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Sample records for pulsed extraction column

  1. Study on the dynamic holdup distribution of the pulsed extraction column

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Chen, J.; Wu, Q.

    2013-07-01

    In the study, a CSTR cascade dynamic hydraulic model was developed to investigate the dynamic holdup distribution of the pulsed extraction column. It is assumed that the dynamic process of the dispersed phase holdup of pulsed extraction column has equal effects with the operational process of multiple cascade CSTRs. The process is consistent with the following assumptions: the holdups vary on different stages but maintain uniform on each stage; the changes of the hydraulic parameters have impact initially on the inlet of dispersed phase, and stability will be reached gradually through stage-by-stage blending. The model was tested and verified utilizing time domain response curves of the average holdup. Nearly 150 experiments were carried out with different capillary columns, various feed liquids, and diverse continuous phases and under different operation conditions. The regression curves developed by the model show a good consistency with the experimental results. After linking parameters of the model with operational conditions, the study further found that the parameters are only linearly correlated with pulse conditions and have nothing to do with flow rate for a specific pulsed extraction column. The accuracy of the model is measured by the average holdup, and the absolute error is ±0.01. The model can provide supports for the boundary studies on hydraulics and mass transfer by making simple and reliable prediction of the dynamic holdup distribution, with relatively less accessible hydraulic experimental data. (authors)

  2. Installation of the Pulse-Plate Column Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Nick R. Mann

    2009-07-01

    There are three primary types of solvent extraction equipment utilized in the nuclear industry for reprocessing of used nuclear fuel; pulse columns, mixer-settlers, and centrifugal contactors. Considerable research and development has been performed at the INL and throughout the DOE complex on the application of centrifugal contactors for used fuel reprocessing and these contactors offer many significant advantages. However, pulse columns have been used extensively in the past in throughout the world for aqueous separations processes and remain the preferred equipment by many commercial entities. Therefore, a pulse-plate column pilot plant has been assembled as part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support experimentation and demonstration of pulse column operation. This will allow the training of personnel in the operation of pulse columns. Also, this capability will provide the equipment to allow for research to be conducted in the operation of pulse columns with advanced solvents and processes developed as part of the fuel cycle research and development being performed in the AFCI program.

  3. Rapid Column Extraction Methods for Urine

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III

    2000-06-09

    A new fecal analysis method that dissolves plutonium oxide was developed at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site. Diphonix Resin (Eichrom Industries), is used to pre-concentrate the actinides from digested fecal samples. A rapid microwave digestion technique is used to remove the actinides from the Diphonix Resin, which effectively extracts plutonium and americium from acidic solutions containing hydrofluoric acid. After resin digestion, the plutonium and americium are recovered in a small volume of nitric acid that is loaded onto small extraction chromatography columns, TEVA Resin and TRU Resin (Eichrom Industries). The method enables complete dissolution of plutonium oxide and provides high recovery of plutonium and americium with good removal of thorium isotopes such as thorium-228.

  4. Instrument for the measurement and determination of chemical pulse column parameters

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, Norman J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1990-01-01

    An instrument for monitoring and measuring pneumatic driving force pulse parameters applied to chemical separation pulse columns obtains real time pulse frequency and root mean square amplitude values, calculates column inch values and compares these values against preset limits to alert column operators to the variations of pulse column operational parameters beyond desired limits.

  5. Evaluation of Packed Columns in Supercritical Extraction Processes 

    E-print Network

    Rathkamp, P. J.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    increasing the overall mass transfer rate. SFE and conventional extraction systems can have similar values of interfacial tension, and in such cases, this property would be expected to contribute little to the differences in performance of the two systems... of different packings as a function of the solvent velocity. The extraction process involved the separation of the monoglyceride of oleic acid from a mixture of the oleic acid glycerides; a one-inch diameter column was used with an acetone entrainer...

  6. Retrievals of column CO2 mixing ratio from airborne pulsed lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Allan, G. R.; Riris, H.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Biraud, S.; Abshire, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    We will present retrieved CO2 column densities from in-flight lidar measurements. We will describe a retrieval algorithm, which extracts the column-average CO2 volume-mixing ratio from pulsed airborne lidar measurements. The airborne instrument steps a pulsed wavelength-tunable laser transmitter across the 1572.33 nm CO2 line in twenty steps at a 450 Hz repitition rate. The laser beam is co-aligned with the receiver and directed toward nadir. The energy of the laser echoes from land and water surfaces are measured. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 are obtained from a retrieval algorithm that fits the observed scan while accounting for atmospheric temperature, pressure, water vapor and the lidar’s wavelength response During summer 2009 we flew the instrument on the NASA Glenn LearJet-25 aircraft over a variety of surface types: corn and soybean fields of the US Midwest, the Oklahoma prairie and waters of the Chesapeake Bay. At selected locations we flew stair step patterns at altitudes from 4 to 12 km. At the Oklahoma site the flights were also coordinated with DOE investigators who flew their in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft inside the LearJet flight pattern. We will present the lidar retrieved CO2 column amounts from the in-flight measurements along side in-situ measurements where available.

  7. Design of Extraction Column Methanol Recovery System for the TAME Reactive Distillation Process

    E-print Network

    Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

    Design of Extraction Column Methanol Recovery System for the TAME Reactive Distillation Process system for TAME reactive distillation process using extraction column with water as a solvent. The design distillation column which was optimized to recover methanol and recycle water to the extraction column. Other

  8. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  9. Effect of the solution temperature on the extraction column hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Karpacheva, S.M.; Maimur, O.K.

    1985-10-01

    This paper discusses uranium extraction and refining at the hydrometallurgical state as well as in radiochemical production. The authors advise carrying out the extraction process at an elevated temperature, especially as the phase separation rate usually also increases. A change in the extractor hydrodynamics with temperature variation can also exert an influence. The optimum process conditions are determined by considering the following factors: effect of the temperature on contact between mutually saturated solutions; drop size; disperse phase retention; the flooding load; and efficiency. The authors conclude that the data presented indicate that the effect of temperature on the characteristics of the extraction processes in a column must be taken into account in determining the optimum process conditions, performing hydrodynamic tests, comparing equipment and packing of various types.

  10. Rapid Column Extraction method for SoilRapid Column Extraction method for Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III; Culligan, Brian K.

    2005-11-07

    The analysis of actinides in environmental soil and sediment samples is very important for environmental monitoring as well as for emergency preparedness. A new, rapid actinide separation method has been developed and implemented that provides total dissolution of large soil samples, high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and DGA-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu) neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. The method combines a rapid fusion step for total dissolution to dissolve refractory analytes and matrix removal using cerium fluoride precipitation to remove the difficult soil matrix. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  11. Prediction of mass transfer and heat evolution of Purex pulsed columns by the DYNAC computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Nabeshima, M. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper proposes empirical correlations of the extractive distribution and overall mass transfer coefficients in the Purex H{sub 2}O-HNO{sub 3}-U(VI)-30% tri- n-butylphosphate/dodecane liquid system that are compared with experimental data. The roles of eddy diffusion and interphase chemical reactions in the transfer kinetics are discussed. These equations are incorporated into the DYNAC computer model and applied to the analysis of a plant-sized pulsed-column connection. The predicted profiles of the uranium concentration and the temperature are in good agreement with the experimental data under steady-state and transient operating conditions. Hence, the kinetic correlations have proven useful in expressing the chemical and diffusional nature of solute tranfer.

  12. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction: ultra-short pulse generation as seeded Hawking radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eilenberger, Falk; Kabakova, Irina V.; de Sterke, C. Martijn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Pertsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We show that light trapped in an optical cavity can be extracted from that cavity in an ultrashort burst by means of a trigger pulse. We find a simple analytic description of this process and show that while the extracted pulse inherits its pulse length from that of the trigger pulse, its wavelength can be completely different. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction is thus well suited for the development of ultrashort laser sources in new wavelength ranges. We discuss similarities between this process and the generation of Hawking radiation at the optical analogue of an event horizon with extremely high Hawking temperature. Our analytic predictions are confirmed by thorough numerical simulations. PMID:24060831

  13. Comparison of an automated nucleic acid extraction system with the column-based procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Rebecca; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Here, we assessed the extraction efficiency of a deployable bench-top nucleic acid extractor EZ1 in comparison to the column-based approach with complex sample matrices. A total of 48 EDTA blood samples and 81 stool samples were extracted by EZ1 automated extraction and the column-based QIAamp DNA Mini Kit. Blood sample extractions were assessed by two real-time malaria PCRs, while stool samples were analyzed by six multiplex real-time PCR assays targeting bacterial, viral, and parasitic stool pathogens. Inhibition control PCR testing was performed as well. In total, 147 concordant and 13 discordant pathogen-specific PCR results were obtained. The latter comprised 11 positive results after column-based extraction only and two positive results after EZ1 extraction only. EZ1 extraction showed a higher frequency of inhibition. This phenomenon was, however, inconsistent for the different PCR schemes. In case of concordant PCR results, relevant differences of cycle threshold numbers for the compared extraction schemes were not observed. Switches from well-established column-based extraction to extraction with the automated EZ1 system do not lead to a relevantly reduced yield of target DNA when complex sample matrices are used. If sample inhibition is observed, column-based extraction from another sample aliquot may be considered. PMID:25883797

  14. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  15. Repetitive Regeneration of Media #1 in a Dynamic Column Extraction using Brine #1

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-10-14

    This data is from a regeneration study from a dynamic column extraction experiment where we ran a solution of REE's through a column of media #1 then stripped the REE's off the media using 2M HNO3 solution. We then re-equilibrated the media and repeated the process of running a REE solution through the column and stripping the REE's off the media and comparing the two runs.

  16. Effects of pulsed and oscillatory flow on water vapor removal from a laboratory soil column. Final report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, K.E.

    1993-05-01

    Subsurface contamination by volatile organic contaminants (VOC`s) in the vadose zone and groundwater is primarily due to leaking underground storage tanks and industrial spills. Soil vapor extraction is a technique that is being used successfully to remove VOC`s from the subsurface. A flow of air is established through the soil to remove the vapor phase component of the contaminant. Soil vapor extraction will initially remove high levels of contaminant that is already present in the macropores. The concentration will start to decline as the removal from the soil matrix becomes limited by diffusion of contaminant from regions away from the air flow paths. This study examines potential methods of overcoming the diffusion limitation by adding an oscillatory component to the steady air flow and by pulsed flow, which involves turning air flow on and off at predetermined intervals. The study considered only the removal of water from the soil to try to establish general vapor behavior in the soil under the imposed conditions. Based on a statistical analysis, both the oscillatory and pulsed flow showed an improved water removal rate over the steady state flow. The effect of oscillatory flow was only examined at higher frequencies. The literature indicates that oscillations at lower frequencies may be more effective. Pulsed flow showed the most efficient removal of water compared to steady state conditions. The pulsed flow was most efficient because rather than reducing the diffusion limitation, the system would shut down and wait for diffusion to occur. This optimizes energy consumption, but does not reduce treatment time. The oscillatory flow actually reduced the diffusion limitation within the column which could result in a shorter treatment time.

  17. Cost/performance comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors designed to process Clinch River Breeder Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ciucci, J.A. Jr.

    1983-12-01

    A comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors was made to determine which type of equipment was more advantageous for use in the primary decontamination cycle of a remotely operated fuel reprocessing plant. Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) fuel was chosen as the fuel to be processed in the proposed 1 metric tonne/day reprocessing facility. The pulse columns and centrifugal contactors were compared on a performance and total cost basis. From this comparison, either the pulse columns or the centrifugal contactors will be recommended for use in a fuel reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel. The reliability, solvent exposure to radiation, required time to reach steady state, and the total costs were the primary areas of concern for the comparison. The pulse column units were determined to be more reliable than the centrifugal contactors. When a centrifugal contactor motor fails, it can be remotely changed in less than one eight hour shift. Pulse columns expose the solvent to approximately five times as much radiation dose as the centrifugal contactor units; however, the proposed solvent recovery system adequately cleans the solvent for either case. The time required for pulse columns to reach steady state is many times longer than the time required for centrifugal contactors to reach steady state. The cost comparison between the two types of contacting equipment resulted in centrifugal contactors costing 85% of the total cost of pulse columns when the contactors were stacked on three levels in the module. If the centrifugal contactors were all positioned on the top level of a module with the unoccupied volume in the module occupied by other equipment, the centrifugal contactors cost is 66% of the total cost of pulse columns. Based on these results, centrifugal contactors are recommended for use in a remotely operated reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel.

  18. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  19. Extraction of negative ions from pulsed electronegative capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ankur; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2012-08-01

    Charge buildup during plasma etching of dielectric features can lead to undesirable effects, such as notching, bowing, and twisting. Pulsed plasmas have been suggested as a method to achieve charge-free plasma etching. In particular, electronegative plasmas are attractive as the collapse of the plasma potential during the after-glow period of pulsed capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) can allow for extraction of negative ions into the feature. The extraction of negative ions in the after-glow of pulsed CCPs sustained in CF{sub 4} containing gas mixtures is computationally investigated. In this paper, the consequences of pulse frequency and gas chemistry on negative ion flux to the wafer are discussed. A low negative ion flux to the wafer was observed only in the late after-glow period of low pulse frequencies. The negative ion flux was found to significantly increase with the addition of highly electronegative gases (such as thermally attaching Cl{sub 2}) even at a high pulse frequency of 10 kHz. As the production of negative ions during the after-glow diminishes, alternative strategies to enhance the flux were also pursued. The flux of negative ions was found to increase by the addition of a pulsed dc voltage on the top electrode that is 180 Degree-Sign out-of-phase with the rf pulse.

  20. The setup of an extraction system coupled to a hydrogen isotopes distillation column

    SciTech Connect

    Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Balteanu, O.; Bucur, C.

    2008-07-15

    Among the most difficult problems of cryogenic distillation one stands apart: the extraction of the heavy fraction. By an optimal design of the cycle scheme, this problem could be avoided. A 'worst case scenario' is usually occurring when the extracted fraction consists of one prevalent isotope such as hydrogen and small amounts of the other two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). This situation is further complicated by two parameters of the distillation column: the extraction flow rate and the hold-up. The present work proposes the conceptual design of an extraction system associated to the cryogenic distillation column used in hydrogen separation processes. During this process, the heavy fraction (DT, T{sub 2}) is separated, its concentration being the highest at the bottom of the distillation column. From this place the extraction of the gaseous phase can now begin. Being filled with adsorbent, the extraction system is used to temporarily store the heavy fraction. Also the extraction system provides samples for the gas Chromatograph. The research work is focused on the existent pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation from our institute to validate the experiments carried out until now. (authors)

  1. Airborne Measurements of Atmospheric Methane Column Abundance Made Using a Pulsed IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anamd; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection IPDA lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier (OPA) pumped by a Nd:YAG laser and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  2. A machine learning approach to extract spinal column centerline from three-dimensional CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caihua; Li, Yuanzhong; Ito, Wataru; Shimura, Kazuo; Abe, Katsumi

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column is one of the most important anatomical structures in the human body and its centerline, that is, the centerline of vertebral bodies, is a very important feature used by many applications in medical image processing. In the past, some approaches have been proposed to extract the centerline of spinal column by using edge or region information of vertebral bodies. However, those approaches may suffer from difficulties in edge detection or region segmentation of vertebral bodies when there exist vertebral diseases such as osteoporosis, compression fracture. In this paper, we propose a novel approach based on machine learning to robustly extract the centerline of the spinal column from threedimensional CT data. Our approach first applies a machine learning algorithm, called AdaBoost, to detect vertebral cord regions, which have a S-shape similar to and close to, but can be detected more stably than, the spinal column. Then a centerline of detected vertebral cord regions is obtained by fitting a spline curve to their central points, using the associated AdaBoost scores as weights. Finally, the obtained centerline of vertebral cord is linearly deformed and translated in the sagittal direction to fit the top and bottom boundaries of the vertebral bodies and then a centerline of the spinal column is obtained. Experimental results on a large CT data set show the effectiveness of our approach.

  3. Droplet diameters and axial mixing in pulse columns in the comparison of the aqueous to organic continuous mode of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fumoto, H. ); Zimmer, E.; Merz, E.R. . Inst. fuer Chemische Technologie der Nuklearen Entsorgung); Suzuki, A.; Kiyose, R. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1987-05-01

    Two 38-mm-diam, 5-m-high pulse columns are investigated to evaluate the droplet diameters and axial mixing in the comparison of the aqueous to organic continuous mode of operation. It is observed that the average droplet diameters are dominated by pulse intensity and are independent of throughputs. Through the evaluation of axial eddy diffusivities, it is concluded that the axial diffusivity coefficient depends mainly on pulse intensity, and the value for the dispersed phase is similar to that for the continuous phase at the same pulse intensity.

  4. Extraction of a single photon from an optical pulse

    E-print Network

    Serge Rosenblum; Orel Bechler; Itay Shomroni; Yulia Lovsky; Gabriel Guendelman; Barak Dayan

    2015-10-14

    Removing a single photon from a pulse is one of the most elementary operations that can be performed on light, having both fundamental significance and practical applications in quantum communication and computation. So far, photon subtraction, in which the removed photon is detected and therefore irreversibly lost, has been implemented in a probabilistic manner with inherently low success rates using low-reflectivity beam splitters. Here we demonstrate a scheme for the deterministic extraction of a single photon from an incoming pulse. The removed photon is diverted to a different mode, enabling its use for other purposes, such as a photon number-splitting attack on quantum key distribution protocols. Our implementation makes use of single-photon Raman interaction (SPRINT) with a single atom near a nanofibre-coupled microresonator. The single-photon extraction probability in our current realization is limited mostly by linear loss, yet probabilities close to unity should be attainable with realistic experimental parameters.

  5. Combined extraction-cleanup column chromatographic procedure for determination of dicofol in avian eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krynitsky, A.J.; Stafford, C.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1988-01-01

    Dicofol in avian eggs was completely oxidized to dichlorobenzophenone (DCBP) when a hexane Soxhlet extraction procedure was used. This degradation did not occur with other avian tissues (muscle and liver). For this reason, a combined extraction-cleanup column chromatographic procedure, without added heat, was developed for the determination of dicofol in avian eggs. Homogenized subsamples of eggs were mixed with sodium sulfate, and the mixture was added as the top layer on a column prepacked with Florisil. The dicofol and other compounds of interest were then eluted with ethyl ether-hexane. The extracts, relatively free from lipids, were quantitated on a gas chromatograph equipped with a 63Ni electron-capture detector and a methyl silicone capillary column. Recoveries from chicken eggs, fortified with dicofol and other DDT-related compounds, averaged 96%. Analysis of eggs of eastern screech-owls, fed a meat diet containing 10 ppm technical Kelthane, showed that both dicofol and DCBP were present. Results were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. This method is rapid and reliable, involves a minimum of sample handling, and is well suited for high volume determination of dicofol in eggs and other avian tissues.

  6. Dynamics of a Finite Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Column in a Pulsed Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Simpson, James; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient paramagnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic field gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. The movement of liquid oxygen is vital to the space program since it one of the primary oxidizers used for propulsion. Transport of liquid oxygen (LOX) via direct interaction of the magnetic fields (B field) with the fluid is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. This method of transporting (i.e. pumping) LOX may have particular advantages on Mars and other reduced gravitational environments, namely safety and reliability. This paper will address transport of a magnetic fluid, LOX, via phased-pulsed electromagnets acting on the edge of the column of fluid. The authors have developed a physical model from first-principles for the motion of a magnetic fluid in a particular U-tube geometry subjected to a pulsed magnetic field from an arbitrary solenoidal electromagnet. Experimental data that have been collected from the analogous geometry correlate well to that of the ab-initio calculations.

  7. Improving Carotenoid Extraction from Tomato Waste by Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Luengo, Elisa; Álvarez, Ignacio; Raso, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, the influence of the application of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of different intensities (3–7?kV/cm and 0–300??s) on the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel and pulp in a mixture of hexane:acetone:ethanol was studied with the aim of increasing extraction yield or reducing the percentage of the less green solvents in the extraction medium. According to the cellular disintegration index, the optimum treatment time for the permeabilization of tomato peel and pulp at different electric field strengths was 90??s. The PEF permeabilization of tomato pulp did not significantly increase the carotenoid extraction. However, a PEF treatment at 5?kV/cm improved the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel by 39% as compared with the control in a mixture of hexane:ethanol:acetone (50:25:25). Further increments of electric field from 5 to 7?kV/cm did not increase significantly the extraction of carotenoids. The presence of acetone in the solvent mixture did not positively affect the carotenoid extraction when the tomato peels were PEF-treated. Response surface methodology was used to determine the potential of PEF for reducing the percentage of hexane in a hexane:ethanol mixture. The application of a PEF treatment allowed reducing the hexane percentage from 45 to 30% without affecting the carotenoid extraction yield. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts obtained from tomato peel was correlated with the carotenoid concentration and it was not affected by the PEF treatment. PMID:25988115

  8. Continuous aqueous two-phase extraction of human antibodies using a packed column.

    PubMed

    Rosa, P A J; Azevedo, A M; Sommerfeld, S; Bäcker, W; Aires-Barros, M R

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a pilot scale packed differential contactor was evaluated for the continuous counter-current aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) from a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells supernatant (CS) enriched with pure protein. Preliminary studies have been firstly performed in order to select the dispersed phase (phosphate-rich or polyethylene glycol 3350 Da (PEG)-rich phase) and the column packing material. The PEG-rich phase has been selected as the dispersed phase and the stainless steel as the preferred material for the column packing bed since it was not wetted preferentially by the selected dispersed phase. Hydrodynamic studies have been also performed, and the experimental results were successfully adjusted to the Richardson-Zaki and Mísek equations, typically used for the conventional organic-aqueous two-phase systems. An experimental set-up combining the packed column with a pump mixer-settler stage showed to have the best performance and to be advantageous when compared to the IgG batch extraction. An IgG recovery yield of 85% could be obtained with about 50% of total contaminants and more than 85% of contaminant proteins removal. Mass transfer studies have revealed that the mass transfer was controlled by the PEG-rich phase. A higher efficiency could be obtained when using an extra pump mixer-settler stage and higher flow rates. PMID:22173005

  9. Laser speckle contrast analysis for pulse waveform extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Pedro; Santos, Pedro; Figueiras, Edite; Correia, Carlos; Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Cardoso, João.

    2015-07-01

    The present paper shows a method for pulse waveform extraction using laser speckle contrast analysis. An experimental apparatus was assembled, using a coherent light source and a digital video camera to record time varying speckle patterns emitted from the radial artery. The speckle data were analysed by computing the speckle pattern contrast on a sequence of video frames. The speckle pulse wave signal was then compared with a photoplethysmographic signal both time and frequency domain. A total of thirty data-sets were acquired from 10 individuals. Subjects heart rate was identified with a root mean square error of 1.3 beats per minute. Signals similarity was evaluated using spectral coherence with an overall mean coherence of 0.63. Speckle contrast analysis is a newly commercialized technique to monitor microvascular blood flow. However, these results demonstrate the ability of the same technique to extract pulse waveform information. The inclusion of this feature in the current speckle devices is only associated with a slightly change in the signal processing techniques and video acquisition parameters but can be very useful in clinical context.

  10. Simultaneous column chromatographic extraction and purification of abscisic acid in peanut plants for direct HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Wen; Fan, Wei-Wei; Li, Hui; Ni, He; Han, Han-Bing; Li, Hai-Hang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a universal signaling molecule, plays important roles in regulating plant growth, development and stress responses. The low contents and complex components in plants make it difficult to be accurately analyzed. A novel one-step sample preparation method for ABA in plants was developed. Fresh peanut (Arachis hypogaea) plant materials were fixed by oven-drying, microwave drying, boiling or Carnoy's fixative, and loaded onto a mini-preparing column. After washed the impurities, ABA was eluted with a small amount of solvent. ABA in plant materials was completely extracted and purified in 2mL solution and directly analyzed by HPLC, with a 99.3% recovery rate. Multiple samples can be simultaneously prepared. Analyses using this method indicated that the endogenous ABA in oven-dried peanut leaves increased 20.2-fold from 1.01 to 20.37?gg(-1) dry weight within 12h and then decreased in 30% polyethylene glycol 6000 treated plants, and increased 3.34-fold from 0.85 to 2.84?gg(-1) dry weight in 5 days and then decreased in soil drought treated plants. The method combined the column chromatographic extraction and solid-phase separation technologies in one step and can completely extracted plant endogenous ABA in a purified and highly concentrated form for direct HPLC analysis. PMID:26343019

  11. Retrievals of Column CO2 Densities from Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G.; Hasselbrack, W.; Kawa, S. R.; Mao, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from our summer 2010 CO2 measurement campaign using the NASA Goddard CO2 lidar sounder onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft platform. This instrument is a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission. The airborne instrument steps a pulsed wavelength-tunable laser transmitter across the 1572.33 nm CO2 line in thirty steps at a 300 Hz repetition rate. The line transmission shape, optical depth, and column densities for the CO2 are obtained from a retrieval algorithm that fits the observed scan while accounting for atmospheric temperature, pressure, water vapor and the lidar's wavelength response. We present results from flights over Railroad Valley Nevada, the ARM site in Oklahoma, and a flight over the Pacific Ocean. During our most recent summer 2011 campaign we flew our instrument over solid and broken cloud as well as smoke from forest fires. Preliminary results from these more challenging conditions will be presented. A second part of the presentation asks how many independent pieces of information about the CO2 vertical profile are retrievable for a given CO2 lidar instrument configuration. We explore how changing the instrument signal to noise and changing the number of wavelengths where the absorption is measured impacts the amount of information in the retrieved CO2 vertical profile. For example if we want CO2 concentrations from 2 independent altitude layers how many wavelength samples, at a given signal to noise, are needed? We consider instrument configurations where only two wavelengths are sampled (simple on-line off-line) up to configurations where 30 wavelengths are sampled.

  12. Pulsed extraction of ionization from helium buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, D. J.; Bollen, G.; Facina, M.; Schwarz, S.

    2008-11-01

    The migration of intense ionization created in helium buffer gas under the influence of applied electric fields is considered. First the chemical evolution of the ionization created by fast heavy-ion beams is described. Straight forward estimates of the lifetimes for charge exchange indicate a clear suppression of charge exchange during ion migration in low pressure helium. Then self-consistent calculations of the migration of the ions in the electric field of a gas-filled cell at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) using a particle-in-cell computer code are presented. The results of the calculations are compared to measurements of the extracted ion current caused by beam pulses injected into the NSCL gas cell.

  13. Bonded-phase extraction column isolation of organic compounds in groundwater at a hazardous waste site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Pereira, W.E.; Ratcliff, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure for isolation of hazardous organic compounds from water for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis Is presented and applied to creosote- and pentachlorophenol-contaminated groundwater resulting from wood-treatment processes. This simple procedure involved passing a 50-100-mL sample through a bonded-phase extraction column, eluting the trapped organic compounds from the column with 2-4 mL of solvent, and evaporating the sample to 100 ??L with a stream of dry nitrogen, after which the sample was ready for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Representative compounds indicative of creosote contamination were used for recovery and precision studies from the cyclohexyl-bonded phase. Recovery of these compounds from n-octyl-, n-octadecyl-, cyclohexyl-, and phenyl-bonded phases was compared. The bonded phase that exhibited the best recovery and least bias toward acidic or basic cmpounds was the n-octadecyl phase. Detailed compound Identification Is given for compounds Isolated from creosote- and pentachlorophenol-contaminated groundwater using the cyclohexyl-bonded phase.

  14. [Immunoaffinity columns and determination of ochratoxin A in cereals by HPLC. Part II. Evaluation of extraction using acetonitrile/water].

    PubMed

    Czerwiecki, Ludwik; Czyzyk, Kamila; Wilczy?ska, Grazyna; Kwiecie?, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    Ochratoxin A from wheat and rye grain was extracted with acetonitrile:water (60:40). After clean-up of extracts using immunoaffinity columns (IAC), ochratoxin was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography using C18 column and fluorometric detection at 330 nm excitation and 460 nm emission. The mean recovery of ochratoxin A at fortification levels 0.1-100 microg/kg, was 74-89%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.015 and 0.025 microg/kg, respectively. The positive results were confirmed by reaction with BF3 complex in methanol. PMID:15732503

  15. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 1 & 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the sigual photon count). Analysis to date shows the decrease in CO2 due to vegetation when flying easterward over the Great Plains as well as the increase in CO2 concentration in the vicinity ofthe coal-fired power plant in New Mexico. Examples of these and other results will be presented.

  16. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Ramanathan, A.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected ~linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes > 6 km the random errors were ~ 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 1 & 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the signal photon count). Analysis to date shows the decrease in CO2 due to vegetation when flying easterward over the Great Plains as well as the increase in CO2 concentration in the vicinity of the coal-fired power plant in New Mexico. Examples of these and other results will be presented.

  17. Quantitation of promethazine and metabolites in urine samples using on-line solid-phase extraction and column-switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Q.; Putcha, L.; Harm, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A chromatographic method for the quantitation of promethazine (PMZ) and its three metabolites in urine employing on-line solid-phase extraction and column-switching has been developed. The column-switching system described here uses an extraction column for the purification of PMZ and its metabolites from a urine matrix. The extraneous matrix interference was removed by flushing the extraction column with a gradient elution. The analytes of interest were then eluted onto an analytical column for further chromatographic separation using a mobile phase of greater solvent strength. This method is specific and sensitive with a range of 3.75-1400 ng/ml for PMZ and 2.5-1400 ng/ml for the metabolites promethazine sulfoxide, monodesmethyl promethazine sulfoxide and monodesmethyl promethazine. The lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) were 3.75 ng/ml with less than 6.2% C.V. for PMZ and 2.50 ng/ml with less than 11.5% C.V. for metabolites based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 10:1 or greater. The accuracy and precision were within +/- 11.8% in bias and not greater than 5.5% C.V. in intra- and inter-assay precision for PMZ and metabolites. Method robustness was investigated using a Plackett-Burman experimental design. The applicability of the analytical method for pharmacokinetic studies in humans is illustrated.

  18. Determination of Myo-Inositol in Infant, Pediatric, and Adult Formulas by Liquid Chromatography-Pulsed Amperometric Detection with Column Switching: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2011.18.

    PubMed

    Butler-Thompson, Linda D; Jacobs, Wesley A; Schimpf, Karen J

    2015-12-01

    AOAC First Action Method 2011.18, Myo-Inositol (Free and Bound as Phosphatidylinositol) in Infant and Pediatric Formulas and Adult Nutritionals, was collaboratively studied. With this method free myo-inositol and phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol are extracted using two different sample preparation procedures, separated by ion chromatography using a combination of Dionex Carbo Pac PA1 and MA1 columns with column switching, and detected with pulsed amperometry using a gold electrode. Free myo-inositol is extracted from samples with dilute hydrochloric acid and water. Phosphatidylinositol is extracted from samples with chloroform and separated from other fats with silica SPE cartridges. Myo-inositol is then released from the glycerol backbone with concentrated acetic and hydrochloric acids at 120°C. During this collaborative study, nine laboratories from five different countries analyzed blind duplicates of nine infant and pediatric nutritional formulas for both free and phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol, and one additional laboratory only completed the free myo-inositol analyses. The method demonstrated acceptable repeatability and reproducibility and met the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPRs(®)) for free myo-inositol plus phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol for all the matrixes analyzed. SMPRs for repeatability were ?5% RSD at myo-inositol concentrations of 2-68 mg/100 g ready-to-feed (RTF) liquid. SMPRs for reproducibility were ?8% RSD in products with myo-inositol concentrations ranging from 2 to 68 mg/100 g RTF liquid. During this collaborative study, repeatability RSDs ranged from 0.51 to 3.22%, and RSDs ranged from 2.66 to 7.55% for free myo-inositol plus phosphatidylinositol bound myo-inositol. PMID:26651580

  19. Extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using an ion-exchange column

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, N.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Dunjic, B.; Lemaire, M.

    1996-04-01

    The selective extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using phenolic resins was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of formaldehyde by phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and phloroglucinol. Their ionoselectivities for five alkali metals were evaluated with a solid-liquid extraction, and their ion-exchange capacities were compared. The resin with the best selectivity for cesium was tested with a real solution at different pH values. An on-column extraction is proposed to obtain cesium with high purity.

  20. Effect of pressure pulses at the interface valve on the stability of second dimension columns in online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Talus, Eric S; Witt, Klaus E; Stoll, Dwight R

    2015-01-23

    Users of online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LCxLC) frequently acknowledge that the mechanical instability of HPLC columns installed in these systems, particularly in the second dimension, is a significant impediment to its use. Such instability is not surprising given the strenuous operating environment to which these columns are subjected, including the large number (thousands per day) of fast and large pressure pulses resulting from interface valve switches (on the timescale of tens of milliseconds) associated with very fast second dimension separations. There appear to be no published reports of systematic studies of the relationship between second dimension column lifetime and any of these variables. In this study we focused on the relationship between the lifetimes of commercially available columns and the pressure pulses observed at the inlet of the second dimension column that occur during the switching of the valve that interfaces the two dimensions of a LCxLC system. We find that the magnitude of the pressure drop at the inlet of the second dimension column during the valve switch, which may vary between 10 and 95% of the column inlet pressure, is dependent on valve switching speed and design, and has a dramatic impact on column lifetime. In the worst case, columns fail within the first few hours of use in an LCxLC system. In the best case, using a valve that exhibits much smaller pressure pulses, the same columns exhibit much improved lifetimes and have been used continuously under LCxLC conditions for several days with no degradation in performance. This result represents a first step in understanding the factors that affect second dimension column lifetime, and will significantly improve the usability of the LCxLC technique in general. PMID:25553909

  1. [Immunoaffinity columns and determination of ochratoxin A in cereals by HPLC. Part I.: Evaluation of extraction using methanol/water].

    PubMed

    Czerwiecki, Ludwik; Czyzyk, Kamila; Kwiecie?, Agnieszka; Wilczy?ska, Grazyna

    2004-01-01

    The method for ochratoxin A determination in cereals (wheat, rye) was described. Application of immunoaffinity columns (IAC) for clean-up of extracts was investigated. The ochratoxin A content was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography using C18 column and fluorimetric detection at 330 nm (excitation) and 460 nm (emission). The mean recovery of ochratoxin A was 65-78%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.015 and 0.025 microg/kg, respectively. The positive results were confirmed by reaction with BF3 complex in methanol. PMID:15493345

  2. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  3. Analysis of Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Weaver, Clark J.; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission [1]. It uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1575 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with the range profile of scattering in the path. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off-line signals via the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. The time of flight of the laser pulses is used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate an early version of the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar stepped the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 wavelength steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a NIR photomultiplier and is recorded on every other reading by a photon counting system [2]. During August 2009 we made a series of 2.5 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over locations in the US, including the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma, central Illinois, north-eastern North Carolina, and over the Chesapeake Bay and the eastern shore of Virginia. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, and in-situ measurements were made using its CO2 sensor and radiosondes. We have conducted an analysis of the ranging and IPDA lidar measurements from these four flights. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We used a cross-correlation approach to process the laser echo records. This was used to estimate the range to the scattering surface, to define the edges of the laser pulses and to determine echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We used a minimum mean square approach to fit an instrument response function and to solve for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape. We then calculated the differential optical depth (DOD) of the fitted CO2 line. We computed its statistics at the various altitude steps, and compare them to the DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column conditions calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The results show the lidar and in-situ measurements have very similar DOD change with altitude and greater than 10 segments per flight where the scatter in the lidar measurements are less than or equal to 1ppm. We also present the results from subsequent CO2 column absorption measurements, which were made with stronger detected signals during three flights on the NASA DC-8 over the southwestern US in during July 2010.

  4. Method for making a non-extractable stationary phase of polymer within a capillary column

    DOEpatents

    Springston, S.R.

    1990-10-30

    A method is described for coating interior capillary column surfaces, or packing material of a packed column, used for gas chromatography, with a stationary polymer phase that is cross-linked by exposing it to a low-temperature plasma that is uniformly distributed over the column or packing material for a predetermined period of time to effect the desired degree of cross-linking of the coating. 7 figs.

  5. Method for making a non-extractable stationary phase of polymer within a capillary column

    DOEpatents

    Springston, Stephen R. (Middle Island, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A method for coating interior capillary column surfaces, or packing material of a packed column, used for gas chromatography, with a stationary polymer phase that is cross-linked by exposing it to a low-temperature plasma that is uniformly distributed over the column or packing material for a predetermined period of time to effect the desired degree of cross-linking of the coating.

  6. Physical versus chemical effects on bacterial and bromide transport as determined from on site sediment column pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, James A.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Fuller, Mark E.; Dong, Hailiang; Deflaun, Mary F.

    2005-02-01

    Twenty eight bacterial and Br transport experiments were performed in the field to determine the effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity of the aquifer sediment. The experiments were performed using groundwater from two field locations to examine the effects of groundwater chemistry on transport. Groundwater was extracted from multilevel samplers and pumped through 7 cm long columns of intact sediment or re-packed sieved and coated or uncoated sediment from the underlying aquifer. Two bacterial strains, Comamonas sp. DA001 and Paenibacillus polymyxa FER-02, were injected along with Br into the influent end of the columns to examine the effect of cell morphology and surface properties on bacterial transport. The effect of column sediment grain size and mineral coatings coupled with groundwater geochemistry were also delineated. Significant irreversible attachment of DA001 was observed in the Fe oxyhydroxide coated columns, but only in the sub-oxic groundwater where the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were ca. 1 ppm. In the oxic groundwater where DOC was ca. 8 ppm, little attachment of DA001 to the Fe oxyhydroxide coated columns was observed. This indicates that DOC can significantly reduce bacterial attachment due electrostatic interactions. The larger and more negatively charged FER-02 displayed increasing attachment with decreasing grain size regardless of DOC concentration, and modeling of FER-02 attachment revealed that the presence of Fe and Al coatings on the sediment also promoted attachment. Finally, the presence of Al coatings and Al containing minerals appeared to significantly retard the Br tracer regardless of the concentration of DOC. These findings suggest that DOC in shallow oxic groundwater aquifers can significantly enhance the transport of bacteria by reducing attachment to Fe, Mn and Al oxyhydroxides. This effect is profound for weakly charged, hydrophilic bacteria and may contribute to differences in observations between laboratory experiments verses field-scale investigations particularly if the groundwater pH remains circum-neutral and Fe oxyhydroxide phases exist. These observations validate the novel approach taken in the experiments outlined here of performing laboratory-scale experiments on site to facilitate the use of fresh groundwater and thus be more representative of in situ groundwater conditions.

  7. Pulse Profiles, Accretion Column Dips and a Flare in GX 1+4 During a Faint State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, A. B.; Galloway, D. K.; Greenhill, J. G.; Storey, M. C.; Wilson, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) spacecraft observed the X-ray GX 1+4 for it period of 34 hours on July 19/20 1996. The source faded front an intensity of approximately 20 mcrab to a minimum of <= 0.7 mcrab and then partially recovered towards the end of the observation. This extended minimum lasted approximately 40,000 seconds. Phase folded light curves at a barycentric rotation period of 124.36568 +/- 0.00020 seconds show that near the center of the extended minimum the source stopped pulsing in the traditional sense but retained a weak dip feature at the rotation period. Away from the extended minimum the dips are progressively narrower at higher energies and may be interpreted as obscurations or eclipses of the hot spot by the accretion column. The pulse profile changed from leading-edge bright before the extended minimum to trailing-edge bright after it. Data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) show that a torque reversal occurred < 10 days after our observation. Our data indicate that the observed rotation departs from a constant period with a P/P value of approximately -1.5% per year at a 4.5sigma significance. We infer that we may have serendipitously obtained data, with high sensitivity and temporal resolution about the time of an accretion disk spin reversal. We also observed a rapid flare which had some precursor activity close to the center of the extended minimum.

  8. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the US Department of Energy's (DOE) SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing CO2 line absorptions with altitudes were evident and comparison with in-situ measurements showed agreements to 6 ppm. In spring 2009 we improved the aircraft's nadir window and during July and August we made 9 additional 2 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surface types in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay in North Carolina and eastern Virginia. Strong laser signals and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The flights over the ARM site were underflown with in-situ measurements made from the DOE Cessna. Analysis shows that the average signal levels follow predicted values, the altimetry measurements had an uncertainty of about 4 m, and that the average optical line depths follow the number density calculated from in-situ sensor readings. The Oklahoma and east coast flights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT CO2 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC in-situ CO2 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL CO2 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. More details of the flights, measurements, analysis and scaling to space will be described in the presentation.

  9. Preparation and characterization of an immunoaffinity column for the selective extraction of aflatoxin B1 in 13 kinds of foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Peng, Tao; He, Jian-Li; Shao, Yu; Fan, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Wen-Xiao; Chen, Min; Wang, Qi; Pei, Xing-Yao; Ding, Shuang-Yang; Jiang, Hai-Yang

    2015-08-15

    A rapid and reliable immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up based ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in cereals, peanuts, vegetable oils and Chinese traditional food products like sufu and lobster sauce. The immunoaffinity column of AFB1 (AFB1-IAC) was prepared by coupling CNBr-activated Sepharose-4B with the anti-AFB1 monoclonal antibody. The column capacity of IAC was over 260ng/mL gel. Samples were extracted with methanol-water (60:40, v/v) and the extracts were then purified on an AFB1-IAC before UPLC-MS/MS analysis. The average recoveries of AFB1 in spiked samples at levels of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0?g/kg ranged from 72% to 98%, with the relative standard deviations of 1.2-9.3% (n=6). The limits of qualification ranged from 0.07 to 0.23?g/kg, which were below the MRLs of AFB1 in the matrices evaluated. In this work, the developed method was suitable for the determination of trace AFB1 residues in 13 kinds of foodstuffs. PMID:26160471

  10. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6 km.

  11. Continuous-flow fractionation of selenium in contaminated sediment and soil samples using rotating coiled column and microcolumn extraction.

    PubMed

    Savonina, Elena Yu; Fedotov, Petr S; Wennrich, Rainer

    2012-01-15

    Dynamic fractionation is considered to be an attractive alternative to conventional batch sequential extraction procedures for partitioning of trace metals and metalloids in environmental solid samples. This paper reports the first results on the continuous-flow dynamic fractionation of selenium using two different extraction systems, a microcolumn (MC) packed with the solid sample and a rotating coiled column (RCC) in which the particulate matter is retained under the action of centrifugal forces. The eluents (leachants) were applied in correspondence with a four-step sequential extraction scheme for selenium addressing "soluble", "adsorbed", "organically bound", and "elemental" Se fractions extractable by distilled water, phosphate buffer, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, and sodium sulphite solutions, respectively. Selenium was determined in the effluent by using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Contaminated creek sediment and dumped waste (soil) samples from the abandoned mining area were used to evaluate resemblances and discrepancies of two continuous-flow methods for Se fractionation. In general, similar trends were found for Se distribution between extractable and residual fractions. However, for the dumped waste sample which is rich in organic matter, the extraction in RCC provided more effective recovery of environmentally relevant Se forms (the first three leachable fractions). The most evident deviation was observed for "adsorbed" Se (recoveries by RCC and MC are 43 and 7 mg kg(-1), respectively). The data obtained were correlated with peculiarities of samples under investigation and operational principles of RCC and MC. PMID:22265512

  12. Extraction of quadrature phase information from multiple pulse NMR signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Burum, D. P.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A multiple pulse sequence (8-pulse sequence) used for high-resolution solid state NMR is analyzed with regard to the information available from each of the four wide sampling windows. It is demonstrated that full quadrature phase information can be obtained using only a single phase detector and that, for the commonly encountered situation where the spectral width is much less than the folding frequency, the signals from the various windows can be combined easily using standard complex Fourier transform software. An improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio equal to the square root of 3 is obtained over either standard single or quadrature phase detection schemes. Procedures for correcting spectral distortions are presented.

  13. Extracting Concrete Thermal Characteristics from Temperature Time History of RC Column Exposed to Standard Fire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method to identify thermal conductivity from time history of one-dimensional temperature variations in thermal unsteady-state is proposed. The numerical method considers the change of specific heat and thermal conductivity with respect to temperature. Fire test of reinforced concrete (RC) columns was conducted using a standard fire to obtain time history of temperature variations in the column section. A thermal equilibrium model in unsteady-state condition was developed. The thermal conductivity of concrete was then determined by optimizing the numerical solution of the model to meet the observed time history of temperature variations. The determined thermal conductivity with respect to temperature was then verified against standard thermal conductivity measurements of concrete bricks. It is concluded that the proposed method can be used to conservatively estimate thermal conductivity of concrete for design purpose. Finally, the thermal radiation properties of concrete for the RC column were estimated from the thermal equilibrium at the surface of the column. The radiant heat transfer ratio of concrete representing absorptivity to emissivity ratio of concrete during fire was evaluated and is suggested as a concrete criterion that can be used in fire safety assessment. PMID:25180197

  14. Sorption of cadmium and copper from an acid mine waste extract by two calcareous soils: Column studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, L.M.; McLean, J.E.; Furst, T.H.; Jurinak, J.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors previous findings suggested different Cu and Cd retention mechanisms for each of two calcareous soils. Solubility data indicated that the Skumpah soil (30% CaCO{sub 3}) reacted with the water extract of an acid mine waste to form tenorite (CuO). Batch desorption of the waste-extract equilibrated Kidman soil (0.2% CaCO{sub 3}) with CaCl{sub 2} indicated that cation exchange was the metal retention mechanism. This study tested these hypotheses of metal retention mechanisms in soil columns. Scanning electron microscopy, back scattering electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate the distribution and forms of Cu in the Skumpah soil that had been leached with waste extracts. Leaching with the mine waste reduced the intensity of calcite and dolomite peaks in diffractograms of soil samples from the upper 8 cm of the columns. Copper and Cd retention in the Kidman soil was investigated via a transport model in which cation exchange was assumed to be the mechanism of metal interaction with the solid phase. Model predictions were compared (1) to metal breakthrough curves for the acid leachate, and (2) to metal release curves obtained by leaching the columns with CaCl{sub 2} after metal breakthrough. The model failed to predict Cd breakthrough portions of the curves satisfactorily but was in agreement with the CaCl{sub 2} leaching curves for all metals. Results of the modeling study indicated that the composition of the leaching solution and exchange phase determined the degree of uncertainty that could be tolerated in the values of the selectivity coefficients. Further, it appeared that exchange reactions controlled metal retention and transport at acid pH.

  15. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Range During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar only on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear C02 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs altitude. The measurements showed -1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and -30 sec averaging times. For the 2010 ASCENDS campaigns we flew the CO2 lidar on the NASA DC-8 and added an O2 lidar channel. During July 2010 we made measurements of CO2 and O2 column absorption during longer flights over Railroad Valley NV, the Pacific Ocean and over Lamont OK. CO2 measurements were made with 30 steps/scan, 300 scans/sec and improved line resolution and receiver sensitivity. Analysis of the 2010 CO2 measurements shows the expected -linear change of DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes> 6 km the random errors were 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. For the summer 2011 ASCENDS campaigns we made further improvements to the lidar's CO2 line scan and receiver sensitivity. The seven flights in the 2011 Ascends campaign were flown over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions in the US, which produced a wide variety of lidar signal conditions. Details of the lidar measurements and their analysis will be described in the presentation.

  16. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs altitude. The measurements showed 1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and 30 sec averaging times. For the 2010 ASCENDS campaigns we flew the CO2lidar on the NASA DC-8 and added an 02lidar channel. During July 2010 we made measurements of CO2 and O2 column absorption during longer flights over Railroad Valley NV, the Pacific Ocean and over Lamont OK. CO2 measurements were made with 30 steps/scan, 300 scans/sec and improved line resolution and receiver sensitivity. Analysis of the 2010 CO2 measurements shows the expected linear change of DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes> 6 km the random errors were 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. For the summer 2011 ASCENDS campaigns we made further improvements to the lidar's CO2 line scan and receiver sensitivity. We demonstrated measurements over the California Central Valley, to stratus cloud tops over the Pacific Ocean, over mountain regions with snow, and over several areas with broken clouds. Details of the lidar measurements and their analysis will be described in the presentation.

  17. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 and 2013 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan with 300 scans per second. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak and the column average CO2 concentrations. We compared these to radiative transfer calculations based on the HITRAN 2008 database, the atmospheric conditions, and the CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. Our team participated in the ASCENDS science flights during July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 absorption line shapes were recorded. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the signal photon count). For flight altitudes above 5 km the biases in retrieved concentrations were 1-2 ppm. Analysis shows the decrease in CO2 due to vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as the sudden increases in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant in New Mexico. Our team also participated in the February 2013 ASCENDS flight campaign, flying over a variety of surfaces in the US, including over Railroad Valley NV, the California Central Valley, desert areas in Arizona, and over cold snow fields in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and warmer snow in Iowa and Wisconsin. Our post-flight analyses showed that the retrievals of lidar range, lineshape and CO2 column absorption and concentrations worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, and through thin clouds. As expected, the relative reflectivity of snow surfaces near 1572 nm was small, about 10% of that of the desert, and good line fits and retrievals were made to these as well. Examples from analyzing the 2011 and 2013 measurements will be presented.

  18. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric C02 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a C02 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, 02 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the C02 line and an 02 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the C02 and 02 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the C02 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear 25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across a selected C02 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz and laser pulse widths are I usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric C02 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm C02 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These nights were coordinated with DOE investigators who Hew an in-situ C02 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing C02 line absorptions with altitudes were evident and comparison with in-situ measurements showed agreements to 6 ppm. This spring we improved the aircraft's nadir window. During July and August 2009 we made 9 additional 2 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric C02 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm C02 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over a variety of surface types in Nebraska, Illinois, the SGP ARM site, and near and over the Chesapeake Bay in North Carolina and Virginia. Strong laser signals and clear line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made through thin clouds. The flights over the ARM site were underflown with in-situ measurements made from the DOE Cessna. The Oklahoma and east coast t1ights were coordinated with a LaRC/ITT C02 lidar on the LaRC UC-12 aircraft, a LaRC insitu C02 sensor, and the Oklahoma flights also included a JPL C02 lidar on a Twin Otter aircraft. Ed Browell and Gary Spiers led the LaRC and JPL teams. More details of the t1ights, measurements and analysis will be described in the presentation.

  19. Effect of Pulsed Ultraviolet Light and High Hydrostatic Pressure on the Antigenicity of Almond Protein Extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on reducing the IgE binding to the almond extracts, was studied using SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA probed with human plasma containing IgE antibodies to almond allergens, and a polyclonal antibody against almond ...

  20. A signal extraction approach to modeling hormone time series with pulses and a changing baseline

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuedong

    A signal extraction approach to modeling hormone time series with pulses and a changing baseline Wensheng Guo, Yuedong Wang and Morton B. Brown \\Lambda July 20, 1998 Abstract Hormones serve as regulating signals for many biological processes. In recent years, it was determined that many hormones are secreted

  1. The fast extraction kicker for J-PARC with a novel pulse compression system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Kunio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    A fast extraction kicker magnet for the main ring of J-PARC has been developed. A lumped constant type magnet is employed for its structural simplicity and stability in high-voltage operation. A disadvantage of the lumped constant type, a slow rise time, was alleviated by the adoption of a newly developed magnetic pulse compression system. The effectiveness of the magnetic pulse compression system in sharpening the excitation current was confirmed both by a circuit simulation and experimentally. The newly developed fast extraction kicker system was operated successfully with a 30 kV charging voltage of the pulsed power supply. The required rise time of less than 1.1 ?s was achieved in the measurement.

  2. A Column Experiment To Determine Black Shale Degradation And Colonization By Means of ?13C and 14C Analysis Of Phospholipid Fatty Acids And DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Gleixner, G.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the degradation of black shale organic matter by microbial communities. We inoculated two columns respectively, with the fungi Schizophyllum commune, the gram-positive bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the gram-negative bacteria Streptomyces griseus and Streptomyces chartreusis. These microorganisms are known to degrade a wide variety of organic macromolecules. Additionally, we had two sets of control columns. To one set the same nutrient solution was added as to the inoculated columns and to the other set only sterile deionised water was supplied. All columns contained 1.5 kg of freshly crushed not autoclaved black shale material with a particle size of 0.63-2 mm. The columns were incubated at 28° C and 60% humidity in the dark. The aim was to investigate, which microorganisms live on black shales and if these microorganisms are able to degrade ancient organic matter. We used compound specific stable isotope measurement techniques and compound specific 14C-dating methods. After 183 days PLFAs were extracted from the columns to investigate the microbial community, furthermore we extracted on one hand total-DNA of column material and on the other hand DNA from pure cultures isolates which grew on Kinks-agar B, Starch-casein-nitrate-agar (SCN) and on complete-yeast-medium-agar (CYM). According to the PLFA analysis bacteria dominated in the columns, whereas in pure cultures more fungi were isolated. A principal component analysis revealed differences between the columns in accordance with the inoculation, but it seems that the inoculated microorganisms were replaced by the natural population. For AMS measurements palmitic acid (C 16:0) was re-isolated from total-PLFA-extract with a preparative fraction collector (PFC). Preliminary results of the study revealed that microorganisms are able to degrade black shale material and that PLFA analysis are useful methods to be combined with analysis of stable isotope and 14C measurements to study microbial degradation processes.

  3. Determination of ricin by nano liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry after extraction using lactose-immobilized monolithic silica spin column.

    PubMed

    Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Kato, Haruhito; Uzawa, Hirotaka; Ohta, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Furuno, Masahiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2011-08-01

    Ricin is a glycosylated proteinous toxin that is registered as toxic substance by Chemical Weapons convention. Current detection methods can result in false negatives and/or positives, and their criteria are not based on the identification of the protein amino acid sequences. In this study, lactose-immobilized monolithic silica extraction followed by tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was developed as a method for rapid and accurate determination of ricin. Lactose, which was immobilized on monolithic silica, was used as a capture ligand for ricin extraction from the sample solution, and the silica was supported in a disk-packed spin column. Recovery of ricin was more than 40%. After extraction, the extract was digested with trypsin and analyzed by LC/MS. The accurate masses of molecular ions and MS/MS spectra of the separated peptide peaks were measured by Fourier transform-MS and linear iontrap-MS, respectively. Six peptides, which were derived from the ricin A-(m/z 537.8, 448.8 and 586.8) and B-chains (m/z 701.3, 647.8 and 616.8), were chosen as marker peptides for the identification of ricin. Among these marker peptides, two peptides were ricin-specific. This method was applied to the determination of ricin from crude samples. The monolithic silica extraction removed most contaminant peaks from the total ion chromatogram of the sample, and the six marker peptides were clearly detected by LC/MS. It takes about 5 h for detection and identification of more than 8 ng/ml of ricin through the whole handling, and this procedure will be able to deal with the terrorism using chemical weapon. PMID:21834021

  4. Long pulse H- beam extraction with a rf driven ion source on a high power level.

    PubMed

    Kraus, W; Fantz, U; Franzen, P

    2010-02-01

    IPP Garching is investigating the applicability of rf driven negative ion sources for the neutral beam injection of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The setup of the tested source was improved to enable long pulses up to 100 kW rf power. The efficiency of negative ion production decreases at high power. The extracted H(-) currents as well as the symmetry of the plasma density close to the plasma grid and of the beam divergence depend on the magnetic filter field. The pulse duration is limited by the increase in coextracted electrons, which depends on the rf power and the caesium conditions on the plasma grid. PMID:20192417

  5. Rapid Column Extraction Method for Actinides and Sr-89/90 in Water Samples

    SciTech Connect

    MAXWELL III, SHERROD L.

    2005-06-15

    The SRS Environmental Laboratory analyzes water samples for environmental monitoring, including river water and ground water samples. A new, faster actinide and strontium 89/90 separation method has been developed and implemented to improve productivity, reduce labor costs and add capacity to this laboratory. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and Sr-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), curium (Cm) and thorium (Th) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized. The method can be used for routine analysis or as a rapid method for emergency preparedness. Thorium and curium are often analyzed separately due to the interference of the daughter of Th-229 tracer, actinium (Ac)-225, on curium isotopes when measured by alpha spectrometry. This new method also adds a separation step using DGA Resin{reg_sign}, (Diglycolamide Resin, Eichrom Technologies) to remove Ac-225 and allow the separation and analysis of thorium isotopes and curium isotopes at the same time.

  6. Computer Simulation of Global Profiles of Carbon Dioxide Using a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Column-Content DIAL System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results of computer simulations of the error in measuring carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles from earth orbit. The simulated sensor is a pulsed, 2-micron, coherent-detection lidar alternately operating on at least two wavelengths. The simulated geometry is a nadir viewing lidar measuring the column content signal. Atmospheric absorption is modeled using FASCODE3P software with the HITRAN 2004 absorption line data base. Lidar shot accumulation is employed up to the horizontal resolution limit. Horizontal resolutions of 50, 100, and 200 km are shown. Assuming a 400 km spacecraft orbit, the horizontal resolutions correspond to measurement times of about 7, 14, and 28 s. We simulate laser pulse-pair repetition frequencies from 1 Hz to 100 kHz. The range of shot accumulation is 7 to 2.8 million pulse-pairs. The resultant error is shown as a function of horizontal resolution, laser pulse-pair repetition frequency, and laser pulse energy. The effect of different on and off pulse energies is explored. The results are compared to simulation results of others and to demonstrated 2-micron operating points at NASA Langley.

  7. Extraction of squalene from shark liver oil in a packed column using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Catchpole, O.J.; Kamp, J.C. von; Grey, J.B.

    1997-10-01

    Continuous extraction of squalene from shark liver oil using supercritical carbon dioxide was carried out in both laboratory and pilot scale plant. The shark liver oil contained around 50% by weight squalene, which was recovered as the main extract stream. The other major components in the oil were triglycerides, which were recovered as raffinate, and pristane, which was recovered as a second extract stream. Separation performance was determined as a function of temperature; pressure; oil to carbon dioxide flow rate ratio, packed height and type of packing; and reflux ratio. The pressure, temperature, and feed oil concentration of squalene determined the maximum loading of oil in carbon dioxide. The oil to carbon dioxide ratio determined the squalene concentration in both the product stream and raffinate stream. The ratio of oil flow rate to the flow rate of squalene required to just saturate carbon dioxide was found to be a useful correlating parameter for the oil loadings and product compositions. Of the three packings investigated, wire wool gave the best separation efficiency and Raschig rings the worst efficiency. Mass transfer correlations from the literature were used to estimate the number of transfer units (NTU) from experimental data and literature correlations. NTU`s from the experimental data were comparable to predictions at a pilot scale but were underpredicted at the laboratory scale. The use of reflux at the pilot scale enabled the concentration of squalene in the product stream to be increased from 92% by mass to a maximum of 99% by mass at fractionation conditions of 250 bar and 333 K.

  8. Simulating ion beam extraction from a single aperture triode acceleration column: A comparison of the beam transport codes IGUN and PBGUNS with test stand data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Wills, J. S. C.; Diamond, W. T.

    2008-04-15

    Ion beam extraction from two different ion sources with single aperture triode extraction columns was simulated with the particle beam transport codes PBGUNS and IGUN. For each ion source, the simulation results are compared to experimental data generated on well-equipped test stands. Both codes reproduced the qualitative behavior of the extracted ion beams to incremental and scaled changes to the extraction electrode geometry observed on the test stands. Numerical values of optimum beam currents and beam emittance generated by the simulations also agree well with test stand data.

  9. Extraction and neutralization of positive and negative ions from a pulsed electronegative inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, D.; el Otell, Z.; Bowden, M. D.; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2015-12-01

    Almost electron-free (ion-ion) plasmas can be transiently formed during the afterglow phase of pulsed plasmas in electronegative gases. In ion-ion plasmas, both positive and negative ions can be extracted which makes them advantageous for a number of applications. In this paper, we investigate the extraction and acceleration of positive and negative ion beams from a pulsed inductively coupled plasma in SF6. The plasma is bounded by two electrodes biased synchronously with the discharge modulation. It is shown that when a DC bias voltage is applied during the afterglow phase, positive/negative ions are accelerated in a positive/negative space charge sheath formed in front of one of the electrodes. The energy of extracted ions closely follows the amplitude of the applied bias voltage (25–150?V) and the peak beam current density reaches 2 A m?2. With a view to using the described system as a source of energetic neutral beams for low damage material processing, simultaneous extraction and surface neutralization of positive and negative ions using an extraction electrode with high aspect ratio apertures is investigated.

  10. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2013-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  11. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A.; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A.; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2014-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  12. Extracting nanosecond pulse signals via stochastic resonance generated by surface plasmon bistability.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Huang, Nan; Wang, Zhaolu; Li, Shaopeng

    2015-11-15

    A technology is investigated to extract nanosecond pulse noise hidden signals via stochastic resonance, which is based on surface plasmon bistability. A theoretical model for recovering nanosecond pulse signals is derived to describe the nonlinear process. It is found that the incident angle, polarization state, medium properties, and input noise intensity all determine the efficiency and fidelity of the output signal. The bistable behavior of the output intensity can be accurately controlled to obtain a cross-correlation gain larger than 6 in a wide range of input signal-to-noise ratio from 1?5 to 1?30. Meanwhile, the distortion in the time domain induced by phase shift can be reduced to a negligible level. This work provides a potential method for detecting low-level or hidden pulse signals in various communication fields. PMID:26565876

  13. Temperature-responsive Solid-phase Extraction Column for Biological Sample Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Akimaru, Michiko; Okubo, Kohei; Hiruta, Yuki; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel solid-phase extraction (SPE) system utilizing a temperature-responsive polymer hydrogel-modified stationary phase. Aminopropyl silica beads (average diameter, 40 - 64 ?m) were coated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based thermo-responsive hydrogels. Butyl methacrylate (BMA) and N,N-dimethylaminopropyl acrylamide (DMAPAAm) were used as the hydrophobic and cationic monomers, respectively, and copolymerized with NIPAAm. To evaluate the use of this SPE cartridge for the analysis of drugs and proteins in biological fluids, we studied the separation of phenytoin and theophylline from human serum albumin (HSA) as a model system. The retention of the analytes in an exclusively aqueous eluent could be modulated by changing the temperature and salt content. These results indicated that this temperature-responsive SPE system can be applied to the pretreatment of biological samples for the measurement of serum drug levels. PMID:26353953

  14. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Sediment and Soil by Pressurized Solvent Extraction, Solid-Phase Extraction, and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 61 compounds in environmental sediment and soil samples is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater and wastewater-impacted sediment on aquatic organisms. This method also may be used to evaluate the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water and sediment quality of urban streams. Method development focused on the determination of compounds that were chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from interfering matrix components by high-pressure water/isopropyl alcohol extraction. The compounds were isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing chemically modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. The cartridges were dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds were eluted with methylene chloride (80 percent)-diethyl ether (20 percent) through Florisil/sodium sulfate SPE cartridge, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-sand samples fortified at 4 to 72 micrograms averaged 76 percent ?13 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method reporting levels for single-component compounds ranged from 50 to 500 micrograms per kilogram. The concentrations of 20 out of 61 compounds initially will be reported as estimated with the 'E' remark code for one of three reasons: (1) unacceptably low-biased recovery (less than 60 percent) or highly variable method performance (greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation), (2) reference standards prepared from technical mixtures, or (3) potential blank contamination. Samples were preserved by freezing to -20 degrees Celsius. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory has established a 1-year sample-holding time limit (prior to sample extraction) from the date of sample collection (if the sample is kept at -20?C) until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of the sample-freezing procedure.

  15. Separation of the Components of a Commercial Analgesic Tablet: A Two-Week Sequence Comparing Purification by Two-Base Extraction and Column Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revell, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    A new laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two benchtop separation methods to isolate the three active components of the commercial analgesic Excedrin. In the two-week sequence, aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine are separated using either a two-base liquid-liquid extraction or silica column chromatography. Students then…

  16. Pressurized liquid extraction as a sample preparation method for the analysis of isoflavones in pulses.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Zamarreño, María Milagros; Pérez-Martín, Lara; Bustamante-Rangel, Myriam; Carabias-Martínez, Rita

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we describe a rapid and simple analytical method that exploits pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and liquid chromatography with diode array detection for the determination of isoflavones in samples of Spanish pulses. Confirmation of the analytes present was performed using ion-trap mass spectrometry. To optimize the PLE extraction, variables such as the dispersing agent, type of solvent and sample amount, and the experimental parameters, such as temperature and the number of extraction cycles, were studied. Separation was carried out using a reverse-phase C18 with polar endcapping as the stationary phase and acetonitrile/water with 0.2 % of formic acid, under a gradient regime, as the mobile phase. Optimal extraction of formononetin and biochanin-A from chickpeas with PLE was achieved using Hydromatrix as a dispersant agent, methanol/water (50:50), a temperature of 90 °C, and three cycles. The same optimal conditions-except methanol/water (75:25)-for solvent extraction were obtained for the extraction of daidzin, genistin, and formononetin from lentils. Recoveries ranged from 97 to 110 %, and standard deviations lower than 20 % were obtained. The contents obtained for daidzin in lentils using the proposed method were not significantly different from those obtained using another official method of analysis. PMID:22427106

  17. Rapid tea catechins and caffeine determination by HPLC using microwave-assisted extraction and silica monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Rahim, A A; Nofrizal, S; Saad, Bahruddin

    2014-03-15

    A rapid reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method using a monolithic column for the determination of eight catechin monomers and caffeine was developed. Using a mobile phase of water:acetonitrile:methanol (83:6:11) at a flow rate of 1.4 mL min(-1), the catechins and caffeine were isocratically separated in about 7 min. The limits of detection and quantification were in the range of 0.11-0.29 and 0.33-0.87 mg L(-1), respectively. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained (94.2-105.2 ± 1.8%) for all samples when spiked at three concentrations (5, 40 and 70 mg L(-1)). In combination with microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), the method was applied to the determination of the catechins and caffeine in eleven tea samples (6 green, 3 black and 2 oolong teas). Relatively high levels of caffeine were found in black tea, but higher levels of the catechins, especially epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) were found in green teas. PMID:24206716

  18. Extraction of He and NE from Individual Lunar Ilmenite Grains by Pulse Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-07-01

    The pulse-heating technique employed for extracting helium and neon from individual interplanetary dust particles [1] has been extended to a similar study of individual lunar grains. A succession of 5-s constant power pulses is applied to the oven holding the particle. The power is increased in 0.25-W increments until all the gas is removed. The peak temperature reached during a pulse lasts about 2 s and increases by roughly 75 degrees C for each 0.25-W increment in power. In the present investigation six individual ilmenite grains of lunar soil 71501 and of breccia 79035 were studied. It was felt that this method of extracting the gas might help in distinguishing between surface embedded solar wind (SW) particles and more deeply embedded constituents such as solar energetic particles (SEP) [2], or gas of trapped or primordial origin. Although only six particles of each type have been studied to date, interesting results are beginning to emerge. For example, for both types of particles, for the initial low power pulses where the maximum pulse temperature does not exceed 500 degrees C, the ^3He/^4He ratio falls near 4 x 10^-4, as expected, if the helium is primarily unfractionated solar wind implanted near the surface. As the pulse temperature is increased to around 1000 degrees C and the solar wind gas presumably has been removed, the ^3He/^4He ratio falls to around 2.5 x 10^-4, in rough agreement with the layer etching results [2]. Likewise, the ^20Ne/^22Ne ratio falls from around 14 to a value near 12, as in the etching experiments [2]. In the case of ^4He/^20Ne ratios there appears to be a real difference between the particles from the two ilmenites. For the 79035 grains, the ratio falls from around 600 for the surface gas to around 150 for the later high-temperature extractions. On the other hand, for the 71501 grains, the ratio starts somewhat lower, near 400, and drops below 100 as the pulse temperature is raised. A qualitatively similar difference was observed in the total gas released by laser beam extractions performed on single grains from the same lunar ilmenite samples [3]. While there is considerable scatter in the data, the overall results are gratifying, and should become more definitive as more particles are investigated. The initial releases, almost certainly from the surfaces of the particles, come closer to the solar wind values [4] than generally reported for lunar grains. It will be interesting to see whether or not the differences observed are real and have a bearing on the general problem of the variation of the solar wind with time [5]. Acknowledgment: We are indebted to R. Wieler for the ilmenite grains used in the investigation. References: [1] Nier A. O. and Schlutter D. J. (1993) LPS XXIV, 1075-1076.[2] Wieler R. et al. (1986) GCA, 50, 1997-2017. [3] Olinger C. T. et al. (1990) Meteoritics, 25, 394. [4] Geiss J. et al. (1972) Apollo 16 Prelim. Sci. Rept., 14-1 to 14-10, NASA SP 315. [5] Becker R. H. and Pepin R. O. (1989) GCA, 53, 1135-1146.

  19. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction, radiation induced due to scattering on the electrostatic septa and limited beam pipe aperture, beam dynamics effects of space charge forces and magnet power supplies ripple. Here we present a novel slow extraction scheme employing a number of non-standard accelerator elements, such as Silicone crystal strips and pulsed stripline dipole correctors, and illustrate practicality of these examples at the 8 GeV proton Recycler Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in simulations. We propose to initiate an R&D program in the Fermilab 8 GeV Recycler to address the key issues of the method: (a) feasibility of very short crystals - from few mm down to 0.2 mm; (b) their efficiency in the channelling and volume reflection regimes; (c) practical aspects of the fast deflectors.

  20. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce. The fluorescence lifetime is emerging in flow cytometry and is helpful in a variety of multiparametric, single cell measurements because it is not impacted by nonlinearity that can occur with fluorescence intensity measurements. Yet time-resolved cytometry systems rely on major hardware modifications making the methodology difficult to reproduce. The motivation of this work is, by taking advantage of the dynamic nature of flow cytometry sample detection and applying digital signal processing methods, to measure fluorescence lifetimes using an unmodified flow cytometer. We collect a new lifetime-dependent parameter, referred to herein as the fluorescence-pulse-delay (FPD), and prove it is a valid representation of the average fluorescence lifetime. To verify we generated cytometric pulses in simulation, with light emitting diode (LED) pulsation, and with true fluorescence measurements of cells and microspheres. Each pulse is digitized and used in algorithms to extract an average fluorescence lifetime inherent in the signal. A range of fluorescence lifetimes is measurable with this approach including standard organic fluorophore lifetimes (?1 to 22 ns) as well as small, simulated shifts (0.1 ns) under standard conditions (reported herein). This contribution demonstrates how digital data acquisition and signal processing can reveal time-dependent information foreshadowing the exploitation of full waveform analysis for quantification of similar photo-physical events within single cells. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25274073

  1. Simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination in nutmeg by ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction and immunoaffinity column clean-up coupled with liquid chromatography and on-line post-column photochemical derivatization-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Liu, Shu-Yu; Qiu, Feng; Xiao, Xiao-He; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2013-05-01

    A simple and sensitive analytical method based on ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction and immunoaffinity column clean-up coupled with high performance liquid chromatography and on-line post-column photochemical derivatization-fluorescence detection (USLE-IAC-HPLC-PCD-FLD) has been developed for simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2 (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in 13 edible and medicinal nutmeg samples marketed in China. AFs and OTA were extracted from nutmeg samples by ultrasonication using a methanol?:?water (80?:?20, v/v) solution, followed by an IAC clean-up step. Different USL extraction conditions, pre-processing ways for nutmeg sample and clean-up columns for mycotoxins, as well as HPLC-PCD-FLD parameters (mobile phase, column temperature, elution procedure, excitation and emission wavelengths) were optimized. This method, which was appraised for analyzing nutmeg samples, showed satisfactory results with reference to limits of detection (LODs) (from 0.02 to 0.25 ?g kg(-1)), limits of quantification (LOQs) (from 0.06 to 0.8 ?g kg(-1)), linear ranges (up to 30 ng mL(-1) for AFB1, AFG1 and OTA and 9 ng mL(-1) for AFB2 and AFG2), intra- and inter-day variability (all <2%) and average recoveries (from 79.6 to 90.8% for AFs and from 93.6 to 97.3% for OTA, respectively). The results of the application of developed method in nutmeg samples have elucidated that four samples were detected with contamination of AFs and one with OTA. AFB1 was the most frequently found mycotoxin in 30.8% of nutmeg samples at contamination levels of 0.73-16.31 ?g kg(-1). At least two different mycotoxins were co-occurred in three samples, and three AFs were simultaneously detected in one sample. PMID:23486692

  2. The effect of dilution and the use of a post-extraction nucleic acid purification column on the accuracy, precision, and inhibition of environmental DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna M.; Spear, Stephen F.; Pierson, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of environmental DNA (eDNA) is an increasingly common method for detecting presence and assessing relative abundance of rare or elusive species in aquatic systems via the isolation of DNA from environmental samples and the amplification of species-specific sequences using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Co-extracted substances that inhibit qPCR can lead to inaccurate results and subsequent misinterpretation about a species’ status in the tested system. We tested three treatments (5-fold and 10-fold dilutions, and spin-column purification) for reducing qPCR inhibition from 21 partially and fully inhibited eDNA samples collected from coastal plain wetlands and mountain headwater streams in the southeastern USA. All treatments reduced the concentration of DNA in the samples. However, column purified samples retained the greatest sensitivity. For stream samples, all three treatments effectively reduced qPCR inhibition. However, for wetland samples, the 5-fold dilution was less effective than other treatments. Quantitative PCR results for column purified samples were more precise than the 5-fold and 10-fold dilutions by 2.2× and 3.7×, respectively. Column purified samples consistently underestimated qPCR-based DNA concentrations by approximately 25%, whereas the directional bias in qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed between stream and wetland samples for both dilution treatments. While the directional bias of qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed among treatments and locations, the magnitude of inaccuracy did not. Our results suggest that 10-fold dilution and column purification effectively reduce qPCR inhibition in mountain headwater stream and coastal plain wetland eDNA samples, and if applied to all samples in a study, column purification may provide the most accurate relative qPCR-based DNA concentrations estimates while retaining the greatest assay sensitivity.

  3. Rapid simultaneous determination of eperisone, tolperisone, and tizanidine in human serum by using a MonoSpin® C18 extraction column and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miura, Naoya; Saito, Takeshi; Taira, Takayuki; Yamagiwa, Takeshi; Morita, Sein; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed for rapid toxicological analysis of eperisone, tolperisone, and tizanidine in human serum using a MonoSpin® C18 extraction column and LC/MS/MS. The method was validated for LOD, linearity, precision, and extraction recovery. This method was rapid with an LOD of 0.5 ng/mL, linearity range 1-500.0 ng/mL (r2 = 0.999), and RSD value below 14.6%. Extraction recovery from the sample was greater than 98.6, 98.8, and 88.5% for eperisone, tolperisone, and tizanidine, respectively. Results showed that combination of the MonoSpin C18 extraction column and LC/MS/MS is a simple and rapid method for the analysis of these three analytes, and a method is described for simultaneous quantitative determination of the analytes in human serum by LC/MSIMS. This method was used to determine the serum levels of eperisone in a patient with eperisone poisoning, and could be successfully applied for screening analyses in clinical cases other than poisoning. PMID:25632432

  4. Marek's disease virus genome separation from feather tip extracts by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Borenshtain, Rinat; Davidson, Irit

    2002-03-01

    Marek's disease virus is an oncogenic herpes virus of poultry that is highly cell associated. In the infected tissues and tumors the virus replicates in a low copy number. The propagation and dissemination of the virus takes place at the feather follicle epithelium, where the viral genome is produced in high copy number. As the viral genome is a large circular DNA molecule (200 kbp), pulsed field gel electrophoresis was used for separation of the viral genome directly from the infected chicken. DNA was extracted from tumors or feather tips by the phenol:chloroform technique or by low melting agar technique. It was found that feathers, being the site of virus productive replication, are useful for separation of free Marek's disease virus DNA from in vivo infections. PMID:11849695

  5. Pulsed electric field pretreatment of rapeseed green biomass (stems) to enhance pressing and extractives recovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Gouyo, T; Grimi, N; Bals, O; Vorobiev, E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) pretreatment on the valorization of extractives (proteins and polyphenols) from rapeseed green biomass (stems) by pressing. The effect of pressure, electric field strength and pulse number on the juice expression yield, total polyphenols and total proteins content in the expressed juices were studied. Experiments conducted under optimal conditions (E=8kV/cm, tPEF=2ms, P=10bar) permitted to increase the juice expressed yield from 34% to 81%. Significant increases in total polyphenols content (0.48 vs. 0.10g GAE/100g DM), in total proteins content (0.14 vs. 0.07g BSA/100g DM) and in consolidation coefficient (9.0×10(-8) vs. 2.2×10(-8)m(2)/s) were also observed after PEF pretreatment. The recovered press cake was well dehydrated with an increase of dry matter content from 8.8% to 53.0%. PMID:26341008

  6. Determination of dihydroergocryptine in human plasma and urine samples using on-line sample extraction-column-switching reversed-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Gerhard; Appel, Kurt; Rose, Thorsten; Wangemann, Martina; Althaus, Michael; Rissler, Klaus

    2004-09-01

    A rapid and sensitive assay for the determination of dihydroergocryptine (DHEC) in human plasma and urine samples with dihydroergotamine (DHET) as the internal standard was developed. The procedure employs on-line sample preparation using an extraction pre-column and an octadecylsilylsilica (ODS) analytical column. After centrifugation human plasma or urine were injected onto the pre-column, concentrated and extracted, back-flushed onto the analytical column and eluted with a binary methanol--aqueous formic acid gradient. Either determination of DHEC as well of its mono- and dihydroxy-metabolites was performed by measurement of the signal responses from MS detection in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode using the transition of the respective parent ions to the common daughter ion at m/z=270.2 amu. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for determinations of DHEC in both plasma and urine were 25 pg/ml for injected sample volumes of 400 microl. Proportionality of signal responses versus concentration was accomplished within the range of 25-1000 pg/ml. Recovery of target analyte from plasma was 99%. Mean values of the coefficients of variation (CV) for the target analyte in plasma ranged from 1.7 to 13.8% (within-day) and 5.0 to 9.1% (between-day) and accuracy from 91.7 to 102.6% for the within-day and from 95.8 to 98.8% for the between-day measurements. The corresponding values for determinations in urine were 1.7-14.5% (within-day) and 5.3-11.8% (between-day) for CV and 95.8-110.7% (within-day) and 100.1-104.6% (between-day) for accuracy. PMID:15261806

  7. Extraction of a nearly monoenergetic ion beam using a pulsed plasma Lin Xu, Demetre J. Economou,a

    E-print Network

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Extraction of a nearly monoenergetic ion beam using a pulsed plasma Lin Xu, Demetre J. Economou,a and Vincent M. Donnelly Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4004 Paul Ruchhoeft Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas

  8. The evaluation of the changes in blood pressure and pulse rate of hypertensive patients during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Gungormus, M; Buyukkurt, M C

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the changes in blood pressure and the pulse rate of hypertensive patients having dental extraction under a local anesthetic containing a vasopressor. The study included 64 patients (42 female and 22 male), 38 to 78 years of age. Twenty-six of the patients were normotensive, 38 were hypertensive patients. The hypertensive patients were identified as those patients who had histories of medically diagnosed high blood pressure and baseline recordings of blood pressures higher than 140/90 mm Hg. Articain HCl with 0.012 mg epinephrine hydrochloride, was used as the local anesthetic for all patients and one tooth was extracted from each patient. Blood pressure and pulse rate measurements were recorded immediately prior to anesthesia, just before extraction and 5 minutes after extraction. The data were analyzed by a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Analysis of the data indicated no statistically significant changes in the systolic and diastolic blood pressures and pulse rate for all interval measurements in both normotensive and hypertensive patients (P > 0.05). In this study, it was determined that there were no significant changes in the blood pressures and the pulse rate of hypertensive patients during surgical procedure, and one cartridge local anesthetic with articain HCl containing 0.012 mg pinephrine may be used safely in hypertensive patients with blood pressure equal or smaller than 154/99 mm Hg. PMID:15055158

  9. Impact of the uranium (VI) speciation in mineralised urines on its extraction by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups used in chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, S; Bouvier-Capely, C; Ritt, A; Peroux, A; Fevrier, L; Rebiere, F; Agarande, M; Cote, G

    2015-11-01

    Actinides determination in urine samples is part of the analyses performed to monitor internal contamination in case of an accident or a terrorist attack involving nuclear matter. Mineralisation is the first step of any of these analyses. It aims at reducing the sample volume and at destroying all organic compounds present. The mineralisation protocol is usually based on a wet ashing step, followed by actinides co-precipitation and a furnace ashing step, before redissolution and the quantification of the actinides by the appropriate techniques. Amongst the existing methods to perform the actinides co-precipitation, alkali-earth (typically calcium) precipitation is widely used. In the present work, the extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and americium(III) from the redissolution solutions (called "mineralised urines") on calix[6]arene columns bearing hydroxamic groups was investigated as such an extraction is a necessary step before their determination by ICP-MS or alpha spectrometry. Difficulties were encountered in the transfer of uranium(VI) from raw to mineralised urines, with yield of transfer ranging between 0% and 85%, compared to about 90% for Pu and Am, depending on the starting raw urines. To understand the origin of such a difficulty, the speciation of uranium (VI) in mineralised urines was investigated by computer simulation using the MEDUSA software and the associated HYDRA database, compiled with recently published data. These calculations showed that the presence of phosphates in the "mineralised urines" leads to the formation of strong uranyl-phosphate complexes (such as UO2HPO4) which compete with the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups. The extraction constant of uranium (VI) by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups was determined in a 0.04molL(-1) sodium nitrate solution (logK=4.86±0.03) and implemented in an extraction model taking into account the speciation in the aqueous phase. This model allowed to simulate satisfactorily the experimental uranium extraction data and to support the preliminary conclusions about the role of the phosphates present in mineralised urines. These calculations also showed that the phosphate/calcium ratio is a key parameter as far as the efficiency of the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene columns is concerned. It predicted that the addition of CaCl2 in mineralised urines would release uranium (VI) from phosphates by forming calcium (II)-phosphate complexes and thus facilitate the uranium (VI) extraction on calix[6]arene columns. These predictions were confirmed experimentally as the addition of 0.1molL(-1) CaCl2 to a mineralised urine containing naturally a high concentration of phosphate (typically 0.04molL(-1)) significantly increased the percentage of uranium (VI) extraction on the calix[6]arene columns. PMID:26452903

  10. Pulse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  11. APPLICATION OF COLUMN EXTRACTION METHOD FOR IMPURITIES ANALYSIS ON HB-LINE PLUTONIUM OXIDE IN SUPPORT OF MOX FEED PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.; Diprete, D.; Wiedenman, B.

    2012-03-20

    The current mission at H-Canyon involves the dissolution of an Alternate Feedstocks 2 (AFS-2) inventory that contains plutonium metal. Once dissolved, HB-Line is tasked with purifying the plutonium solution via anion exchange, precipitating the Pu as oxalate, and calcining to form plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed product for the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, and the anion exchange raffinate will be transferred to H-Canyon. The results presented in this report document the potential success of the RE resin column extraction application on highly concentrated Pu samples to meet MOX feed product specifications. The original 'Hearts Cut' sample required a 10000x dilution to limit instrument drift on the ICP-MS method. The instrument dilution factors improved to 125x and 250x for the sample raffinate and sample eluent, respectively. As noted in the introduction, the significantly lower dilutions help to drop the total MRL for the analyte. Although the spike recoveries were half of expected in the eluent for several key elements, they were between 94-98% after Nd tracer correction. It is seen that the lower ICD limit requirements for the rare earths are attainable because of less dilution. Especially important is the extremely low Ga limit at 0.12 {mu}g/g Pu; an ICP-MS method is now available to accomplish this task on the sample raffinate. While B and V meet the column A limits, further development is needed to meet the column B limits. Even though V remained on the RE resin column, an analysis method is ready for investigation on the ICP-MS, but it does not mean that V cannot be measured on the ICP-ES at a low dilution to meet the column B limits. Furthermore, this column method can be applicable for ICP-ES as shown in Table 3-2, in that it trims the sample of Pu, decreasing and sometimes eliminating Pu spectral interferences.

  12. Monitoring of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch by microdialysis sampling coupled on-line to anion exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed electrochemical detection using post-column switching

    SciTech Connect

    Torto, N.; Gorton, L.; Emneus, J.; Laurell, T.; Marko-Varga, G.; Akerberg, C.; Zacchi, G.

    1997-12-05

    A quantitative evaluation of the hydrolysis of wheat starch using Termamyl, a thermostable {alpha}-amylase, is reported. Data from the monitoring of the hydrolysis of wheat starch indicated that, after 1 h, glucose and maltooligosaccharides up to DP 7 were the main hydrolysis products and thus enabled optimization of a liquefaction step during the production of L-lactic acid. The monitoring system used, both in the on- and off-line mode, was based on continuous flow microdialysis sampling (CFMS) coupled to anion exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed electrochemical detection (IPED). A microdialysis probe equipped with a 5-mm polysulfone (SPS 4005) membrane, with a molecular-weight cut-off of 5 kDa, was used to sample the hydrolysis products of native wheat starch at 90 C. Characteristic fingerpoint separations were achieved by anion exchange chromatography after enzymatic hydrolysis. Post-column switching improved the detection and, consequently, also quantification of the hydrolysates as fouling of the electrode could be reduced. Maltooligosaccharide standards were used for quantification and to verify the elution of the hydrolysates by spiking the off-line samples.

  13. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of pesticides in water by C-18 solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Smith, Steven G.; Fehlberg, Kevin M.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 41 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in natural-water samples using C-18 solid-phase extraction and determination by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the pesticides. The columns are dried using carbon dioxide or nitrogen gas, and adsorbed pesticides are removed from the columns by elution with 3.0 milliliters of hexane-isopropanol (3:1). Extracted pesticides are determined by capillary- column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 4 micrograms per liter (g/L) for most pesticides, with the exception of widely used corn herbicides--atrazine, alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor--which have upper concentration limits of 20 g/L. Single- operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.001 to 0.018 g/L. Average short-term single-operator precision in reagent- water samples is 7 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 8 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. Mean recoveries in reagent-water samples are 73 percent at the 0.1- and 1.0-g/L levels and 83 percent at the 0.01-g/L level. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on the solid-phase extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time.

  14. "In situ" extraction of essential oils by use of Dean-Stark glassware and a Vigreux column inside a microwave oven: a procedure for teaching green analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chemat, Farid; Perino-Issartier, Sandrine; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Fernandez, Xavier

    2012-08-01

    One of the principal objectives of sustainable and green processing development remains the dissemination and teaching of green chemistry in colleges, high schools, and academic laboratories. This paper describes simple glassware that illustrates the phenomenon of extraction in a conventional microwave oven as energy source and a process for green analytical chemistry. Simple glassware comprising a Dean-Stark apparatus (for extraction of aromatic plant material and recovery of essential oils and distilled water) and a Vigreux column (as an air-cooled condenser inside the microwave oven) was designed as an in-situ extraction vessel inside a microwave oven. The efficiency of this experiment was validated for extraction of essential oils from 30 g fresh orange peel, a by-product in the production of orange juice. Every laboratory throughout the world can use this equipment. The microwave power is 100 W and the irradiation time 15 min. The method is performed at atmospheric pressure without added solvent or water and furnishes essential oils similar to those obtained by conventional hydro or steam distillation. By use of GC-MS, 22 compounds in orange peel were separated and identified; the main compounds were limonene (72.1%), ?-pinene (8.4%), and ?-terpinene (6.9%). This procedure is appropriate for the teaching laboratory, does not require any special microwave equipment, and enables the students to learn the skills of extraction, and chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis. They are also exposed to a dramatic visual example of rapid, sustainable, and green extraction of an essential oil, and are introduced to successful sustainable and green analytical chemistry. PMID:22526656

  15. Determination of lignin in marine sediment using alkaline cupric oxide oxidation-solid phase extraction-on-column derivatization-gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Li, Xianguo; Sun, Shuwen; Lan, Haiqing; Du, Peirui; Wang, Min

    2013-03-01

    Lignin serves as one of the most important molecular fossils for tracing Terrestrial Organic Matters (TOMs) in marine environment. Extraction and derivatization of lignin oxidation products (LOPs) are crucial for accurate quantification of lignin in marine sediment. Here we report a modification of the conventional alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation method, the modification consisting in a solid phase extraction (SPE) and a novel on-column derivatization being employed for better efficiency and reproducibility. In spiking blanks, recoveries with SPE for the LOPs are between 77.84% and 99.57% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 0.57% to 8.04% ( n=3), while those with traditional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are from 44.52% to 86.16% with RSDs being from 0.53% to 13.14% ( n=3). Moreover, the reproducibility is greatly improved with SPE, with less solvent consumption and shorter processing time. The average efficiency of on-column derivatization for LOPs is 100.8% ± 0.68%, which is significantly higher than those of in-vial or in-syringe derivatization, thus resulting in still less consumption of derivatizing reagents. Lignin in the surface sediments sampled from the south of Yangtze River estuary, China, was determined with the established method. Recoveries of 72.66% to 85.99% with standard deviation less than 0.01mg/10g dry weight are obtained except for p-hydroxyben-zaldehyde. The lignin content ?8 (produced from 10 g dry sediment) in the research area is between 0.231 and 0.587 mg. S/V and C/V ratios (1.028 ± 0.433 and 0.192 ± 0.066, respectively) indicate that the TOMs in this region are originated from a mixture of woody and nonwoody angiosperm plants; the high values of (Ad/Al)v suggest that the TOMs has been highly degraded.

  16. Extracting Oxygen from Lunar Simulant Using a Transparent Furnace Pulsed Fluidized Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oryshchyn, L.; Paz, A.; Lee, K.; Reddington, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the event that humans return to the moon, utilizing the local materials will be beneficial for extended stays. Rather than transporting resources, such as oxygen, from Earth, NASA is investigating methods of extracting it from lunar regolith. One promising process is hydrogen reduction. In the hydrogen reduction process, lunar regolith is heated to 1000 C in the presence of hydrogen. The iron oxide (Fe-O) bonds, found in lunar material, are broken and the hydrogen attracts the oxygen to produce water vapor [Allen et al., 1996]. FeO + H2 (right arrow) Fe +H2O. The water vapor is then captured, cleaned, and electrolyzed. The hydrogen is recycled back to the reduction process and the oxygen is stored until consumed by an end user (propulsion, life support, etc.). To obtain a good oxygen yield, the majority of lunar regolith must be exposed to the hydrogen gas and have a high rate of heat transfer from heat source to particle. This is achieved with good solids mixing via fluidization or mechanical agitation. In Generation II of the ROxygen program, the ROxygen Team at Johnson Space Center (JSC) investigated the feasibility of gas only pulsed fluidization as the only means to mix synthetic lunar regolith (simulant) at high temperatures. Fluidized beds have been used in industry to effectively process powders for decades. They consist of gas flowing upward through a bed of particles. The stirring action continuously moves the grains around to achieve uniform mixing of gas, solids, and heat [Geldart, 1986]. A transparent furnace unit was developed by Thoughventions Unlimited LLC (TvU) to aid in the qualitative observation of the fluidization behavior at high temperatures. Multipoint thermocouples and pressure sensors provided quantitative information regarding the quality of mixing. The water produced was measured using humidity sensors and captured using a NASA designed and built condenser. Once the simulant was processed, pneumatically transporting the 'hot' simulant out of the furnace was investigated.

  17. Solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixed bed adsorbent (acid activated montmorillonite-silica gel) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, N.; Mishra, Braja Gopal; Pareek, Pawan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    A novel approach has been developed for the solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) based on the adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixture of acid activated montmorillonite (AAM)-silica gel column. The effect of various parameters such as acidity, stability of the column, sample volume, interfering ions, etc., were studied in detail. The adsorbed complex could be easily eluted using polyethylene glycol-sulfuric acid mixture and the concentration of chromium has been determined using visible spectrophotometry. The calibration graph was linear in the range 0-1 ?g mL -1 chromium(VI) with a detection limit of 6 ?g L -1. A highest preconcentration factor of 25 could be obtained for 250 mL sample volume using glass wool as support for the mixed bed adsorbent. Chromium(VI) could be effectively separated from other ions such as nickel, copper, zinc, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, etc., and the method has been successfully applied to study the recovery of chromium in electroplating waste water and spiked water samples.

  18. Development of an Automated Column Solid-Phase Extraction Cleanup of QuEChERS Extracts, Using a Zirconia-Based Sorbent, for Pesticide Residue Analyses by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Morris, Bruce D; Schriner, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    A new, automated, high-throughput, mini-column solid-phase extraction (c-SPE) cleanup method for QuEChERS extracts was developed, using a robotic X-Y-Z instrument autosampler, for analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables by LC-MS/MS. Removal of avocado matrix and recoveries of 263 pesticides and metabolites were studied, using various stationary phase mixtures, including zirconia-based sorbents, and elution with acetonitrile. These experiments allowed selection of a sorbent mixture consisting of zirconia, C18, and carbon-coated silica, that effectively retained avocado matrix but also retained 53 pesticides with <70% recoveries. Addition of MeOH to the elution solvent improved pesticide recoveries from zirconia, as did citrate ions in CEN QuEChERS extracts. Finally, formate buffer in acetonitrile/MeOH (1:1) was required to give >70% recoveries of all 263 pesticides. Analysis of avocado extracts by LC-Q-Orbitrap-MS showed that the method developed was removing >90% of di- and triacylglycerols. The method was validated for 269 pesticides (including homologues and metabolites) in avocado and citrus. Spike recoveries were within 70-120% and 20% RSD for 243 of these analytes in avocado and 254 in citrus, when calibrated against solvent-only standards, indicating effective matrix removal and minimal electrospray ionization suppression. PMID:25702899

  19. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound-assis...

  20. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound assis...

  1. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Whole Water by Continuous Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 69 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on aquatic organisms in wastewater. This method also is useful for evaluating the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are indicators of wastewater or have endocrine-disrupting potential. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Wastewater compounds in whole-water samples were extracted using continuous liquid-liquid extractors and methylene chloride solvent, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 0.5 microgram per liter averaged 72 percent ? 8 percent relative standard deviation. The concentration of 21 compounds is always reported as estimated because method recovery was less than 60 percent, variability was greater than 25 percent relative standard deviation, or standard reference compounds were prepared from technical mixtures. Initial method detection limits averaged 0.18 microgram per liter. Samples were preserved by adding 60 grams of sodium chloride and stored at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory established a sample holding-time limit prior to sample extraction of 14 days from the date of collection.

  2. Simultaneous extraction of trace organophosphorous pesticides from plasma sample by automated solid phase extraction and determination by gas chromatography coupled with pulsed flame photometric detector.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Du, Ran

    2010-05-20

    The purpose of our work was to develop a simple and efficient analytical method for simultaneous determination of different species of organic phosphorus pesticides from plasma sample by using automated solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/pulsed flame photometric detector (GC/PFPD) as a diagnostic tool. Firstly, the developed extraction method was validated using 5 certified reference materials; then, it was applied to plasma sample. Such factors as the category and volume of wash and elution solvent were examined separately. Among these factors, the category of elution solvent is most important. Hexane-acetone (50:50, v/v) seems to be the best choice for it. The eluent was evaporated on a nitrogen stream at room temperature and redissolved by acetone. 1microL of aliquots was chromatographed on GC/PFPD. Response versus the amount of pesticides injected ranging from 0.05 to 2ng showed a good linearity. The detection limits were 0.01ng for dimethoate, 0.03ng for methyl-parathion and malathion, 0.04ng for terbufos and 0.02ng for parathion. Extraction recoveries range from 84.3% to 109.1%.This extraction method for multispecies analysis incorporates many benefits in terms of speed, low solvent use, accuracy of measurement, sensitivity, relative simplicity, as well as the time saving and convenience of multiple species measurement through sample preparation and analysis as an integrated step. PMID:20060669

  3. Multiresidue pesticide analysis of botanical dietary supplements using salt-out acetonitrile extraction, solid-phase extraction cleanup column, and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Douglas G; Wong, Jon W; Shi, Feng; Zhang, Kai; Lee, Nathaniel S; DiBenedetto, Alex L; Hengel, Mathew J

    2013-05-01

    Dietary supplements form an increasing part of the American diet, yet broadly applicable multiresidue pesticide methods have not been evaluated for many of these supplements. A method for the analysis of 310 pesticides, isomers, and pesticide metabolites in dried botanical dietary supplements has been developed and validated. Sample preparation involved acetonitrile:water added to the botanical along with anhydrous magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride for extraction, followed by cleanup with solid-phase extraction using a tandem cartridge consisting of graphitized carbon black (GCB) and primary-secondary amine sorbent (PSA). Pesticides were measured by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Accuracy and precision were evaluated through fortifications of 24 botanicals at 10, 25, 100, and 500 ?g/kg. Mean pesticide recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) for all botanicals were 97%, 91%, 90%, and 90% and 15%, 10%, 8%, and 6% at 10, 25, 100, and 500 ?g/kg, respectively. The method was applied to 21 incurred botanicals. Quinoxyfen was measured in hops (100-620 ?g/kg). Tetraconazole (48 ?g/kg), tetramethrin (15 ?g/kg), methamidophos (50 ?g/kg), and chlorpyrifos (93 ?g/kg) were measured in licorice, mallow, tea, and tribulus, respectively. Quintozene, its metabolites and contaminants (pentachloroaniline, pentachlorobenzene, pentachloroanisole, and pentachlorothioanisole and hexachlorobenzene and tecnazene, respectively), with hexachlorocyclohexanes and DDT were identified in ginseng sources along with azoxystrobin, diazinon, and dimethomorph between 0.7 and 2800 ?g/kg. Validation with these botanicals demonstrated the extent of this method's applicability for screening 310 pesticides in a wide array of botanical dietary supplements. PMID:23534560

  4. Comparison of Column Solid-Phase Extraction Procedures for Spectrophotometric Determination of E129 (Allura Red) in Foodstuff, Pharmaceutical, and Energy Drink Samples.

    PubMed

    Bi?gin, Abdullah Taner; Uçan, Mustafa; Narin, ?brahim

    2015-01-01

    Two novel spectrophotometric determination procedures based on retention of Allura Red onto Amberlite XAD-1180 and XAD-16 resins for its preconcentration, purification, and separation were developed. Analytical parameters of the methods including pH, eluent type, sample volume, and sample and eluent flow rates, were investigated and optimized. Interference effects of some cations, anions, and widely used food dyes were also investigated. Detection limits of the two methods were found to be 1.2 and 1.5 ?g/L for XAD-1180 and XAD-16 columns, respectively, under optimum conditions. Linear calibration curve ranges of the methods were 0.4-8.0 and 0.5-6.0 ?g/mL of Allura Red for XAD-1180 and XAD-16 resins, respectively. Preconcentration factors were found as 80 for both the XAD-1180 and XAD-16 columns using maximum sample volume and minimum eluent volume. RSDs of the methods were below 6% throughout all experiments. All absorbance measurements were performed at 506 nm. Validations of the methods were performed comparatively with determination of the Allura Red contents of some foodstuff, pharmaceutical, and energy drink samples. Allura Red concentrations in investigated solid and liquid samples ranged from 298 to 501 ?g/g and 53.8 to 508 ?g/mL, respectively. Satisfactory results were obtained from the real samples analysis. Allura Red contents of samples were determined to be highly similar using the two extraction methods. Comparisons of the methods were performed by analysis of Allura Red contents of the real samples. In addition to analytical parameters, adsorption isotherm studies were performed for the two kinds of Amberlite resins. It was observed that developed methods fit the linear form of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. All of the experimental results suggested that the developed SPE procedures are suitable for separation, preconcentration, and determination of Allura Red in solid and liquid matrixes. PMID:26268977

  5. Surfactant assisted pulsed two-phase electromembrane extraction followed by GC analysis for quantification of basic drugs in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Pegah; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Moazami, Hamid Reza; Nojavan, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a simple and efficient surfactant assisted pulsed two-phase electromembrane extraction (SA-PEME) procedure combined with gas chromatography (GC) has been developed for the determination of alfentanil, sufentanil and methadone in various samples. It has been found that the addition of anionic surfactant causes the accumulation of the cationic analytes at the SLM/solution interface resulting in an easier transfer of the analytes into the organic phase. The method was accomplished with 1-octanol as the acceptor phase and supported liquid membrane (SLM) by means of an 80V pulsed electrical driving force and the extraction time of 20min. The model analytes were extracted from 3.0mL sample solution (pH 4.0) containing 0.02% w/v surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate). The duty cycle of 92% and frequency of 0.357Hz gave the best performance. Extraction recoveries in the range of 70.5-95.2% and satisfactory repeatability (7.6

  6. In vitro gastric and intestinal digestions of pulsed light-treated shrimp extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel technology most commonly used for microbial inactivation, has recently been employed to effectively mitigate food allergens in peanuts, soybean, shrimp, and almond. Putative mechanisms for the efficacy of PUV in reducing allergen reactivity, include photother...

  7. Determination of copper, lead and iron in water and food samples after column solid phase extraction using 1-phenylthiosemicarbazide on Dowex Optipore L-493 resin.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ozden; Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    A novel solid phase extraction procedure for determination of copper, lead and iron in natural water and food samples has been established in the presented work. 1-Phenylthiosemicarbazide (1-PTSC) as ligand and Dowex Optipore L-493 resin as adsorbent were used in a mini chromatographic column. Various analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of analyte ions including pH, amounts of adsorbent, eluent, sample volume, etc. were investigated. The recovery values for analyte ions were higher than 95%. The determination of copper, lead and iron was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of some alkali, alkali earth and transition metals on the recoveries of analyte ions were investigated. The preconcentration factor was 62.5. The limit of detections of the understudied analytes (k=3, N=21) were 0.64 ?g L(-1) for copper, 0.55 ?g L(-1) for lead and 0.82 ?g L(-1) for iron. The relative standard deviation was found to be lower than 6%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with certified reference material (GBW 07605 Tea). The method was successively applied for the determination of copper, lead and iron in water and some food samples including cheese, bread, baby food, pekmez, honey, milk and red wine after microwave digestion. PMID:21111769

  8. Multisyringe flow injection system for solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography using monolithic column for screening of phenolic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Hugo M; Segundo, Marcela A; Lima, José L F C; Cerdà, Victor

    2009-02-15

    In this work a fast, automatic solid-phase extraction procedure hyphenated to HPLC-UV is proposed for screening of priority phenolic pollutants in waters at ng mL(-1) levels. A flow through column, containing polystyrene-divinylbenzene sorbent, was incorporated to a multisyringe flow injection system (MSFIA), where the sample loading and analyte elution were carried out after computer control. The MSFIA system also directed the eluent to fill the injection loop of the chromatograph, coupling the sample preparation to its determination. High enrichment factors were attained for phenol and ten of its derivatives (mean value 176 for 50 mL of sample), with LOD values lower than 1 ng mL(-1) for the maximum volume of sample used (100mL). For all analytes, mean recoveries between 89 and 103% were obtained for different water matrices. Certified reference material and a contaminated soil (RTC-CRM 112) were also tested successfully. The determination frequency was 4-10h(-1), providing an automatic, fast and reliable tool for water quality and environmental monitoring. PMID:19084666

  9. Method of fast trace microanalysis of the chiral pesticides epoxiconazole and novaluron in soil samples using off-line flow-through extraction and on-column direct large volume injection in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rybár, Ivan; Góra, Robert; Hutta, Milan

    2007-12-01

    An analytical method combining off-line flow-through extraction of a soil micro-sample (mass around 100 mg, packed into a short HPLC glass column) and direct on-column large-volume injection (LVI up to 1.00 mL) of a methanol-water soil extract onto a conventional C18 RP HPLC column enabled fast (within 3.5 minutes) trace micro-analysis of the relatively new chiral pesticides epoxiconazole (E) and novaluron (N), respectively. Linear calibration curves were evaluated from UV detection (230 nm) data in the range from 0.1 to 5 mg/kg in three most abundant Slovak agricultural soils. LOD (confidence band) at the levels 0.08-0.11 mg/kg and LOQ 0.4-0.6 mg/kg and LOD (S/N = 3) at the levels 0.007-0.018 mg/kg and LOQ (S/N = 10) 0.024-0.060 mg/kg, respectively, of dry soil were achieved. Recovery of pesticides in the overall LVI method including flow-through 130-200 mg soil micro-sample extraction was: for epoxiconazole from 74 to 85% and from 56% to 90% for novaluron with reproducibility within +/- 6% RSD. This fast (30 min) and simple method consists of just three steps which are short column filling with a solid micro-sample; flow-through liquid extraction and direct large-volume injection RP HPLC DAD analysis. The method is prepared for automation and further analysis of enantiomers of both investigated pesticides by achiral-chiral column switching techniques. PMID:18027358

  10. Extraction assisted by pulsed electric energy as a potential tool for green and sustainable recovery of nutritionally valuable compounds from mango peels.

    PubMed

    Parniakov, Oleksii; Barba, Francisco J; Grimi, Nabil; Lebovka, Nikolai; Vorobiev, Eugene

    2016-02-01

    The study compares the efficiency of conventional aqueous extraction at different temperatures (20-60 °C) and pH (2.5-11) and extraction assisted by pulsed electric energy (pulsed electric fields, PEF or high voltage electrical discharges, HVED) of nutritionally valuable compounds found in mango peels. Exponential decay pulses with initial electric field strengths of ? 13.3 kV/cm and ? 40 kV/cm for PEF and HVED treatments were used, respectively. The impact of temperature on aqueous extraction of proteins and carbohydrates was not significant. The highest values of nutritionally valuable and antioxidant compounds (7.5mM TE) were obtained for aqueous extraction (T = 60 °C, pH 6) but extracts were unstable and cloudy. The application of two-stage procedure PEF+supplementary aqueous extraction (+SE) that include PEF-assisted extraction as the first step, and +SE at 50 °C, pH 6 during 3h as the second step, allowed a noticeable enhancement of the yields of TPC (+400%) even at normal pH. PMID:26304419

  11. Comparison of Alkaline Lysis with Electroextraction and Optimization of Electric Pulses to Extract Plasmid DNA

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    Plasmid DNA from Escherichia coli Sasa Haberl · Marko Jarc · Ales Strancar · Matjaz Peterka · Dusa Hodzic Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013 Abstract The use of plasmid DNA (pDNA) as a phar- maceutical for extracting pDNA. Keywords Alkaline lysis Á Electroextraction Á Plasmid DNA Á Escherichia coli Introduction

  12. Testing a prototype pulse generator for a continuous flow system and its use for E. coli inactivation and microalgae lipid extraction.

    PubMed

    Flisar, Karel; Meglic, Sasa Haberl; Morelj, Jernej; Golob, Janvit; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2014-12-01

    Among other applications, electroporation is used for the inactivation of pathogens and extraction of substances from microorganisms in liquids where large scale flow systems are used. The aim of our work was therefore to test a pulse generator that enables continuous pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment for Escherichia coli inactivation and microalgae lipid extraction. In the continuous flow PEF system, the flow rate was adjusted so that each bacterial cell received a defined number of pulses. The results of PEF flow treatment showed that the number of pulses influences E. coli inactivation to the same extent as in the previously described cuvette system, i.e., batch system. The continuous flow PEF system was also tested and evaluated for lipid extraction from microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. In control experiments, lipids were extracted via concentration of biomass, drying and cell rupture using pressure or an organic solvent. In contrast, electroporation bypasses all stages, since cells were directly ruptured in the broth and the oil that floated on the broth was skimmed off. The initial experiments showed a 50% oil yield using the electroporation flow system in comparison to extraction with organic solvent. PMID:24713586

  13. EXPERIMENTAL SIMULATION OF DISTILLATION COLUMN PROFILE MAPS

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    EXPERIMENTAL SIMULATION OF DISTILLATION COLUMN PROFILE MAPS Tshepo Sehole David Modise A thesis or in combination, such as distillation, extraction, crystallization, ect. Among these, distillation is by far profiles for the preliminary design of distillation columns. Residue curves and column profile are not only

  14. Olive oil pilot-production assisted by pulsed electric field: impact on extraction yield, chemical parameters and sensory properties.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Eduardo; Martínez de Marañón, Iñigo

    2015-01-15

    The impact of the use of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology on Arroniz olive oil production in terms of extraction yield and chemical and sensory quality has been studied at pilot scale in an industrial oil mill. The application of a PEF treatment (2 kV/cm; 11.25 kJ/kg) to the olive paste significantly increased the extraction yield by 13.3%, with respect to a control. Furthermore, olive oil obtained by PEF showed total phenolic content, total phytosterols and total tocopherols significantly higher than control (11.5%, 9.9% and 15.0%, respectively). The use of PEF had no negative effects on general chemical and sensory characteristics of the olive oil, maintaining the highest quality according to EU legal standards (EVOO; extra virgin olive oil). Therefore, PEF could be an appropriate technology to improve olive oil yield and produce EVOO enriched in human-health-related compounds, such as polyphenols, phytosterols and tocopherols. PMID:25149017

  15. Pulsed electromembrane extraction for analysis of derivatized amino acids: A powerful technique for determination of animal source of gelatin samples.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Aghaei, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation of animal sources of gelatin is required for many reasons such as some anxieties about bovine spongiform encephalopathy or a ban on consuming porcine gelatin in some religions. In the present work, an efficient method is introduced for determination of animal origin of gelatin samples. The basis of this procedure is the application of pulsed electric field for extraction, preconcentration, and analysis of derivatized amino acids in gelatin. To this end, after derivatization of amino acids of interest by means of o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) for enhancing their ultraviolet (UV) absorbance as well as increasing their lipophilicities, a 137V electric field was applied for 20min with 10min(-1) frequency to make the analytes migrate through a 200µm organic liquid membrane into an aqueous acceptor phase. Finally, the acceptor phase was analyzed by HPLC-UV. The proposed technique offered a high efficiency for analysis of amino acids, regarding 43% and 79% as extraction recoveries and 25ng mL(-1) and 50ng mL(-1) as limits of detection (LODs) for asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Therefore, due to sample cleanup ability of the proposed method and obtained preconcentration factors (29 and 53 for asparagine and glutamine, respectively), it could be carried out for differentiation of animal origins of gelatin samples, even if only small amounts of samples are available or in complicated media of foodstuffs and medicament. PMID:25703002

  16. Quantification of endogenous brassinosteroids in plant by on-line two-dimensional microscale solid phase extraction-on column derivatization coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wu, Dapeng; Shen, Zheng; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2013-07-01

    An on-line two-dimensional microscale solid phase extraction (2D?SPE)-on column derivatization (OCD)-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for quantification of brassinosteroids (BRs) in plant tissues. Five BRs with widest distribution in plant species and high bioactivity (24-epibrassinolide, 24-epicastasterone, 6-deoxo-24-epicastasterone, teasterone and typhastero) were selected as target analytes. 2D?SPE column packed sequentially with phenyl boronic acid silica sorbent (the first dimension) and C18 silica sorbent (the second dimension) was used to selectively extract and enrich BRs by 110-146 times. OCD was carried out on the second dimension of 2D?SPE column with m-aminophenylboronic acid (m-APBA) as a derivatization reagent, enhancing the sensitivity of MS/MS to BRs by 13-8437 times. It was also found that pre-trap of derivatization reagent on the C18 section of 2D?SPE column could increase reaction efficiency by 3-10 times. The whole process time of the on-line system was less than 30min. The detection limits of the method for five BRs were between 1.4 and 6.6pg with RSDs less than 10%. Endogeneous BRs in tomato leaves were analyzed by using this method. Owing to the high selectivity of this on-line 2D?SPE system, BRs in plant extracts could be quantified using matrix-free standard calibration method with relative recoveries in the range of 80-124%. PMID:23702098

  17. Method of analysis of a selected group of pyrethroids in soil samples using off-line flow-through extraction and on-column direct large-volume injection in reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chalányová, Mária; Paulechová, Martina; Hutta, Milan

    2006-09-01

    An analytical method using flow-through extraction of a soil sample filled in a short HPLC column with methanol or methanol-water mixtures and large-volume injection in RP-HPLC has been developed for the simultaneous determination of residues of three pyrethroids--kadethrin, cypermethrin, and permethrin--from soil samples. The developed RP-HPLC method enables separation of four diastereoisomers of cypermethrin into three peaks and resolution of two diastereoisomers of permethrin. The UV photometric detection limits of direct on-column large-volume injection of 1.00 mL of extract were 30 ng/mL of kadethrin, 37 ng/mL of total content of cypermethrin, and 65 ng/mL of trans-permethrin, which corresponds to a pyrethroid soil content of around 0.3 mg/kg. Effects of extractant flow rate and optimal extractant volume on the percentage recovery of pyrethroids from Slovak soil samples were studied. Recovery studies were performed at 0.5- 5.0 microg/g fortification level of kadethrin and 1.0-2.5 microg/g fortification level of cypermethrin and permethrin in a soil sample. Recoveries ranged from 83 to 90% for kadethrin, from 87 to 94% for total cypermethrin, and from 85 to 98% for trans-permethrin. This work comprises a basic study aimed at elaboration of an RP-HPLC method of direct analysis of pyrethroids in a soil matrix at low concentration levels achieved by a "solid sample injection" in HPLC--on-line interfacing of analyte extraction, extract clean-up, and analysis. PMID:17069244

  18. Polytetrafluorethylene film-based liquid-three phase micro extraction coupled with differential pulse voltammetry for the determination of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Khoddami, Elaheh; Rezaei, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new combination method based on polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) film-based liquid three-phase micro extraction coupled with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) for the micro extraction and quantification of atorvastatin calcium (ATC) at the ultra-trace level. Different factors affecting the liquid-three phases micro extraction of atorvastatin calcium, including organic solvent, pH of the donor and acceptor phases, concentration of salt, extraction time, stirring rate and electrochemical factors, were investigated, and the optimal extraction conditions were established. The final stable signal was achieved after a 50 min extraction time, which was used for analytical applications. An enrichment factor of 21 was achieved, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method was 4.5% (n = 4). Differential pulse voltammetry exhibited two wide linear dynamic ranges of 20.0-1000.0 pmol L(-1) and 0.001-11.0 µmol L(-1) of ATC. The detection limit was found to be 8.1 pmol L(-1) ATC. Finally, the proposed method was used as a new combination method for the determination of atorvastatin calcium in real samples, such as human urine and plasma. PMID:23474719

  19. Simultaneous determination of palladium, platinum, rhodium and gold by on-line solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography with 5-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenylazo)thiorhodanine as pre-column derivatization regents.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiufen; Yang, Xiangjun; Huang, Zhangjie; Chen, Jing; Yang, Guangyu

    2005-11-11

    In this paper, 5-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenylazo)thiorhodanine (HNATR) was synthesized. A new method for the simultaneous determination of palladium, platinum, rhodium and gold ions as metal-HNATR chelates was developed using a rapid analysis column high performance liquid chromatography equipped with on-line solid phase extraction technique. The samples (Water, human urine, geological samples and soil) were digested by microwave acid-digestion. The palladium, platinum, rhodium and gold ions in the digested samples were pre-column derivatized with HNATR to form colored chelates. The Pd-HNATR, Pt-HNATR, Rh-HNATR and Au-HNATR chelates can be absorbed onto the front of the enrichment column when they were injected into the injector and sent to the enrichment column [Zorbax Stable Bound, 10 mm x 4.6 mm, 1.8 microm] with a buffer solution of 0.05 mol L(-1) phosphoric acid as mobile phase. After the enrichment had finished, by switching the six ports switching valve, the retained chelates were back-flushed by mobile phase and travelling towards the analytical column. These chelates separation on the analytical column [Zorbax Stable Bound, 10 mm x 4.6 mm, 1.8 microm] was satisfactory with 72% acetonitrile (containing 0.05 mol L(-1) of phosphoric acid and 0.1% of Triton X-100) as mobile phase. The palladium, platinum, rhodium and gold chelates were separated completely within 2.5 min. Compared to the routine chromatographic method, more then 80% of separation time was shortened. By on-line solid phase extraction system, a large volume of sample (10 mL) can be injected, and the sensitivity of the method was greatly improved. The detection limits (S/N=3, the sample injection volume is 10 mL) of palladium, platinum, rhodium and gold in the original samples reaches 1.4, 1.8, 2.0 and 1.2 ng L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations for five replicate samples were 2.4-3.6%. The standard recoveries were 88-95%. This method was applied to the determination of palladium, platinum, rhodium and gold in human urine, water and geological samples with good results. PMID:16257292

  20. Methods of analysis by the U. S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - determination of organonitrogen herbicides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Wydoski, Duane S.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Zamboni, Jana L.; Foreman, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the isolation of organonitrogen herbicides from natural water samples using solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction cartridges containing octadecyl-bonded porous silica to remove the herbicides. The cartridges are dried using carbon dioxide, and adsorbed herbicides are removed from the cartridges by elution with 1.8 milliliters of hexaneisopropanol (3:1). Extracts of the eluants are analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of at least three characteristic ions. The method detection limits are dependent on sample matrix and each particular herbicide. The method detection limits, based on a 100-milliliter sample size, range from 0.02 to 0.25 microgram per liter. Recoveries averaged 80 to 115 percent for the 23 herbicides and 2 metabolites in 1 reagent-water and 2 natural-water samples fortified at levels of 0.2 and 2.0 micrograms per liter.

  1. Development of an immunoaffinity column method using broad-specificity monoclonal antibodies for simultaneous extraction and cleanup of quinolone and sulfonamide antibiotics in animal muscle tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a novel mixed-bed immunoaffinity column (IAC) method. The IAC was produced by coupling anti-fluoroquinolone and anti-sulfonamide broad-specificity monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) to Sepharose 4B for simultaneously isolating 13 fluoroquinolones (FQs) and 6 sulfonamides (SAs) from s...

  2. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  3. Batch and fixed-bed column studies for biosorption of Zn(II) ions onto pongamia oil cake (Pongamia pinnata) from biodiesel oil extraction.

    PubMed

    Shanmugaprakash, M; Sivakumar, V

    2015-12-01

    The present work, analyzes the potential of defatted pongamia oil cake (DPOC) for the biosorption of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions in the both batch and column mode. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the optimal pH, effect of adsorbent dosage, initial Zn(II) ions concentration and contact time. The biosorption equilibrium and kinetics data for Zn(II) ions onto the DPOC were studied in detail, using several models, among all it was found to be that, Freundlich and the second-order model explained the equilibrium data well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters had shown that the biosorption of Zn(II) ions was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Batch desorption studies showed that the maximum Zn(II) recovery occurred, using 0.1 M EDTA. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) and the Thomas model was successfully employed to evaluate the model parameters in the column mode. The results indicated that the DPOC can be applied as an effective and eco-friendly biosorbent for the removal of Zn(II) ions in polluted wastewater. PMID:26366934

  4. 40 CFR 799.6786 - TSCA water solubility: Generator column method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. 799.6786 Section...799.6786 TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. (a) Scope —(1...the saturated solutions produced by the generator column. After extraction onto a...

  5. 40 CFR 799.6786 - TSCA water solubility: Generator column method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. 799.6786 Section...799.6786 TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. (a) Scope —(1...the saturated solutions produced by the generator column. After extraction onto a...

  6. 40 CFR 799.6786 - TSCA water solubility: Generator column method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. 799.6786 Section...799.6786 TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. (a) Scope —(1...the saturated solutions produced by the generator column. After extraction onto a...

  7. 40 CFR 799.6786 - TSCA water solubility: Generator column method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. 799.6786 Section...799.6786 TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. (a) Scope —(1...the saturated solutions produced by the generator column. After extraction onto a...

  8. 40 CFR 799.6786 - TSCA water solubility: Generator column method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. 799.6786 Section...799.6786 TSCA water solubility: Generator column method. (a) Scope —(1...the saturated solutions produced by the generator column. After extraction onto a...

  9. Stereospecific determination of amisulpride, a new benzamide derivative, in human plasma and urine by automated solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography on a chiral column. application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ascalone, V; Ripamonti, M; Malavasi, B

    1996-02-01

    Amisulpride, a drug belonging to the benzamide series, demonstrates antischizophrenic and antidepressant (antidysthymic) properties in man. For the pharmacokinetic studies of the racemic drug in man, a method of determination based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) from plasma and HPLC on a stereoselective column was developed. For this aim, one millilitre of plasma, after the addition of the internal standard, tiapride or metoclopramide, is diluted with a borate buffer at pH 9, then automatically loaded onto a SPE C18 100-mg column. The column is washed with different solvents, then eluted with 0.5 ml of methanol. After evaporation of the eluted fraction, the residue is reconstituted in 0.25 ml of eluent mixture. An aliquot is injected onto the HPLC column, a Chiralpak AS, equilibrated with an eluent mixture constituted by n-hexane-ethanol, (67:33, v/v) containing 0.2% (v/v) of diethylamine (DEA) or n-heptane-ethanol, (70:29.8, v/v) containing 0.2% of DEA and connected to a UV detector set at 280 nm or to a fluorimetric detector set at lambda ex = 280 nm and lambda cm = 370 nm. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) in human plasma is 2.5 ng ml-1 for both S-(-)- and R-(+)-amisulpride isomers with both detection methods. The method has been demonstrated to be linear in the range 2.5-320 ng ml-1 for both R-(+)- and S-(-)-amisulpride in human plasma with both UV and fluorescence detection. Absolute recovery of S-(-)- and R-(+)-amisulpride enantiomers from human plasma, as well as selectivity, precision and accuracy have been demonstrated to be satisfactory for pharmacokinetics in man and equivalent for both the proposed methods that have been cross-validated on real dosed human plasma samples. The methods have been used for clinical pharmacokinetic studies allowing pharmacokinetic parameters for amisulpride enantiomers in agreement with those obtained for the racemate to be obtained. After dilution with water, urinary samples from subjects treated with amisulpride racemate can be analysed according to the method used for plasma. PMID:8852049

  10. Application of pulsed electric field in the production of juice and extraction of bioactive compounds from blueberry fruits and their by-products.

    PubMed

    Bobinait?, Ramun?; Pataro, Gianpiero; Lamanauskas, Nerijus; Šatkauskas, Saulius; Viškelis, Pranas; Ferrari, Giovanna

    2015-09-01

    The influence of Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) pre-treatment of blueberry fruits (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), both on the extraction yield and antioxidant properties of juice obtained by pressing and on the on the recovery of bioactive compounds from berry by-products (press cake) by extraction with solvent, was investigated. PEF treatments carried out at field strengths of 1, 3, and 5 kV/cm and an energy input of 10 kJ/kg achieved a cell disintegration index (Z p ) of 0.70, 0.80, and 0.87, respectively. Mechanical pressing (1.32 bar for 8 min) of PEF-treated berries (1, 3, and 5 kV/cm at 10 kJ/kg) significantly increased the juice yield (+28 %) compared with the untreated sample. The juice obtained from PEF pre-treated berries also had a significantly higher total phenolic content (+43 %), total anthocyanin content (+60 %) and antioxidant activity (+31 %). However, PEF treatment intensity higher than 1 kV/cm did not significantly improve the quantitative or qualitative characteristics of the juice. Compared to the untreated sample, higher amounts of total phenolics (+63 %), total athocyanins (+78 %) and antioxidant activity (+65 %) were detected in the press cake extracts. PEF treatment of higher intensity resulted in better extractability of bioactive compounds from blueberry press cake. The results obtained from this study demonstrate the potential of PEF as a mild pre-treatment method to improve the efficiency of the industrial processing of berry fruits. PMID:26345006

  11. Methods of analysis and quality-assurance practices of the U.S. Geological Survey organic laboratory, Sacramento, California; determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical method and quality-assurance practices were developed for a study of the fate and transport of pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin River. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended parti- culate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide, and the pesticides were eluted with three 2-milliliter aliquots of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1). The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for analytes determined per 1,500-milliliter samples ranged from 0.006 to 0.047 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 47 to 89 percent for 12 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.05 and 0.26 microgram per liter. The method was modified to improve the pesticide recovery by reducing the sample volume to 1,000 milliliters. Internal standards were added to improve quantitative precision and accuracy. The analysis also was expanded to include a total of 21 pesticides. The method detection limits for 1,000-milliliter samples ranged from 0.022 to 0.129 microgram per liter. Recoveries ranged from 38 to 128 percent for 21 pesticides in organic-free, Sacramento River and San Joaquin River water samples fortified at 0.10 and 0.75 microgram per liter.

  12. Selective extraction and analysis of catecholamines in rat blood microdialysate by polymeric ionic liquid-diphenylboric acid-packed capillary column and fast separation in high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinguang; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-08-28

    Concentration of blood catecholamines (CAs) is linked to a host of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension and stenocardia. The matrix interferences and low concentration require tedious sample pretreatment methods before quantitative analysis by the gold standard method of high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD). Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been widely used as the pretreatment technique. Here, a facile polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-diphenylboric acid (DPBA)-packed capillary column was prepared to selectively extract dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NE) and epinephrine (E) prior to their quantitative analysis by a fast separation in HPLC-ECD method, while microdialysis sampling method was applied to get the analysis sample. Parameters that influenced desorption efficiency, such as pH, salt concentration, acetonitrile content and wash time, were examined and optimized. The proposed method, combining microdialysis sampling technique, SPE and HPLC-ECD system, was successfully applied to detect CAs in rat blood microdialysate with high sensitivity and selectivity in small sample volumes (5-40?l) and a short analysis time (8min), yielding good reproducibility (RSD 6.5-7.7%) and spiked recovery (91-104.4%). PMID:26206631

  13. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Hadas, Yoav; Schamiloglu, Edl; Krasik, Yakov E.

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  14. Numerical simulations of output pulse extraction from a high-power microwave compressor with a plasma switch

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Bliokh, Yuri; Donskoy, Moshe; Krasik, Yakov E.; Hadas, Yoav; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2014-05-07

    Numerical simulations of the process of electromagnetic energy release from a high-power microwave pulse compressor comprising a gas-filled cavity and interference switch were carried out. A microwave plasma discharge in a rectangular waveguide H-plane tee was modeled with the use of the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code MAGIC. The gas ionization, plasma evolution, and interaction with RF fields accumulated within the compressor were simulated using different approaches provided by the MAGIC code: particle-in-cell approach accounting for electron-neutral collisions, gas conductivity model based on the concept of mobility, and hybrid modeling. The dependences of the microwave output pulse peak power and waveform on parameters that can be controlled in experiments, such as an external ionization rate, RF field amplitude, and background gas pressure, were investigated.

  15. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  16. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  17. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-12-01

    Solvent extraction processing has demonstrated the ability to achieve high decontamination factors for uranium and plutonium while operating at high throughputs. Historical application of solvent extraction contacting equipment implies that for the HA cycle (primary separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products) the equipment of choice is pulse columns. This is likely due to relatively short residence times (as compared to mixer-settlers) and the ability of the columns to tolerate solids in the feed. Savannah River successfully operated the F-Canyon with centrifugal contactors in the HA cycle (which have shorter residence times than columns). All three contactors have been successfully deployed in uranium and plutonium purification cycles. Over the past 20 years, there has been significant development of centrifugal contactor designs and they have become very common for research and development applications. New reprocessing plants are being planned in Russia and China and the United States has done preliminary design studies on future reprocessing plants. The choice of contactors for all of these facilities is yet to be determined.

  18. Enhanced column flotation of fine and ultrafine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.; Buttermore, W.H.; Birlingmair, D.H.; Dawson, M.R.; Pollard, J.L.; Enustun, B.V.

    1992-12-01

    A 2-inch diameter, twenty-foot tall, glass laboratory flotation column was modified to incorporate digital control of critical operating parameters. Different column control strategies were explored including location of the froth interface, and manipulation of volumetric flow ratios. Column flotation tests were performed with both fine (-250{mu}m) and ultrafine (-5{mu}m) Pittsburgh seam coal. Both moisture- and ash-free (MAF) recovery, and ash rejection were improved when the partition of the column`s liquid content into froth and tailings was directly controlled. MAF recovery and ash rejection were also enhanced by brief exposure of the coarser feed to pulsed sonic energy.

  19. Zenix SEC Column Manual Column Information

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    1 Zenix SEC Column Manual Column Information Utilizing proprietary surface technologies and 3 m particle size, Zenix SEC phases are made of uniform, hydrophilic, and neutral nanometer thick films SEC phases with high stability. The uniform surface coating enables high efficiency separation

  20. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Wastewater Compounds by Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene Solid-Phase Extraction and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; Schroeder, Michael P.; Barber, Larry B.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the determination of 67 compounds typically found in domestic and industrial wastewater is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater on aquatic organisms. This method also may be useful for evaluating the impact of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water quality of urban streams. The method focuses on the determination of compounds that are an indicator of wastewater or that have been chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Cartridges are dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds are eluted with dichloromethane-diethyl ether (4:1) and determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-water samples fortified at 4 micrograms per liter averaged 74 percent ? 7 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method detection limits for single-component compounds (excluding hormones and sterols) averaged 0.15 microgram per liter. Samples are preserved by filtration, the addition of 60 grams NaCl, and storage at 4 degrees Celsius. The laboratory has established a sample-holding time (prior to sample extraction) of 14 days from the date of sample collection until a statistically accepted method can be used to determine the effectiveness of these sample-preservation procedures.

  1. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of organophosphate pesticides in whole water by continuous liquid-liquid extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2003-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 organophosphate pesticide degradates from natural-water samples is described. Compounds are extracted from water samples with methylene chloride using a continuous liquid-liquid extractor for 6 hours. The solvent is evaporated using heat and a flow of nitrogen to a volume of 1 milliliter and solvent exchanged to ethyl acetate. Extracted compounds are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator derived method detection limits in three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.003 to 0.009 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds in three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration in each matrix. Mean recoveries of most method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 54 to 137 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 109 percent for all pesticides. Recoveries in reagent-water samples ranged from 42 to 104 percent for all pesticides. The only exception was O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate, which had variable recovery in all three matrices ranging from 27 to 79 percent. As a result, the detected concentration of O-ethyl-O-methyl-S-propylphosphorothioate in samples is reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Based on the performance issue, two more compounds, disulfoton and ethion monoxon, also will be reported in this method with an estimated remark code. Estimated-value compounds, which are ?E-coded? in the data base, do not meet the performance criteria for unqualified quantification, but are retained in the method because the compounds are important owing to high use or potential environmental effects and because analytical performance has been consistent and reproducible.

  2. Five points on columns

    E-print Network

    Rockland, Kathleen

    Column,” like “gene,” has both conceptual and linguistic shortcomings. The simple question “what is a column” is not easy to answer and the word itself is not easy to replace. In the present article, I have selected five ...

  3. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  4. Transient flow and heating characteristics in a pinched plasma column.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, T. M.; Stover, E. K.

    1972-01-01

    The generation of axial flow and heating of an argon plasma in a pinched plasma column of a pulsed, linear z-pinch device was examined experimentally and analytically. Transient (about 5 microsec) axial pressure profiles identify three characteristic periods in the column history. These include (1) strong axial pressure asymmetry indicative of plasma streaming, (2) isotropic, rapidly rising plasma pressure indicative of plasma heating, and (3) column breakup. An efficient conversion of radial collapse to axial streaming velocity is identified. Mechanisms for such an effect and subsequent heating are evaluated; significance to transients in pulsed plasma accelerators is identified.

  5. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for pesticide determination in honey using on-column liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pirard, C; Widart, J; Nguyen, B K; Deleuze, C; Heudt, L; Haubruge, E; De Pauw, E; Focant, J-F

    2007-06-01

    We report on the development and validation under ISO 17025 criteria of a multi-residue confirmatory method to identify and quantify 17 widely chemically different pesticides (insecticides: Carbofuran, Methiocarb, Pirimicarb, Dimethoate, Fipronil, Imidacloprid; herbicides: Amidosulfuron, Rimsulfuron, Atrazine, Simazine, Chloroturon, Linuron, Isoxaflutole, Metosulam; fungicides: Diethofencarb) and 2 metabolites (Methiocarb sulfoxide and 2-Hydroxytertbutylazine) in honey. This method is based on an on-column liquid-liquid extraction (OCLLE) using diatomaceous earth as inert solid support and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) operating in tandem mode (MS/MS). Method specificity is ensured by checking retention time and theoretical ratio between two transitions from a single precursor ion. Linearity is demonstrated all along the range of concentration that was investigated, from 0.1 to 20 ng g(-1) raw honey, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.921 to 0.999, depending on chemicals. Recovery rates obtained on home-made quality control samples are between 71 and 90%, well above the range defined by the EC/657/2002 document, but in the range we had fixed to ensure proper quantification, as levels found in real samples could not be corrected for recovery rates. Reproducibility is found to be between 8 and 27%. Calculated CCalpha and CCbeta (0.0002-0.943 ng g(-1) for CCalpha, and 0.0002-1.232 ng g(-1) for CCbeta) show the good sensitivity attained by this multi-residue analytical method. The robustness of the method has been tested in analyzing more than 100 raw honey samples collected from different areas in Belgium, as well as some wax and bee samples, with a slightly adapted procedure. PMID:17416380

  6. Inelastic column behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E; Wilder, Thomas W , III

    1952-01-01

    The significant findings of a theoretical study of column behavior in the plastic stress range are presented. When the behavior of a straight column is regarded as the limiting behavior of an imperfect column as the initial imperfection (lack of straightness) approaches zero, the departure from the straight configuration occurs at the tangent-modulus load. Without such a concept of the behavior of a straight column, one is led to the unrealistic conclusion that lateral deflection of the column can begin at any load between the tangent-modulus value and the Euler load, based on the original elastic modulus. A family of curves showing load against lateral deflection is presented for idealized h-section columns of various lengths and of various materials that have a systematic variation of their stress-strain curves.

  7. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid/vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency – which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor™ operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor™ utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the column’s pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoint’s proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor™ is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plant’s distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  8. Spiral multicapillary columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, A. P.; Naumenko, I. I.; Soboleva, V. K.

    2008-08-01

    It was shown in a theoretical study and confirmed by experiment that a spiral multicapillary column had maximum efficiency if the bunch of capillaries was additionally coiled around its longitudinal axis to produce an integral number of coils. This technique made it possible to manufacture gas-chromatographic columns with performance as high as 12 to 16 thousand theoretical plates. These columns can find various applications, especially if quick separation is required.

  9. Enhanced column flotation of fine and ultrafine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.; Buttermore, W.H.; Birlingmair, D.H.; Dawson, M.R.; Pollard, J.L.; Enustun, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    A 2-inch diameter, twenty-foot tall, glass laboratory flotation column was modified to incorporate digital control of critical operating parameters. Different column control strategies were explored including location of the froth interface, and manipulation of volumetric flow ratios. Column flotation tests were performed with both fine (-250[mu]m) and ultrafine (-5[mu]m) Pittsburgh seam coal. Both moisture- and ash-free (MAF) recovery, and ash rejection were improved when the partition of the column's liquid content into froth and tailings was directly controlled. MAF recovery and ash rejection were also enhanced by brief exposure of the coarser feed to pulsed sonic energy.

  10. Distillation Column Modeling Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques will Optimize Distillation Column Operation. Distillation is a low thermal efficiency unit operation that currently consumes 4.8 quadrillion BTUs of energy...

  11. Support Column of Bridge

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Support column of bridge across Struve Slough, Highway 1. Enlargement of hole where support enters the ground is an effect of lateral shaking, which caused the concrete to break up where the column joined the bridge and was instrumental in the roadbed collapse....

  12. Inflatable Column Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  13. Medial column stabilization.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, A R

    1991-07-01

    This article presented a brief review of medial column stabilizing procedures. The various types of procedures that have been advocated for different deformities have been discussed. It is important to keep in mind that fusion of any of the medial column joints should not be performed as an isolated procedure in flexible flatfoot deformity. Medial column stabilization is only a component procedure when surgically managing a flexible flatfoot. When choosing procedures to correct a flexible flatfoot, thorough preoperative evaluation is important. It is also important to realize that conservative measures should be exhausted before attempting any type of stabilization of the medial column for flexible flatfoot deformity. Specific criteria for flexible flatfoot surgery should include severe uncontrollable deformity, an inability to wear standard foot gear, and persistent pain and disability despite exhaustive conservative therapy. A medial column stabilization is also an excellent procedure for those patients who have end-stage degenerative joint disease of the medial longitudinal arch. PMID:1893342

  14. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  15. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  16. Modeling of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Wan Nurul Aiffah; Zakaria, Siti Aisyah; Noor, Nor Fashihah Mohd; Sulong, Ibrahim; Arshad, Khairil Anuar

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extractor such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has become a very important subject to be discussed not just among chemical engineers but mathematician as well. In this research, the modeling of small diameter RDC column using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). In the previous research, we begin the process of analyzed the data using methods of design of the experiments (DOE) to identify which factor and their interaction factor are significant and to determine the percentage of contribution of the variance for each factor. From the result obtained, we continue the research by discussed the development and validation of an artificial neural network model in estimating the concentration of continuous and concentration of dispersed outlet for an RDC column. It is expected that an efficient and reliable model will be formed to predict RDC column performance as an alternative to speed up the simulation process.

  17. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    2002-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the flooding predictor, an advanced process control strategy, into a universally useable tool that will maximize the separation yield of a distillation column.

  18. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Buckling of Liquid Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Rahmani, Y.; Bonn, Daniel; Ribe, N. M.

    2010-02-01

    Under appropriate conditions, a column of viscous liquid falling onto a rigid surface undergoes a buckling instability. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that liquid buckling exhibits a hitherto unsuspected complexity involving three different modes—viscous, gravitational, and inertial—depending on how the viscous forces that resist bending of the column are balanced. We also find that the nonlinear evolution of the buckling exhibits a surprising multistability with three distinct states: steady stagnation flow, “liquid rope coiling,” and a new state in which the column simultaneously folds periodically and rotates about a vertical axis. The transitions among these states are subcritical, leading to a complex phase diagram in which different combinations of states coexist in different regions of the parameter space.

  20. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  1. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  2. Transient flow and heating in a pinched plasma column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, T. M.; Stover, E. K.

    1974-01-01

    The axial flow and heating of an argon plasma in a pinched plasma column of a pulsed, linear z-pinch device was experimentally examined with a unique pressure sensing instrument capable of resolving mass flow properties. Transient axial pressure profiles identify periods of intense flow and heating. Mechanisms generating such effects are considered.

  3. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices for determination of pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction and capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at the U.S. Geological Survey California District Organic Chemistry Laboratory, 1996-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Baker, Lucian M.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2000-01-01

    A method of analysis and quality-assurance practices were developed to study the fate and transport of pesticides in the San Francisco Bay-Estuary by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples were filtered to remove suspended-particulate matter and pumped through C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges to extract the pesticides. The cartridges were dried with carbon dioxide and the pesticides were eluted with three cartridge volumes of hexane:diethyl ether (1:1) solution. The eluants were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in full-scan mode. Method detection limits for pesticides ranged from 0.002 to 0.025 microgram per liter for 1-liter samples. Recoveries ranged from 44 to 140 percent for 25 pesticides in samples of organic-free reagent water and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Bay water fortified at 0.05 and 0.50 microgram per liter. The estimated holding time for pesticides after extraction on C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridges ranged from 10 to 257 days.

  4. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  5. Ocular dominance columns in strabismus.

    PubMed

    Adams, Daniel L; Horton, Jonathan C

    2006-01-01

    During development, the projection from the lateral geniculate nucleus to striate cortex becomes segregated into monocular regions called ocular dominance columns. Prior studies in cats have suggested that experimental strabismus or alternating monocular occlusion increases the width and segregation of columns. In the squirrel monkey, strabismus has been reported to induce the formation of ocular dominance columns. However, these studies are difficult to interpret because no animal can serve as its own control and the degree of inter-individual variability among normal subjects is considerable. We have re-examined the effect of strabismus on ocular dominance columns in a large group of strabismic and normal squirrel monkeys. Five animals rendered strabismic at age one week had well-developed, widely spaced columns. Among 16 control animals, a wide spectrum of column morphology was encountered. Some control animals lacked ocular dominance columns, whereas others had columns similar to those observed in strabismic animals. Natural variation in column expression in normal squirrel monkeys, and potential uncontrolled genetic influences, made it impossible to determine if strabismus affects ocular dominance columns. It was evident however, that strabismus does not affect the binocular projection from the lateral geniculate nucleus to each CO patch in the upper layers. In strabismic monkeys, just as in normal animals, each patch received input from geniculate afferents serving both the left eye and the right eye. In addition, in strabismic monkeys, as in normal animals, patches were not aligned with ocular dominance columns. PMID:17020634

  6. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition. PMID:26550724

  7. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  8. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  9. Zenix-C SEC Column User Manual Column Information

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    1 Zenix-C SEC Column User Manual Column Information Utilizing proprietary surface technologies and 3 m particle size, Zenix-C SEC phases are made of uniform, hydrophilic, and neutral nanometer thick density of the thin film benefit Zenix-C SEC phases with high stability. The uniform surface coating

  10. Performance analysis of rotating disc contactor (RDC) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiffah, Wan Nurul; Aisyah, Siti; Fashihah, Nor; Anuar, Khairil

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extrator such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has be come a very important subject to be discussed not just amongst chemical engineers but mathematicans as well. In this study, the performance of small diameter column RDC using the chemical system involving cumene/isobutryric asid/water are analyzed by the method of design of the experiments (DOE). DOE are applied to estimated the effect of four independent variable; protor speed, flow rate, concentration of continuous inlet and dispersed inlet and their interaction factor to detemine the most significant factor that effect the concentration of continuous and dispersed outlet as output parameters.

  11. Solid-phase extraction of galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids from natural sources (Galphimia glauca and Arnicae flos) using pure zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate powders as sorbents inside micro spin columns.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shah; Schönbichler, Stefan A; Güzel, Yüksel; Sonderegger, Harald; Abel, Gudrun; Rainer, Matthias; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2013-10-01

    Galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids are among the most important pharmacological active groups of natural compounds. This study describes a pre-step in isolation of some selected representatives of these groups from biological samples. A selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for these compounds may help assign classes and isomer designations within complex mixtures. Pure zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate powders (325 mesh) were employed as two new sorbents for optimized SPE of phenolic acids. These sorbents possess electrostatic interaction sites which accounts for additional interactions for carbon acid moieties as compared to hydrophilic and hydrophobic sorbents alone. Based on this principle, a selective SPE method for 1,3,4,5-tetragalloylquinic acid (an anti-HIV and anti-asthamatic agent) as a starting compound was developed and then deployed upon other phenolic acids with success. The recoveries and selectivities of both sorbents were compared to most commonly applied and commercially available sorbents by using high performance liquid chromatography. The nature of interaction between the carrier sorbent and the acidic target molecules was investigated by studying hydrophilic (silica), hydrophobic (C18), mixed-mode (ionic and hydrophobic: Oasis(®) MAX) and predominantly electrostatic (zirconium silicate) materials. The newly developed zirconium silicate and bismuth citrate stationary phases revealed promising results for the selective extraction of galloyl- and caffeoylquinic acids from natural sources. It was observed that zirconium silicate exhibited maximum recovery and selectivity for tetragalloylquinic acid (84%), chlorogenic acid (82%) and dicaffeoylquinic acid (94%) among all the tested sorbents. PMID:23831490

  12. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  13. Measuring Ultrashort Optical Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Adam S.; Walmsley, Ian A.

    Ultrafast optics has changed dramatically in the last twenty years, driven by new laser sources, as well as new methods of manipulation and measurement for broadband coherent optical fields. In this article we address the means and technologies that enable experimental characterisation of short electromagnetic pulses, indicating the general principles involved, how these have been implemented in various approaches, and how the most popular methods encode the temporal electric field of a short optical pulse in the measured signal and extract the field reliably from the data. We provide a more detailed design for one of the popular methods, SPIDER.

  14. Automatic connector joins structural columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    Connector snap-locks over toothed bolthead mounted on column end, forming rigid joint that will not bend or twist. Connector is used in conventional construction to install temporary structures or as mechanical coupler. Up to nine receptacles can be clustered in one node to join up to nine converging columns.

  15. Technical Note Engineering Stratigraphic Columns

    E-print Network

    Technical Note Engineering Stratigraphic Columns PAUL M. SANTI Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 JAY M. GREGG Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 Key Terms: Stratigraphic Column, Engineering Properties

  16. Pulse stretcher for narrow pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, R. S., Jr. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A pulse stretcher for narrow pulses is presented. The stretcher is composed of an analog section for processing each arriving analog pulse and a digital section with logic for providing command signals to the gates and switches in the analog section.

  17. Comparison of column flotation cells

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Mohanty, M.K.; Ho, K.

    1995-08-01

    Six commercial column flotation technologies, i.e., Canadian, Flotaire, Jameson, Microcel, Packed-Column, and Turbo-air, were tested for the treatment of Illinois Basin fine coal and the results from each column compared based on separation performance and throughout capacity. The separation performance achieved by each cell approached and, in some cases, exceeded the ultimate performance predicted by release analysis. A comparison of the test results indicates differences in the selectivity obtained by each flotation column on the basis of both ash and sulfur rejection. This finding may be due to variations in cell hydrodynamics and the ability to support a deep froth phase among the different column cells. In addition, throughput capacity of each cell was found to differ, apparently due to the differences in the bubble-particle attachment environment, bubble size, and bubble population. Variations in the operating characteristics, such as reagent additions, aeration rate and wash water rate, were also noted and summarized in this publication.

  18. FUSED SILICA CAPILLARY COLUMN GC/MS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Operational characteristics have been determined for fused silica capillary column (FSCC) GC/MS as applied to 'extractable' priority pollutants. Chromatographic data show excellent relative retention time (RRT) intralaboratory precision and interlaboratory accuracy when multiple ...

  19. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  20. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior of the system, coupled with these processes, define the fundamental compositional and dynamic diversity of the Mush Column. In some ways it functions like a complex musical instrument. Entrainment, transport, and sorting of cumulate crystals as a function of repose time and the local flux intensity also contribute to the basic compositional diversity of the system. In the Ferrar dolerite system, about 104 km3 of dolerite is distributed throughout a fir-tree like stack of 4 or 5 extensive 300-750 m thick sills. The lowest sill contains a vast tongue of entrained orthopyroxene (opx) cumulates emplaced with the sill itself. The bulk sill composition varies from 20 pc MgO in the tongue center to 7 pc in the leading tip and margins of the sill, which itself defines the compositional spectrum of the whole complex and is remarkably similar to that exhibited by Hawaii. Relative sorting of large (1-50 mm) opx and small (1-3 mm) plagioclase due to kinetic sieving in the tongue produces pervasive anorthosite stringers. Through local ponding this has culminated in the formation of a small, well-formed layered intrusion consisting of alternating layers of orthopyroxenite and anorthosite. Upwards in the system the sills become progressively depleted in MgO and temporally and spatially contiguous flood basalts are low MgO tholeiites with no sign of opx cumulates. The size, extent, number of sills, and the internal structure of individual sills suggest a rhythm of injection similar to that of volcanic episodes. The continued horizontal stretching of a system of this type would lead to processes as recorded by ophiolites, and the repeated injection into a single reservoir would undoubtedly lead to a massive layered intrusion or to a series of high-level nested plutons.

  1. Post column derivatisation analyses review. Is post-column derivatisation incompatible with modern HPLC columns?

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2015-08-19

    Post Column derivatisation (PCD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography is a powerful tool in the modern analytical laboratory, or at least it should be. One drawback with PCD techniques is the extra post-column dead volume due to reaction coils used to enable adequate reaction time and the mixing of reagents which causes peak broadening, hence a loss of separation power. This loss of efficiency is counter-productive to modern HPLC technologies, -such as UHPLC. We reviewed 87 PCD methods published from 2009 to 2014. We restricted our review to methods published between 2009 and 2014, because we were interested in the uptake of PCD methods in UHPLC environments. Our review focused on a range of system parameters including: column dimensions, stationary phase and particle size, as well as the geometry of the reaction loop. The most commonly used column in the methods investigated was not in fact a modern UHPLC version with sub-2-micron, (or even sub-3-micron) particles, but rather, work-house columns, such as, 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. columns packed with 5 ?m C18 particles. Reaction loops were varied, even within the same type of analysis, but the majority of methods employed loop systems with volumes greater than 500 ?L. A second part of this review illustrated briefly the effect of dead volume on column performance. The experiment evaluated the change in resolution and separation efficiency of some weak to moderately retained solutes on a 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. column packed with 5 ?m particles. The data showed that reaction loops beyond 100 ?L resulted in a very serious loss of performance. Our study concluded that practitioners of PCD methods largely avoid the use of UHPLC-type column formats, so yes, very much, PCD is incompatible with the modern HPLC column. PMID:26343427

  2. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  3. Fralin Life Science Institute COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY KIT

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    1 Fralin Life Science Institute COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY KIT INFORMATION MANUAL Kristi DeCourcy Fralin ............................................................................................. 3 Column chromatography kit contents ....................................................... 3 Introduction to the column chromatography kit ........................................ 4 INTRODUCTION

  4. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, W.K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  5. SES Microbial Methods Winogradsky Column

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    in the column by microbial respiration, microenvironments arise which foster the development of a diverse growth. In particular, bacteria capable of sulfate reduction, anaerobic photosynthesis, fermentation, observe color development and smell. Are the anaerobic photosynthesizers visible? Can you identify

  6. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Woo K.

    1994-12-31

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternation ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multifunction column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multifunction ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins. Applications are to separation of nitrogen and sulfur isotopes.

  7. TSK-GEL SEC Columns TOSOH BIOSCIENCE

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    TSK-GEL SEC Columns TOSOH BIOSCIENCE Separations Business Unit Get the most from Size Exclusion. Column Selection Guide SEC II. TSK-GEL SEC Columns Overview III. TSK-GEL SW Columns IV. TSK-GEL PW V. TSK-GEL Alpha/SuperAW VI. Optimizing SEC TSK-GEL SEC Columns TSK-GEL SEC Brochure #12;TSK-GEL Column Selection

  8. Telescoping columns. [parabolic antenna support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazur, J. T. (inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An extendable column is described which consists of several axially elongated rigid structural sections nested within one another. Each section includes a number of rotatably attached screws running along its length. The next inner section includes threaded lugs oriented to threadingly engage the screws. The column is extended or retracted upon rotation of the screws. The screws of each section are selectively rotated by a motor and an engagement mechanism.

  9. Feature extraction Feature extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Feature extraction #12;Feature extraction ! · Image interpretation: extract information from images · but the desired information may not be explicit in the raw observed pixel intensities · Transform image to make (hyperspectral sensors) Meteosat thermal IR channel hyperspectral "image cube" #12;Raw intensities ! · Pros

  10. Feature extraction Feature extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Feature extraction #12;Feature extraction · Image interpretation: extract information from images · but the desired information may not be explicit in the raw observed pixel intensities · Transform image to make (hyperspectral sensors) Meteosat thermal IR channel hyperspectral "image cube" #12;Raw intensities · Pros

  11. A quick cogener specific analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in municipal sludge utilizing ultrasonic extraction and capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, W.L.

    1994-12-31

    At the Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) land application is a routine procedure for recycling municipal digested sludge. In 1982 analyses performed by MMSD indicated some areas of the sludge storage lagoons had polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels greater than 50 parts per million (ppm), the EPA established limit for unrestricted land application of sludge. Conflicting test results obtained from commercial laboratories prompted MMSD to find the most reliable test method and also maximize the amount of information received from each analysis. Therefore, an accurate and precise measurement of PCBs in sludge was desired on a daily and sometimes hourly basis. Analysis of sludge samples by soxhlet extraction (SW846 method 3540B) and capillary gas chromatography (GC) required overnight extraction, 2-3 hours extract cleanup and concentration, plus 3 hours elution time on a narrow bore column to achieve a congener specific analysis. A procedure to obtain congener specific PCB data in 2-2.5 hours was developed using ultrasonic extraction (SW846 method 3550B), florisil mini-cartridge cleanup and a 20-meter narrow bore column. Small homogeneous samples of sludge (2-4 grams) were mixed with the extracting solvent in a 50 mL centrifuge tube and then extracted using a sonic dismemberator in the pulsed mode. A 20-meter length was cut from a 60-meter, 0.25 mm i.d. capillary column. Resolution of some of the 95 congeners present was sacrificed to obtain a GC run time of 23 minutes. Sludges ranging from 2% to 30% solids were routinely analyzed with concentrations from detection limits to 200 ppm dry weight. Comparison of the sonication vs. soxhlet extractions exhibited no significant difference in the amount of PCBs recovered from various samples.

  12. Capacitor discharge pulse analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Tanner, Danelle Mary

    2013-08-01

    Capacitors used in firing sets and other high discharge current applications are discharge tested to verify performance of the capacitor against the application requirements. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, rise time, pulse width, peak current and current reversal must be verified to ensure that the capacitor will meet the application needs. This report summarizes an analysis performed on the discharge current data to extract these parameters by fitting a second-order system model to the discharge data and using this fit to determine the resulting performance metrics. Details of the theory and implementation are presented. Using the best-fit second-order system model to extract these metrics results in less sensitivity to noise in the measured data and allows for direct extraction of the total series resistance, inductance, and capacitance.

  13. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  14. Triangular Helical Column for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yu, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Effective column space and stationary phase retention have been improved by changing the configuration of the helical column originally used for toroidal coil countercurrent chromatography. The use of an equilateral triangular core for the helix column doubles effective column space and retains the stationary phase over 40% of the total column capacity without increasing the column pressure. The present results suggest that the stationary phase retention and the peak resolution will be further improved using new column designs fabricated by a new technology called “laser sintering for rapid prototyping.” PMID:20046940

  15. Ultra-short ion and neutron pulse production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2006-01-10

    An ion source has an extraction system configured to produce ultra-short ion pulses, i.e. pulses with pulse width of about 1 .mu.s or less, and a neutron source based on the ion source produces correspondingly ultra-short neutron pulses. To form a neutron source, a neutron generating target is positioned to receive an accelerated extracted ion beam from the ion source. To produce the ultra-short ion or neutron pulses, the apertures in the extraction system of the ion source are suitably sized to prevent ion leakage, the electrodes are suitably spaced, and the extraction voltage is controlled. The ion beam current leaving the source is regulated by applying ultra-short voltage pulses of a suitable voltage on the extraction electrode.

  16. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  17. Development of an analytical method for the determination of polyphenolic compounds in vegetable origin samples by liquid chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection at a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Natale, Anna; Nardiello, Donatella; Palermo, Carmen; Muscarella, Marilena; Quinto, Maurizio; Centonze, Diego

    2015-11-13

    A sensitive and accurate method for the determination of polyphenolic compounds in artichoke bract extracts and olive mill wastewaters by liquid chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection at a glassy carbon working electrode was developed. Preliminary experiments were carried out by cyclic voltammetry to investigate the electrochemical behavior of polyphenols under different mobile phase compositions, and to test the detection and cleaning electrode potentials. Chromatographic separations were performed by using a core-shell C18 column, eluted with acetic acid and acetonitrile, by combined concave-linear binary gradients. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a good column efficiency and peak symmetry were observed, also for stereo and positional isomeric compounds. The developed three-step potential waveform for pulsed amperometric detection was successfully applied for the sensitive chromatographic determination of polyphenols in artichoke extracts and olive mill wastewaters. Linearity, precision and sensitivity of the proposed method have been evaluated. A wide linear range of response (up to 20mg/L) has been obtained for all the investigated compounds. Detection and quantification limits in the vegetable origin sample extracts were in the range 0.004-0.6mg/L and 0.01-2mg/L, respectively, while the injection-to-injection repeatability (n=6) ranged from 5 to 13%. The obtained results confirmed the excellent sensitivity of the electrochemical detection, and its suitability for the determination of electroactive polyphenolic compounds at low concentration levels. PMID:26456515

  18. Extraction chromatography: Progress and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H.

    1997-10-01

    Extraction chromatography provides a simple and effective method for the analytical and preparative-scale separation of a variety of metal ions. Recent advances in extractant design, particularly the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation in highly acidic media, have significantly improved the utility of the technique. Advances in support design, most notably the introduction of functionalized supports to enhance metal ion retention, promise to yield further improvements. Column instability remains a significant obstacle, however, to the process-scale application of extraction chromatography. 79 refs.

  19. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients following an interruption of flow to the column were calculated. The transient calculations were terminated after the maximum resin bed temperature reached the Technical Standard of 60 C, which was set to prevent significant resin degradation. The LANL column differs from the FWR column in that it has a significantly smaller radius, 3.73 cm nominal versus approximately 28 cm. It follows that natural convection removes heat much more effectively from the LANL column, so that the column may reach thermal equilibrium. Consequently, the calculations for a flow interruption were extended until an approach to thermal equilibrium was observed. The LANL ion exchange process also uses a different resin than was used in the FWR column. The LANL column uses Reillex HPQ{trademark} resin, which is more resistant to attack by nitric acid than the Ionac 641{trademark} resin used in the FWR column. Heat generation from the resin oxidation reaction with nitric acid is neglected in this analysis since LANL will be treating the resin to remove the LTE prior to loading the resin in the columns. Calculations were performed using a finite difference computer code, which incorporates models for absorption and elution of plutonium and for forced and natural convection within the resin bed. Calculations for normal column operation during loading were performed using an initial temperature and a feed temperature equal to the ambient air temperature. The model for the normal flow calculations did not include natural convection within the resin bed. The no flow calculations were started with the temperature and concentration profiles at the end of the loading stage, when there would be a maximum amount of plutonium either adsorbed on the resin or in the feed solution in the column.

  20. "Supermarket Column Chromatography of Leaf Pigments" Revisited: Simple and Ecofriendly Separation of Plant Carotenoids, Chlorophylls, and Flavonoids from Green and Red Leaves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Alice M.; Ferreira, Maria La Salete

    2015-01-01

    A simple and ecofriendly procedure was developed in order to prepare extracts from red and green leaves. This procedure enables the separation of yellow, green, and red band pigments and optimizes the previously reported baking soda "supermarket column". The same extract also led to a novel and colorful potato starch column, which can…

  1. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  2. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  3. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments (SETAC Europe 22nd Annual Meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  4. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments NAC/SETAC 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  5. Tapped granular column dynamics: simulations, experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, A. D.; Zuo, L.; Blackmore, D.; Wu, H.; Horntrop, D. J.; Parker, D. J.; Windows-Yule, C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper communicates the results of a synergistic investigation that initiates our long term research goal of developing a continuum model capable of predicting a variety of granular flows. We consider an ostensibly simple system consisting of a column of inelastic spheres subjected to discrete taps in the form of half sine wave pulses of amplitude a/d and period ? . A three-pronged approach is used, consisting of discrete element simulations based on linear loading-unloading contacts, experimental validation, and preliminary comparisons with our continuum model in the form of an integro-partial differential equation.

  6. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you are exercising or if you travel to high altitude. Having a pulse oximeter in these cases will allow you to monitor your blood oxygen level and know when you need to increase your supplemental oxygen flow rate. Ask your health care provider what oxygen ...

  7. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  8. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  9. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A. (Richland, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA)

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.

  10. Two-dimensional protein separation by the HPLC system with a monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Morisaka, Hironobu; Kirino, Aya; Kobayashi, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC) system for protein separation was developed using an ion-exchange column in the first dimension and a reversed-phase monolithic column in the second dimension. The system demonstrated efficient separation of proteins in comparison with conventional systems. For proteomic analysis, proteins extracted from the cell surface of the yeast were separated by 2D-HPLC and evaluated. PMID:22451405

  11. Pulsed Operation of an Ion Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard; Gamero-Castano, Manuel; Goebel, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Electronic circuitry has been devised to enable operation of an ion accelerator in either a continuous mode or a highpeak power, low-average-power pulsed mode. In the original intended application, the ion accelerator would be used as a spacecraft thruster and the pulse mode would serve to generate small increments of impulse for precise control of trajectories and attitude. The present electronic drive circuitry generates the extraction voltage in pulses. Pulse-width modulation can affect rapid, fine control of time-averaged impulse or ion flux down to a minimum level much lower than that achievable in continuous operation.

  12. Water Column Methylation in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartup, A. T.; Calder, R.; Soerensen, A. L.; Mason, R. P.; Balcom, P. H.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs and affects humans and wildlife through fish consumption. Many studies have measured active methylation/demethylation in ocean margin sediments but few have reported similar rates for the marine water column. This presentation will review available evidence for water column methylation in estuaries, including new experimental measurements of methylation/demethylation rates from a deep subarctic fjord in Labrador Canada collected in Spring and Fall of 2012-2013. We used these and other data to construct a mass budget for MeHg in the estuary and show that water column methylation (with rates ranging from 1.5 to 2.8 % day-1), is the largest contributor, followed by inputs from rivers (4.9 mol year-1), to the in situ pool of MeHg available for uptake by biota. By contrast, the sediment in this system is a net sink for MeHg (-1.5 mol year-1). We discuss the relationship between observed MeHg and other ancillary environmental factors (organic carbon, sulfur and nutrients) as well as implications for the response time of fish to future changes in mercury inputs.

  13. Temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-23

    A temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by the integration of a resistive heating element and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Additionally, means are provided to thermally isolate the heated column from their surroundings. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  14. Process Svstems Enaineerina Instability of Distillation Columns

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Process Svstems Enaineerina , Instability of Distillation Columns Elling W. Jacobsen and Sigurd recognized, distillation columns, operating with reflux and boilup as independent inputs, may have The dynamic behavior of distillation columns has been stud- ied quite extensively over the past decades

  15. Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ® Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns Hisn Technical data and operating instructions. For in vitro use only. #12;2 Handling overview Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns - for the purification of proteins with poly-histidine tags Storage conditions Vivapure Metal Chelate Maxi spin columns can be stored

  16. Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ®® Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns Hisn Technical data and operating instructions. For in vitro use only. #12;2 Handling overview Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns - for the purification of proteins with poly-histidine tags Storage conditions Vivapure Metal Chelate Mega spin columns can be stored

  17. Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ® Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns Hisn #12;E. coli cell lysates containing a recombinant Hisn-tagged protein were purified using Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns and competitor products. The Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns were pre- loaded with different metal ions

  18. Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    ® Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns Hisn Technical data and operating instructions. For in vitro use only. #12;2 Handling overview Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns - for the purification of proteins with poly-histidine tags Storage conditions Vivapure Metal Chelate Mini spin columns can be stored

  19. Water Column Correction for Coral Reef Studies by Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application. PMID:25215941

  20. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  1. Supercritical fluid extraction on semibatch mode for the removal of terpene in citrus oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Masaki; Goto, Motonobu; Hirose, Tsutomu

    1996-06-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of a mixture of limonene and linalool was carried out with a rectification column in the semibatch operation mode. For the simple semibatch extraction where the column was controlled at the uniform temperature without an internal reflux, the Rayleigh equation, developed for the simple batch distillation, was applied to express the dynamic extraction behavior. In this paper the Peng-Robinson equation of state was used to estimate the ternary phase equilibria. The semibatch extraction with internal flux induced by a temperature gradient of the rectification column increased the separation selectivity. The internal reflux ratio was calculated by the measurement of the extraction rates at the top and bottom of the column, and it was 7.6 for the column having a temperature gradient from 313 K at the bottom to 333 K at the top at 8.8 MPa. Behavior in the rectification column was discussed by means of estimated physical properties.

  2. Morphological features of crinoid columns

    E-print Network

    Moore, R. C.; Jeffords, Russell M.; Miller, T. H.

    1968-01-26

    stream_size 114700 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name paleo.article.045op.pdf.txt stream_source_info paleo.article.045op.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 THE UNIVERSITY...-86, Figures 1-6, Plates 1-28 CLASSIFICATION AND NOMENCLATURE OF FOSSIL CRINOIDS BASED ON STUDIES OF DISSOCIATED PARTS OF THEIR COLUMNS RAYMOND C. MOORE and RUSSELL M. JEFFORDS ARTICLE 10 Serial Number 47 Pages 1-14, Figures 1-5, Plates 1-4 ONTOGENETIC...

  3. Object extraction Object extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    ("house", "lake") · usually solved jointly as detection: identify all objects of a certain class · object methods · for well-defined corners ­ least-squares matching pixel ­ human (stereoscopic) >0.3 pixel ­ least-squares matching pixel ­ human (stereoscopic) >0.3 pixel #12;Semi-automatic extraction

  4. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are persistence (DT50) of the pesticide, and its sorption/desorption(Koc) characteristics. These parameters may vary for the same pesticide from geographic site-to-site and with soil depth. The interactions that normally occur between pesticides and dissolved organic matter (DOM) or WDC are yet other factors that may complicate pesticide leaching behavior.The soil mobility of pesticides is normally tested both in the laboratory and in the field. Lab studies are initially performed to give researchers a preliminary appraisal of the relative mobility of a pesticide. Later, field lysimeter studies can be performed to provide more natural leaching conditions that emulate the actual field use pattern. Lysimeter studies give the most reliable information on the leaching behavior of a pesticide under field conditions, but these studies are time-consuming and expensive and cannot be performed everywhere. It is for this reason that the laboratory soil column leaching approach is commonly utilized to profile the mobility of a pesticide,and appraise how it behaves in different soils, and relative to other pesticides.Because the soil structure is chemically and physically heterogenous, different pesticide tests may produce variable DT50 and Koc values; therefore, initial pesticide mobility testing is undertaken in homogeneously packed columns that contain two or more soils and are eluted at constant flow rates. Such studies are done in duplicate and utilize a conservative tracer element. By fitting an appropriate mathematical model to the breakthrough curve of the conservative tracer selected,researchers determine key mobility parameters, such as pore water velocity, the column-specific dispersion coefficient, and the contribution of non equilibrium transport processes. Such parameters form the basis for estimating the probable transport and degradation rates that will be characteristic of the tested pesticide. Researchers also examine how a pesticide interacts with soil DOM and WDC, and what contribution from facilitated transport to mobility is made as a result of the effects of

  5. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W. (Sante Fe, NM); Olson, Jeffrey R. (San Mateo, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  6. Injection and extraction magnets: septa

    E-print Network

    Barnes, M J; Goddard, B; Hourican, M

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator has limited dynamic range: a chain of accelerators is required to reach high energy. A combination of septa and kicker magnets is frequently used to inject and extract beam from each stage. The kicker magnets typically produce rectangular field pulses with fast rise- and/or fall-times, however the field strength is relatively low. To compensate for their relatively low field strength, the kicker magnets are generally combined with electromagnetic septa. The septa provide relatively strong field strength but are either DC or slow pulsed. This paper discusses injection and extraction systems with particular emphasis on the hardware required for the septa.

  7. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. COMPARATIVE YIELDS OF MUTAGENS FROM CIGARETTE SMOKERS' URINE OBTAINED BY USING SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urine from cigarette smokers was prepared for mutagenicity testing by extracting mutagens with solid phase extraction columns. ommercially available prepacked bonded silicas (cotadecyl, cyclohexyl, cyanopropyl) were compared for their efficiency and specificity in concentration o...

  9. Atmospheric contributions to the column variance in direct-detection dial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Woods, P. T.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most important parameters of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is the delay time between the on and off resonant pulses. It is important that this delay time is sufficiently small to ensure that the atmosphere is effectively frozen between the pulses. Therefore, most Dial systems were designed with two lasers firing alternately less than 1 msec apart. Despite the importance of this parameter in the design of DIAL systems and its contribution to the overall error of a column measurement, very little is known about the size of the error for the case of a direct-detection system using atmospheric backscatter. The ultraviolet DIAL system uses two independent YAG/dye lasers and is therefore suitable for measuring the effects of different pulse delays on the variance of column measurements for a variety of atmospheric conditions. A set of DIAL returns were acquired with the two lasers tuned to the same wavelength and with a range of pulse delay times between 250 microseconds and several minutes. This data set was recorded in full on a computer and was used both to test different averaging techniques and also to evaluate atmospheric contributions to DIAL columns.

  10. AEDC arc column diagnostic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, W. E., III; Horn, D. D.

    In order to better understand the electrogasdynamic processes in the arc column of an electric arc air heater, diagnostic measurement techniques were developed at the Arnold Engineering Development Center. A water cooled window segment was installed at different axial locations in the bore of an electric arc heater to allow motion pictures of the arc inside the bore of the arc heater to be recorded. The window survived and excellent photographs of the arc were obtained. Two methods were devised to measure the gas resistance inside of a segmented type arc heater. These methods are discussed and the measurements obtained are compared with analytical calculations. These diagnostic measurement techniques will allow further insight into the nature of the arc process.

  11. On vortex streets behind Taylor columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi, Hatef A.; Andersson, Helge I.

    2010-10-01

    Computer experiments were performed to explore the flow in the vicinity of a truncated normal flat plate in a rapidly rotating fluid. A Taylor column formed above the flat plate and the vortex shedding in the wake of the Taylor column closely resembled the vortex street behind the solid plate. This is probably the first observation of a Kármán vortex street behind a Taylor column in a computational study.

  12. Optimization of the determination of 4-aminopyridine in human serum and urine by column liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R N; Hansebout, R R

    1996-02-23

    Two convenient reversed-phase column liquid chromatographic procedures are described for the determination of 4-aminopyridine in human serum and urine. A 0.5-ml aliquot of serum after the addition of a 0.5-ml solution of 4-(aminomethyl)pyridine in 0.1 M Na2HPO4 as the internal standard is passed through a 1-ml BondElut C18 silica extraction column. The column is selectively washed to remove acidic, neutral and weakly basic compounds. The desired compounds are eluted with a 0.3-ml aliquot of 35% perchloric acid-methanol (1:100, v/v). A 10-microliters aliquot of the eluate is injected onto a 150 x 4.6 mm I.D. column packed with 5-microns C18 silica particles that is eluted at ambient temperature with a mobile phase containing octanesulfonic acid as the ion-pairing agent. The peaks are monitored at 263 nm. A. 0.25-ml aliquot of urine or 0.5 ml of serum is mixed with N-propionylprocainamide as the internal standard and subjected to benzoylation by Schotten Baumann reaction. The reaction mixture is adjusted to pH 5.5-6 and extracted with a BondElut C18 extraction column. An aliquot of the eluate is chromatographed at ambient temperature with a mobile phase containing tetramethylammonium perchlorate. The peaks are monitored at 278 nm. PMID:8925094

  13. Counter-current carbon dioxide extraction of soy skim

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of carbon dioxide in a counter-current fractionation column was investigated as a means to remove residual fat from soy skim after enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of soybeans. The stainless steel column was 1.2 meters long with an internal diameter of 1.75 cm and filled protruded stainles...

  14. Fractionating column control apparatus and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, P.A.; Meier, J.; Woodland, B.J.

    1989-12-26

    This patent describes an apparatus for separating a mixture of hydrocarbons into discrete products. It comprises: a fractionating column; means for providing heat to the fractionating column; means for feeding a stream of the mixture of hydrocarbons to the fractionating column whereby the stream is fractionated into an overhead product stream and a bottoms product stream; and means for controlling the Reid vapor pressure of the bottoms product. Also described is a method for determining the Reid Vapor Pressure of a bottoms product stream of a fractionating column used for fractionating a multi-component hydrocarbon feed stream into an overhead product stream and a bottoms product stream.

  15. The Bane of Column Density Analysis and What Good It Can Do for Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How-Huan Chen, Hope; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Burkhart, Blakesley K.; Myers, Philip C.; Collins, David C.; Meisner, Aaron M.; Lee, Katherine I.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that astronomers are inclined to apply statistical tools, from least-square fitting to machine learning, on the big, high-dimensional data, not enough care is often spent on examining the biases that could be introduced by sample selection and observation. The talk focuses on investigating arguably one of the most often applied statistical analyses in clouds and filaments recently--the probability distribution function (PDF) analysis of column density. We look at the correlation between column density PDF and various physical processes including turbulence and star formation as traced by young stellar objects and star forming cores, in both observation and simulation; as well as potential problems in statistically consistent fitting of column density distribution, validating correlation, biased sample selection, and projection effects. Our results show that 1) even though on large scale, the "width" of the column density PDF seems to correlate with turbulence, no clear correlation is found between column density PDF and turbulence in both simulation and observation, and 2) even previous works show that the index of the "power-law tail" correlates with the star formation activity, there is statistical ambiguity in the sampling of column density structures and associating point sources with any of these structures. We further analyze the hierachical structures of column density in molecular clouds and filaments, using the structure extraction algorithm, the dendrogram.

  16. Intermediate cooling from pulse tube and regenerator in a 4 K pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao

    2008-03-01

    This paper introduces intermediate cooling by thermally attaching heat exchangers on the second stage pulse tube and regenerator in a commercial 4 K pulse tube cryocooler. Due to the large enthalpy flow in the 2nd stage pulse tube and regenerator, both intermediate heat exchangers on the pulse tube and regenerator can provide cooling capacities in the temperature range of 5-15 K without or with minor effect on the performance of the 4 K stage. Extracting cooling capacity from the pulse tube or regenerator reduces the 1st stage cooling performance in the present study. The joint intermediate heat exchanger on the pulse tube and regenerator has demonstrated promising results for applications.

  17. Fault tolerant pulse synchronization 

    E-print Network

    Deconda, Keerthi

    2009-05-15

    Pulse synchronization is the evolution of spontaneous firing action across a network of sensor nodes. In the pulse synchronization model all nodes across a network produce a pulse, or "fire", at regular intervals even without access to a shared...

  18. Extraction of sucrose from molasses

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, A.M.

    1982-01-26

    Sucrose is extracted from molasses by passing an aqueous molasses solution over an adsorbent, e.g., calcined Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-supported pyrolyzed C/sub 6/H/sub 6/. Thus, 10 mL molasses (approximately 46% solids) was run through a column containing 70 cubic centimetres above adsorbent with sucrose retention volume 21.4 and selectivity for sucrose - betaine 23.8.

  19. How to Calculate Molecular Column Density

    E-print Network

    Mangum, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is con...

  20. Modeling of column apparatuses: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Doichinova, M. E-mail: petyabs@yahoo.com; Popova-Krumova, P. E-mail: petyabs@yahoo.com

    2013-12-18

    This paper presents a review of the modeling method on the base of the physical approximations of the mechanics of continua, which have been developed for processes in column apparatuses. This method includes diffusion type of model for modeling of mass transfer with chemical reaction in column apparatuses with and without circulation zones. The diffusion type of model is used for modeling of scale effect in column apparatuses too. The study concluded that the proposal method is possibility for investigation the influence of radial non uniformity of the velocity distribution on the process efficiency, influence of zones breadths on the mass transfer efficiency in the column. The method of the column apparatuses modeling can be used for modeling of physical and chemical absorption, chemical adsorption, homogeneous and heterogeneous (catalytic) chemical reactions, airlift reactors for chemical and photochemical reactions.

  1. Use of mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria for the improvement of copper extraction from a low-grade ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darezereshki, E.; Schaffie, M.; Lotfalian, M.; Seiedbaghery, S. A.; Ranjbar, M.

    2011-04-01

    Bioleaching was examined for copper extraction from a low grade ore using mesophilic and moderate thermophilic bacteria. Five equal size columns were used for the leaching of the ore. Sulfuric acid solution with a flow rate of 3.12 L·m-2·h-1 and pH 1.5 passed through each column continuously for 90 d. In the first and the second column, bioleaching was performed without agglomeration of the ore and on the agglomerated ore, respectively. 28wt% of the copper was extracted in the first column after 40 d, while this figure was 38wt% in the second column. After 90 d, however, the overall extractions were almost the same for both of them. Bioleaching with mesophilic bacteria was performed in the third column without agglomeration of the ore and in the fourth column on the agglomerated ore. After 40 d, copper extractions in the third and the fourth columns were 62wt% and 70wt%, respectively. Copper extractions were 75wt% for both the columns after 90 d. For the last column, bioleaching was performed with moderate thermophilic bacteria and agglomerated ore. Copper extractions were 80wt% and 85wt% after 40 and 90 d, respectively. It was concluded that crushing and agglomeration of the ore using bacteria could enhance the copper extraction considerably.

  2. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  3. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  4. Comprehensive two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography system with immobilized liposome chromatography column and reversed-phase column for separation of complex traditional Chinese medicine Longdan Xiegan Decoction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Kong, Liang; Lei, Xiaoyuan; Hu, Lianghai; Zou, Hanfa; Welbeck, Ed; Bligh, S W Annie; Wang, Zhengtao

    2009-03-13

    A comprehensive two-dimensional HPLC system with an immobilized liposome chromatography (ILC) column in conjunction with an RP column (in tandem) was developed for the screening and analysis of the membrane-permeable compounds in a traditional Chinese medicine prescription Longdan Xiegan Decoction (LXD). More than 50 components in LXD were resolved using the developed separation system. Eight flavonoids and two iridoids were identified interacting with the ILC column; a system that mimics biomembranes. The results show that the developed comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography system can be used for identifying membrane permeable natural products in complex matrixes such as extracts of traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions. PMID:18585729

  5. Analysis of Column Instability Modes in Liquid Jet in Crossflow Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Sina; Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios; Herrmann, Marcus

    2010-11-01

    Atomizing liquids by injecting them into crossflows is a common approach to generate fuel sprays in gas turbines and augmentors. The mechanisms by which the liquid jet initially breaks up, however, are not well understood. To analyze the instability mechanism of the liquid column, we perform proper orthogonal decomposition of side view images extracted from detailed simulations of the near injector primary atomization region. This analysis shows a single dominant wavelength with the associated interface corrugation traveling downstream with the jet. Using consistent temporal averaging of the simulation data we extract mean interface geometries and boundary layer velocity profiles. These are used to calculate the most unstable wavelength of the shear layer instability following the procedure of Boeck & Zaleski (2005). The theoretical wavelengths are comparable to those extracted from the simulation data. In addition to shear layer instability we analyze Rayleigh-Taylor as a potential instability mechanism of the liquid column.

  6. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  7. Group methods for advanced column control compared

    SciTech Connect

    Haskins, D.E.; Chauvin, L.; Tolfo, F.

    1985-05-01

    Group method calculations are suited for distillation column advanced controls in real time. Five calculation methods are discussed and compared for accuracy by computing the internal reflux for several columns and operating conditions. Practical design criteria are defined and illustrated by comparing two distillation column reflex control schemes. The resulting conclusions include the best location and preferred order of group method calculations. Because group methods are simpler than stage-to-stage or successive approximation methods, they are more suitable to online computer calculations. Group methods are considered accurate enough for control purposes.

  8. Pulse Consumption, Satiety, and Weight Management1

    PubMed Central

    McCrory, Megan A.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Lovejoy, Jennifer C.; Eichelsdoerfer, Petra E.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has reached epidemic proportions, making finding effective solutions to reduce obesity a public health priority. One part of the solution could be for individuals to increase consumption of nonoilseed pulses (dry beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils), because they have nutritional attributes thought to benefit weight control, including slowly digestible carbohydrates, high fiber and protein contents, and moderate energy density. Observational studies consistently show an inverse relationship between pulse consumption and BMI or risk for obesity, but many do not control for potentially confounding dietary and other lifestyle factors. Short-term (?1 d) experimental studies using meals controlled for energy, but not those controlled for available carbohydrate, show that pulse consumption increases satiety over 2–4 h, suggesting that at least part of the effect of pulses on satiety is mediated by available carbohydrate amount or composition. Randomized controlled trials generally support a beneficial effect of pulses on weight loss when pulse consumption is coupled with energy restriction, but not without energy restriction. However, few randomized trials have been conducted and most were short term (3–8 wk for whole pulses and 4–12 wk for pulse extracts). Overall, there is some indication of a beneficial effect of pulses on short-term satiety and weight loss during intentional energy restriction, but more studies are needed in this area, particularly those that are longer term (?1 y), investigate the optimal amount of pulses to consume for weight control, and include behavioral elements to help overcome barriers to pulse consumption. PMID:22043448

  9. Affinity-based screening of combinatorial libraries using automated, serial-column chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.M.; Williams, K.P.; McGuinness, B.

    1996-04-01

    The authors have developed an automated serial chromatographic technique for screening a library of compounds based upon their relative affinity for a target molecule. A {open_quotes}target{close_quotes} column containing the immobilized target molecule is set in tandem with a reversed-phase column. A combinatorial peptide library is injected onto the target column. The target-bound peptides are eluted from the first column and transferred automatically to the reversed-phase column. The target-specific peptide peaks from the reversed-phase column are identified and sequenced. Using a monoclonal antibody (3E-7) against {beta}-endorphin as a target, we selected a single peptide with sequence YGGFL from approximately 5800 peptides present in a combinatorial library. We demonstrated the applicability of the technology towards selection of peptides with predetermined affinity for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). We expect that this technology will have broad applications for high throughput screening of chemical libraries or natural product extracts. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Monolithic and core-shell columns in comprehensive two-dimensional HPLC: a review.

    PubMed

    Jandera, Pavel; Hájek, Tomáš; Sta?ková, Magda

    2015-01-01

    The crucial point affecting the separation time in comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography is the performance of the column used in the second dimension, which should allow highly efficient fast chromatographic separations in the short time available for the analysis of fractions transferred from the first to the second dimension (often 1 min or less). This can be accomplished on short columns packed with sub-2-?m particles, at the cost of very high operation pressure. Core-shell or silica monolithic columns have better permeability, and their use in the second dimension of comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography with conventional liquid chromatography instrumentation is continuously increasing. Monolithic columns based on organic polymer matrices offer a wide selection of stationary phase chemistries, including new hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography materials, which can be used in the design of novel two-dimensional separations. Some organic polymer monolithic materials offer a dual retention mechanism (reversed-phase hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography), so a single column can be used in alternating runs for highly orthogonal off-line two-dimensional and even three-dimensional separations. In the present work, the properties of core-shell and silica gel monolithic columns are briefly summarized and their applications in two-dimensional separations of peptides, proteins, oligomer surfactants, fats and oils, carotenoids, phenolic and flavone compounds in plant extracts, food, and beverages are reviewed. PMID:25326881

  11. Use of MiniColumns for linear isotherm parameter estimation and prediction of benchtop column performance.

    PubMed

    Keller, William R; Evans, Steven T; Ferreira, Gisela; Robbins, David; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-10-30

    In this paper, a comparison between experimental chromatography data and column simulations is carried out to determine the efficacy of using miniaturized chromatography columns (MiniColumns) for both column modeling parameter estimation and process development. Normalization of the data with respect to column volumes along with appropriate translations to account for system differences is shown to result in comparability of the experimental data for the MiniColumn and benchtop systems. A parameter estimation protocol is then employed to determine the linear steric mass-action (SMA) isotherm and lumped mass transport parameters for two cation exchange resins. The models are then validated and simulations using different parameter sets from the MiniColumn and benchtop systems are shown to result in similar predicted chromatography profiles and calculated retention volumes. The parameters generated from the MiniColumn system are demonstrated to be well suited for predicting experimental data from the benchtop system. These simulation results, the ability to operate MiniColumns in parallel, and the significantly lower material requirements per experiment support an industry trend toward increased usage of miniaturized chromatography columns as a scale-down model for process development. PMID:26422303

  12. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-01

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as 9Be(d,n?)10B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm2 and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  13. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-19

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  14. Chirped Pulse Amplification of Femtosecond Optical Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Maurice Alfonso

    Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) has been instrumental in pushing forward the state of the art in ultrashort pulse amplification. As conceived however, limitations in the methods used for pulse manipulation restrict its utility to regimes in which pulse compression techniques can provide high compression ratios, limiting its use to long pulse (>=q50 psec) oscillators and compressed pulses >=q1 psec. Significantly, this also prevents its use with ultrashort sources where further compression of the pulse is not desired. In this thesis, we develop and demonstrate new methods for optical pulse manipulation enabling us to extend CPA techniques into the femtosecond regime. A generalized diffraction grating pair is shown to be a fully reversible means of expanding femtosecond pulses while providing sufficient positive group velocity dispersion to expand femtosecond pulses by factors >10^3 . A CPA system utilizing these techniques is used for the amplification of 275 fsec pulses from a modelocked dye oscillator. The 275 fsec pulses are expanded to 50 psec and amplified in a multipass regenerative amplifier utilizing the tunable solid-state material alexandrite as the gain medium. The 3 mJ pulses are then compressed to 300 fsec. An analysis of the dispersion properties of the system is shown to lead to limitations in the pulsewidth obtainable from such a system. The presence of dispersive components within the resonator cavity forces the expansion/compression system to be used in a mismatched geometry. The resulting contributions to the cubic phase shift from diffraction gratings and material elements limits the system to pulses of the order of 200 fsec. For amplification and compression of shorter pulses, simultaneous compensation of quadratic and cubic phase shifts becomes necessary. A number of methods for full and partial compensation of cubic phase shifts are examined and one method, based upon a combination of intracavity prisms and external diffraction gratings is implemented. With this and other modifications we show that bandwidths sufficient to support pulses as short as 60 fsec can be amplified to the mJ level. Partial compensation of cubic phase shifts is demonstrated, resulting in pulses of 106 fsec duration with peak powers of nearly 20 GW.

  15. Michael Geller Columns UGA WWW Google Search

    E-print Network

    Geller, Michael R.

    Michael Geller Columns UGA WWW Google Search JULY 19, 2004 In this issue NEWS UGA leads multi into teaching with $1 million federal grant Newspaper exec is named first Carter Professor at UGA UGA Research

  16. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  17. Gas Chromatograph Method Optimization Trade Study for RESOLVE: 20-meter Column v. 8-meter Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huz, Kateryna

    2014-01-01

    RESOLVE is the payload on a Class D mission, Resource Prospector, which will prospect for water and other volatile resources at a lunar pole. The RESOLVE payload's primary scientific purpose includes determining the presence of water on the moon in the lunar regolith. In order to detect the water, a gas chromatograph (GC) will be used in conjunction with a mass spectrometer (MS). The goal of the experiment was to compare two GC column lengths and recommend which would be best for RESOLVE's purposes. Throughout the experiment, an Inficon Fusion GC and an Inficon Micro GC 3000 were used. The Fusion had a 20m long column with 0.25mm internal diameter (Id). The Micro GC 3000 had an 8m long column with a 0.32mm Id. By varying the column temperature and column pressure while holding all other parameters constant, the ideal conditions for testing with each column length in their individual instrument configurations were determined. The criteria used for determining the optimal method parameters included (in no particular order) (1) quickest run time, (2) peak sharpness, and (3) peak separation. After testing numerous combinations of temperature and pressure, the parameters for each column length that resulted in the most optimal data given my three criteria were selected. The ideal temperature and pressure for the 20m column were 95 C and 50psig. At this temperature and pressure, the peaks were separated and the retention times were shorter compared to other combinations. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 operated better at lower temperature mainly due to the shorter 8m column. The optimal column temperature and pressure were 70 C and 30psig. The Inficon Micro GC 3000 8m column had worse separation than the Inficon Fusion 20m column, but was able to separate water within a shorter run time. Therefore, the most significant tradeoff between the two column lengths was peak separation of the sample versus run time. After performing several tests, it was concluded that better detection via good peak separation with a longer run time is a better asset than moderate peak separation with a shorter run time. Even given that RESOLVE is highly interested in water and that mission timeline is of significant importance given the short seven-to-ten-day mission timeline, worse detection with an 8m column may lead to overlooking other substances existing on the moon that could advance planetary science. Thus, I recommend the 20m column. However, if mission timeline and water separation are deemed the highest priority, the 8m column should be selected due to its ability to separate water within a shorter run time than the 20m column.

  18. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Commander prepares glass columns for electrophoresis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Jack Lousma prepares on of the glass columns for the electrophoresis test in the middeck area of the Columbia. The experiment, deployed in an L-shaped mode in upper right corner, consists of the processing unit with glass columns in which the separation takes place; a camera (partially obscurred by Lousma's face) to document the process; and a cryogenic freezer to freeze and store the samples after separation.

  20. Interpretation of the lime column penetration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanapathirana, D. S.; Kelly, R. B.

    2010-06-01

    Dry soil mix (DSM) columns are used to reduce the settlement and to improve the stability of embankments constructed on soft clays. During construction the shear strength of the columns needs to be confirmed for compliance with technical assumptions. A specialized blade shaped penetrometer known as the lime column probe, has been developed for testing DSM columns. This test can be carried out as a pull out resistance test (PORT) or a push in resistance test (PIRT). The test is considered to be more representative of average column shear strength than methods that test only a limited area of the column. Both PORT and PIRT tests require empirical correlations of measured resistance to an absolute measure of shear strength, in a similar manner to the cone penetration test. In this paper, finite element method is used to assess the probe factor, N, for the PORT test. Due to the large soil deformations around the probe, an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) based finite element formulation has been used. Variation of N with rigidity index and the friction at the probe-soil interface are investigated to establish a range for the probe factor.

  1. Extraction and purification of total RNA from Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cury, Jaime A; Koo, Hyun

    2007-06-15

    RNA isolation from Streptococcus mutans within biofilms is challenging because of the presence of extracellular polysaccharide matrix that interferes with RNA extraction procedures. In an effort to solve this difficult problem, we examined several protocols to extract and purify RNA from S. mutans biofilms. A combination of sonication (three times using a 30-s pulse at 7 W) with washing in phosphate-buffered saline removed most of the extracellular polysaccharides from the biofilms and provided the highest RNA yield. Further homogenization-mechanical cells disruption in NAES buffer (50 mM sodium acetate buffer, 10 mM EDTA, and 1% SDS, pH 5.0) and acid phenol/chloroform yielded 547.2+/-23.4 microg RNA/100 mg of biofilm dry weight. An additional acid phenol/chloroform extraction further improved the purification of RNA without significantly affecting the RNA yield. The combination of DNase I in silica gel-based column and recombinant DNase I in solution effectively removed the genomic DNA as determined by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), resulting in 92.0+/-0.6 microg of purified RNA per 100 mg of biofilm dry weight. The complementary DNAs generated from the purified RNA sample were efficiently amplified using gtfB S. mutans-specific primers. The results demonstrated a method that yields high-quality RNA from biofilms of S. mutans in sufficient quantity for real-time RT-PCR analyses, and our data have relevance for isolation of RNA from other biofilm-forming microorganisms. PMID:17475197

  2. Detachment of Bacteria From Porous Media in Laboratory Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, J. L.; Bolster, C. H.

    2004-05-01

    Extended tailing, the continued elution of bacteria at low concentrations, has often been observed in breakthrough curves during both laboratory and field transport experiments. Tailing is caused by the slow detachment (also referred to as entrainment or desorption) of previously attached cells over time, with aqueous concentrations often orders of magnitude below the peak concentration. This transfer of bacteria from the solid phase to the aqueous phase results in the long-term release of bacteria back into drinking water supplies, posing potential human health risks. Unlike the factors controlling bacterial attachment to aquifer sediments, the processes controlling bacterial detachment from sediment surfaces are not well understood. We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the transport and detachment of Escherichia coli (E. coli) at resting state through uncoated and Fe-coated quartz sand in KCl solution at low and high ionic strength (0.001-0.01 M). A one-half pore volume pulse of 3[H]-labeled E. coli was injected into flow-through columns, and column effluent was sampled for approximately 18 pore volumes. To account for biological effects on detachment, experiments were also run using E. coli treated with 0.5% formaldehyde. To calculate bacterial detachment rates, we fit the one dimensional advection-dispersion equation modified to account for deposition (Kf) and detachment (Kr) to the breakthrough curves for each treatment combination. In general, higher (Kr) values were observed under conditions less conducive to irreversible attachment, such as low ionic strength and uncoated sands. Tailing was not observed for experiments using Fe-coated sands, indicating that iron-coated sands irreversibly removed bacteria from the water column. There were no significant differences between fixed and live cells, indicating that bacterial cells at resting state behave like inorganic colloids, which suggests that under these conditions biological effects on attachment and detachment are minimal. Our results indicate that iron-coated sediments can permanently remove bacteria from groundwater under certain conditions. This knowledge is valuable for protecting groundwater supplies from contamination by pathogenic microorganisms.

  3. SNS EXTRACTION FAST KICKER SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; LAMBIASE,R.; LEE,Y.Y.; LOCKEY,R.; MI,J.; NEHRING,T.; PAI,C.; TSOUPAS,N.; TUOZZOLO,J.; WARBURTON,D.; WEI,J.; RUST,K.; CUTLER,R.

    2003-06-15

    The SNS Extraction Fast Kicker System is a very high power, high repetition rate pulsed power system. It was design and developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This system will consist of fourteen identical high voltage, high current modulators, and their auxiliary control and charging systems. The modulators will drive fourteen extraction magnet sections located inside of the SNS accumulator ring. The required kicker field rise time is 200 ns, a pulse flattop of 700 ns, a pulse repetition rate of 60 pulse-per-second. A 2500 Ampere per modulator output is required to reach the extraction kicker magnetic field strength. This design features a Blumlein Pulse-Forming-Network based topology, a low beam impedance termination, a fast current switching thyratron, and low inductance capacitor banks. It has a maximum charging voltage of 50kV, an open circuit output of 100kV, and a designed maximum pulsed current output of 4kA per modulator. The overall system output will be multiple GVA with 60 Pulse-per-second repetition rate. A prototype modulator has been successfully built and tested well above the SNS requirement. The modulator system production is in progress.

  4. Extraction, Purification, and Spectroscopic Characterization of a Mixture of Capsaicinoids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Carl E.; Cahill, Thomas M.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment provides a safe and effective way to instruct undergraduate organic chemistry students about natural-product extraction, purification, and NMR spectroscopic characterization. On the first day, students extract dried habanero peppers with toluene, perform a pipet silica gel column to separate carotenoids from…

  5. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  6. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  7. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  8. Monitoring respiration rate in PACU patients using the plethysmogram from a pulse oximeter Suzanne M. Wendelken*

    E-print Network

    Linder, Stephen

    Monitoring respiration rate in PACU patients using the plethysmogram from a pulse oximeter Suzanne), few have their respiration rate monitored. The goal of our study is to develop algorithms that reliably extract the respiration rate from a standard pulse oximeter signal. The pulse oximeter

  9. Column bioleaching of uranium embedded in granite porphyry by a mesophilic acidophilic consortium.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guanzhou; Li, Qian; Yu, Runlan; Sun, Zhanxue; Liu, Yajie; Chen, Miao; Yin, Huaqun; Zhang, Yage; Liang, Yili; Xu, Lingling; Sun, Limin; Liu, Xueduan

    2011-04-01

    A mesophilic acidophilic consortium was enriched from acid mine drainage samples collected from several uranium mines in China. The performance of the consortium in column bioleaching of low-grade uranium embedded in granite porphyry was investigated. The influences of several chemical parameters on uranium extraction in column reactor were also investigated. A uranium recovery of 96.82% was achieved in 97 days column leaching process including 33 days acid pre-leaching stage and 64 days bioleaching stage. It was reflected that indirect leaching mechanism took precedence over direct. Furthermore, the bacterial community structure was analyzed by using Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis. The results showed that microorganisms on the residual surface were more diverse than that in the solution. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the dominant species in the solution and Leptospirillum ferriphilum on the residual surface. PMID:21316943

  10. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  11. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  12. Alternate drop pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of alternate drop pulse polarography is presented. An experimental evaluation of alternate drop pulse polarography shows complete compensation of the capacitative background due to drop expansion. The capillary response phenomenon was studied in the absence of faradaic reaction and the capillary response current was found to depend on the pulse width to the -0.72 power. Increased signal-to-noise ratios were obtained using alternate drop pulse polarography at shorter drop times.

  13. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  14. Movement of carbofuran (nematicide) in soil columns.

    PubMed

    Kumari, K; Singh, R P; Saxena, S K

    1988-08-01

    Adsorption and movement of carbofuran (a systemic nematicide) were studied using two Indian soils (clay loam and silt loam) of alluvial origin. Equilibrium adsorption coefficient (K) values measured using a batch-slurry technique follows the order clay loam greater than silt loam soil. The distribution coefficients (Kd) for both the soils in batch adsorption as well as in columns were also calculated. Carbofuran movement in soil columns during water infiltration in both air-dried and water-saturated columns was estimated. The order was as anticipated from K and Kd values. A larger amount of water was needed for leaching the carbofuran to 152 cm in clay loam soil than in silt loam soil. Carbofuran appears to increase in drier soils and in finer textured soils. PMID:3181067

  15. Methylmercury production in the marine water column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, G.; Davies, I. M.

    1981-03-01

    Although the biosynthesis of methylmercury in sediments is well established1, this is not necessarily the exclusive natural source of methylmercury entering the marine food chain, particularly commercial fish and shellfish species for human consumption. An examination of mercury levels in freshwater fish2, collected from a lake with a history of industrial mercury contamination, suggested that levels in fish are controlled in part by mercury in suspension and it followed that methylation should occur in the water column. Although methylmercury is present in seawater in coastal areas receiving discharges of waste containing either inorganic mercury3 or methylmercury4 there is no evidence that methylmercury is actually formed in the water column. We now present data which demonstrate that inorganic mercury can be methylated in the water column and we compare this production with that known to occur in marine sediments.

  16. Shaped (Selective) Pulses Rectangular Pulses: Off --On(pw) --Off

    E-print Network

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    Shaped (Selective) Pulses · Rectangular Pulses: Off --On(pw) -- Off o Previously All Pulses Were Pulses Give Wiggles in the Excitation Profile: "sinc" function = sin() / · Shaped Pulses: Amplitude Varies with Time o Amplitude of a Shaped Pulse Follows a Defined Function in Time, e.g. Gaussian "Bell

  17. Final Report, Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2003-05-31

    The Flooding Predictor is an advanced process control strategy comprising a patented pattern-recognition methodology that identifies pre-flood patterns discovered to precede flooding events in distillation columns. The grantee holds a U.S. patent on the modeling system. The technology was validated at the Separations Research Program, The University of Texas at Austin under a grant from the U. S. Department of Energy, Inventions & Innovation Program. Distillation tower flooding occurs at abnormally high vapor and/or liquid rates. The loss in tray efficiencies is attributed to unusual behavior of liquid inventories inside the column leading to conditions of flooding of the space in between trays with liquid. Depending on the severity of the flood condition, consequences range from off spec products to equipment damage and tower shutdown. This non-intrusive pattern recognition methodology, processes signal data obtained from existing column instrumentation. Once the pattern is identified empirically, it is modeled and coded into the plant's distributed control system. The control system is programmed to briefly "unload" the tower each time the pattern appears. The unloading takes the form of a momentary reduction in column severity, e.g., decrease bottom temperature, reflux or tower throughput. Unloading the tower briefly at the pre-flood state causes long-term column operation to become significantly more stable - allowing an increase in throughput and/or product purity. The technology provides a wide range of value between optimization and flooding. When a distillation column is not running at capacity, it should be run in such a way ("pushed") that optimal product purity is achieved. Additional benefits include low implementation and maintenance costs, and a high level of console operator acceptance. The previous commercial applications experienced 98% uptime over a four-year period. Further, the technology is unique in its ability to distinguish between different flooding mechanisms within the same tower, e.g., liquid and jet flooding.

  18. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  19. Monitoring Abundance and Expression of “Dehalococcoides” Species Chloroethene-Reductive Dehalogenases in a Tetrachloroethene-Dechlorinating Flow Column? †

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Azizian, Mohammad F.; McMurdie, Paul J.; Sabalowsky, Andrew; Dolan, Mark E.; Semprini, Lew; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the distribution and activity of chloroethene-degrading microorganisms and associated functional genes during reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene to ethene in a laboratory continuous-flow column. Using real-time PCR, we quantified “Dehalococcoides” species 16S rRNA and chloroethene-reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes (pceA, tceA, vcrA, and bvcA) in nucleic acid extracts from different sections of the column. Dehalococcoides 16S rRNA gene copies were highest at the inflow port [(3.6 ± 0.6) × 106 (mean ± standard deviation) per gram soil] where the electron donor and acceptor were introduced into the column. The highest transcript numbers for tceA, vcrA, and bvcA were detected 5 to 10 cm from the column inflow. bvcA was the most highly expressed of all RDase genes and the only vinyl chloride reductase-encoding transcript detectable close to the column outflow. Interestingly, no expression of pceA was detected in the column, despite the presence of the genes in the microbial community throughout the column. By comparing the 16S rRNA gene copy numbers to the sum of all four RDase genes, we found that 50% of the Dehalococcoides population in the first part of the column did not contain either one of the known chloroethene RDase genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from both ends of the flow column revealed a microbial community dominated by members of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Higher clone sequence diversity was observed near the column outflow. The results presented have implications for our understanding of the ecophysiology of reductively dehalogenating Dehalococcoides spp. and their role in bioremediation of chloroethenes. PMID:18676701

  20. Fast method development of rooibos tea phenolics using a variable column length strategy.

    PubMed

    Cabooter, Deirdre; Broeckhoven, Ken; Kalili, Kathithileni M; de Villiers, André; Desmet, Gert

    2011-10-14

    The development of a method for the separation of standard compounds of the 15 main phenolics found in rooibos tea is presented. The separation of these compounds in a single HPLC analysis is particularly challenging due to the similarity of rooibos phenolics. As a result, multiple methods are often required to analyze all major phenolics in rooibos tea samples. The method development process is significantly enhanced in this study by using the recently introduced automated column coupler in combination with the variable column length strategy. This strategy consists of performing the initial scouting runs, wherein the best separation conditions are determined, on a short column and subsequently fine-tuning the separation on longer columns to benefit from their higher separation performance. It is demonstrated that the method development process can further be expedited by operating each column length at the maximum pressure, in this case 1000 bar. Although this holds in general, it is even more the case for the presently considered sample, since the selectivity of the sample is more pressure- than temperature-dependent. Applying the optimized method to unfermented and fermented aqueous rooibos tea extracts in combination with Q-TOF mass spectrometry, some 30 phenolic compounds are tentatively identified. PMID:21907344

  1. Laboratory studies of water column separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, R.; Rodal, E.

    2013-12-01

    Results of experimental studies of water column separation following an upstream valve closure are presented. Different geometrical arrangements with transparent PVC pipes are installed immediately downstream of the closing valve, namely, horizontal pipes, vertical pipes flowing down, and humpback profile pipes, the last two being used in order to obtain full pipe section vapor cavities. Maximum over pressures at water column rejoining, and maximum cavity lengths and duration, are compared with theoretical values and with previous experiments with horizontal pipes. Good agreement is found between theory and experiments, and interesting visual material is obtained.

  2. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components.

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2004-08-24

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  3. Systems for column-based separations, methods of forming packed columns, and methods of purifying sample components

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  4. Systems For Column-Based Separations, Methods Of Forming Packed Columns, And Methods Of Purifying Sample Components

    DOEpatents

    Egorov, Oleg B. (Richland, WA); O'Hara, Matthew J. (Richland, WA); Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Chandler, Darrell P. (Richland, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J. (Richland, WA)

    2006-02-21

    The invention encompasses systems for column-based separations, methods of packing and unpacking columns and methods of separating components of samples. In one aspect, the invention includes a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber, comprising: a) packing a matrix material within a column chamber to form a packed column; and b) after the packing, unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber without moving the column chamber. In another aspect, the invention includes a system for column-based separations, comprising: a) a fluid passageway, the fluid passageway comprising a column chamber and a flow path in fluid communication with the column chamber, the flow path being obstructed by a retaining material permeable to a carrier fluid and impermeable to a column matrix material suspended in the carrier fluid, the flow path extending through the column chamber and through the retaining material, the flow path being configured to form a packed column within the column chamber when a suspension of the fluid and the column matrix material is flowed along the flow path; and b) the fluid passageway extending through a valve intermediate the column chamber and the retaining material.

  5. Stress pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

  6. EVALUATION OF SAMPLE EXTRACT CLEANUP USING SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION CARTRIDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fractionation and cleanup of sample extracts prior to instrumental analysis is usually accomplished by column chromatography, gel permeation chromatography, or acid-base partitioning. n this report, the results of a study are described in which we investigated the application of ...

  7. Separation of cannabinoids on three different mixed-mode columns containing carbon/nanodiamond/amine-polymer superficially porous particles.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chuan-Hsi; Zukowski, Janusz; Jensen, David S; Miles, Andrew J; Sulak, Clayton; Dadson, Andrew E; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    Three mixed-mode high-performance liquid chromatography columns packed with superficially porous carbon/nanodiamond/amine-polymer particles were used to separate mixtures of cannabinoids. Columns evaluated included: (i) reversed phase (C18 ), weak anion exchange, 4.6 × 33 mm, 3.6 ?m, and 4.6 × 100 mm, 3.6 ?m, (ii) reversed phase, strong anion exchange (quaternary amine), 4.6×33 mm, 3.6 ?m, and (iii) hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, 4.6 × 150 mm, 3.6 ?m. Different selectivities were achieved under various mobile phase and stationary phase conditions. Efficiencies and peak capacities were as high as 54 000 N/m and 56, respectively. The reversed phase mixed-mode column (C18 ) retained tetrahydrocannabinolic acid strongly under acidic conditions and weakly under basic conditions. Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid was retained strongly on the reversed phase, strong anion exchange mixed-mode column under basic polar organic mobile phase conditions. The hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column retained polar cannabinoids better than the (more) neutral ones under basic conditions. A longer reversed phase (C18 ) mixed-mode column (4.6 × 100 mm) showed better resolution for analytes (and a contaminant) than a shorter column. Fast separations were achieved in less than 5 min and sometimes 2 min. A real world sample (bubble hash extract) was also analyzed by gradient elution. PMID:26075936

  8. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  9. Screening of tobacco smoke condensate for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands using cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns and missing peak chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maciuk, Alexandre; Moaddel, Ruin; Haginaka, Jun; Wainer, Irving W

    2008-09-29

    This manuscript reports an approach to the screening of natural product extracts for compounds which are active at membrane-bound receptors, ion channels and transporters. The technique is based upon cellular membrane affinity chromatography (CMAC) columns created through the immobilization of cellular membrane fragments on liquid chromatography stationary phases. In this study a CMAC(nAChR(+)) column was created out of membranes from a transfected cell line expressing the alpha3beta4 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the column was used to screen tobacco smoke condensates. A strategy involving parallel screening with a CMAC column created from a non-transfected form of the same cell line, CMAC(nAChR(-)) was adopted. The condensate was chromatographed on both columns, timed fractions collected and concentrated. Each fraction was analyzed on a C18 column in order to establish a chromatographic fingerprint of each fraction and a differential elution profile of each compound. Comparison of the elution profiles from the CMAC(nAChR(+)) and CMAC(nAChR(-)) columns identified patterns that could be associated with high affinity ligands and with low-affinity/non-binding compounds. Known strong ligands ((S)-nicotine, (R,S)-anatabine, N'-nitrosonornicotine), weak ligands ((R,S)-nornicotine, anabasine) as well as known non-ligands (N-methyl-gamma-oxo-3-pyridinebutanamide, (1'S,2'S)-nicotine 1'-oxide) have been identified in the complex extract. The results demonstrate that CMAC-based screens can be used in the identification of compounds within natural product extracts that bind to membrane-based targets. PMID:18187282

  10. The Behaviour of STeel ColumnS in fire Material -Cross-seCtional CapaCity -ColuMn BuCkling

    E-print Network

    steel with its distinct nonlinear material behaviour at elevated temperatures. an extensive veryThe Behaviour of STeel ColumnS in fire Material - Cross-seCtional CapaCity - ColuMn BuIch december 2012 #12;#12;Structural stability and the general behaviour of steel structures can be described

  11. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2012-12-15

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  12. Effects of Gravity on Cocurrent Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    2001-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results of research on the influence of gravity on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid two-phase flow through packed columns. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under reduced gravity conditions compared to normal gravity cocurrent down-flow. This is illustrated by comparing the flow regime transitions found in reduced gravity with the transitions predicted by Talmor. Next, the effect of gravity on the total pressure drop in a packed column is shown to depend on the flow regime. The difference is roughly equivalent to the liquid static head for bubbly flow but begins to decrease at the onset of pulse flow. As the spray flow regime is approached by increasing the gas to liquid ratio, the effect of gravity on pressure drop becomes negligible. Finally, gravity tends to suppress the amplitude of each pressure pulse. An example of this phenomenon is presented.

  13. GENERATION AND TESTING OF IMMUNOAFFINITY COLUMNS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoaffinity purification is a highly specific, reversible technique that has the potential to be used for the one-step isolation of an analyte from many complex matrices. Application of an immunoaffinity column to isolate and concentrate an analyte may decrease the amount of solvent used, decrea...

  14. BioToolomics Supor Q Column

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    -rings Operational pressure Up to 3 bar Column pressure 4 bar pH stability 2-14 (short term) and 2-12 (long term) Working temperature +4O C to +30O C Chemical stability All commonly used buffers Avoid Alcohols (>20 for the binding-elution of both small (proteins) and large molecules (e.g. plasmid, virus, virus like particle

  15. WATER COLUMN DATA AND SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water samples collected monthly, for 18 months, from six sites in the Laguna Madre were analyzed to identify and quantify phytopigments using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In addition, water column pigment and nutrient data were acquired at 12 stations in Upper ...

  16. Density Gradient Columns for Chemical Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for preparing density gradient columns for chemical displays are presented. They include displays illustrating acid-base reactions, metal ion equilibria, and liquid density. The lifetime of these metastable displays is surprising, some lasting for months in display cabinets. (JN)

  17. Contexts for Column Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Fernandez, Jorge M.; Velazquez Estrella, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss their approach to column addition and subtraction algorithms. Adapting an original idea of Paul Cobb and Erna Yackel's from "A Contextual Investigation of Three-Digit Addition and Subtraction" related to packing and unpacking candy in a candy factory, the authors provided an analogous context by designing…

  18. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  19. LRC Chromatography Columns for Laboratory Applications

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    with: - Internal central screw [4] POMa - Seal actuation nut [5] POM - Central screw [6] POM - Counter nuts [7] and screw [10] POM - Washer [8] POM - Spring washer [9] Steel - O-ring seal [11] FPMb - 10 µm the range of column diameters. Precise Piston Adjustment u Screw-lock system allows rapid coarse adjustment

  20. Synthesis and applications of monolithic HPLC columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chengdu

    Silica and carbon monolithic columns were synthesized and modified for liquid chromatography applications. Column configurations and cladding techniques were investigated in detail. Three novel approaches have been developed for the synthesis of bimodal porous rods. Out of these three methods, gel-casting was adopted for the synthesis of silica monoliths with ordered mesopores and uniform macropores; the use of colloidal templates and dual phase separation has been successfully implemented for the synthesis of carbon monoliths with well-controlled meso- and macro- porosities. The formation of mesopores in carbon materials has been further studied in the microphase separation of block copolymers. Electrochemical modification of carbon monoliths was discovered to be an efficient method for converting covalently bonded functionalities to carbon monoliths. N,N'-diethylaminobenzene has been attached to carbon surface for the separation of proteins and protein digests. The performances of carbon-based monolithic columns were studied intensely through frontal analysis and Van Deemter plot. Temperature and pressure effects were also investigated in carbon-based columns. The density of bonding on the modified carbon monoliths was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis.

  1. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  2. Enhancements of counting invariants: the column group

    E-print Network

    Hennig, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    The column group is a subgroup of the symmetric group on the elements of a finite rack (or quandle) which is invariant under rack (or quandle) isomorphism. We use this group to define enhancements of the rack and quandle counting invariants which specialize to the standard counting invariants but contain more information in general.

  3. Design and Construction of the 3.2 Mev High Voltage Column for Darht II

    E-print Network

    C. Peters; B. Elliott; S. Yu; S. Eylon; E. Henestroza

    2000-09-28

    A 3.2 MeV injector has been designed and built for the Darht II Project at Los Alamos Lab. The installation of the complete injector system is nearing completion at this time. The requirements for the injector are to produce a 3.2 MeV, 2000 ampere electron pulse with a flattop width of at least 2-microseconds and emittance of less than 0.15 p cm-rad normalized. A large high voltage column has been built and installed. The column is vertically oriented, is 4.4 meters long, 1.2 meters in diameter, and weights 5700 kilograms. A novel method of construction has been employed which utilizes bonded mycalex insulating rings. This paper will describe the design, construction, and testing completed during construction. Mechanical aspects of the design will be emphasized.

  4. Design and Construction of the 3.2 Mev High Voltage Column for Darht II

    E-print Network

    Peters, C; Yu, S; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E

    2000-01-01

    A 3.2 MeV injector has been designed and built for the Darht II Project at Los Alamos Lab. The installation of the complete injector system is nearing completion at this time. The requirements for the injector are to produce a 3.2 MeV, 2000 ampere electron pulse with a flattop width of at least 2-microseconds and emittance of less than 0.15 p cm-rad normalized. A large high voltage column has been built and installed. The column is vertically oriented, is 4.4 meters long, 1.2 meters in diameter, and weights 5700 kilograms. A novel method of construction has been employed which utilizes bonded mycalex insulating rings. This paper will describe the design, construction, and testing completed during construction. Mechanical aspects of the design will be emphasized.

  5. SNS EXTRACTION KICKER POWER SUPPLY PROTOTYPE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    MI,J.L.; SANDBERG,J.; SANDERS,R.; SOUKAS,A.; ZHANG,W.

    2000-06-27

    The SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) accumulator ring Extraction System consists of a Fast kicker and a Lambertson Septum magnet. The proposed design will use 14 kicker magnets powered by an Extraction Kicker Power Supply System. They will eject the high power beam from the SNS accumulator ring into RTBT (Ring to Target Beam Tunnel) through a Lambertson Septum magnet. This paper describes some test results of the SNS Extraction Kicker power supply prototype. The high repetition rate of 60 pulse per second operation is the challenging part of the design. In the prototype testing, a 3 kA damp current of 700ns pulse-width, 200 nS rise time and 60 Hz repetition rate at 32 kV PFN operation voltage has been demonstrated. An Extraction kicker power supply system design diagram is depicted.

  6. Developing the Pulsed Fission-Fusion (PuFF) Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Cassibry, Jason; Bradley, David; Fabisinski, Leo; Statham, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    In September 2013 the NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) organization awarded a phase I contract to the PuFF team. Our phase 1 proposal researched a pulsed fission-fusion propulsion system that compressed a target of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) as a mixture in a column, surrounded concentrically by Uranium. The target is surrounded by liquid lithium. A high power current would flow down the liquid lithium and the resulting Lorentz force would compress the column by roughly a factor of 10. The compressed column would reach criticality and a combination of fission and fusion reactions would occur. Our Phase I results, summarized herein, review our estimates of engine and vehicle performance, our work to date to model the fission-fusion reaction, and our initial efforts in experimental analysis.

  7. Physical extraction of microorganisms from water-saturated, packed sediment.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Fabio; Schroth, Martin H; Bürgmann, Helmut; Zeyer, Josef

    2014-05-01

    Microbial characterization of aquifers should include samples of both suspended and attached microorganisms (biofilms). We investigated the effect of shear, sonication, and heat on the extraction of microorganisms from water-saturated, packed sediment columns containing established biofilms. Shear was studied by increasing flow velocity of the column eluent, sonication by treating the columns with ultrasound at different power levels, and heat by warming up the column eluent to different temperatures. Effluent cell concentrations were used as a measure of extraction efficiency. Dissolved organic carbon and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) concentrations were used to corroborate cell-extraction results. Additionally, ATP was used as an indicator of cell-membrane integrity. Extraction quality was determined by comparing terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles of extracted bacterial communities with destructively sampled sediment-community profiles. Sonication and heat increased the extraction efficiency up to 200-fold and yielded communities comparable to the sediment community. These treatments showed high potential for in-situ application in aquifers. PMID:24961067

  8. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 ?s at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method.

  9. Controlling output pulse and prepulse in a resonant microwave pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A.; Artemenko, S.; Chumerin, P.; Yushkov, Yu.

    2013-02-07

    A resonant microwave pulse compressor with a waveguide H-plane-tee-based energy extraction unit was studied in terms of its capability to produce output pulses that comprise a low-power long-duration (prepulse) and a high-power short-duration part. The application of such combined pulses with widely variable prepulse and high-power pulse power and energy ratios is of interest in the research area of electronic hardware vulnerability. The characteristics of output radiation pulses are controlled by the variation of the H-plane tee transition attenuation at the stage of microwave energy storage in the compressor cavity. Results of theoretical estimations of the parameters tuning range and experimental investigations of the prototype S-band compressor (1.5 MW, 12 ns output pulse; {approx}13.2 dB gain) are presented. The achievable maximum in the prepulse power is found to be about half the power of the primary microwave source. It has been shown that the energy of the prepulse becomes comparable with that of the short-duration (nanosecond) pulse, while the power of the latter decreases insignificantly. The possible range of variation of the prepulse power and energy can be as wide as 40 dB. In the experiments, the prepulse level control within the range of {approx}10 dB was demonstrated.

  10. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 ?s at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method. PMID:26233376

  11. Isolated Attosecond Pulse Generation without the Need to Stabilize the Carrier-Envelope Phase of Driving Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, Steve; Khan, Sabih D.; Wu Yi; Chini, Michael; Chang Zenghu

    2010-08-27

    Single isolated attosecond pulses can be extracted from a pulse train with an ultrafast gate in the generation target. By setting the gate width sufficiently narrow with the generalized double optical gating, we demonstrate that single isolated attosecond pulses can be generated with any arbitrary carrier-envelope phase value of the driving laser. The carrier-envelope phase only affects the photon flux, not the pulse duration or contrast. Our results show that isolated attosecond pulses can be generated using carrier-envelope phase unstabilized 23 fs pulses directly from chirped pulse amplifiers.

  12. III Lead ECG Pulse Measurement Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, S. K.; Munisamy, K.

    2015-09-01

    Heart rate sensing is very important. Method of measuring heart pulse by using an electrocardiogram (ECG) technique is described. Electrocardiogram is a measurement of the potential difference (the electrical pulse) generated by a cardiac tissue, mainly the heart. This paper also reports the development of a three lead ECG hardware system that would be the basis of developing a more cost efficient, portable and easy to use ECG machine. Einthoven's Three Lead method [1] is used for ECG signal extraction. Using amplifiers such as the instrumentation amplifier AD620BN and the conventional operational amplifier Ua741 that would be used to amplify the ECG signal extracted develop this system. The signal would then be filtered from noise using Butterworth filter techniques to obtain optimum output. Also a right leg guard was implemented as a safety feature to this system. Simulation was carried out for development of the system using P-spice Program.

  13. Securing mechanism for the deployable column of the Hoop/Column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahl, E. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Column Longeron Latch (CLL) was designed and developed as the securing mechanism for the deployable, telescoping column of the Hoop/Column antenna. The column is an open lattice structure with three longerons as the principal load-bearing members. It is divided into telescoping sections that are deployed after the antenna is place in Earth orbit. The CLL provides a means to automatically lock the longeron sections into position during deployment as well as a means of unlocking the sections when the antenna is to be restowed. The CLL is a four bar linkage mechanism using the over center principle for locking. It utilizes the relative movement of the longeron sections to activate the mechanism during antenna deployment and restowing. The CLL design is one of the first mechanisms developed to meet the restowing requirements of spacecraft which will utilize the STS retrieval capability.

  14. ANALYSIS OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IONS IN SOIL EXTRACTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method using ion chromatography (IC) for the analysis of ferrous (Fe 2+) and ferric (Fe 3+) ions in soil extracts has been developed. This method uses an ion exchange column with detection at 520 nm after post-column derivatization. Selectivity is achieved by using an anionic...

  15. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE HIGH COLUMN DENSITY TURNOVER IN THE H I COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Erkal, Denis; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-12-10

    We study the high column density regime of the H I column density distribution function and argue that there are two distinct features: a turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, which is present at both z = 0 and z Almost-Equal-To 3, and a lack of systems above N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} at z = 0. Using observations of the column density distribution, we argue that the H I-H{sub 2} transition does not cause the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} but can plausibly explain the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. We compute the H I column density distribution of individual galaxies in the THINGS sample and show that the turnover column density depends only weakly on metallicity. Furthermore, we show that the column density distribution of galaxies, corrected for inclination, is insensitive to the resolution of the H I map or to averaging in radial shells. Our results indicate that the similarity of H I column density distributions at z = 3 and 0 is due to the similarity of the maximum H I surface densities of high-z and low-z disks, set presumably by universal processes that shape properties of the gaseous disks of galaxies. Using fully cosmological simulations, we explore other candidate physical mechanisms that could produce a turnover in the column density distribution. We show that while turbulence within giant molecular clouds cannot affect the damped Ly{alpha} column density distribution, stellar feedback can affect it significantly if the feedback is sufficiently effective in removing gas from the central 2-3 kpc of high-redshift galaxies. Finally, we argue that it is meaningful to compare column densities averaged over {approx} kpc scales with those estimated from quasar spectra that probe sub-pc scales due to the steep power spectrum of H I column density fluctuations observed in nearby galaxies.

  16. Impact of a pressure drop on a monolithic capillary column on the efficiency and separation ability of the column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, V. E.; Korolev, A. A.; Popova, T. P.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of inlet and outlet column pressures on column separation properties was investigated for monolithic capillary column in gas chromatography. It was demonstrated that the classical Van Deemter equation does not allow us to make a clear choice of the optimal separation conditions. More relevant data can be obtained from the dependence of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) on the inlet and outlet column pressures. The dependence ensures that the minimum HETP value can be achieved at high values of inlet and outlet column pressures, but the ratio of the pressures must approach 1. The efficiency of the column under these optimal conditions can exceed by 25-35% the column efficiency under the optimal conditions found using the classical Van Deemter plot. It was shown that a decrease in inlet and outlet column pressures even at a relative pressure close to 1 leads to an increase in HETP and the loss of column separation ability.

  17. Random pulse generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, R. S., Jr. (inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a source of random width and random spaced rectangular voltage pulses whose mean or average frequency of operation is controllable within prescribed limits of about 10 hertz to 1 megahertz. A pair of thin-film metal resistors are used to provide a differential white noise voltage pulse source. Pulse shaping and amplification circuitry provide relatively short duration pulses of constant amplitude which are applied to anti-bounce logic circuitry to prevent ringing effects. The pulse outputs from the anti-bounce circuits are then used to control two one-shot multivibrators whose output comprises the random length and random spaced rectangular pulses. Means are provided for monitoring, calibrating and evaluating the relative randomness of the generator.

  18. Design procedures for fiber composite structural components: Rods, columns and beam columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    Step by step procedures are described which are used to design structural components (rods, columns, and beam columns) subjected to steady state mechanical loads and hydrothermal environments. Illustrative examples are presented for structural components designed for static tensile and compressive loads, and fatigue as well as for moisture and temperature effects. Each example is set up as a sample design illustrating the detailed steps that are used to design similar components.

  19. A Case of Polymyxin b-Immobilized Fiber Column Treatment for Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Pneumonia Associated with Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia associated with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis who responded to single course of polymyxin b-immobilized fiber column treatment. Initial treatment with pulsed corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide, intravenous immunoglobulin, and cyclosporine seemed to suppress the activity of interstitial lung disease temporarily, but signs of relapse were detected such as elevation of serum KL-6 level and progressing pulmonary shadows in chest computed tomography scan. After polymyxin b-immobilized fiber column treatment, the areas of pulmonary shadows drastically decreased. Gradually, arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio recovered, and serum ferritin level and KL-6 level decreased. These findings indicate that polymyxin b-immobilized fiber column treatment could be promising in combination with conventional therapy for rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia associated with clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis, especially at the early phase of relapse. PMID:23983712

  20. CAPABILITY OF GC/FT-IR TO IDENTIFY TOXIC SUBSTANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLE EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The minimum identifiable quantities of 55 toxic substances have been determined by packed column gas chromatography/Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (GC/FT-IR) at conditions compatible with environmental extract analysis. Identification of each GC effluent component was ac...

  1. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Springfield, Ray M. (Sante Fe, NM); Wheat, Jr., Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  2. PulseSoar

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, P.; Peglow, S.

    1992-07-21

    This paper is an introduction to the PulseSoar concept. PulseSoar is a hypervelocity airplane that uses existing airport facilities and current technologies to fly at the very edge of space. It will be shown that PulseSoar can fly between any two points on the globe in less than two hours with fuel efficiency exceeding current state of the art commercial airliners. In addition, it will be shown that PulseSoar avoids environmental issues concerning the ozone layer and sonic booms because of its unique flight profile. All of this can be achieved with current technology. PulseSoar does not require the development of enabling technology. It is a concept which can be demonstrated today. The importance of this idea goes beyond the technical significance`s of PulseSoar in terms of feasibility and performance. PulseSoar could provide a crucial economic advantage to America`s largest export market: commercial aircraft. PulseSoar is a breakthrough concept for addressing the emerging markets of long range and high speed aircraft. Application of PulseSoar to commercial transport could provide the US Aerospace industry a substantial lead in offering high speed/long range aircraft to the world`s airlines. The rapid emergence of a US developed high speed aircraft could also be important to our competitiveness in the Pacific Rim and South American economies. A quick and inexpensive demonstration vehicle is proposed to bang the concept to reality within two years. This discussion will address all the major technical subjects encompassed by PulseSoar and identifies several near-term, and low risk, applications which may be further explored with the initial demonstration vehicle. What is PulseSoar? PulseSoar could enable high speed, high altitude and long range flight without many of the difficulties encountered by traditional hypersonic vehicles.

  3. Extractant composition

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Ryan, Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    An organic extracting solution useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  4. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  5. Alternative and Efficient Extraction Methods for Marine-Derived Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Clara; Valentão, Patrícia; Ferreres, Federico; Andrade, Paula B.

    2015-01-01

    Marine ecosystems cover more than 70% of the globe’s surface. These habitats are occupied by a great diversity of marine organisms that produce highly structural diverse metabolites as a defense mechanism. In the last decades, these metabolites have been extracted and isolated in order to test them in different bioassays and assess their potential to fight human diseases. Since traditional extraction techniques are both solvent- and time-consuming, this review emphasizes alternative extraction techniques, such as supercritical fluid extraction, pressurized solvent extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field-assisted extraction, enzyme-assisted extraction, and extraction with switchable solvents and ionic liquids, applied in the search for marine compounds. Only studies published in the 21st century are considered. PMID:26006714

  6. Pressure drop in CIM disk monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Mihelic, Igor; Nemec, Damjan; Podgornik, Ales; Koloini, Tine

    2005-02-11

    Pressure drop analysis in commercial CIM disk monolithic columns is presented. Experimental measurements of pressure drop are compared to hydrodynamic models usually employed for prediction of pressure drop in packed beds, e.g. free surface model and capillary model applying hydraulic radius concept. However, the comparison between pressure drop in monolith and adequate packed bed give unexpected results. Pressure drop in a CIM disk monolithic column is approximately 50% lower than in an adequate packed bed of spheres having the same hydraulic radius as CIM disk monolith; meaning they both have the same porosity and the same specific surface area. This phenomenon seems to be a consequence of the monolithic porous structure which is quite different in terms of the pore size distribution and parallel pore nonuniformity compared to the one in conventional packed beds. The number of self-similar levels for the CIM monoliths was estimated to be between 1.03 and 2.75. PMID:15782951

  7. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  8. Enhanced phytoremediation in the vadose zone: Modeling and column studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Chang, Y.; Corapcioglu, M.; Cho, C.

    2002-05-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant-based technique with potential for enhancing the remediation of vadoese zone soils contaminated by pollutants. The use of deep-rooted plants is an alternative to conventional methodologies. However, when the phytoremediation is applied to the vadose zone, it might have some restrictions since it uses solely naturally driven energy and mechanisms in addition to the complesxity of the vadose zone. As a more innovative technique than conventional phytoremediation methods, air injected phytoremediation technique is introduced to enhance the remediation efficiency or to apply at the former soil vapor extraction or bio venting sites. Effects of air injection, vegetation treatment, and air injection with vegetation treatments on the removal of hydrocarbon were investigated by column studies to simulate the field situation. Both the removal efficiency and the microbial activity were highest in air-injected and vegetated column soils. It was suggested that increased microorganisms activity stimulated by plant root exudates enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds. Air injection provided sufficient opportunity for promoting the microbial activity at depths where the conditions are anaerobic. Air injection can enhance the physicochemical properties of the medium and contaminant and increase the bioavailability i.e., the plant and microbial accessibility to the contaminant. A mathematical model that can be applied to phytoremediation, especially to air injected phytoremediation, for simulating the fate and the transport of a diesel contaminant in the vadose zone is developed. The approach includes a two-phase model of water flow in vegetated and unplanted vadose zone soil. A time-specific root distribution model and a microbial growth model in the rhizosphere of vegetated soil were combined with an unsaturated soil water flow equation as well as with a contaminant transport equation. The proposed model showed a satisfactory representation of contaminant fate in the air injected phytoremediation.

  9. Extractable resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The use of information from space systems in the operation of extractive industries, particularly in exploration for mineral and fuel resources was reviewed. Conclusions and recommendations reported are based on the fundamental premise that survival of modern industrial society requires a continuing secure flow of resources for energy, construction and manufacturing, and for use as plant foods.

  10. Divided Wall Column Without the Wall 

    E-print Network

    Tung, P.

    2004-01-01

    for internal liquid / vapor traffic adjustments. Without such flexibility, feed quality change becomes a product spec control concern. A novel design arrangement provides practically unlimited hydrostatic head for vapor / liquid splits control... to Fig. 3, the PETLYUK column is the replacement of vapor and liquid streams for the pre-frac by a split liquid and split vapor stream from the main-frac. Conceptually, Fig. 3a is represented by Fig. 3b, which is processwise identical to Fig. 3c...

  11. 4. VIEW FROM LOWER LEVEL PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY. FOUR SUPPORT COLUMNS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW FROM LOWER LEVEL PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY. FOUR SUPPORT COLUMNS WITH SWAY BRACING AND BRACKETS IN COLUMNS. - Chanute Air Force Base, Hangar No. 4, Junction of Challenger Street & Sentry Street, Rantoul, Champaign County, IL

  12. 14. Detail view of columns, capitals and beams at south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail view of columns, capitals and beams at south end of north section of mill. Note the transition from deep pocket to shallow pocket column capitals. - Lowe Mill, Eighth Avenue, Southwest, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. 6. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY, INTERIOR SHOWING ORIGINAL GRANITE COLUMNS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY, INTERIOR SHOWING ORIGINAL GRANITE COLUMNS AND COLUMN BRICKFACED AFTER THE GREAT FIRE 1904 - Old U.S. Appraisers Stores, Gay & Lombard Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  14. Query execution in column-oriented database systems

    E-print Network

    Abadi, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    There are two obvious ways to map a two-dimension relational database table onto a one-dimensional storage interface: store the table row-by-row, or store the table column-by-column. Historically, database system implementations ...

  15. 18. VIEW SOUTH OF TIMBER COLUMNS ON FIRST FLOOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW SOUTH OF TIMBER COLUMNS ON FIRST FLOOR OF BUILDING 21 SHOWING TYPICAL MILL CONSTRUCTION; COLUMNS REST ON CAST IRON BASE PLATES - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  16. 29. View of paired concreteencased columns at joint between beams ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. View of paired concrete-encased columns at joint between beams contrasted against wider single columns. Looking east. - Stillwell Avenue Station, Intersection of Stillwell & Surf Avenues, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  17. CAR MACHINE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, DETAIL OF WOOD COLUMN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CAR MACHINE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, DETAIL OF WOOD COLUMN AND INVERTED KING-POST TRUSS TO PROVIDE INCREASED SPAN BETWEEN COLUMNS, LOOKING SOUTH. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Car Machine Shop, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  18. Water column characterization of anchialine caves in Quintana Roo, Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Dodson, Brett Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Water column characteristics of three coastal cave systems in Quintana Roo, Mexico on the Yucatan Peninsula were profiled from January 1996 to July 1997. A Hydrolab Data Sonde 3 Multiprobe Logger was used to acquire in situ water column data...

  19. Integrated Thermal and Hydraulic Analysis of Distillation Columns 

    E-print Network

    Samant, K.; Sinclair, I.; Keady, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the implementation of column thermal and hydraulic analysis in a simulation environment. The methodology is described using a separations example. Column Thermal Analysis has been discussed in the literature extensively...

  20. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  1. Column experiments and full dissolution rate law of gibbsite

    SciTech Connect

    Mogollon, J.L.; Ganor, J.; Soler, J.M.; Lasaga, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    The dissolution of a gibbsitic bauxite in natural systems was simulated in the laboratory, at 25{degrees}C, using a column reactor, with input pHs ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 and fluid velocities ranging from 61 to 1085 m/y. As a result, the dissolution of gibbsite was measured under a wide range of saturation state conditions from equilibrium or near-equilibrium conditions to very far from equilibrium conditions. Far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates were measured under steady-state conditions. At slower flow rates, the variation of the rates with deviation from equilibrium was also extracted. The slowest flow rates yielded the equilibrium solubility of gibbsite. The solubility (K{sub sp}) of natural gibbsite and the column output solution saturation states (expressed as the Gibbs Free Energy of reaction, {Delta}G{sub {gamma}}) were determined with respect to the overall reaction: Al(OH){sub 3} + 3H{sup +} = Al{sup 3} + 3H{sub 2}O. Despite the impurities present in the natural sample material, the calculated log K{sub sp}, 7.83 {plus_minus} 0.12, is in excellent agreement with published K{sub sp} values for pure gibbsite. Far-from-equilibrium, {Delta}G{sub {gamma}} <{minus}0.7 kcal/mol, the dissolution rates attain a constant value of {minus}7.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} moles/m{sup 2}/sec at input pH values of 3.5. A reaction order of 0.33 with respect to a{sub H+} was found. The variation of the rates with deviation from equilibrium was found to be very similar to the results of Nagy and Lasaga (1992), even though our study used natural gibbsite, a column device, and different pH and temperature. Therefore, the comparison of the results of this study and Nagy and Lasaga (1992) validates the use of a general rate law and suggests that the same kind of {Delta}G{sub {gamma}} functionality is valid over a broad range of pH and temperature conditions. 45 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. [Spectral investigation of atmospheric pressure plasma column].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Chen; Chang, Yuan-Yuan; Xu, Long-Fei

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma column has many important applications in plasma stealth for aircraft. In the present paper, a plasma column with a length of 65 cm was generated in argon at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes in coaxial configurations. The discharge mechanism of the plasma column was studied by optical method and the result indicates that a moving layer of light emission propagates in the upstream region. The propagation velocity of the plasma bullet is about 0.6 x 10(5) m x s(-1) through optical measurement. Spectral intensity ratios as functions of the applied voltage and driving frequency were also investigated by spectroscopic method. The variation in spectral intensity ratio implies a change in the averaged electron energy. Results show that the averaged electron energy increases with the increase in the applied voltage and the driving frequency. These results have significant values for industrial applications of the atmospheric pressure discharge and have extensive application potentials in stealth for military aircraft. PMID:23016319

  3. Cross flow flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Ralph W.; Patton, Robert A.

    1997-12-01

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophilic tailings.

  4. Cross flow cyclonic flotation column for coal and minerals beneficiation

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Ralph W. (Upper St. Clair, PA); Patton, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the separation of coal from pyritic impurities using a modified froth flotation system. The froth flotation column incorporates a helical track about the inner wall of the column in a region intermediate between the top and base of the column. A standard impeller located about the central axis of the column is used to generate a centrifugal force thereby increasing the separation efficiency of coal from the pyritic particles and hydrophillic tailings.

  5. Bipolar pulse generator for intense pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Igawa, K.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2007-01-15

    A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named ''bipolar pulse accelerator'' (BPA) has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator for the bipolar pulse experiment, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the first experimental result of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PFL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138 kV, 72 ns) and the second pulse (+130 kV, 70 ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time.

  6. Extrusion cooking: Legume pulses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion is used commercially to produce high value breakfast and snack foods based on cereals such as wheat or corn. However, this processing method is not being commercially used for legume pulses seeds due to the perception that they do not expand well in extrusion. Extrusion cooking of pulses (...

  7. A Simple Plant Nutrient Solution Purification Method for Effective Removal of Trace Metals Using Controlled Pore Glass-8-Hydroxyquinoline Chelation Column Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Eskew, David L.; Welch, Ross M.; Cary, Earle E.

    1984-01-01

    Column chelation chromatography on controlled pore glass-8-hydroxyquinoline was demonstrated to be a very efficient method for removing trace metal contaminants from concentrated macronutrient salt solutions used to prepare nutrient media. By using 63Ni and 65Zn radio-isotopes as tracers, controlled pore glass-8-hydroxyquinoline column packings were found to retain 99.9% of the radiotracer and quantitative recovery of the radioisotopes from these columns was obtained by eluting with 1.2 n HCl. This method has several advantages over liquid-liquid extraction methods of purification which previously have been used in plant micronutrient research. PMID:16663778

  8. 24. DETAIL VIEW OF COLUMN #072 DEVIATING FROM VERTICAL IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL VIEW OF COLUMN #072 DEVIATING FROM VERTICAL IN ROW OF INTACT COLUMNS, LOOKING NORTHEAST TO SOUTHWEST. (NOTE BOLTED BLOCK SCABBED TO COLUMN AS JOIST/TRUSS SUPPORT) - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  9. The Book Review Column1 by William Gasarch

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, Aravind

    The Book Review Column1 by William Gasarch Department of Computer Science University of Maryland at College Park College Park, MD, 20742 email: gasarch@cs.umd.edu Welcome to the Book Reviews Column. We hope to bring you at least two reviews of books every month. In this column three books are reviewed. 1

  10. Model Predictive Control of a Kaibel Distillation Column

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Model Predictive Control of a Kaibel Distillation Column Martin Kvernland Ivar Halvorsen Sigurd (e-mail: skoge@ntnu.no) Abstract: This is a simulation study on controlling a Kaibel distillation column with model predictive control (MPC). A Kaibel distillation column has several advantages compared

  11. Active constraint regions for optimal operation of distillation columns

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Active constraint regions for optimal operation of distillation columns Magnus G. Jacobsen the control structure of distillation columns, with optimal operation in mind, it is important to know how for distillation columns change with variations in energy cost and feed flow rate. The production of the most

  12. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high thermal conductivity in the cryogenic temperature range and would typically be made of pure copper to satisfy this requirement. The metallic part is bonded to the nonmetallic part with epoxy. Copper screens are inserted in the metallic part to form the cold-end heat exchanger, then the assembled pulse tube is inserted in the cold tip.

  13. Enhanced degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in a soil column planted with Indian mallow (Abutilon avicennae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoon-Young; Kwon, Young-Seok; Kim, Sun-Young; Lee, In-Sook; Bae, Bumhan

    2004-01-01

    Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was studied by growing Indian mallow (Abutilon avicennae) in a soil column reactor with 2 kg of TNT contaminated soil (120 mgTNT/kg) in the top and 18 kg of uncontaminated soil in the bottom. After 50 d, TNT remaining in the column with Indian mallow was 23.2% of the initial TNT, while 48.1% of the initial TNT remained in the column without Indian mallow. In the TNT contaminated column, the growth of Indian mallow decreased by 32.4% in roots and 34.3% in shoots on a dry weight basis, respectively, compared to the uncontaminated column. However, critical symptoms such as chlorosis and leaf loss were not observed. Of the 76.8% of the TNT that disappeared in the planted column, less than 0.2% of initial TNT was recovered in the shoot and root extracts of Indian mallow. TNT transformation products in plants include unidentified polar intermediates and aminodinitrotoluenes. The results showed that planting Indian mallow in TNT contaminated soil enhanced TNT reduction both by stimulating microbial activity that enhances microbial TNT transformation, and by direct uptake and phytotransformation of TNT. PMID:16233599

  14. Preparation of 20-µm-i.d. Silica-based Monolithic Columns and Application for Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Quanzhou; Shen, Yufeng; Hixson, Kim K.; Zhao, Rui; Yang, Feng; Moore, Ronald J.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    We report on the preparation and performance of a high efficiency 70 cm ´ 20 µm i.d. silica-based monolithic capillary column. With a mobile phase delivery pressure of 5000 psi, this monolithic column provides flow rates as low as ~40 nL/min at an LC linear velocity of ~0.24 cm/s. The resultant columns provided a separation peak capacity of ~420 under conditions of on-line coupling micro solid phase extraction (SPE) and nanoelectrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for a Shewanella oneidensis tryptic digest. A sensitivity of ~15 attomole for detection of peptides was obtained when a conventional ion trap MS/MS was used for the detection. The sensitivity and separation efficiency of this column enabled identification of 2367 different peptides from 855 S. oneidensis distinct proteins from a 2.5 µg tryptic digest sample in a single 10-h analysis by nanoLC/MS/MS. The run-to-run and column-to-column reproducibility was investigated for proteomic analyses.

  15. Open tubular lab-on-column/mass spectrometry for targeted proteomics of nanogram sample amounts.

    PubMed

    Hustoft, Hanne Kolsrud; Vehus, Tore; Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Krauss, Stefan; Greibrokk, Tyge; Wilson, Steven Ray; Lundanes, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    A novel open tubular nanoproteomic platform featuring accelerated on-line protein digestion and high-resolution nano liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been developed. The platform features very narrow open tubular columns, and is hence particularly suited for limited sample amounts. For enzymatic digestion of proteins, samples are passed through a 20 µm inner diameter (ID) trypsin + endoproteinase Lys-C immobilized open tubular enzyme reactor (OTER). Resulting peptides are subsequently trapped on a monolithic pre-column and transferred on-line to a 10 µm ID porous layer open tubular (PLOT) liquid chromatography LC separation column. Wnt/ß-catenein signaling pathway (Wnt-pathway) proteins of potentially diagnostic value were digested+detected in targeted-MS/MS mode in small cell samples and tumor tissues within 120 minutes. For example, a potential biomarker Axin1 was identifiable in just 10 ng of sample (protein extract of ?1,000 HCT15 colon cancer cells). In comprehensive mode, the current OTER-PLOT set-up could be used to identify approximately 1500 proteins in HCT15 cells using a relatively short digestion+detection cycle (240 minutes), outperforming previously reported on-line digestion/separation systems. The platform is fully automated utilizing common commercial instrumentation and parts, while the reactor and columns are simple to produce and have low carry-over. These initial results point to automated solutions for fast and very sensitive MS based proteomics, especially for samples of limited size. PMID:25222838

  16. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

  17. Lability of trace metals in submerged soils: a column study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimirciag, Ramona; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2013-04-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) and Mn (IV) and the decomposition of organic matter exert a great influence on the biogeochemical cycles of many trace metals and nutrients in the environment. In the particular case of intermittently submerged soils, metals associated with Fe and Mn oxides become readily available due to the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides. The effects of oxido-reductive conditions on the release of Cu and Zn from heavy metal contaminated soils and the changes in their chemical speciation were studied. Column experiments were performed, using Rhizon soil moisture samplers inserted at different heights to monitor the mobility and transport of metals in the submerged soil samples. Cu was released in solution immediately, in the first red-ox cycle, either due to the solubilization of Fe and Mn oxides, or to the oxidation of organic matter with which Cu is commonly complexed, or both. During the following reductive half-cycles, the amount of Cu extracted from the soil solution decreased. However, the concentration of Cu in the solution leached from the column, which was percolated in aerobic conditions, increased. Since in the successive red-ox cycles the Eh decreases faster and to lower values, it is possible that Cu might have been removed from pore water by sulfide precipitation during the anaerobic half-cycle and released during the aerobic half-cycle, due to the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates. The release of Zn was similar to the dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxydes, and the amount extracted by Rhizon and by leaching increased during the four red-ox cycles. The chemical fractionation of the soils was also studied and the results showed that the alternate oxidative-reductive conditions cause, in general, an increase in the lability of trace metals. While Zn speciation suffers little change, Cu showed a much higher exchangeable fraction in the submerged soils, as compared to the initial, not submerged ones. The results of this study indicate that intermittent submergence of contaminated soils not only causes the release of trace metals previously bound to Fe and Mn oxides and to organic matter, but also leads to an increase in their lability, rending them more readily available to be released into the environment.

  18. Effectiveness of multiple pulses on flow index of electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Bashir I.; Shams, Maitham; Mussivand, Tofy

    2012-04-01

    Electroporation is the formation of reversible pores in cell membranes without rupturing the membrane using a high electric field. Electroporation is an important technique for various biomedical applications including drug delivery, gene transfection and therapeutic treatments. A microfluidic device was developed to investigate electroporation using single and multiple pulses. The device contained integrated electrodes inside microchannels. Stained cells were introduced inside the microchannels and excitation pulses were applied. Sequences of images were captured using an integrated-camera on an optical microscope in the bright-field mode. Stained pixel data from the sequences of images were extracted through image processing to detect and quantify electroporation. Flow Index of EP (FIEP) was computed from the normalized (wrt initial) stained pixel data. Multiple pulses increased FIEP when increased energy was delivered, but reduced FIEP when the same amount of energy was delivered. Mean FIEP using 20 V excitation for 1 pulse of 1 ms was 0.256, 10 pulses of 1 ms was 0.329 and 1 pulse of 10 ms was 0.422. These experimental results show that a single pulse is more effective to induce higher FIEP compared to multiple pulses. FIEP enables quantitative and systematic study towards optimization of pulse parameters for electroporation-based applications.

  19. Localized wave pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D L; Henderson, T L; Krueger, K L; Lewis, D K; Zilkowski, R N

    1999-06-01

    The Localized Wave project of the Strategic System Support Program has recently finished an experiment in cooperation with the Advanced SONAR group of the Applied Research Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin. The purpose of the experiment was three-fold. They wanted to see if (1) the LW pulse could propagate over significant distances, to see if (2) a new type of array and drive system specifically designed for the pulse would increase efficiency over single frequency tone bursts, and to see if (3) the complexity of our 24 channel drivers resulted in better efficiency than a single equivalent pulse driving a piston. In the experiment, several LW pulses were launched from the Lake Travis facility and propagated over distances of either 100 feet or 600 feet, through a thermocline for the 600 foot measurements. The results show conclusively that the Localized Wave will propagate past the near field distance. The LW pulses resulted in extremely broad frequency band width pulses with narrow spatial beam patterns and unmeasurable side lobes. Their array gain was better than most tone bursts and further, were better than their equivalent piston pulses. This marks the first test of several Low Diffraction beams against their equivalent piston pulses, as well as the first propagation of LW pulses over appreciable distances. The LW pulse is now proven a useful tool in open water, rather than a laboratory curiosity. The experimental system and array were built by ARL, and the experiments were conducted by ARL staff on their standard test range. The 600 feet measurements were made at the farthest extent of that range.

  20. Gradient ascent pulse engineering for rapid exchange saturation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancan, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Glaser, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    Efforts in the clinical translation of the paraCEST contrast agent Yb-HPDO3A have prompted an investigation into saturation pulse optimality under energy constraints. The GRAPE algorithm has been adapted and implemented for saturation pulse optimization with chemical exchange. The flexibility of the methodology, both in extracting the microscopical parameter ensemble for the algorithm as well as in determining the characteristics of this new class of rising amplitude waveforms allows rapid testing and implementation. Optimal pulses achieve higher saturation efficiencies than the continuous wave gold standard for rapid and especially for variable exchange rates, as brought about by pH-catalysis. Gains of at least 5-15% without any tradeoff have been confirmed both on a spectrometer and on a clinical imager. Pool specific solutions, with pulses optimized for a specific exchange rate value, additionally increase the flexibility of the CEST ratiometric analysis. A simple experimental approach to determine close to optimal triangular pulses is presented.

  1. Direct enantiomeric separation of cis-(+/-)diltiazem in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with ovomucoid column.

    PubMed

    Rosell, G; Camacho, A; Parra, P

    1993-09-01

    A method is proposed for the direct enantiomeric separation of cis-(+/-)diltiazem in plasma. The method is based on a commercial Ultron ES-OVM column with a mobile phase of different mixtures of ethanol-phosphate buffer. The degree of extraction of the enantiomers was more than 86%. The detection limit of the method used was 5 ng of racemic mixture on column (coefficient of variation = 13%), corresponding to 3.2 ng for cis-(+/-)diltiazem and 1.8 ng for cis-(+/-)diltiazem. PMID:8245167

  2. High-power pulse trains excited by modulated continuous waves

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yan; Li, Lu; Malomed, Boris A

    2015-01-01

    Pulse trains growing from modulated continuous waves (CWs) are considered, using solutions of the Hirota equation for solitons on a finite background. The results demonstrate that pulses extracted from the maximally compressed trains can propagate preserving their shape and forming robust arrays. The dynamics of double high-power pulse trains produced by modulated CWs in a model of optical fibers, including the Raman effect and other higher-order terms, is considered in detail too. It is demonstrated that the double trains propagate in a robust form, with frequencies shifted by the Raman effect.

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Mulberry Fruit Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Arfan, Muhammad; Khan, Rasool; Rybarczyk, Anna; Amarowicz, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from the fruits of Morus nigra and Morus alba using methanol and acetone. The sugar-free extracts (SFEs) were prepared using Amberlite XAD-16 column chromatography. All of the SFEs exhibited antioxidant potential as determined by ABTS (0.75–1.25 mmol Trolox/g), DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) (EC50 from 48 ?g/mL to 79 ?g/mL), and reducing power assays. However, a stronger activity was noted for the SFEs obtained from Morus nigra fruits. These extracts also possessed the highest contents of total phenolics: 164 mg/g (methanolic SFE) and 173 mg/g (acetonic SFE). The presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids in the extracts was confirmed using HPLC method and chlorogenic acid and rutin were found as the dominant phenolic constituents in the SFEs. PMID:22408465

  4. Leaching of Salmonella Senftenberg and Cryptosporidium Parvum in Intact Clay Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, T. B.; Forslund, A.; Dalsgaard, A.; Jacobsen, O.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2008-12-01

    Manure application on land has been associated with both environmental and public health problems, even when management is within the current guidelines. Outbreaks of infection have been associated with water or food, including processed fruits and vegetables, contaminated with animal manure. A wide range of pathogenic microorganisms can be found in animal waste, including bacteria, protozoan, and viruses. When animal waste is disposed on agricultural land different factors will influence the risk for contaminating the groundwater. 1) Animal waste application method, rate, volume and frequency will have an effect on contamination. 2) Survival of the pathogens in the soil will e.g. depend on soil water content, temperature and pH. Salmonella species can survive up to 332 days and Cryptosporidium species can remain viable for several years in the soil environment. In the present study we compared the transport between the pathogenic bacteria S. senftenberg and the pathogenic protozoan C. parvum in intact clay columns. Furthermore, we compared the effect from surface and sub-surface manure application on the transport potential. 15 intact clay columns were placed in an outdoor multi-column lysimeter for 36 days. Manure inoculated with S. senftenberg, C. parvum and chloride was added to the soil surface or injected 8 cm into the columns. Drainage water was collected from the soil columns and DNA was extracted to quantify S. senftenberg and C. parvum by quantitative PCR. In addition S. senftenberg was enumerated by plate counting. Acid yellow was applied to selected columns to visualize the pathway down through the soil column. The highest concentration of S. senftenberg was in the first drainage sample ranging from 100-10000 CFU/ml. Breakthrough curves for chloride and S. senftenberg indicates the importance of preferential flow as well as a faster transport for the bacteria compared to chloride. C. parvum is retained to a higher degree in the soil but is still found in concentrations up to 800 oocysts/ml. Differences between C. parvum and S. senftenberg can be explained by size differences. When comparing the two application methods there was a tendency that more S. senftenberg was leached when manure was injected. Due to large variation in the columns this difference is not significant. For C. parvum approximately 10 fold more was leached when manure was injected.

  5. Sensitive quantitation of Ochratoxin A in cocoa beans using differential pulse voltammetry based aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rupesh K; Hayat, Akhtar; Catanante, Gaëlle; Istamboulie, Georges; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose for the first time a sensitive Ochratoxin A (OTA) detection in cocoa beans using competitive aptasensor by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In the proposed method, biotin labeled and free OTA competed to bind with immobilized aptamer onto the surface of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), and percentage binding was calculated. The detection was performed after adding avidin-ALP to perform avidin-biotin reaction; the signal was generated through a suitable substrate 1-naphthyl phosphate (1-NP), for alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The cocoa samples were extracted and purified using molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) columns specifically designed for OTA. The developed aptasensor showed a good linearity in the range 0.15-5 ng/mL with the limit of detection (LOD) 0.07 ng/mL and 3.7% relative standard deviation (RSD). The aptasensor displayed good recovery values in the range 82.1-85% with 3.87% RSD, thus, demonstrated the efficiency of proposed aptasensor for such matrices. PMID:26304413

  6. The pattern of ocular dominance columns in cat primary visual cortex: intra-and interindividual variability of column

    E-print Network

    The pattern of ocular dominance columns in cat primary visual cortex: intra- and interindividual variability of column spacing and its dependence on genetic background Matthias Kaschube,1,2 Fred Wolf,1, genetic determination, ocular dominance columns, visual cortex Abstract We present a comprehensive

  7. Extraction and identification of flavonoids from parsley extracts by HPLC analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, M.; Soran, M. L.; Varodi, C.; Lung, I.

    2012-02-01

    Flavonoids are phenolic compounds isolated from a wide variety of plants, and are valuable for their multiple properties, including antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. In the present work, parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) extracts were obtained by three different extraction techniques: maceration, ultrasonic-assisted and microwave-assisted solvent extractions. The extractions were performed with ethanol-water mixtures in various ratios. From these extracts, flavonoids like the flavones apigenin and luteolin, and the flavonols quercetin and kaempferol were identified using an HPLC Shimadzu apparatus equipped with PDA and MS detectors. The separation method involved a gradient step. The mobile phase consisted of two solvents: acetonitrile and distilled water with 0.1% formic acid. The separation was performed on a RP-C18 column.

  8. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  9. Contrasting Extraction Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postal, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper grounds a novel typology yielding three major types of English (L(eft)-extraction, defined by their relationship to resumptive pronouns (RPs): (1) B-extractions, which require RPs in their extraction sites, (2) A1-extractions, which allow RPs in their extraction sites, and (3) A2-extractions, which forbid RPs in their extraction sites.…

  10. Ionic liquids monolithic columns for protein separation in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Cui; Deng, Qi-Liang; Fang, Guo-Zhen; Liu, Hui-Lin; Wu, Jian-Hua; Pan, Ming-Fei; Wang, Shuo

    2013-12-01

    A series of ionic liquids (ILs) monolithic capillary columns based on 1-vinyl-3-octylimidazolium (ViOcIm(+)) were prepared by two approaches ("one-pot" approach and "anion-exchange" approach). The effects of different anions (bromide, Br(-); tetrafluoroborate, BF4(-); hexafluorophosphate, PF6(-); and bis-trifluoromethanesulfonylimide, NTf2(-)) on chromatography performance of all the resulting columns were investigated systematically under capillary electrochromatography (CEC) mode. The results indicated that all these columns could generate a stable reversed electroosmotic flow (EOF) over a wide pH range from 2.0 to 12.0. For the columns prepared by "one-pot" approach, the EOF decreased in the order of ViOcIm(+)Br(-)>ViOcIm(+)BF4(-)>ViOcIm(+)PF6(-)>ViOcIm(+)NTf2(-) under the same CEC conditions; the ViOcIm(+)Br(-) based column exhibited highest column efficiencies for the test small molecules; the ViOcIm(+)NTf2(-) based column possessed the strongest retention for aromatic hydrocarbons; and baseline separation of four standard proteins was achieved on ViOcIm(+)NTf2(-) based column corresponding to the highest column efficiency of 479,000 N m(-1) for cytochrome c (Cyt c). These results indicated that the property of ILs based columns could be tuned successfully by changing anions, which gave these columns potential to separate both small molecules and macro biomolecules. PMID:24267098

  11. Differential extraction of axonally transported proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, J.S. )

    1990-10-01

    Axonally transported proteoglycans were differentially solubilized by a sequence of extractions designed to infer their relationship to nerve terminal membranes. Groups of goldfish were injected unilaterally with 35SO4 and contralateral optic tecta containing axonally transported molecules were removed 16 h later. Tecta were homogenized in isotonic buffer and centrifuged at 100,000 g for 60 min to create a total supernatant fraction. Subsequent homogenizations followed by recentrifugation were with hypotonic buffer (lysis extract), 1 M NaCl, Triton X-100 or alternatively Triton-1 M NaCl. Populations of proteoglycans in each extract were isolated on DEAE ion exchange columns and evaluated for content of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Results show the distribution of transported proteoglycans to be 26.3% total soluble, 13.7% lysis extract, 13.8% NaCl extract, 12.2% Triton extract, and 46.2% Triton-NaCl extract. Proteoglycans from all fractions contained heparan sulfate as the predominant GAG, with lesser amounts of chondroitin (4 or 6) sulfate. The possible localizations of transported proteoglycans suggested by the extraction results are discussed.

  12. Heat Exchanger Technologies for Distillation Columns 

    E-print Network

    Polley, G. T.

    2002-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-02-04-11.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 22278 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-02-04-11.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Heat Exchanger... Technologies for Distillation Columns G.T.Polley Pinchtechnology.com In this paper we look at the challenges that improvements in energy efficiency of distillation systems presents the heat exchanger designer. We examine each type of exchanger in turn...

  13. Growing Cobalt Silicide Columns In Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Obert W.

    1991-01-01

    Codeposition by molecular-beam epitaxy yields variety of structures. Proposed fabrication process produces three-dimensional nanometer-sized structures on silicon wafers. Enables control of dimensions of metal and semiconductor epitaxial layers in three dimensions instead of usual single dimension (perpendicular to the plane of the substrate). Process used to make arrays of highly efficient infrared sensors, high-speed transistors, and quantum wires. For fabrication of electronic devices, both shapes and locations of columns controlled. One possible technique for doing this electron-beam lithography, see "Making Submicron CoSi2 Structures on Silicon Substrates" (NPO-17736).

  14. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  15. Application of wave-shape functions and Synchrosqueezing transform to pulse signal analysis

    E-print Network

    Wu, Hau-tieng; Wu, Han-Kuei; Wang, Chun-Li; Yang, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Wen-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST) to model and study the pulse wave signal. Based on the wave shape function model and SST, we extract features, called the spectral pulse signature, based on the functional regression technique, to characterize the hemodynamics from the pulse wave signals. To demonstrate how the algorithm and the extracted features work, we study the radial pulse wave signal recorded by the sphygmomanometer from normal subjects and patients with congestive heart failure. The analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features. In addition, it shows that different positions of the radial artery contain significant different information, which is compatible with the empirical conclusion of the pulse diagnosis in the traditional Chinese medicine.

  16. Direct probing of chromatography columns by laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffin, V.L.

    1992-12-07

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of this research project from September 1, 1989 to February 28, 1993. During this period, we have accomplished all of the primary scientific objectives of the research proposal: (1) constructed and evaluated a laser-induced fluorescence detection system that allows direct examination of the chromatographic column, (2) examined nonequilibrium processes that occur upon solute injection and elution, (3) examined solute retention in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, (4) examined solute zone dispersion in liquid chromatography as a function of temperature and pressure, and (5) developed appropriate theoretical models to describe these phenomena. In each of these studies, substantial knowledge has been gained of the fundamental processes that are responsible for chromatographic separations. In addition to these primary research objectives, we have made significant progress in three related areas: (1) examined pyrene as a fluorescent polarity probe insupercritical fluids and liquids as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) developed methods for the class-selective identification of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived fluids by microcolumn liquid chromatography with fluorescence quenching detection, and (3) developed methods for the determination of saturated and unsaturated (including omega-3) fatty acids in fish oil extracts by microcolumn liquid chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence detection. In these studies, the advanced separation and detection techniques developed in our laboratory are applied to practical problems of environmental and biomedical significance.

  17. Stringlike Pulse Quantification Study by Pulse Wave in 3D Pulse Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yu-Feng; Yeh, Cheng-Chang; Si, Xiao-Chen; Chang, Chien-Chen; Hu, Chung-Shing; Chu, Yu-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A stringlike pulse is highly related to hypertension, and many classification approaches have been proposed in which the differentiation pulse wave (dPW) can effectively classify the stringlike pulse indicating hypertension. Unfortunately, the dPW method cannot distinguish the spring stringlike pulse from the stringlike pulse so labeled by physicians in clinics. Design By using a Bi-Sensing Pulse Diagnosis Instrument (BSPDI), this study proposed a novel Plain Pulse Wave (PPW) to classify a stringlike pulse based on an array of pulse signals, mimicking a Traditional Chinese Medicine physician's finger-reading skill. Results In comparison to PPWs at different pulse taking positions, phase delay ??and correlation coefficient r can be elucidated as the quantification parameters of stringlike pulse. As a result, the recognition rates of a hypertensive stringlike pulse, spring stringlike pulse, and non–stringlike pulse are 100%, 100%, 77% for PPW and 70%, 0%, 59% for dPW, respectively. Conclusions Integrating dPW and PPW can unify the classification of stringlike pulse including hypertensive stringlike pulse and spring stringlike pulse. Hence, the proposed novel method, PPW, enhances quantification of stringlike pulse. PMID:23057481

  18. Extractant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Jarvihen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes an organic extracting solution useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. It comprises: primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoly-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  19. Pulse measurement apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Marciante, John R. (Webster, NY); Donaldson, William R. (Pittsford, NY); Roides, Richard G. (Scottsville, NY)

    2011-10-25

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a pulse measuring system that measures a characteristic of an input pulse under test, particularly the pulse shape of a single-shot, nano-second duration, high shape-contrast optical or electrical pulse. An exemplary system includes a multi-stage, passive pulse replicator, wherein each successive stage introduces a fixed time delay to the input pulse under test, a repetitively-gated electronic sampling apparatus that acquires the pulse train including an entire waveform of each replica pulse, a processor that temporally aligns the replicated pulses, and an averager that temporally averages the replicated pulses to generate the pulse shape of the pulse under test. An embodiment of the invention is directed to a method for measuring an optical or an electrical pulse shape. The method includes the steps of passively replicating the pulse under test with a known time delay, temporally stacking the pulses, and temporally averaging the stacked pulses. An embodiment of the invention is directed to a method for increasing the dynamic range of a pulse measurement by a repetitively-gated electronic sampling device having a rated dynamic range capability, beyond the rated dynamic range of the sampling device; e.g., enhancing the dynamic range of an oscilloscope. The embodied technique can improve the SNR from about 300:1 to 1000:1. A dynamic range enhancement of four to seven bits may be achieved.

  20. Comparison between a spray column and a sieve tray column operating as liquid-liquid heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, A.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.

    1980-12-01

    The performance of a spray column and a sieve tray column was compared as a liquid-liquid heat exchanger. In carrying out these studies a 15.2 cm (6.0 in.) diameter column, 183 cm (6.0 ft) tall was utilized. The performance of the spray column as a heat exchanger was shown to correlate with the model of Letan-Kehat which has as a basis that the heat transfer is dominated by the wakeshedding characteristics of the drops over much of the column length. This model defines several hydrodynamic zones along the column of which the wake formation zone at the bottom appears to have the most efficient heat transfer. The column was also operated with four perforated plates spaced two column diameters apart in order to take advantage of the wake formation zone heat transfer. The plates induce coalescence of the dispersed phase and reformation of the drops, and thus cause a repetition of the wake formation zone. It is shown that the overall volumetric heat transfer coefficient in a perforated plate column is increased by a minimum of eleven percent over that in a spray column. A hydrodynamic model that predicts the performance of a perforated plate column is suggested.

  1. Surfactant-bound monolithic columns for CEC.

    PubMed

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2009-11-01

    A novel anionic surfactant bound monolithic stationary phase based on 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid is designed for CEC. The monolith possessing bonded undecanoyl groups (hydrophobic sites) and carboxyl groups (weak cationic ion-exchange sites) were evaluated as a mixed-mode stationary phase in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar solutes. Using a multivariate D-optimal design the composition of the polymerization mixture was modeled and optimized with five alkylbenzenes and seven alkyl phenyl ketones as test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of electrochromatographic parameters on the concentration of 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid monomer and porogen (water) in the polymerization mixture. A difference of 6, 8 and 13% RSD between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of efficiency, resolution and retention time, respectively, indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. The physical (i.e. morphology, porosity and permeability) and chromatographic properties of the monolithic columns were thoroughly investigated. With the optimized monolithic column, high efficiency separation of N-methylcarbamates pesticides and positional isomers was successfully achieved. It appears that this type of mixed-mode monolith (containing both chargeable and hydrophobic sites) may have a great potential as a new generation of CEC stationary phase. PMID:19885887

  2. Parametric laser pulse shortening.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Chung; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-08-15

    We report simultaneous laser pulse shortening and wavelength conversion based on spectral-temporal correlation in high-gain optical parametric generation (OPG). By spectrally filtering the off-peak signal energy, we shortened a 560 ps pump pulse at 1064 nm to an 80 ps signal pulse at 1.5 ?m from a 45 mm long PPLN optical parametric generator with 60 ?J pump energy from a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Using the same technique, we further demonstrated a 3.6 time shortened laser pulse at 1072 nm from noncollinearly phase matched OPG in a 44 mm long lithium niobate crystal with 3 mJ amplified pump energy from the same Nd:YAG laser. PMID:25121876

  3. Digital pulse processing

    E-print Network

    McCormick, Martin (Martin Steven)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis develops an exact approach for processing pulse signals from an integrate-and-fire system directly in the time-domain. Processing is deterministic and built from simple asynchronous finite-state machines that ...

  4. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  5. Effect of nitrification on movement of trace metals in soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.; Broadbent, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Soil column experiments were conducted with sludge-treated and untreated samples of two soils, Omni silty clay and Delhi loamy sand, to determine whether protons generated during the nitrification process would affect the mobility of the trace metals Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn. Columns 5 cm x 100 cm were leached bi- or tri-weekly with 7.5-cm applications of solutions of CaCl/sub 2/, NH/sub 4/Cl, or KCl. Trace metals in effluents from the columns were analyzed after each application of leaching solution. After 11 appications over a period of several months-the columns were sectioned and the vertical distribution of 2N NCl-extractable metals determined. Average concentrations of metals in column effluents were well below 1 ppM in all cases except Zn eluted from untreated Delhi loamy sand where 20 mM NH/sub 4/Cl or KCl leaching solutions produced effluent concentrations slightly above 1 ppM. There was evidence of nitrification affecting movement of several of the metals, particularly in the cases of Mn, Zn, Cu, and Cd in the untreated Delhi soil. The presence of sludge had a pronounced stabilizing influence of Cd and Zn, and to a lesser degree on other metals, probably as a result of organo-metal complexes. Much of the input labeled NH/sub 4/-N was denitrified, as shown by recoveries of N ranging from 14 to 20% in the Omni soil and 40 to 78% in the Delhi soil. Proton generation during denitrification. It was concluded that nitrification had relatively little effect on metal mobility under the conditions of the experiment.

  6. Sweet and Sour: Attenuating Sulfidogenesis in an Advective Flow Column System with Perchlorate or Nitrate Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrektson, A. L.; Hubbard, C. G.; Piceno, Y.; Boussina, A.; Jin, Y.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Tom, L.; Hu, P.; Conrad, M. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) biogenesis in oil reservoirs is a primary cause of souring and of associated costs in reservoir and pipeline maintenance. In addition to the corrosive effects of the H2S itself, abiotic and biological oxidation also generates sulfuric acid, further degrading metallic surfaces. Amending these environments with perchlorate (ClO4-) resolves these problems by inhibition of biological sulfate reduction and re-oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur by dissimilatory (per)chlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB). Triplicate flow through columns packed with San Francisco bay sediment were flushed with bay water ([SO4=] = 25-30 mM) containing yeast extract with 50 mM inhibitor concentrations (NO3-or ClO4-) decreasing to 25 mM and finally 12.5 mM. Influent and effluent geochemistry was monitored and DNA was prepared from the sediment bed for microbial community analysis. Souring was reversed by both treatments (at 50 mM) compared to the control columns that had no ion addition. Nitrate began to re-sour when treatment concentration was decreased to 25 mM but treatment had to be decreased to 12.5 mM before the perchlorate treated columns began to re-sour. However, the treated columns re-soured to a lesser extent than the control columns. Phylochip microbial community analyses indicated microbial community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Isotopic analysis of sulfate showed trends that broadly agreed with the geochemistry but also suggested further sulfur cycling was occurring. This study indicates that perchlorate shows great promise as an inhibitor of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms are involved in this process.

  7. Microbial removal of wastewater organic compounds as a function of input concentration in soil columns.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, S R; Tomson, M B; Wilson, J T; Ward, C H

    1984-11-01

    The fate of six organic compounds during rapid infiltration of primary wastewater through soil columns was studied. Feed solutions were prepared which contained all six compounds in individual concentrations ranging from 1 to 1,000 micrograms/liter and were applied to separate soil columns on a flooding-drying schedule. Feed solutions and column effluents were analyzed for the compounds by XAD resin (Rohm and Haas Co.) extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry during each of three successive inundation cycles. Breakthrough profiles of o-phenylphenol were relatively consistent during the test, with fractional breakthrough (mass output/mass input) being independent of input concentration. Consistent profiles were also observed for 2-(methylthio)benzothiazole, although fractional breakthroughs were higher at lower input concentrations, indicating that removal processes were operating less efficiently at these levels. The behavior of p-dichlorobenzene was similar to that of 2-(methylthio)benzothiazole after the first inundation cycle, with the exception that increased fractional breakthroughs were observed at the highest input concentration as well. Microbial adaptation was evident for benzophenone, 2-methylnaphthalene, and p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol, as indicated by increased removal efficiencies during successive inundation cycles, especially at the higher input concentrations. Column effluent concentrations of the latter two compounds were independent of input concentrations during the final stage of the test. Microbial activity and adaptation were confirmed for several of the compounds by using isotopes and measuring the extent of mineralization in batch tests with soil from one of the columns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6508302

  8. A versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarr, C. E.; Nickerson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A digital pulse programmer producing the standard pulse sequences required for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is described. In addition, a 'saturation burst' sequence, useful in the measurement of long relaxation times in solids, is provided. Both positive and negative 4 V trigger pulses are produced that are fully synchronous with a crystal-controlled time base, and the pulse programmer may be phase-locked with a maximum pulse jitter of 3 ns to the oscillator of a coherent pulse spectrometer. Medium speed TTL integrated circuits are used throughout.

  9. Pulse magnetic welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder is described for automated closure of fuel pins by a pulsed magnetic process in which the open end of a length of cladding is positioned within a complementary tube surrounded by a pulsed magnetic welder. Seals are provided at each end of the tube, which can be evacuated or can receive tag gas for direct introduction to the cladding interior. Loading of magnetic rings and end caps is accomplished automatically in conjunction with the welding steps carried out within the tube.

  10. Fetal pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Luttkus, A K; Dudenhausen, J W

    1998-12-01

    Within the last ten years several groups adapted pulse oximetry to be used in the fetus. The obvious advantage of this technology is the fact that a biochemical parameter--the arterial oxygen saturation--can be measured continuously during delivery. Nevertheless, the continuous information about the fetal oxygenation during delivery has a couple of obstacles to surmount. It is well known that fetal reflectance pulse oximetry may be influenced by a number of artifacts. In addition, severe physiological considerations should remind us of the limited diagnostic value of saturation monitoring alone in order to predict fetal acidosis. Some recent articles deal with the predictive value of fetal pulse oximetry for fetal compromise. While it appears that the fetal wellbeing is more likely to be in accordance with a normal saturation measured by current pulse oximetry systems, the number of fetuses detected by pulse oximetry suffering from hypoxia seems to be low. Different authors describe a poor sensitivity to predict fetal compromise. One reason therefore may be the reduced precision of the oxysensor in the low saturation range. Therefore, we conclude that the current generation of fetal pulse oximetry sensors is not improving the quality of combined fetal monitoring of fetal heart rate and fetal scalp blood analysis. PMID:9866017

  11. Single attosecond pulse generation from multicycle nonlinear chirped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Niu Yueping; Qi Yihong; Gong Shangqing; Xiang Yang

    2009-12-15

    We present a method of producing single attosecond pulses by high-order harmonic generation with multicycle nonlinear chirped driver laser pulses. The symmetry of the laser field in several optical cycles near the pulse center is broken, and then the photons near the cutoff burst only in half optical cycle. By selecting out the harmonics near the cutoff, an isolated attosecond pulse could be obtained. The results are almost independent of the length and chirp form of the driver laser pulse.

  12. INFLUENCE OF SEDIMENT EXTRACT FRACTIONATION METHODS ON BIOASSAY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four bioassays [Microtax(tm), Mutatox(tm), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and metabolic cooperation] were used to analyze marine sediment extracts fractionated by two different methods: silica gel column chromatography and acid-base fractionation. esults indicated that a sedime...

  13. Processing of X-ray Microcalorimeter Data with Pulse Shape Variation using Principal Component Analysis

    E-print Network

    Yan, Daikang; Gades, Lisa; Jacobsen, Chris; Madden, Timothy; Miceli, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    We present a method using principal component analysis (PCA) to process x-ray pulses with severe shape variation where traditional optimal filter methods fail. We demonstrate that PCA is able to noise-filter and extract energy information from x-ray pulses despite their different shapes. We apply this method to a dataset from an x-ray thermal kinetic inductance detector which has severe pulse shape variation arising from position-dependent absorption.

  14. Column properties and flow profiles of a flat, wide column for high-pressure liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2008-01-01

    The design and the construction of a pressurized, flat, wide column for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are described. This apparatus, which is derived from instruments that implement over-pressured thin layer chromatography, can carry out only uni-dimensional chromatographic separations. However, it is intended to be the first step in the development of more powerful instruments that will be able to carry out two-dimensional chromatographic separations, in which case, the first separation would be a space-based separation, LC{sup x}, taking place along one side of the bed and the second separation would be a time-based separation, LC{sup t}, as in classical HPLC but proceeding along the flat column, not along a tube. The apparatus described consists of a pressurization chamber made of a Plexiglas block and a column chamber made of stainless steel. These two chambers are separated by a thin Mylar membrane. The column chamber is a cavity which is filled with a thick layer (ca. 1 mm) of the stationary phase. Suitable solvent inlet and outlet ports are located on two opposite sides of the sorbent layer. The design allows the preparation of a homogenous sorbent layer suitable to be used as a chromatographic column, the achievement of effective seals of the stationary phase layer against the chamber edges, and the homogenous flow of the mobile phase along the chamber. The entire width of the sorbent layer area can be used to develop separations or elute samples. The reproducible performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by the chromatographic separations of different dyes. This instrument is essentially designed for testing detector arrays to be used in a two-dimensional LC{sup x} x LC{sup t} instrument. The further development of two-dimension separation chromatographs based on the apparatus described is sketched.

  15. Determination of the Antibiotic Oxytetracycline in Commercial Milk by Solid-Phase Extraction: A High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Experiment for Quantitative Instrumental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mei-Ratliff, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Trace levels of oxytetracylcine spiked into commercial milk samples are extracted, cleaned up, and preconcentrated using a C[subscript 18] solid-phase extraction column. The extract is then analyzed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) instrument equipped with a UV detector and a C[subscript 18] column (150 mm x 4.6 mm x 3.5 [mu]m).…

  16. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  17. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  18. Optimization of the sonication extraction method of Hibiscus tiliaceus L. flowers.

    PubMed

    Melecchi, Maria Inês Soares; Péres, Valéria Flores; Dariva, Cláudio; Zini, Claudia Alcaraz; Abad, Fernanda Contieri; Martinez, Migdália Miranda; Caramão, Elina Bastos

    2006-04-01

    The influence of several experimental parameters on the ultrasonic extraction of Hibiscus tiliaceus L. flowers were investigated: extraction time, solvent polarity, sample amount, solvent volume and sample particle size. It was concluded that the most influential variables were extraction time and solvent polarity. The optimized procedure employed 5 g of ground flowers, 150 mL of methanol and 140 min of extraction. The extracts were fractionated using preparative silica columns and the resulting fractions were analyzed by GC/MS. Some saturated hydrocarbons, fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, phytosterols, and vitamin E were identified in the plant extracts. PMID:15993639

  19. Prototype module of a long pulse ion induction Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, S.; Kubota, Y.; Miyahara, A.; Yamamoto, K.

    1983-10-01

    A module of an induction Linac is developed, being aimed at application to ion acceleration. A proton beam of 30 mA is extracted from a reflex discharge ion source and accelerated up to 20 keV, directly by the applied inductive field in a 0.5--1.0 ..mu..s pulse.

  20. Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01

    A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

  1. Serial versus parallel columns using isocratic elution: a comparison of multi-column approaches in mono-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Segura, T; Ortiz-Bolsico, C; Torres-Lapasió, J R; García-Álvarez-Coque, M C

    2015-04-17

    When a new separation problem is faced with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the analysis is addressed conventionally with a single column, trying to find out a single experimental condition aimed to resolve all compounds. However, in practice, the system selectivity may be insufficient to achieve full resolution. When a separation fails, the usual practice consists of introducing drastic changes in the chromatographic system (e.g. use of another column, solvent or pH). An alternative solution is taking benefit of the combined separation capability of two or more columns, which can be attained in multiple ways, such as diverse modalities of two-dimensional HPLC, or mono-dimensional HPLC with serial or parallel columns. In this work, the separation performance offered by the serial coupling of columns of different nature and length, operated at varying mobile phase composition in isocratic elution, is compared with the results offered by parallel columns. The resolution capability of both approaches is characterised through the limiting peak purities. It is demonstrated that serial columns of different lengths perform as new columns that increase enormously the probabilities of success. The potential of the approach is illustrated through the separation of 15 sulphonamides. In spite of the poor individual performance of the four selected columns (phenyl, cyano and two C18 columns, with nearly null resolution for the cyano column), it was found that the serial coupling of the phenyl and cyano columns of appropriate lengths succeeded in the full resolution of the 15 compounds in 20-25min, and the serial coupling of the two C18 columns yielded acceptable resolution in less than 20min. PMID:25747668

  2. Microbial Transformation of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Aerobic Soil Columns

    PubMed Central

    Bruns-Nagel, D.; Breitung, J.; von Low, E.; Steinbach, K.; Gorontzy, T.; Kahl, M.; Blotevogel, K.; Gemsa, D.

    1996-01-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soil material of a former TNT production plant was percolated aerobically in soil columns. Nineteen days of percolation with a potassium phosphate buffer supplemented with glucose or glucose plus ammonium sulfate caused an over 90% decline in the amount of extractable nitroaromatics in soils containing 70 to 2,100 mg of TNT per kg (dry weight). In the percolation solution, a complete elimination of TNT was achieved. Mutagenicity and soil toxicity were significantly reduced by the percolation process. 4-N-Acetylamino-2-amino-6-nitrotoluene was generated in soil and percolation fluid as a labile TNT metabolite. PMID:16535369

  3. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds in canned artichoke by LC/DAD/ESI-MS using core-shell C18 column: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbing; Qian, Yongsheng; Mao, Peipei; Chen, Linyao; Lu, Yanbin; Wang, Huizhong

    2013-05-15

    Core-shell silica stationary phase was considered as a breakthrough in column technology in HPLC world. In this work, the chromatographic performance of core-shell column, made by fusing a 0.5?m porous silica layer onto 1.7?m nonporous silica cores, was compared with sub-2?m fully porous particle materials for separation and identification of phenolic compounds in canned artichoke heads. The anti-oxidant caffeoylquinic acids of artichoke extract was taken as representative for calculating the plate heights in a wide flow rate range and analyzed on the basis of the van Deemter and Knox equations. Theoretical Poppe plots were constructed for each column to compare their kinetic performance. Both phases gave similar minimum plate heights when using non-reduced coordinates. Meanwhile, the flat C-term of core-shell column provided the possibilities for applying high flow rates without significant loss in efficiency. In addition, the peak capacities of both columns were measured, at constant chromatographic linear velocity and intrinsic gradient steepness, in order to generate comparable retention window for the least and the most retained compounds. Finally, the core-shell column was successfully applied for separation and identification of 10 phenolic compounds in canned artichoke extracts by liquid chromatography-diode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry, exhibiting great potential in the field of food analysis. PMID:23266111

  4. Parallel array of independent thermostats for column separations

    DOEpatents

    Foret, Frantisek; Karger, Barry L.

    2005-08-16

    A thermostat array including an array of two or more capillary columns (10) or two or more channels in a microfabricated device is disclosed. A heat conductive material (12) surrounded each individual column or channel in array, each individual column or channel being thermally insulated from every other individual column or channel. One or more independently controlled heating or cooling elements (14) is positioned adjacent to individual columns or channels within the heat conductive material, each heating or cooling element being connected to a source of heating or cooling, and one or more independently controlled temperature sensing elements (16) is positioned adjacent to the individual columns or channels within the heat conductive material. Each temperature sensing element is connected to a temperature controller.

  5. Eight Pulse Performance of DARHT Axis II - Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-12-08

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 1.65-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. Standard operation of the DARHT Axis II accelerator involves extracting four short pulses from the 1.6 us long macro-pulse produced by the LIA. The four short pulses are extracted using a fast kicker in combination with a quadrupole septum magnet and then transported for several meters to a high Z material target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. The ability of the DARHT Axis 2 kicker to produce more than the standard four pulse format has been previously demonstrated. This capability was developed to study potential risks associated with beam transport during an initial commissioning phase at low energy (8 MeV) and low current (1.0 kA).The ability of the kicker to deliver more than four pulses to the target has been realized for many years. This note describes the initial results demonstrating this capability.

  6. The vertebral column of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott A; Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Frater, Nakita; Churchill, Steven E; Schmid, Peter; Berger, Lee R

    2013-04-12

    Two partial vertebral columns of Australopithecus sediba grant insight into aspects of early hominin spinal mobility, lumbar curvature, vertebral formula, and transitional vertebra position. Au. sediba likely possessed five non-rib-bearing lumbar vertebrae and five sacral elements, the same configuration that occurs modally in modern humans. This finding contrasts with other interpretations of early hominin regional vertebral numbers. Importantly, the transitional vertebra is distinct from and above the last rib-bearing vertebra in Au. sediba, resulting in a functionally longer lower back. This configuration, along with a strongly wedged last lumbar vertebra and other indicators of lordotic posture, would have contributed to a highly flexible spine that is derived compared with earlier members of the genus Australopithecus and similar to that of the Nariokotome Homo erectus skeleton. PMID:23580532

  7. Ewing's sarcoma of the vertebral column

    SciTech Connect

    Pilepich, M.V.; Vietti, T.J.; Nesbit, M.E.; Tefft, M.; Kissane, J.; Burgert, O.; Pritchard, D.; Gehan, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with vertebral primaries were registered in the Intergroup Ewing's Sarcoma Study between 1973 and 1977. The radiation doses to the primary tumors ranged between 3800 and 6200 rad. All patients received intensive combination chemotherapy. After a followup ranging between 14 and 62 months, 14 patients remained disease-free. All patients with primary tumor of the cervical and dorsal spine remained disease-free. Of eight patients with lesions in the distal spine, (sacrococcygeal region) six developed recurrence, in three a local recurrence was observed despite doses of 6000 rad or higher. Doses of 5000 rad or less (in addition to combination chemotherapy as used in the Intergroup Ewing's Study) appear adequate in controlling the primary tumors of the proximal segments of the spinal column.

  8. Dynamic CT scanning of spinal column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cann, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Dynamic sequential computed tomographic scanning with automatic table incrementation uses low milliampere-second technique to eliminate tube cooling delays between scanning slices and, thus, markedly shortens examination times. A total of 25 patients with spinal column trauma involving 28 levels were studied with dynamic scans and retrospectively reviewed. Dynamic studies were considerably faster than conventional spine examinations and yielded reliable diagnosis. Bone disruption and subluxation was accurately evaluated, and the use of intrathecal metrizamide in low doses allowed direct visualization of spinal cord or radicular compromise. Multiplanar image reformation was aided by the dynamic incrementation technique, since motion between slices (and the resulting misregistration artifact on image reformation) was minimized. A phantom was devised to test spatial resolution of computed tomography for objects 1-3 mm in size and disclosed minimal differences for dynamic and conventional computed tomographic techniques in resolving medium-to-high-contrast objects.

  9. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D. (Aiken, SC)

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  10. Self-heating of Pu-238 anion exchange column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-03-23

    Heat and mass transfer calculations were performed to determine the effect of increases in the H-canyon Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column loading on column temperatures during flow interruptions. The heat transfer calculations are based on a previous analysis of the H Frames columns, and the mass transfer calculations use data from two recent laboratory elutions. The current Technical Standard (TS) limits the total amount of Pu-238 on the column to 490 g. To meet production goals for NASA`s Cassini mission, this limit needs to be increased. In addition to the loading limit, the TS stipulates that column temperatures cannot exceed 60{degrees}C. Significant column heating occurs only when flow to the column is interrupted. During normal operation, column temperatures are approximately equal to the ambient temperature. Results from the laboratory elutions and the heat and mass transfer analyses show that, for an ambient temperature of 30{degrees}C, the maximum column temperature cannot reach the TS limit of 60{degrees}C until 80 min. after flow is interrupted during loading or washing or until 50 min. after flow is interrupted during elution. These times are independent of operating conditions. The heating rate for loading and washing was calculated assuming adiabatic heating at a maximum adsorbed plutonium concentration of 45 g/L. The heating rate for elution is based on adiabatic hearing at a total plutonium concentration of 71 g/L. The maximum total concentration during elution consists of 45 g/L adsorbed plutonium plus 26 g/L dissolved plutonium in equilibrium with the adsorbed solid. Based on the results of this study and the previous analysis of the H Frames columns, it is safe to raise the Pu-238 loading of the FWR column from 490 to 800 g or more without violating the TS column temperature limit of 60{degrees}C during a 15-min. flow interruption.

  11. Detection of ketamine and its metabolites in human hair using an integrated nanoflow liquid chromatography column and electrospray emitter fritted with a single porous 10 ?m bead.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Mark C; Longmoore, Alana M; Turfus, Sophie C; Braithwaite, Robin A; Cowan, David A; Elliott, Simon; Kicman, Andrew T

    2013-02-15

    Targeting metabolites incorporated into hair following drug administration is useful for evidential purposes as this approach can aid in differentiating between administration and passive exposure. Greater analytical sensitivity is required than for targeting the parent drug alone. A 20 ?m i.d. fused silica capillary column with an integrated electrospray emitter fritted with a single porous 10 ?m polymeric bead has been successfully fabricated to facilitate this purpose. The sensitivity gains through the use of these integrated single fritted columns coupled to a nanoelectrospray source (nanoflow-LC nanoESI) over conventional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) columns was explored by their application to the detection of ketamine and its phase I metabolites in human hair. Hair was collected from 4 volunteers following the administration of a small oral dose of ketamine (50 mg) and subsequently analysed by the capillary-LC nanoESI approach. The drug and its metabolites were extracted from hair using solid phase extraction following a methanolic wash, pulverisation with a ball mill and acid digestion. From a 50 ?L extract, 1 ?L was injected and the method provided a limit of detection estimated to be 5 fg on column for ketamine and norketamine and 10 fg for dehydronorketamine. The single porous frit minimises extra column band broadening and offers an alternative fritting approach which reduces the blocking of the electrospray emitter, in comparison with other approaches such as sintering and polymerisation. PMID:23332304

  12. Monolithic capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate for peptide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, E. V.; Melnik, D. M.; Korolev, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu.; Pirogov, A. V.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Monolythic medium-polar capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were optimized for separation of peptides. The synthesis temperature and time, the fraction of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, and the nature of alcohol contained in the complex porogen were chosen as optimization parameters. The highest efficiency was attained for columns obtained with 33 and 34% monomer at a polymerization time of 75 min and a temperature of 75°C. The columns with the optimum structure were effective in separation of a model mixture of five peptides. The sensitivity of the method was 200 ng of peptide per column.

  13. 15. FIRST FLOOR WAREHOUSE SPACE, SHOWING COLUMN / BEAM CONNECTION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. FIRST FLOOR WAREHOUSE SPACE, SHOWING COLUMN / BEAM CONNECTION. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Dubuque Seed Company Warehouse, 169-171 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  14. Mini-columns for Conducting Breakthrough Experiments. Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Reimus, Paul William; Ware, Stuart Douglas

    2015-06-11

    Experiments with moderately and strongly sorbing radionuclides (i.e., U, Cs, Am) have shown that sorption between experimental solutions and traditional column materials must be accounted for to accurately determine stationary phase or porous media sorption properties (i.e., sorption site density, sorption site reaction rate coefficients, and partition coefficients or Kd values). This report details the materials and construction of mini-columns for use in breakthrough columns to allow for accurate measurement and modeling of sorption parameters. Material selection, construction techniques, wet packing of columns, tubing connections, and lessons learned are addressed.

  15. Stability of leaning column at Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harp, Edwin L.; Lindsay, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    In response to reports from climbers that an 8-meter section (referred to as the leaning column) of the most popular climbing route on Devils Tower in northeastern Wyoming is now moving when being climbed, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey inspected the site to determine the stability of the column and the underlying column that serves as a support pedestal. Evidence of a recent tensile spalling failure was observed on the pedestal surface immediately beneath the contact with the overlying leaning column. The spalling of a flake-shaped piece of the pedestal, probably due to the high stress concentration exerted by the weight of the leaning column along a linear contact with the pedestal, is likely causing the present movement of the leaning column. Although it is unlikely that climbers will dislodge the leaning column by their weight alone, the possibility exists that additional spalling failures may occur from the pedestal surface and further reduce the stability of the leaning column and result in its toppling. To facilitate detection of further spalling failures from the pedestal, its surface has been coated with a layer of paint. Any new failures from the pedestal could result in the leaning column toppling onto the climbing route or onto the section of the Tower trail below.

  16. HydroPulse Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  17. Single grism pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikrant; Bowlan, Pamela; Miesak, Edward; Kane, Steve; Trebino, Rick

    2009-02-01

    We introduce a simple, compact, and automatically distortion-free single-grism pulse compressor that can compensate for large amounts of material dispersion in ultrashort pulses, which increases the pulse duration and decreases the peak intensity. Diffraction-grating pulse compressors can compensate for high dispersion, but they do not compensate for higher-order dispersion (important when GDD is large). Worse, all previous general-purpose grating designs have involved multiple gratings and so are also difficult to align and prone to distortions: small misalignments cause unwanted spatio-temporal pulse distortions. A compressor based on grisms solves the higher-order-dispersion problem because grisms allow the ratio of third-order to second-order dispersion to be tuned to match that of the material that introduced the GDD. A grism can also compensate for large amounts of dispersion. Unfortunately, previous grism compressors used multiple grisms and so are difficult to align and prone to spatio-temporal distortions. To overcome this problem, we introduce a single-grism compressor. It comprises only three elements: a reflection grism, a corner cube, and a roof mirror. SEA TADPOLE measured the compressor GDD and third-order dispersion, verifying its operation. This convenient device should be a valuable general tool.

  18. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  19. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, Mark D. (Penfield, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  20. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles (Fremont, CA)

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  1. Pulse power linac

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A linear acceleration for charged particles is constructed of a plurality of transmission line sections that extend between a power injection region and an accelerating region. Each line section is constructed of spaced plate-like conductors and is coupled to an accelerating gap located at the accelerating region. Each gap is formed between a pair of apertured electrodes, with all of the electrode apertures being aligned along a particle accelerating path. The accelerating gaps are arranged in series, and at the injection region the line sections are connected in parallel. At the injection region a power pulse is applied simultaneously to all line sections. The line sections are graduated in length so that the pulse reaches the gaps in a coordinated sequence whereby pulse energy is applied to particles as they reach each of the gaps along the accelerating path.

  2. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  3. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig (late of Albuquerque, NM); Rowland, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  4. Rapid preparation of procyanidins B2 and C1 from Granny Smith apples by using low pressure column chromatography and identification of their oligomeric procyanidins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun-Song; Liu, Liang; Wu, Hua; Xie, Bi-Jun; Yang, Er-Ning; Sun, Zhi-Da

    2008-03-26

    Research in the field of procyanidins is always hindered by the lack of procyanidin standards, and the preparation of procyanidins, especially in large scale, remains difficult and time-consuming. Commercial sources of procyanidin standards are scarce. In this study, a rapid preparation method of procyanidins by using low-pressure column chromatography was developed. Procyanidins in Granny Smith apples were extracted with boiled water and purified on an ADS-17 macroporous resin column to obtain a Granny Smith apple procyanidin extract (GSE). GSE was fractionated according to its degree of polymerization on a Toyopearl TSK HW-40s column. Procyanidins B2 (epicatechin-(4beta-8)-epicatechin) and C1 (epicatechin-(4beta-8)-epicatechin-(4beta-8)-epicatechin) were prepared without HPLC separation. Oligomeric procyanidins from Granny Smith apples were also identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. PMID:18298060

  5. Boston Column Network: Compact Solar-Tracking Spectrometers and Differential Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Samra, J.; Gottlieb, E.; Budney, J.; Daube, C.; Daube, B. C.; Hase, F.; Gerbig, C.; Chance, K.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    In urban environments, the surface concentration is influenced by both the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and by emissions. Path-integrated measurements that integrate through the entire mixed layer are valuable complements to surface data, compatible with the scale of the atmospheric models and therefore help reduce the representation errors in data assimilation studies of surface emission rates. Here we present a ground-based column sensor network in metro Boston. The network extends the existing surface sensor network to the vertical dimension in order to help quantify the concentration gradients across a city using a differential strategy: by measuring the "total column" of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, H2O etc.) and pollutants (NO2, O3, CH2O etc.) simultaneously inside and upwind of the urban core. Each stationary network site has a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker, EM27Sun), a UV-visible grating spectrometer (Pandora) and a LIDAR (Sigma Space, Mini MPL) to provide PBL height. Two EM27Sun Fourier transform spectrometers at fixed locations are complemented by our self-developed solar-tracking Fourier transform spectrometer (Nicolet) to be used as a mobile unit to acquire cross-sectional slices of total column burdens across the urban dome. In additional to O2, CO2, CH4, H2O measurements, this system is also capable of measuring CO and N2O. This compact, inexpensive instrument uses a diffuser as a part of the tracking optics, which results in a rugged and simplified system. A novel camera-based active tracking schema is developed: the sun image on the diffuser is always regulated to the same position to ensure an accurate tracking. In this paper we will show comparisons between the self-developed solar-tracking system and the commercial Bruker EM27Sun. In addition, initial data for the retrieved column concentrations in and outside of the Boston urban dome will be presented.

  6. 3D printed porous media columns with fine control of column packing morphology.

    PubMed

    Fee, Conan; Nawada, Suhas; Dimartino, Simone

    2014-03-14

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the use of 3D printing (also known as additive manufacturing or rapid prototyping) to create porous media with precisely defined packing morphologies, directly from computer aided design (CAD) models. We used CAD to design perfectly ordered beds with octahedral beads (115 ?m apothem) packed in a simple cubic configuration and monoliths with hexagonal channels (150 ?m apothem) in parallel and herringbone arrangements. The models were then printed by UV curing of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene powder layers. Each porous bed was printed at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mL volumes, within a complete column, including internal flow distributors and threaded 10-32 flow connectors. Close replication of CAD models was achieved. The resultant individual octahedral beads were highly uniform in size, with apothems of 113.6±1.9 ?m, while the monolith hexagonal cross-section channels had apothems of 148.2±2.0 ?m. Residence time distribution measurements show that the beds largely behaved as expected from their design void volumes. Radial and fractal flow distributor designs were also tested. The former displayed poor flow distribution in parallel and herringbone pore columns, while the fractal distributors provided uniform flow distribution over the entire cross section. The results show that 3D printing is a feasible method for producing precisely controlled porous media. We expect our approach to revolutionize not only fundamental studies of flow in porous media but methods of chromatography column production. PMID:24529407

  7. Transport of surfactant-facilitated multiwalled carbon nanotube suspensions in columns packed with sized soil particles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinying; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2014-09-01

    Transport of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in soil/sediment matrixes can regulate their potential eco-effects and has been however rarely studied. Herein, column experiments were conducted to investigate mobility of CNT suspensions stabilized by dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (SDBS), octyl-phenol-ethoxylate (TX-100) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in four soil samples with certain particle sizes. Humic acid was extracted from a soil sample and was coated on quartz sands to explore the effect of soil organic matter (SOM) on the mobility. Results showed that the positively-charged CPC-CNT was entirely retained in the columns while the negatively-charged SDBS-CNT and TX-100-CNT more or less broke through the columns. Pearson correlation analyses revealed that soil texture rather than SOM controlled the mobility. Electrostatic attraction to and/or precipitation on the grain surfaces together with the straining effect could explain the CNT retention. These novel results will help to understand the eco-effects of CNTs. PMID:24880534

  8. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  9. Biomarkers in the stratified water column of the Landsort Deep (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndmeyer, C.; Thiel, V.; Schmale, O.; Wasmund, N.; Blumenberg, M.

    2014-12-01

    The water column of the Landsort Deep, central Baltic Sea, is stratified into an oxic, suboxic, and anoxic zone. This stratification controls the distributions of individual microbial communities and biogeochemical processes. In summer 2011, particulate organic matter was filtered from these zones using an in situ pump. Lipid biomarkers were extracted from the filters to establish water-column profiles of individual hydrocarbons, alcohols, phospholipid fatty acids, and bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs). As a reference, a cyanobacterial bloom sampled in summer 2012 in the central Baltic Sea Gotland Deep was analyzed for BHPs. The biomarker data from the surface layer of the oxic zone showed major inputs from cyanobacteria, dinoflagellates, and ciliates, while the underlying cold winter water layer was characterized by a low diversity and abundance of organisms, with copepods as a major group. The suboxic zone supported bacterivorous ciliates, type I aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and, most likely, methanogenic archaea. In the anoxic zone, sulfate reducers and archaea were the dominating microorganisms as indicated by the presence of distinctive branched fatty acids: archaeol and pentamethylicosane (PMI) derivatives, respectively. Our study of in situ biomarkers in the Landsort Deep thus provided an integrated insight into the distribution of relevant compounds and describes useful tracers to reconstruct stratified water columns in the geological record.

  10. [Application and improvement of aflatoxin analysis in foods using a multifunctional column and HPLC].

    PubMed

    Goda, Y; Akiyama, H; Otsuki, T; Fujii, A; Toyoda, M

    2001-02-01

    In an earlier report, we developed a rapid, sensitive and clean method consisting of non-chloroform extraction, clean-up on a commercial multifunctional cartridge column and HPLC with fluorescence detection for the analyses of aflatoxins. In this report, we applied this method to analyze aflatoxins in nuts, giant corn, cereals, spice and black teas. The method was effective for macadamia nuts, walnuts, hazelnuts, brazil nuts, giant corn, rice, wheat and buckwheat, and the recoveries of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 spiked in them at the level of 10 ng/g were 85-106%. However, in the chromatograms of spices and black tea, many background peaks were observed. Therefore, we added a purification step with an affinity column to the clean-up of these samples with the multifunctional cartridge column. After the additional purification, most of the background peaks were gone. The recoveries of aflatoxins B1, B2 and G1 spiked at the level of 10 ng/g were 71-112% except for the case of B2 in white pepper (48%). The recoveries of G2 were 49-95%. PMID:11383158

  11. Biomarkers in the stratified water column of the Landsort Deep (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndmeyer, C.; Thiel, V.; Schmale, O.; Wasmund, N.; Blumenberg, M.

    2014-06-01

    The water column of the Landsort Deep, central Baltic Sea, is stratified into an oxic, suboxic and anoxic zone. This stratification controls the distributions of individual microbial communities and biogeochemical processes. In summer 2011, particulate organic matter was filtered from these zones using an in~situ pump. Lipid biomarkers were extracted from the filters to establish water column profiles of individual hydrocarbons, alcohols, phospholipid fatty acids, and bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs). As a reference, a cyanobacterial bloom sampled in summer 2012 in the central Baltic Sea Gotland Deep was analyzed for BHPs. The biomarker data from the surface layer of the oxic zone showed major inputs from different cyanobacteria and eukaryotes such as dinoflagellates and ciliates, while the underlying cold winter water layer was characterized by a low diversity and abundance of organisms, with copepods as a major group. The suboxic zone supported bacterivorous ciliates, type I aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, and, most likely, methanogenic archaea. In the anoxic zone, sulfate reducers and archaea were the dominating microorganisms as indicated by the presence of distinctive branched fatty acids, archaeol and PMI derivatives, respectively. Our study of in situ biomarkers in the Landsort Deep thus provided an integrated insight into the distribution of relevant players and the related biogeochemical processes in stratified water columns of marginal seas.

  12. Microwave-assisted digestion combined with silica-based spin column for DNA isolation from human bones.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir-Kaynak, Elif; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-10-01

    A protocol for the extraction of DNA from ancient skeletal material was developed. Bone specimen samples (powder or slice), buffer, pretreatment, and extraction methodologies were compared to investigate the best conditions yielding the highest concentration of DNA. The degree of extract contamination by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors was compared as well. Pretreatment was carried out using agitation in an incubator shaker and microwave digestion. Subsequently, DNA from bones was isolated by the classical organic phenol-chloroform extraction and silica-based spin columns. Decalcification buffer for total demineralization was required as well as lysis buffer for cell lysis to obtain DNA, whereas microwave-assisted digestion proved to be very rapid, with an incubation time of 2min instead of 24h at an incubator shaker without using lysis buffer. The correction of isolated DNA was detected using real-time PCR with melt curve analysis, which was 82.8±0.2°C for highly repetitive ?-satellite gene region specific for human chromosome 17 (locus D17Z1). Consequently, microwave-based DNA digestion followed by silica column yielded a high-purity DNA with a concentration of 19.40ng/?l and proved to be a superior alternative to the phenol-chloroform method, presenting an environmentally friendly and efficient technique for DNA extraction. PMID:26142220

  13. Pulsed NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.

    1978-01-01

    Method gives results approximating those of classical continuous-irradiation method but in less time. Method also makes it possible to measure chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation times with improved sensitivity. Equipment can be used for adiabatic demagnetization experiments, measurements of rotating-frame spin/lattice relaxation times, and accurate measurements of exact resonance points. When measuring relaxation times, pulse technique can be very effective since pulses may be limited in amplitude and length to prevent spin system from being driven into saturation.

  14. Size Exclusion HPLC of Protein Using a Narrow-Bore Column for Evaluation of Bread-Making Quality of Hard Spring Wheat Flours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate if a narrow-bore column (NBC) (300 x 4.5 mm i.d.) improved analyses of unreduced proteins in flour by size exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) and subsequent evaluation of bread-making quality of hard spring wheat flours. Total protein extracts and sodium dodecyl...

  15. Simulations of pulse propagation in the laser wakefield accelerator using an object-oriented particle-in-cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John; Sonnad, Kiran

    1999-11-01

    The propagation of a laser pulse through underdense plasma is studied using a modified version of XOOPIC, a two-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The object-oriented implementation of the code makes relatively simple the task of extending and including new physics into the original code. We modified the code to include a cyclic mesh. This technique is suitable for following short laser pulses and for laser-plasma accelerators because only the region of plasma near the laser pulse is of interest. The computational window moves with the laser pulse at the speed of light by removing columns of cells and particles from behind the pulse and placing them at the front of the pulse with new particles. The modified code is also used to study the propagation of a charged particle beam.

  16. Clustering header categories extracted from web tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, George; Embley, David W.; Krishnamoorthy, Mukkai; Seth, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Revealing related content among heterogeneous web tables is part of our long term objective of formulating queries over multiple sources of information. Two hundred HTML tables from institutional web sites are segmented and each table cell is classified according to the fundamental indexing property of row and column headers. The categories that correspond to the multi-dimensional data cube view of a table are extracted by factoring the (often multi-row/column) headers. To reveal commonalities between tables from diverse sources, the Jaccard distances between pairs of category headers (and also table titles) are computed. We show how about one third of our heterogeneous collection can be clustered into a dozen groups that exhibit table-title and header similarities that can be exploited for queries.

  17. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  18. Innovative Graphite Oxide-Cellulose Based Material Specific for Genomic DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-09-01

    Extraction of genomic DNA from various types of samples is often challenging for commercial silica spin column. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/cellulose composite as an alternative material for genomic DNA extraction. The purity of DNA and extraction efficiency were compared to that of commercial silica product. In this study, the total weight % of GO was fixed at 4.15% in GO/Cellulose composite. Chewed gum, nail clip, cigarette bud paper, animal tissue and hair sample were used as various genomic DNA sources for extraction experiments. Among all types of samples, the extraction efficiencies were 4 to 12 times higher than that of commercial silica spin column. The absorbance ratio of 260 nm to 280 nm (A260/A280) of all samples ranged between 1.6 and 2.0. The results demonstrated that GO/Cellulose composites might serve as an innovative solid support material for genomic DNA extraction.

  19. Innovative Graphite Oxide-Cellulose Based Material Specific for Genomic DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-11-01

    Extraction of genomic DNA from various types of samples is often challenging for commercial silica spin column. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/cellulose composite as an alternative material for genomic DNA extraction. The purity of DNA and extraction efficiency were compared to that of commercial silica product. In this study, the total weight % of GO was fixed at 4.15% in GO/Cellulose composite. Chewed gum, nail clip, cigarette bud paper, animal tissue and hair sample were used as various genomic DNA sources for extraction experiments. Among all types of samples, the extraction efficiencies were 4 to 12 times higher than that of commercial silica spin column. The absorbance ratio of 260 nm to 280 nm (A260/A280) of all samples ranged between 1.6 and 2.0. The results demonstrated that GO/Cellulose composites might serve as an innovative solid support material for genomic DNA extraction.

  20. Weakly dispersive modal pulse propagation in the North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Udovydchenkov, Ilya A; Brown, Michael G; Duda, Timothy F; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Howe, Bruce M; Colosi, John A

    2013-10-01

    The propagation of weakly dispersive modal pulses is investigated using data collected during the 2004 long-range ocean acoustic propagation experiment (LOAPEX). Weakly dispersive modal pulses are characterized by weak dispersion- and scattering-induced pulse broadening; such modal pulses experience minimal propagation-induced distortion and are thus well suited to communications applications. In the LOAPEX environment modes 1, 2, and 3 are approximately weakly dispersive. Using LOAPEX observations it is shown that, by extracting the energy carried by a weakly dispersive modal pulse, a transmitted communications signal can be recovered without performing channel equalization at ranges as long as 500 km; at that range a majority of mode 1 receptions have bit error rates (BERs) less than 10%, and 6.5% of mode 1 receptions have no errors. BERs are estimated for low order modes and compared with measurements of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and modal pulse spread. Generally, it is observed that larger modal pulse spread and lower SNR result in larger BERs. PMID:24116531

  1. Design and construction of the 3.2 MeV high voltage column for DARHT II

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C., Elliott, B.; Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    2000-08-20

    A 3.2 MeV injector has been designed and built for the DARHT II Project at Los Alamos Lab. The installation of the complete injector system is nearing completion at this time. The requirements for the injector are to produce a 3.2 MeV, 2000-ampere electron pulse with a flattop width of at least 2-microseconds and emittance of less than 0.15 pi cm-rad normalized. A large high voltage column has been built and installed. The column is vertically oriented, is 4.4 meters long, 1.2 meters in diameter, and weighs 5700 kilograms. A novel method of construction has been employed which utilizes bonded Mycalex insulating rings. This paper will describe the design, construction, and testing completed during construction. Mechanical aspects of the design will be emphasized.

  2. Transport of silver nanoparticles in saturated columns of natural soils.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Geert; Pang, Liping; Doolette, Casey; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2013-10-01

    With industrialization and urbanization soils are increasingly exposed to engineered nanoparticles (ENP), yet knowledge regarding the transport of ENP in natural soils is lacking, a process that was examined further in the current study. Saturated columns of 11 natural soils with varying physical and chemical properties were spiked with two pore volumes of a solution containing 1.7 mg Ag L(-1) as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNP) (40 nm actual diameter) and eluted at a constant flow rate of 1 ml min(-1). Breakthrough of Ag was analyzed using filtration theory and a HYDRUS-1D transport model that incorporated two-site kinetic attachment-detachment. Separate kinetic batch studies suggested fast heteroaggregation between negatively charged AgNP and positively charged sites on the common soil colloids maghemite or montmorillonite. The concentration of such sites in the soil correlates positively with the oxalate-extractable aluminum concentration of the soils, a measure that correlated positively with collision efficiency. This correlation thus suggested favorable deposition of AgNP and/or enhanced straining following heteroaggregation of AgNP with mobile soils colloids. Occurrence of heteroaggregation was supported by the batch studies, enhanced size-exclusion in the soil with the highest porosity, and reversible attachment-detachment predicted from HYDRUS modeling, whereas straining and favorable deposition were suggested by irreversible attachment. Our study suggests that under similar experimental conditions, PVP-coated AgNP would rapidly interact with natural colloids in soils significantly reducing their mobility and hence potential risk from off-site transport. PMID:23792254

  3. Extraction of furfural with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gamse, T.; Marr, R.; Froeschl, F.; Siebenhofer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A new approach to separate furfural from aqueous waste has been investigated. Recovery of furfural and acetic acid from aqueous effluents of a paper mill has successfully been applied on an industrial scale since 1981. The process is based on the extraction of furfural and acetic acid by the solvent trooctylphosphineoxide (TOPO). Common extraction of both substances may cause the formation of resin residues. Improvement was expected by selective extraction of furfural with chlorinated hydrocarbons, but ecological reasons stopped further development of this project. The current investigation is centered in the evaluation of extraction of furfural by supercritical carbon dioxide. The influence of temperature and pressure on the extraction properties has been worked out. The investigation has considered the multi-component system furfural-acetic acid-water-carbon dioxide. Solubility of furfural in liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide has been measured, and equilibrium data for the ternary system furfural-water-CO{sub 2} as well as for the quaternary system furfural-acetic acid-water-CO{sub 2} have been determined. A high-pressure extraction column has been used for evaluation of mass transfer rates.

  4. COLUMN EXPERIMENTS AND ANOMALOUS CONDUCTIVITY IN HYDROCARBON-IMPACTED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory experiment was designed to increase the understanding of the geoelectric effects of microbial " degradation of hydrocarbons. Eight large columns were were paired to provide a replicate of each of four experiments. These large-volume columns contained "sterilized" soi...

  5. Exploring the Sulfur Nutrient Cycle Using the Winogradsky Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogan, Brian; Lemke, Michael; Levandowsky, Michael; Gorrell, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The Winogradsky column demonstrates how the metabolic diversity of prokaryotes transforms sulfur to different forms with varying redox states and hence, supplies nutrients and/or energy to the organism. The Winogardsky column is an excellent way to show that not all bacteria are pathogens and they have an important role in the geochemical cycling…

  6. Gas chromatographic column for the Viking 1975 molecular analysis experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, M.; Hayes, J. M.; Bruner, F.; Simmonds, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    A gas chromatographic column has been developed for use in the remote analysis of the Martian surface. The column, which utilizes a liquid-modified organic adsorbent (Tenax) as the stationary phase, provides efficient transmission and resolution of nanogram quantities of organic materials in the presence of millionfold excesses of water and carbon dioxide.

  7. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product ...

  8. The Book Review Column1 by William Gasarch

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, Aravind

    The Book Review Column1 by William Gasarch Department of Computer Science University of Maryland at College Park College Park, MD, 20742 email: gasarch@cs.umd.edu Editorial about Book Prices: In the first draft of this column I had the following comment about Beck's book on Combinatorial Games: The books

  9. Modified Elastofiber Element for Steel Slender Column and Brace Modeling

    E-print Network

    Krishnan, Swaminathan

    Modified Elastofiber Element for Steel Slender Column and Brace Modeling Swaminathan Krishnan, M to capture the overall features of the elastic and inelastic responses of slender columns and braces under critical buckling load of box and I sections with a wide range of slenderness ratios L/r=40, 80, 120, 160

  10. A Better Method for Filling Pasteur Pipet Chromatography Columns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruekberg, Ben

    2006-01-01

    An alternative method for the preparation of Pasteur pipet chromatography columns is presented that allows the column to be filled with solvent without bubbles and allows greater control of fluid flow while the materials to be separated are added. Students are required to wear gloves and goggles and caution should be used while handling glass…

  11. Ultrasonic testing device having an adjustable water column

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Neidigk, Stephen O.; Rackow, Kirk A.; Duvall, Randy L.

    2015-09-01

    An ultrasonic testing device having a variable fluid column height is disclosed. An operator is able to adjust the fluid column height in real time during an inspection to to produce optimum ultrasonic focus and separate extraneous, unwanted UT signals from those stemming from the area of interest.

  12. Spinning column of air Associated with strong updraught and

    E-print Network

    Allan, Richard P.

    5 Tornado · Spinning column of air · Associated with strong updraught and turbulence people died from 18 March 1925 tornadoes A tornado is a rapidly spinning column of air which forms within are thought to be over 400 km/hour although this is difficult to measure. More than 50 tornados hit central

  13. Breaking Row and Column Symmetries in Matrix Models

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    with a 2-d 0/1 matrix representing which cards go into which racks (a model with a 3-d matrix is givenBreaking Row and Column Symmetries in Matrix Models Pierre Flener 1 , Alan M. Frisch 2 , Brahim occur when we have a matrix of decision variables in which rows and/or columns can be swapped. We show

  14. 46 CFR 174.085 - Flooding on column stabilized units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flooding on column stabilized units. 174.085 Section 174.085 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.085 Flooding on column...

  15. 46 CFR 174.085 - Flooding on column stabilized units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flooding on column stabilized units. 174.085 Section 174.085 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.085 Flooding on column...

  16. 46 CFR 174.085 - Flooding on column stabilized units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flooding on column stabilized units. 174.085 Section 174.085 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.085 Flooding on column...

  17. 46 CFR 174.085 - Flooding on column stabilized units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flooding on column stabilized units. 174.085 Section 174.085 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.085 Flooding on column...

  18. DYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS A CRITICAL SURVEY

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    DYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS ­ A CRITICAL SURVEY Sigurd Skogestad \\Lambda Chemical, Identification and Control, 18, 177­217, 1997. Abstract Distillation column dynamics and control has been viewed these, the feasibility of using the distillate­bottom structure for control (which was believed

  19. DYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS -A CRITICAL SURVEY

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    DYNAMICS AND CONTROL OF DISTILLATION COLUMNS - A CRITICAL SURVEY Sigurd Skogestad Chemical cation and Control, 18, 177-217, 1997. Abstract Distillation column dynamics and control has been viewed, the feasibility of using the distillate-bottomstructure for control which was believed to be impossible

  20. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  1. Injection and extraction magnets: kicker magnets

    E-print Network

    Barnes, M J; Fowler, T; Senaj, V; Sermeus, L

    2010-01-01

    Each stage of an accelerator system has a limited dynamic range and therefore a chain of stages is required to reach high energy. A combination of septa and kicker magnets is frequently used to inject and extract beam from each stage. The kicker magnets typically produce rectangular field pulses with fast rise- and/or fall-times, however, the field strength is relatively low. To compensate for their relatively low field strength, the kicker magnets are generally combined with electromagnetic septa. The septa provide relatively strong field strength but are either DC or slow pulsed. This paper discusses injection and extraction systems with particular emphasis on the hardware required for the kicker magnet.

  2. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  3. Experiments in Pulsed Ultrasonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Forster, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    Describes and apparatus designed to generate and detect pulsed ultrasonics in solids and liquids over the frequency range 1-20 MHz. Experiments are suggested for velocity of sound, elastic constant and ultrasonic attenuation measurements on various materials over a wide temperature range. The equipment should be useful for demonstration purposes.…

  4. Analog pulse processor

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Kemper, Dale A.

    2003-06-03

    A very low power analog pulse processing system implemented as an ASIC useful for processing signals from radiation detectors, among other things. The system incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaping amplifier, a peak sample and hold circuit, and, optionally, an analog to digital converter and associated drivers.

  5. Extracting source parameters from beam monitors on a chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, Douglas L; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    The intensity distributions of beam monitors in direct-geometry time-of-flight neutron spectrometers provide important information about the instrument resolution. For short-pulse spallation neutron sources in particular, the asymmetry of the source pulse may be extracted and compared to Monte Carlo source simulations. An explicit formula using a Gaussian-convolved Ikeda-Carpenter distribution is given and compared to data from the ARCS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  6. Design, testing, and simulation of microscale gas chromatography columns

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.L.; Kottenstette, R.; Matzke, C.M.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Adkins, D.R.; Wong, C.C.

    1998-08-01

    A microscale gas chromatography column is one component in a microscale chemistry laboratory for detecting chemical agents. Several columns were fabricated using the Bosch etch process which allows deep, high aspect ratio channels of rectangular cross-section. A design tool, based on analytical models, was developed to evaluate the effects of operating conditions and column specifications on separation resolution and time. The effects of slip flow, channel configuration, and cross-sectional shape were included to evaluate the differences between conventional round, straight columns and the microscale rectangular, spiral columns. Experimental data were obtained and compared with the predicted flowrates and theoretical number of plates. The design tool was then employed to select more optimum channel dimensions and operating conditions for high resolution separations.

  7. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2013-10-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes (Cashman et al., 2008; Kennedy and Russell, 2011) and of thermal anomalies (Kendrick et al., 2012), key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation with an isothermal remanent magnetisation signature that typifies local electric currents in faults. The pseudotachylyte presents an impermeable barrier, which is thought to have influenced the degassing pathway. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV (Neuberg et al., 2006). Frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is an inevitable consequence of seismogenic, conduit-dwelling magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may have an important influence on magma ascent dynamics.

  8. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2014-04-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation, altering the structure, porosity and permeability of the material, and the magnetic signature typifies local electric currents in faults. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV. Frictional melting of Soufrière Hills andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) thought to be required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is a common consequence of seismogenic magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may govern the ascent of magma in the upper conduit.

  9. An alternative clean-up column for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Ndunda, Elizabeth N; Madadi, Vincent O; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-12-01

    The need for continuous monitoring of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has necessitated the development of analytical techniques that are sensitive and selective with minimal reagent requirement. In light of this, we developed a column for clean-up of soil and sediment extracts, which is less demanding in terms of the amount of solvent and sorbent. The dual-layer column consists of acidified silica gel and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). MIPs were synthesized via aqueous suspension polymerization using PCB 15 as the dummy template, 4-vinylpyridine as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker and the obtained particles characterized via SEM, BET, and batch rebinding assays. Pre-concentration of the spiked real-world water sample using MISPE gave recoveries between 85.2 and 104.4% (RSD < 8.69). On the other hand, the specific dual-layer column designed for clean-up of extracts from complex matrices provided recoveries of 91.6-102.5% (RSD < 4%) for spiked soil, which was comparable to clean-up using acidified silica (70.4-90.5%; RSD < 3.72%) and sulfoxide modified silica (89.7-103.0%; RSD < 13.0%). However, the polymers were reusable maintaining recoveries of 79.8-111.8% after 30 cycles of regeneration and re-use, thereby availing a cost-effective clean-up procedure for continuous monitoring of PCBs. Method detection limits were 0.01-0.08 ng g(-1) and 0.002-0.01 ng mL(-1) for solid matrices and water, respectively. PMID:26560633

  10. Predicting the significant factor response in rotating disc contactor (RDC) column using regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Siti Aisyah; Ismail, Wan Nurul Aiffah; Noor, Nor Fashihah Mohd; Ariffin, Wan Nor Munirah

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is one of the most important separation processes. Different kinds of liquid-liquid extractor such as Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) Column being used in industries. The study of liquid-liquid extraction in an RDC column has become a very important subject to be discussed not only amongst chemical engineers but mathematicians as well. Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) was applied to justify the relationship between the input variables and output variables. The input variables taken into considered include rotor speed (Nr); ratio of flow (Fd); concentration of continuous inlet (Ccin); concentration of dispersed inlet (Cdin); interaction between Nr with Fd; interaction between Nr with Ccin; interaction Nr with Cdin. Meanwhile the output variables are concentration of continuous outlet (Ccout) and concentration of dispersed outlet (Cdout) on RDC column performance. The regression model is applied to estimates the dependent variable outside the period used to fit the data. Therefore, we have two linear model represent two output of Ccout and Cdout. The results show that there is a positive relationship between the Ccout and Ccin, as well as Cdin and interaction Nr with Cdin. For the first model based on Ccout, the coefficient of Nr record the highest value, meaning that the rotor speed (Nr) has a great influence on the concentration of continuous outlet (Ccout). On the other result, there is a negative relationship between Cdout and interaction Nr with Cdin for the second model based on Cdout. The coefficient of Ccin record the highest value, meaning that the concentration of continuous inlet (Ccin) has a great influence on the concentration of dispersed outlet (Cdout).

  11. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  12. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Lowell

    2014-12-01

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because synthetically produced ergovaline is difficult to obtain, we developed a seed extraction and partial purification protocol for ergovaline/ergovalinine that provided a biologically active product. Tall fescue seed was ground and packed into several different sized columns for liquid extraction. Smaller particle size and increased extraction time increased efficiency of extraction. Our largest column was a 114 × 52 × 61 cm (W×L×D) stainless steel tub. Approximately 150 kg of seed could be extracted in this tub. The extraction was done with 80% ethanol. When the solvent front migrated to bottom of the column, flow was stopped and seed was allowed to steep for at least 48 h. Light was excluded from the solvent from the beginning of this step to the end of the purification process. Following elution, ethanol was removed from the eluate by evaporation at room temperature. Resulting syrup was freeze-dried. About 80% recovery of alkaloids was achieved with 18-fold increase in concentration of ergovaline. Initial purification of the dried product was accomplished by extracting with hexane/water (6:1, v/v) and the hexane fraction was discarded. The aqueous fraction was extracted with chloroform, the aqueous layer discarded, after which the chloroform was removed with a resulting 20-fold increase of ergovaline. About 65% of the ergovaline was recovered from the chloroform residue for an overall recovery of 50%. The resultant partially purified ergovaline had biological activities in in vivo and in vitro bovine bioassays that approximate that of synthetic ergovaline.

  13. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ji, Huihua; Fannin, F; Klotz, J; Bush, Lowell

    2014-01-01

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because synthetically produced ergovaline is difficult to obtain, we developed a seed extraction and partial purification protocol for ergovaline/ergovalinine that provided a biologically active product. Tall fescue seed was ground and packed into several different sized columns for liquid extraction. Smaller particle size and increased extraction time increased efficiency of extraction. Our largest column was a 114 × 52 × 61 cm (W × L × D) stainless steel tub. Approximately 150 kg of seed could be extracted in this tub. The extraction was done with 80% ethanol. When the solvent front migrated to bottom of the column, flow was stopped and seed was allowed to steep for at least 48 h. Light was excluded from the solvent from the beginning of this step to the end of the purification process. Following elution, ethanol was removed from the eluate by evaporation at room temperature and the resulting syrup was freeze-dried. About 80% recovery of alkaloids was achieved with 18-fold increase in concentration of ergovaline. Initial purification of the dried product was accomplished by extracting with hexane/water (6:1, v/v). The aqueous fraction was extracted with chloroform, the aqueous layer discarded, after which the chloroform was removed with a resulting 20-fold increase of ergovaline. About 65% of the ergovaline was recovered from the chloroform residue for an overall recovery of 50%. The resultant partially purified ergovaline had biological activities in in vivo and in vitro bovine bioassays that approximate that of synthetic ergovaline. PMID:25566528

  14. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Aug 5,2015 ... are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 4 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 5 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  15. Two-Pulse Stitch Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torborg, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    Second welding pulse at about 20 percent higher energy repairs bad single-pulse welds. Method used successfully to weld polytetrafluoroethyleneinsulated nickel wire to stainless-steel terminals in back-plane wiring.

  16. Wide spectrum microwave pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Various techniques are postulated as diagnostics for wide band microwave pulses. The diagnostics include determinations of both the instantaneous amplitude and the frequency content of one-shot pulses. 6 refs., 11 figs. (WRF)

  17. CHARM-F: An airborne integral path differential absorption lidar for simultaneous measurements of carbon dioxide and methane columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, H.-C.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Wirth, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Löhring, J.; Klein, V.

    2012-04-01

    CHARM-F (CO2 and CH4 Atmospheric Remote Monitoring - Flugzeug) is DLR's airborne Integral Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for simultaneous measurements of the column-weighted average dry-air mixing ratios of atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, designed to be flown on DLR's new High-Altitude, LOng-range research aircraft, HALO. It is meant to serve as a demonstrator of the use of spaceborne active optical instruments in inferring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 surface fluxes from total column measurements by inverse modeling. As it will be shown, this is enabled by HALO's high flight altitude and its range of 8000 km, which will make it possible to produce real-world data at truly regional scales with a viewing geometry and vertical weighting function similar to those enabled by a space platform. In addition, CHARM-F has the potential to be used as a validation tool not only for active but also passive spaceborne instruments utilizing scattered solar radiation for remote sensing of greenhouse gases. Building on the expertise from CHARM, a helicopter-borne methane IPDA lidar for pipeline monitoring developed in collaboration with E.ON, and WALES, DLR's water vapour differential absorption lidar, CHARM-F relies on a double-pulse transmitter architecture producing nanosecond pulses which allows for a precise ranging and a clean separation of atmospheric influences from the ground returns leading to an unambiguously defined column. One pulse is tuned to an absorption line of the trace gas under consideration, the other to a nearby wavelength with much less absorption. The close temporal separation of 250 ?s within each pulse pair ensures that nearly the same spot on ground is illuminated. The ratio of both return signals is then a direct function of the column-weighted average dry-air mixing ratio. The two laser systems, one for each trace gas, use highly efficient and robust Nd:YAG lasers to pump an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) level which converts the pump radiation to the desired wavelengths. Because typical surface CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks alter the total column only by a few percent, the required precision and accuracy are very stringent. This puts particularly challenging requirements on the spectral properties of the emitted pulses. To achieve single mode operation with very high spectral purity, both pumps and OPOs are injection seeded. Absolute stability of the emitted wavelengths is achieved by locking the seed lasers to the same absorption lines as those used in the atmosphere by means of a single absorption cell filled with a mixture of CO2 and CH4, and monitoring the wavelength deviations between each outgoing laser pulse and the corresponding seed laser to detect and correct for possible mode pulling effects. Another key requirement is the monitoring of the relative outgoing pulse energies with high accuracy, which is based on a specifically designed optical architecture. Assembly and laboratory tests of the instrument are on-going, the first ground tests are planned for summer 2012.

  18. DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Kaye S.; Zhu, Wenyi; Barnett, Mark O.

    2013-05-13

    Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55 â?? 67 mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate, and pH columns while only U(VI) was observed in the control and acetate columns. In the soil layer, the acetate and bicarbonate columns both indicate minor reduction to U(IV), but U(VI) predominated in all columns. In the ORIFC soils, U was consistently present as U(VI); sorption appears to be the main mechanism of association for U present with Fe and/or Mn, while U occurring with P appears in discrete particles consistent with a U mineral phase. U in soil locations with no other elemental associations shown by XRF are likely uranium oxide phases.

  19. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  20. Grape Seed Extract

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Grape Seed Extract Common Name: grape seed extract Latin Name: Vitis vinifera On this page: ... This fact sheet provides basic information about grape seed extract—common names, what the science says, potential ...

  1. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dominic S

    2008-01-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study we compare 30 cm long, 4.6 mm ID columns to capillary columns (750 {micro}m ID) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}pU, {sup 241}Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as for automated separations of actinide materials.

  2. Operation of a microwave proton source in pulsed mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Rose, C.; Schneider, J.D.; Sherman, J.; Stevens, R. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    Initial beam operation of the cw radio-frequency-quadrupole (RFQ) built for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) project requires the injection into the RFQ of a 75-keV, pulsed, H{sup +} beam with a rise and fall time less than 10 microseconds and a pulse width from 0.1 to 1 millisecond at a repetition rate up to 10 Hz. The ion source for the accelerator is a microwave proton source driven by a 2.45-GHz magnetron. Pulsed beam for the RFQ is accomplished by modulation of the magnetron tube current. The magnetron provides microwave pulses to the ion source, and a medium-bandwidth, extraction power supply produces the H{sup +} ion beam using a four-electrode extractor. A similar ion source with a three-element extractor operating at 50 kV has also been tested with this magnetron modulator. The authors report the results of modulating the ion-source microwave power and extracting a pulsed proton beam using both a triode and a tetrode extractor.

  3. Pulsed power supply for three APS septum magnets

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, D.G.

    1991-03-24

    Three septum magnets will be operated at a repetition-rate of 2 Hz. Two of the septum magnets are identical and operate at the same values; these are the synchrotron extraction and the storage ring injection magnets. They are transformer septum magnets, with a primary inductance of 23 {mu}H and resistance of 6.3 m{Omega}, and must be pulsed at a 2 Hz rate to extract beam from the synchrotron and inject beam into the storage ring at 7.7 GeV. The third septum magnet is used to inject electrons into the synchrotron at 650 MeV or positrons at 450 MeV. It is also a transformer septum magnet, with a primary inductance of 21 {mu}H and resistance of 6.7 m{Omega}, and must be pulsed at a 2 Hz rate. A design study was performed of the power supply proposed in the APS Title I design. This supply produces a pulse that is approximately a half-sine-wave with a base width of approximately 1/3 ms; its peakcurrent is adjustable from 470 A to 4.7 kA and is repeatable within {plus_minus}0.05%. The septum steel is reset by a half-sine pulse of reverse polarity a few milliseconds after the forward current pulse. No beam is present during reset. The use of the transformer design minimizes the cost of the capacitors used for energy storage.

  4. TECHNICAL ADVANCES A rapid column-based ancient DNA extraction method for

    E-print Network

    Reich, David

    Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School. 2006; Krystufek et al. 2007) based on museum specimens. Finally, in forensic science, DNA analyses are

  5. Wave Energy Extraction from an Oscillating Water Column in a Truncated Circular Cylinder 

    E-print Network

    Wang, Hao

    2013-07-19

    regular wave is explored. The hydrodynamic coefficients in scattering and radiation potential are solved using Galerkin approximation. The numerical results for the free surface elevation have been verified by a series of experiments conducted...

  6. Inner-pipe structure to improve column heterogeneity and peak shape.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Mei, Xiang; Shi, Pengchao; Zhou, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Column heterogeneity plays an important role in peak tailing and asymmetric profiles. We have designed a novel column structure (concentric column structure) that has a concentric inner-pipe nested in a column. This structure was studied by a number calculation method and wider diameter column experiments. The results showed that column heterogeneity and column efficiency were improved by inner-pipe structure. Moreover, the results showed that high-efficiency columns were stronger influenced by inner-pipe structure than low-efficiency columns. The influence of an inner-pipe was related to its size. The optimal inner-pipe diameter was nearly 0.625 times of column diameter. By using inner-pipe structure in this way, it was possible to decrease column heterogeneity and increase column efficiency of a wide-diameter column. PMID:25048455

  7. Optomechanical Entanglement under Pulse Drive

    E-print Network

    Qing Lin; Bing He

    2015-08-12

    We report a study of optomechanical entanglement under the drive of one or a series of laser pulses with arbitrary detuning and different pulse shapes. Because of the non-existence of system steady state under pulsed driving field, we adopt a different approach from the standard treatment to optomechanical entanglement. The situation of the entanglement evolution in high temperature is also discussed.

  8. Polymeric Cryogel-Based Boronate Affinity Chromatography for Separation of Ribonucleic Acid from Bacterial Extracts.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Akhilesh Kumar; Srivastava, Akshay; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional monolithic columns are preferred stationary phase in column chromatography. Conventional columns based on silica or particles are efficient in bioseparation though associated with limitations of nonspecific interaction and uneven porosity that causes high mass transfer resistance for the movement of big molecules. Cryogels as a monolith column have shown promising application in bioseparation. Cryogels column can be synthesized in the form of a monolith at sub-zero temperature through gelation of pre-synthesized polymers or polymerization of monomers. Cryogels are macroporous and mechanically stable materials. They have open interconnected micron-sized pores with a wide range of porosity (10-200 ?m). Current protocol demonstrated the ability of poly(hydroxymethyl methacrylate)-co-vinylphenyl boronic acid p(HEMA-co-VPBA) cryogel matrix for selective separation of RNA from the bacterial crude extract. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26623972

  9. If You Were a Molecule in a Chromatography Column, What Would You See?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattice, John

    2008-01-01

    To visualize what takes place in a chromatography column, enlarge the molecules to human size and expand the columns to keep the ratio of size of molecule to size of column the same. If we were molecules, what would the columns be like? A typical gas chromatography (GC) capillary column would be 50 x 10 [superscript 6] 6 km (31 million mi) long,…

  10. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  11. Column Grid Array Rework for High Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Atul C.; Bodie, Charles C.

    2008-01-01

    Due to requirements for reduced size and weight, use of grid array packages in space applications has become common place. To meet the requirement of high reliability and high number of I/Os, ceramic column grid array packages (CCGA) were selected for major electronic components used in next MARS Rover mission (specifically high density Field Programmable Gate Arrays). ABSTRACT The probability of removal and replacement of these devices on the actual flight printed wiring board assemblies is deemed to be very high because of last minute discoveries in final test which will dictate changes in the firmware. The questions and challenges presented to the manufacturing organizations engaged in the production of high reliability electronic assemblies are, Is the reliability of the PWBA adversely affected by rework (removal and replacement) of the CGA package? and How many times can we rework the same board without destroying a pad or degrading the lifetime of the assembly? To answer these questions, the most complex printed wiring board assembly used by the project was chosen to be used as the test vehicle, the PWB was modified to provide a daisy chain pattern, and a number of bare PWB s were acquired to this modified design. Non-functional 624 pin CGA packages with internal daisy chained matching the pattern on the PWB were procured. The combination of the modified PWB and the daisy chained packages enables continuity measurements of every soldered contact during subsequent testing and thermal cycling. Several test vehicles boards were assembled, reworked and then thermal cycled to assess the reliability of the solder joints and board material including pads and traces near the CGA. The details of rework process and results of thermal cycling are presented in this paper.

  12. Miniature Distillation Column for Producing LOX From Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozzi, Jay C.

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows components of a distillation column intended for use as part of a system that produces high-purity liquid oxygen (LOX) from air by distillation. (The column could be easily modified to produce high-purity liquid nitrogen.) Whereas typical industrial distillation columns for producing high-purity liquid oxygen and/or nitrogen are hundreds of feet tall, this distillation column is less than 3 ft (less than about 0.9 m) tall. This column was developed to trickle-charge a LOX-based emergency oxygen system (EOS) for a large commercial aircraft. A description of the industrial production of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen by distillation is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the present miniaturized distillation column. Typically, such industrial production takes place in a chemical processing plant in which large quantities of high-pressure air are expanded in a turboexpander to (1) recover a portion of the electrical power required to compress the air and (2) partially liquefy the air. The resulting two-phase flow of air is sent to the middle of a distillation column. The liquid phase is oxygen-rich, and its oxygen purity increases as it flows down the column. The vapor phase is nitrogen-rich and its nitrogen purity increases as it flows up the column. A heater or heat exchanger, commonly denoted a reboiler, is at the bottom of the column. The reboiler is so named because its role is to reboil some of the liquid oxygen collected at the bottom of the column to provide a flow of oxygen-rich vapor. As the oxygen-rich vapor flows up the column, it absorbs the nitrogen in the down-flowing liquid by mass transfer. Once the vapor leaves the lower portion of the column, it interacts with down-flowing nitrogen liquid that has been condensed in a heat exchanger, commonly denoted a condenser, at the top of the column. Liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen products are obtained by draining some of the purified product at the bottom and top of the column, respectively. Because distillation is a mass-transfer process, the purity of the product(s) can be increased by increasing the effectiveness of the mass-transfer process (increasing the mass-transfer coefficient) and/or by increasing the available surface area for mass transfer through increased column height. The diameter of a distillation column is fixed by pressure-drop and mass-flow requirements. The approach taken in designing the present distillation column to be short yet capable of yielding a product of acceptably high purity was to pay careful attention to design details that affect mass-transfer processes.

  13. Model of decision system for 13C Isotope Separation column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the model of a decisional system for 13C Isotope Separation column, which is used to detect mission critical situation. The start model was a model of one distributed control system of critical situations that may arise in the operation of the distillation column. The research work it is proposed a model of decision system which implement a temperature sensor inside of liquid nitrogen level in the condenser. The condenser is a part of column where take place the cryogenic process using nitrogen liquid. The work temperature is very low about -192oC, and because the temperature can grow or go down more than 2 degrees is a very critical location inside the column. In this way the column has a deeply monitor and supervised and it take a decision in a proper time when the temperature is grow up or getting down and became a critical situation. For monitor and supervised it was used MatLAB SimuLink. The model, the decision system gives a signal to one sensor when something is wrong in the condenser which is the most critical place of the isotopic column. In this way it creates an alarm that something is getting wrong in the isotopic column.

  14. Comparison of chromatographic band profiles obtained under microwave irradiated and non-irradiated reversed-phase liquid chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Galinada, Wilmer A; Guiochon, Georges

    2005-10-28

    The possible influence of the application of microwave energy to a reversed-phase liquid chromatography column on the mass transfer kinetics and the thermodynamics of equilibrium between mobile and stationary phases was examined. Chromatograms of propylbenzene and phenol were recorded under the same experimental conditions, on the same column, successively irradiated and not. The effect of microwave irradiation on the mass transfer kinetics was determined by measuring the second moment of small pulses of propylbenzene in a 70:30 (v/v) solution of methanol in water and microwave outputs of 15 and 30 W. The effect of microwave irradiation on the equilibrium thermodynamics was determined by measuring the elution time of breakthrough curves of phenol at high concentrations in a 20:80 (v/v) solution of methanol and water and microwave outputs of 15, 50, and 150 W. A qualitative comparison of the profiles of the propylbenzene peaks obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation affects significantly the peak shapes. However, a qualitative comparison of the profiles of the breakthrough curves of phenol obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation has no significant effect on their shapes. The peak sharpening observed may be due to an increase in the diffusivity, resulting from the dielectric polarization under microwave irradiation. This effect is directly related to an increase of the rate of mass transfers in the column. In contrast, the similarity of the overloaded band profiles at high concentrations suggests that the equilibrium thermodynamics is unaffected by microwave irradiation. This may be explained by the transparence of the stationary phase to microwaves at 2.45 GHz. The column temperature was measured at the column outlet under irradiation powers of 15, 30, 50, and 150 W. It increases with increasing power, the corresponding effluent temperatures being 25+/-1, 30+/-1, 35+/-1, and 45+/-1 degrees C, respectively. PMID:16199229

  15. Comparison of chromatographic band profiles obtained under microwave irradiated and non-irradiated reversed-phase liquid chromatography column

    SciTech Connect

    Galinada, Wilmer; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    The possible influence of the application of microwave energy to a reversed-phase liquid chromatography column on the mass transfer kinetics and the thermodynamics of equilibrium between mobile and stationary phases was examined. Chromatograms of propylbenzene and phenol were recorded under the same experimental conditions, on the same column, successively irradiated and not. The effect of microwave irradiation on the mass transfer kinetics was determined by measuring the second moment of small pulses of propylbenzene in a 70:30 (v/v) solution of methanol in water and microwave outputs of 15 and 30 W. The effect of microwave irradiation on the equilibrium thermodynamics was determined by measuring the elution time of breakthrough curves of phenol at high concentrations in a 20:80 (v/v) solution of methanol and water and microwave outputs of 15, 50, and 150 W. A qualitative comparison of the profiles of the propylbenzene peaks obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation affects significantly the peak shapes. However, a qualitative comparison of the profiles of the breakthrough curves of phenol obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation has no significant effect on their shapes. The peak sharpening observed may be due to an increase in the diffusivity, resulting from the dielectric polarization under microwave irradiation. This effect is directly related to an increase of the rate of mass transfers in the column. In contrast, the similarity of the overloaded band profiles at high concentrations suggests that the equilibrium thermodynamics is unaffected by microwave irradiation. This may be explained by the transparence of the stationary phase to microwaves at 2.45 GHz. The column temperature was measured at the column outlet under irradiation powers of 15, 30, 50, and 150 W. It increases with increasing power, the corresponding effluent temperatures being 25 {+-} 1, 30 {+-} 1, 35 {+-} 1, and 45 {+-} 1 C, respectively.

  16. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth in a series of contracts and grants exploring the advanced particulate pollution control technology of electron beam precipitation. The chief goal of the current contract is to develop a laboratory scale electron beam precharger using a pulsed electric field to the proof-of-concept stage. Contract tasks leading to the achievement of this goal are generally divided up into two categories: tasks required to bring the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) test system up to an operational level for the contract work, and tasks concerning the actual experimental and analytical phase of the study. Not unexpectedly, the early portion of the contract duration will be devoted to the commissioning of the EBP and its many subsystems, while the latter portion will devote itself to testing the new pulsed electron beam precharger.

  17. Pulsed excimer laser processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, D.

    1985-01-01

    The status of pulsed excimer laser processing of PV cells is presented. The cost effective feasibility of fabricating high efficiency solar cells on Czochralski wafers using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation, surface passivation, and front metallization. Laser annealing results were promising with the best AR coated cell having an efficiency of 16.1%. Better results would be expected with larger laser spot size because there was some degradation in open circuit voltage caused by laser spot overlap and edge effects. Surface heating and photolytic decomposition by the laser was used to deposit tungsten from the reaction of tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen. The line widths were 5 to 10 mils, and the depositions passed the tape adhesion test. Thinner lines are practical using an optimized optical system.

  18. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  19. Achieving high peak capacity production for gas chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography by minimizing off-column peak broadening.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ryan B; Siegler, W Christopher; Hoggard, Jamin C; Fitz, Brian D; Nadeau, Jeremy S; Synovec, Robert E

    2011-05-27

    By taking into consideration band broadening theory and using those results to select experimental conditions, and also by reducing the injection pulse width, peak capacity production (i.e., peak capacity per separation time) is substantially improved for one dimensional (1D-GC) and comprehensive two dimensional (GC×GC) gas chromatography. A theoretical framework for determining the optimal linear gas velocity (the linear gas velocity producing the minimum H), from experimental parameters provides an in-depth understanding of the potential for GC separations in the absence of extra-column band broadening. The extra-column band broadening is referred to herein as off-column band broadening since it is additional band broadening not due to the on-column separation processes. The theory provides the basis to experimentally evaluate and improve temperature programmed 1D-GC separations, but in order to do so with a commercial 1D-GC instrument platform, off-column band broadening from injection and detection needed to be significantly reduced. Specifically for injection, a resistively heated transfer line is coupled to a high-speed diaphragm valve to provide a suitable injection pulse width (referred to herein as modified injection). Additionally, flame ionization detection (FID) was modified to provide a data collection rate of 5kHz. The use of long, relatively narrow open tubular capillary columns and a 40°C/min programming rate were explored for 1D-GC, specifically a 40m, 180?m i.d. capillary column operated at or above the optimal average linear gas velocity. Injection using standard auto-injection with a 1:400 split resulted in an average peak width of ?1.5s, hence a peak capacity production of 40peaks/min. In contrast, use of modified injection produced ?500ms peak widths for 1D-GC, i.e., a peak capacity production of 120peaks/min (a 3-fold improvement over standard auto-injection). Implementation of modified injection resulted in retention time, peak width, peak height, and peak area average RSD%'s of 0.006, 0.8, 3.4, and 4.0%, respectively. Modified injection onto the first column of a GC×GC coupled with another high-speed valve injection onto the second column produced an instrument with high peak capacity production (500-800peaks/min), ?5-fold to 8-fold higher than typically reported for GC×GC. PMID:21255787

  20. Study of the transport of cadusafos in two tropical undisturbed soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisio Fernandez-Bayo, Jesus; Crevoisier, David; Saison, Carine; Geniez, Chantal; Huttel, Olivier; Samouelian, Anatja; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The use of pesticides to control agriculture pests is a common practice on most tropical plantations whose vulnerability to pesticide pollution is very important due to the frequent heavy rains that wash pesticides from target areas. Tropical volcanic soils have been scarcely investigated in this sense and monitoring the dynamic of pesticide at column scale is of great interest for a better understanding at catchment scale and risk modelling. The objective was to study and model the transport of cadusafos (CDS) in two undisturbed soil columns from a nitisol and an andosol, representative of the major soils in agricultural areas of the FWI. Undisturbed soil columns from andosol (sandy-loam soil) and nitisol (clay soil) from Guadeloupe Island were spiked with 14C-CDS along with 10 g of granulate Rugby®. To each soil column, 10 rain events of different intensities (20 and 40 mm/h during 4 and 2 hours, respectively) were applied with 4-7 days delay between two subsequent rain events. For the nitisol columns, the cumulated rain was halved (by decreasing duration of each rain event) since these soils occur in drier areas of Guadeloupe and because the imposed rain intensities led to the accumulation of water at the surface of the column. At the end of the leaching experiment the extractable and non-extractable remaining pesticide residues were determined along the soil profile. The andosol presented a very high permeability attributed to the preferential flow expected in this type of soil with high macroporosity due to the allophane materials. The maximum concentration of CDS was attained during the first rainfall event while the cumulated infiltrated volume of water was much less than the pore volume of the column soil. The peak concentration levels of CDS were almost constant during the first 5 rain events and they decreased during the subsequent rain events, probably due to degradation and/or ageing processes of CDS. The nitisol showed lower permeability reflected in the accumulation of water at the soil surface and in a delay in the beggining of percolation which lasted longer than in the andosol. The concentrations in percolated water constantly increased during each rainfall event and from one rainfall event to the other, without reaching a plateau at the end of the set of events. Single and dual-porosity modelling appraoches are compared for simulating the observed water flow and CDS sorption and transport in these two soils. In conclusion, it seems that soon after application, due to rapid flush processes, the risk of water contamination is high on andosols, whereas it is lower on nitisol where the displacement is much slower. But on the long term, given a higher availability of sorbed CDS to leaching in nitisol, cumulated water pollution by CDS stemming from nitisol percolation will be much larger than that from andosols. The modelling of these results will help to more accurately determine the predicted environmental concentrations of pesticides in ground and surface waters.