. Method for making a non-extractable stationary phase of polymer within a capillary column

    DOEpatents

    Springston, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    A method for coating interior capillary column surfaces, or packing material of a packed column, used for gas chromatography, with a stationary polymer phase that is cross-linked by exposing it to a low-temperature plasma that is uniformly distributed over the column or packing material for a predetermined period of time to effect the desired degree of cross-linking of the coating.

  3. Method for making a non-extractable stationary phase of polymer within a capillary column

    DOEpatents

    Springston, S.R.

    1990-10-30

    A method is described for coating interior capillary column surfaces, or packing material of a packed column, used for gas chromatography, with a stationary polymer phase that is cross-linked by exposing it to a low-temperature plasma that is uniformly distributed over the column or packing material for a predetermined period of time to effect the desired degree of cross-linking of the coating. 7 figs.

  4. [Immunoaffinity columns and determination of ochratoxin A in cereals by HPLC. Part I.: Evaluation of extraction using methanol/water].

    PubMed

    Czerwiecki, Ludwik; Czyzyk, Kamila; Kwiecie?, Agnieszka; Wilczy?ska, Grazyna

    2004-01-01

    The method for ochratoxin A determination in cereals (wheat, rye) was described. Application of immunoaffinity columns (IAC) for clean-up of extracts was investigated. The ochratoxin A content was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography using C18 column and fluorimetric detection at 330 nm (excitation) and 460 nm (emission). The mean recovery of ochratoxin A was 65-78%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.015 and 0.025 microg/kg, respectively. The positive results were confirmed by reaction with BF3 complex in methanol. PMID:15493345

  5. Comparative study between extraction techniques and column separation for the quantification of sinigrin and total isothiocyanates in mustard seed.

    PubMed

    Cools, Katherine; Terry, Leon A

    2012-07-15

    Glucosinolates are ?-thioglycosides which are found naturally in Cruciferae including the genus Brassica. When enzymatically hydrolysed, glucosinolates yield isothiocyanates and give a pungent taste. Both glucosinolates and isothiocyanates have been linked with anticancer activity as well as antifungal and antibacterial properties and therefore the quantification of these compounds is scientifically important. A wide range of literature exists on glucosinolates, however the extraction and quantification procedures differ greatly resulting in discrepancies between studies. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the most popular extraction procedures to identify the most efficacious method and whether each extraction can also be used for the quantification of total isothiocyanates. Four extraction techniques were compared for the quantification of sinigrin from mustard cv. Centennial (Brassica juncea L.) seed; boiling water, boiling 50% (v/v) aqueous acetonitrile, boiling 100% methanol and 70% (v/v) aqueous methanol at 70 C. Prior to injection into the HPLC, the extractions which involved solvents (acetonitrile or methanol) were freeze-dried and resuspended in water. To identify whether the same extract could be used to measure total isothiocyanates, a dichloromethane extraction was carried out on the sinigrin extracts. For the quantification of sinigrin alone, boiling 50% (v/v) acetonitrile was found to be the most efficacious extraction solvent of the four tested yielding 15% more sinigrin than the water extraction. However, the removal of the acetonitrile by freeze-drying had a negative impact on the isothiocyanate content. Quantification of both sinigrin and total isothiocyanates was possible when the sinigrin was extracted using boiling water. Two columns were compared for the quantification of sinigrin revealing the Zorbax Eclipse to be the best column using this particular method. PMID:22743340

  6. In-process inventory estimation for pulsed columns and mixer-settlers

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, D.D.; Burkhart, L.E.; Beyerlein, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear materials accounting and control in fuels reprocessing plants can be improved by near-real-time estimation of the nuclear materials inventory in solvent-extraction contactors. Techniques are being developed for the estimation of the in-process inventory in contactors. These techniques are derived from recent developments in chemical modeling of contactor systems, on-line measurements for materials accounting and control of the Purex process, and computer-based data acquisition and analysis methods.

  7. Physical versus chemical effects on bacterial and bromide transport as determined from on site sediment column pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, James A.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Fuller, Mark E.; Dong, Hailiang; Deflaun, Mary F.

    2005-02-01

    Twenty eight bacterial and Br transport experiments were performed in the field to determine the effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity of the aquifer sediment. The experiments were performed using groundwater from two field locations to examine the effects of groundwater chemistry on transport. Groundwater was extracted from multilevel samplers and pumped through 7 cm long columns of intact sediment or re-packed sieved and coated or uncoated sediment from the underlying aquifer. Two bacterial strains, Comamonas sp. DA001 and Paenibacillus polymyxa FER-02, were injected along with Br into the influent end of the columns to examine the effect of cell morphology and surface properties on bacterial transport. The effect of column sediment grain size and mineral coatings coupled with groundwater geochemistry were also delineated. Significant irreversible attachment of DA001 was observed in the Fe oxyhydroxide coated columns, but only in the sub-oxic groundwater where the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were ca. 1 ppm. In the oxic groundwater where DOC was ca. 8 ppm, little attachment of DA001 to the Fe oxyhydroxide coated columns was observed. This indicates that DOC can significantly reduce bacterial attachment due electrostatic interactions. The larger and more negatively charged FER-02 displayed increasing attachment with decreasing grain size regardless of DOC concentration, and modeling of FER-02 attachment revealed that the presence of Fe and Al coatings on the sediment also promoted attachment. Finally, the presence of Al coatings and Al containing minerals appeared to significantly retard the Br tracer regardless of the concentration of DOC. These findings suggest that DOC in shallow oxic groundwater aquifers can significantly enhance the transport of bacteria by reducing attachment to Fe, Mn and Al oxyhydroxides. This effect is profound for weakly charged, hydrophilic bacteria and may contribute to differences in observations between laboratory experiments verses field-scale investigations particularly if the groundwater pH remains circum-neutral and Fe oxyhydroxide phases exist. These observations validate the novel approach taken in the experiments outlined here of performing laboratory-scale experiments on site to facilitate the use of fresh groundwater and thus be more representative of in situ groundwater conditions.

  8. Pulse Profiles, Accretion Column Dips and a Flare in GX 1+4 During a Faint State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, A. B.; Galloway, D. K.; Greenhill, J. G.; Storey, M. C.; Wilson, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) spacecraft observed the X-ray GX 1+4 for it period of 34 hours on July 19/20 1996. The source faded front an intensity of approximately 20 mcrab to a minimum of <= 0.7 mcrab and then partially recovered towards the end of the observation. This extended minimum lasted approximately 40,000 seconds. Phase folded light curves at a barycentric rotation period of 124.36568 +/- 0.00020 seconds show that near the center of the extended minimum the source stopped pulsing in the traditional sense but retained a weak dip feature at the rotation period. Away from the extended minimum the dips are progressively narrower at higher energies and may be interpreted as obscurations or eclipses of the hot spot by the accretion column. The pulse profile changed from leading-edge bright before the extended minimum to trailing-edge bright after it. Data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) show that a torque reversal occurred < 10 days after our observation. Our data indicate that the observed rotation departs from a constant period with a P/P value of approximately -1.5% per year at a 4.5sigma significance. We infer that we may have serendipitously obtained data, with high sensitivity and temporal resolution about the time of an accretion disk spin reversal. We also observed a rapid flare which had some precursor activity close to the center of the extended minimum.

  9. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the US Department of Energy's (DOE) SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing CO2 line absorptions with altitudes were evident and comparison with in-situ measurements showed agreements to 6 ppm. In spring 2009 we improved the aircraft's nadir window and during July and August we made 9 additional 2 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surface types in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay in North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Strong laser signals and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The flights over the ARM site were underflown with in-situ measurements made from the DOE Cessna. Analysis shows that the average signal levels follow predicted values, the altimetry measurements had an uncertainty of about 4 m, and that the average optical line depths follow the number density calculated from in-situ sensor readings. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC in-situ CO2 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL CO2 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. More details of the flights, measurements, analysis and scaling to space will be described in the presentation.

  10. Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the US Department of Energy's (DOE) SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing CO2 line absorptions with altitudes were evident and comparison with in-situ measurements showed agreements to 6 ppm. In spring 2009 we improved the aircraft's nadir window and during July and August we made 9 additional 2 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surface types in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay in North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Strong laser signals and clear Co2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The flights over the ARM site were underflown with in-situ measurements made from the DOE Cessna. Analysis shows that the average signal levels follow predicted values, the altimetry measurements had an uncertainty of about 4 m, and that the average optical line depths follow the number density calculated from in-situ sensor readings. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC in-situ CO2 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL CO2 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. More details of the flights, measurements, analysis and scaling to space will be described in the presentation.

  11. Kinetic and stoichiometric parameters estimation in a nitrifying bubble column through "in-situ" pulse respirometry.

    PubMed

    Ordaz, Alberto; Oliveira, Catarina S; Aguilar, Ricardo; Carrin, Manuel; Ferreira, Eugnio C; Alves, Madalena; Thalasso, Frdric

    2008-05-01

    This article proposes a simple "in-situ" pulse respirometric method for the estimation of four important kinetic and stoichiometric parameters. The method is validated in a suspended biomass nitrifying reactor for the determination of (i) maximum oxygen uptake rate (OUR(ex)max), (ii) oxidation yield (f(E)), (iii) biomass growth yield (f(S)), and (iv) affinity constant (K(S)). OUR(ex)max and f(E) were directly obtained from respirograms. In the presented case study, a minimum substrate pulse of 10 mgNH(4) (+)-N L(-1) was necessary to determine OUR(ex)max which was 61.15 +/- 4.09 mgO(2) L(-1) h(-1) (5 repetitions). A linear correlation (r(2) = 0.93) obtained between OUR(ex)max and the biomass concentration in the reactor suggests that biomass concentration can be estimated from respirometric experiments. The substrate oxidation yield, f(E), was determined along 60 days of continuous operation with an average error of 5.6%. The biomass growth yield was indirectly estimated from the substrate oxidation yield f(E). The average obtained value (0.10 +/- 0.04 mgCOD mg(-1)COD) was in accordance with the f(S) estimation by the traditional COD mass balance method under steady-state conditions (0.09 +/- 0.01). The affinity constant K(S) was indirectly estimated after fitting the ascending part of the respirogram to a theoretical model. An average value of 0.48 +/- 0.08 mgNH(4) (+)-N L(-1) was obtained, which is in the range of affinity constants reported in the literature for the nitrification process (0.16-2 mgNH(4) (+)-N L(-1)). PMID:18078297

  12. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6 km.

  13. Fabrication of two-weir structure-based packed columns for on-chip solid-phase extraction of DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Runtao; Liu, Dayu; Yu, Linfen; Ye, Nannan; Dai, Zhongpeng; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2007-08-01

    Microchip-based packed column SPE of DNA was performed using the microfabricated two-weir structure within a microchannel. We developed two methods to fabricate the two-weir structured glass chips: a "two-side etching/alignment" method and a simplified "one-side/two-step etching" method. The former method required a straightforward alignment step, while the latter approach comprised a simplified wet etching process using paraffin wax as the temporary protective layer. Both methods were convenient and rapid as compared to the previous approaches. Through a reversibly sealed bead-introduction channel, beads can be fed into or out of the chip columns, thus enabling refreshment of the packing materials. Using the proposed chip columns, highly efficient lambda-DNA extractions (average recovery >80%) were performed with good chip-to-chip reproducibility (RSD <10%). The on-chip SPE procedure was completed within 15 min at the flow rate of 3 microL/min and the bulk of the loaded DNA was eluted within a small volume of approximately 8 microL. Application of the microchip-based packed columns was demonstrated by purifying PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA from human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells and human whole blood samples. PMID:17640088

  14. Preparation and characterization of an immunoaffinity column for the selective extraction of aflatoxin B1 in 13 kinds of foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Peng, Tao; He, Jian-Li; Shao, Yu; Fan, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Wen-Xiao; Chen, Min; Wang, Qi; Pei, Xing-Yao; Ding, Shuang-Yang; Jiang, Hai-Yang

    2015-08-15

    A rapid and reliable immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up based ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in cereals, peanuts, vegetable oils and Chinese traditional food products like sufu and lobster sauce. The immunoaffinity column of AFB1 (AFB1-IAC) was prepared by coupling CNBr-activated Sepharose-4B with the anti-AFB1 monoclonal antibody. The column capacity of IAC was over 260ng/mL gel. Samples were extracted with methanol-water (60:40, v/v) and the extracts were then purified on an AFB1-IAC before UPLC-MS/MS analysis. The average recoveries of AFB1 in spiked samples at levels of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0?g/kg ranged from 72% to 98%, with the relative standard deviations of 1.2-9.3% (n=6). The limits of qualification ranged from 0.07 to 0.23?g/kg, which were below the MRLs of AFB1 in the matrices evaluated. In this work, the developed method was suitable for the determination of trace AFB1 residues in 13 kinds of foodstuffs. PMID:26160471

  15. Binary Solvent Extraction System and Extraction Time Effects on Phenolic Antioxidants from Kenaf Seeds (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) Extracted by a Pulsed Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Hwee Wen; Nyam, Kar Lin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best parameter for extracting phenolic-enriched kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seeds by a pulsed ultrasonic-assisted extraction. The antioxidant activities of ultrasonic-assisted kenaf seed extracts (KSE) were determined by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity assay, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging assay, β-carotene bleaching inhibition assay, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) evaluations were carried out to determine the phenolic and flavonoid contents in KSE. The KSE from the best extraction parameter was then subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the phenolic compounds. The optimised extraction condition employed 80% ethanol for 15 min, with the highest values determined for the DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assay. KSE contained mainly tannic acid (2302.20 mg/100 g extract) and sinapic acid (1198.22 mg/100 g extract), which can be used as alternative antioxidants in the food industry. PMID:24592184

  16. Analysis of biomass sugars and galacturonic acid by gradient anion exchange chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection without post-column addition.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Wilbur

    2011-02-01

    While the most accurate method for analysis of sugars in biomass is based on gas chromatography of trimethylsilane or alditol acetate derivatives of sugars, the derivation method is time consuming and laborious. In comparison, sample preparation for sugar analysis of hydrolyzed biomass samples using liquid chromatography is a simple dilution procedure with water. A gradient HPLC method using a anion-exchange column and pulsed-amperometric detection modified to reduce analysis time from 75 to 40 min was further improved. The new method no longer requires post-column addition to stablilize the baseline using a pulsed-amperometric detector with the mobile phase gradient. The method provides good resolution of arabinose, rhamnose, galactose, xylose, glucose, fructose, sucrose, cellobiose, and galacturonic acid in both standards and hydrolyzed citrus waste materials. By changing the waveform used with the PAD detector, the requirement for post-column addition was eliminated while maintaining a stable baseline. PMID:20978822

  17. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Range During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar only on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear C02 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs altitude. The measurements showed -1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and -30 sec averaging times. For the 2010 ASCENDS campaigns we flew the CO2 lidar on the NASA DC-8 and added an O2 lidar channel. During July 2010 we made measurements of CO2 and O2 column absorption during longer flights over Railroad Valley NV, the Pacific Ocean and over Lamont OK. CO2 measurements were made with 30 steps/scan, 300 scans/sec and improved line resolution and receiver sensitivity. Analysis of the 2010 CO2 measurements shows the expected -linear change of DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes> 6 km the random errors were 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. For the summer 2011 ASCENDS campaigns we made further improvements to the lidar's CO2 line scan and receiver sensitivity. The seven flights in the 2011 Ascends campaign were flown over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions in the US, which produced a wide variety of lidar signal conditions. Details of the lidar measurements and their analysis will be described in the presentation.

  18. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs altitude. The measurements showed 1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and 30 sec averaging times. For the 2010 ASCENDS campaigns we flew the CO2lidar on the NASA DC-8 and added an 02lidar channel. During July 2010 we made measurements of CO2 and O2 column absorption during longer flights over Railroad Valley NV, the Pacific Ocean and over Lamont OK. CO2 measurements were made with 30 steps/scan, 300 scans/sec and improved line resolution and receiver sensitivity. Analysis of the 2010 CO2 measurements shows the expected linear change of DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes> 6 km the random errors were 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. For the summer 2011 ASCENDS campaigns we made further improvements to the lidar's CO2 line scan and receiver sensitivity. We demonstrated measurements over the California Central Valley, to stratus cloud tops over the Pacific Ocean, over mountain regions with snow, and over several areas with broken clouds. Details of the lidar measurements and their analysis will be described in the presentation.

  19. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption during the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G.; Hasselbrack, W.; Browell, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs altitude. The measurements showed ~1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and ~30 sec averaging times. For the 2010 ASCENDS campaigns we flew the CO2 lidar on the NASA DC-8 and added an O2 lidar channel. During July 2010 we made measurements of CO2 and O2 column absorption during longer flights over Railroad Valley NV, the Pacific Ocean and over Lamont OK. CO2 measurements were made with 30 steps/scan, 300 scans/sec and improved line resolution and receiver sensitivity. Analysis of the 2010 CO2 measurements shows the expected ~linear change of DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes > 6 km the random errors were 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. For the summer 2011 ASCENDS campaigns we made further improvements to the lidar's CO2 line scan and receiver sensitivity. To date we have demonstrated measurements over the California Central Valley and to and through stratus clouds over the Pacific Ocean. Details of the lidar measurements and their analysis will be described in the presentation.

  20. Extracting Concrete Thermal Characteristics from Temperature Time History of RC Column Exposed to Standard Fire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method to identify thermal conductivity from time history of one-dimensional temperature variations in thermal unsteady-state is proposed. The numerical method considers the change of specific heat and thermal conductivity with respect to temperature. Fire test of reinforced concrete (RC) columns was conducted using a standard fire to obtain time history of temperature variations in the column section. A thermal equilibrium model in unsteady-state condition was developed. The thermal conductivity of concrete was then determined by optimizing the numerical solution of the model to meet the observed time history of temperature variations. The determined thermal conductivity with respect to temperature was then verified against standard thermal conductivity measurements of concrete bricks. It is concluded that the proposed method can be used to conservatively estimate thermal conductivity of concrete for design purpose. Finally, the thermal radiation properties of concrete for the RC column were estimated from the thermal equilibrium at the surface of the column. The radiant heat transfer ratio of concrete representing absorptivity to emissivity ratio of concrete during fire was evaluated and is suggested as a concrete criterion that can be used in fire safety assessment. PMID:25180197

  1. Extracting concrete thermal characteristics from temperature time history of RC column exposed to standard fire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung J; Youm, Kwang-Soo; Reda Taha, Mahmoud M

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method to identify thermal conductivity from time history of one-dimensional temperature variations in thermal unsteady-state is proposed. The numerical method considers the change of specific heat and thermal conductivity with respect to temperature. Fire test of reinforced concrete (RC) columns was conducted using a standard fire to obtain time history of temperature variations in the column section. A thermal equilibrium model in unsteady-state condition was developed. The thermal conductivity of concrete was then determined by optimizing the numerical solution of the model to meet the observed time history of temperature variations. The determined thermal conductivity with respect to temperature was then verified against standard thermal conductivity measurements of concrete bricks. It is concluded that the proposed method can be used to conservatively estimate thermal conductivity of concrete for design purpose. Finally, the thermal radiation properties of concrete for the RC column were estimated from the thermal equilibrium at the surface of the column. The radiant heat transfer ratio of concrete representing absorptivity to emissivity ratio of concrete during fire was evaluated and is suggested as a concrete criterion that can be used in fire safety assessment. PMID:25180197

  2. Effects of pulsed UV-light on peanut allergens in extracts and liquid peanut butter.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed ultraviolet (PUV)-light, a non-thermal technology, was used to treat both peanut extracts and liquid peanut butter. The objective was to determine if such treatment would lead to a reduction in the allergenic potency of the peanut extract and butter. Peanut samples were PUV treated, using a X...

  3. Use of pulsed ultraviolet light to reduce the allergenic potency of soybean extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a non-thermal food processing technology, is reported to be able to inactivate enzymes and reduce allergen levels from peanut extracts. The objective of this study was to determine if PUV would reduce the allergen levels and allergenic potency of soy extracts. Soy ext...

  4. Determination of myo-inositol (free and bound as phosphatidylinositol) in infant formula and adult nutritionals by liquid chromatography/pulsed amperometry with column switching: first action 2011.18.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Karen; Thompson, Linda; Baugh, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Myo-inositol is a 6-carbon cyclic polyalcohol also known as meso-inositol, meat sugar, inosite, and i-inositol. It occurs in nature in both free (myo-inositol) and bound (inositol phosphates and phosphatidylinositol) forms. For the determination of free myo-inositol, samples are mixed with dilute hydrochloric acid to extract myo-inositol and precipitate proteins, diluted with water, and filtered. For the determination of myo-inositol bound as phosphatidylinositol, samples are extracted with chloroform, isolated from other fats with silica SPE cartridges, and hydrolyzed with concentrated acid to free myo-inositol. Prepared samples are first injected onto a Dionex CarboPac PA1 column, which separates myo-inositol from other late-eluting carbohydrates. After column switching, myo-inositol is further separated on a CarboPac MA1 column using a 0.12% sodium hydroxide mobile phase; strongly retained carbohydrates are eluted from the PA1 column with a 3% sodium hydroxide mobile phase. Eluant from the CarboPac MA1 analytical column passes through an electrochemical detector cell where myo-inositol is detected by pulsed amperometry using a gold electrode. The method showed appropriate performance characteristics versus selected established standard method performance requirement parameters for the determination of myo-inositol: linear response; repeatability (RSDr) of 2%; and intermediate precision (RSDir) of 2.5%. Instrument LOD and LOQ were 0.0004 and 0.0013 mg/100 mL, respectively, and correspond to a free myo-inositol quantitation limit of 0.026 mg/100 g and a phosphatidylinositol quantitation limit of 0.016 mg/100 g. Correlation with the reference microbiological assay was good. The proposed method has been accepted by the Expert Review Panel as an AOAC First Action Method, suitable for the routine determination of myo-inositol in infant formula and adult nutritionals. PMID:22970560

  5. Use of cyanopropyl-bonded hplc column for bioassay-directed fractionation of organic extracts from incinerator emissions

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarini, D.M.; Williams, R.W.; Brooks, L.R.; Taylor, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The present study has shown that cyanopropyl-(CN) bonded silica HPLC columns are applicable for the fractionation of mass and mutagenic activity of organic extracts from some incinerator emissions. Dichloromethane-extractable organics from particles emitted by two different municipal waste incinerators and by a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator that was combusting polyethylene were fractionated by HPLC, and the mutagenicity of the fractions was determined by means of a microsuspension mutagenicity assay with Salmonella TA98. The CN-bonded silica columns provided high (80-100 percent) mass and mutagenicity recoveries for most emission extracts, and it fractionated the mutagenic activity. The results suggest that the emissions from municipal waste incinerators contain a high amount of direct-acting (-S9) mutagenic activity that is resolvable by HPLC using CN-bonded silica. Sub-fractionation of selected mutagenic HPLC fractions and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy can be used to identify mutagenic species within complex incinerator emissions. The coupling of microsuspension bioassays to HPLC fractionation should be a useful tool for this type of analysis.

  6. Comparison between leaky and pulsed modes of ion extraction from an electron beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhimin; Ishiguro, Yusuke; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-03-01

    We present the charge state distributions of highly charged ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The distributions were obtained in the two different extraction modes, pulsed mode and leaky mode. The number ratio between adjacent charge state ions, which is an important quantity to measure dielectronic recombination cross sections with an EBIT, is compared between the two extraction modes. The results are also compared with recent theoretical predictions by Zhang et al. [17].

  7. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 and 2013 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan with 300 scans per second. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak and the column average CO2 concentrations. We compared these to radiative transfer calculations based on the HITRAN 2008 database, the atmospheric conditions, and the CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. Our team participated in the ASCENDS science flights during July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 absorption line shapes were recorded. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the signal photon count). For flight altitudes above 5 km the biases in retrieved concentrations were 1-2 ppm. Analysis shows the decrease in CO2 due to vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as the sudden increases in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant in New Mexico. Our team also participated in the February 2013 ASCENDS flight campaign, flying over a variety of surfaces in the US, including over Railroad Valley NV, the California Central Valley, desert areas in Arizona, and over cold snow fields in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and warmer snow in Iowa and Wisconsin. Our post-flight analyses showed that the retrievals of lidar range, lineshape and CO2 column absorption and concentrations worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, and through thin clouds. As expected, the relative reflectivity of snow surfaces near 1572 nm was small, about 10% of that of the desert, and good line fits and retrievals were made to these as well. Examples from analyzing the 2011 and 2013 measurements will be presented.

  8. Development of an immunoaffinity chromatography column for selective extraction of a new agonist phenylethylamine A from feed, meat and liver samples.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liyun; Cao, Biyun; Yang, Hong; Xie, Yun; Xu, Shouming; Deng, Anping

    2014-01-15

    Phenylethanolamine A (PA) is a new emerged ?-adrenergic agonist that has been illegally used as an animal feed additive for growth promotion in China. In this study, an immunoaffinity chromatography (IAC) column for selective extraction of PA from swine feed, meat and liver samples was developed. The IAC column was constructed by covalently coupling specific polyclonal antibody (Ab) against PA to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B and packed into a common solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The extraction conditions including loading, washing and eluting solutions were carefully optimized. Under optimal conditions, the IAC column was characterized in terms of maximum capacity, selectivity, extraction recovery and stability. The maximum capacity of the ICA for PA extraction was found to be 239.4ng. For selectivity testing, 100ng of other three ?-adrenergic agonists (clenbuterol, ractopamine and salbutamol) was separately loaded onto the column, and it was observed that the tested compounds could not be captured on the column, e.g. the column could only selectively recognize PA. The recovery of the IAC for PA extraction was found within 96.47-101.98% when 10, 50 and 100ng PA were separately loaded onto IAC column. The IAC column was also applied to real sample extraction. Swine feed, meat and liver samples were collected and spiked with PA in range of 1.0-20ngg(-1). The spiked and unspiked samples were extracted by IAC column and measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It was found that there was no detectable PA in the blank samples, and the extraction recoveries of the IAC for PA from the spiked samples were within 89.48-104.89%. The stability of the column was also tested. It was showed that after 35 times repeated usage, 60% of the maximum capacity was still remained. The proposed IAC was proven to be a feasible extraction method for PA from different matrices with the properties of high maximum capacity, selectivity, extraction efficiency and stability. PMID:24342511

  9. Extraction of quadrature phase information from multiple pulse NMR signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Burum, D. P.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A multiple pulse sequence (8-pulse sequence) used for high-resolution solid state NMR is analyzed with regard to the information available from each of the four wide sampling windows. It is demonstrated that full quadrature phase information can be obtained using only a single phase detector and that, for the commonly encountered situation where the spectral width is much less than the folding frequency, the signals from the various windows can be combined easily using standard complex Fourier transform software. An improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio equal to the square root of 3 is obtained over either standard single or quadrature phase detection schemes. Procedures for correcting spectral distortions are presented.

  10. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric C02 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a C02 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, 02 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the C02 line and an 02 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the C02 and 02 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the C02 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear 25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across a selected C02 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz and laser pulse widths are I usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric C02 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm C02 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These nights were coordinated with DOE investigators who Hew an in-situ C02 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing C02 line absorptions with altitudes were evident and comparison with in-situ measurements showed agreements to 6 ppm. This spring we improved the aircraft's nadir window. During July and August 2009 we made 9 additional 2 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric C02 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm C02 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surface types in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay in North Carolina and Virginia. Strong laser signals and clear line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The flights over the ARM site were underflown with in-situ measurements made from the DOE Cessna. The Oklahoma and east coast t1ights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT C02 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC insitu C02 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL C02 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. Ed Browell and Gary Spiers led the LaRC and JPL teams. More details of the t1ights, measurements and analysis will be described in the presentation.

  11. Laser capture microdissection coupled with on-column extraction LC-MS(n) enables lipidomics of fluorescently labeled Drosophila neurons.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, Sarita; Schulz, Wolf Dieter; Sauer, Ulrich; Schwudke, Dominik

    2014-06-01

    We have used laser capture microdissection (LCM) and fluorescence microscopy to isolate genetically labeled neurons from the Drosophila melanogaster brain. From native thin sections, regions of interest could be analyzed with a spatial resolution better than 50 ?m. To exploit the specificity of LCM for lipidomics, catapulted tissue patches were directly collected on a reversed phase column and analyzed using an on-column extraction (OCE) that was directly coupled with liquid chromatography-multistage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)). With this approach, more than 50 membrane lipids belonging to 9 classes were quantified in tissue regions equivalent to a sample amount of 50 cells. Using this method, the limit of quantitation and the extraction efficiency could be estimated enabling a reliable evaluation of acquired lipid profiles. The lipid profiles of cell body- and synapse-enriched regions of the Drosophila brain were determined and found to be distinct. We argue that this workflow represents a tremendous improvement for tissue lipidomics by integrating genetics, fluorescence microscopy, LCM and LC-MS(n). PMID:24820458

  12. Ultrashort-pulse energy-extraction measurements in XeCl amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Gosnell, T.R.; Roberts, J.P. )

    1990-01-15

    Energy extraction in XeCl discharge amplifiers is examined experimentally and theoretically for 0.16-, 3.0-, and 600-psec pulse durations. Saturation energies of 1.0, 1.0, and 2.5 mJ/Cm{sup 2}, respectively, are measured. When nonsaturable loss is included in the analysis the values of the saturation energies increase to 1.35, 1.35, and 3.0 mJ/cm{sup 2}, respectively. A significant decrease in the effective small-signal gain is observed as the pulse duration decreases to the bandwidth limit, in agreement with a simple coherent pulse-propagation calculation.

  13. [Determination of free formaldehyde in cosmetics by pre-column derivatization, extraction inhibition and high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    L, Chunhua; Huang, Chaoqun; Chen, Mei; Xie, Wen; Chen, Xiaomei

    2012-12-01

    Pre-column derivatization and inhibition by solvent extraction were applied to determine free formaldehyde in cosmetics by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Due to the rapid decomposition of formaldehyde donors in the derivatization, it is hard to detect the amount of the free formaldehyde in cosmetics. The formaldehyde directly reacted with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine in acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 2) (1:1, v/v) solution for 2 min, then dichloromethane extraction was used to induce the decomposition of formaldehyde donors. The extract was diluted with acetonitrile and then determined by HPLC. The formaldehyde derivative was separated on an Agilent C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) at 30 degrees C with acetonitrile-water (60:40, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and detected at the wavelength of 355 nm. The recoveries were from 81% to 106% at the spiked levels of 50, 100, 500, 1 000 microg/g of formaldehyde in shampoo, milk, cream, hand cleaner, toothpaste, nail polish, powder separately, and the relative standard deviations (n = 6) were less than 5.0%. The limit of quantification of the formaldehyde in cosmetics was 50 microg/g. The method has been applied to the determination of free formaldehyde in real samples and the results showed that the release by formaldehyde donors was inhibited. The method has the advantages of simple operation, good accuracy and meets the requirement of determination of free formaldehyde in cosmetics. PMID:23593888

  14. Direct extraction of coherent mode properties from imaging measurements in a linear plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Light, A. D.; Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Department of Physics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 ; Thakur, S. C.; Brandt, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093

    2013-08-15

    Spectral properties of coherent waves in an argon plasma column are examined using fluctuation data from fast imaging. Visible light from ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a high-speed digital camera. A cross-spectral phase technique allows direct visualization of dominant phase structures as a function of frequency, as well as identification of azimuthal asymmetries present in the system. Experimental dispersion estimates are constructed from imaging data alone. Drift-like waves are identified by comparison with theoretical dispersion curves, and a tentative match of a low-frequency spectral feature to Kelvin-Helmholtz-driven waves is presented. Imaging measurements are consistent with previous results, and provide non-invasive, single-shot measurements across the entire plasma cross-section. Implications of the measured spectral properties for imaging measurements of mode dynamics are explored.

  15. SV40 DNA extracted from persistently infected Vero cells using miniprep columns for plasmids.

    PubMed

    Hamelin, C; Yelle, J; D'Amours, B; Chung, Y S

    1993-01-01

    A recombinant pAT153 plasmid carrying the whole simian virus 40 (SV40) genome in the form of two consecutive Pst I restriction fragments was rapidly isolated using a commercially available minipreps DNA purification system. This rapid and simple method was used to extract SV40 DNA from infected Vero monkey cells. Viral DNA replication in persistently infected SVP-1 monkey cells was also conveniently followed over a period of 8 d by agarose gel electrophoresis and molecular hybridization using minipreps and the recombinant plasmid (pLCB104) as a probe. Unsatisfactory results were obtained, however, when herpes simplex virus DNA was tentatively extracted from infected Vero cells with the above method. Only covalently closed circular DNA molecules, with two strands unable to separate fully under denaturing conditions, were apparently retained after rapid neutralization by the silicone-based minipreps DNA purification resin. PMID:8293042

  16. A pressure-driven column-based technique for the efficient extraction of DNA from respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Hirama, Takashi; Mogi, Hajime; Egashira, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Eiji; Kukisaki, Shigenari; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takei, Osamu

    2015-05-20

    Currently molecular techniques are a broadly accepted tool for diagnosis and are able to benefit patients in clinical practice. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been especially incorporated into practical applications that are already in widespread use across the globe. With regard to the initial DNA extraction from clinically relevant samples, a number of commercially available kits are commonly used and are also designed to be easy to handle and less labor-intensive. In this study, the pressure system extracting DNA in column-based kit was developed, and its utility was compared with the centrifuge method using sputum from patients who were diagnosed with pneumonia. Also, due to the compact size and rapid processing time, the practical application of the pressure-based system incorporated into an automated pipetting machine was evaluated through clinical study. Our data suggests that DNA extraction by pressure was capable of serving as a substitute for the centrifuge method, and the compact and automatic nature of the pressure system device provided rapid and valuable information for clinical practice. PMID:25824633

  17. Rapid Column Extraction Method for Actinides and Sr-89/90 in Water Samples

    SciTech Connect

    MAXWELL III, SHERROD L.

    2005-06-15

    The SRS Environmental Laboratory analyzes water samples for environmental monitoring, including river water and ground water samples. A new, faster actinide and strontium 89/90 separation method has been developed and implemented to improve productivity, reduce labor costs and add capacity to this laboratory. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and Sr-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), curium (Cm) and thorium (Th) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized. The method can be used for routine analysis or as a rapid method for emergency preparedness. Thorium and curium are often analyzed separately due to the interference of the daughter of Th-229 tracer, actinium (Ac)-225, on curium isotopes when measured by alpha spectrometry. This new method also adds a separation step using DGA Resin{reg_sign}, (Diglycolamide Resin, Eichrom Technologies) to remove Ac-225 and allow the separation and analysis of thorium isotopes and curium isotopes at the same time.

  18. A Column Experiment To Determine Black Shale Degradation And Colonization By Means of ?13C and 14C Analysis Of Phospholipid Fatty Acids And DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Gleixner, G.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the degradation of black shale organic matter by microbial communities. We inoculated two columns respectively, with the fungi Schizophyllum commune, the gram-positive bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the gram-negative bacteria Streptomyces griseus and Streptomyces chartreusis. These microorganisms are known to degrade a wide variety of organic macromolecules. Additionally, we had two sets of control columns. To one set the same nutrient solution was added as to the inoculated columns and to the other set only sterile deionised water was supplied. All columns contained 1.5 kg of freshly crushed not autoclaved black shale material with a particle size of 0.63-2 mm. The columns were incubated at 28 C and 60% humidity in the dark. The aim was to investigate, which microorganisms live on black shales and if these microorganisms are able to degrade ancient organic matter. We used compound specific stable isotope measurement techniques and compound specific 14C-dating methods. After 183 days PLFAs were extracted from the columns to investigate the microbial community, furthermore we extracted on one hand total-DNA of column material and on the other hand DNA from pure cultures isolates which grew on Kinks-agar B, Starch-casein-nitrate-agar (SCN) and on complete-yeast-medium-agar (CYM). According to the PLFA analysis bacteria dominated in the columns, whereas in pure cultures more fungi were isolated. A principal component analysis revealed differences between the columns in accordance with the inoculation, but it seems that the inoculated microorganisms were replaced by the natural population. For AMS measurements palmitic acid (C 16:0) was re-isolated from total-PLFA-extract with a preparative fraction collector (PFC). Preliminary results of the study revealed that microorganisms are able to degrade black shale material and that PLFA analysis are useful methods to be combined with analysis of stable isotope and 14C measurements to study microbial degradation processes.

  19. Effect of Pulsed Ultraviolet Light and High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Antigenicity of Almond Protein Extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on reducing the IgE binding to the almond extracts, was studied using SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA probed with human plasma containing IgE antibodies to almond allergens, and a polyclonal antibody against almond ...

  20. High-Efficiency On-Line Solid-Phase Extraction Coupling to 15-150 um I.D. Column Liquid Chromatography for Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng ); Moore, Ronald J. ); Zhao, Rui ); Blonder, Josip ); Auberry, Deanna L. ); Masselon, Christophe D. ); Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana ); Hixson, Kim K. ); Auberry, Kenneth J. ); Smith, Richard D. )

    2003-07-15

    Flexible manipulation of various properties of proteomic samples is important for proteomic analyses, but it has been little explored for newly developed approaches based on liquid chromatography (LC) in combination with mass spectrometry (MS). With miniaturization of the LC column inner diameter dimensions (required for improving the analysis sensitivity), this issue becomes more challenging due to the small flow rates and the increasing effects of extra column volume on the separation quality and its use for resolving complex proteomic mixtures. In this study, we used commercial switching valves (150-mm channels) to implement the on-line coupling of capillary LC columns with relatively large solid phase extraction (SPE) columns operated at 10,000 psi. With optimized column connections, switching modes, and SPE column dimensions, high-efficiency on-line SPE-capillary and nanoscale LC separations were obtained with peak capacities of~1000 for capillaries having inner diameters between 15 to 150 mm. The on-line coupled SPE columns increased the sample processing capabilities by~400-fold for sample solution volume and~10-fold for sample mass. The proteomic applications of this on-line SPE-capillary LC system were evaluated for analysis of both soluble and membrane protein tryptic digests. Used with an ion trap tandem MS we could typically identify 1100-1500 peptides for analyses in a single 5-hour run. Peptides extracted on the SPE column and eluted from the LC column covered a hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity range that include an estimated~98% of all the tryptic peptides. The present implementation also facilitates automation and enables use of both disposable SPE columns and electrospray emitters, providing a robust basis for routine proteomic analyses.

  1. Extraction of squalene from shark liver oil in a packed column using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Catchpole, O.J.; Kamp, J.C. von; Grey, J.B.

    1997-10-01

    Continuous extraction of squalene from shark liver oil using supercritical carbon dioxide was carried out in both laboratory and pilot scale plant. The shark liver oil contained around 50% by weight squalene, which was recovered as the main extract stream. The other major components in the oil were triglycerides, which were recovered as raffinate, and pristane, which was recovered as a second extract stream. Separation performance was determined as a function of temperature; pressure; oil to carbon dioxide flow rate ratio, packed height and type of packing; and reflux ratio. The pressure, temperature, and feed oil concentration of squalene determined the maximum loading of oil in carbon dioxide. The oil to carbon dioxide ratio determined the squalene concentration in both the product stream and raffinate stream. The ratio of oil flow rate to the flow rate of squalene required to just saturate carbon dioxide was found to be a useful correlating parameter for the oil loadings and product compositions. Of the three packings investigated, wire wool gave the best separation efficiency and Raschig rings the worst efficiency. Mass transfer correlations from the literature were used to estimate the number of transfer units (NTU) from experimental data and literature correlations. NTU`s from the experimental data were comparable to predictions at a pilot scale but were underpredicted at the laboratory scale. The use of reflux at the pilot scale enabled the concentration of squalene in the product stream to be increased from 92% by mass to a maximum of 99% by mass at fractionation conditions of 250 bar and 333 K.

  2. Monolithic spin column: a new extraction device for analysis of drugs in urine and serum by GC/MS and HPLC/MS.

    PubMed

    Namera, Akira; Nagao, Masakata; Nakamoto, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Shota; Saito, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    A monolithic spin column was developed for the extraction of analytes from biological materials. This column was constructed by packing a monolithic silica disk into a spin column. Sample loading, washing, and elution of the target drugs were accomplished simply by centrifugation of the column. Opiates and benzodiazepines are abused throughout the world. Identification and quantification of these drugs is very important to solve crimes or the cause of death. Three opiates (morphine, codeine, and dihydrocodeine) were extracted from urine and serum by using the column. After conversion to trimethylsilyl derivatives of the opiates by vigorous mixing with the derivatizing reagent, the solution was subjected to GC/MS. A linear curve was observed for opiates from 10 to 2500 ng/mL in urine and 5 to 1200 ng/mL in serum, respectively (correlation coefficient > 0.996). For benzodiazepines, the hydroxyl metabolites of triazolam and etizolam were extracted from urine using the column, and the eluate was directly analyzed by HPLC/MS without evaporation. The LOD values were at the ppb level, with RSD values lower than 15%. The proposed methods were successfully applied to clinical and forensic cases, and good agreement of results was obtained compared to conventional methods. PMID:21797004

  3. Computer Simulation of Global Profiles of Carbon Dioxide Using a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Column-Content DIAL System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results of computer simulations of the error in measuring carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles from earth orbit. The simulated sensor is a pulsed, 2-micron, coherent-detection lidar alternately operating on at least two wavelengths. The simulated geometry is a nadir viewing lidar measuring the column content signal. Atmospheric absorption is modeled using FASCODE3P software with the HITRAN 2004 absorption line data base. Lidar shot accumulation is employed up to the horizontal resolution limit. Horizontal resolutions of 50, 100, and 200 km are shown. Assuming a 400 km spacecraft orbit, the horizontal resolutions correspond to measurement times of about 7, 14, and 28 s. We simulate laser pulse-pair repetition frequencies from 1 Hz to 100 kHz. The range of shot accumulation is 7 to 2.8 million pulse-pairs. The resultant error is shown as a function of horizontal resolution, laser pulse-pair repetition frequency, and laser pulse energy. The effect of different on and off pulse energies is explored. The results are compared to simulation results of others and to demonstrated 2-micron operating points at NASA Langley.

  4. Temperature-responsive Solid-phase Extraction Column for Biological Sample Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Akimaru, Michiko; Okubo, Kohei; Hiruta, Yuki; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) system utilizing a temperature-responsive polymer hydrogel-modified stationary phase. Aminopropyl silica beads (average diameter, 40 - 64 ?m) were coated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based thermo-responsive hydrogels. Butyl methacrylate (BMA) and N,N-dimethylaminopropyl acrylamide (DMAPAAm) were used as the hydrophobic and cationic monomers, respectively, and copolymerized with NIPAAm. To evaluate the use of this SPE cartridge for the analysis of drugs and proteins in biological fluids, we studied the separation of phenytoin and theophylline from human serum albumin (HSA) as a model system. The retention of the analytes in an exclusively aqueous eluent could be modulated by changing the temperature and salt content. These results indicated that this temperature-responsive SPE system can be applied to the pretreatment of biological samples for the measurement of serum drug levels. PMID:26353953

  5. Energy extraction from pulsed amplified stimulated emission lasers operating under conditions of strong saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Simon M.; Spence, David J.

    2006-06-01

    The output of pulsed, homogeneously broadened amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) lasers operating under conditions of strong saturation is considered. An expression for the maximum power (energy) per unit volume that may be extracted from steady-state (pulsed) systems is derived and shown to be independent of the saturation intensity. Numerical calculations of the temporal evolution of the populations in the laser levels and the growth in the ASE fluence, peak intensity, and spectral width are presented for three types of laser system: quasi steady state, short pump pulses, and self-termination. In all cases the growth in the fluence of the ASE pulse is found to agree with an analytic solution derived for conditions of strong saturation. The calculated growth in intensity of the ASE pulse is compared with expressions derived by Pert [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B11, 1425 (1994)] for the steady-state case. As expected, good agreement is found for the quasi-steady-state system, but in the limit of strong saturation significant differences occur for the short pump pulse and self-terminating laser systems considered. For all cases considered, the variation of the spectral width of the ASE pulse is found to be in reasonable agreement with that predicted by Pert for steady-state conditions.

  6. Exploring the effects of pulsed electric field processing parameters on polyacetylene extraction from carrot slices.

    PubMed

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Ingrid; Abreu, Corina; Hossain, Mohammad B; Altisent, Rosa; Brunton, Nigel; Viñas, Inmaculada; Rai, Dilip K

    2015-01-01

    The effects of various pulsed electric field (PEF) parameters on the extraction of polyacetylenes from carrot slices were investigated. Optimised conditions with regard to electric field strength (1-4 kV/cm), number of pulses (100-1500), pulse frequency (10-200 Hz) and pulse width (10-30 μs) were identified using response surface methodology (RSM) to maximise the extraction of falcarinol (FaOH), falcarindiol (FaDOH) and falcarindiol-3-acetate (FaDOAc) from carrot slices. Data obtained from RSM and experiments fitted significantly (p < 0.0001) the proposed second-order response functions with high regression coefficients (R2) ranging from 0.82 to 0.75. Maximal FaOH (188%), FaDOH (164.9%) and FaDOAc (166.8%) levels relative to untreated samples were obtained from carrot slices after applying PEF treatments at 4 kV/cm with 100 number of pulses of 10 μs at 10 Hz. The predicted values from the developed quadratic polynomial equation were in close agreement with the actual experimental values with low average mean deviations (E%) ranging from 0.68% to 3.58%. PMID:25738537

  7. Simulating ion beam extraction from a single aperture triode acceleration column: A comparison of the beam transport codes IGUN and PBGUNS with test stand data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Wills, J. S. C.; Diamond, W. T.

    2008-04-15

    Ion beam extraction from two different ion sources with single aperture triode extraction columns was simulated with the particle beam transport codes PBGUNS and IGUN. For each ion source, the simulation results are compared to experimental data generated on well-equipped test stands. Both codes reproduced the qualitative behavior of the extracted ion beams to incremental and scaled changes to the extraction electrode geometry observed on the test stands. Numerical values of optimum beam currents and beam emittance generated by the simulations also agree well with test stand data.

  8. Long pulse H- beam extraction with a rf driven ion source on a high power level.

    PubMed

    Kraus, W; Fantz, U; Franzen, P

    2010-02-01

    IPP Garching is investigating the applicability of rf driven negative ion sources for the neutral beam injection of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The setup of the tested source was improved to enable long pulses up to 100 kW rf power. The efficiency of negative ion production decreases at high power. The extracted H(-) currents as well as the symmetry of the plasma density close to the plasma grid and of the beam divergence depend on the magnetic filter field. The pulse duration is limited by the increase in coextracted electrons, which depends on the rf power and the caesium conditions on the plasma grid. PMID:20192417

  9. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Sediment and Soil by Pressurized Solvent Extraction, Solid-Phase Extraction, and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 61 compounds in environmental sediment and soil samples is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater and wastewater-impacted sediment on aquatic organisms. This method also may be used to evaluate the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water and sediment quality of urban streams. Method development focused on the determination of compounds that were chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from interfering matrix components by high-pressure water/isopropyl alcohol extraction. The compounds were isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing chemically modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. The cartridges were dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds were eluted with methylene chloride (80 percent)-diethyl ether (20 percent) through Florisil/sodium sulfate SPE cartridge, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-sand samples fortified at 4 to 72 micrograms averaged 76 percent ?13 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method reporting levels for single-component compounds ranged from 50 to 500 micrograms per kilogram. The concentrations of 20 out of 61 compounds initially will be reported as estimated with the 'E' remark code for one of three reasons: (1) unacceptably low-biased recovery (less than 60 percent) or highly variable method performance (greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation), (2) reference standards prepared from technical mixtures, or (3) potential blank contamination. Samples were preserved by freezing to -20 degrees Celsius. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory has established a 1-year sample-holding time limit (prior to sample extraction) from the date of sample collection (if the sample is kept at -20?C) until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of the sample-freezing procedure.

  10. Separation of the Components of a Commercial Analgesic Tablet: A Two-Week Sequence Comparing Purification by Two-Base Extraction and Column Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revell, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    A new laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two benchtop separation methods to isolate the three active components of the commercial analgesic Excedrin. In the two-week sequence, aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine are separated using either a two-base liquid-liquid extraction or silica column chromatography. Students then…

  11. Separation of the Components of a Commercial Analgesic Tablet: A Two-Week Sequence Comparing Purification by Two-Base Extraction and Column Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revell, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    A new laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two benchtop separation methods to isolate the three active components of the commercial analgesic Excedrin. In the two-week sequence, aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine are separated using either a two-base liquid-liquid extraction or silica column chromatography. Students then

  12. Extraction and neutralization of positive and negative ions from a pulsed electronegative inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, D.; el Otell, Z.; Bowden, M. D.; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2015-12-01

    Almost electron-free (ion-ion) plasmas can be transiently formed during the afterglow phase of pulsed plasmas in electronegative gases. In ion-ion plasmas, both positive and negative ions can be extracted which makes them advantageous for a number of applications. In this paper, we investigate the extraction and acceleration of positive and negative ion beams from a pulsed inductively coupled plasma in SF6. The plasma is bounded by two electrodes biased synchronously with the discharge modulation. It is shown that when a DC bias voltage is applied during the afterglow phase, positive/negative ions are accelerated in a positive/negative space charge sheath formed in front of one of the electrodes. The energy of extracted ions closely follows the amplitude of the applied bias voltage (25–150 V) and the peak beam current density reaches 2 A m‑2. With a view to using the described system as a source of energetic neutral beams for low damage material processing, simultaneous extraction and surface neutralization of positive and negative ions using an extraction electrode with high aspect ratio apertures is investigated.

  13. Extracting nanosecond pulse signals via stochastic resonance generated by surface plasmon bistability.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Li, Shaopeng

    2015-11-15

    A technology is investigated to extract nanosecond pulse noise hidden signals via stochastic resonance, which is based on surface plasmon bistability. A theoretical model for recovering nanosecond pulse signals is derived to describe the nonlinear process. It is found that the incident angle, polarization state, medium properties, and input noise intensity all determine the efficiency and fidelity of the output signal. The bistable behavior of the output intensity can be accurately controlled to obtain a cross-correlation gain larger than 6 in a wide range of input signal-to-noise ratio from 1?5 to 1?30. Meanwhile, the distortion in the time domain induced by phase shift can be reduced to a negligible level. This work provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse signals in various communication fields. PMID:26565876

  14. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2013-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  15. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A.; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A.; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2014-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  16. Effect of pulsed electric field treatments on permeabilization and extraction of pigments from Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Elisa; Condón-Abanto, Santiago; Álvarez, Ignacio; Raso, Javier

    2014-12-01

    The effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) treatments of different intensities on the electroporation of the cytoplasmatic membrane of Chlorella vulgaris, and on the extraction of carotenoids and chlorophylls were investigated. Staining the cells with propidium iodide before and after the PEF treatment revealed the existence of reversible and irreversible electroporation. Application of PEF treatments in the range of 20-25 kV cm(-1) caused most of the population of C. vulgaris to be irreversibly electroporated even at short treatment times (5 pulses of 3 µs). However, at lower electric field strengths (10 kV cm(-1)), cells that were reversibly electroporated were observed even after 50 pulses of 3 µs. The electroporation of C. vulgaris cells by PEF higher than 15 kV cm(-1) and duration is higher than 15 µs increased significantly the extraction yield of intracellular components of C. vulgaris. The application of a 20 kV cm(-1) for 75 μs increased the extraction yield just after the PEF treatment of the carotenoids, and chlorophylls a and b 0.5, 0.7, and 0.8 times, respectively. However, further increments in electric field strength and treatment time did not cause significant increments in the extraction yield. The extraction of carotenoids from PEF-treated C. vulgaris cells after 1 h of the application of the treatment significantly increased the extraction yield in comparison to the yield obtained from the cells extracted just after the PEF treatment. After PEF treatment at 20 kV cm(-1) for 75 µs, extraction yield for carotenoids, and chlorophylls a and b increased 1.2, 1.6, and 2.1 times, respectively. A high correlation was observed between irreversible electroporation and percentage of yield increase when the extraction was conducted after 1 h of the application of PEF treatment (R: 0.93), but not when the extraction was conducted just after PEF treatment (R: 0.67). PMID:24880235

  17. Rapid tea catechins and caffeine determination by HPLC using microwave-assisted extraction and silica monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Rahim, A A; Nofrizal, S; Saad, Bahruddin

    2014-03-15

    A rapid reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method using a monolithic column for the determination of eight catechin monomers and caffeine was developed. Using a mobile phase of water:acetonitrile:methanol (83:6:11) at a flow rate of 1.4 mL min(-1), the catechins and caffeine were isocratically separated in about 7 min. The limits of detection and quantification were in the range of 0.11-0.29 and 0.33-0.87 mg L(-1), respectively. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained (94.2-105.2 1.8%) for all samples when spiked at three concentrations (5, 40 and 70 mg L(-1)). In combination with microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), the method was applied to the determination of the catechins and caffeine in eleven tea samples (6 green, 3 black and 2 oolong teas). Relatively high levels of caffeine were found in black tea, but higher levels of the catechins, especially epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) were found in green teas. PMID:24206716

  18. Atmospheric Backscatter Profiles at 1572nm from Pulsed Lidar Measurments of CO2 Column Absorption from the 2011 ASCENDS Flight Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, G. R.; Riris, H.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.; Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    We present height-resolved backscatter profiles from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's CO2 sounder lidar, rich in detail, which shows clear evidence of multiple backscatter layers, clouds, and aerosols allowing for the identification of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). This data is recorded as a consequence of our pulsed lidar measurements of the CO2 column absorption. The CO2 Sounder is a pulsed lidar for active remote measurements of CO2 abundance from an airborne platform and is one candidate for the lidar on the NASA ASCENDS mission. The lidar uses a scanning, pulsed laser and fiber amplifier in a Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) configuration to measure CO2 absorption at 1572.335 nm, lineshape, range to scattering surface and backscatter profiles. The laser is scanned across the absorption feature measuring at 30 discrete wavelengths/scan and ~300 scans/sec. The time-resolved return signal, with a temporal resolution of 8ns, is detected by a photon-counting PMT fiber coupled to a modified commercial, 2m focal length f10 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The column density for CO2 is estimated from the differential optical depth (DOD) of the scanned absorption line using an integrated-path differential absorption (IPDA) technique and the optical path from the time of flight. A backscatter profile of the measured column is recorded for every pulse of every scan and integrated for 1 second. The backscatter profiles we will show are determined from the receivers photon counting record using a cross-correaltion technique (sliding inner product) with a vertical resolution of better than 300m, set by the 1μs pulse width from the MOPA. The range to the surface can be determined to a few meters. Major benefits of a pulsed technique using time-resolved detection to measure lineshape, is the unambiguous detection of the ground return, intervening clouds, aerosols and information on the vertical distribution of CO2. This technique can uniquely identify the ground-return, removing scatter due to intervening aerosols and clouds, notably sub-visible cirrus, which improves the accuracy of the retrieval. Further analyses of the CO2 column incorporating the backscatter profiles allows for the identification of the PBL. Identification of the height above ground of the PBL in which the CO2 is greatly varying, both spatially and temporally, improves the quality of the retrieval from the knowledge of both the lineshape and depth of the PBL. We will present backscatter data from the 2011 ASCENDS campaign from predominantly the central and western USA. The data, rich in detail, shows clear evidence of multiple backscatter layers, clouds, the PBL, surface aerosols and smoke plumes from forest fires to clear air column over the Pacific Ocean.

  19. Pulsed Ultraviolet Light Reduces Immunoglobulin E Binding to Atlantic White Shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) Extract

    PubMed Central

    Shriver, Sandra; Yang, Wade; Chung, Si-Yin; Percival, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown to reduce allergen levels in peanut and soybean samples. In this study, the efficacy of using PUV to reduce the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36-kDa), and to attenuate immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to shrimp extract was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) extract was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source) for 4 min. Tropomyosin was compared in the untreated, boiled, PUV-treated and [boiled+PUV]-treated samples, and changes in the tropomyosin levels were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). IgE binding of the treated extract was analyzed via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using pooled human plasma containing IgE antibodies against shrimp allergens. Results showed that levels of tropomyosin and IgE binding were reduced following PUV treatment. However, boiling increased IgE binding, while PUV treatment could offset the increased allergen reactivity caused by boiling. In conclusion, PUV treatment reduced the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, and decreased the IgE binding capacity of the shrimp extract. PMID:21845146

  20. A high performance liquid chromatographic post-column fluorescent ion pair extraction system: application to physostigmine and its metabolite eseroline in human serum.

    PubMed

    Quinn, K D; Stewart, J T

    1991-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic post-column fluorescent ion pair extraction system was developed for the analysis of quaternary ammonium and amine drugs in serum. A new fluorescent ion pair reagent, sodium alpha-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) cinnamonitrile-2'-sulfonate (DPS), was synthesized and characterized. The post-column extraction system consisted of a three-dimensional knitted teflon mixing coil and a membrane phase separator which was modified from an original literature design. Physostigmine and its metabolite eseroline were used as model cations. A solid phase extraction procedure using octadecylsilane columns was developed to extract the compounds and neostigmine bromide (internal standard) from human serum. The compounds were chromatographed on a diol column using a 80:20 aqueous phosphate buffer pH 4 absolute methanol mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. Methylene chloride was used as the on-line extraction solvent for the DPS ion pairs formed. Fluorescence of the extracted ion pairs was measured using an excitation of 243 nm and an emission cut-off filter at 418 nm. Linearity was in the 2-100 ng/mL and 5-100 ng/mL ranges for physostigmine and eseroline, respectively. Detection limits based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 2, were 2 and 5 ng/mL, respectively. Precision of the method was found to be in the 1.5-3% range and percentage error in the 1.5-7% range for both compounds. PMID:2032023

  1. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A; McCord, James; Muddiman, David C; Paull, Brett

    2016-01-28

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L(-1) levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min(-1), and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L(-1) for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%. PMID:26755132

  2. Pressurized liquid extraction as a sample preparation method for the analysis of isoflavones in pulses.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Zamarreo, Mara Milagros; Prez-Martn, Lara; Bustamante-Rangel, Myriam; Carabias-Martnez, Rita

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we describe a rapid and simple analytical method that exploits pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and liquid chromatography with diode array detection for the determination of isoflavones in samples of Spanish pulses. Confirmation of the analytes present was performed using ion-trap mass spectrometry. To optimize the PLE extraction, variables such as the dispersing agent, type of solvent and sample amount, and the experimental parameters, such as temperature and the number of extraction cycles, were studied. Separation was carried out using a reverse-phase C18 with polar endcapping as the stationary phase and acetonitrile/water with 0.2% of formic acid, under a gradient regime, as the mobile phase. Optimal extraction of formononetin and biochanin-A from chickpeas with PLE was achieved using Hydromatrix as a dispersant agent, methanol/water (50:50), a temperature of 90C, and three cycles. The same optimal conditions-except methanol/water (75:25)-for solvent extraction were obtained for the extraction of daidzin, genistin, and formononetin from lentils. Recoveries ranged from 97 to 110%, and standard deviations lower than 20% were obtained. The contents obtained for daidzin in lentils using the proposed method were not significantly different from those obtained using another official method of analysis. PMID:22427106

  3. A column system for the selective extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) using a new chelating sorbent.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, D; Subramanian, M S

    2003-11-12

    A new method has been developed using (bis-3,4-dihydroxy benzyl)p-phenylene diamine functionalized to XAD-16 (a polystyrene divinyl benzene copolymer) matrix, to preconcentrate mainly U(VI) and Th(IV) from synthetic and real samples. The developed method is free from matrix interference due to alkali and alkaline metal ions and preconcentrates the actinides with a high degree of selectivity, with consistent trace recoveries. The new chelating resin provides dramatic improvement in metal exchange rate, with half value saturation time (t(1/2)) of less than 1.6 min. The developed method was superior in its metal loading capacity for U(VI) and Th(IV), with values of 0.666 and 0.664 mmol g(-1), respectively. Various physio-chemical properties like effect of solution pH, kinetic studies, resin loading capacity, sample breakthrough volume, matrix effects etc., on metal ion sorption to sorbent phase, were studied using both batch and column method. The new chelatogen was applied to extract U(VI) from near neutral real water samples. Preconcentration and separation of metal ions were possible through pH variation and also by varying the eluant concentration. A high preconcentration factor value of 350 with a lower limit of detection of 20 and 30 ng cm(-3) was obtained for U(VI) and Th(IV), respectively. The practical applicability of the developed resin was examined using synthetic and real samples such as sea/well water samples. The method provides low relative standard deviation values of <3.5% for all analytical measurements, reflecting on the reproducibility and accuracy of the developed method. The new resin is quite durable with recycling time >35 cycles, without any major change in its quantitative metal uptake nature. PMID:18969203

  4. A Fast-sampling, Planar Array for Measuring the AC Field of Fermilab Pulsed Extraction Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Johnstone, C.; Kiemschies, O.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Lamm, M.J.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Russell, A.D.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-25

    A system employing a planar array of inductive pick-up coils has been developed for measurements of the rapidly changing dipole field in pulsed extraction magnets for the Fermilab MuCool project. The magnets are of C-type and deigned to support a peak field of 0.65 T during 8.33 millisecond half-sine pulse at a 15 Hz repetition rate. The coils of the measurement system are fabricated on a single, 97.5 mm wide, 2-layer circuit board. The array of coils is simultaneously sampled at data rates of up to 100 kHz with 10 kHz bandwidth using 24-bit ADC's. A detailed overview of the system and data analysis is presented, along with a characterization of results and system performance.

  5. HPLC-MS-MS Determination of ZCZ-011, A Novel Pharmacological Tool for Investigation of the Cannabinoid Receptor in Mouse Brain Using Clean Screen FASt™ Column Extraction.

    PubMed

    Poklis, Justin L; Clay, Deborah J; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Zanato, Chiara; Ross, Ruth A; Greig, Iain R; Abdullah, Rehab A; Mustafa, Mohammed A; Lichtman, Aron H; Poklis, Alphonse

    2015-06-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the detection and quantification of 6-methyl-3-(2-nitro-1-(thiophen-2-yl)propyl)-2-phenyl-1H-indole (ZCZ-011) using 2-phenylindole as the internal standard (ISTD). ZCZ-011 was synthesized as a possible positive allosteric modulator with the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. The analytical method employs a rapid extraction technique using Clean Screen FASt™ columns with a Positive Pressure Manifold. FASt™ columns were originally developed for urine drug analysis but we have successfully adapted them to the extraction of brain tissue. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Restek Allure Biphenyl 5 µ, 100 × 3.2 mm column (Bellefonte, PA). The mobile phase consisted of 1:9 deionized water with 10 mmol ammonium acetate and 0.1% formic acid-methanol. The following transition ions (m/z) were monitored for ZCZ-011: 363 > 207 and 363 > 110 and for the ISTD: 194 > 165 and 194 > 89. The FASt™ columns lowered and stabilized the ion suppression over the linear range of the assay (40-4,000 ng/g). The method was evaluated for recovery, ion suppression, accuracy/bias, intraday and interday precision, bench-top stability, freeze-thaw and post-preparative stability. The method was successfully applied to brain tissue from C57BL/6J mice that received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections with 40 mg/kg of ZCZ-011 or vehicle. PMID:25737338

  6. Atmospheric Backscatter Profiles at 765nm and 1572nm from Pulsed Lidar Measurements of CO2 and O2 Column Absorption from the 2013 ASCENDS Flight Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, G. R.; Riris, H.; Hasselbrack, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramanathan, A.; Sun, X.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present height-resolved, range corrected, backscatter profiles from NASA GSFC's two-channel (CO2 & O2) sounder, an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar, which measures simultaneously both carbon dioxide & oxygen column absorptions. These backscatter profiles show clear evidence of multiple backscattering layers, clouds & aerosols, which allows for the identification of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). The backscatter measurements enable sampling of the vertical distribution of CO2 in the atmosphere when broken & thin clouds are present & may help identify sources & sinks within the PBL as opposed to natural variations in the vertical distribution of CO2. The CO2 Sounder is an airborne pulsed lidar for active remote measurements of CO2 abundance & is a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days & Seasons). The O2 channel measures atmospheric pressure in the same air column to calculate the dry mixing ratio of CO2. The lidars use a scanning, pulsed laser & fiber amplifier in a Master Oscillator Power Amplifier configuration to measure lineshape, range to scattering surface & backscatter profiles. The CO2 channel operates at 1572.335 nm. The O2 channel uses similar technology but frequency doubles the output from ~1530nm to the O2 A-band absorption around 765nm. Both lasers are scanned across the absorption feature of interest sampling the line at a fixed number of discrete wavelengths per scan around ~300 scans per second. The time-resolved return signal is detected by photon-counting detectors with a temporal resolution of a few nanoseconds. The CO2 channel uses a PMT while the O2 channel uses Single Photon Counting Modules. The detectors are fiber coupled to a 2m f10 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The column density of the gas of interest is estimated from the differential optical depths of the scanned absorption using the IPDA technique & the optical path from the time of flight. A backscatter profile of the measured column is recorded for every pulse of every scan & integrated along track for 1 second. Major benefits of a time-resolved pulsed technique is the unambiguous detection of the ground return, intervening clouds, aerosols & information on the vertical distribution of CO2. Additionally the difference in backscatter between the two channels gives some information on particle size. We will present backscatter data from the Summer 2011 & Winter 2013 ASCENDS campaign from predominantly the central & western USA. The data, rich in detail, shows clear evidence of multiple backscatter layers, clouds, the PBL, & aerosols. False-color backscatter counts(arb units) at 765nm, recorded east of and over the Rocky Mountains, March 8, 2013. This plot, rich in detail, clearly shows the ground return, aerosols and clouds.

  7. Simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination in nutmeg by ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction and immunoaffinity column clean-up coupled with liquid chromatography and on-line post-column photochemical derivatization-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Shu-Yu; Qiu, Feng; Xiao, Xiao-He; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2013-05-01

    A simple and sensitive analytical method based on ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction and immunoaffinity column clean-up coupled with high performance liquid chromatography and on-line post-column photochemical derivatization-fluorescence detection (USLE-IAC-HPLC-PCD-FLD) has been developed for simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2 (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in 13 edible and medicinal nutmeg samples marketed in China. AFs and OTA were extracted from nutmeg samples by ultrasonication using a methanol : water (80 : 20, v/v) solution, followed by an IAC clean-up step. Different USL extraction conditions, pre-processing ways for nutmeg sample and clean-up columns for mycotoxins, as well as HPLC-PCD-FLD parameters (mobile phase, column temperature, elution procedure, excitation and emission wavelengths) were optimized. This method, which was appraised for analyzing nutmeg samples, showed satisfactory results with reference to limits of detection (LODs) (from 0.02 to 0.25 μg kg(-1)), limits of quantification (LOQs) (from 0.06 to 0.8 μg kg(-1)), linear ranges (up to 30 ng mL(-1) for AFB1, AFG1 and OTA and 9 ng mL(-1) for AFB2 and AFG2), intra- and inter-day variability (all <2%) and average recoveries (from 79.6 to 90.8% for AFs and from 93.6 to 97.3% for OTA, respectively). The results of the application of developed method in nutmeg samples have elucidated that four samples were detected with contamination of AFs and one with OTA. AFB1 was the most frequently found mycotoxin in 30.8% of nutmeg samples at contamination levels of 0.73-16.31 μg kg(-1). At least two different mycotoxins were co-occurred in three samples, and three AFs were simultaneously detected in one sample. PMID:23486692

  8. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction, radiation induced due to scattering on the electrostatic septa and limited beam pipe aperture, beam dynamics effects of space charge forces and magnet power supplies ripple. Here we present a novel slow extraction scheme employing a number of non-standard accelerator elements, such as Silicone crystal strips and pulsed stripline dipole correctors, and illustrate practicality of these examples at the 8 GeV proton Recycler Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in simulations. We propose to initiate an R&D program in the Fermilab 8 GeV Recycler to address the key issues of the method: (a) feasibility of very short crystals - from few mm down to 0.2 mm; (b) their efficiency in the channelling and volume reflection regimes; (c) practical aspects of the fast deflectors.

  9. Combination pulsed electric field with ethanol solvent for Nannochloropsis sp. extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafis, Ghazy Ammar; Mumpuni, Perwitasari Yekti; Indarto, Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, energy is one of human basic needs. As the human population increased, energy consumption also increased. This condition causes energy depletion. In case of the situation, alternative energy is needed to replace existing energy. Microalgae is chosen to become one of renewable energy resource, especially biodiesel, because it contains high amount of lipid instead of other feedstock which usually used. Fortunately, Indonesia has large area of water and high intensity of sunlight so microalgae cultivation becomes easier. Nannochloropsis sp., one of microalgae species, becomes the main focus because of its high lipid content. Many ways to break the cell wall of microalgae so the lipid content inside the microalgae will be released, for example conventional extraction, ultrasonic wave extraction, pressing, and electrical method. The most effective way for extraction is electrical method such as pulsed electric field method (PEF). The principal work of this method is by draining the electrical current into parallel plate. Parallel plate will generate the electrical field to break microalgae cell wall and the lipid will be released. The aim of this work is to evaluate two-stage procedure for extraction of useful components from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. The first stage of this procedure includes pre-treatment of microalgae by ethanol solvent extraction and the second stage applies the PEF extraction using a binary mixture of water and ethanol solvent. Ethanol is chosen as solvent because it's safer to be used and easier to be handled than other solvent. Some variables that used to study the most effective operation conditions are frequency and duty cycle for microalgae. The optimum condition based on this research are at frequency 1 Hz and duty cycle 13%.

  10. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce. The fluorescence lifetime is emerging in flow cytometry and is helpful in a variety of multiparametric, single cell measurements because it is not impacted by nonlinearity that can occur with fluorescence intensity measurements. Yet time-resolved cytometry systems rely on major hardware modifications making the methodology difficult to reproduce. The motivation of this work is, by taking advantage of the dynamic nature of flow cytometry sample detection and applying digital signal processing methods, to measure fluorescence lifetimes using an unmodified flow cytometer. We collect a new lifetime-dependent parameter, referred to herein as the fluorescence-pulse-delay (FPD), and prove it is a valid representation of the average fluorescence lifetime. To verify we generated cytometric pulses in simulation, with light emitting diode (LED) pulsation, and with true fluorescence measurements of cells and microspheres. Each pulse is digitized and used in algorithms to extract an average fluorescence lifetime inherent in the signal. A range of fluorescence lifetimes is measurable with this approach including standard organic fluorophore lifetimes (?1 to 22 ns) as well as small, simulated shifts (0.1 ns) under standard conditions (reported herein). This contribution demonstrates how digital data acquisition and signal processing can reveal time-dependent information foreshadowing the exploitation of full waveform analysis for quantification of similar photo-physical events within single cells. 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25274073

  11. The effect of dilution and the use of a post-extraction nucleic acid purification column on the accuracy, precision, and inhibition of environmental DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna M.; Spear, Stephen F.; Pierson, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of environmental DNA (eDNA) is an increasingly common method for detecting presence and assessing relative abundance of rare or elusive species in aquatic systems via the isolation of DNA from environmental samples and the amplification of species-specific sequences using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Co-extracted substances that inhibit qPCR can lead to inaccurate results and subsequent misinterpretation about a species’ status in the tested system. We tested three treatments (5-fold and 10-fold dilutions, and spin-column purification) for reducing qPCR inhibition from 21 partially and fully inhibited eDNA samples collected from coastal plain wetlands and mountain headwater streams in the southeastern USA. All treatments reduced the concentration of DNA in the samples. However, column purified samples retained the greatest sensitivity. For stream samples, all three treatments effectively reduced qPCR inhibition. However, for wetland samples, the 5-fold dilution was less effective than other treatments. Quantitative PCR results for column purified samples were more precise than the 5-fold and 10-fold dilutions by 2.2× and 3.7×, respectively. Column purified samples consistently underestimated qPCR-based DNA concentrations by approximately 25%, whereas the directional bias in qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed between stream and wetland samples for both dilution treatments. While the directional bias of qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed among treatments and locations, the magnitude of inaccuracy did not. Our results suggest that 10-fold dilution and column purification effectively reduce qPCR inhibition in mountain headwater stream and coastal plain wetland eDNA samples, and if applied to all samples in a study, column purification may provide the most accurate relative qPCR-based DNA concentrations estimates while retaining the greatest assay sensitivity.

  12. Determination of trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine in Yunnan Arabica coffee by microwave-assisted extraction and HPLC with two columns in series.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Shao, Jinliang; Li, Qiwan; Li, Yangang; Yan, Hong Mei; He, Lizhong

    2012-01-01

    A simple, rapid method was developed for simultaneous extraction of trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine from coffee, and separation by two chromatographic columns in series. The trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine were extracted with microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The optimal conditions selected were 3 min, 200 psi, and 120 degrees C. The chromatographic separation was performed with two columns in series, polyaromatic hydrocarbon C18 (250 x 4.6 mm id, 5 microm particle size) and Bondapak NH2 (300 x 3.9 mm id, 5 microm particle size). Isocratic elution was with 0.02 M phosphoric acid-methanol (70 + 30, v/v) mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Good recoveries and RSD values were found for all analytes in the matrix. The LOD of the three compounds was 0.02 mg/L, and the LOQ was 0.005% in the matrix. The concentrations of trigonelline, nicotinic acid, and caffeine in instant coffee, roasted coffee, and raw coffee (Yunnan Arabica coffee) were assessed by MAE and hot water extraction; the correlation coefficients between concentrations of the three compounds obtained were close to 1. PMID:22970583

  13. Cold column trapping-cloud point extraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography for preconcentration and determination of curcumin in human urine.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Marzieh; Hashemi, Payman; Nazari, Fariba

    2014-05-15

    A cold column trapping-cloud point extraction (CCT-CPE) method coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for preconcentration and determination of curcumin in human urine. A nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, was used as the extraction medium. In the proposed method, a low surfactant concentration of 0.4% v/v and a short heating time of only 2min at 70C were sufficient for quantitative extraction of the analyte. For the separation of the extraction phase, the resulted cloudy solution was passed through a packed trapping column that was cooled to 0?C. The temperature of the CCT column was then increased to 25C and the surfactant rich phase was desorbed with 400?L ethanol to be directly injected into HPLC for the analysis. The effects of different variables such as pH, surfactant concentration, cloud point temperature and time were investigated and optimum conditions were established by a central composite design (response surface) method. A limit of detection of 0.066mgL(-1) curcumin and a linear range of 0.22-100mgL(-1) with a determination coefficient of 0.9998 were obtained for the method. The average recovery and relative standard deviation for six replicated analysis were 101.0% and 2.77%, respectively. The CCT-CPE technique was faster than a conventional CPE method requiring a lower concentration of the surfactant and lower temperatures with no need for the centrifugation. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of curcumin in human urine samples. PMID:24793851

  14. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in columns treated with edible oil emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Cameron M.; Borden, Robert C.

    2006-09-01

    The effect of edible oil emulsion treatment on enhanced reductive dechlorination was evaluated in a 14 month laboratory column study. Experimental treatments included: (1) emulsified soybean oil and dilute HCl to inhibit biological activity; (2) emulsified oil only; (3) emulsified oil and anaerobic digester sludge; and (4) continuously feeding soluble substrate. A single application of emulsified oil was effective in generating strongly reducing, anaerobic conditions for over 14 months. PCE was rapidly reduced to cis-DCE in all three live columns. Bioaugmentation with a halorespiring enrichment culture resulted in complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene in the soluble substrate column (yeast extract and lactate). However, an additional treatment with a pulse of yeast extract and bioaugmentation culture was required to stimulate complete dechlorination in the emulsion treated columns. Once the dechlorinating population was established, the emulsion only column degraded PCE from 90-120 μM to below detection with concurrent ethene production in a 33 day contact time. The lower biodegradation rates in the emulsion treated columns compared to the soluble substrate column suggest that emulsified oil barriers may require a somewhat longer contact time for effective treatment. In the HCl inhibited column, partitioning of PCE to the retained oil substantially delayed PCE breakthrough. However, reduction of PCE to more soluble degradation products ( cis-DCE, VC and ethene) greatly reduced the impact of oil-water partitioning in live columns. There was only a small decline in the hydraulic conductivity ( K) of column #1 (low pH + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.57) and column #2 (live + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.73) indicating emulsion injection did not result in appreciable clogging of the clayey sand. However, K loss was greater in column #3 (sludge +emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.12) and column #4 (soluble substrate, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.03) indicating clogging due to biomass and/or gas production can be significant.

  15. Determination of dihydroergocryptine in human plasma and urine samples using on-line sample extraction-column-switching reversed-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Gerhard; Appel, Kurt; Rose, Thorsten; Wangemann, Martina; Althaus, Michael; Rissler, Klaus

    2004-09-01

    A rapid and sensitive assay for the determination of dihydroergocryptine (DHEC) in human plasma and urine samples with dihydroergotamine (DHET) as the internal standard was developed. The procedure employs on-line sample preparation using an extraction pre-column and an octadecylsilylsilica (ODS) analytical column. After centrifugation human plasma or urine were injected onto the pre-column, concentrated and extracted, back-flushed onto the analytical column and eluted with a binary methanol--aqueous formic acid gradient. Either determination of DHEC as well of its mono- and dihydroxy-metabolites was performed by measurement of the signal responses from MS detection in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode using the transition of the respective parent ions to the common daughter ion at m/z=270.2 amu. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for determinations of DHEC in both plasma and urine were 25 pg/ml for injected sample volumes of 400 microl. Proportionality of signal responses versus concentration was accomplished within the range of 25-1000 pg/ml. Recovery of target analyte from plasma was 99%. Mean values of the coefficients of variation (CV) for the target analyte in plasma ranged from 1.7 to 13.8% (within-day) and 5.0 to 9.1% (between-day) and accuracy from 91.7 to 102.6% for the within-day and from 95.8 to 98.8% for the between-day measurements. The corresponding values for determinations in urine were 1.7-14.5% (within-day) and 5.3-11.8% (between-day) for CV and 95.8-110.7% (within-day) and 100.1-104.6% (between-day) for accuracy. PMID:15261806

  16. On-line hyphenation of solid-phase extraction to chromatographic separation of sulfonamides with fused-core columns in sequential injection chromatography.

    PubMed

    Batista, Alex D; Chocholouš, Petr; Satínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2015-02-01

    On-line sample pretreatment (clean-up and analyte preconcentration) is for the first time coupled to sequential injection chromatography. The approach combines anion-exchange solid-phase extraction and the highly effective pentafluorophenylpropyl (F5) fused-core particle column for separation of eight sulfonamide antibiotics with similar structures (sulfathiazole, sulfanilamide, sulfacetamide, sulfadiazine, sulfamerazine, sulfadimidine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfadimethoxine). The stationary phase was selected after a critical comparison of the performance achieved by three fused-core reversed phase columns (Ascentis(®) Express RP-Amide, Phenyl-Hexyl, and F5) and two monolithic columns (Chromolith(®) High Resolution RP-18 and CN). Acetonitrile and acetate buffer pH 5.0 at 0.60 mL min(-1) were used as mobile phase to perform the separations before spectrophotometric detection. The first mobile phase was successfully used as eluent from SPE column ensuring transfer of a narrow zone to the chromatographic column. Enrichment factors up to 39.2 were achieved with a 500 µL sample volume. The developed procedure showed analysis time <10.5 min, resolutions >1.83 with peak symmetry ≤1.52, LODs between 4.9 and 27 µg L(-1), linear response ranges from 30.0 to 1000.0 µg L(-1) (r(2)>0.996) and RSDs of peak heights <2.9% (n=6) at a 100 µg L(-1) level and enabled the screening control of freshwater samples contaminated at the 100 µg L(-1) level. The proposed approach expanded the analytical potentiality of SIC and avoided the time-consuming batch sample pretreatment step, thus minimizing risks of sample contamination and analyte losses. PMID:25435240

  17. Accurate Extraction of Electrostatic Force by a Voltage-Pulse Force Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2015-06-01

    The classification of interaction forces between two approaching bodies is important in a wide range of research fields. Here, we propose a method to unambiguously extract the electrostatic force (Fele ), which is one of the most significant forces. This method is based on the measurement of the energy dissipation under applied voltage pulse between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and sample. It allowed us to obtain Fele as a function of the tip-sample distance and voltage including the distance-independent part, to which conventional AFM is insensitive. The obtained Fele curves nicely fit the analytical model, enabling estimation of the geometry of the tip. The distance-dependent contact potential difference could also be correctly obtained by the measured Fele, opening an alternative route to quantitative Kelvin probe force microscopy.

  18. Accurate Extraction of Electrostatic Force by a Voltage-Pulse Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2015-06-19

    The classification of interaction forces between two approaching bodies is important in a wide range of research fields. Here, we propose a method to unambiguously extract the electrostatic force (F(ele)), which is one of the most significant forces. This method is based on the measurement of the energy dissipation under applied voltage pulse between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and sample. It allowed us to obtain F(ele) as a function of the tip-sample distance and voltage including the distance-independent part, to which conventional AFM is insensitive. The obtained F(ele) curves nicely fit the analytical model, enabling estimation of the geometry of the tip. The distance-dependent contact potential difference could also be correctly obtained by the measured F(ele), opening an alternative route to quantitative Kelvin probe force microscopy. PMID:26196989

  19. Marek's disease virus genome separation from feather tip extracts by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Borenshtain, Rinat; Davidson, Irit

    2002-03-01

    Marek's disease virus is an oncogenic herpes virus of poultry that is highly cell associated. In the infected tissues and tumors the virus replicates in a low copy number. The propagation and dissemination of the virus takes place at the feather follicle epithelium, where the viral genome is produced in high copy number. As the viral genome is a large circular DNA molecule (200 kbp), pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used for separation of the viral genome directly from the infected chicken. DNA was extracted from tumors or feather tips by the phenol:chloroform technique or by low melting agar technique. It was found that feathers, being the site of virus productive replication, are useful for separation of free Marek's disease virus DNA from in vivo infections. PMID:11849695

  20. Repellent, toxic, and food protectant effects of pithraj,Aphanamixis polystachya extracts against pulse beetle,Callosobruchus chinensis in storage.

    PubMed

    Talukder, F A; Howse, P E

    1994-04-01

    Ground leaves, bark, seeds, and four seed extracts of pithraj,Aphanamixis polystachya (family Meliaceae), a locally grown plant in Bangladesh, were evaluated for their repellency, contact toxicity, and food protectant efficacy against adult pulse beetle (Callosobruchus chinensis L.). The seed extracts showed poor repellent effects, but high contact toxicity to adults at 72 hr after application. The ground leaves, bark, and seeds provided good protection for mung beans against pulse beetles, and the seed powder greatly reduced the F1 progeny and seed damage rates. PMID:24242204

  1. Pulsed electric field pretreatment of rapeseed green biomass (stems) to enhance pressing and extractives recovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Gouyo, T; Grimi, N; Bals, O; Vorobiev, E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) pretreatment on the valorization of extractives (proteins and polyphenols) from rapeseed green biomass (stems) by pressing. The effect of pressure, electric field strength and pulse number on the juice expression yield, total polyphenols and total proteins content in the expressed juices were studied. Experiments conducted under optimal conditions (E = 8 kV/cm, tPEF = 2 ms, P = 10 bar) permitted to increase the juice expressed yield from 34% to 81%. Significant increases in total polyphenols content (0.48 vs. 0.10 g GAE/100g DM), in total proteins content (0.14 vs. 0.07 g BSA/100g DM) and in consolidation coefficient (9.0 10(-8) vs. 2.2 10(-8)m(2)/s) were also observed after PEF pretreatment. The recovered press cake was well dehydrated with an increase of dry matter content from 8.8% to 53.0%. PMID:26341008

  2. Photoionization of helium by attosecond pulses: Extraction of spectra from correlated wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, Luca; Pazourek, Renate; Feist, Johannes; Nagele, Stefan; Liertzer, Matthias; Persson, Emil; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Lindroth, Eva

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the photoionization spectrum of helium by attosecond XUV pulses both in the spectral region of doubly excited resonances as well as above the double ionization threshold. In order to probe for convergence, we compare three techniques to extract photoelectron spectra from the wave packet resulting from the integration of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in a finite-element discrete variable representation basis. These techniques are projection on products of hydrogenic bound and continuum states, projection onto multichannel scattering states computed in a B-spline close-coupling basis, and a technique based on exterior complex scaling implemented in the same basis used for the time propagation. These methods allow one to monitor the population of continuum states in wave packets created with ultrashort pulses in different regimes. Applications include photo cross sections and anisotropy parameters in the spectral region of doubly excited resonances, time-resolved photoexcitation of autoionizing resonances in an attosecond pump-probe setting, and the energy and angular distribution of correlated wave packets for two-photon double ionization.

  3. Solid phase extraction and spectrophotometric determination of mercury by adsorption of its diphenylthiocarbazone complex on an alumina column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, N.; Gurulakshmanan, G.

    2008-02-01

    A simple method has been developed for the preconcentration of mercury based on the adsorption of its diphenylthiocarbazone complex on a neutral alumina column. The influence of acidity, eluting agents, stability of the column, sample volume and interfering ions has been investigated in detail. The adsorbed complex could be eluted using environmentally benign polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) and the concentration of mercury was determined by visible spectrophotometry at a wavelength maximum of 520 nm. A detection limit of 4 ?g L -1 could be achieved and the developed procedure was successfully applied for the determination of mercury in spiked water samples and city waste incineration ash (CRM176). The preconcentration factor attainable for quantitative recovery (>95%) of mercury(II) was 100 for a 1000 mL sample volume.

  4. Impact of the uranium (VI) speciation in mineralised urines on its extraction bycalix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups used in chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, S; Bouvier-Capely, C; Ritt, A; Peroux, A; Fevrier, L; Rebiere, F; Agarande, M; Cote, G

    2015-11-01

    Actinides determination in urine samples is part of the analyses performed to monitor internal contamination in case of an accident or a terrorist attack involving nuclear matter. Mineralisation is the first step of any of these analyses. It aims at reducing the sample volume and at destroying all organic compounds present. The mineralisation protocol is usually based on a wet ashing step, followed by actinides co-precipitation and a furnace ashing step, before redissolution and the quantification of the actinides by the appropriate techniques. Amongst the existing methods to perform the actinides co-precipitation, alkali-earth (typically calcium) precipitation is widely used. In the present work, the extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and americium(III) from the redissolution solutions (called "mineralised urines") on calix[6]arene columns bearing hydroxamic groups was investigated as such an extraction is a necessary step before their determination by ICP-MS or alpha spectrometry. Difficulties were encountered in the transfer of uranium(VI) from raw to mineralised urines, with yield of transfer ranging between 0% and 85%, compared to about 90% for Pu and Am, depending on the starting raw urines. To understand the origin of such a difficulty, the speciation of uranium (VI) in mineralised urines was investigated by computer simulation using the MEDUSA software and the associated HYDRA database, compiled with recently published data. These calculations showed that the presence of phosphates in the "mineralised urines" leads to the formation of strong uranyl-phosphate complexes (such as UO2HPO4) which compete with the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups. The extraction constant of uranium (VI) by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups was determined in a 0.04 mol L(-1) sodium nitrate solution (logK=4.860.03) and implemented in an extraction model taking into account the speciation in the aqueous phase. This model allowed to simulate satisfactorily the experimental uranium extraction data and to support the preliminary conclusions about the role of the phosphates present in mineralised urines. These calculations also showed that the phosphate/calcium ratio is a key parameter as far as the efficiency of the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene columns is concerned. It predicted that the addition of CaCl2 in mineralised urines would release uranium (VI) from phosphates by forming calcium (II)-phosphate complexes and thus facilitate the uranium (VI) extraction on calix[6]arene columns. These predictions were confirmed experimentally as the addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) CaCl2 to a mineralised urine containing naturally a high concentration of phosphate (typically 0.04 mol L(-1)) significantly increased the percentage of uranium (VI) extraction on the calix[6]arene columns. PMID:26452903

  5. In vitro gastric and intestinal digestions of pulsed light-treated shrimp extracts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wade W; Shriver, Sandra K; Chung, Si-Yin; Percival, Susan; Correll, Melanie J; Rababah, Taha M

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel technology most commonly used for microbial inactivation, has recently been employed to effectively mitigate food allergens in peanuts, soybean, shrimp, and almond. Putative mechanisms for the efficacy of PUV in reducing allergen reactivity include photothermal, photochemical, and photophysical effects. To date, there are no published data highlighting the effects of in vitro simulated gastric and intestinal digestion on the stability of PUV reduced allergen reactivity of food. In this study, PUV-treated shrimp extracts were subjected to simulated gastric fluid containing pepsin and simulated intestinal fluid containing trypsin and chymotrypsin, and then tested for changes in allergen potency. SDS-PAGE showed no major band deviation between undigested and digested PUV-treated shrimp extracts. IgE binding to tropomyosin remained markedly decreased as seen in Western blot analysis. Total shrimp allergen reactivity remained unchanged following in vitro peptic digestion and was markedly reduced following in vitro intestinal digestion as illustrated in indirect ELISA. The PUV reduced shrimp allergens remained at a low level under the in vitro simulated digestive conditions. The results inferred that PUV could be a potential method to create less allergenic shrimp products that would remain at a low allergen level under human gastric and intestinal digestive conditions. PMID:22278049

  6. The Perils of Pathogen Discovery: Origin of a Novel Parvovirus-Like Hybrid Genome Traced to Nucleic Acid Extraction Spin Columns

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, Samia N.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Lee, Deanna; Coffey, Lark L.; Phan, Tung; Rein-Weston, Annie; Aronsohn, Andrew; Hackett, John; Delwart, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing was used for discovery and de novo assembly of a novel, highly divergent DNA virus at the interface between the Parvoviridae and Circoviridae. The virus, provisionally named parvovirus-like hybrid virus (PHV), is nearly identical by sequence to another DNA virus, NIH-CQV, previously detected in Chinese patients with seronegative (non-A-E) hepatitis. Although we initially detected PHV in a wide range of clinical samples, with all strains sharing ?99% nucleotide and amino acid identity with each other and with NIH-CQV, the exact origin of the virus was eventually traced to contaminated silica-binding spin columns used for nucleic acid extraction. Definitive confirmation of the origin of PHV, and presumably NIH-CQV, was obtained by in-depth analyses of water eluted through contaminated spin columns. Analysis of environmental metagenome libraries detected PHV sequences in coastal marine waters of North America, suggesting that a potential association between PHV and diatoms (algae) that generate the silica matrix used in the spin columns may have resulted in inadvertent viral contamination during manufacture. The confirmation of PHV/NIH-CQV as laboratory reagent contaminants and not bona fide infectious agents of humans underscores the rigorous approach needed to establish the validity of new viral genomes discovered by next-generation sequencing. PMID:24027301

  7. The effect of silanol masking on the recovery of picloram and other solutes from a hydrocarbonaceous pre-analysis extraction column

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    The recoveries of picloram, picloram-methylester, hexazinone, benzene, and acetophenone from aqueous samples were studied using a commercially available hydrocarbonaceous pre-analysis extraction cartridge, both with and without tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulfate (TBAHS) in the eluent. Extraction efficiency was found to be dependent on sample loading volume. The results suggest a mixed mechanism of retention involving both ''silanophilic'' and ''hydrophobic'' interactions in the absence of tetrabutylammonium ion. The ability of TBAHS to mask surface silanol groups and/or ion-pair with counterionic solutes is invoked to explain the observations. Chromatograms of the solutes obtained on a C/sub 18/ bonded analytical column in both the presence and absence of TBAHS are also presented.

  8. Monitoring of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch by microdialysis sampling coupled on-line to anion exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed electrochemical detection using post-column switching

    SciTech Connect

    Torto, N.; Gorton, L.; Emneus, J.; Laurell, T.; Marko-Varga, G.; Akerberg, C.; Zacchi, G.

    1997-12-05

    A quantitative evaluation of the hydrolysis of wheat starch using Termamyl, a thermostable {alpha}-amylase, is reported. Data from the monitoring of the hydrolysis of wheat starch indicated that, after 1 h, glucose and maltooligosaccharides up to DP 7 were the main hydrolysis products and thus enabled optimization of a liquefaction step during the production of L-lactic acid. The monitoring system used, both in the on- and off-line mode, was based on continuous flow microdialysis sampling (CFMS) coupled to anion exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed electrochemical detection (IPED). A microdialysis probe equipped with a 5-mm polysulfone (SPS 4005) membrane, with a molecular-weight cut-off of 5 kDa, was used to sample the hydrolysis products of native wheat starch at 90 C. Characteristic fingerpoint separations were achieved by anion exchange chromatography after enzymatic hydrolysis. Post-column switching improved the detection and, consequently, also quantification of the hydrolysates as fouling of the electrode could be reduced. Maltooligosaccharide standards were used for quantification and to verify the elution of the hydrolysates by spiking the off-line samples.

  9. APPLICATION OF COLUMN EXTRACTION METHOD FOR IMPURITIES ANALYSIS ON HB-LINE PLUTONIUM OXIDE IN SUPPORT OF MOX FEED PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.; Diprete, D.; Wiedenman, B.

    2012-03-20

    The current mission at H-Canyon involves the dissolution of an Alternate Feedstocks 2 (AFS-2) inventory that contains plutonium metal. Once dissolved, HB-Line is tasked with purifying the plutonium solution via anion exchange, precipitating the Pu as oxalate, and calcining to form plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed product for the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, and the anion exchange raffinate will be transferred to H-Canyon. The results presented in this report document the potential success of the RE resin column extraction application on highly concentrated Pu samples to meet MOX feed product specifications. The original 'Hearts Cut' sample required a 10000x dilution to limit instrument drift on the ICP-MS method. The instrument dilution factors improved to 125x and 250x for the sample raffinate and sample eluent, respectively. As noted in the introduction, the significantly lower dilutions help to drop the total MRL for the analyte. Although the spike recoveries were half of expected in the eluent for several key elements, they were between 94-98% after Nd tracer correction. It is seen that the lower ICD limit requirements for the rare earths are attainable because of less dilution. Especially important is the extremely low Ga limit at 0.12 {mu}g/g Pu; an ICP-MS method is now available to accomplish this task on the sample raffinate. While B and V meet the column A limits, further development is needed to meet the column B limits. Even though V remained on the RE resin column, an analysis method is ready for investigation on the ICP-MS, but it does not mean that V cannot be measured on the ICP-ES at a low dilution to meet the column B limits. Furthermore, this column method can be applicable for ICP-ES as shown in Table 3-2, in that it trims the sample of Pu, decreasing and sometimes eliminating Pu spectral interferences.

  10. The potential of downscaled dynamic column extraction for fast and reliable assessment of natural weathering effects of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes.

    PubMed

    Rosende, María; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2008-07-01

    There is a current worldwide interest for evaluating the potential reuse of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash as a sub-base in road construction and secondary building material. Yet, there is a need for exploration of the physicochemical features of the bottom ashes to ensure environmental sustainability. To this end, batchwise water extraction as promulgated by the European norm EN 12457 or the German DIN 38414-S4 tests is commonly utilized to ascertain the impact of leachable trace elements in bottom ashes on biota. However, the above extraction protocols are not properly simulating the dynamic extraction conditions occurring in the nature, whereby the analytical information provided for risk assessment is debatable. In this work, a downscaled flow-through extraction method is proposed for mimicking the leaching of hazardous trace elements (namely, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu and Cr) in MSWI bottom ashes by runoff waters more accurately than the manual counterparts. The flow assembly facilitates the full automation of standard and regulatory leaching tests by packing of a suitable amount of solid material into a column, whereupon the leaching reagent is continuously pumped through, thus yielding an accurate assessment of the environmentally significant water-extraction fraction with no effect from readsorption phenomena. The flow-through column system is exploited as a screening tool for fast evaluation of the influence of natural bottom ash weathering on the immobilization of hazardous elements to dictate the potential reuse of the solid waste. The dependence of sorption sites for humic substances on trace element leachability is also discussed. As compared to the steady-state approach, the dynamic method features the substantial shortening of the analytical extraction protocol from 24h to just 30min, better precision, with relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) <11% versus >20% R.S.D. for batchwise extraction, improved accuracy because of the absence of metal redistribution phenomena and minimization of manual operations as well as straightforward investigation of leaching rates for the suite of target elements. PMID:18558112

  11. "In situ" extraction of essential oils by use of Dean-Stark glassware and a Vigreux column inside a microwave oven: a procedure for teaching green analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chemat, Farid; Perino-Issartier, Sandrine; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Fernandez, Xavier

    2012-08-01

    One of the principal objectives of sustainable and green processing development remains the dissemination and teaching of green chemistry in colleges, high schools, and academic laboratories. This paper describes simple glassware that illustrates the phenomenon of extraction in a conventional microwave oven as energy source and a process for green analytical chemistry. Simple glassware comprising a Dean-Stark apparatus (for extraction of aromatic plant material and recovery of essential oils and distilled water) and a Vigreux column (as an air-cooled condenser inside the microwave oven) was designed as an in-situ extraction vessel inside a microwave oven. The efficiency of this experiment was validated for extraction of essential oils from 30 g fresh orange peel, a by-product in the production of orange juice. Every laboratory throughout the world can use this equipment. The microwave power is 100 W and the irradiation time 15 min. The method is performed at atmospheric pressure without added solvent or water and furnishes essential oils similar to those obtained by conventional hydro or steam distillation. By use of GC-MS, 22 compounds in orange peel were separated and identified; the main compounds were limonene (72.1%), β-pinene (8.4%), and γ-terpinene (6.9%). This procedure is appropriate for the teaching laboratory, does not require any special microwave equipment, and enables the students to learn the skills of extraction, and chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis. They are also exposed to a dramatic visual example of rapid, sustainable, and green extraction of an essential oil, and are introduced to successful sustainable and green analytical chemistry. PMID:22526656

  12. Determination of lignin in marine sediment using alkaline cupric oxide oxidation-solid phase extraction-on-column derivatization-gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Li, Xianguo; Sun, Shuwen; Lan, Haiqing; Du, Peirui; Wang, Min

    2013-03-01

    Lignin serves as one of the most important molecular fossils for tracing Terrestrial Organic Matters (TOMs) in marine environment. Extraction and derivatization of lignin oxidation products (LOPs) are crucial for accurate quantification of lignin in marine sediment. Here we report a modification of the conventional alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation method, the modification consisting in a solid phase extraction (SPE) and a novel on-column derivatization being employed for better efficiency and reproducibility. In spiking blanks, recoveries with SPE for the LOPs are between 77.84% and 99.57% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 0.57% to 8.04% ( n=3), while those with traditional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are from 44.52% to 86.16% with RSDs being from 0.53% to 13.14% ( n=3). Moreover, the reproducibility is greatly improved with SPE, with less solvent consumption and shorter processing time. The average efficiency of on-column derivatization for LOPs is 100.8% ± 0.68%, which is significantly higher than those of in-vial or in-syringe derivatization, thus resulting in still less consumption of derivatizing reagents. Lignin in the surface sediments sampled from the south of Yangtze River estuary, China, was determined with the established method. Recoveries of 72.66% to 85.99% with standard deviation less than 0.01mg/10g dry weight are obtained except for p-hydroxyben-zaldehyde. The lignin content Σ8 (produced from 10 g dry sediment) in the research area is between 0.231 and 0.587 mg. S/V and C/V ratios (1.028 ± 0.433 and 0.192 ± 0.066, respectively) indicate that the TOMs in this region are originated from a mixture of woody and nonwoody angiosperm plants; the high values of (Ad/Al)v suggest that the TOMs has been highly degraded.

  13. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Smith, Steven G.; Fehlberg, Kevin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in natural-water samples using C-18 solid-phase extraction and determination by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the pesticides. The columns are dried using carbon dioxide or nitrogen gas, and adsorbed pesticides are removed from the columns by elution with 3.0 milliliters of hexane-isopropanol (3:1). Extracted pesticides are determined by capillary- column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 4 micrograms per liter (g/L) for most pesticides, with the exception of widely used corn herbicides--atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor--which have upper concentration limits of 20 g/L. Single- operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.001 to 0.018 g/L. Average short-term single-operator precision in reagent- water samples is 7 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 8 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. Mean recoveries in reagent-water samples are 73 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 83 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on the solid-phase extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time.

  14. Dual-column capillary microextraction (CME) combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the speciation of arsenic in human hair extracts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Hu, Bin

    2010-02-01

    In this work, dual-column capillary microextraction (CME) system consisting of N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AAPTS)-silica coated capillary (C1) and 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS)-silica coated capillary (C2) was developed for sequential separation/preconcentration of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] in the extracts of human hair followed by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) detection with iridium as permanent modifier. Various experimental parameters affecting the dual-column microextraction of different As species had been investigated in detail. It was found that at pH 9, As(V) and MMA could be quantitatively retained by C1 and only As(III) could be quantitatively retained by C2. With the aid of valve switching, As(V)/MMA(V) retained on C1 and As(III) retained on C2 could be sequentially desorbed by 10 microl of 0.01 mol l(-1) HNO(3) [for As(V)], 0.1 mol l(-1) HNO(3) [for MMA(V)] and 0.2 mol l(-1) HNO(3)-3% thiourea (m/v) [for As(III)], respectively, the eluents were immediately introduced into the Ir-coated graphite tubes for further ETV-ICP-MS detection. With two-step ETV pyrolysis program, Cl(-) in the sample matrix could be in situ removed, and the total As in the human hair extracts or digested solution could be interference-free, determined by ETV-ICP-MS. DMA(V) in the human hair extracts was obtained by subtraction of total As in the human hair extracts from other three As species. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (3 sigma) of the method were 3.9 pg ml(-1) for As(III), 2.7 pg ml(-1) for As(V), 2.6 pg ml(-1) for MMA(V) and 124 pg ml(-1) for total As with the relative standard deviations less than 7.0% (C = 0.1 ng ml(-1), n = 7), and the enrichment factor was 286, 262 and 260 for As(III), As(V) and MMA(V), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the speciation of arsenic in the extracts of human hair. PMID:19950110

  15. Optimal Extraction of Tropospheric Ozone Column by Simultaneous Use of OMI and TES Data and the Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasheri, M. R.; Shirazi, H.

    2015-12-01

    This article aims to increase the accuracy of Ozone data from tropospheric column (TOC) of the OMI and TES satellite instruments. To validate the estimated amount of satellite data, Ozonesonde data is used. The vertical resolution in both instruments in the tropospheric atmosphere decreases so that the degree of freedom signals (DOFS) on the average for TES is reduced to 2 and for OMI is reduced to1. But this decline in accuracy in estimation of tropospheric ozone is more obvious in urban areas so that estimated ozone in both instruments alone in non-urban areas show a high correlation with Ozonesonde. But in urban areas this correlation is significantly reduced, due to the ozone pre-structures and consequently an increase on surface-level ozone in urban areas. In order to improve the accuracy of satellite data, the average tropospheric ozone data from the two instruments were used. The aim is to increase the vertical resolution of ozone profile and the results clearly indicate an increase in correlations, but nevertheless the satellite data have a positive bias towards the earth data. To reduce the bias, with the solar flux and nitrogen dioxide values and surface temperatures are calculated as factors of ozone production on the earth's surface and formation of mathematical equations based on coefficients for each of the mentioned values and multiplication of these coefficients by satellite data and repeated comparison with the values of Ozonesonde, the results showed that bias in urban areas is greatly reduced.

  16. Electron stripping processes of H- ion beam in the 80 kV high voltage extraction column and low energy beam transport line at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganic, I. N.

    2016-02-01

    Basic vacuum calculations were performed for various operating conditions of the Los Alamos National Neutron Science H- Cockcroft-Walton (CW) injector and the Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS). The vacuum pressure was estimated for both the CW and ISTS at five different points: (1) inside the H- ion source, (2) in front of the Pierce electrode, (3) at the extraction electrode, (4) at the column electrode, and (5) at the ground electrode. A static vacuum analysis of residual gases and the working hydrogen gas was completed for the normal ion source working regime. Gas density and partial pressure were estimated for the injected hydrogen gas. The attenuation of H- beam current and generation of electron current in the high voltage acceleration columns and low energy beam transport lines were calculated. The interaction of H- ions on molecular hydrogen (H2) is discussed as a dominant collision process in describing electron stripping rates. These results are used to estimate the observed increase in the ratio of electrons to H- ion beam in the ISTS beam transport line.

  17. Electron stripping processes of H(-) ion beam in the 80 kV high voltage extraction column and low energy beam transport line at LANSCE.

    PubMed

    Draganic, I N

    2016-02-01

    Basic vacuum calculations were performed for various operating conditions of the Los Alamos National Neutron Science H(-) Cockcroft-Walton (CW) injector and the Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS). The vacuum pressure was estimated for both the CW and ISTS at five different points: (1) inside the H(-) ion source, (2) in front of the Pierce electrode, (3) at the extraction electrode, (4) at the column electrode, and (5) at the ground electrode. A static vacuum analysis of residual gases and the working hydrogen gas was completed for the normal ion source working regime. Gas density and partial pressure were estimated for the injected hydrogen gas. The attenuation of H(-) beam current and generation of electron current in the high voltage acceleration columns and low energy beam transport lines were calculated. The interaction of H(-) ions on molecular hydrogen (H2) is discussed as a dominant collision process in describing electron stripping rates. These results are used to estimate the observed increase in the ratio of electrons to H(-) ion beam in the ISTS beam transport line. PMID:26931993

  18. Solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixed bed adsorbent (acid activated montmorillonite-silica gel) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, N.; Mishra, Braja Gopal; Pareek, Pawan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    A novel approach has been developed for the solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) based on the adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixture of acid activated montmorillonite (AAM)-silica gel column. The effect of various parameters such as acidity, stability of the column, sample volume, interfering ions, etc., were studied in detail. The adsorbed complex could be easily eluted using polyethylene glycol-sulfuric acid mixture and the concentration of chromium has been determined using visible spectrophotometry. The calibration graph was linear in the range 0-1 ?g mL -1 chromium(VI) with a detection limit of 6 ?g L -1. A highest preconcentration factor of 25 could be obtained for 250 mL sample volume using glass wool as support for the mixed bed adsorbent. Chromium(VI) could be effectively separated from other ions such as nickel, copper, zinc, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, etc., and the method has been successfully applied to study the recovery of chromium in electroplating waste water and spiked water samples.

  19. Determination of the temperature dependence of water solubilities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a generator column-on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Reza, Joel; Trejo, Arturo; Vera-Avila, Luz Elena

    2002-06-01

    An improved dynamic coupled column liquid chromatographic (DCCLC) technique for determining water solubility data of hydrophobic compounds is presented. The technique is based on pumping water through a thermostated generator column in order to generate emulsion-free, saturated aqueous solutions of the compound under study. Through a switching valve system the solute in the aqueous solution is extracted and concentrated by an on-line solid-phase extraction process and subsequently eluted and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (fluorescence detection coupled to photodiode array detection). The improvements carried out to the original DCCLC technique have given rise to savings in time for the experimental work and increased sensitivity during the detection and quantification stage. Applicability of the method for studying highly hydrophobic substances is demonstrated by determining water solubility of anthracene and pyrene in the temperature range of 8.9-49.9 and 8.5-32.2 degrees C, respectively. The measured water solubilities are in good agreement with the best available literature data. The method has also been applied to the determination of water solubility of m-terphenyl, 9, 10-dihydrophenanthrene and guaiazulene, in the temperature range of 4.8-49.9, 4.8-25.0, and 4.5-29.9 degrees C, respectively. The uncertainty in the Sw values determined in this work ranged from 0.7% to 4.6%. The experimental water solubility data, as a function of temperature, are fitted to the equation In Sw = A + B/T; where Sw and T are given in mole fraction and Kelvin, respectively. PMID:12108700

  20. Extracting Oxygen from Lunar Simulant Using a Transparent Furnace Pulsed Fluidized Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oryshchyn, L.; Paz, A.; Lee, K.; Reddington, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the event that humans return to the moon, utilizing the local materials will be beneficial for extended stays. Rather than transporting resources, such as oxygen, from Earth, NASA is investigating methods of extracting it from lunar regolith. One promising process is hydrogen reduction. In the hydrogen reduction process, lunar regolith is heated to 1000 C in the presence of hydrogen. The iron oxide (Fe-O) bonds, found in lunar material, are broken and the hydrogen attracts the oxygen to produce water vapor [Allen et al., 1996]. FeO + H2 (right arrow) Fe +H2O. The water vapor is then captured, cleaned, and electrolyzed. The hydrogen is recycled back to the reduction process and the oxygen is stored until consumed by an end user (propulsion, life support, etc.). To obtain a good oxygen yield, the majority of lunar regolith must be exposed to the hydrogen gas and have a high rate of heat transfer from heat source to particle. This is achieved with good solids mixing via fluidization or mechanical agitation. In Generation II of the ROxygen program, the ROxygen Team at Johnson Space Center (JSC) investigated the feasibility of gas only pulsed fluidization as the only means to mix synthetic lunar regolith (simulant) at high temperatures. Fluidized beds have been used in industry to effectively process powders for decades. They consist of gas flowing upward through a bed of particles. The stirring action continuously moves the grains around to achieve uniform mixing of gas, solids, and heat [Geldart, 1986]. A transparent furnace unit was developed by Thoughventions Unlimited LLC (TvU) to aid in the qualitative observation of the fluidization behavior at high temperatures. Multipoint thermocouples and pressure sensors provided quantitative information regarding the quality of mixing. The water produced was measured using humidity sensors and captured using a NASA designed and built condenser. Once the simulant was processed, pneumatically transporting the 'hot' simulant out of the furnace was investigated.

  1. Development of an Automated Column Solid-Phase Extraction Cleanup of QuEChERS Extracts, Using a Zirconia-Based Sorbent, for Pesticide Residue Analyses by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Morris, Bruce D; Schriner, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    A new, automated, high-throughput, mini-column solid-phase extraction (c-SPE) cleanup method for QuEChERS extracts was developed, using a robotic X-Y-Z instrument autosampler, for analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables by LC-MS/MS. Removal of avocado matrix and recoveries of 263 pesticides and metabolites were studied, using various stationary phase mixtures, including zirconia-based sorbents, and elution with acetonitrile. These experiments allowed selection of a sorbent mixture consisting of zirconia, C18, and carbon-coated silica, that effectively retained avocado matrix but also retained 53 pesticides with <70% recoveries. Addition of MeOH to the elution solvent improved pesticide recoveries from zirconia, as did citrate ions in CEN QuEChERS extracts. Finally, formate buffer in acetonitrile/MeOH (1:1) was required to give >70% recoveries of all 263 pesticides. Analysis of avocado extracts by LC-Q-Orbitrap-MS showed that the method developed was removing >90% of di- and triacylglycerols. The method was validated for 269 pesticides (including homologues and metabolites) in avocado and citrus. Spike recoveries were within 70-120% and 20% RSD for 243 of these analytes in avocado and 254 in citrus, when calibrated against solvent-only standards, indicating effective matrix removal and minimal electrospray ionization suppression. PMID:25702899

  2. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Whole Water by Continuous Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 69 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on aquatic organisms in wastewater. This method also is useful for evaluating the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are indicators of wastewater or have endocrine-disrupting potential. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Wastewater compounds in whole-water samples were extracted using continuous liquid-liquid extractors and methylene chloride solvent, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 0.5 microgram per liter averaged 72 percent ? 8 percent relative standard deviation. The concentration of 21 compounds is always reported as estimated because method recovery was less than 60 percent, variability was greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation, or standard reference compounds were prepared from technical mixtures. Initial method detection limits averaged 0.18 microgram per liter. Samples were preserved by adding 60 grams of sodium chloride and stored at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory established a sample holding-time limit prior to sample extraction of 14 days from the date of collection.

  3. Extraction of pulse repetition intervals from sperm whale click trains for ocean acoustic data mining.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Serge; van der Schaar, Mike; Hougnigan, Ludwig; Andr, Michel

    2013-02-01

    The analysis of acoustic data from the ocean is a valuable tool to study free ranging cetaceans and anthropogenic noise. Due to the typically large volume of acquired data, there is a demand for automated analysis techniques. Many cetaceans produce acoustic pulses (echolocation clicks) with a pulse repetition interval (PRI) remaining nearly constant over several pulses. Analyzing these pulse trains is challenging because they are often interleaved. This article presents an algorithm that estimates a pulse's PRI with respect to neighboring pulses. It includes a deinterleaving step that operates via a spectral dissimilarity metric. The sperm whale (SW) produces trains with PRIs between 0.5 and 2 s. As a validation, the algorithm was used for the PRI-based identification of SW click trains with data from the NEMO-ONDE observatory that contained other pulsed sounds, mainly from ship propellers. Separation of files containing SW clicks with a medium and high signal to noise ratio from files containing other pulsed sounds gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.96. This study demonstrates that PRI can be used for the automated identification of SW clicks and that deinterleaving via spectral dissimilarity contributes to algorithm performance. PMID:23363108

  4. Multi-pulse extraction from Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring for radiographic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.; Neri, F.; Rust, K.; Redd, D.B.

    1997-08-01

    In Proton Radiography, one of the goals is a motion picture of a rapidly moving object. The Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) in its normal operating mode, delivers a single pulse approximately 120 ns wide (fwhm). In development runs at the PSR, the authors successfully demonstrated operation of a technique to deliver two pulses, each 40 nsec wide, with adjustable spacing.

  5. Digital microfluidics platform for interfacing solid-liquid extraction column with portable capillary electropherograph for analysis of soil amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gorbatsova, Jelena; Jaanus, Martin; Vaher, Merike; Kaljurand, Mihkel

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the concept of a field-portable analyzer is proposed that operates with milliliter amounts of solvents and samples. The need to develop such an analyzer is not only driven by specific extraterrestrial analysis but also, for example, by forensics applications where the amount of liquid that can be taken to the field is severely limited. The prototype of the proposed analyzer consists of a solid-liquid extractor, the output of which is connected to the micropump, which delivers droplets of extracts to digital microfluidic platform (DMFP). In this way, world-to-chip interfacing is established. Further, the sample droplets are transported to CE capillary inlet port, separated and detected via a contactless conductivity detector. Working buffers and other solvents needed to perform CE analysis are also delivered as droplets to the DMFP and transported through the CE capillary. The performance of the analyzer is demonstrated by analysis of amino acids in sand matrices. The recovery of the spiked amino acids from the inert sand sample was from 34 to 51% with analysis LOD from 0.2 to 0.6 ppm and migration time RSD from 0.2 to 6.0%. PMID:26426309

  6. Long pulse beam extraction with a prototype ion source for the KSTAR neutral beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Doo-Hee; Jeong, Seung Ho; Lee, Kwang-Won; In, Sang-Ryul; Yoon, Byung-Joo; Seo, Min-Seok; Jin, Jung-Tae; Kim, Bum-Ryul; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jung, Ki-Sok; Kim, Jinchoon; Kim, Tae-Seong; Bae, Young Soon

    2008-02-15

    Long pulse operational characteristics of the high current ion source for the KSTAR neutral beam system are described. The beam pulse length of 300 s was successfully operated at a beam power of 1.6 MW with a beam energy of 70 keV. Beam energy, beam current, beam divergence, arc power, and several other operational parameters were measured during a pulse to analyze the long pulse properties. The increase of the cooling water temperature of the accelerator grids and plasma generator components were measured by water flow calorimetric system using thermocouples. The temperature rises of the filament electrodes of the ion source and the G1 grids (plasma grids) of the accelerator turned out to be the critical factors of the long pulse operation in the current system.

  7. Multiresidue pesticide analysis of botanical dietary supplements using salt-out acetonitrile extraction, solid-phase extraction cleanup column, and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Douglas G; Wong, Jon W; Shi, Feng; Zhang, Kai; Lee, Nathaniel S; DiBenedetto, Alex L; Hengel, Mathew J

    2013-05-01

    Dietary supplements form an increasing part of the American diet, yet broadly applicable multiresidue pesticide methods have not been evaluated for many of these supplements. A method for the analysis of 310 pesticides, isomers, and pesticide metabolites in dried botanical dietary supplements has been developed and validated. Sample preparation involved acetonitrile:water added to the botanical along with anhydrous magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride for extraction, followed by cleanup with solid-phase extraction using a tandem cartridge consisting of graphitized carbon black (GCB) and primary-secondary amine sorbent (PSA). Pesticides were measured by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Accuracy and precision were evaluated through fortifications of 24 botanicals at 10, 25, 100, and 500 ?g/kg. Mean pesticide recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) for all botanicals were 97%, 91%, 90%, and 90% and 15%, 10%, 8%, and 6% at 10, 25, 100, and 500 ?g/kg, respectively. The method was applied to 21 incurred botanicals. Quinoxyfen was measured in hops (100-620 ?g/kg). Tetraconazole (48 ?g/kg), tetramethrin (15 ?g/kg), methamidophos (50 ?g/kg), and chlorpyrifos (93 ?g/kg) were measured in licorice, mallow, tea, and tribulus, respectively. Quintozene, its metabolites and contaminants (pentachloroaniline, pentachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, and pentachlorothioanisole and hexachlorobenzene and tecnazene, respectively), with hexachlorocyclohexanes and DDT were identified in ginseng sources along with azoxystrobin, diazinon, and dimethomorph between 0.7 and 2800 ?g/kg. Validation with these botanicals demonstrated the extent of this method's applicability for screening 310 pesticides in a wide array of botanical dietary supplements. PMID:23534560

  8. Comparison of Column Solid-Phase Extraction Procedures for Spectrophotometric Determination of E129 (Allura Red) in Foodstuff, Pharmaceutical, and Energy Drink Samples.

    PubMed

    Bi?gin, Abdullah Taner; Uan, Mustafa; Narin, ?brahim

    2015-01-01

    Two novel spectrophotometric determination procedures based on retention of Allura Red onto Amberlite XAD-1180 and XAD-16 resins for its preconcentration, purification, and separation were developed. Analytical parameters of the methods including pH, eluent type, sample volume, and sample and eluent flow rates, were investigated and optimized. Interference effects of some cations, anions, and widely used food dyes were also investigated. Detection limits of the two methods were found to be 1.2 and 1.5 ?g/L for XAD-1180 and XAD-16 columns, respectively, under optimum conditions. Linear calibration curve ranges of the methods were 0.4-8.0 and 0.5-6.0 ?g/mL of Allura Red for XAD-1180 and XAD-16 resins, respectively. Preconcentration factors were found as 80 for both the XAD-1180 and XAD-16 columns using maximum sample volume and minimum eluent volume. RSDs of the methods were below 6% throughout all experiments. All absorbance measurements were performed at 506 nm. Validations of the methods were performed comparatively with determination of the Allura Red contents of some foodstuff, pharmaceutical, and energy drink samples. Allura Red concentrations in investigated solid and liquid samples ranged from 298 to 501 ?g/g and 53.8 to 508 ?g/mL, respectively. Satisfactory results were obtained from the real samples analysis. Allura Red contents of samples were determined to be highly similar using the two extraction methods. Comparisons of the methods were performed by analysis of Allura Red contents of the real samples. In addition to analytical parameters, adsorption isotherm studies were performed for the two kinds of Amberlite resins. It was observed that developed methods fit the linear form of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. All of the experimental results suggested that the developed SPE procedures are suitable for separation, preconcentration, and determination of Allura Red in solid and liquid matrixes. PMID:26268977

  9. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound-assis...

  10. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound assis...

  11. A Comparative Study on the Effects of Millisecond- and Microsecond-Pulsed Electric Field Treatments on the Permeabilization and Extraction of Pigments from Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Elisa; Martnez, Juan Manuel; Coustets, Mathilde; lvarez, Ignacio; Teissi, Justin; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Raso, Javier

    2015-10-01

    The interdependencies of the two main processing parameters affecting "electroporation" (electric field strength and pulse duration) while using pulse duration in the range of milliseconds and microseconds on the permeabilization, inactivation, and extraction of pigments from Chlorella vulgaris was compared. While irreversible "electroporation" was observed above 4 kV/cm in the millisecond range, electric field strengths of ?10 kV/cm were required in the microseconds range. However, to cause the electroporation of most of the 90 % of the population of C. vulgaris in the millisecond (5 kV/cm, 20 pulses) or microsecond (15 kV/cm, 25 pulses) range, the specific energy that was delivered was lower for microsecond treatments (16.87 kJ/L) than in millisecond treatments (150 kJ/L). In terms of the specific energy required to cause microalgae inactivation, treatments in the microsecond range also resulted in greater energy efficiency. The comparison of extraction yields in the range of milliseconds (5 kV, 20 ms) and microseconds (20, 25 pulses) under the conditions in which the maximum extraction was observed revealed that the improvement in the carotenoid extraction was similar and chlorophyll a and b extraction was slightly higher for treatments in the microsecond range. The specific energy that was required for the treatment in the millisecond range (150 kJ/L) was much higher than those required in the microsecond range (30 kJ/L). The comparison of the efficacy of both types of pulses on the extraction enhancement just after the treatment and after a post-pulse incubation period seemed to indicate that PEF in the millisecond range created irreversible alterations while, in the microsecond range, the defects were a dynamic structure along the post-pulse time that caused a subsequent increment in the extraction yield. PMID:25819916

  12. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of semivolatile organic compounds in bottom sediment by solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatographic fractionation, and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, E.T.; Vaught, D.G.; Merten, L.M.; Foreman, W.T.; Gates, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the determination of 79 semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and 4 surrogate compounds in soils and bottom sediment is described. The SOCs are extracted from bottom sediment by solvent extraction, followed by partial isolation using high-performance gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The SOCs then are qualitatively identified and quantitative concentrations determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This method also is designed for an optional simultaneous isolation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) insecticides, including toxaphene. When OCs and PCBs are determined, an additional alumina- over-silica column chromatography step follows GPC cleanup, and quantitation is by dual capillary- column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC/ECD). Bottom-sediment samples are centrifuged to remove excess water and extracted overnight with dichloromethane. The extract is concentrated, centrifuged, and then filtered through a 0.2-micrometer polytetrafluoro-ethylene syringe filter. Two aliquots of the sample extract then are quantitatively injected onto two polystyrene- divinylbenzene GPC columns connected in series. The SOCs are eluted with dichloromethane, a fraction containing the SOCs is collected, and some coextracted interferences, including elemental sulfur, are separated and discarded. The SOC-containing GPC fraction then is analyzed by GC/MS. When desired, a second aliquot from GPC is further processed for OCs and PCBs by combined alumina-over-silica column chromatography. The two fractions produced in this cleanup then are analyzed by GC/ECD. This report fully describes and is limited to the determination of SOCs by GC/MS.

  13. Multisyringe flow injection system for solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography using monolithic column for screening of phenolic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Hugo M; Segundo, Marcela A; Lima, Jos L F C; Cerd, Victor

    2009-02-15

    In this work a fast, automatic solid-phase extraction procedure hyphenated to HPLC-UV is proposed for screening of priority phenolic pollutants in waters at ng mL(-1) levels. A flow through column, containing polystyrene-divinylbenzene sorbent, was incorporated to a multisyringe flow injection system (MSFIA), where the sample loading and analyte elution were carried out after computer control. The MSFIA system also directed the eluent to fill the injection loop of the chromatograph, coupling the sample preparation to its determination. High enrichment factors were attained for phenol and ten of its derivatives (mean value 176 for 50 mL of sample), with LOD values lower than 1 ng mL(-1) for the maximum volume of sample used (100mL). For all analytes, mean recoveries between 89 and 103% were obtained for different water matrices. Certified reference material and a contaminated soil (RTC-CRM 112) were also tested successfully. The determination frequency was 4-10h(-1), providing an automatic, fast and reliable tool for water quality and environmental monitoring. PMID:19084666

  14. Determination of copper, lead and iron in water and food samples after column solid phase extraction using 1-phenylthiosemicarbazide on Dowex Optipore L-493 resin.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ozden; Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    A novel solid phase extraction procedure for determination of copper, lead and iron in natural water and food samples has been established in the presented work. 1-Phenylthiosemicarbazide (1-PTSC) as ligand and Dowex Optipore L-493 resin as adsorbent were used in a mini chromatographic column. Various analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of analyte ions including pH, amounts of adsorbent, eluent, sample volume, etc. were investigated. The recovery values for analyte ions were higher than 95%. The determination of copper, lead and iron was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of some alkali, alkali earth and transition metals on the recoveries of analyte ions were investigated. The preconcentration factor was 62.5. The limit of detections of the understudied analytes (k=3, N=21) were 0.64 ?g L(-1) for copper, 0.55 ?g L(-1) for lead and 0.82 ?g L(-1) for iron. The relative standard deviation was found to be lower than 6%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with certified reference material (GBW 07605 Tea). The method was successively applied for the determination of copper, lead and iron in water and some food samples including cheese, bread, baby food, pekmez, honey, milk and red wine after microwave digestion. PMID:21111769

  15. Development and characterization of the ?3?4?5 nicotinic receptor cellular membrane affinity chromatography column and its application for on line screening of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, L; Okine, M; Rosenberg, A; Dossou, K S S; Toll, L; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2016-01-29

    The ?3?4?5 nAChR has been recently shown to be a useful target for smoking cessation pharmacotherapies. Herein, we report on the development and characterization of the ?3?4?5 nicotinic receptor column by frontal displacement chromatography. The binding affinity of the nicotine and minor alkaloids found in tobacco smoke condensates were determined for both the ?3?4 and ?3?4?5 nicotinic receptors. It was demonstrated that while no subtype selectivity was observed for nicotine and nornicotine, anabasine was selective for the ?3?4?5 nicotinic receptor. The non-competitive inhibitor binding site was also studied and it was demonstrated while mecamylamine was not selective between subtypes, buproprion showed subtype selectivity for the ?3?4 nicotinic receptor. The application of this methodology to complex mixtures was then carried out by screening aqueous-alcoholic solutions of targeted plant extracts, including Lycopodium clavatum L. (Lycopodiaceae) and Trigonella foenum graecum L. (Fabaceae) against both the ?3?4 and ?3?4?5 nAChRs. PMID:26774122

  16. Comprehensive characterization of Annonaceous acetogenins within a complex extract by HPLC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap using post-column lithium infusion.

    PubMed

    Le Ven, Jessica; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Lewin, Guy; Laprvote, Olivier; Brunelle, Alain; Touboul, David; Champy, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins (AAGs) are a homogenous class of polyketides proposed as environmental neurotoxins. Previous dereplication studies of AAGs were limited by the use of low-resolution mass spectrometers. Only poor information in terms of structures was provided due to the limited fragmentation of protonated or sodium cationized species. An innovative approach, using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap/orbitrap mass spectrometer (LTQ-Orbitrap), was therefore performed. Sensitivity was enhanced by post-column infusion of lithium, since AAGs have a high affinity for this cation. High level of structural information was obtained from low-energy-collision-induced dissociation fragmentation experiments of lithium-cationized AAGs ([M + Li](+) ions) as demonstrated with purified standards. The method was then applied to a total ethyl-acetate extract prepared from commercial soursop nectar (Annona muricata L.). The sensitivity, mass accuracy and specific fragmentation patterns proved to be particularly useful for characterization of the AAGs. Typical structural identification procedure and unexpected observations for specific structural types are illustrated, with major and minor compounds. PMID:23147829

  17. A Dual-Column Solid Phase Extraction Strategy for Online Collection and Preparation of Continuously Flowing Effluent Streams for Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Jeffrey R.; Marasco, Christina C.; Wikswo, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Current desalination techniques for mass spectrometry-based protocols are problematic for performing temporal response studies where increased temporal resolution requires small samples and faster sampling frequencies, which greatly increases the number of samples and sample preparation time. These challenges are pertinent to cellular dynamics experiments, where it is important to sample the biological system frequently and with as little sample waste as possible. To address these needs, we present a dual-column online solid phase extraction (SPE) approach capable of preconcentrating and preparing a constantly perfusing sample stream, with minimal to no sample loss. This strategy is evaluated for use in microfluidic bioreactor studies specifically aimed at characterizing suitable sample flow rates, temporal resolving power, and analyte concentrations. In this work we demonstrate that this strategy may be used for flow rates as low as 500 nL/min, with temporal resolving power on the order of 3 minutes, with analyte loadings ranging from fmol to pmol for metabolites. Under these conditions recoveries of ca. 80% are obtained even at fmol loadings. PMID:22967262

  18. Surfactant assisted pulsed two-phase electromembrane extraction followed by GC analysis for quantification of basic drugs in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Pegah; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Moazami, Hamid Reza; Nojavan, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a simple and efficient surfactant assisted pulsed two-phase electromembrane extraction (SA-PEME) procedure combined with gas chromatography (GC) has been developed for the determination of alfentanil, sufentanil and methadone in various samples. It has been found that the addition of anionic surfactant causes the accumulation of the cationic analytes at the SLM/solution interface resulting in an easier transfer of the analytes into the organic phase. The method was accomplished with 1-octanol as the acceptor phase and supported liquid membrane (SLM) by means of an 80 V pulsed electrical driving force and the extraction time of 20 min. The model analytes were extracted from 3.0 mL sample solution (pH 4.0) containing 0.02% w/v surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate). The duty cycle of 92% and frequency of 0.357 Hz gave the best performance. Extraction recoveries in the range of 70.5-95.2% and satisfactory repeatability (7.6

  19. Trace determination of lenalidomide in plasma by non-extractive HPLC procedures with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization with fluorescamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lenalidomide (LND) is a new potent drug used for treatment of multiple myeloma. For its pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic monitoring, a proper analytical method was required. Results In this study, a non extractive and simple pre-column derivatization procedures have been proposed, for the for trace determination of lenalidomide (LND) in human plasma by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Plasma samples were treated with acetonitrile for protein precipitation then treated with copper acetate to form stable complexes with the biogenic amines and mask their interference with the derivatization reaction of LND. Treated plasma samples containing LND was derivatized with fluorescamine (FLC) in aqueous media at ambient temperature. Separation of the derivatized LND was performed on Hypersil BDS C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm particle size) using a mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer (pH 4):methanol: tetrahydrofuran (70:10:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The derivatized samples were monitored at an emission wavelength of 495 nm after excitation at a wavelength of 382 nm. Under the optimum chromatographic conditions, a linear relationship with good correlation coefficient (r = 0.9997, n = 9) was found between the peak area and LND concentrations in the range of 2–100 ng/mL. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.8 and 2.30 ng/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-assay precisions were satisfactory and the accuracy of the method was proved. The recovery of LND from the spiked human plasma was 99.30 ± 2.88. Conclusions The proposed method had high throughput as the analysis involved simple sample pre-treatment procedure and a relatively short run-time (< 15 min). The results demonstrated that the method would have a great value when it is applied in the therapeutic monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies for LND. PMID:23497635

  20. In vitro gastric and intestinal digestions of pulsed light-treated shrimp extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel technology most commonly used for microbial inactivation, has recently been employed to effectively mitigate food allergens in peanuts, soybean, shrimp, and almond. Putative mechanisms for the efficacy of PUV in reducing allergen reactivity, include photother...

  1. Method of fast trace microanalysis of the chiral pesticides epoxiconazole and novaluron in soil samples using off-line flow-through extraction and on-column direct large volume injection in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rybr, Ivan; Gra, Robert; Hutta, Milan

    2007-12-01

    An analytical method combining off-line flow-through extraction of a soil micro-sample (mass around 100 mg, packed into a short HPLC glass column) and direct on-column large-volume injection (LVI up to 1.00 mL) of a methanol-water soil extract onto a conventional C18 RP HPLC column enabled fast (within 3.5 minutes) trace micro-analysis of the relatively new chiral pesticides epoxiconazole (E) and novaluron (N), respectively. Linear calibration curves were evaluated from UV detection (230 nm) data in the range from 0.1 to 5 mg/kg in three most abundant Slovak agricultural soils. LOD (confidence band) at the levels 0.08-0.11 mg/kg and LOQ 0.4-0.6 mg/kg and LOD (S/N = 3) at the levels 0.007-0.018 mg/kg and LOQ (S/N = 10) 0.024-0.060 mg/kg, respectively, of dry soil were achieved. Recovery of pesticides in the overall LVI method including flow-through 130-200 mg soil micro-sample extraction was: for epoxiconazole from 74 to 85% and from 56% to 90% for novaluron with reproducibility within +/- 6% RSD. This fast (30 min) and simple method consists of just three steps which are short column filling with a solid micro-sample; flow-through liquid extraction and direct large-volume injection RP HPLC DAD analysis. The method is prepared for automation and further analysis of enantiomers of both investigated pesticides by achiral-chiral column switching techniques. PMID:18027358

  2. Application of a semi-automated 96-well format solid-phase extraction, column-switching, fluorescence detection protocol for the determination of alendronate in human urine samples obtained from a bioequivalence study.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, Constantinos; Dotsikas, Yannis; Kousoulos, Constantinos; Tsatsou, Georgia; Colocouri, Filomila; Soumelas, Georgios-Stefanos; Loukas, Yannis L

    2007-02-19

    In the current study, a semi-automated, 96-well format, solid-phase extraction (SPE), analytical column-switching method for alendronate determination in human urine is developed, validated and applied to a bioequivalence study. The current protocol was a substantial improvement of an existing classical method. A robotic liquid handling system was employed to simplify and reduce the time of sample preparation procedure. Automated SPE was carried out using a 96-well cartridge plate and a vacuum control system. Urine samples were determined by applying a column-switching protocol with fluorescence detection. Analysis time, due to the column-switching procedure, was about half of the conventional LC approach (11.5 min instead of 21 min). The method application required the determination of alendronate in urine samples obtained from 96 healthy volunteers as part of a bioequivalence study of two 70 mg alendronate sodium tablets. All major pharmacokinetic parameters of the bioequivalence study were estimated and reported. PMID:17045443

  3. High-Frequency, Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Alveolar Bone Healing of Extraction Sockets in Rats: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Lhi; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Joon Bong; Heo, Jung Sun; Choi, Yumi

    2016-02-01

    Most studies of the beneficial effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on bone healing have used frequencies between 1.0 and 1.5 MHz. However, after consideration of ultrasound wave characteristics and depth of target tissue, higher-frequency LIPUS may have been more effective on superficially positioned alveolar bone. We investigated this hypothesis by applying LIPUS (frequency, 3.0 MHz; intensity, 30 mW/cm(2)) on shaved right cheeks over alveolar bones of tooth extraction sockets in rats for 10 min/d for 2 wk after tooth extraction; the control group (left cheek of the same rats) did not receive LIPUS treatment. Compared with the control group, the LIPUS group manifested more new bone growth inside the sockets on histomorphometric analysis (maximal difference = 2.5-fold on the seventh day after extraction) and higher expressions of osteogenesis-related mRNAs and proteins than the control group did. These findings indicate that 3.0-MHz LIPUS could enhance alveolar bone formation and calcification in rats. PMID:26653935

  4. Extraction assisted by pulsed electric energy as a potential tool for green and sustainable recovery of nutritionally valuable compounds from mango peels.

    PubMed

    Parniakov, Oleksii; Barba, Francisco J; Grimi, Nabil; Lebovka, Nikolai; Vorobiev, Eugene

    2016-02-01

    The study compares the efficiency of conventional aqueous extraction at different temperatures (20-60 °C) and pH (2.5-11) and extraction assisted by pulsed electric energy (pulsed electric fields, PEF or high voltage electrical discharges, HVED) of nutritionally valuable compounds found in mango peels. Exponential decay pulses with initial electric field strengths of ≈ 13.3 kV/cm and ≈ 40 kV/cm for PEF and HVED treatments were used, respectively. The impact of temperature on aqueous extraction of proteins and carbohydrates was not significant. The highest values of nutritionally valuable and antioxidant compounds (7.5mM TE) were obtained for aqueous extraction (T = 60 °C, pH 6) but extracts were unstable and cloudy. The application of two-stage procedure PEF+supplementary aqueous extraction (+SE) that include PEF-assisted extraction as the first step, and +SE at 50 °C, pH 6 during 3h as the second step, allowed a noticeable enhancement of the yields of TPC (+400%) even at normal pH. PMID:26304419

  5. Determination of co-administrated opioids and benzodiazepines in urine using column-switching solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lingjuan; Wang, Rong; Liang, Chen; Teng, Xiaomei; Jiang, Fengli; Zeng, Libo; Ye, Haiying; Ni, Chunfang; Yuan, Xiaoliang; Rao, Yulan; Zhang, Yurong

    2015-05-22

    Co-administration of opioids with benzodiazepines is very common around the world. A semi-automated method was developed for the determination of four opioids and two benzodiazepines as well as their metabolites (including glucuronide metabolites) in human urine, based on on-line column-switching-solid-phase extraction (CS-SPE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The CS-SPE was performed by loading 200μL of urine sample to an Oasis HLB cartridge. Detection was achieved using a LC-MS/MS system equipped with an electrospray ionization source (ESI). For unequivocal identification and confirmation, two selected reaction monitoring transitions were registered for each compound, and no co-elution of interferences was observed at the expected retention time. Significant ion suppressions were observed for most analytes during chromatographic runs, but isotope-labeled internal standards (ISs) were used and found to be useful to compensate for the determination error caused by the matrix effect. The assay's linearity ranged from 1-20ng/mL to 800-1000ng/mL for 23 compounds, except for lorazepam (LOR), whose linearity was in the range of 1-100ng/mL. This method showed to be precise and accurate. The relative standard deviation (RSD) % values of within-run precision, between-run precision and total precision were not greater than 10.4% (n=3), 12.9% (n=5) and 15.1% (n=15), respectively. Accuracy values were in the range of 87.5-110%. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.2ng/mL to 5ng/mL, and limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 1ng/mL to 20ng/mL. The method was applied to the assay of 12 samples from forensic cases, which exemplified the co-administration of benzodiazepines (BZDs) by some heroin abusers. This method was of high sensitivity, selectivity and reliability, minimum sample manipulation, semi-automation, and fairly high throughput (analysis time per sample was 20min). The method developed will be useful for the detection of co-administrated drugs and the study of the interactions of BDZs with opioids. PMID:25888098

  6. Quantification of endogenous brassinosteroids in plant by on-line two-dimensional microscale solid phase extraction-on column derivatization coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wu, Dapeng; Shen, Zheng; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2013-07-01

    An on-line two-dimensional microscale solid phase extraction (2D?SPE)-on column derivatization (OCD)-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for quantification of brassinosteroids (BRs) in plant tissues. Five BRs with widest distribution in plant species and high bioactivity (24-epibrassinolide, 24-epicastasterone, 6-deoxo-24-epicastasterone, teasterone and typhastero) were selected as target analytes. 2D?SPE column packed sequentially with phenyl boronic acid silica sorbent (the first dimension) and C18 silica sorbent (the second dimension) was used to selectively extract and enrich BRs by 110-146 times. OCD was carried out on the second dimension of 2D?SPE column with m-aminophenylboronic acid (m-APBA) as a derivatization reagent, enhancing the sensitivity of MS/MS to BRs by 13-8437 times. It was also found that pre-trap of derivatization reagent on the C18 section of 2D?SPE column could increase reaction efficiency by 3-10 times. The whole process time of the on-line system was less than 30min. The detection limits of the method for five BRs were between 1.4 and 6.6pg with RSDs less than 10%. Endogeneous BRs in tomato leaves were analyzed by using this method. Owing to the high selectivity of this on-line 2D?SPE system, BRs in plant extracts could be quantified using matrix-free standard calibration method with relative recoveries in the range of 80-124%. PMID:23702098

  7. Pulsed electromembrane extraction for analysis of derivatized amino acids: A powerful technique for determination of animal source of gelatin samples.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Aghaei, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation of animal sources of gelatin is required for many reasons such as some anxieties about bovine spongiform encephalopathy or a ban on consuming porcine gelatin in some religions. In the present work, an efficient method is introduced for determination of animal origin of gelatin samples. The basis of this procedure is the application of pulsed electric field for extraction, preconcentration, and analysis of derivatized amino acids in gelatin. To this end, after derivatization of amino acids of interest by means of o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) for enhancing their ultraviolet (UV) absorbance as well as increasing their lipophilicities, a 137V electric field was applied for 20min with 10min(-1) frequency to make the analytes migrate through a 200µm organic liquid membrane into an aqueous acceptor phase. Finally, the acceptor phase was analyzed by HPLC-UV. The proposed technique offered a high efficiency for analysis of amino acids, regarding 43% and 79% as extraction recoveries and 25ng mL(-1) and 50ng mL(-1) as limits of detection (LODs) for asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Therefore, due to sample cleanup ability of the proposed method and obtained preconcentration factors (29 and 53 for asparagine and glutamine, respectively), it could be carried out for differentiation of animal origins of gelatin samples, even if only small amounts of samples are available or in complicated media of foodstuffs and medicament. PMID:25703002

  8. Olive oil pilot-production assisted by pulsed electric field: impact on extraction yield, chemical parameters and sensory properties.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Eduardo; Martínez de Marañón, Iñigo

    2015-01-15

    The impact of the use of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology on Arroniz olive oil production in terms of extraction yield and chemical and sensory quality has been studied at pilot scale in an industrial oil mill. The application of a PEF treatment (2 kV/cm; 11.25 kJ/kg) to the olive paste significantly increased the extraction yield by 13.3%, with respect to a control. Furthermore, olive oil obtained by PEF showed total phenolic content, total phytosterols and total tocopherols significantly higher than control (11.5%, 9.9% and 15.0%, respectively). The use of PEF had no negative effects on general chemical and sensory characteristics of the olive oil, maintaining the highest quality according to EU legal standards (EVOO; extra virgin olive oil). Therefore, PEF could be an appropriate technology to improve olive oil yield and produce EVOO enriched in human-health-related compounds, such as polyphenols, phytosterols and tocopherols. PMID:25149017

  9. Simultaneous determination of glucose, D-gluconic, 2-keto-D-gluconic and 5-keto-D-gluconic acids by ion chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection with column-switching technique.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zuoyi; Xi, Lingling; Subhani, Qamar; Huang, Zhongping; Zhu, Yan

    2013-09-15

    A simple ion chromatographic (IC) method for simultaneous determination of glucose, D-gluconic acid (DGA), 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2-KDG) and 5-keto D-gluconic acid (5-KDG) was proposed, with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) and column-switching technique. Using this technique, the four compounds were detected simultaneously in a short time with strongly retained compounds (2-KDG and 5-KDG) eluted out prior to weakly retained compounds (glucose and DGA). Under the optimized conditions, the method showed good linearity in the range of 0.01-20 mg L(-1) with determination coefficients (R(2))? 99.84%. Low detection limits (LODs) in the range of 0.87-2.59 ?g L(-1) and good repeatability (RSD<3%, n=6) were obtained. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of the four compounds in the fermentation broth, in which Gluconobacter oxydans was used to produce gluconic acids from glucose. PMID:23708631

  10. Method of analysis of a selected group of pyrethroids in soil samples using off-line flow-through extraction and on-column direct large-volume injection in reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chalnyov, Mria; Paulechov, Martina; Hutta, Milan

    2006-09-01

    An analytical method using flow-through extraction of a soil sample filled in a short HPLC column with methanol or methanol-water mixtures and large-volume injection in RP-HPLC has been developed for the simultaneous determination of residues of three pyrethroids--kadethrin, cypermethrin, and permethrin--from soil samples. The developed RP-HPLC method enables separation of four diastereoisomers of cypermethrin into three peaks and resolution of two diastereoisomers of permethrin. The UV photometric detection limits of direct on-column large-volume injection of 1.00 mL of extract were 30 ng/mL of kadethrin, 37 ng/mL of total content of cypermethrin, and 65 ng/mL of trans-permethrin, which corresponds to a pyrethroid soil content of around 0.3 mg/kg. Effects of extractant flow rate and optimal extractant volume on the percentage recovery of pyrethroids from Slovak soil samples were studied. Recovery studies were performed at 0.5- 5.0 microg/g fortification level of kadethrin and 1.0-2.5 microg/g fortification level of cypermethrin and permethrin in a soil sample. Recoveries ranged from 83 to 90% for kadethrin, from 87 to 94% for total cypermethrin, and from 85 to 98% for trans-permethrin. This work comprises a basic study aimed at elaboration of an RP-HPLC method of direct analysis of pyrethroids in a soil matrix at low concentration levels achieved by a "solid sample injection" in HPLC--on-line interfacing of analyte extraction, extract clean-up, and analysis. PMID:17069244

  11. Development of an immunoaffinity column method using broad-specificity monoclonal antibodies for simultaneous extraction and cleanup of quinolone and sulfonamide antibiotics in animal muscle tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a novel mixed-bed immunoaffinity column (IAC) method. The IAC was produced by coupling anti-fluoroquinolone and anti-sulfonamide broad-specificity monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) to Sepharose 4B for simultaneously isolating 13 fluoroquinolones (FQs) and 6 sulfonamides (SAs) from s...

  12. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - determination of organonitrogen herbicides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Wydoski, Duane S.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Zamboni, Jana L.; Foreman, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the isolation of organonitrogen herbicides from natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction cartridges containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to remove the herbicides. The cartridges are dried using carbon dioxide, and adsorbed herbicides are removed from the cartridges by elution with 1.8 milliliters of hexaneisopropanol (3:1). Extracts of the eluants are analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of at least three characteristic ions. The method detection limits are dependent on sample matrix and each particular herbicide. The method detection limits, based on a 100-milliliter sample size, range from 0.02 to 0.25 microgram per liter. Recoveries averaged 80 to 115 percent for the 23 herbicides and 2 metabolites in 1 reagent-water and 2 natural-water samples fortified at levels of 0.2 and 2.0 micrograms per liter.

  13. Deparaffinization and lysis by hydrothermal pressure (pressure cooking) coupled with chaotropic salt column purification: a rapid and efficient method of DNA extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Haohao; Liu, Yan; Talmor, Monica; Wu, Bingquan; Hui, Pei

    2013-03-01

    We report a hydrothermal pressure method (pressure cooking) for simultaneous deparaffinization and lysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue followed by conventional chaotropic salt column purification to obtain high-quality DNA. Using this method, the release of DNA occurred within the first minute of treatment, reaching the maximum at 5 minutes. An optimal treatment window was between 5 and 30 minutes. The extracted DNA was of high quality as determined by the 260/280 absorbance ratios, and the quantity of DNA extracted was linear with the input tissue amount. In paired sample experiments (N=19), the quantity of DNA extracted by hydrothermal pressure treatment was comparable to that obtained through the conventional xylene deparaffinization and protease K digestion method. The integrity of the recovered DNA was also comparable, evidenced by polymerase chain reaction amplifications of variable-sized amplicons in tissue samples archived from 0.2 to 22 years (N=14). The high quality of DNA was further confirmed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and Sanger sequencing analysis of representative exons of the EGFR gene in human non-small cell lung cancer tissue samples. In summary, this novel method offers DNA release from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue with unprecedented simplicity, speed, biohazard safety, and cost-efficiency. Combined with chaotropic salt column purification, high-quality DNA can be prepared for downstream applications in <30 minutes. PMID:23370427

  14. Virus movement in soil columns flooded with secondary sewage effluent.

    PubMed Central

    Lance, J C; Gerba, C P; Melnick, J L

    1976-01-01

    Secondary sewage effluent containing about 3 X 10(4) plaque-forming units of polio virus type 1 (LSc) per ml was passed through columns 250 cm in length packed with calcareous sand from an area in the Salt River bed used for ground-water recharge of secondary sewage effluent. Viruses were not detected in 1-ml samples extracted from the columns below the 160-cm level. However, viruses were detected in 5 of 43 100-ml samples of the column drainage water. Most of the viruses were adsorbed in the top 5 cm of soil. Virus removal was not affected by the infiltration rate, which varied between 15 and 55 cm/day. Flooding a column continuosly for 27 days with the sewage water virus mixture did not saturate the top few centimeters of soil with viruses and did not seem to affect virus movement. Flooding with deionized water caused virus desorption from the soil and increased their movement through the columns. Adding CaCl2 to the deionized water prevented most of the virus desorption. Adding a pulse of deionized water followed by sewage water started a virus front moving through the columns, but the viruses were readsorbed and none was detected in outflow samples. Drying the soil for 1 day between applying the virus and flooding with deionized water greatly reduced desorption, and drying for 5 days prevented desorption. Large reductions (99.99% or more) of virus would be expected after passage of secondary sewage effluent through 250 cm of the calcareous sand similar to that used in our laboratory columns unless heavy rains fell within 1 day after the application of sewage stopped. Such virus movement could be minimized by the proper management of flooding and drying cycles. PMID:185960

  15. Continuous biosorption of Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd in fixed-bed column using algae Gelidium and granulated agar extraction algal waste.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Loureiro, José M; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-06-15

    Continuous metal ions biosorption from Pb/Cu and Pb/Cd solutions onto seaweed Gelidium sesquipedale and a composite material prepared from an industrial algal waste was performed in a packed bed column. A binary Langmuir equation describes well the equilibrium data and indicates a good adsorption capacity. In the sorption process, Cd and Cu break through the column faster than Pb due to its lower affinity for the biosorbent. An overshoot in the outlet Cd concentration was observed and explained by competitive adsorption between Pb and Cd, whereby the higher Pb affinity for the biosorbent displaces bound Cd ions. A small overshoot happens for Cu adsorption in the presence of Pb ions. Desorption using 0.1 M HNO3 as eluant, was 100% effective. A mass transfer model for the adsorption and desorption processes, considering an external and intraparticle film resistance, adequately simulates the column performance. A binary Langmuir equation was used to describe equilibrium for the saturation process and a mass action law for the desorption process. Elution process is defined as an ion exchange mechanism, between protons and metal ions. PMID:18162305

  16. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  17. Batch and fixed-bed column studies for biosorption of Zn(II) ions onto pongamia oil cake (Pongamia pinnata) from biodiesel oil extraction.

    PubMed

    Shanmugaprakash, M; Sivakumar, V

    2015-12-01

    The present work, analyzes the potential of defatted pongamia oil cake (DPOC) for the biosorption of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions in the both batch and column mode. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the optimal pH, effect of adsorbent dosage, initial Zn(II) ions concentration and contact time. The biosorption equilibrium and kinetics data for Zn(II) ions onto the DPOC were studied in detail, using several models, among all it was found to be that, Freundlich and the second-order model explained the equilibrium data well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters had shown that the biosorption of Zn(II) ions was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Batch desorption studies showed that the maximum Zn(II) recovery occurred, using 0.1M EDTA. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) and the Thomas model was successfully employed to evaluate the model parameters in the column mode. The results indicated that the DPOC can be applied as an effective and eco-friendly biosorbent for the removal of Zn(II) ions in polluted wastewater. PMID:26366934

  18. A Novel Reduplicate Strategy for Tracing Hemostatic Compounds from Heating Products of the Flavonoid Extract in Platycladi cacumen by Spectrum-Effect Relationships and Column Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yeqing; Yu, Hongli; Wu, Hao; Pan, Yaozong; Wang, Kuilong; Liu, Liping; Jin, Yangping; Zhang, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Platycladi cacumen and its processed product have been utilized as a Chinese medicine to treat hemorrhages. In this study, the base peak chromatogram fingerprints of heating products of total flavonoids in Platycladi cacumen were established by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS/MS), and the hemostatic activities were studied by hemostatic screening tests in vivo. The spectrum-effect relationships between fingerprints and hemostatic activities were analyzed by using canonical correlation analysis to trace the peaks responsible for the significant hemostatic effects. Peak 10 and peak 12 were correlated most closely, thus probably being the main hemostatic compounds. To confirm the reliability of this strategy, the targeted unknown peak was obtained by bioactivity-guided isolation, characterized by MS, H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, and 2D-NMR spectroscopies, and referred to as cecarbon as a new compound. In addition, the isolated compound exhibited hemostatic effect in a dose-dependent manner with different potencies in vitro and existed in Platycladi cacumen Carbonisatus. A novel dereplication strategy was employed to trace and identify the active compounds of other herbs that have bioactivity enhancement after processing using spectrum-effect relationships and column chromatography. PMID:26393545

  19. KrF laser fusion: perform optical systems study of direct short pulse extraction. Final technical report, 26 June 1978-14 March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, Jr, R S; Betts, J A; Aprahamian, R; Livingston, P M

    1981-03-01

    KrF is a prime candidate for a laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) driver, however, there are still scaling issues to be addressed. The purpose of this program is to determine KrF performance in a regime of ICF interest both experimentally and analytically. Using a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) configuration, 100J has been obtained from a five liter optical volume KrF amplifier pumped at 300 KW/cm/sup 3/ peak at the end of a 500 nsec pulse. A normalized input flux of 0.4 was required to reduce amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) to one half the free running value. A peak extraction efficiency of 0.46 was obtained under these conditions at 1 atm total pressure. The TRW kinetics model has been refined to give excellent agreement with high and low pump regimes. An integrated kinetics and pulse propagation code has also been developed and agrees well with experiment.

  20. Methods of analysis and quality-assurance practices of the U.S. Geological Survey organic laboratory, Sacramento, California; determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical method and quality-assurance practices were developed for a study of the fate and transport of pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin River. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended parti- culate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide, and the pesticides were eluted with three 2-milliliter aliquots of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1). The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for analytes determined per 1,500-milliliter samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.047 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 89 percent for 12 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.05 and 0.26 microgram per liter. The method was modified to improve the pesticide recovery by reducing the sample volume to 1,000 milliliters. Internal standards were added to improve quantitative precision and accuracy. The analysis also was expanded to include a total of 21 pesticides. The method detection limits for 1,000-milliliter samples ranged from 0.022 to 0.129 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 38 to 128 percent for 21 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.10 and 0.75 microgram per liter.

  1. Selective extraction and analysis of catecholamines in rat blood microdialysate by polymeric ionic liquid-diphenylboric acid-packed capillary column and fast separation in high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinguang; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-08-28

    Concentration of blood catecholamines (CAs) is linked to a host of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension and stenocardia. The matrix interferences and low concentration require tedious sample pretreatment methods before quantitative analysis by the gold standard method of high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD). Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been widely used as the pretreatment technique. Here, a facile polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-diphenylboric acid (DPBA)-packed capillary column was prepared to selectively extract dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NE) and epinephrine (E) prior to their quantitative analysis by a fast separation in HPLC-ECD method, while microdialysis sampling method was applied to get the analysis sample. Parameters that influenced desorption efficiency, such as pH, salt concentration, acetonitrile content and wash time, were examined and optimized. The proposed method, combining microdialysis sampling technique, SPE and HPLC-ECD system, was successfully applied to detect CAs in rat blood microdialysate with high sensitivity and selectivity in small sample volumes (5-40?l) and a short analysis time (8min), yielding good reproducibility (RSD 6.5-7.7%) and spiked recovery (91-104.4%). PMID:26206631

  2. Analysis of protein phosphorylation by monolithic extraction columns based on poly(divinylbenzene) containing embedded titanium dioxide and zirconium dioxide nano-powders.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Matthias; Sonderegger, Harald; Bakry, Rania; Huck, Christian W; Morandell, Sandra; Huber, Lukas A; Gjerde, Douglas T; Bonn, Gnther K

    2008-11-01

    The potential of an organic monolith with incorporated titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2)) nanoparticles was evaluated for the selective enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from tryptic digests. A pipette tip was fitted with a monolith based on divinylbenzene (DVB) of highly porous structure, which allows sample to pass through the monolithic bed. The enrichment of phosphopeptides was enhanced by increasing the pipetting cycles during the sample preparation and a higher recovery could be achieved with adequate buffer systems. A complete automated process was developed for enrichment of phosphopeptides leading to high reproducibility and resulting in a robust method designed to minimize analytical variance while providing high sensitivity at high sample throughput. The effect of particle size on the selectivity of phosphopeptides was investigated by comparative studies with nano- and microscale TiO(2) and ZrO(2) powders. Eleven phosphopeptides from alpha-casein digest could be recovered by an optimized mixture of microscale TiO(2)/ZrO(2) particles, whereas nine additional phosphopeptides could be retained by the same mixture of nano-structured material. When compared to conventional immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and commercial phosphorylation-enrichment kits, higher selectivity was observed in case of self fabricated tips. About 20 phosphopeptides could be retained from alpha-casein and five from beta-casein digests by using TiO(2) and ZrO(2) based extraction tips. Further selectivity for phosphopeptides was demonstrated by enriching a digest of in vitro phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 (ERK1). Two phosphorylated peptides of ERK1 could be identified by MALDI-MS/MS measurements and a following MASCOT database search. PMID:18837466

  3. Analysis of protein phosphorylation by monolithic extraction columns based on poly(divinylbenzene) containing embedded titanium dioxide and zirconium dioxide nano-powders.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Rainer M; Sonderegger H; Bakry R; Huck CW; Morandell S; Huber LA; Gjerde DT; Bonn GK

    2008-11-01

    The potential of an organic monolith with incorporated titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2)) nanoparticles was evaluated for the selective enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from tryptic digests. A pipette tip was fitted with a monolith based on divinylbenzene (DVB) of highly porous structure, which allows sample to pass through the monolithic bed. The enrichment of phosphopeptides was enhanced by increasing the pipetting cycles during the sample preparation and a higher recovery could be achieved with adequate buffer systems. A complete automated process was developed for enrichment of phosphopeptides leading to high reproducibility and resulting in a robust method designed to minimize analytical variance while providing high sensitivity at high sample throughput. The effect of particle size on the selectivity of phosphopeptides was investigated by comparative studies with nano- and microscale TiO(2) and ZrO(2) powders. Eleven phosphopeptides from alpha-casein digest could be recovered by an optimized mixture of microscale TiO(2)/ZrO(2) particles, whereas nine additional phosphopeptides could be retained by the same mixture of nano-structured material. When compared to conventional immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and commercial phosphorylation-enrichment kits, higher selectivity was observed in case of self fabricated tips. About 20 phosphopeptides could be retained from alpha-casein and five from beta-casein digests by using TiO(2) and ZrO(2) based extraction tips. Further selectivity for phosphopeptides was demonstrated by enriching a digest of in vitro phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 (ERK1). Two phosphorylated peptides of ERK1 could be identified by MALDI-MS/MS measurements and a following MASCOT database search.

  4. Application of pulsed electric field in the production of juice and extraction of bioactive compounds from blueberry fruits and their by-products.

    PubMed

    Bobinait?, Ramun?; Pataro, Gianpiero; Lamanauskas, Nerijus; atkauskas, Saulius; Vikelis, Pranas; Ferrari, Giovanna

    2015-09-01

    The influence of Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) pre-treatment of blueberry fruits (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), both on the extraction yield and antioxidant properties of juice obtained by pressing and on the on the recovery of bioactive compounds from berry by-products (press cake) by extraction with solvent, was investigated. PEF treatments carried out at field strengths of 1, 3, and 5kV/cm and an energy input of 10kJ/kg achieved a cell disintegration index (Z p ) of 0.70, 0.80, and 0.87, respectively. Mechanical pressing (1.32bar for 8min) of PEF-treated berries (1, 3, and 5kV/cm at 10kJ/kg) significantly increased the juice yield (+28%) compared with the untreated sample. The juice obtained from PEF pre-treated berries also had a significantly higher total phenolic content (+43%), total anthocyanin content (+60%) and antioxidant activity (+31%). However, PEF treatment intensity higher than 1kV/cm did not significantly improve the quantitative or qualitative characteristics of the juice. Compared to the untreated sample, higher amounts of total phenolics (+63%), total athocyanins (+78%) and antioxidant activity (+65%) were detected in the press cake extracts. PEF treatment of higher intensity resulted in better extractability of bioactive compounds from blueberry press cake. The results obtained from this study demonstrate the potential of PEF as a mild pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of the industrial processing of berry fruits. PMID:26345006

  5. Determination of N-nitrosodiethanolamine, NDELA in cosmetic ingredients and products by mixed mode solid phase extraction and UPLC-tandem mass spectrometry with porous graphitic carbon column through systemic sample pre-cleanup procedure.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyung-Mi; Shin, Mi-Sook; Jung, Ji-hee; Kim, Boo-Min; Lee, John-Whan; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-05-01

    A rapid, sensitive, accurate and specific ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the detection of N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA), a highly toxic contaminant in cosmetic raw materials and products was developed and validated. Systematized sample preparation steps were developed according to product types. Various SPE cartridges and columns were examined to establish the condition of SPE and chromatographic separation for NDELA. Sample cleanup steps consisting of solvent and liquid-liquid extraction tailored to the various sample matrix types were established prior to mixed mode SPE (Bond Elut AccuCAT). Chromatographic separation was achieved within 7 min on a porous graphitic carbon (PGC) column using a gradient elution with the mobile phase of 1mM ammonium acetate containing 0.1% acetic acid and methanol. NDELA was monitored using an electrospray positive ionization mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode (m/z 134.9>103.7(quantifier) and 73.7(qualifier ion)) with d8-NDELA (m/z 143.1>111.0) as internal standard. The standard curves were linear over the concentration range of 1-100 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 10 and 20 ?g/kg, respectively (0.5 and 1 ng/mL in standard solution). The intra- and inter-day precisions were estimated to be below 11.1% and accuracies were within the range of 90.8-115.8%. The validated method was successfully applied to the analysis of real samples including raw materials, skin care, make-up, shampoos and hair products. PMID:25770613

  6. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Krasik, Yakov E.; Hadas, Yoav; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2014-05-07

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  7. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Hadas, Yoav; Schamiloglu, Edl; Krasik, Yakov E.

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  8. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,

  9. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Wastewater Compounds by Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Barber, Larry B.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of 67 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater on aquatic organisms. This method also may be useful for evaluating the impact of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are an indicator of wastewater or that have been chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted with dichloromethane-diethyl ether (4:1) and determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 4 micrograms per liter averaged 74 percent ? 7 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds (excluding hormones and sterols) averaged 0.15 microgram per liter. Samples are preserved by filtration, the addition of 60 grams NaCl, and storage at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory has established a sample-holding time (prior to sample extraction) of 14 days from the date of sample collection until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of these sample-preservation procedures.

  10. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in whole water by continuous liquid-liquid extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 organophosphate pesticide degradates from natural-water samples is described. Compounds are extracted from water samples with methylene chloride using a continuous liquid-liquid extractor for 6 hours. The solvent is evaporated using heat and a flow of nitrogen to a volume of 1 milliliter and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. Extracted compounds are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator derived method detection limits in three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.009 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds in three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of most method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 54 to 137 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 109 percent for all pesticides. Recoveries in reagent-water samples ranged from 42 to 104 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had variable recovery in all three matrices ranging from 27 to 79 percent. As a result, the detected concentration of O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate in samples is reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Based on the performance issue, two more compounds, disulfoton and ethion monoxon, also will be reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Estimated-value compounds, which are ?E-coded? in the data base, do not meet the performance criteria for unqualified quantification, but are retained in the method because the compounds are important owing to high use or potential environmental effects and because analytical performance has been consistent and reproducible.

  11. A rapid HPLC post-column reaction analysis for the quantification of ergothioneine in edible mushrooms and in animals fed a diet supplemented with extracts from the processing waste of cultivated mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, The Han; Giri, Anupam; Ohshima, Toshiaki

    2012-07-15

    For establishing an efficient and sensitive method for the quantitative determination of 2-thiol-l-histidine-betaine (ergothioneine, ERG) in edible mushrooms and the blood and muscles of animals, a technique using reversed-phase separation and post-column reaction between 2'-dipyridyl disulphide and ERG was developed. A corresponding derivative 2-thiopyridone, detected at 343 nm, was used for estimating ERG concentration. The flow rate, temperature, pH, and composition of the solution were optimised. A low limit of quantification (1.41 ppm) and a simpler sample preparation made this technique more rapid compared to other methods using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The coefficient of variation (CV) values for the reproducibility and recovery of ERG were within the acceptable values of 6% and 97.5-100.0%, respectively. The efficiency of this methodology was compared with that of spectrophotometric and mass-spectrometric quantitative methods, and was assessed in the light of previous studies. The ERG contents in different mushrooms were 12.69-234.85 mg/kg wet weight basis. Dietary supplementation with extracts from mushroom processing waste significantly improved ERG bioavailability in the blood of yellowtail fish and muscle tissue of cattle. PMID:25683437

  12. Speciation analysis of organotin compounds in human urine by headspace solid-phase micro-extraction and gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Anbal; Lespes, Gatane; Quiroz, Waldo; Aguilar, Luis F; Bravo, Manuel A

    2014-07-01

    A new headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) method followed by gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD) analysis has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 11 organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl-, phenyl- and octyltin derivates, in human urine. The methodology has been validated by the analysis of urine samples fortified with all analytes at different concentration levels, and recovery rates above 87% and relative precisions between 2% and 7% were obtained. Additionally, an experimental-design approach has been used to model the storage stability of organotin compounds in human urine, demonstrating that organotins are highly degraded in this medium, although their stability is satisfactory during the first 4 days of storage at 4 C and pH=4. Finally, this methodology was applied to urine samples collected from harbor workers exposed to antifouling paints; methyl- and butyltins were detected, confirming human exposure in this type of work environment. PMID:24840433

  13. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  14. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  15. Inelastic column behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E; Wilder, Thomas W , III

    1952-01-01

    The significant findings of a theoretical study of column behavior in the plastic stress range are presented. When the behavior of a straight column is regarded as the limiting behavior of an imperfect column as the initial imperfection (lack of straightness) approaches zero, the departure from the straight configuration occurs at the tangent-modulus load. Without such a concept of the behavior of a straight column, one is led to the unrealistic conclusion that lateral deflection of the column can begin at any load between the tangent-modulus value and the Euler load, based on the original elastic modulus. A family of curves showing load against lateral deflection is presented for idealized h-section columns of various lengths and of various materials that have a systematic variation of their stress-strain curves.

  16. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment.

    PubMed

    Postma, P R; Pataro, G; Capitoli, M; Barbosa, M J; Wijffels, R H; Eppink, M H M; Olivieri, G; Ferrari, G

    2016-03-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11kWhkgDW(-1)) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from 25 to 55C resulted in a conductivity increase of 75% as a result of cell membrane permeabilization. In this range of temperatures, 25-39% carbohydrates and 3-5% proteins release occurred and only for carbohydrate release a synergistic effect was observed at 55C. Above 55C spontaneous cell lysis occurred without PEF. Combined PEF-temperature treatment does not sufficiently disintegrate the algal cells to release both carbohydrates and proteins at yields comparable to the benchmark bead milling (40-45% protein, 48-58% carbohydrates). PMID:26722806

  17. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-12-01

    Solvent extraction processing has demonstrated the ability to achieve high decontamination factors for uranium and plutonium while operating at high throughputs. Historical application of solvent extraction contacting equipment implies that for the HA cycle (primary separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products) the equipment of choice is pulse columns. This is likely due to relatively short residence times (as compared to mixer-settlers) and the ability of the columns to tolerate solids in the feed. Savannah River successfully operated the F-Canyon with centrifugal contactors in the HA cycle (which have shorter residence times than columns). All three contactors have been successfully deployed in uranium and plutonium purification cycles. Over the past 20 years, there has been significant development of centrifugal contactor designs and they have become very common for research and development applications. New reprocessing plants are being planned in Russia and China and the United States has done preliminary design studies on future reprocessing plants. The choice of contactors for all of these facilities is yet to be determined.

  18. Distillation Column Modeling Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques will Optimize Distillation Column Operation. Distillation is a low thermal efficiency unit operation that currently consumes 4.8 quadrillion BTUs of energy...

  19. Transient flow and heating characteristics in a pinched plasma column.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, T. M.; Stover, E. K.

    1972-01-01

    The generation of axial flow and heating of an argon plasma in a pinched plasma column of a pulsed, linear z-pinch device was examined experimentally and analytically. Transient (about 5 microsec) axial pressure profiles identify three characteristic periods in the column history. These include (1) strong axial pressure asymmetry indicative of plasma streaming, (2) isotropic, rapidly rising plasma pressure indicative of plasma heating, and (3) column breakup. An efficient conversion of radial collapse to axial streaming velocity is identified. Mechanisms for such an effect and subsequent heating are evaluated; significance to transients in pulsed plasma accelerators is identified.

  20. Optimisation and application of accelerated solvent extraction and flash chromatography for quantification of PCBs in tree barks and XAD-2 passive samplers using GC-ECD with dual columns.

    PubMed

    Guguen, Florence; Stille, Peter; Millet, Maurice

    2013-07-15

    An analytical method for the quantification of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations in XAD-2 passive air samplers (PAS) and tree barks collected close to the Rhine River between France and Germany was developed. This method used Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) followed by a purification step by flash chromatography using a 4gr cartridge (3 g of silica gel and 1 g of 44% acidified silica) and analysis by GC-ECD with dual columns. Quantification (QL) and detection (DL) limits varied 0.5 from and 5.7 ng PAS(-1) and from 0.5 and 3.0 ng PAS(-1) respectively. For tree barks, quantification and detection limits were calculated for each congener on washed tree bark sample with a signal to noise ratio of 3:1 and 10:1 (corresponding to a LQ in the range of 1-4 ng per bark sample by congeners). Uncertainties on each congener concentration were calculated to be in the range of 3-20% XAD-2 passive samplers were field calibrated by using Hi-vol. Samplers. Sampling rates of 4.2, 11.5, 1.6, and 7.9 m(3) PAS(-1) d(-1) for tri-, tetra-, penta- hexa-PCBs, respectively were obtained and are comparable to those already obtained with PUF-PAS for gas phase only (gas/particle distribution was 90/10). Method was applied to real atmospheric samples collected by XAD-2 passive samplers and tree barks in the east of France. PMID:23622537

  1. Support Column of Bridge

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Support column of bridge across Struve Slough, Highway 1. Enlargement of hole where support enters the ground is an effect of lateral shaking, which caused the concrete to break up where the column joined the bridge and was instrumental in the roadbed collapse....

  2. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  3. Medial column stabilization.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, A R

    1991-07-01

    This article presented a brief review of medial column stabilizing procedures. The various types of procedures that have been advocated for different deformities have been discussed. It is important to keep in mind that fusion of any of the medial column joints should not be performed as an isolated procedure in flexible flatfoot deformity. Medial column stabilization is only a component procedure when surgically managing a flexible flatfoot. When choosing procedures to correct a flexible flatfoot, thorough preoperative evaluation is important. It is also important to realize that conservative measures should be exhausted before attempting any type of stabilization of the medial column for flexible flatfoot deformity. Specific criteria for flexible flatfoot surgery should include severe uncontrollable deformity, an inability to wear standard foot gear, and persistent pain and disability despite exhaustive conservative therapy. A medial column stabilization is also an excellent procedure for those patients who have end-stage degenerative joint disease of the medial longitudinal arch. PMID:1893342

  4. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid/vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency – which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor™ operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor™ utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the column’s pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoint’s proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor™ is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plant’s distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  5. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  6. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    2002-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the flooding predictor, an advanced process control strategy, into a universally useable tool that will maximize the separation yield of a distillation column.

  7. Determination of 12 urinary phthalate metabolites in Norwegian pregnant women by core-shell high performance liquid chromatography with on-line solid-phase extraction, column switching and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sabaredzovic, Azemira; Sakhi, Amrit Kaur; Brantster, Anne Lise; Thomsen, Cathrine

    2015-10-01

    Phthalates (dialkyl or alkyl phenyl esters of phthalic acid, benzene-1.2-dicarboxylic acid) are a group of industrial chemicals that have been used for more than 50 years. Phthalates are ubiquitous and can potentially have adverse effects on humans. The present study presents an accurate, sensitive and automated analytical method for measuring 12 phthalate metabolites (free and conjugated) in human urine using on-line solid phase extraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry. A small volume of urine sample (300?L) is required. Glucoronidated phthalate metabolites are deconjugated by incubation with glucoronidase enzyme (Escherihia coli-K 12) and the reaction is stopped by adding formic acid. This is the only sample preparation needed prior to injection into the column switching system. Thus, the method involves minimal sample handling and minimizes possible contaminations from the surroundings. The method was validated by spiking synthetic urine at 5-8 levels in the range of 0.1-500ng phthalate metabolites/mL synthetic urine. The method is sensitive with limits of detection in the low nanogram range, and rapid with a total run time about 25min. The accuracy was between 90 and 120 % and the intermediate precision was given as relative standard deviation was below 20% for most of the compounds. The high sensitivity, high throughput and minimal manual handling make the method suitable for large-scale biomonitoring studies. The present method was applied for the determination of phthalate metabolites in urine samples from 116 pregnant women, a subproject within the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Concentrations of all the twelve phthalate metabolites was >LOQ in 100% of the samples analysed. Mean urinary concentrations for different phthalate metabolites ranged from 1 to 100ng/mL, the highest concentrations were observed for di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolites and lowest for di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DiNP) metabolites. The urinary concentrations for most of the phthalate metabolites in the present study were found to be in the same range as found in other studies of pregnant women. PMID:26355271

  8. Towards Atomic Column-by-Column Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Rafferty, B.

    1998-09-06

    The optical arrangement of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is ideally suited for performing analysis of individual atomic columns in materials. Using the incoherent Z-contrast image as a reference, and arranging incoherent conditions also for the spectroscopy, a precise correspondence is ensured between features in the inelastic image and elastic signals. In this way the exact probe position needed to maximise the inelastic signal from a selected column can be located and monitored during the analysis using the much higher intensity elastic signal. Although object functions for EELS are typically less than 1 {Angstrom} full width at half maximum, this is still an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding object functions for elastic (or diffuse) scattering used to form the Z-contrast image. Therefore the analysis is performed with an effective probe that is significantly broader than that used for the reference Z-contrast image. For a 2.2 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is of the order of 2.5 {Angstrom}, while for a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is 1.6 {Angstrom}. Such increases in effective probe size can significantly reduce or even eliminate contrast between atomic columns that are visible in the image. However, this is only true if we consider circular collector apertures. Calculations based upon the theory of Maslen and Rossouw (Maslen and Rossouw 1984; Rossouw and Maslen 1984) show that employing an annular aperture can reduce the FWHM of the inelastic object function down to values close 0.1 {Angstrom}. With practical aperture sizes it should be possible to achieve this increased spatial resolution without loosing too much signal.

  9. Modeling of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Wan Nurul Aiffah; Zakaria, Siti Aisyah; Noor, Nor Fashihah Mohd; Sulong, Ibrahim; Arshad, Khairil Anuar

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extractor such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has become a very important subject to be discussed not just among chemical engineers but mathematician as well. In this research, the modeling of small diameter RDC column using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). In the previous research, we begin the process of analyzed the data using methods of design of the experiments (DOE) to identify which factor and their interaction factor are significant and to determine the percentage of contribution of the variance for each factor. From the result obtained, we continue the research by discussed the development and validation of an artificial neural network model in estimating the concentration of continuous and concentration of dispersed outlet for an RDC column. It is expected that an efficient and reliable model will be formed to predict RDC column performance as an alternative to speed up the simulation process.

  10. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. OPTIMIZED DETERMINATION OF TRACE JET FUEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BLOOD USING IN-FIELD LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH SUBSEQUENT LABORATORY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC-MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS AND ON-COLUMN LARGE VOLUME INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A practical and sensitive method to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from JP-8 jet fuel in human whole blood was developed by modifying previously established liquid-liquid extraction procedures, optimizing extraction times, solvent volume, specific sample processing te...

  12. Buckling of Liquid Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Rahmani, Y.; Bonn, Daniel; Ribe, N. M.

    2010-02-01

    Under appropriate conditions, a column of viscous liquid falling onto a rigid surface undergoes a buckling instability. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that liquid buckling exhibits a hitherto unsuspected complexity involving three different modesviscous, gravitational, and inertialdepending on how the viscous forces that resist bending of the column are balanced. We also find that the nonlinear evolution of the buckling exhibits a surprising multistability with three distinct states: steady stagnation flow, liquid rope coiling, and a new state in which the column simultaneously folds periodically and rotates about a vertical axis. The transitions among these states are subcritical, leading to a complex phase diagram in which different combinations of states coexist in different regions of the parameter space.

  13. ICPSEF: a user's manual for the computer mathematical model of the ICPP purex solvent extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Bendixsen, C L

    1982-11-01

    A computer-based mathematical program, ICPSEF, was developed for the first-cycle extraction system at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). At the ICPP, spent nuclear fuels are processed to recover unfissioned uranium. The uranium is recovered from aqueous solutions in a pulse column, solvent extraction system using tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent (purex process). A previously developed SEPHIS-MOD4 computer program was added to and modified to provide a model for the ICPP system. Major modifications included addition of: (1) partial theoretical stages to permit more accurate modeling of ICPP columns, (2) modeling ammonium hydroxide neutralization of nitric acid in a scrubbing column, and (3) equilibrium data for 5 to 10 vol % TBP. The model was verified by comparison with actual operating data. Detailed instructions for using the ICPSEF model and sample results of the model are included.

  14. Improved HPLC column-switching determination of Coenzyme Q and Vitamin E in plasma.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Stefano; Tulipani, Sara; Romandini, Stefania; Giorgetti, Raffaele; Battino, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    A novel isocratic modified column-switching HPLC method for automated quantitative analysis of Vitamin E and Coenzyme Q, in the reduced and oxidized form, is described. Many column-switching HPLC methods are found in the literature, also for determining antioxidant substances, but we developed a different system of column-switching. An empty column, 5 cm long, was connected to the switching valve, before the sample loop and the extraction column. The sample loop was connected directly after the empty column. The inserted column, containing about 1.4 ml of the extraction eluent simulated a gradient elution, enhancing sensitivity and resolution. When switching the columns, the empty column is placed right before the extraction column and acts as a static mixer for the extraction phase and the incoming analytical phase. Samples were cleaned from interfering compounds by transfer onto a extraction-column, using a C-8 silica. Separation was performed onto an analytical column C18 3 m icrom, 150 mm x 4.6 mm at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min with 20 mmol/l lithium perchlorate/perchloric acid, pH3.0 in Ethanol as analytical eluent. Detection was performed with a ESA Coulochem 5100 A model. The method was found to be suitable for automated analysis of Coenzyme Q, reduced and oxidized form, and Vitamin E in serum. PMID:19096123

  15. Dual low thermal mass gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast dual-column separation of pesticides in complex sample.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Kikuo; Ochiai, Nobuo; Kanda, Hirooki

    2007-07-31

    A method is described for fast dual-column separation of pesticides by use of dual low thermal mass gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (dual LTM-GC-MS) with different temperature programming. The method can provide two total ion chromatograms with different separation on DB-5 and DB-17 in a single run, which allows improved identification capability, even with short analysis time (<17 min). Also simultaneous detection with MS and elemental selective detector, e.g. pulsed flame photometric detection (PFPD) was evaluated for fast dual-column separation of 82 pesticide mixtures including 27 phosphorus pesticides. Dual LTM-GC-MS/PFPD was applied to analysis of pesticides in a brewed green tea sample with dual stir bar sorptive extraction method (dual SBSE). PMID:19071809

  16. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's

  17. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  18. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  19. Modified Purex first-cycle extraction for neptunium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Binh; Moisy, Philippe; Baron, Pascal; Calor, Jean-Noel; Espinoux, Denis; Lorrain, Brigitte; Benchikouhne-Ranchoux, Magali

    2008-07-01

    A new PUREX first-cycle flowsheet was devised to enhance the extraction yield of neptunium at the extraction step of this cycle. Simulation results (using a qualified process-simulation tool), le d to raising the nitric acid concentration of the feed from 3 M to 4.5 M to allow extraction of more than 99% of the neptunium. This flowsheet was operated in the shielded process cell of ATALANTE facility using pulsed columns and mixer-settlers banks. A 15 kg quantity of genuine oxide fuel of average burn up of 52 GWd/t with cooling time of nearly five years was treated, and the neptunium extraction yield obtained was greater than 99.6%. (authors)

  20. Development of novel contactor for nuclear solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shekhar; Kumar, Rajnish; Sivakumar, D.; Balamurugan, M.; Koganti, S.B.

    2008-07-01

    For current designs of radiochemical plants, solvent-extraction contactors with no periodic maintenance like pulse column are the first choice. In addition, as costs of specialty solvents for nuclear extraction are quite high, there is a demand for operation at extreme phase ratios. Recently a novel mixer-settler was visualized and developed for this kind of service. The mixer of the novel contactor is based on rotated helical tubes and does not involve any mechanical moving part. Mass-transfer runs were carried out with aqueous nitric acid and 30% TBP solvent at A/O of 0.25-200 (in extraction) and A/O of 0.25-10 (in back-extraction mode). The developed contactor exhibited nearly 100% efficiency for all the cases. (authors)

  1. Microfabricated packed gas chromatographic column

    DOEpatents

    Kottenstette, Richard; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-16

    A new class of miniaturized gas chromatographic columns has been invented. These chromatographic columns are formed using conventional micromachining techniques, and allow packed columns having lengths on the order of a meter to be fabricated with a footprint on the order of a square centimeter.

  2. Transient flow and heating in a pinched plasma column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, T. M.; Stover, E. K.

    1974-01-01

    The axial flow and heating of an argon plasma in a pinched plasma column of a pulsed, linear z-pinch device was experimentally examined with a unique pressure sensing instrument capable of resolving mass flow properties. Transient axial pressure profiles identify periods of intense flow and heating. Mechanisms generating such effects are considered.

  3. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices for determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey California District Organic Chemistry Laboratory, 1996-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Baker, Lucian M.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2000-01-01

    A method of analysis and quality-assurance practices were developed to study the fate and transport of pesticides in the San Francisco Bay-Estuary by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended-particulate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide and the pesticides were eluted with three cartridge volumes of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1) solution. The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for pesticides ranged from 0.002 to 0.025 microgram per liter for 1-liter samples. Recoveries ranged from 44 to 140 percent for 25 pesticides in samples of organic-free reagent water and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Bay water fortified at 0.05 and 0.50 microgram per liter. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges ranged from 10 to 257 days.

  4. Structure and function of assemblages of Bacteria and Archaea in model anaerobic aquifer columns: can functional instability be practically beneficial?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Denice K; Lapara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2012-09-18

    Biodegradable organic carbon is often added to aquifers to stimulate microbial reduction of oxidized contaminants. This carbon also stimulates fermenters, which generate important metabolites that can fuel contaminant reduction and may enhance dissolution of hydrophobic compounds. Therefore, understanding how different methods of carbon addition affect the fermentative community will enable design of more effective remediation strategies. Our research objective was to evaluate the microbial communities that developed in model aquifer columns in response to pulsed or continuous molasses input. Results indicated that the continuously fed column produced relatively low concentrations of metabolic intermediates and had a greater proportion of Bacteria and methanogens, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, near the column inlet. In contrast, the pulsed-fed column generated periodic high concentrations of metabolic intermediates, with Bacteria and methanogens distributed throughout the length of the column. The community structures of Bacteria and Archaea, measured via automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, in the pulsed-fed column were significantly different from those in the control column (not fed). The microbial community composition of the continuously fed column, however, became increasingly similar to the control column along the column length. These results demonstrate that a strategy of pulsed carbon addition leads to activity that is associated with functional instability, in terms of the production of periodic pulses of fermentation products and changing carbon concentration, and may be advantageous for remediation by producing large quantities of beneficial intermediates and resulting in more homogenously distributed biomass. PMID:22873515

  5. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  6. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition. PMID:26550724

  7. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  8. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  9. Extracting the distribution of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces for 351 nm, 3 ns laser pulses at high fluences (20-150 J/cm2).

    PubMed

    Laurence, Ted A; Bude, Jeff D; Ly, Sonny; Shen, Nan; Feit, Michael D

    2012-05-01

    Surface laser damage limits the lifetime of optics for systems guiding high fluence pulses, particularly damage in silica optics used for inertial confinement fusion-class lasers (nanosecond-scale high energy pulses at 355 nm/3.5 eV). The density of damage precursors at low fluence has been measured using large beams (1-3 cm); higher fluences cannot be measured easily since the high density of resulting damage initiation sites results in clustering. We developed automated experiments and analysis that allow us to damage test thousands of sites with small beams (10-30 m), and automatically image the test sites to determine if laser damage occurred. We developed an analysis method that provides a rigorous connection between these small beam damage test results of damage probability versus laser pulse energy and the large beam damage results of damage precursor densities versus fluence. We find that for uncoated and coated fused silica samples, the distribution of precursors nearly flattens at very high fluences, up to 150 J/cm2, providing important constraints on the physical distribution and nature of these precursors. PMID:22565775

  10. Pulsed electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of pulsed electric fields (PEF) was first proposed in 1967 to change the behavior or microorganisms. The electric field phenomenon was identified as membrane rupture theory in the 1980s. Increasing the membrane permeability led to the application of PEF assisted extraction of cellular co...

  11. Verification of a model for foam flotation column operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.E.; Rodriguez, J.; McIntyre, G.; Thackston, E.L.; Wilson, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    We report experimental data testing the validity of a mathematical model for the time-dependent operation of a continuous-flow foam floating column.Sodium lauryl sulfate was the surfactant being removed. The responses of the column in steady-state operation and under the influence of rectangular pulses in sodium lauryl sulfates concentration and in hydraulic loading rate were investigated and compared with the results of computer simulation.Effluent surfactant concentrations were well simulated under all conditions. It was found that the fraction of liquid in the Plateau borders varies somewhat with the hydraulic loading rate, which causes some discrepancy between calculated and observed collapsed foamate flow rates.

  12. An Undergraduate Column Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danot, M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for an experiment designed to introduce undergraduate students to the theoretical and technical aspects of column chromatography. The experiment can also be shortened to serve as a demonstration of the column chromatography technique. (JN)

  13. Buckling testing of composite columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ever; Tomblin, John

    1992-11-01

    Euler buckling test results are presented for large composite columns relevant to the mass production of composite structural members by pultrusion. The experimental procedure employed yields highly reproducible and accurate results. All percentage differences between theory and experiment are below 6.2 percent; the theoretically predicted long-column buckling load is accurate even in the case of the most complex composite materials.

  14. Solid-phase extraction of galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids from natural sources (Galphimia glauca and Arnicae flos) using pure zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate powders as sorbents inside micro spin columns.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shah; Schönbichler, Stefan A; Güzel, Yüksel; Sonderegger, Harald; Abel, Gudrun; Rainer, Matthias; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2013-10-01

    Galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids are among the most important pharmacological active groups of natural compounds. This study describes a pre-step in isolation of some selected representatives of these groups from biological samples. A selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for these compounds may help assign classes and isomer designations within complex mixtures. Pure zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate powders (325 mesh) were employed as two new sorbents for optimized SPE of phenolic acids. These sorbents possess electrostatic interaction sites which accounts for additional interactions for carbon acid moieties as compared to hydrophilic and hydrophobic sorbents alone. Based on this principle, a selective SPE method for 1,3,4,5-tetragalloylquinic acid (an anti-HIV and anti-asthamatic agent) as a starting compound was developed and then deployed upon other phenolic acids with success. The recoveries and selectivities of both sorbents were compared to most commonly applied and commercially available sorbents by using high performance liquid chromatography. The nature of interaction between the carrier sorbent and the acidic target molecules was investigated by studying hydrophilic (silica), hydrophobic (C18), mixed-mode (ionic and hydrophobic: Oasis(®) MAX) and predominantly electrostatic (zirconium silicate) materials. The newly developed zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate stationary phases revealed promising results for the selective extraction of galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids from natural sources. It was observed that zirconium silicate exhibited maximum recovery and selectivity for tetragalloylquinic acid (84%), chlorogenic acid (82%) and dicaffeoylquinic acid (94%) among all the tested sorbents. PMID:23831490

  15. Effect of soil permeability on virus removal through soil columns.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D S; Gerba, C P; Lance, J C

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed on four different soils, using 100 cm long columns, to determine the extent of virus movement when wastewater percolated through the soils at various hydraulic flow rates. Unchlorinated secondary sewage effluent seeded with either poliovirus type 1 (strain LSc) or echovirus type 1 (isolate V239) was continuously applied to soil columns for 3 to 4 days at constant flow rates. Water samples were extracted daily from ceramic samplers at various depths of the column for the virus assay. The effectiveness of virus removal from wastewater varied greatly among the different soil types but appeared to be largely related to hydraulic flow rates. At a flow rate of 33 cm/day, Anthony sandy loam removed 99% of seeded poliovirus within the first 7 cm of the column. At flow rates of 300 cm/day and above, Rubicon sand gave the poorest removal of viruses; less than 90% of the seeded viruses were removed by passage of effluent through the entire length of the soil column. By linear regression analyses, the rate of virus removal in soil columns was found to be negatively correlated with the flow of the percolating sewage effluent. There was no significant difference in rate of removal between poliovirus and echovirus in soil columns 87 cm long. The rate of virus removal in the upper 17 cm of the soil column was found to be significantly greater than in the lower depths of the soil column. This study suggests that the flow rate of water through the soil may be the most important factor in predicting the potential of virus movement into the groundwater. Furthermore, the length of the soil column is critical in obtaining useful data to predict virus movement into groundwater. PMID:6266338

  16. Comparison of column flotation cells

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Mohanty, M.K.; Ho, K.

    1995-08-01

    Six commercial column flotation technologies, i.e., Canadian, Flotaire, Jameson, Microcel, Packed-Column, and Turbo-air, were tested for the treatment of Illinois Basin fine coal and the results from each column compared based on separation performance and throughout capacity. The separation performance achieved by each cell approached and, in some cases, exceeded the ultimate performance predicted by release analysis. A comparison of the test results indicates differences in the selectivity obtained by each flotation column on the basis of both ash and sulfur rejection. This finding may be due to variations in cell hydrodynamics and the ability to support a deep froth phase among the different column cells. In addition, throughput capacity of each cell was found to differ, apparently due to the differences in the bubble-particle attachment environment, bubble size, and bubble population. Variations in the operating characteristics, such as reagent additions, aeration rate and wash water rate, were also noted and summarized in this publication.

  17. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior of the system, coupled with these processes, define the fundamental compositional and dynamic diversity of the Mush Column. In some ways it functions like a complex musical instrument. Entrainment, transport, and sorting of cumulate crystals as a function of repose time and the local flux intensity also contribute to the basic compositional diversity of the system. In the Ferrar dolerite system, about 104 km3 of dolerite is distributed throughout a fir-tree like stack of 4 or 5 extensive 300-750 m thick sills. The lowest sill contains a vast tongue of entrained orthopyroxene (opx) cumulates emplaced with the sill itself. The bulk sill composition varies from 20 pc MgO in the tongue center to 7 pc in the leading tip and margins of the sill, which itself defines the compositional spectrum of the whole complex and is remarkably similar to that exhibited by Hawaii. Relative sorting of large (1-50 mm) opx and small (1-3 mm) plagioclase due to kinetic sieving in the tongue produces pervasive anorthosite stringers. Through local ponding this has culminated in the formation of a small, well-formed layered intrusion consisting of alternating layers of orthopyroxenite and anorthosite. Upwards in the system the sills become progressively depleted in MgO and temporally and spatially contiguous flood basalts are low MgO tholeiites with no sign of opx cumulates. The size, extent, number of sills, and the internal structure of individual sills suggest a rhythm of injection similar to that of volcanic episodes. The continued horizontal stretching of a system of this type would lead to processes as recorded by ophiolites, and the repeated injection into a single reservoir would undoubtedly lead to a massive layered intrusion or to a series of high-level nested plutons.

  18. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  19. Performance analysis of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiffah, Wan Nurul; Aisyah, Siti; Fashihah, Nor; Anuar, Khairil

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extrator such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has be come a very important subject to be discussed not just amongst chemical engineers but mathematicans as well. In this study, the performance of small diameter column RDC using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of design of the experiments (DOE). DOE are applied to estimated the effect of four independent variable; protor speed, flow rate, concentration of continuous inlet and dispersed inlet and their interaction factor to detemine the most significant factor that effect the concentration of continuous and dispersed outlet as output parameters.

  20. Packing columns for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Coln, L A; Maloney, T D; Fermier, A M

    2000-07-28

    Considering the current interest in capillary electrochromatography (CEC), performed in packed columns, we present the different methods used to pack capillary columns for use in CEC. General considerations on column packing are given and the column fabrication process is discussed in sufficient detail to allow instruction to those who are not experienced in the field. Five different packing methods are discussed to deliver packing material into the capillary column from a practical view point: slurry pressure packing, packing with supercritical CO2, electrokinetic packing, using centripetal forces, and packing by gravity. Entrapment of particulate material by sintering and sol-gel technology is also mentioned. Although slurry pressure packing procedures are most common, higher separation efficiencies are obtained using other packing approaches. Electrokinetic packing seems to be the simplest technique to deliver the packing material into the capillary columns. Nevertheless, as with the other packing techniques, skill and experience are required to complete all the steps involved in the fabrication of packed columns for CEC. PMID:10961303

  1. Microbial activity in weathering columns.

    PubMed

    Garca, C; Ballester, A; Gonzlez, F; Blzquez, M L

    2007-03-22

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the metabolic activity of the microbial population associated with a pyritic tailing after a column-weathering test. For this purpose, a column 150cm high and 15cm diameter was used. The solid was a tailing with 63.4% pyrite and with minor amounts of Cu, Pb and Zn sulfides (1.4, 0.5 and 0.8%, respectively). The column model was the habitual one for weathering tests: distilled water was added at the top of the column; the water flowed down through tailings and finally was collected at the bottom for chemical and microbiological analysis. Weathering was maintained for 36 weeks. The results showed a significant presence of microbial life that was distributed selectively over the column: sulfur- and iron-oxidizing aerobic bacteria were in the more oxygenated zone; anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacteria were isolated from the samples taken from the anoxic part of the column. Activity testing showed that (oxidizing and reducing) bacteria populations were active at the end of the weathering test. The quality of the water draining from the column was thus the final product of biological oxidation and reduction promoted by the bacteria consortia. PMID:16949201

  2. Solute transport through large uniform and layered soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porro, I.; Wierenga, P. J.; Hills, R. G.

    1993-04-01

    Solute transport experiments are often conducted with homogeneous soils, whereas transport in real situations takes place in heterogeneous soils. An experiment was conducted to compare unsaturated solute transport through uniform and layered soils. Pulse inputs of tritiated water, bromide and chloride were applied under steady flow conditions to the tops of two large (0.95 m diameter by 6 m deep) soil columns. One column was uniformly filled with loamy fine sand and the other filled with alternating 20-cm-thick layers of loamy fine sand and silty clay loam. Soil solution samples were collected during the experiment with suction candles installed at various depths in the columns. Solute transport parameters were estimated by fitting the convection-dispersion equation to the observed breakthrough curves for each solute at various depths in each column. The match between the resulting calibrated curves and the experiment was better for the layered soil column than for the uniform soil column. The results displayed no clear relationship between the dispersion coefficients and depth for any of the tracers for either column. However, dispersivities were greater in the uniform column (3.5 cm) than in the layered column (1.2 cm), while retardation factors for bromide and chloride were similar (0.8 and 0.83, respectively, for the uniform and layered columns). A retardation factor less than one is attributed to anion exclusion. There was evidence of preferential flow in the uniform soil column. The peak concentrations at 5 m depth were greater than those observed at 4 m. Such behavior is inconsistent with one-dimensional flow. Similar results were observed in an experiment performed 3.5 years earlier using the same soil column and approximately the same flow rates, but using a different tracer and associated chemical analysis, different soil saturation prior to the execution of the experiment, and different experimental personnel. This supports the thesis that the anomalous behavior is due to some form of preferential flow rather than due to experimental error.

  3. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, W.K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  4. Pulse stretcher for narrow pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, R. S., Jr. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A pulse stretcher for narrow pulses is presented. The stretcher is composed of an analog section for processing each arriving analog pulse and a digital section with logic for providing command signals to the gates and switches in the analog section.

  5. Column oil agglomeration of fly ash with ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.L.; Champagne, K.J.; Soong, Y.; Finseth, D.H.

    1999-07-01

    A promising oil agglomeration process has been developed for the beneficiation of fly ash using a six-foot agglomeration column. Carbon concentrates have been separated from fly ash with yields greater than 60 % and purities of 55 to 74 %. The parameters examined in the study include ultrasonic exposure, pulse rate, frequency, agitation speed, and blade configuration. The effects of the experimental variables on the quality of separation are discussed.

  6. Radiotracer Imaging of Sediment Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W. W.; O'Neil, J. P.; Boutchko, R.; Nico, P. S.; Druhan, J. L.; Vandehey, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear medical PET and SPECT cameras routinely image radioactivity concentration of gamma ray emitting isotopes (PET - 511 keV; SPECT - 75-300 keV). We have used nuclear medical imaging technology to study contaminant transport in sediment columns. Specifically, we use Tc-99m (T1/2 = 6 h, E? = 140 keV) and a SPECT camera to image the bacteria mediated reduction of pertechnetate, [Tc(VII)O4]- + Fe(II) ? Tc(IV)O2 + Fe(III). A 45 mL bolus of Tc-99m (32 mCi) labeled sodium pertechnetate was infused into a column (35cm x 10cm ) containing uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment from the Rifle, CO site. A flow rate of 1.25 ml/min of artificial groundwater was maintained in the column. Using a GE Millennium VG camera, we imaged the column for 12 hours, acquiring 44 frames. As the microbes in the sediment were inactive, we expected most of the iron to be Fe(III). The images were consistent with this hypothesis, and the Tc-99m pertechnetate acted like a conservative tracer. Virtually no binding of the Tc-99m was observed, and while the bolus of activity propagated fairly uniformly through the column, some inhomogeneity attributed to sediment packing was observed. We expect that after augmentation by acetate, the bacteria will metabolically reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), leading to significant Tc-99m binding. Imaging sediment columns using nuclear medicine techniques has many attractive features. Trace quantities of the radiolabeled compounds are used (micro- to nano- molar) and the half-lives of many of these tracers are short (<1 day). This allows multiple measurements to be made on the same column and thus the sediment biology to be monitored non-invasively over time (i.e. after an augmentation has been introduced) and minimizes long-lived radioactive waste. Different parameters can be measured, depending on the tracer type and delivery. A constant infusion of a conservative tracer, such as the positron emitter Br-76 (T1/2= 16.2 hr), measures the exclusion fraction (as a function of position in the column), while a bolus maps the flow velocity as a function of position. A tracer that interacts chemically with the contents of the column (e.g., [99m-Tc(VII)O4]- reduced to 99m-TcO2 by Fe(II) ) yields a map of the chemical environment (e.g., the distribution of Fe(II)). Image of Tc-99m distribution in a column containing Rifle sediment at four times.

  7. FUSED SILICA CAPILLARY COLUMN GC/MS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Operational characteristics have been determined for fused silica capillary column (FSCC) GC/MS as applied to 'extractable' priority pollutants. Chromatographic data show excellent relative retention time (RRT) intralaboratory precision and interlaboratory accuracy when multiple ...

  8. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  9. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  10. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  11. Polydispersed solids behavior in a bubble column. [Slurry bubble columns

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A.; Stiegel, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    New data and theory are presented for describing polydispersed solids in slurry bubble columns. Axial solids concentration distributions were measured in a 0.108-m-ID slurry bubble column apparatus operated at steady-state conditions. Slurry and gas superficial velocities ranged from 0.007 to 0.02 m/s and 0.03 to 0.20 m/s, respectively. The liquid phase was water and the solid phase consisted of binary or ternary mixtures of narrow-sized fractions of glass spheres. The experimental data have been used to develop a method for predicting average solids loadings and axial distributions of solids in a bubble column with a one-dimensional sedmentation-dispersion model. Correlations are given for the hindered settling velocity, the solids dispersion coefficient, and the solids concentration at the top and bottom of the column. The effect of a distribution of particle size is interpreted by summation of the concentration of solids for each discrete particle size fraction. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  12. 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WITH LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION EQUIPMENT IN THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Drain, F.; Vinoche, R.; Duhamet, J.

    2003-02-27

    Three types of liquid-liquid extraction equipment are used in industrial reprocessing plants. Each is described below, with a special focus on pulsed columns and centrifugal extractors, which have been the subject of an extensive R&D program by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). Various models have been developed to simulate equipment behavior and flowsheets. The excellent results obtained during industrial operation of the UP3 and UP2-800 plants in La Hague have confirmed the validity of the choices made during the design phases and pave the way for future improvement of the reprocessing process, from a technical and a financial standpoint.

  13. Pulse oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Jubran, Amal

    1999-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is one of the most commonly employed monitoringmodalities in the critical care setting. This review describes the latesttechnological advances in the field of pulse oximetry. Accuracy of pulseoximeters and their limitations are critically examined. Finally, the existingdata regarding the clinical applications and cost-effectiveness of pulseoximeters are discussed. PMID:11094477

  14. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  15. Triangular Helical Column for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yu, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Effective column space and stationary phase retention have been improved by changing the configuration of the helical column originally used for toroidal coil countercurrent chromatography. The use of an equilateral triangular core for the helix column doubles effective column space and retains the stationary phase over 40% of the total column capacity without increasing the column pressure. The present results suggest that the stationary phase retention and the peak resolution will be further improved using new column designs fabricated by a new technology called laser sintering for rapid prototyping. PMID:20046940

  16. Monolithic molecularly imprinted polymeric capillary columns for isolation of aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Szumski, Micha?; Grzywi?ski, Damian; Prus, Wojciech; Buszewski, Bogus?aw

    2014-10-17

    Monolithic molecularly imprinted polymers extraction columns have been prepared in fused-silica capillaries by UV or thermal polymerization in a two-step process. First, a poly-(trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) (polyTRIM) core monolith was synthesized either by UV or thermal polymerization. Then it was grafted with the mixture of methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a cross-linking agent, 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (DMC) as an aflatoxin-mimicking template, toluene as a porogen solvent and 2,2-azobis-(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN) as an initiator of the polymerization reaction. Different thermal condition of the photografting and different concentrations of the grafting mixture were tested during polymerization. The extraction capillary columns were evaluated in the terms of their hydrodynamic and chromatographic properties. Retention coefficients for aflatoxin B1 and DMC were used for assessment of the selectivity and imprinting factor. The obtained results indicate that the temperature of photografting and concentration of the grafting mixture are key parameters that determine the quality of the prepared MIPs. From the MIP columns characterized by the highest permeability the column of the highest imprinting factor was applied for isolation of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 from the model aqueous sample followed by on-line chromatographic separation. The process was performed using a micro-MISPE-microLC-LIF system of a novel design, which allowed for detection of the eluates from the sample preparation part as well as from the chromatographic separation. PMID:25218633

  17. Isotope Enrichment in a Fully Ionized, Rotating Metal Plasma Column.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geva, Michael

    In 1971 Bonnevier('1) demonstrated experimentally isotopic. separation in a rotating neon plasma column. Since then much. study has been conducted of the mass separation in a plasma. centrifuge, and enrichment has been shown in a variety of plasmas. In these studies the plasma was either partially ionized or. surrounded by a neutral gas. The neutral particles limited the. achievable separation by slowing down the rotation below the. Alfven critical velocity or by dragging the rotating ions and causing. turbulence which smeared out the stratification. In this thesis, an. experimental study is presented, of a pure, fully ionized rotating. plasma column, produced in a laser-initiated vacuum arc in an axial. magnetic field. The plasma column was surrounded by a vacuum,. thus avoiding the deleterious effect of the neutral particles. Experiments are reported, in which various properties of the plasma. centrifuge were studied under a variety of conditions. Plasma. columns of C, Cu, Cu-Ni, Al-Ti, Dc-Sn and others were investigated. The discharge was pulsed, of milliseconds duration, with peak. currents of several kiloamps, in axial magnetic fields of up to 3.7kG. The study included characteristics of the vacuum arc in an axial. magnetic field, the rotation of the plasma column, the radial electric. field in the column, and the radial and axial dependence of the. plasma density and of the centrifugal mass separation. The. measurements showed a radial density of roughly a Gaussian. profile, with peak values of about 10('13)cm(' -3) and of FWHM of 4-6cm. The plasma column exhibited a solid body rotation, at an angular. frequency of (TURN)10('5) rad/sec. The radial electric field in the column. was linearly dependent on the radius and had values of typically. several volts/cm, indicating the column rotational velocities to be. close to the ExB drift. Mass separation of about 80% were measured. in Cu-Ni and ('65)Cu-('63)Cu, and of 20% in Sn -Cd. In Al-Ti plasma, the. relative abundance of the Al, whose mass to charge ratio was higher. than that of the Ti, was 4 times higher at r = 3cm than at the center. The axial evolution of the radial density and enrichment profiles. showed a strong axial dependence near the cathode which became. rather weak at about 1m from the cathode. Based on this behavior. an analytical model was developed of a plasma centrifuge in a. quasi-equilibrium steady-state, and was compared to the experimental results. ('1)B. Bonnevier, Plasma Physics, 13, 763 (1971).

  18. Streamlined, two-column, simulated countercurrent chromatography for binary separation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rui C R; Silva, Ricardo J S; Mota, Jos P B

    2010-05-14

    We report on a numerical and experimental study of two-column versions of streamlined, multicolumn, semi-continuous chromatography for binary separation. The systems combine a flexible node design, cyclic flow-rate modulation, and relayed operation of the inlet/outlet ports to extend the mass-transfer zone over the largest possible length, while keeping it inside the system at all times. One advantage of these streamlined designs is the simplicity of their physical realization: regardless of the number of columns, they only require two pumps to supply feed and desorbent into the system, while the flow rates of liquid withdrawn from the system are controlled by material balance using simple two-way valves. In one case, an extra pump is needed to recirculate the fluid in closed-loop. A rigorous model-based optimization approach is employed in the optimal design of the cycles to generate solutions that are physically realizable in the experimental set-ups. The optimized schemes for two-column operation supply fresh feed into the middle of the system where the composition of the circulating fluid is closest to that of the feedstock fluid, and recover the purified products, extract and raffinate, alternately at the downstream end of the unit, while desorbent is continuously supplied into the upstream end of the system. By internally recycling part of the non-pure cut fraction, the scheme with a step of closed-loop recycling significantly reduces its solvent consumption. The feasibility and effectiveness of the reported two-column processes have been verified experimentally on the linear separation of nucleosides by reversed phase subject to 99% purity constraints on both products. It is shown that our processes compare favorably against single-column batch chromatography, steady-state recycling, and four-column, open-loop SMB, for the same amount of adsorbent; they are also better than the four-column, closed-loop SMB at high feed throughputs. PMID:20356598

  19. Capacitor discharge pulse analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Tanner, Danelle Mary

    2013-08-01

    Capacitors used in firing sets and other high discharge current applications are discharge tested to verify performance of the capacitor against the application requirements. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, rise time, pulse width, peak current and current reversal must be verified to ensure that the capacitor will meet the application needs. This report summarizes an analysis performed on the discharge current data to extract these parameters by fitting a second-order system model to the discharge data and using this fit to determine the resulting performance metrics. Details of the theory and implementation are presented. Using the best-fit second-order system model to extract these metrics results in less sensitivity to noise in the measured data and allows for direct extraction of the total series resistance, inductance, and capacitance.

  20. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  1. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients following an interruption of flow to the column were calculated. The transient calculations were terminated after the maximum resin bed temperature reached the Technical Standard of 60 C, which was set to prevent significant resin degradation. The LANL column differs from the FWR column in that it has a significantly smaller radius, 3.73 cm nominal versus approximately 28 cm. It follows that natural convection removes heat much more effectively from the LANL column, so that the column may reach thermal equilibrium. Consequently, the calculations for a flow interruption were extended until an approach to thermal equilibrium was observed. The LANL ion exchange process also uses a different resin than was used in the FWR column. The LANL column uses Reillex HPQ{trademark} resin, which is more resistant to attack by nitric acid than the Ionac 641{trademark} resin used in the FWR column. Heat generation from the resin oxidation reaction with nitric acid is neglected in this analysis since LANL will be treating the resin to remove the LTE prior to loading the resin in the columns. Calculations were performed using a finite difference computer code, which incorporates models for absorption and elution of plutonium and for forced and natural convection within the resin bed. Calculations for normal column operation during loading were performed using an initial temperature and a feed temperature equal to the ambient air temperature. The model for the normal flow calculations did not include natural convection within the resin bed. The no flow calculations were started with the temperature and concentration profiles at the end of the loading stage, when there would be a maximum amount of plutonium either adsorbed on the resin or in the feed solution in the column.

  2. [Poetry Instruction.] Motivator of the Month. [Compiled from Columns in Three issues of "Notes Plus," January and November 1984 and September 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notes Plus, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The teaching activities presented in the four journal columns extracted here focus on understanding and writing poetry. The first column (by Carol Case) presents an introduction to poetry unit containing five preliminary steps designed to help students develop an understanding of poetry. The second column (by Carol Anderson) describes a week of

  3. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  4. Water Column Methylation in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartup, A. T.; Calder, R.; Soerensen, A. L.; Mason, R. P.; Balcom, P. H.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs and affects humans and wildlife through fish consumption. Many studies have measured active methylation/demethylation in ocean margin sediments but few have reported similar rates for the marine water column. This presentation will review available evidence for water column methylation in estuaries, including new experimental measurements of methylation/demethylation rates from a deep subarctic fjord in Labrador Canada collected in Spring and Fall of 2012-2013. We used these and other data to construct a mass budget for MeHg in the estuary and show that water column methylation (with rates ranging from 1.5 to 2.8 % day-1), is the largest contributor, followed by inputs from rivers (4.9 mol year-1), to the in situ pool of MeHg available for uptake by biota. By contrast, the sediment in this system is a net sink for MeHg (-1.5 mol year-1). We discuss the relationship between observed MeHg and other ancillary environmental factors (organic carbon, sulfur and nutrients) as well as implications for the response time of fish to future changes in mercury inputs.

  5. Evolution of mantle column beneath Bartoy volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashchepkov, Igor; Karmanov, Nikolai; Kanakin, Sergei; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2013-04-01

    Pleistocene Bartoy volcanoes 1.5-0.8 Ma (Ashchepkov et al., 2003) represent variable set of hydrous cumulates and megacrysts and peridotite mantle xenoliths from spinel facies (Ashchepkov, 1991; Ionov, Kramm, 1992). Hydrous peridotites give series of the temperature groups: 1) deformed Fe - lherzolites (1200-1100o) , 2) Phl porhyroclasti? (1100-1020o), 3) Amph -Phl (1020-940o), 4) Dry protogranular (1020-940o), 5)Amph equigranular (940-880o) and 6) dry and fine grained (880-820o). and Fe-rich poikilitic (700-600o) (Ashchepkov, 1991). T according (Nimis, Taylor, 2000) The sequence of the megacrysts crystallized on the wall of basaltic feeder in pre - eruption stage is starting from HT dark green websterites (1300-1200o), black Cpx- Gar varieties (1250-1200o) evolved to Phl -CPx (1200-1130o) and Cpx - Kaers (1130-1020o) - Cpx low in TiO2., Ilm and San (<1000o) like in Vitim (Ashchepkov et la., 2011). The differentiation trends looks branched but the question if they. Differentiation ain relatively large magma bodies p produced Ga- Cpx (+Amph-Phl- Ilm +-San) and then Cpx-Gar -Pl cumulates in( ~8-12 kbar) interval. In the ToC-Fe# diagram the Intermediate trend between lherzolites and megacrysts sub parallel to lherzolitic is correspondent to the fractionation of the hydrous alkali basalt melts in vein network created from the highly H2O bearing basaltic derivates formed in intermediate magma chambers. The interaction of the peridotites with the pulsing rising and evolving basaltic system produced the wall rock metasomatism and separate groups of peridotites in different levels of mantle column. PT calculations show two PT path and probably melt intrusion events. Trace elements in glass from crystalline basalts show Zr, Pb dips and Ta, Nb, Sr enrichment for the black megacrystalline Cpx , Gar series. They show link with evolved basalts by HFSE, Ba enrichment but Cpx from kaersutite and further Gar - Cpx cumulates show depressions in Ta, Nb, Zr, and Pb moderate enrichment in LILE and Sr. Pl - Gar cumulates show even jugged TRE spidergrams with Eu peaks and dips. The green Cpx from green series have now humps in TRE related to the garnet in meting source and are depleted in HFSE especially in Zr suggesting H2O- induced melting. Lherzolitic Cpx show enrichment in LREE and LILE but decrease in HFSE. The Cpx in contacts with basaltic derivates show U shaped REE and flattened patterns with Zr dips . The interaction is not highly pronounced and the distance of 3-4 sm. Most probably that metasomatism in lherzolitic column was produced by melts more rich fluids. The interaction with HT basalts produced the Fe lherzolites with the TRE patterns showing hump garnet signatures The model of the developing of the mantle column beneath Bartoy volcanoes suggest pulsing interaction with the basalts are checking using TRE components of all studied samples. Grant 11-05-00060.

  6. Effects of a malfunctional column on conventional and FeedCol-simulated moving bed chromatography performance.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Donghoon; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2015-07-17

    The effects of a malfunctional column on the performance of a simulated moving bed (SMB) process were studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental results of conventional four-zone SMB (2-2-2-2 configuration) and FeedCol operation (2-2-2-2 configuration with one feed column) with one malfunctional column were compared with simulation results of the corresponding SMB processes with a normal column configuration. The malfunctional column in SMB processes significantly deteriorated raffinate purity. However, the extract purity was equivalent or slightly improved compared with the corresponding normal SMB operation because the complete separation zone of the malfunctional column moved to a lower flow rate range in zones II and III. With the malfunctional column configuration, FeedCol operation gave better experimental performance (up to 7%) than conventional SMB operation because controlling product purity with FeedCol operation was more flexible through the use of two additional operating variables, injection time and injection length. Thus, compared with conventional SMB separation, extract with equivalent or slightly better purity could be produced from FeedCol operation even with a malfunctional column, while minimizing the decrease in raffinate purity (less than 2%). PMID:26037316

  7. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A. (Richland, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA)

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.

  8. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  9. Tapped granular column dynamics: simulations, experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, A. D.; Zuo, L.; Blackmore, D.; Wu, H.; Horntrop, D. J.; Parker, D. J.; Windows-Yule, C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper communicates the results of a synergistic investigation that initiates our long term research goal of developing a continuum model capable of predicting a variety of granular flows. We consider an ostensibly simple system consisting of a column of inelastic spheres subjected to discrete taps in the form of half sine wave pulses of amplitude a/d and period ? . A three-pronged approach is used, consisting of discrete element simulations based on linear loading-unloading contacts, experimental validation, and preliminary comparisons with our continuum model in the form of an integro-partial differential equation.

  10. A quick cogener specific analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in municipal sludge utilizing ultrasonic extraction and capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    At the Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) land application is a routine procedure for recycling municipal digested sludge. In 1982 analyses performed by MMSD indicated some areas of the sludge storage lagoons had polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels greater than 50 parts per million (ppm), the EPA established limit for unrestricted land application of sludge. Conflicting test results obtained from commercial laboratories prompted MMSD to find the most reliable test method and also maximize the amount of information received from each analysis. Therefore, an accurate and precise measurement of PCBs in sludge was desired on a daily and sometimes hourly basis. Analysis of sludge samples by soxhlet extraction (SW846 method 3540B) and capillary gas chromatography (GC) required overnight extraction, 2-3 hours extract cleanup and concentration, plus 3 hours elution time on a narrow bore column to achieve a congener specific analysis. A procedure to obtain congener specific PCB data in 2-2.5 hours was developed using ultrasonic extraction (SW846 method 3550B), florisil mini-cartridge cleanup and a 20-meter narrow bore column. Small homogeneous samples of sludge (2-4 grams) were mixed with the extracting solvent in a 50 mL centrifuge tube and then extracted using a sonic dismemberator in the pulsed mode. A 20-meter length was cut from a 60-meter, 0.25 mm i.d. capillary column. Resolution of some of the 95 congeners present was sacrificed to obtain a GC run time of 23 minutes. Sludges ranging from 2% to 30% solids were routinely analyzed with concentrations from detection limits to 200 ppm dry weight. Comparison of the sonication vs. soxhlet extractions exhibited no significant difference in the amount of PCBs recovered from various samples.

  11. Ultra-short ion and neutron pulse production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2006-01-10

    An ion source has an extraction system configured to produce ultra-short ion pulses, i.e. pulses with pulse width of about 1 .mu.s or less, and a neutron source based on the ion source produces correspondingly ultra-short neutron pulses. To form a neutron source, a neutron generating target is positioned to receive an accelerated extracted ion beam from the ion source. To produce the ultra-short ion or neutron pulses, the apertures in the extraction system of the ion source are suitably sized to prevent ion leakage, the electrodes are suitably spaced, and the extraction voltage is controlled. The ion beam current leaving the source is regulated by applying ultra-short voltage pulses of a suitable voltage on the extraction electrode.

  12. Application of a new hybrid organic-inorganic monolithic column for efficient deoxyribonucleic acid purification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengbing; Geng, Jing; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Jing; Feng, Airong; Chen, Xiangdong; Tong, Hua; Hu, Jiming

    2008-03-24

    A new hybrid organic-inorganic monolithic column for efficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction was prepared in situ by polymerization of N-(beta-aminoethyl)-gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AEAPTES) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The main extraction mechanism was based on the Coulombic force between DNA and the amino silica hybrid monolithic column. DNA extraction conditions, such as pH, ion concentration and type, and loading capacity, were optimized online by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Under optimal condition, a 6.0-cm monolithic column provided a capacity of 48 ng DNA with an extraction efficiency of 74+/-6.3% (X+/-RSD). The DNA extraction process on this monolithic column was carried out in a totally aqueous system for the successful purification of DNA and removal of proteins. The PBE2 plasmid could be extracted from Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) crude lysate within 25 min, and the purified DNA was suitable for the amplification of a target fragment by polymerase chain reaction. This study demonstrates a new attractive solid-phase support for DNA extraction to meet the increasingly miniaturized and automated trends of genetic analyses. PMID:18328318

  13. Axial laser heating of three meter theta pinch plasma columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Lowenthal, D. D.

    1980-10-01

    A 3-m long plasma column formed and confined by a fast rising solenoidal field was irradiated from one end by a powerful pulsed CO2 laser. It was found that beam trapping density minima could be maintained for the length of the laser pulse if the plasma diameter exceeded about 1.5 cm. The erosion of the density minimum was governed by classical diffusion processes. Three meter long plasmas in 2.6 cm bore plasma tubes could be fairly uniformly heated by 3.0 kJ of CO2 laser irradiation. Best results were obtained when heating began before or during the theta pinch implosion phase and the plasma fill pressure exceeded 1.0 torr H2. Plasma line energies of about 1 kJ/m could be obtained in a magnetic field rising to 6 T in 4.7 microseconds.

  14. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  15. Dry-Column Flash Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusterman, Alan J.; McDougal, Patrick G.; Glasfeld, Arthur

    1997-10-01

    Dry-column flash chromatography is a safe, powerful, yet easily learned preparative chromatography technique. It has proven useful in research, and an adaptation of the technique for use in large teaching laboratories (general chemistry, organic chemistry) is described here. The student version is similar to vacuum filtration, uses the same compact, readily available glassware, and inexpensive and safe solvents (ethyl acetate and hexane) and adsorbent (Merck grade 60 silica gel). The technique is sufficiently simple and powerful that a beginning student can successfully resolve diastereomers on sample scales ranging from 100 mg to >1 g.

  16. "Supermarket Column Chromatography of Leaf Pigments" Revisited: Simple and Ecofriendly Separation of Plant Carotenoids, Chlorophylls, and Flavonoids from Green and Red Leaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Alice M.; Ferreira, Maria La Salete

    2015-01-01

    A simple and ecofriendly procedure was developed in order to prepare extracts from red and green leaves. This procedure enables the separation of yellow, green, and red band pigments and optimizes the previously reported baking soda "supermarket column". The same extract also led to a novel and colorful potato starch column, which can…

  17. "Supermarket Column Chromatography of Leaf Pigments" Revisited: Simple and Ecofriendly Separation of Plant Carotenoids, Chlorophylls, and Flavonoids from Green and Red Leaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Alice M.; Ferreira, Maria La Salete

    2015-01-01

    A simple and ecofriendly procedure was developed in order to prepare extracts from red and green leaves. This procedure enables the separation of yellow, green, and red band pigments and optimizes the previously reported baking soda "supermarket column". The same extract also led to a novel and colorful potato starch column, which can

  18. PULSE COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Trumbo, D.E.

    1959-02-10

    A transistorized pulse-counting circuit adapted for use with nuclear radiation detecting detecting devices to provide a small, light weight portable counter is reported. The small size and low power requirements of the transistor are of particular value in this instance. The circuit provides an adjustable count scale with a single transistor which is triggered by the accumulated charge on a storage capacitor.

  19. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you are exercising or if you travel to high altitude. Having a pulse oximeter in these cases will allow you to monitor your blood oxygen level and know when you need to increase your supplemental oxygen flow rate. Ask your health care provider what oxygen ...

  20. Development of an analytical method for the determination of polyphenolic compounds in vegetable origin samples by liquid chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection at a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Natale, Anna; Nardiello, Donatella; Palermo, Carmen; Muscarella, Marilena; Quinto, Maurizio; Centonze, Diego

    2015-11-13

    A sensitive and accurate method for the determination of polyphenolic compounds in artichoke bract extracts and olive mill wastewaters by liquid chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection at a glassy carbon working electrode was developed. Preliminary experiments were carried out by cyclic voltammetry to investigate the electrochemical behavior of polyphenols under different mobile phase compositions, and to test the detection and cleaning electrode potentials. Chromatographic separations were performed by using a core-shell C18 column, eluted with acetic acid and acetonitrile, by combined concave-linear binary gradients. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a good column efficiency and peak symmetry were observed, also for stereo and positional isomeric compounds. The developed three-step potential waveform for pulsed amperometric detection was successfully applied for the sensitive chromatographic determination of polyphenols in artichoke extracts and olive mill wastewaters. Linearity, precision and sensitivity of the proposed method have been evaluated. A wide linear range of response (up to 20 mg/L) has been obtained for all the investigated compounds. Detection and quantification limits in the vegetable origin sample extracts were in the range 0.004-0.6 mg/L and 0.01-2mg/L, respectively, while the injection-to-injection repeatability (n=6) ranged from 5 to 13%. The obtained results confirmed the excellent sensitivity of the electrochemical detection, and its suitability for the determination of electroactive polyphenolic compounds at low concentration levels. PMID:26456515

  1. Water Column Correction for Coral Reef Studies by Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application. PMID:25215941

  2. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  3. Extraction chromatography: Progress and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

    1997-10-01

    Extraction chromatography provides a simple and effective method for the analytical and preparative-scale separation of a variety of metal ions. Recent advances in extractant design, particularly the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation in highly acidic media, have significantly improved the utility of the technique. Advances in support design, most notably the introduction of functionalized supports to enhance metal ion retention, promise to yield further improvements. Column instability remains a significant obstacle, however, to the process-scale application of extraction chromatography. 79 refs.

  4. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments (SETAC Europe 22nd Annual Meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  5. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments NAC/SETAC 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  6. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  7. Tevatron extraction microcomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, L.; Finley, D.A.; Harrison, M.; Merz, W.

    1985-06-01

    Extraction in the Fermilab Tevatron is controlled by a multi-processor Multibus microcomputer system called QXR (Quad eXtraction Regulator). QXR monitors several analog beam signals and controls three sets of power supplies: the ''bucker'' and ''pulse'' magnets at a rate of 5760 Hz, and the ''QXR'' magnets at 720 Hz. QXR supports multiple slow spills (up to a total of 35 seconds) with multiple fast pulses intermixed. It linearizes the slow spill and bucks out the high frequency components. Fast extraction is done by outputting a variable pulse waveform. Closed loop learning techniques are used to improve performance from cycle to cycle for both slow and fast extraction. The system is connected to the Tevatron clock system so that it can track the machine cycle. QXR is also connected to the rest of the Fermilab control system, ACNET. Through ACNET, human operators and central computers can monitor and control extraction through communications with QXR. The controls hardware and software both employ some standard and some specialized components. This paper gives an overview of QXR as a control system; another paper summarizes performance.

  8. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  9. High current short pulse ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-08-01

    High current short pulse ion beams can be generated by using a multicusp source. This is accomplished by switching the arc or the RF induction discharge on and off. An alternative approach is to maintain a continuous plasma discharge and extraction voltage but control the plasma flow into the extraction aperture by a combination of magnetic and electric fields. Short beam pulses can be obtained by using a fast electronic switch and a dc bias power supply. It is also demonstrated that very short beam pulses ({approximately} 10 {micro}s) with high repetition rate can be formed by a laser-driven LaB{sub 6} or barium photo-cathode.

  10. Quantitative analysis of the hydrogen peroxide formed in aqueous cigarette tar extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Church, D.F.; Pryor, W.A. )

    1989-01-01

    We have established, for the first time, a reliable method to quantitate hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) generated in aqueous extracts of cigarette smoke tar. The aqueous tar extract was passed through a short reverse-phase column and its H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration determined by differential pulse polarography using an automatic reference subtraction system. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration increased with aging, pH and temperature; the presence of superoxide dismutase lead to lower H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations. This method was applied to many kinds of research and commercial cigarettes. With a few exceptions, the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formed after a fixed time from each cigarette smoke was proportional to its tar yield.

  11. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  12. AEDC arc column diagnostic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, W. E., III; Horn, D. D.

    In order to better understand the electrogasdynamic processes in the arc column of an electric arc air heater, diagnostic measurement techniques were developed at the Arnold Engineering Development Center. A water cooled window segment was installed at different axial locations in the bore of an electric arc heater to allow motion pictures of the arc inside the bore of the arc heater to be recorded. The window survived and excellent photographs of the arc were obtained. Two methods were devised to measure the gas resistance inside of a segmented type arc heater. These methods are discussed and the measurements obtained are compared with analytical calculations. These diagnostic measurement techniques will allow further insight into the nature of the arc process.

  13. Pulsed Operation of an Ion Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard; Gamero-Castano, Manuel; Goebel, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Electronic circuitry has been devised to enable operation of an ion accelerator in either a continuous mode or a highpeak power, low-average-power pulsed mode. In the original intended application, the ion accelerator would be used as a spacecraft thruster and the pulse mode would serve to generate small increments of impulse for precise control of trajectories and attitude. The present electronic drive circuitry generates the extraction voltage in pulses. Pulse-width modulation can affect rapid, fine control of time-averaged impulse or ion flux down to a minimum level much lower than that achievable in continuous operation.

  14. EFFICIENCY OF DIOXIN RECOVERY FROM FLY ASH SAMPLES DURING EXTRACTION AND CLEANUP PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data from preliminary investigations of the efficiency of dioxin recovery from fly ash samples during sample extraction and subsequent column cleanup of sample extracts are discussed. teps of the extraction and the column cleanup procedures were evaluated by using radiolabele...

  15. The jet flotation column control system

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiqiang; Ming Shangzhi; Liu Lijian; Huangfu Jinghua; Huo Sen; Zhang Rongzeng; Yang Hongjun

    1998-12-31

    Compared with the conventional mechanical flotation column, the jet flotation column has the advantages of high selectivity of separation, low investment and production cost, low floor space requirement, low dosage of reagent, easy control; it is more suitable to process fine particles. Recently, many new types of flotation columns have been developed with new methods. Mineral Processing Dept., China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing) designed an aerated, double-jet flotation column in the lab and the industrial trial will be put into operation. One of the significant characteristics of the new type of flotation column is high selectivity of separation, fast bubble mineralization speed. As it is sensitive to various factors, a control system for flotation column has been developed to stabilize the working condition, and this set of control system has been operated in the lab experiment.

  16. On vortex streets behind Taylor columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi, Hatef A.; Andersson, Helge I.

    2010-10-01

    Computer experiments were performed to explore the flow in the vicinity of a truncated normal flat plate in a rapidly rotating fluid. A Taylor column formed above the flat plate and the vortex shedding in the wake of the Taylor column closely resembled the vortex street behind the solid plate. This is probably the first observation of a Krmn vortex street behind a Taylor column in a computational study.

  17. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are persistence (DT50) of the pesticide, and its sorption/desorption(Koc) characteristics. These parameters may vary for the same pesticide from geographic site-to-site and with soil depth. The interactions that normally occur between pesticides and dissolved organic matter (DOM) or WDC are yet other factors that may complicate pesticide leaching behavior.The soil mobility of pesticides is normally tested both in the laboratory and in the field. Lab studies are initially performed to give researchers a preliminary appraisal of the relative mobility of a pesticide. Later, field lysimeter studies can be performed to provide more natural leaching conditions that emulate the actual field use pattern. Lysimeter studies give the most reliable information on the leaching behavior of a pesticide under field conditions, but these studies are time-consuming and expensive and cannot be performed everywhere. It is for this reason that the laboratory soil column leaching approach is commonly utilized to profile the mobility of a pesticide,and appraise how it behaves in different soils, and relative to other pesticides.Because the soil structure is chemically and physically heterogenous, different pesticide tests may produce variable DT50 and Koc values; therefore, initial pesticide mobility testing is undertaken in homogeneously packed columns that contain two or more soils and are eluted at constant flow rates. Such studies are done in duplicate and utilize a conservative tracer element. By fitting an appropriate mathematical model to the breakthrough curve of the conservative tracer selected,researchers determine key mobility parameters, such as pore water velocity, the column-specific dispersion coefficient, and the contribution of non equilibrium transport processes. Such parameters form the basis for estimating the probable transport and degradation rates that will be characteristic of the tested pesticide. Researchers also examine how a pesticide interacts with soil DOM and WDC, and what contribution from facilitated transport to mobility is made as a result of the effects of pH and ionic strength. Other methods are used to test how pesticides may interact with soil components to change mobility. Spectroscopic approaches are used to analyze the nature of soil pesticide complexes. These may provide insight into the mechanism by which interactions occur. Other studies may be performed to determine the effect of agricultural practices (e.g., tillage) on pesticide leaching under controlled conditions using intact soil cores from the field. When preferential flow is suspected to occur, dye staining is used to examine the contribution of macropores to pesticide transport. These methods and others are addressed in the text of this review. PMID:23090630

  18. Fractionating column control apparatus and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, P.A.; Meier, J.; Woodland, B.J.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes an apparatus for separating a mixture of hydrocarbons into discrete products. It comprises: a fractionating column; means for providing heat to the fractionating column; means for feeding a stream of the mixture of hydrocarbons to the fractionating column whereby the stream is fractionated into an overhead product stream and a bottoms product stream; and means for controlling the Reid vapor pressure of the bottoms product. Also described is a method for determining the Reid Vapor Pressure of a bottoms product stream of a fractionating column used for fractionating a multi-component hydrocarbon feed stream into an overhead product stream and a bottoms product stream.

  19. Micro cell isolation column for allergic diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koichiro; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Yuhki; Hide, Michihiro; Miyake, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    We suggest a new micro cell isolation column of basophils for an allergic diagnostic system for detecting human basophils activations. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensors using human basophils allow allergic diagnosis of less than 1 ml of peripheral blood. However, an isolation of basophils from a small amount of blood is not easy. In this study, we constructed a new micro cell isolation column for basophils with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microflow pass including magnetic particles. Furthermore, we determined whether leukocytes were captured by the micro cell isolation column from a small amount of blood. We can isolate basophils from other leukocytes by using the micro cell isolation column.

  20. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  1. Linear optical methods for temporal characterization of femtosecond UV pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadan, Mohammadhassan; D'Ambrosio, Davide; Gesuele, Felice; Velotta, Raffaele; Altucci, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    The realization of a first-order interferometric autocorrelator in a nearly collinear geometry is reported as an alternative method to measure the minimum pulse duration of femtosecond deep-UV laser pulses. The Fourier limited duration of 257-nm femtosecond pulses is measured with high accuracy, and compared to what obtained by spectrally measuring the bandwidth of the pulses. The agreement between the two methods is excellent, thus indicating the interferometric autocorrelator as a useful tool to extract the chirp of femtosecond UV pulses when used together with a second-order autocorrelator to measure the actual pulse duration.

  2. Atmospheric contributions to the column variance in direct-detection dial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Woods, P. T.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most important parameters of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is the delay time between the on and off resonant pulses. It is important that this delay time is sufficiently small to ensure that the atmosphere is effectively frozen between the pulses. Therefore, most Dial systems were designed with two lasers firing alternately less than 1 msec apart. Despite the importance of this parameter in the design of DIAL systems and its contribution to the overall error of a column measurement, very little is known about the size of the error for the case of a direct-detection system using atmospheric backscatter. The ultraviolet DIAL system uses two independent YAG/dye lasers and is therefore suitable for measuring the effects of different pulse delays on the variance of column measurements for a variety of atmospheric conditions. A set of DIAL returns were acquired with the two lasers tuned to the same wavelength and with a range of pulse delay times between 250 microseconds and several minutes. This data set was recorded in full on a computer and was used both to test different averaging techniques and also to evaluate atmospheric contributions to DIAL columns.

  3. Short communication: Amino trap column improves the separation of methylimidazoles, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, and sugars in Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian-Bing; Liu, Ding-Bo; Yu, Shu-Juan; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Yu, Pei

    2014-11-01

    A simultaneous analysis of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in the Maillard reaction was improved by use of an amino trap column. Analysis was carried out by using high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) coupled with an amino trap column. The amino trap column was a useful tool to improve the separation of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde. This technique is useful for simultaneous analysis of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in risk assessment for dairy products. PMID:25200783

  4. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Column anchorage. 1926.755 Section 1926.755 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.755 Column anchorage. (a) General requirements for erection...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Column anchorage. 1926.755 Section 1926.755 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.755 Column anchorage. (a) General requirements for erection...

  6. Circulation in gas-slurry column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.; Kuhlman, J.; Celik, I.; Gross, R.; Nebiolo, E.; Wang, Yi-Zun.

    1990-08-15

    Circulation in bubble columns, such as those used in fischer-tropsch synthesis, detracts from their performance in that gas is carried on average more rapidly through the column, and the residence time distribution of the gas in the column is widened. Both of these factors influence mass-transfer operations in bubble columns. Circulation prediction and measurement has been undertaken using probes, one-dimensional models, laser Doppler velocimetry, and numerical modeling. Local void fraction was measured using resistance probes and a newly developed approach to determining air/water threshold voltage for the probe. A tall column of eight inch diameter was constructed of Plexiglas and the distributor plate was manufactured to distribute air evenly through the base of the column. Data were gathered throughout the volume at three different gas throughputs. Bubble velocities proved difficult to measure using twin probes with cross-correlation because of radial bubble movement. A series of three-dimensional mean and RMS bubble and liquid velocity measurements were also obtained for a turbulent flow in a laboratory model of a bubble column. These measurements have been made using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV), to determine velocity distributions non-intrusively. Finally, the gas-liquid flow inside a vertically situated circular isothermal column reactor was simulated numerically. 74 refs., 170 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. The development of HPLC columns: Packing structure, column efficiency, stability and standardization

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, K.K.; Hallman, M.; Ranis-Jansen, R.

    1995-12-01

    Packing procedures for HPLC columns, such as the slurry technique (analytical columns) and the axial compression technique (preparative columns) have been widely established. However, there is still a lack of fundamental knowledge concerning the actual packing structure of a column and its impact on efficiency and stability. Recently, attempts have been made to model the packing procedure as well as the column bed structure and to apply experimental methods to characterize the assembly of microparticles in a column and the elution profiles in situ. The high reproducibility of commercial HPLC columns with respect to efficiency is mainly due to the substantial improvements made in particle technology, column hardware and optimized column packing procedures. The stability of commercial columns is acceptable but very much dependent on the extent of sample clean-up and the column handling and operation by the user. To validate HPLC methods, a project is planned to establish a C18 reversed phase reference column for standardization and certification in the frame of the EC Programme on {open_quotes}Measurements and Testing{open_quotes}.

  8. Modeling of column apparatuses: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Doichinova, M. E-mail: petyabs@yahoo.com; Popova-Krumova, P. E-mail: petyabs@yahoo.com

    2013-12-18

    This paper presents a review of the modeling method on the base of the physical approximations of the mechanics of continua, which have been developed for processes in column apparatuses. This method includes diffusion type of model for modeling of mass transfer with chemical reaction in column apparatuses with and without circulation zones. The diffusion type of model is used for modeling of scale effect in column apparatuses too. The study concluded that the proposal method is possibility for investigation the influence of radial non uniformity of the velocity distribution on the process efficiency, influence of zones breadths on the mass transfer efficiency in the column. The method of the column apparatuses modeling can be used for modeling of physical and chemical absorption, chemical adsorption, homogeneous and heterogeneous (catalytic) chemical reactions, airlift reactors for chemical and photochemical reactions.

  9. Effect of the homogeneity of the column set on the performance of a simulated moving bed unit. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Mihlbachler, K; Fricke, J; Yun, T; Seidel-Morgenster, A; Schmidt-Traub, H; Guiochon, G

    2001-01-26

    Although it is impossible to manufacture identical columns for use in a simulated moving bed (SMB) process, theoretical studies assume that all the columns in an SMB unit have identical characteristics. In practice, calculations in modeling and optimization studies are made with the average values of each column parameter set. In this report, the effects on SMB process performance caused by column-to-column fluctuations of the parameters are discussed. As a first step, we show how the differences in porosity of the columns may be taken into account with a revised set of separation conditions. Reductions in the purity of the extract and the raffinate streams are quantitatively related to the column-to-column fluctuations of the retention times of the two components arising from these porosity differences. For the sake of simplicity, the discussion first addresses the case of a four-column SMB operating under linear conditions. Then, the scope is extended to the cases of SMB units incorporating several columns in each section and to SMB units operating under nonlinear conditions. PMID:11218134

  10. Supercritical fluid extraction on semibatch mode for the removal of terpene in citrus oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Masaki; Goto, Motonobu; Hirose, Tsutomu

    1996-06-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of a mixture of limonene and linalool was carried out with a rectification column in the semibatch operation mode. For the simple semibatch extraction where the column was controlled at the uniform temperature without an internal reflux, the Rayleigh equation, developed for the simple batch distillation, was applied to express the dynamic extraction behavior. In this paper the Peng-Robinson equation of state was used to estimate the ternary phase equilibria. The semibatch extraction with internal flux induced by a temperature gradient of the rectification column increased the separation selectivity. The internal reflux ratio was calculated by the measurement of the extraction rates at the top and bottom of the column, and it was 7.6 for the column having a temperature gradient from 313 K at the bottom to 333 K at the top at 8.8 MPa. Behavior in the rectification column was discussed by means of estimated physical properties.

  11. The Bane of Column Density Analysis and What Good It Can Do for Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How-Huan Chen, Hope; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Burkhart, Blakesley K.; Myers, Philip C.; Collins, David C.; Meisner, Aaron M.; Lee, Katherine I.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that astronomers are inclined to apply statistical tools, from least-square fitting to machine learning, on the big, high-dimensional data, not enough care is often spent on examining the biases that could be introduced by sample selection and observation. The talk focuses on investigating arguably one of the most often applied statistical analyses in clouds and filaments recently--the probability distribution function (PDF) analysis of column density. We look at the correlation between column density PDF and various physical processes including turbulence and star formation as traced by young stellar objects and star forming cores, in both observation and simulation; as well as potential problems in statistically consistent fitting of column density distribution, validating correlation, biased sample selection, and projection effects. Our results show that 1) even though on large scale, the "width" of the column density PDF seems to correlate with turbulence, no clear correlation is found between column density PDF and turbulence in both simulation and observation, and 2) even previous works show that the index of the "power-law tail" correlates with the star formation activity, there is statistical ambiguity in the sampling of column density structures and associating point sources with any of these structures. We further analyze the hierachical structures of column density in molecular clouds and filaments, using the structure extraction algorithm, the dendrogram.

  12. Purification of C70 using charcoal as a stationary phase in a flash chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivens, W. A.; Cassell, A. M.; Kinsey, K. E.; Tour, J. M.

    1995-06-01

    Described is a method for the purification of C60 and C70 using a flash chromatography column that contains charcoal as the stationary phase. A number of functionalized aromatic solvents are studied and their efficacy for extraction, NMR spectral acquisition, and chromatographic purification of fullerenes is discussed. Ortho-dichlorobenzene was chosen as the best solvent for these applications and examples of its use in the extraction of higher fullerenes (greater than C84) and in the rapid acquisition of C-13 NMR spectra are given. Finally, single column purification of both C60 and C70 is discussed. Starting with a typical arc-derived mixture of soluble fullerenes, 5.97 g of C60 at greater than 99.9 percent purity and 1.58 g of C70 at greater than 97 percent purity were produced in a single column pass.

  13. Highly efficient capillary columns packed with superficially porous particles via sequential column packing.

    PubMed

    Treadway, James W; Wyndham, Kevin D; Jorgenson, James W

    2015-11-27

    Highly efficient capillary columns packed with superficially porous particles were created for use in ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography. Superficially porous particles around 1.5?m in diameter were packed into fused silica capillary columns with 30, 50, and 75?m internal diameters. To create the columns, several capillary columns were serially packed from the same slurry, with packing progress plots being generated to follow the packing of each column. Characterization of these columns using hydroquinone yielded calculated minimum reduced plate heights as low as 1.24 for the most efficient 30?m internal diameter column, corresponding to over 500,000plates/m. At least one highly efficient column (minimum reduced plate height less than 2) was created for all three of the investigated column inner diameters, with the smallest diameter columns having the highest efficiency. This study proves that highly efficient capillary columns can be created using superficially porous particles and shows the efficiency potential of these particles. PMID:26499974

  14. A Rapid Screening Analysis of Antioxidant Compounds in Native Australian Food Plants Using Multiplexed Detection with Active Flow Technology Columns.

    PubMed

    Rupesinghe, Emmanuel Janaka Rochana; Jones, Andrew; Shalliker, Ross Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional techniques for identifying antioxidant and phenolic compounds in native Australian food plants are laborious and time-consuming. Here, we present a multiplexed detection technique that reduces analysis time without compromising separation performance. This technique is achieved using Active Flow Technology-Parallel Segmented Flow (AFT-PSF) columns. Extracts from cinnamon myrtle (Backhousia myrtifolia) and lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves were analysed via multiplexed detection using an AFT-PSF column with underivatised UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy (MS), and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH()) derivatisation for antioxidants as detection methods. A number of antioxidant compounds were detected in the extracts of each leaf extract. PMID:26805792

  15. Analysis of saikosaponins in Bupleuri Radix and Caihu-shugan-san using reversed-phase HPLC with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ha-Jeong; Sim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Sa-im; Lee, Yong-Moon; Lee, Je-Hyun; Park, Yong-Duk; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2011-03-01

    A simple and sensitive reversed-phase (RP) HPLC coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) method was developed to determine the saikosaponin content in Bupleuri Radix or Caihu-shugan-san. Four saikosaponins in Bupleuri Radix and Caihu-shugan-san were extracted with a 6:4 solution of 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 8)/100% ethanol. Pulsed amperometric detection of carbohydrates in four major saikosaponins was highly sensitive when used with a water-acetonitrile gradient on an alkaline RP column with a post-column delivery system. The limits of detection (S/N=3) and of quantification (S/N=10) of saikosaponins were 0.01-0.02 and 0.03-0.05 ?g/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precision (RSDs) were each <9.7% and the average recoveries were 95.0-97.6% in Bupleuri Radix. This method can be used to analyze saikosaponins in Bupleuri Radix and Caihu-shugan-san. PMID:21312331

  16. Mini-column screening assay for tetracyclines in chicken.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Ali R

    2015-01-01

    A simple, rapid, reliable and economical mini-column (MC) method for the detection of tetracyclines (TCs) residues in chicken meat was developed. The method employs a commonly available Pasteur pipette which is tightly packed with silica gel and anhydrous sodium sulfate. Clean-up and detection of illegal levels can be achieved on the same column. Viewing the developed MC under an ultraviolet lamp revealed that TCs can be detected as a compact golden yellow fluorescent band at the junction between the anhydrous sodium sulfate and silica gel layers. Comparing the yellow band of control extracts with those fortified (100ngml(-1)) showed no overlap between analyte and impurities. The limit of detection (LOD) of the MC assay was 1ng, indicating that the chicken sample containing 10g TCs kg(-1) sample could be easily detected. Moreover, the intensity of the yellow band increased whenever TCs levels in the extract increased. Evaluation utility of the method with blind samples as controls or samples fortified with total TCs at various levels indicated that the total blank and spiked samples at levels equal or below the permissible limits were assessed as accepted. The method can provide an alternative to microbial screening assays and could be used as an effective pre-screening technique in public health laboratories. PMID:25430068

  17. An Optimal Pulse System Design by Multichannel Sensors Fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dimin; Zhang, David; Lu, Guangming

    2016-03-01

    Pulse diagnosis, recognized as an important branch of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has a long history for health diagnosis. Certain features in the pulse are known to be related with the physiological status, which have been identified as biomarkers. In recent years, an electronic equipment is designed to obtain the valuable information inside pulse. Single-point pulse acquisition platform has the benefit of low cost and flexibility, but is time consuming in operation and not standardized in pulse location. The pulse system with a single-type sensor is easy to implement, but is limited in extracting sufficient pulse information. This paper proposes a novel system with optimal design that is special for pulse diagnosis. We combine a pressure sensor with a photoelectric sensor array to make a multichannel sensor fusion structure. Then, the optimal pulse signal processing methods and sensor fusion strategy are introduced for the feature extraction. Finally, the developed optimal pulse system and methods are tested on pulse database acquired from the healthy subjects and the patients known to be afflicted with diabetes. The experimental results indicate that the classification accuracy is increased significantly under the optimal design and also demonstrate that the developed pulse system with multichannel sensors fusion is more effective than the previous pulse acquisition platforms. PMID:25608317

  18. Pretreatment method for immunoassay of polychlorinated biphenyls in transformer oil using multilayer capillary column and microfluidic liquid-liquid partitioning.

    PubMed

    Aota, Arata; Date, Yasumoto; Terakado, Shingo; Ohmura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that are present in the insulating oil inside a large number of transformers. To aid in eliminating PCB-contaminated transformers, PCBs in oil need to be measured using a rapid and cost-effective analytical method. We previously reported a pretreatment method for the immunoassay of PCBs in oil using a large-scale multilayer column and a microchip with multiple microrecesses, which permitted concentrated solvent extraction. In this paper, we report on a more rapid and facile pretreatment method, without an evaporation process, by improving the column and the microchip. In a miniaturized column, the decomposition and separation of oil were completed in 2 min. PCBs can be eluted from the capillary column at concentrations seven-times higher than those from the previous column. The total volume of the microrecesses was increased by improving the microrecess structure, the enabling extraction of four-times the amount of PCBs achieved with the previous system. By interfacing the capillary column with the improved microchip, PCBs in the eluate from the column were extracted into dimethyl sulfoxide in microrecesses with high enrichment and without the need for evaporation. Pretreatment was completed within 20 min. The pretreated oil was analyzed using a flow-based kinetic exclusion immunoassay. The limit of detection of PCBs in oil was 0.15 mg kg(-1), which satisfies the criterion set in Japan of 0.5 mg kg(-1). PMID:23574664

  19. Microwaves Scattering by Underdense Inhomogeneous Plasma Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-03-01

    The scattering characteristics of microwaves (MWs) by an underdense inhomogeneous plasma column have been investigated. The plasma column is generated by hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in a glass tube filled with low pressure argon. The plasma density in the column can be varied by adjusting the discharge current. The scattering power of X-band MWs by the column is measured at different discharge currents and receiving angles. The results show that the column can affect the properties of scattering wave significantly regardless of its plasma frequency much lower than the incident wave frequency. The power peak of the scattering wave shifts away from 0° to about ±15° direction. The finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method is employed to analyze the wave scattering by plasma column with different electron density distributions. The reflected MW power from a metal plate located behind the column is also measured to investigate the scattering effect on reducing MW reflectivity of a metal target. This study is expected to deepen the understanding of plasma-electromagnetic wave interaction and expand the applications concerning plasma antenna and plasma stealth.

  20. Single column locking plate fixation is inadequate in two column acetabular fractures. A biomechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine whether one can achieve stable fixation of a two column (transverse) acetabular fracture by only fixing a single column with a locking plate and unicortical locking screws. We hypothesized that a locking plate applied to the anterior column of a transverse acetabular fracture would create a construct that is more rigid than a non-locking plate, and that this construct would be biomechanically comparable to two column fixation. Methods Using urethane foam models of the pelvis, we simulated transverse acetabular fractures and stabilized them with 1) an anterior column plate with bicortical screws, 2) an anterior locking plate with unicortical screws, 3) an anterior plate and posterior column lag screw, and 4) a posterior plate with an anterior column lag screw. These constructs were mechanically loaded on a servohydraulic material testing machine. Construct stiffness and fracture displacement were measured. Result and Discussion We found that two column fixation is 54% stiffer than a single column fixation with a conventional plate with bicortical screws. There was no significant difference between fixation with an anterior column locking plate with unicortical screws and an anterior plate with posterior column lag screw. We detected a non-significant trend towards more stiffness for the anterior locking plate compared to the anterior non-locking plate. Conclusion In conclusion, a locking plate construct of the anterior column provides less stability than a traditional both column construct with posterior plate and anterior column lag screw. However, the locking construct offers greater strength than a non-locking, bicortical construct, which in addition often requires extensive contouring and its application is oftentimes accompanied by the risk of neurovascular damage. PMID:20459688

  1. Generation of short and intense attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sabih Ud Din

    Extremely broad bandwidth attosecond pulses (which can support 16as pulses) have been demonstrated in our lab based on spectral measurements, however, compensation of intrinsic chirp and their characterization has been a major bottleneck. In this work, we developed an attosecond streak camera using a multi-layer Mo/Si mirror (bandwidth can support ˜100as pulses) and position sensitive time-of-flight detector, and the shortest measured pulse was 107.5as using DOG, which is close to the mirror bandwidth. We also developed a PCGPA based FROG-CRAB algorithm to characterize such short pulses, however, it uses the central momentum approximation and cannot be used for ultra-broad bandwidth pulses. To facilitate the characterization of such pulses, we developed PROOF using Fourier filtering and an evolutionary algorithm. We have demonstrated the characterization of pulses with a bandwidth corresponding to ˜20as using synthetic data. We also for the first time demonstrated single attosecond pulses (SAP) generated using GDOG with a narrow gate width from a multi-cycle driving laser without CE-phase lock, which opens the possibility of scaling attosecond photon flux by extending the technique to peta-watt class lasers. Further, we generated intense attosecond pulse trains (APT) from laser ablated carbon plasmas and demonstrated ˜9.5 times more intense pulses as compared to those from argon gas and for the first time demonstrated a broad continuum from a carbon plasma using DOG. Additionally, we demonstrated ˜100 times enhancement in APT from gases by switching to 400 nm (blue) driving pulses instead of 800 nm (red) pulses. We measured the ellipticity dependence of high harmonics from blue pulses in argon, neon and helium, and developed a simple theoretical model to numerically calculate the ellipticity dependence with good agreement with experiments. Based on the ellipticity dependence, we proposed a new scheme of blue GDOG which we predict can be employed to extract intense SAP from an APT driven by blue laser pulses. We also demonstrated compression of long blue pulses into >240 microJ broad-bandwidth pulses using neon filled hollow core fiber, which is the highest reported pulse energy of short blue pulses. However, compression of phase using chirp mirrors is still a technical challenge.

  2. Group methods for advanced column control compared

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, D.E.; Chauvin, L.; Tolfo, F.

    1985-05-01

    Group method calculations are suited for distillation column advanced controls in real time. Five calculation methods are discussed and compared for accuracy by computing the internal reflux for several columns and operating conditions. Practical design criteria are defined and illustrated by comparing two distillation column reflex control schemes. The resulting conclusions include the best location and preferred order of group method calculations. Because group methods are simpler than stage-to-stage or successive approximation methods, they are more suitable to online computer calculations. Group methods are considered accurate enough for control purposes.

  3. Separation of fructooligosaccharides using zeolite fixed bed columns.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Raquel Cristine; Maugeri Filho, Francisco

    2010-07-15

    Recent studies have shown that the chromatographic separation of mixtures of monosaccharides and disaccharides may be improved by employing Y zeolites, a procedure which holds promise in the separation of oligosaccharides. In the present study, a column packed with zeolite was employed to study the separation of fructooligosaccharides (FOS). FOS were produced by an enzyme isolated from Rhodotorula sp., which produces GF2 (kestose), GF3 (nystose) and GF4 (frutofuranosyl nystose). The identification and quantification of the sugars were carried out by ion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The separation of fructooligosaccharides was carried out using a fixed bed column packed with Ba2+-exchange Y zeolites. The effects of temperature (40-50 degrees C), injected volume per bed volume (2.55-7.64%), superficial velocity (0.1-0.15 cm min(-1)) and eluent composition (40-60% ethanol) were investigated using a fractionary factorial design with separation efficiency as the response. The results showed that the most favorable conditions for the separation of the oligosaccharide-glucose mixture were 60% ethanol as eluent, temperature of 50 degrees C, superficial velocity of 0.1 cm min(-1) and 2.55% injection volume per bed volume of injection mixture, using two columns in series. The values for separation efficiency were 0.60 for oligosaccharide-glucose, 1.00 for oligosaccharide-fructose, 0.22 for oligosaccharide-sucrose, 0.43 for glucose-fructose, 0.82 for glucose-sucrose and 1.23 for fructose-sucrose. PMID:20617538

  4. Use of MiniColumns for linear isotherm parameter estimation and prediction of benchtop column performance.

    PubMed

    Keller, William R; Evans, Steven T; Ferreira, Gisela; Robbins, David; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-10-30

    In this paper, a comparison between experimental chromatography data and column simulations is carried out to determine the efficacy of using miniaturized chromatography columns (MiniColumns) for both column modeling parameter estimation and process development. Normalization of the data with respect to column volumes along with appropriate translations to account for system differences is shown to result in comparability of the experimental data for the MiniColumn and benchtop systems. A parameter estimation protocol is then employed to determine the linear steric mass-action (SMA) isotherm and lumped mass transport parameters for two cation exchange resins. The models are then validated and simulations using different parameter sets from the MiniColumn and benchtop systems are shown to result in similar predicted chromatography profiles and calculated retention volumes. The parameters generated from the MiniColumn system are demonstrated to be well suited for predicting experimental data from the benchtop system. These simulation results, the ability to operate MiniColumns in parallel, and the significantly lower material requirements per experiment support an industry trend toward increased usage of miniaturized chromatography columns as a scale-down model for process development. PMID:26422303

  5. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  6. PRTR ion exchange vault column sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1995-03-14

    This report documents ion exchange column sampling and Non Destructive Assay (NDA) results from activities in 1994, for the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. The objective was to obtain sufficient information to prepare disposal documentation for the ion exchange columns found in the PRTR Ion exchange vault. This activity also allowed for the monitoring of the liquid level in the lower vault. The sampling activity contained five separate activities: (1) Sampling an ion exchange column and analyzing the ion exchange media for purpose of waste disposal; (2) Gamma and neutron NDA testing on ion exchange columns located in the upper vault; (3) Lower vault liquid level measurement; (4) Radiological survey of the upper vault; and (5) Secure the vault pending waste disposal.

  7. COMPARATIVE YIELDS OF MUTAGENS FROM CIGARETTE SMOKERS' URINE OBTAINED BY USING SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urine from cigarette smokers was prepared for mutagenicity testing by extracting mutagens with solid phase extraction columns. ommercially available prepacked bonded silicas (cotadecyl, cyclohexyl, cyanopropyl) were compared for their efficiency and specificity in concentration o...

  8. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Quality improvements of cell membrane chromatographic column.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Chen, Xiaofei; Cao, Yan; Jia, Dan; Wang, Dongyao; Zhu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Juping; Hong, Zhanying; Chai, Yifeng

    2014-09-12

    Cell Membrane Chromatography (CMC) is a biological affinity chromatographic method using a silica stationary phase covered with specific cell membrane. However, its short life span and poor quality control was highlighted in a lot of research articles. In this study, special attention has been paid to the disruption, cell load and packing procedure in order to improve the quality of the CMC columns. Hereto, two newly established CMC models, HSC-T6/CMC and SMMC-7721/CMC have been developed and used in this research project. The optimization of the abovementioned parameters resulted in a better reproducibility of the retention time of the compound GFT (RSD<10%) and improved significantly the quality of the CMC columns. 3.510(7)cells were the optimal cell load for the preparation of the CMC columns, the disruption condition was optimized to 5 cycles (400W and 20s interval per cycle) by an ultrasonic processor reducing the total time of cell disruption to 1.5min and the packing flow rate was optimized by applying a linear gradient program. Additionally, 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) was employed to improve the column quality and prolong the column life span. The results showed that the retention time was longer with PFA treated columns than the ones obtained with the control groups. PMID:25115453

  10. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better detection via good peak separation with a longer run time is a better asset than moderate peak separation with a shorter run time. Even given that RESOLVE is highly interested in water and that mission timeline is of significant importance given the short seven-to-ten-day mission timeline, worse detection with an 8m column may lead to overlooking other substances existing on the moon that could advance planetary science. Thus, I recommend the 20m column. However, if mission timeline and water separation are deemed the highest priority, the 8m column should be selected due to its ability to separate water within a shorter run time than the 20m column.

  11. Counter-current carbon dioxide extraction of soy skim

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of carbon dioxide in a counter-current fractionation column was investigated as a means to remove residual fat from soy skim after enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of soybeans. The stainless steel column was 1.2 meters long with an internal diameter of 1.75 cm and filled protruded stainles...

  12. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  13. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  14. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  15. Analysis of Column Instability Modes in Liquid Jet in Crossflow Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Sina; Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios; Herrmann, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    Atomizing liquids by injecting them into crossflows is a common approach to generate fuel sprays in gas turbines and augmentors. The mechanisms by which the liquid jet initially breaks up, however, are not well understood. To analyze the instability mechanism of the liquid column, we perform proper orthogonal decomposition of side view images extracted from detailed simulations of the near injector primary atomization region. This analysis shows a single dominant wavelength with the associated interface corrugation traveling downstream with the jet. Using consistent temporal averaging of the simulation data we extract mean interface geometries and boundary layer velocity profiles. These are used to calculate the most unstable wavelength of the shear layer instability following the procedure of Boeck & Zaleski (2005). The theoretical wavelengths are comparable to those extracted from the simulation data. In addition to shear layer instability we analyze Rayleigh-Taylor as a potential instability mechanism of the liquid column.

  16. Preparation and performance of immobilized yeast cells in columns containing no inert carrier. [Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, H.Y.; Chiang, L.C.; Yang, C.M.; Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1983-02-01

    Schizosaccharomyes pombe was cultivated in a medium of glucose (10 g/l), malt extract (3 g/l), yeast extract (3 g/l), and bactopeptone (5 g/l) to form flocs. More than 95% of the cell population were flocculated. Variation in glucose concentration (from 10 to 11 g/l) did not affect flocculation. Yeast extract helped induce flocculation. Application of the immobilized yeast for the continuous production of ethanol was tested in a column reactor. Soft yeast flocs (50-200 mesh) underwent morphological changes to heavy particles (0.1-9.3 cm diameter) after continuously being fed with fresh substrates in the column. Productivity as high as 87 g EtOH/l/hour was obtained when a 150 g/l glucose medium was fed. The performance of this yeast reactor was stable over a two-month period. The ethanol yield was 97% of the theoretical maximum based upon glucose consumed. (Refs. 16).

  17. Column Selection for Biomedical Analysis Supported by Column Classification Based on Four Test Parameters.

    PubMed

    Plenis, Alina; Rekowska, Natalia; B?czek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on correlating the column classification obtained from the method created at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL), with the chromatographic resolution attained in biomedical separation. In the KUL system, each column is described with four parameters, which enables estimation of the FKUL value characterising similarity of those parameters to the selected reference stationary phase. Thus, a ranking list based on the FKUL value can be calculated for the chosen reference column, then correlated with the results of the column performance test. In this study, the column performance test was based on analysis of moclobemide and its two metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography (LC), using 18 columns. The comparative study was performed using traditional correlation of the FKUL values with the retention parameters of the analytes describing the column performance test. In order to deepen the comparative assessment of both data sets, factor analysis (FA) was also used. The obtained results indicated that the stationary phase classes, closely related according to the KUL method, yielded comparable separation for the target substances. Therefore, the column ranking system based on the FKUL-values could be considered supportive in the choice of the appropriate column for biomedical analysis. PMID:26805819

  18. Column Selection for Biomedical Analysis Supported by Column Classification Based on Four Test Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Plenis, Alina; Rekowska, Natalia; Bączek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on correlating the column classification obtained from the method created at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL), with the chromatographic resolution attained in biomedical separation. In the KUL system, each column is described with four parameters, which enables estimation of the FKUL value characterising similarity of those parameters to the selected reference stationary phase. Thus, a ranking list based on the FKUL value can be calculated for the chosen reference column, then correlated with the results of the column performance test. In this study, the column performance test was based on analysis of moclobemide and its two metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography (LC), using 18 columns. The comparative study was performed using traditional correlation of the FKUL values with the retention parameters of the analytes describing the column performance test. In order to deepen the comparative assessment of both data sets, factor analysis (FA) was also used. The obtained results indicated that the stationary phase classes, closely related according to the KUL method, yielded comparable separation for the target substances. Therefore, the column ranking system based on the FKUL-values could be considered supportive in the choice of the appropriate column for biomedical analysis. PMID:26805819

  19. Pulse-burst laser systems for fast Thomson scattering (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Holly, D. J.; Robl, P. E.; Borchardt, M. T.; Falkowski, A. F.; Harris, W. S.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Stephens, H. D.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-10-15

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) lasers have been upgraded to ''pulse-burst'' capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to 15 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates of 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to record the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature profile and temperature fluctuations. To further these investigations, a custom pulse-burst laser system with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is now being commissioned.

  20. Pulse-burst laser systems for fast Thomson scattering (invited).

    PubMed

    Den Hartog, D J; Ambuel, J R; Borchardt, M T; Falkowski, A F; Harris, W S; Holly, D J; Parke, E; Reusch, J A; Robl, P E; Stephens, H D; Yang, Y M

    2010-10-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to 15 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates of 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to record the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature profile and temperature fluctuations. To further these investigations, a custom pulse-burst laser system with a maximum pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz is now being commissioned. PMID:21033868

  1. Comprehensive two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography system with immobilized liposome chromatography column and reversed-phase column for separation of complex traditional Chinese medicine Longdan Xiegan Decoction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Kong, Liang; Lei, Xiaoyuan; Hu, Lianghai; Zou, Hanfa; Welbeck, Ed; Bligh, S W Annie; Wang, Zhengtao

    2009-03-13

    A comprehensive two-dimensional HPLC system with an immobilized liposome chromatography (ILC) column in conjunction with an RP column (in tandem) was developed for the screening and analysis of the membrane-permeable compounds in a traditional Chinese medicine prescription Longdan Xiegan Decoction (LXD). More than 50 components in LXD were resolved using the developed separation system. Eight flavonoids and two iridoids were identified interacting with the ILC column; a system that mimics biomembranes. The results show that the developed comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography system can be used for identifying membrane permeable natural products in complex matrixes such as extracts of traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions. PMID:18585729

  2. Monolithic and core-shell columns in comprehensive two-dimensional HPLC: a review.

    PubMed

    Jandera, Pavel; Hjek, Tom; Sta?kov, Magda

    2015-01-01

    The crucial point affecting the separation time in comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography is the performance of the column used in the second dimension, which should allow highly efficient fast chromatographic separations in the short time available for the analysis of fractions transferred from the first to the second dimension (often 1min or less). This can be accomplished on short columns packed with sub-2-?m particles, at the cost of very high operation pressure. Core-shell or silica monolithic columns have better permeability, and their use in the second dimension of comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography with conventional liquid chromatography instrumentation is continuously increasing. Monolithic columns based on organic polymer matrices offer a wide selection of stationary phase chemistries, including new hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography materials, which can be used in the design of novel two-dimensional separations. Some organic polymer monolithic materials offer a dual retention mechanism (reversed-phase hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography), so a single column can be used in alternating runs for highly orthogonal off-line two-dimensional and even three-dimensional separations. In the present work, the properties of core-shell and silica gel monolithic columns are briefly summarized and their applications in two-dimensional separations of peptides, proteins, oligomer surfactants, fats and oils, carotenoids, phenolic and flavone compounds in plant extracts, food, and beverages are reviewed. PMID:25326881

  3. Affinity-based screening of combinatorial libraries using automated, serial-column chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.M.; Williams, K.P.; McGuinness, B.

    1996-04-01

    The authors have developed an automated serial chromatographic technique for screening a library of compounds based upon their relative affinity for a target molecule. A {open_quotes}target{close_quotes} column containing the immobilized target molecule is set in tandem with a reversed-phase column. A combinatorial peptide library is injected onto the target column. The target-bound peptides are eluted from the first column and transferred automatically to the reversed-phase column. The target-specific peptide peaks from the reversed-phase column are identified and sequenced. Using a monoclonal antibody (3E-7) against {beta}-endorphin as a target, we selected a single peptide with sequence YGGFL from approximately 5800 peptides present in a combinatorial library. We demonstrated the applicability of the technology towards selection of peptides with predetermined affinity for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). We expect that this technology will have broad applications for high throughput screening of chemical libraries or natural product extracts. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Detachment of Bacteria From Porous Media in Laboratory Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, J. L.; Bolster, C. H.

    2004-05-01

    Extended tailing, the continued elution of bacteria at low concentrations, has often been observed in breakthrough curves during both laboratory and field transport experiments. Tailing is caused by the slow detachment (also referred to as entrainment or desorption) of previously attached cells over time, with aqueous concentrations often orders of magnitude below the peak concentration. This transfer of bacteria from the solid phase to the aqueous phase results in the long-term release of bacteria back into drinking water supplies, posing potential human health risks. Unlike the factors controlling bacterial attachment to aquifer sediments, the processes controlling bacterial detachment from sediment surfaces are not well understood. We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the transport and detachment of Escherichia coli (E. coli) at resting state through uncoated and Fe-coated quartz sand in KCl solution at low and high ionic strength (0.001-0.01 M). A one-half pore volume pulse of 3[H]-labeled E. coli was injected into flow-through columns, and column effluent was sampled for approximately 18 pore volumes. To account for biological effects on detachment, experiments were also run using E. coli treated with 0.5% formaldehyde. To calculate bacterial detachment rates, we fit the one dimensional advection-dispersion equation modified to account for deposition (Kf) and detachment (Kr) to the breakthrough curves for each treatment combination. In general, higher (Kr) values were observed under conditions less conducive to irreversible attachment, such as low ionic strength and uncoated sands. Tailing was not observed for experiments using Fe-coated sands, indicating that iron-coated sands irreversibly removed bacteria from the water column. There were no significant differences between fixed and live cells, indicating that bacterial cells at resting state behave like inorganic colloids, which suggests that under these conditions biological effects on attachment and detachment are minimal. Our results indicate that iron-coated sediments can permanently remove bacteria from groundwater under certain conditions. This knowledge is valuable for protecting groundwater supplies from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms.

  5. Automated metal-free multiple-column nanoLC for improved phosphopeptide analysis sensitivity and throughput

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Rui; Ding, Shi-Jian; Shen, Yufeng; Camp, David G.; Livesay, Eric A.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-15

    We report on the development and characterization of an automated metal-free nanoscale multiple-capillary system for reversed-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of phosphopeptides. The system incorporates a capillary column (50 um i.d. 30 cm, packed with 5 um C18 particles) coupled on-line to a solid phase extraction column (150 um i.d. 4 cm, packed with 5 um C18 particles). Electrospray ionization tips are constructed on the packed capillary column to couple the reversed-phase liquid chromatographic separation to a linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometer.

  6. Tooth extraction

    MedlinePLUS

    A tooth extraction is a procedure to remove a tooth from the gum socket. It is usually done by a general ... gum. If you need a more complex tooth extraction: You will be given sedation so you are ...

  7. Characterizing gaseous flow in submicron chromatography columns.

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Chung-Nin Channy

    2003-05-01

    Enormous interest exists to develop the next generation of an integrated microsystem for chemical and biological analysis ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) and to further reduce the volume of the system. One approach is to scale down the size of critical components and to explore any pumping mechanism that can minimize the power requirement. Since the majority of the pumping requirement is to overcome the wall resistance in the gas chromatography (GC) column, our attention is to study the gas flow in this GC column. As the column dimension decreases, the gaseous flow will go from a continuum regime into a non-continuum regime; i.e., slip, transition, and free molecular regimes. Thus it is very important to well characterize the gaseous flow in submicron columns and to understand its flow behavior. Specifically, in this study, our focus is to investigate the effects of viscosity, rarefaction, and compressibility as the column dimension decreases. Both theoretical predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  8. Determination of astragalin and astragaloside content in Radix Astragali using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ha-Jeong; Park, Yong-Duk

    2012-04-01

    Astragalin and astragalosides were measured in Radix Astragali using reversed-phase chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection. Because the target compounds showed poor stability in aqueous solutions, they were extracted in 100% methanol under reflux. All compounds were detected with high sensitivity under highly alkaline conditions using sodium hydroxide as a post-column eluent. The limits of detection and quantification of target compounds were 0.02-0.36 ?g/mL and 0.06-1.09 ?g/mL, respectively, and the linear regression coefficients were 0.9982-1.0000. The intra- and inter-day precisions were <0.92% in retention time and <4.78% in calculated contents. Average recoveries were >91.33%. Astragalin and astragaloside contents between Radix Astragali at different ages and in different parts were successfully determined without sample purification or concentration. PMID:22209546

  9. Simultaneous determination of malachite green and its metabolite leucomalachite green in eel plasma using post-column oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hajee, C A; Haagsma, N

    1995-07-21

    A rapid HPLC method with solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up for malachite green (MG) and leucomalachite green (LMG) in eel plasma was developed. MG and LMG were extracted with a buffered methanolic solution. The extract was subjected to aromatic sulphonic acid SPE. MG and LMG were eluted from the SPE column with methanol after a treatment with ammonia gas. The reconstituted eluate was analyzed on a Chromspher B column with acetonitrile-ion-pair buffer (pH 4.0) (6:4, v/v) as the mobile phase and detection at 610 nm after post-column oxidation with PbO2. The average recoveries for MG and LMG over the linear range of applicability (20-2500 ng/ml) were 82 +/- 1% and 83 +/- 1%, respectively. The limits of quantification were 5.0 micrograms/l for MG and 0.9 micrograms/l for LMG. PMID:7581898

  10. Pulse Consumption, Satiety, and Weight Management1

    PubMed Central

    McCrory, Megan A.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Eichelsdoerfer, Petra E.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has reached epidemic proportions, making finding effective solutions to reduce obesity a public health priority. One part of the solution could be for individuals to increase consumption of nonoilseed pulses (dry beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils), because they have nutritional attributes thought to benefit weight control, including slowly digestible carbohydrates, high fiber and protein contents, and moderate energy density. Observational studies consistently show an inverse relationship between pulse consumption and BMI or risk for obesity, but many do not control for potentially confounding dietary and other lifestyle factors. Short-term (≤1 d) experimental studies using meals controlled for energy, but not those controlled for available carbohydrate, show that pulse consumption increases satiety over 2–4 h, suggesting that at least part of the effect of pulses on satiety is mediated by available carbohydrate amount or composition. Randomized controlled trials generally support a beneficial effect of pulses on weight loss when pulse consumption is coupled with energy restriction, but not without energy restriction. However, few randomized trials have been conducted and most were short term (3–8 wk for whole pulses and 4–12 wk for pulse extracts). Overall, there is some indication of a beneficial effect of pulses on short-term satiety and weight loss during intentional energy restriction, but more studies are needed in this area, particularly those that are longer term (≥1 y), investigate the optimal amount of pulses to consume for weight control, and include behavioral elements to help overcome barriers to pulse consumption. PMID:22043448

  11. Wave energy absorption from oscillating water columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, C. C.; Rolfes, M. H.

    1982-03-01

    The characteristics of the oscillating water column wave energy device are investigated under the assumptions of infinite water depth and excitation by harmonic, small amplitude waves. Expressions describing the amplitude of water motion inside the column, velocity and pressure at the turbine inlet, and energy absorption of the devices are presented. A vertical surface piercing hollow circular cylinder is examined whose air chamber area decays exponentially above the still water level. A power takeoff device is located a finite distance above the still water level where the energy absorption of the device is modeled linearly and/or quadratically with the air velocity at the turbine inlet. The problem of two identical interacting oscillating water column devices such as the one just described is also investigated.

  12. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Patrick R.; Wheeler, David R.

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  13. Final Report, Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2003-05-31

    The Flooding Predictor is an advanced process control strategy comprising a patented pattern-recognition methodology that identifies pre-flood patterns discovered to precede flooding events in distillation columns. The grantee holds a U.S. patent on the modeling system. The technology was validated at the Separations Research Program, The University of Texas at Austin under a grant from the U. S. Department of Energy, Inventions & Innovation Program. Distillation tower flooding occurs at abnormally high vapor and/or liquid rates. The loss in tray efficiencies is attributed to unusual behavior of liquid inventories inside the column leading to conditions of flooding of the space in between trays with liquid. Depending on the severity of the flood condition, consequences range from off spec products to equipment damage and tower shutdown. This non-intrusive pattern recognition methodology, processes signal data obtained from existing column instrumentation. Once the pattern is identified empirically, it is modeled and coded into the plant's distributed control system. The control system is programmed to briefly "unload" the tower each time the pattern appears. The unloading takes the form of a momentary reduction in column severity, e.g., decrease bottom temperature, reflux or tower throughput. Unloading the tower briefly at the pre-flood state causes long-term column operation to become significantly more stable - allowing an increase in throughput and/or product purity. The technology provides a wide range of value between optimization and flooding. When a distillation column is not running at capacity, it should be run in such a way ("pushed") that optimal product purity is achieved. Additional benefits include low implementation and maintenance costs, and a high level of console operator acceptance. The previous commercial applications experienced 98% uptime over a four-year period. Further, the technology is unique in its ability to distinguish between different flooding mechanisms within the same tower, e.g., liquid and jet flooding.

  14. Laboratory studies of water column separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, R.; Rodal, E.

    2013-12-01

    Results of experimental studies of water column separation following an upstream valve closure are presented. Different geometrical arrangements with transparent PVC pipes are installed immediately downstream of the closing valve, namely, horizontal pipes, vertical pipes flowing down, and humpback profile pipes, the last two being used in order to obtain full pipe section vapor cavities. Maximum over pressures at water column rejoining, and maximum cavity lengths and duration, are compared with theoretical values and with previous experiments with horizontal pipes. Good agreement is found between theory and experiments, and interesting visual material is obtained.

  15. Optical Measurement Technique for Space Column Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Watson, Judith J.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Phelps, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A simple optical technique for the structural characterization of lightweight space columns is presented. The technique is useful for determining the coefficient of thermal expansion during cool down as well as the induced strain during tension and compression testing. The technique is based upon object-to-image plane scaling and does not require any photogrammetric calibrations or computations. Examples of the measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion are presented for several lightweight space columns. Examples of strain measured during tension and compression testing are presented along with comparisons to results obtained with Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT) position transducers.

  16. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-19

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  17. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-01

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as 9Be(d,n?)10B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm2 and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  18. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  19. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  20. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  1. Development of an HPLC post-column antioxidant assay for Solidago canadensis radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Marksa, Mindaugas; Radušienė, Jolita; Jakštas, Valdas; Ivanauskas, Liudas; Marksienė, Rūta

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to modify and validate the post-column high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ABTS and DPPH methods for evaluating the antioxidant activity of the methanolic extracts of Solidago canadensis (Canadian goldenrod) leaves and flowers. Separation of the analytes was performed via the HPLC-PDA method on a YMC analytical column using a gradient elution program. Three compounds with antioxidant properties - chlorogenic acid, rutin and isoquercitrin - and two unidentified antioxidants were established. The research showed that the coil temperature regimes and loop length combinations influence the optimised post-column assay method for detecting the antioxidant activity of goldenrod radical scavengers. Investigations established that the temperature in the reaction coil was a substantial factor contributing to the signal strength of the analytes after reacting with the DPPH and ABTS radicals. PMID:25835071

  2. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 ..mu..s. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations.

  3. Stabilization of Regional Column Models by Parameterized Dynamical Tendencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    Atmospheric Single Column Models (SCMs) provide an efficient modeling framework for regional studies. In these models, vertical profiles of temperature and humidity evolve in response to diabatic interactions within the column and adiabatic tendencies produced by by the large scale circulation. The adiabatic tendencies are either prescribed or neglected and,thus, decoupled from the diabatic tendencies. This decoupling can lead to the rapid development of unrealistic atmospheric states. In particular, the temperature profiles from a SCM can become unrealistic enough within just a few hours to render any meaningful diagnosis difficult, if not impossible. We have implemented an SCM framework in which the adiabatic tendencies are coupled to the column physics through a formula that links vertical temperature advection to the time-history of diabatic heating rates. The parameters in any such coupling formula should depend in principle depend upon the zonal, meridional, vertical and temporal scales of the heating. In practice, however, we find that the dependence is weak over a wide range of zonal and meridional scales; the vertical dependence is accounted for in the formula itself, as is also the temporal dependence by considering the time history of the diabatic forcing rather than just instantaneous values. The effect of this dynamical coupling on the behavior of an SCM extracted from the NCAR CCM is investigated here. Because of the coupling, only the mean temperature and humidity profiles for the environment in which the column is embedded need to be explicitly specified; all other quantities are generated by the model. The coupled SCM is tested in tropical conditions during the TOGA COARE period. Control runs and 100-member ensembles, in which initial temperature and humidity profiles are perturbed, are run for environmental conditions taken from 85 sets of observed temperature and humidity profiles. The same data are also used to force the original, dynamically uncoupled, SCM. Coupling substantially reduces the bias and variability of the SCM. Temperature and humidity profiles for each of the 85 sets of runs are maintained within realistic values in the coupled SCM, whereas in the uncoupled SCM the bias often exceeds 10 K. However, the sensitivity to initial perturbations in the two models is similar. Perhaps the most important benefit of the coupling is that it allows us to diagnose error growth in the SCM while maintaining a realistic atmospheric state.

  4. The industrial practice and development of flotation column in China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiongtian; Zhang Shuangquan

    1997-12-31

    This paper reviewed the developing course of the flotation column since the 1960`s in China. Based on the practical data from several coal preparation plants, two types of flotation columns (the pressure aerated column and the jetting-cyclone column) were compared by their operation, performance and the reasons why they succeeded in the coal industry in China. The paper points out that the flotation column has come into commercial use and has good application prospects in China.

  5. Systems for column-based separations, methods of forming packed columns, and methods of purifying sample components

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  6. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components.

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2004-08-24

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  7. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2006-02-21

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  8. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... plate weld and the column foundation, shall be designed to resist a minimum eccentric gravity load of...; if guying or bracing is needed, it shall be installed. (b) Repair, replacement or field modification... field-modified without the approval of the project structural engineer of record. (2) Prior to...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plate weld and the column foundation, shall be designed to resist a minimum eccentric gravity load of...; if guying or bracing is needed, it shall be installed. (b) Repair, replacement or field modification... field-modified without the approval of the project structural engineer of record. (2) Prior to...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.755 - Column anchorage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... plate weld and the column foundation, shall be designed to resist a minimum eccentric gravity load of...; if guying or bracing is needed, it shall be installed. (b) Repair, replacement or field modification... field-modified without the approval of the project structural engineer of record. (2) Prior to...

  11. Contexts for Column Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Fernandez, Jorge M.; Velazquez Estrella, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss their approach to column addition and subtraction algorithms. Adapting an original idea of Paul Cobb and Erna Yackel's from "A Contextual Investigation of Three-Digit Addition and Subtraction" related to packing and unpacking candy in a candy factory, the authors provided an analogous context by designing…

  12. GENERATION AND TESTING OF IMMUNOAFFINITY COLUMNS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoaffinity purification is a highly specific, reversible technique that has the potential to be used for the one-step isolation of an analyte from many complex matrices. Application of an immunoaffinity column to isolate and concentrate an analyte may decrease the amount of solvent used, decrea...

  13. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  14. Reducing axial mixing in flotation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Al Taweel, A.M.; Ramadan, A.M.; Moharam, M.R.; Hassan, T.A.; El Mofty, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The axial mixing characteristics of a pilot-scale flotation column were investigated with the objective of identifying means to mitigate the extent of axial mixing that adversely affects its grade/recovery performance. A wide range of design and operating conditions wa investigated and the experimental results, obtained using the dynamic response method, were analyzed using three axial mixing models. The dynamic response of the column can best be described using the axial dispersion model. The results obtained suggest that the value of the axial dispersion coefficient, E{sub L}, can be significantly reduced by judicial selection of hydrodynamic conditions and/or the use of column inserts that suppress the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities inherent to the operation of conventional flotation columns. Up to 40% reduction in the value of E{sub L} was thus obtained by using spargers that produce more uniform bubble sizes, while up to 30% reductions were obtained by controlling the residual frother concentration. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Density Gradient Columns for Chemical Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for preparing density gradient columns for chemical displays are presented. They include displays illustrating acid-base reactions, metal ion equilibria, and liquid density. The lifetime of these metastable displays is surprising, some lasting for months in display cabinets. (JN)

  16. Heat Integration in Batch Distillation Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Debadrita; Jana, Amiya K.; Samanta, Amar Nath

    2010-10-01

    A new heat integrated batch distillation column has been configured in this paper. Here the column and reboiler are connected in an annular arrangement and a compressor is positioned between them to maintain the pressure difference. The heat integration is between the rectifying batch column and one concentric reboiler. Ethanol-Water binary system is chosen as an example for the design and analysis of this heat integrated batch distillation column (HIBDiC). In this work, a sensitivity test for selecting the optimal value of the total number of trays and reboiler duty and a thermodynamic feasibility test for its design acceptability has been accomplished. The principal objective of this study is to investigate the influence of compression ratio (CR) on the energy consumption of distillation and to find out the optimal value of CR. Also a comparative analysis of HIBiDC on energy consumption in steady state as well as in dynamic state has been carried out on the basis of its conventional model. The proposed scheme is capable to save the energy up to 50.52% compared to its conventional one by selecting the CR of 1.4 as an optimal value.

  17. WATER COLUMN DATA AND SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water samples collected monthly, for 18 months, from six sites in the Laguna Madre were analyzed to identify and quantify phytopigments using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In addition, water column pigment and nutrient data were acquired at 12 stations in Upper ...

  18. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  19. Polydispersed solids behavior in a bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    New data and theory are presented for describing polydispersed solids in slurry bubble columns. Axial solids concentration distributions were measured on a 0.108-M slurry bubble column apparatus operated at steady-state conditions. Slurry and gas superficial velocities ranged from 0.007 to 0.02 M/S and from 0.03 to 0.20 M/S, respectively. The liquid phase was water, and the solid phase consisted of binary or ternary mixtures of narrow-sized fractions of glass spheres. The experimental data have been used to develop a method for predicting average solids loadings and axial distributions of solids in a bubble column with a one-dimensional sedimentation-dispersion model. Correlations are given for the hindered-settling velocity, the solids dispersion coefficient, and the solids concentration at the top and bottom of the column. The effect of a distribution of particle size is interpreted by summation of the concentration of solids for each discrete particle-size fraction.

  20. Extendible column can be stowed on drum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtz, G. M.; Howard, E. A.

    1965-01-01

    Column formed from a series of segments held together by an internal spring or cable can be coiled on a drum or extended into a rigid structure. This storable coil is useful in boring for soil samples and supporting electrical and optical sensors.

  1. Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1999-06-16

    This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades.

  2. Contexts for Column Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Fernandez, Jorge M.; Velazquez Estrella, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss their approach to column addition and subtraction algorithms. Adapting an original idea of Paul Cobb and Erna Yackel's from "A Contextual Investigation of Three-Digit Addition and Subtraction" related to packing and unpacking candy in a candy factory, the authors provided an analogous context by designing

  3. An Improved Row/Column Scanning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Lawrence H.

    The use of row/column scanning, a technique for accessing a large number of selections with a single volitional action, is considered for individuals with disabilities. It is explained that such a scanning approach is particularly useful for those with only one volitional action, or those, such as people with cerebral palsy, who have pointing…

  4. [Determination of acrylamide in processed foods by column-switching HPLC with UV detection].

    PubMed

    Terada, Hisaya; Tamura, Yukio

    2003-12-01

    A simple and convenient analytical method for the determination of acrylamide in processed foods was established. Acrylamide was extracted with water in an ultrasonic bath. The extract was passed through an OASIS HLB cartridge and the eluate was injected into the HPLC system using a column-switching technique. The HPLC system consisted of two pumps, two 6-port-2-position valves, two columns and a UV detector. At first, the sample solution was chromatographed on an ODS column with a mobile phase of water, then the flow of the mobile phase was switched using a 6-port-2-position valve, and the acrylamide peak fraction was introduced into an aqueous gel permeation column (analytical column). The fraction was chromatographed again on the analytical column with a mobile phase of water, and the eluate was monitored with a UV detector (205 nm). The recoveries of acrylamide from potato chips, fried potato, croquette and instant noodle fortified at levels of 50 to 1,000 micrograms/kg were 93.1 to 101.5% and the coefficient of variation was 1.5 to 5.2%. The detection limit corresponded to 10 micrograms/kg in processed foods. Forty-six samples, potato chips (11), fried potato (10), croquette (20) and instant noodle (5), were analyzed by this method. The acrylamide level was 67-4,499 micrograms/kg for potato chips, 125-1,183 micrograms/kg for fried potato, nd-255 micrograms/kg for croquette and nd-151 micrograms/kg for instant noodle. PMID:15038112

  5. DNAPL transport through macroporous, clayey till columns

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, P.R. |; Broholm, K.; Sonnenborg, T.O.; Arvin, E.

    1998-07-01

    This paper provides the first experimental determination of the rates and distribution of transport of a dense, nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) through a naturally bioporous and fractured clayey till deposit. Until now, assessment of DNAPL behavior in this type of deposit has relied on theoretical studies. Predictions of DNAPL transport have proven to be uncertain as a result of difficulties in measuring critical parameters such as DNAPL entry pressure and flow behavior in response to natural fracture/biopore apertures and the degree of interconnection of these structures. In the present investigation, the migration of free product trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied by means of two undisturbed clayey till columns under in situ effective soil stress conditions. The experiments revealed that transport of TCE was restricted to biopores in one column and fractures in another column, bypassing the low-permeability clayey matrix. Effective porosities of the columns, i.e., biopores and fractures, were two to three orders of magnitude lower than total porosities, i.e., macropores and matrix. Single phase water flow rates through the columns at water-saturated conditions followed a linear relationship with hydraulic gradient. TCE flow could not be predicted from the single-phase calculations because of nonlinearity observed between applied TCE injection heads and resulting TCE flow. TCE flow rates were 24 and 10.3 m/day at TCE gradients of 1.18 and 0.91, respectively. The observed flow rates indicate that in cases where vertical biopores or fractures fully penetrate clayey till aquitards, a low-viscosity DNAPL may quickly enter underlying aquifers. The experiments further indicate that 100 liters of a low-viscosity DNAPL are sufficient to contaminate approximately 25 to 100 m{sup 3} of till material because of the small effective porosity constituted by the biopores and fractures.

  6. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  7. Constant potential pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of constant potential pulse polarography, In which all pulses are to be the same potential, is presented theoretically and evaluated experimentally. The response obtained is in the form of a faradaic current wave superimposed on a constant capacitative component. Results obtained with a computer-controlled system exhibit a capillary response current similar to that observed In normal pulse polarography. Calibration curves for Pb obtained using a modified commercial pulse polarographic instrument are in good accord with theoretical predictions.

  8. Alternate drop pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of alternate drop pulse polarography is presented. An experimental evaluation of alternate drop pulse polarography shows complete compensation of the capacitative background due to drop expansion. The capillary response phenomenon was studied in the absence of faradaic reaction and the capillary response current was found to depend on the pulse width to the -0.72 power. Increased signal-to-noise ratios were obtained using alternate drop pulse polarography at shorter drop times.

  9. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  10. Drying and burning wood waste using pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Buckkowski, A.G.; Eng, P.; Kitchen, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    Development of an industrial dryer using pulse combustion as a heating source for drying wood waste has continued. Pulse combustion offers the advantage of high heat transfer, efficient combustion, low NOx emissions and a source of kinetic energy for providing a motive force for a drying system. In our experiments, the drying system consists of a pulse combustor and a vertical drying column. The wood waste is injected into the exhaust gases from the combustor where the turbulence created by the pulsations enhance the drying process by reducing the boundary layer thicknesses. The material is further dried in the vertical drying column, then separated from the conveying airstream using a cyclone. The paper discusses two aspects of the drying system. Firstly, the performance of the drying tests are reviewed. Tests with the 1,000,000 BTU/hr test rig have shown that a gas-fired pulse combustion dryer can dry materials such as sawdust and pulverized hog fuel from a moisture content of 50% down to a 30% in a single pass, or further with multiple passes, without scorching or burning. Preliminary figures show that the operating costs of the dryer are reduced due to the kinetic energy created by the pulse combustor which offsets the use of electricity. Secondly, it has been shown that a pulse combustor can be fired with wood waste and thereby providing the potential to displace natural gas or propane as a fuel. The development of the wood burning combustor is reviewed.

  11. Laboratory sand column study of encapsulated buffer release for potential in situ pH control.

    PubMed

    Rust, Christine M; Aelion, C Marjorie; Flora, Joseph R V

    2002-01-01

    Encapsulation technology is being investigated as a method for controlling pH in situ at contaminated groundwater sites where pH may limit remediation of organic contaminants. This study examined the effectiveness of using KH2PO4 buffer encapsulated in a pH-sensitive coating to neutralize pH in laboratory sand columns (1.5-1) under a simulated groundwater flow rate and characterized the pattern of capsule release in the flow-through system. Denitrification was used in the columns to increase the pH of the pore water. Each of three columns was equipped with three miniature mesh wells to allow contact of the buffer with column pore water, but capsules (15 g) were inserted into only one column (amended). The two other columns served as amendment (no buffer) and abiotic (no denitrification) controls. Oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, NH4+, NO3- +NO2-, PO(4)3-, and pH were measured in the influent, two side ports, and effluent of the columns over time. Near complete conversion of 80 mg N/1 of nitrate and 152 mg/l of ethanol per day resulted in a mean pH increase from 6.2 to 8.2 in the amendment control column. The amended column maintained the target pH of 7.0 +/- 0.2 for 4 weeks until the capsules began to be depleted, after which time the pH slowly started to increase. The capsules exhibited pulses of buffer release, and were effectively dissolved after 7.5 weeks of operation. Base-neutralizing capacity contributed by the encapsulated buffer over the entire study period, calculated as cation equivalents, was 120 mM compared to 8 mM without buffer. This study demonstrates the potential for this technology to mediate pH changes and provides the framework for future studies in the laboratory and in the field, in which pH is controlled in order to enhance organic contaminant remediation by pH-sensitive systems. PMID:11858196

  12. Bayesian Monte Carlo updating of Hudson River PCB model using water column PCB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Toll, J.; Cothern, K.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have developed prior probability distributions for model parameters and terms describing physico-chemical processes in sediment and water column models of PCB fate in a segment of the lower Hudson River, and performed importance analyses to identify the key uncertainties affecting the models` predictive power. In this work, the authors employ field measurements of the mean total water column PCB concentration from nearby river segments to refine the prior probability distributions for the important parameters and terms in the water column PCB model, using Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis. The principal objectives of the current work are (1) to implement Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis, to demonstrate the technique and evaluate its potential benefits, and (2) to improve the parameterization of the water column PCB model on the basis of site-specific PCB concentration data. The Bayesian updating procedure resulted in improved estimates of PCB mass loading and re-suspension velocity terms, but posteriors for three other key parameters -- settling velocity and particulate PCB fractions in the water column and surface sediments -- were unaffected by the information extracted from the new field data. In addition, the authors found that some of the high posterior probability parameter vectors, though mathematically plausible, were physically implausible, as a consequence of the unrealistic (but common) Monte Carlo assumption that the model`s parameters are independently distributed. The implications of this and other findings are discussed.

  13. A micromethod for the on-column methylation of valproic acid by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Calendrillo, B A; Reynoso, G

    1980-01-01

    We described a simple procedure for the flash heater methylation of valproic acid and cyclohexylacetic acid (internal standard) by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). A small volume (100 microL) of sample is acidified with 10% perchloric acid and extracted into hexane. An aliquot is back extracted into 5% tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMH). A 1 microL sample of the TMH layer is injected into the GLC equipped with flame ionization detector (FID) and a 6 ft x 2 mm i.d. - nickel column packed with 3% OV-17 on 80/100 mesh Supelcoport. The injector temperature is set at 350 degrees C to ensure methylation. Recoveries are greater than 95% of theoretical value. The linearity for calibration points between 15 and 180 microgram/mL is excellent (coefficient of correlation and determination greater than 0.9999). The procedure is rapid and sensitive and does not require a dedicated column in the gas chromatograph. PMID:6782370

  14. Securing mechanism for the deployable column of the Hoop/Column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahl, E. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Column Longeron Latch (CLL) was designed and developed as the securing mechanism for the deployable, telescoping column of the Hoop/Column antenna. The column is an open lattice structure with three longerons as the principal load-bearing members. It is divided into telescoping sections that are deployed after the antenna is place in Earth orbit. The CLL provides a means to automatically lock the longeron sections into position during deployment as well as a means of unlocking the sections when the antenna is to be restowed. The CLL is a four bar linkage mechanism using the over center principle for locking. It utilizes the relative movement of the longeron sections to activate the mechanism during antenna deployment and restowing. The CLL design is one of the first mechanisms developed to meet the restowing requirements of spacecraft which will utilize the STS retrieval capability.

  15. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE HIGH COLUMN DENSITY TURNOVER IN THE H I COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Erkal, Denis; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-12-10

    We study the high column density regime of the H I column density distribution function and argue that there are two distinct features: a turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, which is present at both z = 0 and z Almost-Equal-To 3, and a lack of systems above N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} at z = 0. Using observations of the column density distribution, we argue that the H I-H{sub 2} transition does not cause the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} but can plausibly explain the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. We compute the H I column density distribution of individual galaxies in the THINGS sample and show that the turnover column density depends only weakly on metallicity. Furthermore, we show that the column density distribution of galaxies, corrected for inclination, is insensitive to the resolution of the H I map or to averaging in radial shells. Our results indicate that the similarity of H I column density distributions at z = 3 and 0 is due to the similarity of the maximum H I surface densities of high-z and low-z disks, set presumably by universal processes that shape properties of the gaseous disks of galaxies. Using fully cosmological simulations, we explore other candidate physical mechanisms that could produce a turnover in the column density distribution. We show that while turbulence within giant molecular clouds cannot affect the damped Ly{alpha} column density distribution, stellar feedback can affect it significantly if the feedback is sufficiently effective in removing gas from the central 2-3 kpc of high-redshift galaxies. Finally, we argue that it is meaningful to compare column densities averaged over {approx} kpc scales with those estimated from quasar spectra that probe sub-pc scales due to the steep power spectrum of H I column density fluctuations observed in nearby galaxies.

  16. Extraction and purification of total RNA from Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cury, Jaime A; Koo, Hyun

    2007-06-15

    RNA isolation from Streptococcus mutans within biofilms is challenging because of the presence of extracellular polysaccharide matrix that interferes with RNA extraction procedures. In an effort to solve this difficult problem, we examined several protocols to extract and purify RNA from S. mutans biofilms. A combination of sonication (three times using a 30-s pulse at 7 W) with washing in phosphate-buffered saline removed most of the extracellular polysaccharides from the biofilms and provided the highest RNA yield. Further homogenization-mechanical cells disruption in NAES buffer (50 mM sodium acetate buffer, 10 mM EDTA, and 1% SDS, pH 5.0) and acid phenol/chloroform yielded 547.2+/-23.4 microg RNA/100 mg of biofilm dry weight. An additional acid phenol/chloroform extraction further improved the purification of RNA without significantly affecting the RNA yield. The combination of DNase I in silica gel-based column and recombinant DNase I in solution effectively removed the genomic DNA as determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), resulting in 92.0+/-0.6 microg of purified RNA per 100 mg of biofilm dry weight. The complementary DNAs generated from the purified RNA sample were efficiently amplified using gtfB S. mutans-specific primers. The results demonstrated a method that yields high-quality RNA from biofilms of S. mutans in sufficient quantity for real-time RT-PCR analyses, and our data have relevance for isolation of RNA from other biofilm-forming microorganisms. PMID:17475197

  17. Flow injection with in-line reduction column and conductometric detection for determination of total inorganic nitrogen in soil.

    PubMed

    Yanu, Pattama; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2015-11-01

    A cost effective flow injection (FI) conductometric system has been developed for determination of total inorganic nitrogen (TIN). The system is aimed for evaluation of nitrogen nutrient in soil for agricultural application. Inorganic nitrogen compounds were extracted from soil according to the standard method by using potassium chloride solution as an extractant, and the extracted solution was then injected into the FI system. Nitrate and nitrite are converted to ammonium ion by an in-line reduction column packed with a Devarda's alloy. A gas diffusion unit was incorporated into the FI system to separate ammonium ion from other ions in a donor stream by forming ammonia gas that can diffuse through a PTFE membrane to re-dissolve in an acceptor stream. Conductance of the acceptor stream was directly proportional to ammonium ion concentration. Various parameters affecting reduction efficiency of the column, e.g., column diameter, column packing procedure, and column length was investigated and optimized. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2.00-60.00 mg L(-1) N-NH4(+) (y=0.123x+0.039, R(2) =0.997) was obtained with a limit of detection of 0.47 mg L(-1). Sample throughput of 20 samples h(-1) was achieved. The result of developed method was correlated with total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) obtained from the Kjeldahl digestion method. The proposed method could be used as an alternative method to the Kjeldahl method for determination of TIN in soil. PMID:26452820

  18. SNS EXTRACTION FAST KICKER SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; LAMBIASE,R.; LEE,Y.Y.; LOCKEY,R.; MI,J.; NEHRING,T.; PAI,C.; TSOUPAS,N.; TUOZZOLO,J.; WARBURTON,D.; WEI,J.; RUST,K.; CUTLER,R.

    2003-06-15

    The SNS Extraction Fast Kicker System is a very high power, high repetition rate pulsed power system. It was design and developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This system will consist of fourteen identical high voltage, high current modulators, and their auxiliary control and charging systems. The modulators will drive fourteen extraction magnet sections located inside of the SNS accumulator ring. The required kicker field rise time is 200 ns, a pulse flattop of 700 ns, a pulse repetition rate of 60 pulse-per-second. A 2500 Ampere per modulator output is required to reach the extraction kicker magnetic field strength. This design features a Blumlein Pulse-Forming-Network based topology, a low beam impedance termination, a fast current switching thyratron, and low inductance capacitor banks. It has a maximum charging voltage of 50kV, an open circuit output of 100kV, and a designed maximum pulsed current output of 4kA per modulator. The overall system output will be multiple GVA with 60 Pulse-per-second repetition rate. A prototype modulator has been successfully built and tested well above the SNS requirement. The modulator system production is in progress.

  19. Stress pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

  20. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  1. Transverse bacterial migration induced by chemotaxis in a packed column with structured physical heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Ford, Roseanne M.

    2009-01-01

    The significance of chemotaxis in directing bacterial migration towards contaminants in natural porous media was investigated under groundwater flow conditions. A laboratory-scale column, with a coarse-grained sand core surrounded by a fine-grained annulus, was used to simulate natural aquifers with strata of different hydraulic conductivities. A chemoattractant source was placed along the central axis of the column to model contaminants trapped in the heterogeneous subsurface. Chemotactic bacterial strains, Escherichia coli HCB1 and Pseudomonas putida F1, introduced into the column by a pulse injection, were found to alter their transport behaviors under the influence of the attractant chemical emanating from the central source. For E. coli HCB1, approximately 18% more of the total population relative to the control without attractant exited the column from the coarse sand layer due to the chemotactic effects of ?-methylaspartate under an average fluid velocity of 5.1 m/d. Although P. putida F1 demonstrated no observable changes in migration pathways with the model contaminant acetate under the same flow rate, when the flow rate was reduced to 1.9 m/d, approximately 6~10% of the population relative to the control migrated from the fine sand layer towards attractant into the coarse sand layer. Microbial transport properties were further quantified by a mathematical model to examine the significance of bacterial motility and chemotaxis under different hydrodynamic conditions, which suggested important considerations for strain selection and practical operation of bioremediation schemes. PMID:19731698

  2. Electromagnetic wave radiation by an electron beam spiraling in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Zaboronkova, T. M.; Krafft, C.

    2007-06-15

    The paper studies the electromagnetic wave radiation by a density modulated and thin electron beam of finite length injected obliquely with respect to the constant external magnetic field into a cylindrical plasma column embedded in a homogeneous medium (plasma, dielectric, or free space) and aligned along the magnetic field lines. The time-averaged power radiated at the modulation frequency is determined as a function of the beam, the plasma column, and the medium parameters. Particular attention is devoted to the case when the beam modulation frequency belongs to the whistler frequency band. The paper shows what significant differences exist between the physical features of the emissions when the beam radiates in a plasma column embedded in a homogeneous medium or in a uniform and unbounded magnetized plasma. Based on the results of numerical calculations, the time-averaged power radiated by pulsed and modulated beams has been estimated for typical laboratory plasma experiments. In particular, it is shown that a beam propagating in a plasma column can efficiently enhance its wave emission due to Cherenkov and normal cyclotron excitation of guided whistler modes.

  3. Effects of Gravity on Cocurrent Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    2001-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results of research on the influence of gravity on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid two-phase flow through packed columns. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under reduced gravity conditions compared to normal gravity cocurrent down-flow. This is illustrated by comparing the flow regime transitions found in reduced gravity with the transitions predicted by Talmor. Next, the effect of gravity on the total pressure drop in a packed column is shown to depend on the flow regime. The difference is roughly equivalent to the liquid static head for bubbly flow but begins to decrease at the onset of pulse flow. As the spray flow regime is approached by increasing the gas to liquid ratio, the effect of gravity on pressure drop becomes negligible. Finally, gravity tends to suppress the amplitude of each pressure pulse. An example of this phenomenon is presented.

  4. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2012-12-15

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  5. Extraction, Purification, and Spectroscopic Characterization of a Mixture of Capsaicinoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Carl E.; Cahill, Thomas M.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment provides a safe and effective way to instruct undergraduate organic chemistry students about natural-product extraction, purification, and NMR spectroscopic characterization. On the first day, students extract dried habanero peppers with toluene, perform a pipet silica gel column to separate carotenoids from…

  6. Extraction, Purification, and Spectroscopic Characterization of a Mixture of Capsaicinoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Carl E.; Cahill, Thomas M.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment provides a safe and effective way to instruct undergraduate organic chemistry students about natural-product extraction, purification, and NMR spectroscopic characterization. On the first day, students extract dried habanero peppers with toluene, perform a pipet silica gel column to separate carotenoids from

  7. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  8. Axial solid distribution in slurry bubble columns

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.; Fan, L.-S. )

    1989-11-01

    The axial sold concentration distribution in a slurry bubbly column was studied in both batch and continuous operation. Air and water were used as the gas and liquid phases, respectively. The gas velocity ranged from 0.016 to 0.173 m/s, and the slurry velocity ranged from 0.0 to 0.031 m/s. Glass beads of diameters 163,97, and 49 {mu}m were used as the solid phase. The holdup distribution of each solid in binary mixtures was also studied. The effects of gas velocity, slurry velocity, and particle size on the axial solid concentration distribution were examined. A mechanistic model is developed to describe the solid distribution in the slurry bubble columns. The model accounts for the solid distribution for both batch and continuous operation involving monodispersed and binary mixtures of solid particles.

  9. Algae columns with anodic stripping voltammetric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, W.W.; Wang, J.; Darnall, D.

    1989-03-01

    The use of silica-immobilized algal cells for on-line column separation in conjunction with continuous monitoring of trace metals is described. Algae-silica preparations are highly suitable for flow analysis as they couple the unique reactivity patterns and high binding capacity of algal biomass with the hydrodynamic and mechanical features of porous silica. Such advantages are illustrated by using on-line anodic stripping voltammetry and the alga Chlorella pyrenidosa. Selective and exhaustive removal of interfering constituents circumvents common problems such as overlapping peaks and intermetallic effects. Effects of flow rate, pH, operation time, and other variables are reported. The system is characterized by high durability, simplicity, and economy and offers an attractive alternative to prevalent columns used for flow analysis.

  10. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7?kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  11. Urine iodide determination by ion-pair reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vo Thanh Phuong; Piersoel, Virginie; El Mahi, Tarik

    2012-09-15

    A sensitive and specific ion-pair reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for urinary iodine analysis is described. This method is based on pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) using a silver working electrode (HPLC-PAD), which improves peak shape, electrode stability as well as linearity and reproducibility. A two-step extraction process consisting of solid phase extraction (SPE) and liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane was added in order to improve sample purification which is essential with the use of PAD. Treated samples were eluted on a C18 column, using a phosphate buffer containing ion-pairing reagent tetrabutylammonium and 5% MeOH. The calibration standard curves were linear up to 500 ?g/L and within-run and between-run coefficients of variation (CVs) were <6% with the quantification limit fixed at 6 ?g/L. Accuracy, expressed as recovery, ranged from 94% to 104%. Comparison with the Technicon AutoAnalyzer acid digestion (AA) method resulted in a high correlation (r=0.9916). Due to a low quantification limit and high sample throughput, the proposed technique appears suitable for both epidemiological and clinical follow-up studies. PMID:22967590

  12. Separation of cannabinoids on three different mixed-mode columns containing carbon/nanodiamond/amine-polymer superficially porous particles.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chuan-Hsi; Zukowski, Janusz; Jensen, David S; Miles, Andrew J; Sulak, Clayton; Dadson, Andrew E; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    Three mixed-mode high-performance liquid chromatography columns packed with superficially porous carbon/nanodiamond/amine-polymer particles were used to separate mixtures of cannabinoids. Columns evaluated included: (i) reversed phase (C18 ), weak anion exchange, 4.6 × 33 mm, 3.6 μm, and 4.6 × 100 mm, 3.6 μm, (ii) reversed phase, strong anion exchange (quaternary amine), 4.6×33 mm, 3.6 μm, and (iii) hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, 4.6 × 150 mm, 3.6 μm. Different selectivities were achieved under various mobile phase and stationary phase conditions. Efficiencies and peak capacities were as high as 54 000 N/m and 56, respectively. The reversed phase mixed-mode column (C18 ) retained tetrahydrocannabinolic acid strongly under acidic conditions and weakly under basic conditions. Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid was retained strongly on the reversed phase, strong anion exchange mixed-mode column under basic polar organic mobile phase conditions. The hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column retained polar cannabinoids better than the (more) neutral ones under basic conditions. A longer reversed phase (C18 ) mixed-mode column (4.6 × 100 mm) showed better resolution for analytes (and a contaminant) than a shorter column. Fast separations were achieved in less than 5 min and sometimes 2 min. A real world sample (bubble hash extract) was also analyzed by gradient elution. PMID:26075936

  13. SPEEDUP{trademark} ion exchange column model

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.

    2000-03-06

    A transient model to describe the process of loading a solute onto the granular fixed bed in an ion exchange (IX) column has been developed using the SpeedUp{trademark} software package. SpeedUp offers the advantage of smooth integration into other existing SpeedUp flowsheet models. The mathematical algorithm of a porous particle diffusion model was adopted to account for convection, axial dispersion, film mass transfer, and pore diffusion. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was employed to solve the governing transport equations. The model allows the use of a non-linear Langmuir isotherm based on an effective binary ionic exchange process. The SpeedUp column model was tested by comparing to the analytical solutions of three transport problems from the ion exchange literature. In addition, a sample calculation of a train of three crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IX columns in series was made using both the SpeedUp model and Purdue University's VERSE-LC code. All test cases showed excellent agreement between the SpeedUp model results and the test data. The model can be readily used for SuperLig{trademark} ion exchange resins, once the experimental data are complete.

  14. Plant practices in fine coal column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, V.L. Jr.; Bethell, P.J.; Stanley, F.L.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1995-10-01

    Five 3 m (10 ft) diameter Microcel{trademark} flotation columns were installed at Clinchfield Coal Company`s Middle Fork preparation facility in order to reduce product ash and increase recovery and plant capacity. The Middle Fork facility is utilized for the recovery of fine coal from a feed stream that consists primarily of 1.5 mm x 0 material. The columns replaced conventional flotation cells for the treatment of the minus 150 {micro}m fraction while spirals are used to upgrade the plus 150 {micro}m material in the plant feed. The addition of the column flotation circuit resulted in an increase in plant capacity in excess of 20 percent while reducing the flotation product ash content by approximately 7 percentage points. Flotation circuit combustible recovery wa increased by 17 percentage points. This paper discusses circuit design, commissioning, and sparging system design. Circuit instrumentation, level control, reagent system control, performance comparisons with conventional flotation, and general operating procedures are also discussed.

  15. Flubendiamide transport through packed soil columns.

    PubMed

    Das, Shaon Kumar; Mukherjee, Irani

    2012-02-01

    Flubendiamide insecticide is widely used in Indian subtropical condition to control lepidopteron pests mainly in rice and cotton. The present study reports leaching behaviour of flubendiamide, N(2)-[1,1-dimethyl-2-(methylsulfonyl)ethyl]-3-iodo-N(1)-[2-methyl-4-[1,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1 (trifluoromethyl)ethyl] phenyl]-1,2-benzene dicarboxamide, in packed soil columns under different rainfall conditions. Flubendiamide did not leach out of the 25 cm long soil columns even after percolating water equivalent to 462.18 mm rainfall. After leaching with water equivalent to 462.18 mm rainfall, in analytical grade treatment, 68.06% of the recovered flubendiamide was the major amount present in 5-10 cm depth whereas in the formulation 67.22% of the recovered flubendiamide was confined to 0-5 cm depth. Results revealed that with percolating 160 mL of water residues of desiodo flubendiamide detected up to 20-25 cm layer along with 9.47% residues in this layer, indicating that metabolite is more mobile as compared to analytical grade flubendiamide and 39.35% SC formulation. Formulation slowed the downward mobility of flubendiamide in soil column. Flubendiamide is slightly mobile in sandy loam soil, but desiodo flubendiamide is relatively more mobile and may leach into ground water. PMID:22002178

  16. [Spectral investigation of atmospheric pressure plasma column].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Chen; Chang, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Long-Fei

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma column has many important applications in plasma stealth for aircraft. In the present paper, a plasma column with a length of 65 cm was generated in argon at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes in coaxial configurations. The discharge mechanism of the plasma column was studied by optical method and the result indicates that a moving layer of light emission propagates in the upstream region. The propagation velocity of the plasma bullet is about 0.6 x 10(5) m x s(-1) through optical measurement. Spectral intensity ratios as functions of the applied voltage and driving frequency were also investigated by spectroscopic method. The variation in spectral intensity ratio implies a change in the averaged electron energy. Results show that the averaged electron energy increases with the increase in the applied voltage and the driving frequency. These results have significant values for industrial applications of the atmospheric pressure discharge and have extensive application potentials in stealth for military aircraft. PMID:23016319

  17. Nanosecond length electron pulses from a laser-excited photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.; D'Etat, B.; Stutzin, G.C.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1989-06-01

    A photocathode made from polycrystalline lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) has produced nanosecond length electron pulses when excited by an excimer laser at 308nm. Peak currents in excess of 1A have been observed, with quantum yields of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} being measured. A method for extracting the electrons from an emission-limited cathode, plasma extraction, has been demonstrated. This technique uses a low power continuous discharge to provide the electric field needed to extract the photoelectrons. This technique may be useful in producing high repetition rate short pulse ion sources. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Screening of tobacco smoke condensate for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands using cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns and missing peak chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maciuk, Alexandre; Moaddel, Ruin; Haginaka, Jun; Wainer, Irving W

    2008-09-29

    This manuscript reports an approach to the screening of natural product extracts for compounds which are active at membrane-bound receptors, ion channels and transporters. The technique is based upon cellular membrane affinity chromatography (CMAC) columns created through the immobilization of cellular membrane fragments on liquid chromatography stationary phases. In this study a CMAC(nAChR(+)) column was created out of membranes from a transfected cell line expressing the alpha3beta4 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the column was used to screen tobacco smoke condensates. A strategy involving parallel screening with a CMAC column created from a non-transfected form of the same cell line, CMAC(nAChR(-)) was adopted. The condensate was chromatographed on both columns, timed fractions collected and concentrated. Each fraction was analyzed on a C18 column in order to establish a chromatographic fingerprint of each fraction and a differential elution profile of each compound. Comparison of the elution profiles from the CMAC(nAChR(+)) and CMAC(nAChR(-)) columns identified patterns that could be associated with high affinity ligands and with low-affinity/non-binding compounds. Known strong ligands ((S)-nicotine, (R,S)-anatabine, N'-nitrosonornicotine), weak ligands ((R,S)-nornicotine, anabasine) as well as known non-ligands (N-methyl-gamma-oxo-3-pyridinebutanamide, (1'S,2'S)-nicotine 1'-oxide) have been identified in the complex extract. The results demonstrate that CMAC-based screens can be used in the identification of compounds within natural product extracts that bind to membrane-based targets. PMID:18187282

  19. Short pulse phenomena produced with long pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernndez, J. V.; Esry, B. D.

    2011-05-01

    We have found a way to produce to phenomena usually associated with ultrashort laser pulses using surprisingly long pulses. For example, the spatial asymmetry of a dissociating molecule has been observed to vary with the CEP for very short intense pulses. By using chirped pulses with large bandwidths, however, our calculations show large, CEP-dependent asymmetry in dissociating H2+even for 100 fs long pulses. This effect is also shown in the spatial asymmetry of an ionized atomic target. We also find varying the bandwidth and the direction of the chirp of the pulse can affect another multi-photon process, zero-photon dissociation of H2+.While it is not obvious how these unexpected phenomena can be explained in the usual time-dependent, field-based picture, their explanation in terms of a photon picture is rather straightforward, underscoring its utility even in the strong field regime. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Comparison of monolithic silica and polymethacrylate capillary columns for LC.

    PubMed

    Moravcov, Dana; Jandera, Pavel; Urban, Jiri; Planeta, Josef

    2004-07-01

    Organic polymer monolithic capillary columns were prepared in fused-silica capillaries by radical co-polymerization of ethylene dimethacrylate and butyl methacrylate monomers with azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator of the polymerization reaction in the presence of various amounts of porogenic solvent mixtures and different concentration ratios of monomers and 1-propanol, 1,4-butanediol, and water. The chromatographic properties of the organic polymer monolithic columns were compared with those of commercial silica-based particulate and monolithic capillary and analytical HPLC columns. The tests included the determination of H-u curves, column permeabilities, pore distribution by inversed-SEC measurements, methylene and polar selectivities, and polar interactions with naphthalenesulphonic acid test samples. Organic polymer monolithic capillary columns show similar retention behaviour to chemically bonded alkyl silica columns for compounds with different polarities characterized by interaction indices, Ix, but have lower methylene selectivities and do not show polar interactions with sulphonic acids. The commercial capillary and analytical silica gel-based monolithic columns showed similar selectivities and provided symmetrical peaks, indicating no significant surface heterogeneities. To allow accurate characterization of the properties of capillary monolithic columns, the experimental data should be corrected for extra-column contributions. With 0.3 mm ID capillary columns, corrections for extra-column volume contributions are sufficient, but to obtain true information on the efficiency of 0.1 mm ID capillary columns, the experimental bandwidths should be corrected for extra-column contributions to peak broadening. PMID:15354556

  1. Column on column structures as indicators of lava/ice interaction, Ruapehu andesite volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprli, K. B.; Rowland, J. V.

    2006-10-01

    Lava flows of the Mangawhero Formation (ca. 15-60 ka) on Ruapehu volcano erupted during the last glaciation. In a distal flow lobe at Tukino, on the east side of the mountain, small secondary columns (10-20 cm thick) have formed on the sides of large, rectangular, primary (0.5-3 m thick) cooling columns. Thick (10 m+) zones of such small columns form a lateral and basal outer rind of the lobe. As they do not mark glassy zones of quenching, these secondary columns are interpreted as being formed by a second cooling event at temperatures below the boundary between the low creep and elastic regimes ( 600 C) by rapid influx of copious amounts of water. Temperature drops deduced from extensional strains of the two sets of columns were used to gauge the viability of such a two-stage process. Absence of reliable data on andesite contraction coefficients was overcome by using a sliding scale to assess a large range of values. The estimates indicate that two-stage chilling is feasible. After flowing across relatively ice-poor terrain, the lava flow must have interacted with a valley glacier that provided water for further chilling the already formed primary columns and formation of the outer rind small columns. Given this evidence for lava/ice interaction, it is likely that prominent, thick flows elsewhere in the Mangawhero Formation may have been constrained to their ridge-top locations by ice conditions similar to those described by Lescinsky and Sisson [Lescinsky, D.T., Sisson, T.W., 1998. Ridge-forming, ice-bounded lava flows at Mount Rainier, Washington. Geology, 26, 351-354].

  2. Dips in the pulse profiles of accretion powered pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devasia, Jincy; Paul, Biswajit; James, Marykutty; Indulekha, K.

    We report detection of sharp dips in the pulse profiles of several persistent and transient accretion powered X-ray pulsars using RXTE observations. The pulse profiles of accretion powered pulsars carry a lot of information regarding the radiative processes near the surface of the star, magnetic fields that channel the accretion flow etc. The dips in the pulse profiles can be due to the interaction of accretion column with the emitting radiation as it passes through the line of sight. We have also investigated the energy and intensity dependence and phase width of these dips to have a better understanding of the nature of the absorbing material. Any intensity dependence of the pulse phase of the dips will also reveal the nature of the absorbing structure in relation to the neutron star.

  3. Variation of the pulse profile of Hercules X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohashi, T.; Inoue, H.; Kawai, N.; Koyama, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mitani, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Nagase, F.; Nakagawa, M.; Kondo, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray pulsar Her X-1 was observed in an on-state during its 35th cycle of activity in May, 1983 using the gas scintillation proportional counter (GSPC) array of the Tenma X-ray astronomy satellite. The outstanding features observed during the declining phase of the on-state included: a sharp decrease in the main X-ray pulse amplitude; and a steady increase in the column density of cool matter. On the basis of the spectral shape of the pulses, it is suggested that the main phase was attenuated due to electron scattering of the X-ray beam in a highly ionized medium located 3 x 10 to the 8th cm from the neutron star. Near the end of the on-state, the main pulse totally disappeared and a plain sinusoidal profile was observed. The observed pulse profiles are reproduced in graphic form.

  4. Elucidation of phosphatidylcholine composition in krill oil extracted from Euphausia superba.

    PubMed

    Winther, Bjrn; Hoem, Nils; Berge, Kjetil; Reubsaet, Lon

    2011-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry was used to elucidate the phospholipids in krill oil extracted from Euphausia superba, an emerging source for human nutritional supplements. The study was carried out in order to map the species of the choline-containing phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and lyso-phosphatidylcholine. In addition, the prevalent phosphatidylcholine class was quantified and the results compared with prior analysis. The qualification was performed with separation on a reverse phase chromatography column, while the quantification was obtained with class separation on a normal phase chromatography column. An Orbitrap system was used for the detection, and pulsed-Q dissociation fragmentation was utilized for the identification of the species. An asymmetrical exclusion list was applied for detection of phospholipid species of lower concentration, significantly improving the number of species observed. A total of 69 choline-containing phospholipids were detected, whereof 60 phosphatidylcholine substances, among others seven with probable omega-3 fatty acids in both sn-1 and sn-2. The phosphatidylcholine concentration was estimated to be 34 5 g/100 g oil (n = 5). These results confirm the complexity of the phospholipid composition of krill oil, and the presence of long chained, heavily unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:20848234

  5. Enhanced phytoremediation in the vadose zone: Modeling and column studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Chang, Y.; Corapcioglu, M.; Cho, C.

    2002-05-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant-based technique with potential for enhancing the remediation of vadoese zone soils contaminated by pollutants. The use of deep-rooted plants is an alternative to conventional methodologies. However, when the phytoremediation is applied to the vadose zone, it might have some restrictions since it uses solely naturally driven energy and mechanisms in addition to the complesxity of the vadose zone. As a more innovative technique than conventional phytoremediation methods, air injected phytoremediation technique is introduced to enhance the remediation efficiency or to apply at the former soil vapor extraction or bio venting sites. Effects of air injection, vegetation treatment, and air injection with vegetation treatments on the removal of hydrocarbon were investigated by column studies to simulate the field situation. Both the removal efficiency and the microbial activity were highest in air-injected and vegetated column soils. It was suggested that increased microorganisms activity stimulated by plant root exudates enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds. Air injection provided sufficient opportunity for promoting the microbial activity at depths where the conditions are anaerobic. Air injection can enhance the physicochemical properties of the medium and contaminant and increase the bioavailability i.e., the plant and microbial accessibility to the contaminant. A mathematical model that can be applied to phytoremediation, especially to air injected phytoremediation, for simulating the fate and the transport of a diesel contaminant in the vadose zone is developed. The approach includes a two-phase model of water flow in vegetated and unplanted vadose zone soil. A time-specific root distribution model and a microbial growth model in the rhizosphere of vegetated soil were combined with an unsaturated soil water flow equation as well as with a contaminant transport equation. The proposed model showed a satisfactory representation of contaminant fate in the air injected phytoremediation.

  6. A Convenient Method for Comparison of Efficiency of Fractionating Columns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a method for demonstrating the use of various fractionating columns to resolve mixtures into individual components and to correlate the resolving powers of column packings to their "hold-up" volumes. Fractions were analyzed using refractive indices. (KR)

  7. 6. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY, INTERIOR SHOWING ORIGINAL GRANITE COLUMNS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY, INTERIOR SHOWING ORIGINAL GRANITE COLUMNS AND COLUMN BRICKFACED AFTER THE GREAT FIRE 1904 - Old U.S. Appraisers Stores, Gay & Lombard Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  8. 4. VIEW FROM LOWER LEVEL PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY. FOUR SUPPORT COLUMNS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW FROM LOWER LEVEL PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY. FOUR SUPPORT COLUMNS WITH SWAY BRACING AND BRACKETS IN COLUMNS. - Chanute Air Force Base, Hangar No. 4, Junction of Challenger Street & Sentry Street, Rantoul, Champaign County, IL

  9. Method to fabricate silicon chromatographic column comprising fluid ports

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Adkins, Douglas R.

    2004-03-02

    A new method for fabricating a silicon chromatographic column comprising through-substrate fluid ports has been developed. This new method enables the fabrication of multi-layer interconnected stacks of silicon chromatographic columns.

  10. CAR MACHINE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, DETAIL OF WOOD COLUMN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAR MACHINE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, DETAIL OF WOOD COLUMN AND INVERTED KING-POST TRUSS TO PROVIDE INCREASED SPAN BETWEEN COLUMNS, LOOKING SOUTH. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Car Machine Shop, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  11. 29. View of paired concreteencased columns at joint between beams ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. View of paired concrete-encased columns at joint between beams contrasted against wider single columns. Looking east. - Stillwell Avenue Station, Intersection of Stillwell & Surf Avenues, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  12. 14. Detail view of columns, capitals and beams at south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail view of columns, capitals and beams at south end of north section of mill. Note the transition from deep pocket to shallow pocket column capitals. - Lowe Mill, Eighth Avenue, Southwest, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. 19. Detail of builtup 5" x 13" column at fruit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Detail of built-up 5" x 13" column at fruit and vegetable storage room; note ledger plates bolted to top of column - Fort Hood, World War II Temporary Buildings, Cold Storage Building, Seventeenth Street, Killeen, Bell County, TX

  14. 20. Detail of 8" square solid wood column at fruit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail of 8" square solid wood column at fruit and vegetable storage room; note ledger plates bolted to top of column - Fort Hood, World War II Temporary Buildings, Cold Storage Building, Seventeenth Street, Killeen, Bell County, TX

  15. Column experiments and full dissolution rate law of gibbsite

    SciTech Connect

    Mogollon, J.L.; Ganor, J.; Soler, J.M.; Lasaga, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    The dissolution of a gibbsitic bauxite in natural systems was simulated in the laboratory, at 25{degrees}C, using a column reactor, with input pHs ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 and fluid velocities ranging from 61 to 1085 m/y. As a result, the dissolution of gibbsite was measured under a wide range of saturation state conditions from equilibrium or near-equilibrium conditions to very far from equilibrium conditions. Far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates were measured under steady-state conditions. At slower flow rates, the variation of the rates with deviation from equilibrium was also extracted. The slowest flow rates yielded the equilibrium solubility of gibbsite. The solubility (K{sub sp}) of natural gibbsite and the column output solution saturation states (expressed as the Gibbs Free Energy of reaction, {Delta}G{sub {gamma}}) were determined with respect to the overall reaction: Al(OH){sub 3} + 3H{sup +} = Al{sup 3} + 3H{sub 2}O. Despite the impurities present in the natural sample material, the calculated log K{sub sp}, 7.83 {plus_minus} 0.12, is in excellent agreement with published K{sub sp} values for pure gibbsite. Far-from-equilibrium, {Delta}G{sub {gamma}} <{minus}0.7 kcal/mol, the dissolution rates attain a constant value of {minus}7.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} moles/m{sup 2}/sec at input pH values of 3.5. A reaction order of 0.33 with respect to a{sub H+} was found. The variation of the rates with deviation from equilibrium was found to be very similar to the results of Nagy and Lasaga (1992), even though our study used natural gibbsite, a column device, and different pH and temperature. Therefore, the comparison of the results of this study and Nagy and Lasaga (1992) validates the use of a general rate law and suggests that the same kind of {Delta}G{sub {gamma}} functionality is valid over a broad range of pH and temperature conditions. 45 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Cross flow cyclonic flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, R.W.; Patton, R.A.

    2000-05-02

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophilic tailings.

  17. Cross flow flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Ralph W.; Patton, Robert A.

    1997-12-01

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophilic tailings.

  18. Column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, M

    1942-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the column strength of extruded magnesium alloy AM-57S. Column specimens were tested with round ends and with flat ends. It was found that the compressive properties should be used in computations for column strengths rather than the tensile properties because the compressive yield strength was approximately one-half the tensile yield strength. A formula for the column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S is given.

  19. Cross flow cyclonic flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Ralph W. (Upper St. Clair, PA); Patton, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophillic tailings.

  20. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  1. Pulse-burst operation of standard Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Borchardt, M. T.; Reusch, J. A.; Robl, P. E.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-05-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to fifteen 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to study the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature.

  2. A Case of Polymyxin b-Immobilized Fiber Column Treatment for Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Pneumonia Associated with Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Oh; Dohi, Makoto; Harada, Hiroaki; Imamura, Mitsuru; Tsuchida, Yumi; Yamaguchi, Kensuke; Komai, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia associated with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis who responded to single course of polymyxin b-immobilized fiber column treatment. Initial treatment with pulsed corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, intravenous immunoglobulin, and cyclosporine seemed to suppress the activity of interstitial lung disease temporarily, but signs of relapse were detected such as elevation of serum KL-6 level and progressing pulmonary shadows in chest computed tomography scan. After polymyxin b-immobilized fiber column treatment, the areas of pulmonary shadows drastically decreased. Gradually, arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio recovered, and serum ferritin level and KL-6 level decreased. These findings indicate that polymyxin b-immobilized fiber column treatment could be promising in combination with conventional therapy for rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia associated with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis, especially at the early phase of relapse. PMID:23983712

  3. Random pulse generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, R. S., Jr. (inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a source of random width and random spaced rectangular voltage pulses whose mean or average frequency of operation is controllable within prescribed limits of about 10 hertz to 1 megahertz. A pair of thin-film metal resistors are used to provide a differential white noise voltage pulse source. Pulse shaping and amplification circuitry provide relatively short duration pulses of constant amplitude which are applied to anti-bounce logic circuitry to prevent ringing effects. The pulse outputs from the anti-bounce circuits are then used to control two one-shot multivibrators whose output comprises the random length and random spaced rectangular pulses. Means are provided for monitoring, calibrating and evaluating the relative randomness of the generator.

  4. 24. DETAIL VIEW OF COLUMN #072 DEVIATING FROM VERTICAL IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL VIEW OF COLUMN #072 DEVIATING FROM VERTICAL IN ROW OF INTACT COLUMNS, LOOKING NORTHEAST TO SOUTHWEST. (NOTE BOLTED BLOCK SCABBED TO COLUMN AS JOIST/TRUSS SUPPORT) - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. Quantitative determination of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol in hair by column switching LC-ESI-MS(3).

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; In, Sanghwan; Kim, Eunmi; Park, Yonghoon

    2014-02-01

    Hair analysis has been regarded as an alternative method to urine analysis in forensic and criminal cases. Cannabis (marijuana) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world and it has been controlled in South Korea since 1976. Identification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in hair can be an important proof of cannabis use because it can exclude the possibility of passive cannabis smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative method of THCCOOH in hair using simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), selective column switching liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS(3). For the column switching system three columns (precolumn, trap column and analytical column) were used. Valve switch from the precolumn to the trap column was set from 3.0 to 4.0 min because THCCOOH appeared around 3.5 min with this precolumn. After 4.0 min the valve was switched to the original position and the analytes in the trap column were eluted onto the analytical column. Resolution occurred in this column and eluted into the ESI-MS(3) system. The internal standard was THCCOOH-d3. We used ESI-negative-MS(3) transition of ions at m/z 343 to 299 to 245 (343/299/245) and m/z 346 to 302 to 248 (346/302/248) for quantification of THCCOOH and THCCOOH-d3, respectively. The validation results of selectivity, matrix effect, recovery, linearity, precision and accuracy, and processed sample stability were satisfactory. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.05 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.10 pg/mg. The range of concentration of THCCOOH from 98 authentic human hair was 0.13-15.75 pg/mg. This method was successfully applied in the analysis of authentic human hair samples. PMID:24434565

  6. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Springfield, Ray M. (Sante Fe, NM); Wheat, Jr., Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  7. PulseSoar

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, P.; Peglow, S.

    1992-07-21

    This paper is an introduction to the PulseSoar concept. PulseSoar is a hypervelocity airplane that uses existing airport facilities and current technologies to fly at the very edge of space. It will be shown that PulseSoar can fly between any two points on the globe in less than two hours with fuel efficiency exceeding current state of the art commercial airliners. In addition, it will be shown that PulseSoar avoids environmental issues concerning the ozone layer and sonic booms because of its unique flight profile. All of this can be achieved with current technology. PulseSoar does not require the development of enabling technology. It is a concept which can be demonstrated today. The importance of this idea goes beyond the technical significance`s of PulseSoar in terms of feasibility and performance. PulseSoar could provide a crucial economic advantage to America`s largest export market: commercial aircraft. PulseSoar is a breakthrough concept for addressing the emerging markets of long range and high speed aircraft. Application of PulseSoar to commercial transport could provide the US Aerospace industry a substantial lead in offering high speed/long range aircraft to the world`s airlines. The rapid emergence of a US developed high speed aircraft could also be important to our competitiveness in the Pacific Rim and South American economies. A quick and inexpensive demonstration vehicle is proposed to bang the concept to reality within two years. This discussion will address all the major technical subjects encompassed by PulseSoar and identifies several near-term, and low risk, applications which may be further explored with the initial demonstration vehicle. What is PulseSoar? PulseSoar could enable high speed, high altitude and long range flight without many of the difficulties encountered by traditional hypersonic vehicles.

  8. Pulsed magnetic welding

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-11-20

    Solid state welding techniques are an alternative to fusion welding. Two solid state welding techniques are pulsed magnetic welding and explosive bonding. Both achieve bonds by impacting the metals to be joined at high velocity. Development of the pulsed magnetic welding process by Hanford Engineers for fuel fabrication may make this process useful for a variety of other applications. Hanford engineers have developed advanced equipment for pulsed magnetic welding and have defined conditions for reliably welding stainless steel fuel pins using this equipment.

  9. EVALUATION OF SAMPLE EXTRACT CLEANUP USING SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION CARTRIDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fractionation and cleanup of sample extracts prior to instrumental analysis is usually accomplished by column chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, or acid-base partitioning. n this report, the results of a study are described in which we investigated the application of ...

  10. Extraction of uranium: comparison of stripping with ammonia vs. strong acid

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovan, B.; Grinbaum, B.; Efraim, A.

    2008-07-01

    Following extraction of uranium in the first stage of solvent extraction using a tertiary amine, typically Alamine 336, the stripping of the extracted uranium is accomplished either by use of an aqueous solution of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} /NH{sub 4}OH or by strong-acid stripping using 400-500 g/L H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Both processes have their merits and determine the downstream processing. The classical stripping with ammonia is followed by addition of strong base, to precipitate ammonium uranyl sulfate (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}, which yields finally the yellow cake. Conversely, stripping with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, followed by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide yields uranyl oxide as product. At the Cameco Key Lake operation, both processes were tested on a pilot scale, using a Bateman Pulsed Column (BPC). The BPC proved to be applicable to both processes. It met the process criteria both for extraction and stripping, leaving less than 1 mg/L of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the raffinate, and product solution had the required concentration of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} at high flux and reasonable height of transfer unit. In the Key Lake mill, each operation can be carried out in a single column. The main advantages of the strong-acid stripping over ammonia stripping are: (1) 60% higher flux in the extraction, (2) tenfold higher concentration of the uranium in the product solution, and (3) far more robust process, with no need of pH control in the stripping and no need to add acid to the extraction in order to keep the pH above the point of precipitation of iron compounds. The advantages of the ammoniacal process are easier stripping, that is, less stages needed to reach equilibrium and lower concentration of modifier needed to prevent the creation of a third phase. (authors)

  11. Focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction for the determination of perfluorinated compounds in fish, vegetables and amended soil.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Itsaso; Bizkarguenaga, Ekhie; Iparragirre, Arantza; Navarro, Patricia; Prieto, Ailette; Fernndez, Luis ngel; Zuloaga, Olatz

    2014-02-28

    In the present work a method was developed for the determination of different perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), including three perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs), seven perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), three perfluorophosphonic acids (PFPAs) and perfluorooctanesulfonamide (PFOSA) in fish, vegetables and amended soil samples based on focused ultrasound solid-liquid extraction (FUSLE) followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Different variables affecting the chromatographic separation (column type and pH of the mobile phase), the electrospray ionization (capillary voltage, nebulizer pressure and drying gas flow) and mass spectrometric detection (fragmentor voltage and collision energy) were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity of the separation and detection steps. In the case of FUSLE variables such as the solvent type, the solvent volume, the extraction temperature, the sonication and extraction time and the percentage of applied irradiation power were studied. Under optimized conditions, sonication of 2.5min with pulse times on of 0.8s and pulse times off of 0.2s in 7mL of (9:1) acetonitrile (ACN): water mixture in duplicate guaranteed exhaustive extraction of the matrices analyzed. Due to the non-selective extraction using FUSLE, different SPE cartridges (200-mg Waters Oasis-HLB, 150-mg Waters Oasis-WAX and 150-mg Waters Oasis-MAX) were tested in terms of extraction efficiency and matrix effect both in the extraction and detection steps. Mix mode SPE using Waters Oasis-WAX provided the best extraction efficiencies with the lowest matrix effect. The final method was validated in terms of recovery at two fortification levels (in the 80-120% for most of the analytes and matrices), precision (relative standard deviation in the 2-15% range) and method detection limits (MDLs, 0.3-12.4ng/g for vegetables, 0.2-12.5ng/g for fish and 1-22ng/g for amended soil). Finally the method was applied for the determination of the 14 PFCs in different vegetables and fish samples from a local supermarket and in a soil amended with a compost from a local wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). PMID:24495790

  12. Control of microbial souring of oil in a porous media column

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsel, M.

    1996-06-01

    Oil reservoir souring is a major problem in industry due to H{sub 2}S toxicity, corrosion, plugging, and sulfide concentrations in natural gas. Reservoir souring was simulated in Berea sandstone columns and cores using native mixed microbial consortia from two oil fields. Similar souring activity was seen with both consortia growing as a biofilm in columns and cores at 60{degrees}C. Most of the souring activity occurred at the beginning of the columns. This simulated injection well souring, in which sulfate-reducing bacteria, sulfate and carbon sources, are all available at the well bore. Biomass and precipitated iron sulfide accumulated uniformly along the column length and caused plugging. More plugging was found in systems with lower initial permeabilities, and most of this plugging was due to iron sulfide precipitation. Several novel methods were discovered to inhibit souring in the columns and cores. Addition of 10 ppm nitrate stimulated both native consortia to quickly and completely inhibit active souring, and 5 ppm maintained the inhibition. Nitrite was produced at 80-100% of the nitrate level added through incomplete denitrification by nitrate-reducing bacteria, and nitrite was found to be the inhibitory agent. Direct continuous addition of 10-12 ppm nitrite also inhibited souring; but pulse addition was found to be more effective than continuous addition at the same total addition rate. In the 20-hour residence time of the reactor, 10-20% of the nitrite was consumed. Nitrite addition appeared to decrease plugging in the core system. Removal of nitrate or nitrite allowed souring to resume after it had been inhibited for as long as three months. Nitrite was a more effective and longer lasting inhibitor than was glutaraldehyde, a biocide routinely used in oil fields and other industrial applications.

  13. A review of oscillating water columns.

    PubMed

    Heath, T V

    2012-01-28

    This paper considers the history of oscillating water column (OWC) systems from whistling buoys to grid-connected power generation systems. The power conversion from the wave resource through to electricity via pneumatic and shaft power is discussed in general terms and with specific reference to Voith Hydro Wavegen's land installed marine energy transformer (LIMPET) plant on the Scottish island of Islay and OWC breakwater systems. A report on the progress of other OWC systems and power take-off units under commercial development is given, and the particular challenges faced by OWC developers reviewed. PMID:22184660

  14. OH vertical column abundance - Tropical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Clyde R.; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.; Burnett, Elizabeth B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been made during the period 1987-1989 at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Moen, Truk, Federated States of Micronesia (7 deg N, 152 deg E). A total of 384 independent data sets was obtained. Tropical OH abundance levels average about 22 percent above corresponding mid-latitude values, with OH levels during late winter and early spring up to 50 percent above those observed at 40 deg N. Stratospheric wind and temperature data obtained from the daily NWS radiosonde data are examined for correlations with the OH results.

  15. A COMPILATION OF INTERSTELLAR COLUMN DENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.; Preethi, K.; Murthy, Jayant E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com

    2012-03-01

    We have collated absorption line data toward 3008 stars in order to create a unified database of interstellar column densities. These data have been taken from a number of different published sources and include many different species and ionizations. The preliminary results from our analysis show a tight relation [N(H)/E(B - V) = 6.12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21}] between N(H) and E(B - V). Similar plots have been obtained with many different species, and their correlations along with the correlation coefficients are presented.

  16. Growing Cobalt Silicide Columns In Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Obert W.

    1991-01-01

    Codeposition by molecular-beam epitaxy yields variety of structures. Proposed fabrication process produces three-dimensional nanometer-sized structures on silicon wafers. Enables control of dimensions of metal and semiconductor epitaxial layers in three dimensions instead of usual single dimension (perpendicular to the plane of the substrate). Process used to make arrays of highly efficient infrared sensors, high-speed transistors, and quantum wires. For fabrication of electronic devices, both shapes and locations of columns controlled. One possible technique for doing this electron-beam lithography, see "Making Submicron CoSi2 Structures on Silicon Substrates" (NPO-17736).

  17. Developing the Pulsed Fission-Fusion (PuFF) Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Cassibry, Jason; Bradley, David; Fabisinski, Leo; Statham, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    In September 2013 the NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) organization awarded a phase I contract to the PuFF team. Our phase 1 proposal researched a pulsed fission-fusion propulsion system that compressed a target of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) as a mixture in a column, surrounded concentrically by Uranium. The target is surrounded by liquid lithium. A high power current would flow down the liquid lithium and the resulting Lorentz force would compress the column by roughly a factor of 10. The compressed column would reach criticality and a combination of fission and fusion reactions would occur. Our Phase I results, summarized herein, review our estimates of engine and vehicle performance, our work to date to model the fission-fusion reaction, and our initial efforts in experimental analysis.

  18. Controlling output pulse and prepulse in a resonant microwave pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A.; Artemenko, S.; Chumerin, P.; Yushkov, Yu.

    2013-02-07

    A resonant microwave pulse compressor with a waveguide H-plane-tee-based energy extraction unit was studied in terms of its capability to produce output pulses that comprise a low-power long-duration (prepulse) and a high-power short-duration part. The application of such combined pulses with widely variable prepulse and high-power pulse power and energy ratios is of interest in the research area of electronic hardware vulnerability. The characteristics of output radiation pulses are controlled by the variation of the H-plane tee transition attenuation at the stage of microwave energy storage in the compressor cavity. Results of theoretical estimations of the parameters tuning range and experimental investigations of the prototype S-band compressor (1.5 MW, 12 ns output pulse; {approx}13.2 dB gain) are presented. The achievable maximum in the prepulse power is found to be about half the power of the primary microwave source. It has been shown that the energy of the prepulse becomes comparable with that of the short-duration (nanosecond) pulse, while the power of the latter decreases insignificantly. The possible range of variation of the prepulse power and energy can be as wide as 40 dB. In the experiments, the prepulse level control within the range of {approx}10 dB was demonstrated.

  19. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 ?s at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method.

  20. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 ?s at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method. PMID:26233376

  1. DNA extraction from fossil eggshell.

    PubMed

    Oskam, Charlotte L; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Avian eggshell fragments recovered from both paleontological and archaeological deposits contain a cache of well-preserved ancient DNA. Here, we describe an extraction protocol that has been optimized to maximize the recovery of ancient DNA from fossil eggshell and minimize the co-purification of PCR inhibitors. In this method, fossil eggshell fragments are powdered, then digested and heated to release DNA from the calcite matrix. The digest then undergoes a concentration step before purification and washing using silica columns. The method has been used to recover aDNA from the eggshell of many avian species including moa, elephant birds, and emu, up to 19,000 years old. PMID:22237523

  2. RF synchronized short pulse laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Tongu, Hiromu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Okamura, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source that produces shortly bunched ion beam is proposed. In this ion source, ions are extracted immediately after the generation of laser plasma by an ultra-short pulse laser before its diffusion. The ions can be injected into radio frequency (RF) accelerating bucket of a subsequent accelerator. As a proof-of-principle experiment of the ion source, a RF resonator is prepared and H2 gas was ionized by a short pulse laser in the RF electric field in the resonator. As a result, bunched ions with 1.2 mA peak current and 5 ns pulse length were observed at the exit of RF resonator by a probe.

  3. III Lead ECG Pulse Measurement Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, S. K.; Munisamy, K.

    2015-09-01

    Heart rate sensing is very important. Method of measuring heart pulse by using an electrocardiogram (ECG) technique is described. Electrocardiogram is a measurement of the potential difference (the electrical pulse) generated by a cardiac tissue, mainly the heart. This paper also reports the development of a three lead ECG hardware system that would be the basis of developing a more cost efficient, portable and easy to use ECG machine. Einthoven's Three Lead method [1] is used for ECG signal extraction. Using amplifiers such as the instrumentation amplifier AD620BN and the conventional operational amplifier Ua741 that would be used to amplify the ECG signal extracted develop this system. The signal would then be filtered from noise using Butterworth filter techniques to obtain optimum output. Also a right leg guard was implemented as a safety feature to this system. Simulation was carried out for development of the system using P-spice Program.

  4. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  5. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  6. [Determination of fructooligosaccharides in milk powder using high performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection].

    PubMed

    Geng, Lijuan; Huang, Junrong; Feng, Feng; Jiang, Pingping; Chu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Feng; Ling, Yun

    2014-12-01

    Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) are usually added in milk powder as a kind of prebiotic. Thus, quantitative analysis of the FOS is very important for the quality control of milk powder. In this study, a simple method for the simultaneous determination of three FOS components with degrees of polymerization (DP) 3-5 in milk powder was developed by high performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The samples were extracted with 50% (v/v) ethanol aqueous solution and defatted by an On Guard RP pretreatment column. The separation was performed on a CarboPac PA200 column by gradient elution using deionized water, 0. 2 mol/L NaOH solution and 0. 4 mol/L NaAc solution as the mobile phases. The flow rate was 0. 4 mL/min. The column temperature was 30 C; and the injection volume was 25 L. Good linear response was observed in the concentration range of 0.05-10 mg/L (r2 >0. 9993). The limits of quantification were 0. 02, 0. 005 and 0. 02 mg/L for 1-kestose, nystose and fructofuranosyl-nystose, respectively. The mean recoveries varied from 86. 0% to 114. 0% at three spiked levels of 0. 5, 1. 0 and 5. 0 mg/L. The short-chain fructooligosaccharides from inulooligosaccharides (IOS) were successfully separated by the developed HPAEC-PAD method. The method is simple, accurate, sensitive, and helpful for the quality control of milk powder. PMID:25902647

  7. Performance of single particle fritted capillary columns in electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Qing; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Qiuquan

    2013-01-11

    Development of capillary electrochromatography (CEC) largely depends on column technology. The past ten years or so have seen a great number of CEC works performed on monolithic columns, due to simplicity and robustness in column fabrication. Monolithic columns eliminate the issue of column fritting, which conventionally made particle-packed capillary columns fragile and introduced nonuniformity to the chromatographic bed. The particulate packing material, however, is still a popular type of stationary phase widely used in CEC, as the rich library of HPLC packing material provides a wide range of choices for chromatographic separations performed in electrodriven mode. In this study, we investigated a purely physical fritting method, single particle fritting technology, to immobilize particulate chromatographic material inside capillary tube in a sinter-free manner to produce robust capillary columns. Single particle fritted columns present significantly improved column-to-column reproducibility (n=10) in peak efficiency, retention factor, peak area and asymmetry (%RSD=5.4, 7.7, 6.2 and 6.1, respectively, at 26 kV), enabling their practical application in high throughput parallel analysis using multiple columns. PMID:23261296

  8. Open Tubular Lab-On-Column/Mass Spectrometry for Targeted Proteomics of Nanogram Sample Amounts

    PubMed Central

    Hustoft, Hanne Kolsrud; Vehus, Tore; Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Krauss, Stefan; Greibrokk, Tyge; Wilson, Steven Ray; Lundanes, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    A novel open tubular nanoproteomic platform featuring accelerated on-line protein digestion and high-resolution nano liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been developed. The platform features very narrow open tubular columns, and is hence particularly suited for limited sample amounts. For enzymatic digestion of proteins, samples are passed through a 20 m inner diameter (ID) trypsin + endoproteinase Lys-C immobilized open tubular enzyme reactor (OTER). Resulting peptides are subsequently trapped on a monolithic pre-column and transferred on-line to a 10 m ID porous layer open tubular (PLOT) liquid chromatography LC separation column. Wnt/-catenein signaling pathway (Wnt-pathway) proteins of potentially diagnostic value were digested+detected in targeted-MS/MS mode in small cell samples and tumor tissues within 120 minutes. For example, a potential biomarker Axin1 was identifiable in just 10 ng of sample (protein extract of ?1,000 HCT15 colon cancer cells). In comprehensive mode, the current OTER-PLOT set-up could be used to identify approximately 1500 proteins in HCT15 cells using a relatively short digestion+detection cycle (240 minutes), outperforming previously reported on-line digestion/separation systems. The platform is fully automated utilizing common commercial instrumentation and parts, while the reactor and columns are simple to produce and have low carry-over. These initial results point to automated solutions for fast and very sensitive MS based proteomics, especially for samples of limited size. PMID:25222838

  9. Laser photography pulse synchronization circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Auds, J.M.; Becker, R.J.

    1988-05-17

    A laser keep alive triggering control apparatus for initiating the generation of laser output pulses, maintaining laser operation temperatures, and slaving the occurrence of laser output pulses to a variable speed mechanical apparatus is described comprising: a pulse triggered laser; first pulse sourcing means including a free-running electronic oscillator circuit received therein, second pulse sourcing means including a signal pickup transducer responsive to predetermined movement events of the variable speed mechanical apparatus for generating second electrical pulses also capable of triggering bursts of optical energy from the laser; electronic switching means responsive to a predetermined rate of the second pulse sourcing means for selecting one or the other of the first sourcing means and second sourcing means electrical pulses of the laser; and means for inhibiting premature first and second pulses and resultant short cycle triggering of the laser, following first pulse to second pulse and second pulse to first pulse triggering changes in the switching means.

  10. Extractant composition

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Ryan, Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    An organic extracting solution useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  11. Identification of flow regime in a slurry bubble column by Hilbert-Huang transform analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiling; Zhong, Wenqi; Jin, Baosheng; Xiao, Rui

    2013-06-01

    Experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional (2-D) slurry bubble column, which had a length of 0.1m, a width of 0.01m and a total height of 0.8m. The gas phase was oil-free air, tap water was used as the liquid phase, glass powders with particle diameter of 58?m-75?m constituted the solid phase, which belonged to the Geldart A particles. Time-domain analysis and the Hilbert-Huang transform methods were employed to analyze the differential pressure signals obtained and to identify the transition points of the flow regimes in the slurry bubble column. Useful qualitative and quantitative information about the changes in flow structure and particle distributions were extracted. Changes in the standard deviation, skewness and flatness of measured pressure time series with superficial gas velocity are proposed. Hilbert-Huang transform was applied to extract information from signals, and flow structures of the slurry bubble column were characterized by the energy distribution of the multi-resolution signals and the EMD energy entropy. Particle distributions were obtained and analyzed from flow pattern images.

  12. Pulsed Laser Tissue Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Joseph T.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Jansen, E. Duco; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    Pulsed lasers, by virtue of their ability to deliver energy in a spatially and temporally confined fashion, are able to micromachine biological tissues. The clinical success of pulsed laser treatment, however, is often limited by the extent of damage that is caused to the tissue in the vicinity of the ablation crater. In general, pulsed ablation is a trade off between thermal damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively long pulses (>100 ms), and mechanical damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively short pulses (<1 ms). To identify the origin of pulsed laser induced damage, the possible laser tissue interactions and ablation are discussed here and in Chapter 14. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the reader with a condensed overview of the parameters that must be considered in the process of pulsed laser ablation of soft tissue. In this chapter, pulsed infrared ablation of biological soft tissue is used as a paradigm to illustrate the concepts and design considerations. Generally speaking, the absorption of laser light may lead to photothermal, photomechanical or photochemical interaction with the irradiated tissue [1-5]. The vast majority of therapeutic laser-tissue interactions is based on photothermal interactions where laser energy is converted into heat. Subsequent to thermalization of the absorbed optical energy, heat transfer mechanisms, in particular conduction allow thermal diffusion from high temperature areas to surrounding regions. When laser penetration depth is less than the laser spot radius, the thermal diffusion time, τ th, can be defined as:

  13. Pulsed Fission Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the 1960's U.S. Government laboratories, under Project Orion, investigated a pulsed nuclear fission propulsion system. Small nuclear pulse units would be sequentially discharged from the aft end of the vehicle. A blast shield and shock absorber system would protect the crew and convert the shock loads into a continuous propulsive force.

  14. Pulsed Fission Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the 1960's U.S. Government laboratories, under Project Orion, investigated a pulsed nuclear fission propulsion system. Small nuclear pulse units would be sequentially discharged from the aft end of the vehicle. A blast shield and shock absorber system would protect the crew and convert the shock loads into a continuous propusive force.

  15. Extrusion cooking: Legume pulses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion is used commercially to produce high value breakfast and snack foods based on cereals such as wheat or corn. However, this processing method is not being commercially used for legume pulses seeds due to the perception that they do not expand well in extrusion. Extrusion cooking of pulses (...

  16. Industrial Applications of Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hidenori; Fudamoto, Taisuke; Katsuki, Sunao; Namihira, Takao; Sakugawa, Takashi

    Recent developments of pulsed power generators have been concentrated into the developments of repetitively operated pulsed power generators. In addition, the stability and quality of the pulsed power output have been pursued. The developments of these high-quality pulsed power generators enable the industrial applications of pulsed power. Industrial applications are described in the fields of environmental, medical, nanotechnologies and recycling applications.

  17. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high thermal conductivity in the cryogenic temperature range and would typically be made of pure copper to satisfy this requirement. The metallic part is bonded to the nonmetallic part with epoxy. Copper screens are inserted in the metallic part to form the cold-end heat exchanger, then the assembled pulse tube is inserted in the cold tip.

  18. Enhanced degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in a soil column planted with Indian mallow (Abutilon avicennae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoon-Young; Kwon, Young-Seok; Kim, Sun-Young; Lee, In-Sook; Bae, Bumhan

    2004-01-01

    Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was studied by growing Indian mallow (Abutilon avicennae) in a soil column reactor with 2 kg of TNT contaminated soil (120 mgTNT/kg) in the top and 18 kg of uncontaminated soil in the bottom. After 50 d, TNT remaining in the column with Indian mallow was 23.2% of the initial TNT, while 48.1% of the initial TNT remained in the column without Indian mallow. In the TNT contaminated column, the growth of Indian mallow decreased by 32.4% in roots and 34.3% in shoots on a dry weight basis, respectively, compared to the uncontaminated column. However, critical symptoms such as chlorosis and leaf loss were not observed. Of the 76.8% of the TNT that disappeared in the planted column, less than 0.2% of initial TNT was recovered in the shoot and root extracts of Indian mallow. TNT transformation products in plants include unidentified polar intermediates and aminodinitrotoluenes. The results showed that planting Indian mallow in TNT contaminated soil enhanced TNT reduction both by stimulating microbial activity that enhances microbial TNT transformation, and by direct uptake and phytotransformation of TNT. PMID:16233599

  19. Isolated Attosecond Pulse Generation without the Need to Stabilize the Carrier-Envelope Phase of Driving Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, Steve; Khan, Sabih D.; Wu Yi; Chini, Michael; Chang Zenghu

    2010-08-27

    Single isolated attosecond pulses can be extracted from a pulse train with an ultrafast gate in the generation target. By setting the gate width sufficiently narrow with the generalized double optical gating, we demonstrate that single isolated attosecond pulses can be generated with any arbitrary carrier-envelope phase value of the driving laser. The carrier-envelope phase only affects the photon flux, not the pulse duration or contrast. Our results show that isolated attosecond pulses can be generated using carrier-envelope phase unstabilized 23 fs pulses directly from chirped pulse amplifiers.

  20. Bipolar pulse generator for intense pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Igawa, K.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2007-01-15

    A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named ''bipolar pulse accelerator'' (BPA) has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator for the bipolar pulse experiment, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the first experimental result of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PFL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138 kV, 72 ns) and the second pulse (+130 kV, 70 ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time.