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Sample records for pulsed gas lasers

  1. Pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Louis W.; Fitzsimmons, William A.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  2. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  3. High Power Pulsed Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteman, W. J.

    1987-09-01

    Gas lasers have shown to be capable of delivering tens of terrawatt aspeak power or tens of kilowatt as average power. The efficiencies of most high power gas lasers are relatively high compared with other types of lasers. For instance molecular lasers, oscillating on low lying vibrational levels, and excimer lasers may have intrinsic efficiencies above 10%.The wavelengths of these gas lasers cover the range from the far infrared to the ultra-violet region, say from 12000 to 193 nm. The most important properties are the scalability, optical homogeneity of the excited medium, and the relatively low price per watt of output power. The disadvantages may be the large size of the systems and the relatively narrow line width with limited tunability compared with solid state systems producing the same peak power. High power gas lasers group into three main categories depending on the waste-heat handling capacity.

  4. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Alger, Terry W.

    1985-01-01

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  5. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1982-09-29

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  6. Continuous and Pulsed THz generation with molecular gas lasers and photoconductive antennas gated by femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Flavio C.; Nogueira, T.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Jarschel, Paulo F.; Frateschi, Newton C.; Viscovini, Ronaldo C.; Vieira, Bruno R. B.; Guevara, Victor M. B.; Pereira, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    We report THz generation based on two systems: 1) continuous-wave (cw) laser generation in molecular gas lasers, and 2) short pulse generation in photoconductive antennas, gated by femtosecond near-infrared Ti:sapphire lasers. With the first system, we have generated tens of monochromatic cw laser lines over the last years, extending roughly from 40 microns to several hundred microns. This is done by optical pumping of gas lasers based on polar molecules such as methanol and its isotopes. In the second system, under development, pulsed THz radiation is generated by a photoconductive antenna built in a semi-insulating GaAs substrate excited by femtosecond pulses from a near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser.

  7. Decay of transverse acoustic waves in a pulsed gas laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarny, V.A.

    1980-11-01

    The long-term characteristics of transverse acoustic waves in the cavity of a pulsed gaseous laser were studied by analyzing them in a straight duct configuration with nonlinear techniques used in sonic boom problems. A decaying sawtooth waveform containing a shockwave reverberated in the cavity transverse to the flow direction. In the asymptotic decay, the relative pressure perturbation of the wave varies as the 2/5 power of the product of the relative overpressure from the pulse and the speed of sound in the gas.

  8. Pulsed laser linescanner for a backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Bambha, Ray P.

    2004-02-10

    An active (laser-illuminated) imaging system is described that is suitable for use in backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI). A BAGI imager operates by imaging a scene as it is illuminated with radiation that is absorbed by the gas to be detected. Gases become "visible" in the image when they attenuate the illumination creating a shadow in the image. This disclosure describes a BAGI imager that operates in a linescanned manner using a high repetition rate pulsed laser as its illumination source. The format of this system allows differential imaging, in which the scene is illuminated with light at least 2 wavelengths--one or more absorbed by the gas and one or more not absorbed. The system is designed to accomplish imaging in a manner that is insensitive to motion of the camera, so that it can be held in the hand of an operator or operated from a moving vehicle.

  9. Ultra-Intense Laser Pulse Propagation in Gas and Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T. M.

    2004-10-26

    It is proposed here to continue their program in the development of theories and models capable of describing the varied phenomena expected to influence the propagation of ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulses with particular emphasis on guided propagation. This program builds upon expertise already developed over the years through collaborations with the NSF funded experimental effort lead by Professor Howard Milchberg here at Maryland, and in addition the research group at the Ecole Polytechnique in France. As in the past, close coupling between theory and experiment will continue. The main effort of the proposed research will center on the development of computational models and analytic theories of intense laser pulse propagation and guiding structures. In particular, they will use their simulation code WAKE to study propagation in plasma channels, in dielectric capillaries and in gases where self focusing is important. At present this code simulates the two-dimensional propagation (radial coordinate, axial coordinate and time) of short pulses in gas/plasma media. The plasma is treated either as an ensemble of particles which respond to the ponderomotive force of the laser and the self consistent electric and magnetic fields created in the wake of pulse or as a fluid. the plasma particle motion is treated kinetically and relativistically allowing for study of intense pulses that result in complete cavitation of the plasma. The gas is treated as a nonlinear medium with rate equations describing the various stages of ionization. A number of important physics issues will be addressed during the program. These include (1) studies of propagation in plasma channels, (2) investigation of plasma channel nonuniformities caused by parametric excitation of channel modes, (3) propagation in dielectric capillaries including harmonic generation and ionization scattering, (4) self guided propagation in gas, (5) studies of the ionization scattering instability recently

  10. Effect of laser pulse energy on the laser ignition of compressed natural gas fueled engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Dhananjay Kumar; Wintner, Ernst; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Laser pulses of few a nanoseconds' duration are focused by an appropriate converging lens system, leading to breakdown of the medium (combustible gases), resulting in the formation of intense plasma. Plasma thus induced can be used to initiate the combustion of combustible air-fuel mixtures in a spark ignition engine provided the energy of the plasma spark is high enough. Laser ignition has several advantages over the conventional spark ignition system, especially in case of lean air-fuel mixture. In this study, laser ignition of compressed natural gas was investigated in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC) as well as in a single-cylinder engine. Flame kernel visualizations for different pulse energy of natural gas-air mixtures were carried out in the CVCC. The images of the development of early flame kernel stages and its growth with time were recorded by shadowgraphy technique. The effect of laser pulse energy on the engine combustion, performance, and emissions was investigated using different air-fuel mixtures. Increased peak cylinder pressure, higher rate of heat release, faster combustion, and increased combustion stability were observed for higher laser pulse energies. The effect of laser pulse energy on the engine-out emissions was also investigated in this study.

  11. Prepulse effect on intense femtosecond laser pulse propagation in gas

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, Antonio; Tomassini, Paolo; Galimberti, Marco; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Koester, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ceccotti, Tiberio; D'Oliveira, Pascal; Auguste, Thierry; Monot, Pascal; Martin, Philippe

    2006-09-15

    The propagation of an ultrashort laser pulse can be affected by the light reaching the medium before the pulse. This can cause a serious drawback to possible applications. The propagation in He of an intense 60-fs pulse delivered by a Ti:sapphire laser in the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) mode has been investigated in conditions of interest for laser-plasma acceleration of electrons. The effects of both nanosecond amplified spontaneous emission and picosecond pedestals have been clearly identified. There is evidence that such effects are basically of refractive nature and that they are not detrimental for the propagation of a CPA pulse focused to moderately relativistic intensity. The observations are fully consistent with numerical simulations and can contribute to the search of a stable regime for laser acceleration.

  12. Temporal Behavior of the Pump Pulses, Residual Pump Pulses, and THz Pulses for D2O Gas Pumped by a TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Lijie; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhai, Yusheng; Su, Yuling; Zhou, Fanghua; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-08-01

    Temporal behavior of the pump pulses, residual pump pulses, and THz pulses for optically pumped D2O gas molecules was investigated by using a tunable TEA CO2 laser as the pumping source. The pulse profiles of pump laser pulses, residual pump pulses, and the THz output pulses were measured, simultaneously, at several different gas pressures. For THz pulse, the pulse delay between the THz pulse and the pump pulse was observed and the delay time was observed to increase from 40 to 70 ns with an increase in gas pressure from 500 to 1700 Pa. Both THz pulse broadening and compression were observed, and the pulse broadening effect transformed to the compression effect with increasing the gas pressure. For the residual pump pulse, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main pulse decreased with increasing gas pressure, and the main pulse disappeared at high gas pressures. The secondary pulses were observed at high gas pressure, and the time intervals of about 518 and 435 ns were observed between the THz output pulse and the secondary residual pump pulse at the pressure of 1400 Pa and 1700 Pa, from which the vibrational relaxation time constants of about 5.45 and 5.55 μs Torr were obtained.

  13. Quenching Plasma Waves in Two Dimensional Electron Gas by a Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael; Rudin, Sergey; Greg Rupper Collaboration; Andrey Muraviev Collaboration

    Plasmonic detectors of terahertz (THz) radiation using the plasma wave excitation in 2D electron gas are capable of detecting ultra short THz pulses. To study the plasma wave propagation and decay, we used femtosecond laser pulses to quench the plasma waves excited by a short THz pulse. The femtosecond laser pulse generates a large concentration of the electron-hole pairs effectively shorting the 2D electron gas channel and dramatically increasing the channel conductance. Immediately after the application of the femtosecond laser pulse, the equivalent circuit of the device reduces to the source and drain contact resistances connected by a short. The total response charge is equal to the integral of the current induced by the THz pulse from the moment of the THz pulse application to the moment of the femtosecond laser pulse application. This current is determined by the plasma wave rectification. Registering the charge as a function of the time delay between the THz and laser pulses allowed us to follow the plasmonic wave decay. We observed the decaying oscillations in a sample with a partially gated channel. The decay depends on the gate bias and reflects the interplay between the gated and ungated plasmons in the device channel. Army Research Office.

  14. Channel Formation in Long Laser Pulse Interaction with a Helium Gas Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, V.; De Wispelaere, E.; Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S.; Bonadio, R.; Coulaud, C.; Haroutunian, R.; Modena, A.; Puissant, D.; Stenz, C.; Hueller, S.; Casanova, M.

    1997-10-01

    Experimental realization of an electron density channel created by a low intensity laser in a helium gas jet is presented. The long (2.5mm) plasma channel is fully ionized and thus prevents undesirable refraction effects for propagation and guiding of a subsequent high intensity laser pulse. The channel parameters are easily controlled and well suited for laser guiding. The radial plasma expansion and the temperature evolution have been measured and compared to hydrodynamic simulations which show that the plasma expansion is governed by a thermal wave during the laser pulse. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Design and Construction of a High Voltage Pulsed Source for Electric Excitation of the Gas Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Xavier Daza; Neira, Oscar León B.; Díaz-Pérez, H. Abraham

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, the design, construction and implementation of High Voltage Pulsed Source for Electrical Excitation of the Gas Lasers, as a first phase of the research project "Design and Construction of an economically and reliable Laser System constituted by a molecular pulsed laser and a single optical head for dyes" is presented. We proposed and considered the design and the construction of a source of pulsed high voltage that adjusts to the requirements of the pumping system that requires a low pressure nitrogen laser. The design and construction of the source high voltage prototype is presented like part of the electrical pumping system for a Pulsed Nitrogen Laser. The electrical pumping System is conformed by three subsystems: the high pulsed regulated voltage Source, the storage and unloading system of electrical energy of active medium, and the frequency control system of discharge repetition (spark gap) constituted by a circuit RLC and the electrodes of the laser discharge tube. In the present work the aspects related to the pulsed high regulated voltage Source is presented, Our Source of high pulsed voltage is constituted by four fundamental stages: the Stage of Conversion AC-DC (voltage reducer), the Stage of Commutation by means of a Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT), the stage of Generation of signal modulated by the pulses width "PWM" (with base to Circuit TL 494) and the Stage of Elevation of Voltage (using a FlyBack Transformer).

  16. Pulse Compression of CO2 laser in SF6 and it's Mixtures with Dymel Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Dechang; Mahajan, Satish

    2003-10-01

    Laser pulse compression using OFID in ammonia, and CH3F gases has been reported in the past. Recent work in dymel gas indicated a four times sharper pulse than that in vacuum [1]. In the present work, experiments were conducted in SF6 gas to investigate the possibility of an OFID effecting a compressed CO2 laser pulse. An average of fourty laser pulses was acquired at a typical gas pressure in the test cell. Pressure of SF6 was varied from 0 to 2.5 torr while that of dymel (in a mixture with SF6) was varied from 0 to 6 torr. Pressure of SF6 was limited to a maximum of 2.5 torr due to strong absorption leading to weakening of output pulse. Results indicate that the addition of SF6 to dymel led to a variation in sharpness (intensity divided by pulsewidth) of a pulse and also to a shift in pressure at which maximum compression in dymel normally occurs. [1]D. Yi, and S.Mahajan,"Pulse Compression of CO2 laser by Optical Free Induction decay (OFID) Effect, Bulletin of APS,Vol.47,No.7,October 2002,pp.27,

  17. The development of a pulsed laser imaging system for natural gas leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, Thomas J.

    The detection of gas leaks represents a critical operation performed regularly by the gas industry to maintain the integrity and safety of its vast network of piping, both above and below the ground. We are developing a technology that allows the real-time imaging of gas plumes in a television format. Termed backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI), the technique operates by illuminating a scene with infrared laser radiation having a wavelength that is absorbed by the gas to be detected (in this case, methane). Backscattered laser radiation is used to create a video image of the scene. If a leak of the target gas is present in the field-of-view of the camera, it attenuates a portion of the backscatter and creates a dark cloud in the video picture. The specific purpose of this project is to investigate a new method of accomplishing BAGI using a pulsed laser source. The pulsed laser imager under development in this project is expected to have a range (greater than or equal to 40 m) and sensitivity (less than 10 ppm-m) that will surpass the respective attributes of a scanned continuous wave laser imager. The pulsed system will operate by flooding (rather than scanning) the imaged scene with pulses of laser radiation. Imaging will be accomplished using a focal-plane array camera that operates in a snapshot format. The higher power of the pulsed laser source and the more effective collection optics of the focal-plane array-based receiver will allow the performance enhancements to be achieved.

  18. A multiphase model for pulsed ns-laser ablation of copper in an ambient gas

    SciTech Connect

    Autrique, D.; Chen, Z.; Alexiades, V.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2012-07-30

    Laser ablation in an ambient gas is nowadays used in a growing number of applications, such as chemical analysis and pulsed laser deposition. Despite the many applications, the technique is still poorly understood. Therefore models describing the material evolution in time during short pulse laser irradiation can be helpful to unravel the puzzle and finally result in the optimization of the related applications. In the present work, a copper target is immersed in helium, initially set at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Calculations are performed for a Gaussian-shaped laser pulse with a wavelength of 532 nm, full width at half maximum of 6 ns, and laser fluences up to 10 J/cm{sup 2}. In order to describe the transient behaviour in and above the copper target, hydrodynamic equations are solved. An internal energy method accounting for pressure relaxation is applied for the description of the target. In the plume domain a set of conservation equations is solved, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Calculated crater depths and transmission profiles are compared with experimental results and similar trends are found. Our calculations indicate that for the laser fluence regime under study, explosive boiling could play a fundamental role in the plasma formation of metals under ns-pulsed laser irradiation.

  19. Theoretical analysis of fluorescence signals in filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses in nitrogen molecular gas

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo, E.; Becker, A.

    2005-10-15

    We study numerically and analytically the role of the combined effect of self-focusing, geometrical focusing, and the plasma defocusing in the formation of the fluorescence signal during the filamentation of a Ti:sapphire laser pulse in nitrogen molecular gas. Results of numerical simulations are used to estimate the number of excited ions in the focal volume, which is proportional to the fluorescence signal. We find good agreement between the theoretical results and the experimental data, showing that such data can be used to get further insight into the effective focal volume during filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses in transparent media.

  20. Charge exchange of laser-produced ions in a pulsed gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Antonov, V. M.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Posukh, V. G.; Melekhov, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Results of an experiment on the interaction of laser-produced plasma with a pulsed gas jet are reported. A resonant charge-exchange pumping of the n=3 level of the C3+ ion was observed. A spatial structure of the region of intensive interaction was obtained by a short time imaging of filtered plasma radiation. According to independent probe measurements, the interaction was realized at densities of ions and gas particles in excess of 1016 cm-3. The obtained data provide a prospect for future experiments on laser gain in the EUV spectral range based on charge-exchange pumping of the C5+ ion.

  1. Effect of background gas pressure and laser pulse intensity on laser induced plasma radiation of copper samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabian, S.; Aghaei, M.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2010-04-01

    Study of laser induced plasma emission of Cu in one dimension is numerically carried out. Effects of different background gas pressure (He), 100, 500, and 760 torr, and laser pulse intensities, 0.5, 0.7, and 1 GW/cm2, on the plasma emission as well as ablation processes are investigated. Under a specified condition, heat conduction equation in the target accompanied with gas dynamic equations in the plume is solved simultaneously. The mentioned equations are coupled to each other through the Knudsen layer conditions and the energy and mass balances at the interface between the target and the vapor. The Bremsstrahlung radiation of plasma and the spectral emission of copper atoms are studied under various background gas pressure and laser pulse intensities. Furthermore, number density of He, Cu, and the electron, pressure, and temperature of the plume under various conditions are obtained. In the early time after laser pulse, plasma radiation is mainly due to the Bremsstrahlung radiation while after some 10 ns, the plasma radiation is dominated by spectral emission of Cu atoms. A similar uncoupling is observed spatially. The Bremsstrahlung emission is dominant near the sample surface while at farther points the spectral emission is the dominant one. By increase in the background pressure and also the pulse intensity, the dominancy of the spectral emission would occur later in time and farther in position.

  2. Pulsed laser facilities operating from UV to IR at the Gas Laser Lab of the Lebedev Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, Andrei; Kholin, Igor; Vasil'Ev, Boris; Zvorykin, Vladimir

    2003-05-01

    Pulsed laser facilities developed at the Gas Lasers Lab of the Lebedev Physics Institute and their applications for different laser-matter interactions are discussed. The lasers operating from UV to mid-IR spectral region are as follows: e-beam pumped KrF laser (λ= 0.248 μm) with output energy 100 J; e-beam sustained discharge CO2(10.6 μm) and fundamental band CO (5-6 μm) lasers with output energy up to ~1 kJ; overtone CO laser (2.5-4.2 μm) with output energy ~ 50 J and N2O laser (10.9 μm) with output energy of 100 J; optically pumped NH3 laser (11-14 μm). Special attention is paid to an e-beam sustained discharge Ar-Xe laser (1.73 μm ~ 100 J) as a potential candidate for a laser-propulsion facility. The high energy laser facilities are used for interaction of laser radiation with polymer materials, metals, graphite, rocks, etc.

  3. Multifrequency laser probing of CO-containing gas mixtures excited in a pulsed discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Rulev, O A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2007-03-31

    The method of multifrequency laser probing is developed which can be used for diagnostics of the temperature and population of vibrational levels in gas mixtures containing CO molecules in excited vibrational states. The method is tested by studying the dynamics of the gas temperature and population of vibrational levels of the CO molecule in gas mixtures excited by a pulsed discharge. It is shown that the method provides the reduction of the gas temperature measurement error down to 3%. It is found that the population of lower vibrational levels in the CO-O{sub 2} mixture can exceed the population of levels in CO-He and CO-N{sub 2} laser mixtures by several times. (active media)

  4. Decomposition experiment of hydro-fluorocarbon gas by pulsed TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Kazuo; Udagawa, Shinsuke; Toyada, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with a trial experiment of decomposition of environmental gas R-12 by the pulsed TEA CO2 laser. Nowadays refrigerant R-12 and other hydro-chlorofluorocarbon gases are strongly prohibited to produce, as these gases have both strong ozone-depleting effects and green-house effects. The gases of already produced by huge amount should be decomposed as fast as possible by suitable technical methods. Along with the conventional kiln furnace of cement, arc discharge and the HG discharge are good methods for the freon decomposition. Both methods, however, have the weakness of electrode damages (arcing) or low-pressure operation (HF discharge). High power CO2 laser seems to have good properties for such decomposition with favorable wavelength for the absorption. In our small-scale experiment of gas decomposition a pulsed TEA CO2 laser of several joules is utilized to produce the plasma in R-12 flow channel of glass tube. The withdrawal of decomposed gases is performed by Ca alkalized water. The deposit mass is measured, and powder X-ray diffraction measurement is carried out on the deposit powder. The possibility of our laser gas decomposition is discussed.

  5. Ionization-induced dynamics of ultrashort laser pulses focused in a dense gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, E. S.; Kim, A. V.; Quiroga-Teixeiro, M.

    2009-10-01

    In the present paper we address several aspects of ionization-induced laser-gas interaction. First, we consider the ionization dynamics of an ultrashort laser pulse in the presence of additional electromagnetic perturbations, and show theoretically via dispersion relation analysis and numerically via 2D FDTD simulation that ionizationinduced scattering can occur even in the case of limited spatial and temporal scales and significantly affects pulse dynamics. Second, for the case of tight focusing of laser beam we show on the basis of numerical simulation that for 2D TE- and TM-polarized pulses there is a critical angle which delimits two qualitatively different regimes. For angles exceeding the critical one, the formed plasma distribution may become microstructured, otherwise the plasma structures are smooth. It is also shown than the critical angle and plasma-field dynamics depend significantly on pulse spectrum. Finally, we consider the impact of the electron collisions and Kerr nonlinearity and determine the boundaries within which the role of these effects is crucial.

  6. Self-injection and acceleration of electrons during ionization of gas atoms by a short laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.P.

    2006-04-15

    Using a relativistic three-dimensional single-particle code, acceleration of electrons created during the ionization of nitrogen and oxygen gas atoms by a laser pulse has been studied. Barrier suppression ionization model has been used to calculate ionization time of the bound electrons. The energy gained by the electrons peaks for an optimum value of laser spot size. The electrons created near the tail do not gain sufficient energy for a long duration laser pulse. The electrons created at the tail of pulse escape before fully interacting with the trailing part of the pulse for a short duration laser pulse, which causes electrons to retain sufficient energy. If a suitable frequency chirp is introduced then energy of the electrons created at the tail of the pulse further increases.

  7. Terahertz generation by nonlinear mixing of laser pulses in a clustered gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, V. K.

    2011-05-15

    A scheme of terahertz (THz) generation by two collinear laser pulses of finite spot size in a clustered gas is investigated theoretically. The lasers quickly ionize the atoms of the clusters, converting them into plasma balls, and exert a ponderomotive force on the cluster electrons, producing a beat frequency longitudinal current of limited transverse extent. The current acts as an antenna to produce beat frequency terahertz radiation. As the cluster expands under the hydrodynamic pressure, plasma frequency of cluster electrons {omega}{sub pe} decreases and approaches {radical}(3) times the frequency of laser, resonant heating and expansion of clusters occurs. On further expansion of clusters as {omega}{sub pe} approaches {radical}(3) times the terahertz frequency, resonant enhancement in THz radiated power occurs.

  8. Picosecond pulsed laser deposition of metal-oxide sensing layers with controllable porosity for gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekkonen, Ville; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Clarke, Fergus; Kaisto, Juho; Liimatainen, Jari; Pandian, Santhosh Kumar; Piirto, Jarkko; Siltanen, Mikael; Zolotukhin, Aleksey

    2016-03-01

    Recent results of properties and performance of {WO}_3 gas sensing layers produced by industrial picosecond pulsed laser deposition process developed by Picodeon Ltd Oy are presented in this paper. {WO}_3 layers with controllable porosity and nanostructure were successfully deposited on commercial sensor platforms, and basic measurements to characterize their performance as gas sensors gave promising results.

  9. Gas-Monitor Detector for Intense and Pulsed VUV/EUV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Feldhaus, J.; Gerth, Ch.; Gottwald, A.; Hahn, U.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Steeg, B.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.

    2004-05-01

    In the framework of current developments of new powerful VUV and EUV radiation sources, like VUV free-electron-lasers or EUV plasma sources for 13-nm lithography, we developed a gas-monitor detector in order to measure the photon flux of highly intense and extremely pulsed VUV and EUV radiation in absolute terms. The device is based on atomic photoionization of a rare gas at low particle density. Therefore, it is free of degradation and almost transparent, which allows the detector to be used as a continuously working beam-intensity monitor. The extended dynamic range of the detector allowed its calibration with relative standard uncertainties of 4% in the Radiometry Laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron-storage ring BESSY II in Berlin using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation at low photon intensities and its utilization for absolute photon flux measurements of high power sources. In the present contribution, we describe the design of the detector and its application for the characterization of VUV free-electron-laser radiation at the TESLA test facility in Hamburg. By first pulse resolved measurements, a peak power of more than 100 MW at a wavelength of 87 nm was detected.

  10. Ionization effects in the generation of wake-fields by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Makito, K.; Shin, J.-H.; Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S.; Kodama, R.

    2012-10-15

    Difference in mechanisms of wake-field generation and electron self-injection by high contrast femtosecond laser pulses in an initially neutral Argon gas and in pre-ionized plasma without ionization is studied via 2D particle-in-cell simulations including optical ionization of the media. For shorter laser pulses, 40 fs, ionization results only in an increase of the charge of accelerated electrons by factor of {approx}3 with qualitatively the same energy distribution. For longer pulses, 80 fs, a more stable wake field structure is observed in the neutral gas with the maximal energy of the accelerated electrons exceeding that in the fixed density plasma. In higher density Argon, an ionizing laser pulse converts itself to a complex system of solitons at a self-induced, critical density ramp.

  11. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Demchuk, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H2 – F2(NF3 or SF66) and He(Ne) – H2 – F2(NF3 or SF6) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%.

  12. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to <1 ns) in the delay of the output pulses' appearance with respect to the time of the beam's entrance into the switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  13. Ionization heating in rare-gas clusters under intense XUV laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas

    2010-07-15

    The interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses ({lambda}=32 nm, I=10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with small rare-gas clusters (Ar{sub 147}) is studied by quasiclassical molecular dynamics simulations. Our analysis supports a very general picture of the charging and heating dynamics in finite samples under short-wavelength radiation that is of relevance for several applications of free-electron lasers. First, up to a certain photon flux, ionization proceeds as a series of direct photoemission events producing a jellium-like cluster potential and a characteristic plateau in the photoelectron spectrum as observed in Bostedt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133401 (2008)]. Second, beyond the onset of photoelectron trapping, nanoplasma formation leads to evaporative electron emission with a characteristic thermal tail in the electron spectrum. A detailed analysis of this transition is presented. Third, in contrast to the behavior in the infrared or low vacuum ultraviolet range, the nanoplasma energy capture proceeds via ionization heating, i.e., inner photoionization of localized electrons, whereas collisional heating of conduction electrons is negligible up to high laser intensities. A direct consequence of the latter is a surprising evolution of the mean energy of emitted electrons as function of laser intensity.

  14. Creation of Pure Frozen Gas Targets for Ion Acceleration using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; Jiao, Xuejing; Quevedo, Hernan; Franke, Philip; Agustsson, Ronald; Oshea, Finn; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Woods, Kayley; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Sam; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas targets was developed at the University of Texas and will be tested at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which can hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consist of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice are frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. Frozen gas targets comprised of simple molecules like methane and single element gasses like hydrogen and deuterium will provide novel target configuations that will be compared with laser plasma interaction simulations. The targets will be shot with the ultra-intense short-pulse Trident laser. Accelerated ion spectra will be characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92T and electric field strength of 30kV. Hydrogen targets will be additionally characterized using stacks of copper which become activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal which be imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Details of target creation and pre-shot characterization will be presented.

  15. Exploration of pulse timing for multiple laser hits within a combined heat transfer, phase change, and gas dynamics model for laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullenix, Nathan; Povitsky, Alex

    2007-05-01

    Laser ablation involves heat transfer, phase changes and/or chemical reactions, and gas dynamics. All three of these processes are tightly coupled with each other. A model has previously been developed to simulate the nanosecond scale laser ablation of carbon. This model has been extended to accommodate longer term simulations and multiple laser pulses. The effects of varying the timing of a second laser pulse by tens of nanoseconds are explored. It is shown that by changing this interval one can control the total mass ablated and the mass transfer rate.

  16. Convoluted effect of laser fluence and pulse duration on the property of a nanosecond laser-induced plasma into an argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xueshi; Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu Jin; Sabourdy, David; Nguyen, Luc; Jalocha, Alain

    2013-01-07

    We studied the behavior of the plasma induced by a nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse on a metallic target (Al) during its propagation into argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure and especially over the delay interval ranging from several hundred nanoseconds to several microseconds. In such interval, the plasma is particularly interesting as a spectroscopic emission source for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIBS). We show a convoluted effect between laser fluence and pulse duration on the structure and the emission property of the plasma. With a relatively high fluence of about 160 J/cm{sup 2} where a strong plasma shielding effect is observed, a short pulse of about 4 ns duration is shown to be significantly more efficient to excite the optical emission from the ablation vapor than a long pulse of about 25 ns duration. While with a lower fluence of about 65 J/cm{sup 2}, a significantly more efficient excitation is observed with the long pulse. We interpret our observations by considering the post-ablation interaction between the generated plume and the tailing part of the laser pulse. We demonstrate that the ionization of the layer of ambient gas surrounding the ablation vapor plays an important role in plasma shielding. Such ionization is the consequence of laser-supported absorption wave and directly dependent on the laser fluence and the pulse duration. Further observations of the structure of the generated plume in its early stage of expansion support our explanations.

  17. Controlling the length of plasma waveguide up to 5 mm, produced by femtosecond laser pulses in atomic clustered gas.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Walid Tawfik; Chen, Guanglong; Kim, Jaehoon; Tao, Geng Xiao; Ahn, Jungkwen; Kim, Dong Eon

    2011-08-15

    We report the observation of longitudinally uniform plasma waveguide with a controlled length of up to nearly 5 mm, in argon clustered gas jet. This self-channeling plasma is obtained using a 35 mJ, 30 fs FWHM pulse as a pump laser pulse to create the plasma channel. A 1 mJ pulse of the same laser is used for probing the plasma channels using interferometric diagnostics. The radial distribution of the electron density confirms the formation of a plasma waveguide. Clustered argon enhances the absorption efficiency of femtosecond pulses which enables the use of pump pulses of only 35 mJ, approximately 10 times less energy than required for heating conventional gas targets. The plasma channel length is controlled by the laser focus point (F), the laser intensity (I), the pump-probe delay time (t) and the laser height from a nozzle (z). The variation of the electron density for these parameters is also studied. We found that the highest density of 1.2 x 10(19) cm(-3) was obtained at I = 5.2 x 10(16) W/cm(2), z = 2 mm and t = 7.6 ns. It was demonstrated that by using a clustered jet, both the plasma waveguide length and the plasma density could be controlled. PMID:21934955

  18. Acoustic experimental investigation of interaction femtosecond laser pulses with gas-aerosol media and biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, N. N.; Kabanov, A. M.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2008-02-01

    Using two optical acoustic approaches we experimentally investigated spatial location of filament zone of propagation channel of focused laser radiation. For femtosecond pulses passing in air it was shown that nonlinear focus length had spatial scale of 1/P at initial power P moderate for self-focusing and at optical system focus distance significantly lower than Rayleigh beam length. The results of experimental optical acoustic investigation of femto- and nanosecond pulses attenuation by some biological tissues (muscular tissue, adipose tissue, cutaneous covering, milk) and optical breakdown thresholds on these one are presented. It was shown that penetration depth of short laser pulse radiation into biological tissues is the same as for longer one. However, amplitude of acoustic response to a process of interaction of femtosecond laser pulse with biological tissue is larger in several times than that to interaction with nanosecond pulses of the same power and spectral distribution. The obtained of threshold values can be interesting for tabulation of limit allowable levels of irradiation at work with laser radiation. Such values are unknown for femtosecond laser pulses today.

  19. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  20. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  1. Bremsstrahlung {gamma}-ray generation by electrons from gas jets irradiated by laser pulses for radiographic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Zhidkov, Alexei; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2012-07-11

    Electron generation from a gas jet irradiated by low energy femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally as a promising source of radiation for radioisotope-free {gamma}-ray imaging systems. The calculated yield of {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2 MeV range, produced by low-average-power lasers and gas targets, exceeds the yields from solid tape targets up to 60 times. In addition, an effect of quasi-mono energetic electrons on {gamma}-ray imaging is also discussed.

  2. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  3. Formation of plasma channels in the interaction of a nanosecond laser pulse at moderate intensities with helium gas jets.

    PubMed

    De Wispelaere, E; Malka, V; Hüller, S; Amiranoff, F; Baton, S; Bonadio, R; Casanova, M; Dorchies, F; Haroutunian, R; Modena, A

    1999-06-01

    We report on a detailed study of channel formation in the interaction of a nanosecond laser pulse with a He gas jet. A complete set of diagnostics is used in order to characterize the plasma precisely. The evolution of the plasma radius and of the electron density and temperature are measured by Thomson scattering, Schlieren imaging, and Mach-Zehnder interferometry. In gas jets, one observes the formation of a channel with a deep density depletion on axis. Because of ionization-induced defocusing which increases the size of the focal spot and decreases the maximum laser intensity, no channel is observed in the case of a gas-filled chamber. The results obtained in various gas-jet and laser conditions show that the channel radius, as well as the density along the propagation axis, can be adjusted by changing the laser energy and gas-jet pressure. This is a crucial issue when one wants to adapt the channel parameters in order to guide a subsequent high-intensity laser pulse. The experimental results and their comparison with one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations show that the main mechanism for channel formation is the hydrodynamic evolution behind a supersonic electron heat wave propagating radially in the plasma. It is also shown from 2D simulations that a fraction of the long pulse can be self-guided in the channel it creates. The preliminary results and analyses on this subject have been published before [V. Malka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2979 (1997)]. PMID:11969699

  4. Dynamics of rare gas nanoclusters irradiated by short and intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheau, S.; Bonté, C.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Jouin, H.; Peyrusse, O.; Pons, B.; Santos, J. J.

    2007-05-01

    We report on a joint experimental-theoretical effort to shed light on the dynamics of rare gas (Ar) nanoclusters irradiated by short and intense laser pulses. The experiments employ a streak camera coupled to a conical crystal to yield energy- and time-resolved X-ray spectra, in the keV range on picosecond scale. These spectra display ultrafast subpicosecond ionization dynamics, leading to highly charged states such as Ar 16+, and indicate that the duration of the energetic X-rays is less than the experimental 1.3 ps temporal resolution. The theoretical calculations rely on the well-known nanoplasma model, which has been improved to represent the collisional ionization processes that are of importance in nanoplasma dynamics. Allowance is made for high-order ionization transitions involving intermediate excited states. The simulations indicate significant populations of excited states of highly charged ions, in agreement with the experimental findings. Further, detailed collisional-radiative calculations indicate that the duration of the X-ray bursts is less than 100 fs.

  5. Electron-ion collision rates in noble gas clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2012-05-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of electron-ion collision rates in xenon gas clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The present analysis is based on the eikonal approximation (EA), the first Born approximation (FBA) and the classical (CL) methods. The calculations are performed using the plasma-screened Rogers potential introduced by Moll et al. [J. Phys. B. 43, 135103 (2010)] as well as the Debye potential for a wide range of experimental parameters. We find that the magnitudes of electron-ion collision frequency obtained in the EA do not fall as rapidly with the kinetic energy of electrons as in the FBA and CL methods for higher charge states of xenon ion (Xe8+ and Xe14+). Furthermore, EA shows that the effect of the inner structure of ion is most dominant for the lowest charge state of xenon ion (Xe1+). In the case of the present effective potential, FBA overestimates the CL results for all three different charge states of xenon, whereas for the Debye potential, both the FBA and CL methods predict collision frequencies which are nearly close to each other.

  6. Propagation dynamics of femtosecond laser pulses in a hollow fiber filled with argon: constant gas pressure versus differential gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhuda, Muhammad; Suda, Akira; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Hatayama, Masatoshi; Nagasaka, Keigo

    2003-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of femtosecond laser pulses propagating in a hollow fiber filled with argon, through a full numerical solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The simulation results show that, if the intensity is low and no ionization takes place, the spatial profile of the beam does not change very much so that its propagation model may be simplified to a one-dimensional model. If the intensity is high and ionization takes place, the spatial dynamics as well as temporal dynamics become very complicated because of self-focusing and defocusing. It is found that, for the same value of the B integral, self-focusing inside a hollow fiber can be substantially suspended by a differential gas pressure technique, where the gas pressure is set to be a minimum at the entrance and then increased with the propagation distance. Numerical simulations show that using such a technique, the energy transmitted during propagation inside hollow fiber is significantly enhanced, and the spatial phase is also improved.

  7. Pulsed electron-beam sustained discharge CO laser on oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Seleznev, L V

    2008-02-28

    It is shown that the addition of molecular oxygen to the working mixture of a pulsed electron-beam sustained-discharge (EBSD) laser CO amplifier leads to the increase in the small-signal gain (SSG) at the fundamental vibrational v+1{yields}v transitions in a CO molecule for v=6-13, which is explained by the increase in the population of vibrational levels. In this case, the temporal parameters of the dynamics decrease at all probed transitions. Variations observed in the SSG dynamics are explained by analysing the kinetic processes of vibrational-vibrational exchange between molecules. The study of lasing parameters of a pulsed CO laser showed that the threshold energy input decreased with increasing the oxygen content in the working mixture. It is found that the CO laser efficiency at fundamental transitions increases with the addition of oxygen, the maximum efficiency being achieved at lower energy inputs. It is shown that the pulsed EBSD CO laser can operate on the air working mixture both at the fundamental transitions and the first vibrational overtone transitions v+2{yields}v. (lasers. amplifiers)

  8. CFD assisted simulation of temperature distribution and laser power in pulsed and CW pumped static gas DPALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, Karol; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2015-10-01

    An analysis of radiation, kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is reported. The analysis is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) model. The CFD code which solves the gas conservation equations includes effects of natural convection and temperature diffusion of the species in the DPAL mixture. The gas flow conservation equations are coupled to the equations for DPAL kinetics and to the Beer-Lambert equations for pump and laser beams propagation. The DPAL kinetic processes in the Cs/CH4 (K/He) gas mixtures considered involve the three low energy levels, (1) n2S1/2, (2) n2P3/2 and (3) n2P1/2 (where n=4,6 for K and Cs, respectively), three excited alkali states and two alkali ionic states. Using the CFD model, the gas flow pattern and spatial distributions of the pump and laser intensities in the resonator were calculated for end-pumped CW and pulsed Cs and K DPALs. The DPAL power and medium temperature were calculated as a function of pump power and pump pulse duration. The CFD model results were compared to experimental results of Cs and K DPALs.

  9. Dynamic mechanism of the velocity splitting of ablated particles produced by pulsed-laser deposition in an inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X. C.; Wang, Y. L.; Chu, L. Z.; Deng, Z. C.; Liang, W. H.; Galalaldeen, I. I. A.; Fu, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    The transport dynamics of ablated particles produced by pulsed-laser deposition in an inert gas is investigated via the Monte Carlo simulation method. The splitting mechanism of ablated particles is discussed by tracking every ablated particle with their forces, velocities and locations. The force analysis demonstrates that whether the splitting appears or not is decided by the releasing way of the driving force acting on the ablated particles. The "average" drag force, which is related to the mass and radius of the ambient gas, determines the releasing way of the driving force. Our simulated results are approximately in agreement with the previous experimental data.

  10. Electron dynamics in strong laser pulse illumination of large rare gas clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, U.; Rost, J. M.

    2005-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of up to 105 electrons resulting from illuminating a xenon cluster with 9093 atoms with intense laser pulses of different length and peak intensity. Interesting details of electron motion are identified which can be probed with a time resolution of 100 attoseconds. Corresponding experiments would shed light on unexplored territory in complex electronic systems such as clusters and they would also permit to critically access the present theoretical description of this dynamics.

  11. The flip-over effect in pulsed laser deposition: Is it relevant at high background gas pressures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Schneider, Christof W.; Döbeli, Max; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    In pulsed laser deposition the use of a rectangular or elliptical beam spot with a non 1:1 aspect ratio leads to the so called flip-over effect. Here, the longest dimension of the laser spot results in the shortest direction of plasma plume expansion. This effect has been mainly reported for vacuum depositions of single element targets and is particularly noticeable when the aspect ratio of the beam spot is large. We investigate the flip-over effect in vacuum and at three relevant background-gas pressures for pulsed laser deposition using a La0.4Ca0.6MnO3 target by measuring the thickness dependence of the deposited material as a function of angle. The film thicknesses and compositions are determined by Rutherford backscattering and argon is used to reduce the influence of additional chemical reactions in the plasma. The results show the prevalence of the flip-over effect for all pressures except for the highest, i.e. 1 × 10-1 mbar, where the film thickness is constant for all angles. The composition profiles show noticeable compositional variations of up to 30% with respect to the target material depending on the background gas pressure, the angular location, and the laser spot dimensions.

  12. Kinetic study of terahertz generation based on the interaction of two-color ultra-short laser pulses with molecular hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani Gishini, M. S.; Ganjovi, A.; Saeed, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, using a two dimensional particle in cell-Monte Carlo collision simulation scheme, interaction of two-color ultra-short laser pulses with the molecular hydrogen gas (H2) is examined. The operational laser parameters, i.e., its pulse shape, duration, and waist, are changed and, their effects on the density and kinetic energy of generated electrons, THz electric field, intensity, and spectrum are studied. It is seen that the best pulse shape generating the THz signal radiation with the highest intensity is a trapezoidal pulse, and the intensity of generated THz radiation is increased at the higher pulse durations and waists. For all the operational laser parameters, the maximum value of emitted THz signal frequency always remains lower than 5 THz. The intensity of applied laser pulses is taken about 1014 w/cm2, and it is observed that while a small portion of the gaseous media gets ionized, the radiated THz signal is significant.

  13. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  14. Influence of ambient gas on the microstructural properties of Er-doped nanocrystalline Si film fabricated by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; Chu, Lizhi; Duan, Pingguang; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yinglong; F, Guangsheng

    2007-12-01

    Er-doped nanocrystalline Si thin films were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation in high-purity Ar gas with different gas pressures at room temperature and post-annealing technology under different temperature in nitrogen. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM), x-ray diffraction(XRD) and Raman were employed to picture the microstructure of films. The SEM photographs showed that the morphology of film was transformed from the uniform nanoparticles in size to the web-like structure with the increase of gas pressure, which was attributed to the different collision cooling process of ablated particles. Raman and XRD spectra showed that the introduction of Ar gas could effectively improve the crystallinity degree of the samples and Si nanoparticle size could be controlled by adjusting the post-annealing temperature which was critical for improving the luminescent intensity of Er 3+ ion. More uniform and higher crystallinity degree Er-doped Si thin films could be obtained at lower annealing temperature.

  15. Pulse-shaping circuit for laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Narrower, impedence-matched pulses initiate stabler electric discharges for gas lasers. Discharges are more efficient, more compact, capable of high repetition rate, and less expensive than conventional electron-beam apparatus, but gas tends to break down and form localized arcs. Pulse-shaping circuit compresses width of high-voltage pulses from relatively-slow rise-time voltage generator and gradually grades circuit impedance from inherent high impedance of generator to low impedence of gas.

  16. Propagation dynamics of an ultrashort, high energy laser pulse via self-modulation in gas medium with atmospheric pressure for laser compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Kudo, Masashi; Sakai, Shohei; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2010-08-01

    Self-compression of 20-mJ laser pulses has been demonstrated in a free-space argon-filled cell. A 130-fs pulse was compressed to less than 60 fs (full width at half maximum) with an output energy of 17 mj at an argon gas pressure of 25 kPa, corresponding to an input peak power of 3.65 times the self-focusing critical power through a single filament in a 10-mJ energy region.

  17. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO 2 laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D.; Bokorov, M.; Trtica, M.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of a TEA CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm2 in the surrounding of air, N2, O2 or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO2 laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N2 and O2, and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  18. Gas bubble formation in fused silica generated by ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Cvecek, Kristian; Miyamoto, Isamu; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-06-30

    During processing of glass using ultra-fast lasers the formation of bubble-like structures can be observed in several glass types such as fused silica. Their formation can be exploited to generate periodic gratings in glasses but for other glass processing techniques such as waveguide-writing or glass welding by ultra-fast lasers the bubble formation proves often detrimental. In this work we present experiments and their results in order to gain understanding of the origins and on the underlying formation and transportation mechanisms of the gas bubbles. PMID:24977843

  19. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.; Delaporte, Ph.; Pereira, A.; Grojo, D.; Torres, R.; Sarnet, Th.; Sentis, M.

    2010-03-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  20. Acceleration of electrons generated during ionization of a gas by a nearly flat profile laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    2009-09-15

    A scheme of acceleration of electrons generated during ionization of krypton by nearly flat radial and nearly flat temporal laser pulse profiles has been suggested. The energy spectrum of the electrons suggests that energy of the electrons is higher for a nearly flat temporal profile than that for a nearly flat radial profile. The suppression of scattering of the electrons is better for a nearly flat radial profile than that for a nearly flat temporal profile. The energy of the electrons increases, scattering decreases, and beam quality improves with an increase in flatness of radial and temporal profiles.

  1. Gas-dynamic explosion of water microparticles under action high-power femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanov, Alexander A.; Geints, Yuri E.; Apeksimov, Dmitrii V.

    2006-02-01

    Among the broad audience of problems of atmospheric nonlinear optics the important place is occupied with a problem about interaction of intensive laser radiation with water microparticles. Drops, being in a field of powerful light radiation, owing to effects of evaporation or explosion change the optical characteristics and influence on the optical properties of an environment. It results to that process and the distribution of intensive laser radiation in a particle is characterized by self-influence and is capable to change the internal power of a drop due to occurrence of areas of optical breakdown. In the report the model of destruction of water microparticles under action of supershort laser radiation is submitted. The physical contents of model is the effect of shock boiling up of a liquid at it gas-dynamic expansion from areas subject to optical breakdown.

  2. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics. PMID:20672069

  3. Pulsed atomic soliton laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, L.D.; Brand, J.

    2004-09-01

    It is shown that simultaneously changing the scattering length of an elongated, harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate from positive to negative and inverting the axial portion of the trap, so that it becomes expulsive, results in a train of self-coherent solitonic pulses. Each pulse is itself a nondispersive attractive Bose-Einstein condensate that rapidly self-cools. The axial trap functions as a waveguide. The solitons can be made robustly stable with the right choice of trap geometry, number of atoms, and interaction strength. Theoretical and numerical evidence suggests that such a pulsed atomic soliton laser can be made in present experiments.

  4. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  5. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  6. Laser pulse sampler

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  7. Laser pulse detector

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.; Akerman, M.A.

    1979-08-13

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  8. Laser pulse detector

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Akerman, M. Alfred

    1981-01-01

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  9. Generation of 4.3 fs, 1 mJ laser pulses via compression of circularly polarized pulses in a gas-filled hollow-core fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowei; Jullien, Aurélie; Malvache, Arnaud; Canova, Lorenzo; Borot, Antonin; Trisorio, Alexandre; Durfee, Charles G; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2009-05-15

    We report the generation of 4.3 fs, 1 mJ pulses at 1 kHz using a hollow-core fiber compressor seeded with circularly polarized laser pulses. We observe up to 30% more energy throughput compared to the case of linearly polarized laser input, together with significantly improved output spectral stability. Seeding with circularly polarized pulses proves to be an effective approach for high-energy operation of the hollow-fiber compression technique. PMID:19448830

  10. Semiconductor nanocrystallite formation using inert gas ambient pulsed laser ablation and its application to light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Yamada, Yuka; Suzuki, Nobuyasu; Makino, Toshiharu; Orii, Takaaki; Onai, Seinosuke

    1999-07-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in inert background gases can synthesize the nanoscaled silicon (Si), for studying its material properties as one of the quantum confinement effects. We report an optimized condition in Si nanocrystalline formation by the PLA in inert background gas, varying processing parameters: pulse energy and width, inert background gas pressure. The optimized process can prepare well-dispersed Si nanocrystallites without any droplets and debris. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the processing parameters Si nanocrystallites without any droplets and debris. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the processing parameters on transition from amorphous-like Si thin films to nanocrystallites. It was found that there is a processing window of the inert background gas pressure where the carrier confinement effects become apparent. Next, we have fabricated electroluminescent (EL), diodes with active layers of the Si nanocrystallites. The structure of the EL diodes was semitransparent platinum electrode/Si nanocrystallite layer/p-type Si/Pt electrode. We have observed visible spectra of not only green photoluminescence, but also red EL, at room temperature. Furthermore, we have found that the EL diodes showed strong nonlinear dependence of EL intensity on current density.

  11. Ion Acceleration from Pure Frozen Gas Targets using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; O'Shea, Finn; Jiao, Xuejing; Agustsson, Ronald; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Samuel; Quevedo, Hernan; Woods, Kaley; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2014-10-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas ice targets was developed and tested on the Trident laser system at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which could hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consisted of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice were frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. The thickness of the ice targets was determined by using alpha spectroscopy. Accelerated ion spectra were characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92 T and electric field strength of 30kV and radio-chromic film stacks. Hydrogen targets were additionally characterized using stacks of copper which became activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal. The beta decay was imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Results of the interchangeable, laser-based ion accelerator will be presented. Work Supported by NIH grant.

  12. Effects of collision between two plumes on plume expansion dynamics during pulsed laser ablation in background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezu, Ikurou; Sakamoto, Naomichi; Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Yasuhiro; Nobuzawa, Koichiro; Sugimura, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Si and Ge targets were simultaneously irradiated by individual two pulsed lasers, and two plumes from the targets were collided head-on with expectation to prepare hybrid nanoparticles. We investigate effects of He background gas pressure on plume collision dynamics. Three characteristic behaviors of plume expansion dynamics are observed at low, middle, and high background gas pressure regions. Interaction between the two atomic species during plume expansion was small and the effect of collision was hardly observed at a low background gas pressure, 130 Pa, while spatial evolution of the plume was suppressed at middle pressure, 270 Pa, due to collision of the two plumes. At high pressure, 2700 Pa, plume expansion is suppressed by background gas and the effect of a direct collision of two plumes was small. These results indicate that plume collision dynamics, which governs nanoparticle formation, and the mixture of Si and Ge species can be varied by background gas pressure. The deposit near the center of two targets was nanoparticles that were composed of Si and Ge.

  13. CW-pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J. C.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus for generating a spatially coherent laser beam having both CW and pulsed modes is disclosed. The modes are generated in differing volumetric regions of a single gain medium excited by a continuous energy pump. The CW portion of the output beam passes from the gain medium through a partially transmissive output coupling. The pulsed modes in the output beam are created in the respective region of the gain medium when transition materials from a selected group are stimulated to undergo an abrupt change between their reflective and transmissive states. Either cavity dumped or Q-switched configurations can be created by selective and patterned location of the transition materials at the ends of the gain medium. Symmetric organization of the volumetric regions within the gain medium allows temporal superposition of the two modes while maintaining spatial distinctiveness within the laser beam generated.

  14. Pulsed laser microtomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. B.; Bonch-Bruevich, A. M.; Vasil'Ev, V. I.; Ionov, L. N.; Nikolaev, S. D.; Starobogatov, I. O.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes a pulsed laser tomographic apparatus that has been implemented in practice and has a spatial resolution of 2-5 microns in the transverse direction and approximately 70 microns in the probe-radiation propagation direction. Experiments have been performed with model objects. Results have been obtained that confirm the possibility of early diagnosis of skin mycoses that cannot be diagnosed by existing methods.

  15. 100-kHz-rate gas-phase thermometry using 100-ps pulses from a burst-mode laser.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sukesh; Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R

    2015-11-01

    Temperature measurements based on gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy are demonstrated in reacting flows at a rate of 100 kHz employing a burst-mode laser with a pulse duration of ∼100  ps. The recently developed picosecond-duration, high-energy burst-mode laser is used to pump an optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier that produces broadband light centered at ∼680  nm to provide the Stokes beams for excitation of the rovibrational Raman transitions of H(2). The 532-nm output of the picosecond burst-mode laser is then utilized as a pump beam for the CARS process that generates 100 single-shot spectra at a rate of 100 kHz during the 1-ms duration burst. Coherent spectroscopy-based temperature measurements at 100 kHz will significantly aid the understanding of transient and unsteady flow phenomena related to turbulent combustion, transonic and hypersonic flows, high-enthalpy flows, and the dynamics of energetic materials. PMID:26512535

  16. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  17. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  18. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  19. Plume propagation and Pt film growth during shadow-masked pulsed laser deposition in a buffer Ar gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fominski, V. Yu.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Gnedovets, A. G.; Romanov, R. I.; Volosova, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Shadow-masked pulsed laser deposition (SMPLD) enables the preparation of films that contain none of the droplets that are normally formed in laser irradiation of the target. The platinum (Pt) film produced by SMPLD was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) of helium ions. The film thickness distribution across the substrate surface took the shape of a simple crater, and the film thickness on the crated "bottom" (center of the shadow area) was approximately 5 times less than that on the "mound" (edge of the shadow area). Monte Carlo collision (MCC) modeling of the laser plume movement during SMPLD was performed to clarify the role of the mask in the formation of the Pt films. The dynamics of the Pt atoms in the laser plume was studied using the vacuum deposition method through a narrow slit onto a rapidly displaced substrate, augmented by RBS measurements of the deposited film thickness along the substrate movement direction. The ionic flux was specifically measured using an ion probe. MCC simulation allowed the changes in the basic parameters of the deposited atom stream to be evaluated with the use of a mask. Comparison of the experimental and calculated distribution of the Pt film indicated that the best correlation was observed using the interpenetration model of the plume and buffer gas (argon, Ar) accompanied by elastic collisions of Pt atoms with the Ar atoms using the variable hard sphere model. Atomic flux models were utilized to imitate the growth of individual Pt crystals using the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In the SMPLD case, the root mean square roughness of the model crystal surface increased by ∼10% and the concentration of vacancies increased by ∼4% compared with the model crystal obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The surface topography of the experimental Pt films was defined by the nanocrystal nature of their structure. The use of a mask

  20. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  1. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  2. Formation of the active medium in high-power repetitively pulsed gas lasers pumped by an electron-beam-controlled discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulaev, V. D.; Lysenko, S. L.

    2015-07-01

    A high-power repetitively pulsed e-beam-controlled discharge CO2 laser is simulated numerically; the simulation results are compared with experimental data. Optimal sizes and design of electrodes and configuration of the external magnetic field are found, which allow one to introduce no less than 90% electric pump energy into a specified volume of the active medium, including the active volume of a laser with an aperture of 110 × 110 cm. The results obtained can also be used to design other types of highpower gas lasers.

  3. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  4. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  5. Lasers for ultrashort light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, J.; Wilhelmi, B.

    1987-01-01

    The present rapid expansion of research work on picosecond lasers and their application makes it difficult to survey and comprehend the large number of publications in this field. This book aims to provide an introduction to the field starting with the very basic and moving on to an advanced level. Contents: Fundamentals of the interaction between light pulses and matter; Fundamentals of lasers for ultrashort light pulses; Methods of measurement; Active modelocking; Synchronously pumped lasers; Passive modelocking of dye lasers; Passive modelocking of solid state lasers; Nonstationary nonlinear optical processes; Ultrafast spectroscopy.

  6. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C5H12) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 1014 W/cm2, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  7. Calorimeters for pulsed lasers: calibration.

    PubMed

    Thacher, P D

    1976-07-01

    A calibration technique is developed and tested in which a calorimeter used for single-shot laser pulse energy measurements is calibrated with reference to a cw power standard using a chopped cw laser beam. A pulsed laser is required only to obtain the relative time response of the calorimeter to a pulse. With precautions as to beam alignment and wavelength, the principal error of the technique is that of the cw standard. Calibration of two thermopiles with cone receivers showed -2.5% and -3.5% agreement with previous calibrations made by the National Bureau of Standards. PMID:20165270

  8. 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch for multimodule, multiterawatt pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechien, K. R.; Stygar, W. A.; Savage, M. E.; Wakeland, P. E.; Anaya, V.; Artery, D. S.; Baremore, M. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Chavez, R.; Coombs, G. D.; Corley, J. P.; Jones, P. A.; Kipp, A. K.; Lewis, B. A.; Lott, J. A.; Lynch, J. J.; McKee, G. R.; Ploor, S. D.; Prestwich, K. R.; Roznowski, S. A.; Spencer, D. C.; White, S. D.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    A 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch (LTGS) is used to synchronize the 36 modules of the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Each module includes one switch, which serves as the last command-fired switch of the module, and hence is used to determine the time at which each module electrically closes relative to the other modules. The switch is ˜81-cm in length, ˜45-cm in diameter, and is immersed in mineral oil. The outer switch envelope consists of six corrugated monomer-cast acrylic insulators and five contoured stainless-steel rings. The trigger electrodes are fabricated from copper-infused tungsten. The switch is pressurized with several atmospheres of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which is turbulently purged within 2 seconds after every shot. Each switch is powered from a 6-MV, 0.78-MJ Marx generator which pulse charges a 24-nF intermediate-store water capacitor in 1.4-μs. Closure of the switch allows power to flow into pulse-forming transmission lines. The power pulse is subsequently compressed by water switches, which results in a total accelerator output power in excess of 70-TW. A previous version of the LTGS performed exceptionally at a 5.4-MV, 0.7-MA level on an engineering test module used for switch development. It exhibited a 1-σ jitter of ˜5ns, a prefire and flashover rate less than 0.1%, and a lifetime in excess of 150 shots. When installed on the Z accelerator, however, the switch exhibited a prefire probability of ˜3%, a flashover probability of ˜7%, and a 15-ns jitter. The difference in performance is attributed to several factors such as higher total charge transfer, exposure to more debris, and more stressful dynamic mechanical loading upon machine discharge. Under these conditions, the replacement lifetime was less than ten shots. Since refurbishment of Z in October 2007, there have been three LTGS design iterations to improve the performance at 6.1-MV. The most recent design exhibits a prefire rate of less than 0.1%, a

  9. Gas-dynamic perturbations in an electric-discharge repetitively pulsed DF laser and the role of He in their suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdokimov, P. A.; Sokolov, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    The gas-dynamic perturbations in a repetitively pulsed DF laser are studied using a Michelson interferometer. Based on the analysis of experimental data obtained in two experimental sets (working medium without buffer gas and with up to 90% of He), it is concluded that such phenomena as isentropic expansion of a thermal plug, gas heating by shock waves and resonance acoustic waves do not considerably decrease the upper limit of the pulse repetition rate below a value determined by the time of the thermal plug flush out of the discharge gap. It is suggested that this decrease for a DF laser with the SF6 - D2 working mixture is caused by the development of overheat instability due to an increased energy deposition into the near-electrode regions and to the formation of electrode shock waves. Addition of He to the active media of the DF laser changes the discharge structure and improves its homogeneity over the discharge gape cross section, thus eliminating the reason for the development of this instability. A signification dilution of the active medium of a DF laser with helium up to the atmospheric pressure allowed us to achieve the limiting discharge initiation frequencies with the active medium replacement ratio K ~ 1.

  10. Multiplex electric discharge gas laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, James B. (Inventor); Pacala, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A multiple pulse electric discharge gas laser system is described in which a plurality of pulsed electric discharge gas lasers are supported in a common housing. Each laser is supplied with excitation pulses from a separate power supply. A controller, which may be a microprocessor, is connected to each power supply for controlling the application of excitation pulses to each laser so that the lasers can be fired simultaneously or in any desired sequence. The output light beams from the individual lasers may be combined or utilized independently, depending on the desired application. The individual lasers may include multiple pairs of discharge electrodes with a separate power supply connected across each electrode pair so that multiple light output beams can be generated from a single laser tube and combined or utilized separately.

  11. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  12. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  13. Dual-Laser-Pulse Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Early, James W.; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2006-01-01

    A dual-pulse laser (DPL) technique has been demonstrated for generating laser-induced sparks (LIS) to ignite fuels. The technique was originally intended to be applied to the ignition of rocket propellants, but may also be applicable to ignition in terrestrial settings in which electric igniters may not be suitable.

  14. Pulsed Single Frequency Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed single frequency fiber lasers with mJ level near 1 micron, 1.55 micron and 2 micron wavelengths were demonstrated by using our proprietary highly doped fibers. These fiber lasers exhibit excellent long term stable operation with M2<1.2.

  15. Breakdown of a gas on a metallic surface by CO2 laser pulses of 10-1000 microsec duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. S.; Popov, A. M.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Seleznev, B. V.; Khropov, S. M.

    1985-04-01

    The formation of a plasma on the surface of a metal target under direct exposure to a CO2 laser is studied theoretically. A classical kinetic equation is derived to calculate the critical radiation intensity of several metallic target materials. Experimental measurements of the time to the development of optical breakdown are found to agree with the theoretical results. It is shown that the breakdown discontinuity of the target shifts to the front of the laser pulse if the temperature of the radiation exceeds the critical temperature. No relation was found between the breakdown discontinuity and the boiling point of the metallic target materials.

  16. Overview of repetitively pulsed photolytic iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlie, L. A. V.

    1996-02-01

    The performance of a repetitively pulsed, 70 joule, closed cycle 1.3 (mu) M photolytic atomic iodine laser with excellent beam quality (BQ equals 1.15) is presented. This BQ was exhibited in the fundamental mode from a M equals 3.1 confocal unstable resonator at a 0.5 Hz repetition rate. A closed cycle scrubber/laser fuel system consisting of a condensative- evaporative section, two Cu wool I2 reactor regions, and an internal turbo-blower enabled the laser to operate very reliably with low maintenance. The fuel system provided C3F7I gas at 10 - 60 torr absent of the photolytic quenching by-product I2. Using a turbo- molecular blower longitudinal flow velocities greater than 10 m/s were achieved through the 150 cm long by 7.5 multiplied by 7.5 cm2 cross sectional photolytic iodine gain region. In addition to the high laser output and excellent BQ, the resulting 8 - 12 microsecond laser pulse had a coherence length greater than 45 meters and polarization extinction ratio better than 100:1. Projections from this pulsed photolytic atomic iodine laser technology to larger energies, higher repetition rates, and variable pulse widths are discussed.

  17. Energy absorption of free rare gas clusters irradiated by intense VUV pulses of a free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, J.; Wabnitz, H.; Laarmann, T.; Gürtler, P.; Laasch, W.; Swiderski, A.; Möller, Th.; de Castro, A. R. B.

    2003-07-01

    As one of the first experiments at the free electron laser of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) the Coulomb explosion of Xenon clusters irradiated with high intensity pulses at a wavelength of 98 nm has been observed. Classical trajectory calculations have been performed in order to illuminate the energy absorption process. Comparison with typical parameters in the infrared regime shows that above barrier ionization is suppressed due to the fast oscillating field and thermionic ionization prevails.

  18. Generation of 1.5 cycle 0.3 TW laser pulses using a hollow-fiber pulse compressor.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyun; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Nam, Chang Hee

    2009-08-01

    Pulse compression in a differentially pumped neon-filled hollow fiber was used to generate high-power few-cycle laser pulses. The pulse compression process was optimized by adjusting gas pressure and laser chirp to produce the shortest laser pulses. Precise dispersion control enabled the generation of laser pulses with duration of 3.7 fs and energy of 1.2 mJ. This corresponds to an output of 1.5 cycle, 0.3 TW pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate using positively chirped 33 fs laser pulses. PMID:19649091

  19. GAS LASERS FOR STRONG-FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2004-09-15

    Atomic-, molecular- and excimer-gas lasers employ variety of pumping schemes including electric discharge, optical, or chemical reactions and cover a broad spectral range from UV to far-IR. Several types of gas lasers can produce multi-kilojoule pulses and kilowatts of average power. Among them, excimer- and high-pressure molecular lasers have sufficient bandwidth for generating pico- and femtosecond pulses. Projects are underway and prospects are opening up to bring ultrafast gas laser technology to the front lines of advanced accelerator applications.

  20. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  1. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.

    2015-02-15

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  2. Wavelength-agile diode-laser sensing strategies for monitoring gas properties in optically harsh flows: application in cesium-seeded pulse detonation.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Scott; Mattison, Daniel; Ma, Lin; Jeffries, Jay; Hanson, Ronald

    2002-06-17

    The rapid, broad wavelength scanning capabilities of advanced diode lasers allow extension of traditional diode-laser absorption techniques to high pressure, transient, and generally hostile environments. Here, we demonstrate this extension by applying a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to monitor gas temperature and pressure in a pulse detonation engine (PDE). Using aggressive injection current modulation, the VCSEL is scanned through a 10 cm-1 spectral window at megahertz rates - roughly 10 times the scanning range and 1000 times the scanning rate of a conventional diode laser. The VCSEL probes absorption lineshapes of the ~ 852 nm D2 transition of atomic Cs, seeded at ~ 5 ppm into the feedstock gases of a PDE. Using these lineshapes, detonated-gas temperature and pressure histories, spanning 2000 - 4000 K and 0.5 - 30 atm, respectively, are recorded with microsecond time response. The increasing availability of wavelength-agile diode lasers should support the development of similar sensors for other harsh flows, using other absorbers such as native H2O. PMID:19436388

  3. Multistage plasma initiation process by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti sample in an ambient gas (He, Ar, or N2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Dubreuil, B.

    1993-02-01

    New experimental results are reported on plasma initiation in front of a titanium sample irradiated by ir (λ=10.6 μm) laser pulses in an ambient gas (He, Ar, and N2) at pressures ranging from several Torr up to the atmosphere. The plasma is studied by space- and time-resolved emission spectroscopy, while sample vaporization is probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Threshold laser intensities leading to the formation of a plasma in the vapor and in the ambient gases are determined. Experimental results support the model of a vaporization mechanism for the plasma initiation (vaporization-initiated plasma breakdown). The plasma initiation is described by simple numerical criteria based on a two-stage process. Theoretical predictions are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the experiment. This study provides also a clear explanation of the influence of the ambient gas on the laser beam-metal surface energy transfer. Laser irradiation always causes an important vaporization when performed in He, while in the case of Ar or N2, the interaction is reduced in heating and vaporization of some surface defects and impurities.

  4. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  5. Pulsed DF laser effects study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. B.; Maher, W. E.; Nichols, D. B.

    1981-07-01

    This study of DF laser interaction with materials investigated the amount of energy coupled to targets. Large focal spot dimensions were obtained with the Boeing photo-initiated 50-1 pulsed chemical laser with a stable resonator. Effects experiments emphasized metallic targets, especially aluminum. The single pulse coupling results yielded absorbed fluence values greater than those obtained with comparable energies at 10.6 micrometer wavelength. Ambient pressure and angle of incidence were varied. Research results also showed multiple-pulse effect at DF wavelength. Multiple-pulse thermal coupling experiments with aluminum demonstrated that, after 10 shots on the same spot, the coupled fluence per pulse doubled. Because of target melting and vaporization, both the intrinsic absorptivity and the plasma enhanced coupled fluence of succeeding pulses is greatly increased. In general, the multiple pulse effect is intensity-dependent and is small at either low or high intensities. Energy deposition was tested for uniformity by measuring the rises in temperature at five locations within the focal spot with an array of thermocouples.

  6. Glass drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse and a pulse tail. The energy of the pulse tail was controlled by adjusting medium gas. Using three types of CO2 laser pulse with the same spike-pulse energy and the different pulse-tail energy, the characteristics of the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass was investigated. Higher pulse-tail energy gave deeper ablation depth. In the short laser pulse with the spike-pulse energy of 1.2 mJ, the spike pulse width of 162 ns, the pulse-tail energy of 24.6 mJ, and the pulse-tail length of 29.6 μs, 1000 shots irradiation produced the ablation depth of 988 μm. In the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass by the CO2 laser, a crack-free process was realized.

  7. Laser cutting of titanium with pulsed and modulated pulsed Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Warren; Tong, Kwok-On

    1998-05-01

    Recent test results demonstrate the differences between laser cutting of Ti with different pulsed formats at 1.06 micrometer wavelength. The precision Laser Machining (PLM) consortium is dedicated to investigating improved processing obtained with the use of diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers having high beam quality and high average power. One of the PLM lasers developed at TRW was used to determine the best parameters for laser cutting 0.034' Ti. Average power was available up to 340 W. Pulse repetition rates were 322 Hz with pulse lengths of 454 microseconds, while the modulated laser output had a 142 kHz micropulse train within the pulse envelope. Beam quality was sufficient to permit a 100 micrometer spot size to be used with f/10 focusing. Ar assist gas was used. At each setting of the laser average power the cutting tests usually were tried at 11 different speeds, up to 3'/second. The highest speed for which cutting is possible at a given average power is the threshold speed for that power. The cut specimens were evaluated for dross for a variety of rear surface Ar cross flow conditions. Each cut specimen also was evaluated for excess heating indicated by metallurgical and/or surface chemistry changes. Cutting at speeds above a critical minimum speed for each setting of laser average power greatly reduces degradation due to excess heating. Good cutting is possible between the threshold speed and this minimum speed (both a function of average power). Data for threshold and minimum speed were obtained for the pulsed and the modulated pulsed laser output. These tests also determined evidence of optimum conditions for cutting with a rear cross flow of Ar that substantially eliminates rear surface dross on the edge of the kerf. The quality of the cut edge was evaluated by inspection of its polished cross-section.

  8. Ultrashort-pulse laser machining

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S; Feit, M D; Nguyen, H T; Perry, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Sefcik, J A; Stuart, B C

    1998-09-01

    A new type of material processing is enabled with ultrashort (t < 10 ps) laser pulses. Cutting, drilling, sculpting of all materials (biologic materials, ceramics, sapphire, silicon carbide, diamond, metals) occurs by new mechanisms that eliminate thermal shock or collateral damage. High-precision machining to submicron tolerances is enabled resulting in high surface quality and negligible heat affected zone.

  9. Ultrashort-pulse lasers machining

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P S; Feit, M D; Nguyen, H T; Perry, M D, Stuart, B C

    1999-01-22

    A new type of material processing is enabled with ultrashort (t < 10 psec) laser pulses. Cutting, drilling, sculpting of all materials (biologic materials, ceramics, sapphire, silicon carbide, diamond, metals) occurs by new mechanisms which eliminate thermal shock or collateral damage. High precision machining to submicron tolerances is enabled resulting in high surface quality and negligible heat affected zone.

  10. Pulsed-laser excitation of acoustic modes in open high-Q photoacoustic resonators for trace gas monitoring: results for C2H4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Christian; Winkler, Andreas; Hess, Peter; Miklós, András; Bozóki, Zoltán; Sneider, János

    1995-06-01

    The pulsed excitation of acoustic resonances was studied with a continuously monitoring photoacoustic detector system. Acoustic waves were generated in C2H4/N 2 gas mixtures by light absorption of the pulses from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser. The photoacoustic part consisted of high-Q cylindrical resonators (Q factor 820 for the first radial mode in N2) and two adjoining variable acoustic filter systems. The time-resolved signal was Fourier transformed to a frequency spectrum of high resolution. For the first radial mode a Lorentzian profile was fitted to the measured data. The outside noise suppression and the signal-to-noise ratio were investigated in a normal laboratory environment in the flow-through mode. The acoustic and electric filter system combined with the

  11. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad; Margot, Joëlle

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon) and pressure (from ˜5 × 10-7 Torr up to atmosphere) is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  12. Size- and intensity-dependent photoelectron spectra from gas-phase gold nanoparticles irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J.; Robatjazi, S. J.; Makhija, V.; Vajdi, A.; Li, X.; Malakar, Y.; Pearson, W. L.; Rudenko, A.; Sorensen, C.; Stierle, J.; Kling, M. F.

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles bridge the gap between atomic/molecular and bulk matter offering unique opportunities to study light interactions with complex systems, in particular, near-field enhancements and excitation of plasmons. Here we report on a systematic study of photoelectron emission from isolated gold nanoparticles irradiated by 800 nm, 25 fs laser pulses at 10-50 TW/ cm2 peak intensities. A combination of an aerodynamic lens nanoparticle injector, high-energy velocity-map imaging spectrometer and a high-speed, single-shot camera is employed to record shot by shot photoelectron emission patterns from individual particles. By sorting the recorded images according to the number of emitted electrons, we select the events from the regions of particular laser intensities within the laser focus, thus, essentially avoiding focal volume averaging. Using this approach, we study the intensity- and size-dependence of photoelectron energy and angular distributions for particle sizes ranging from 5 nm to 400 nm. This work is supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049. JRML operations and personal are supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of BES, Office of Science, U. S. DOE.

  13. Nanosecond component in a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Semak, V. V.; Zhang Zhili

    2012-11-15

    Experimental and computational results show that the coherent microwave scattering from a laser-induced plasma can be used for measuring the quality of a fs laser pulse. The temporal dynamics of the microwave scattered signal from the fs-laser induced plasma can be related to the effect of nanosecond tail of the fs laser pulse.

  14. Pulse transformer for GaAs laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    High-radiance gallium arsenide (GaAs) laser operating at room temperature is utilized in optical navigation system. For efficient transformer-to-laser impedance match, laser should be connected directly to pulse transformer secondary winding.

  15. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  16. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  17. Emission of Thermally Activated Electrons from Rare Gas Clusters Irradiated with Intense VUV Light Pulses from a Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Laarmann, T.; Rusek, M.; Schulz, J.; Castro, A.R.B. de; Guertler, P.; Laasch, W.; Moeller, T.

    2005-08-05

    The ionization dynamics of Ar and Xe clusters irradiated with intense vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. Clusters comprising between 70 and 900 atoms were irradiated with femtosecond pulses at 95 nm wavelength ({approx}13 eV photon energy) and a peak intensity of {approx}4x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. A broad thermal distribution of emitted electrons from clusters with a maximum kinetic energy up to 30-40 eV is observed. The observation of relatively low-energy photoelectrons is in good agreement with calculations using a time-dependent Thomas-Fermi model and gives experimental evidence of an outer ionization process of the clusters, due to delayed thermoelectronic emission.

  18. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  19. Investigation of Laser Parameters in Silicon Pulsed Laser Conduction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Khoshnoud, Afsaneh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser welding of silicon in conduction mode is investigated numerically. In this study, the effects of laser beam characteristics on the welding have been studied. In order to model the welding process, heat conduction equation is solved numerically and laser beam energy is considered as a boundary condition. Time depended heat conduction equation is used in our calculations to model pulsed laser welding. Thermo-physical and optical properties of the material are considered to be temperature dependent in our calculations. Effects of spatial and temporal laser beam parameters such as laser beam spot size, laser beam quality, laser beam polarization, laser incident angle, laser pulse energy, laser pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and welding speed on the welding characteristics are assessed. The results show that how the temperature dependent thermo-physical and optical parameters of the material are important in laser welding modeling. Also the results show how the parameters of the laser beam influence the welding characteristics.

  20. Ultrashort-pulse laser calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijia; Kazansky, Peter G.; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Control of structural modifications inside silica glass by changing the front tilt of an ultrashort pulse is demonstrated, achieving a calligraphic style of laser writing. The phenomena of anisotropic bubble formation at the boundary of an irradiated region and modification transition from microscopic bubbles formation to self-assembled form birefringence are observed, and the physical mechanisms are discussed. The results provide the comprehensive evidence that the light beam with centrosymmetric intensity distribution can produce noncentrosymmetric material modifications.

  1. Widely tunable gas laser for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothe, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced, highly efficient and reliable Rare-Gas Halide laser was developed. It employs the following: (1) novel prepulse techniques and impedance matching for efficient energy transfer; (2) magnetic switches for high reliability; (3) x-ray preionization for discharge uniformity and beam quality; and (4) an integrated gas flow loop for compactness. When operated as a XeCl laser, the unit produces 2 J per pulse with good beam uniformity. Optical pulse duration is 100 ns. Pulse repetition rate was tested up to 25 Hz. Efficiency is 3 percent.

  2. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  3. Pulsed-discharge carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willetts, David V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to attempt a general introduction to pulsed carbon dioxide lasers of the kind used or proposed for laser radar applications. Laser physics is an excellent example of a cross-disciplinary topic, and the molecular spectroscopy, energy transfer, and plasma kinetics of the devices are explored. The concept of stimulated emission and population inversions is introduced, leading on to the molecular spectroscopy of the CO2 molecule. This is followed by a consideration of electron-impact pumping, and the pertinent energy transfer and relaxation processes which go on. Since the devices are plasma pumped, it is necessary to introduce a complex subject, but this is restricted to appropriate physics of glow discharges. Examples of representative devices are shown. The implications of the foregoing to plasma chemistry and gas life are discussed.

  4. Wakefield generation via two color laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Saroch, Akanksha; Kumar Verma, Nirmal

    2013-05-15

    The analytical study for the evolution of longitudinal as well as transverse electric wakefields, generated via passage of two color laser pulses through uniform plasma, has been presented in the mildly relativistic regime. The frequency difference between the two laser pulses is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency, in the present analysis. The relative angle between the directions of polarization of the two laser pulses is varied and the wakefield amplitudes are compared. Further, the amplitude of the excited wakes by two color pulses are compared with those generated by a single laser pulse.

  5. Numerical simulation of microwave amplification in a plasma channel produced in a gas via multiphoton ionisation by a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatskaya, A V; Popov, A M; Volkova, E A

    2014-12-31

    This paper examines the evolution of a nonequilibrium plasma channel produced in xenon by a femtosecond KrF laser pulse. We demonstrate that such a channel can be used to amplify microwave pulses over times of the order of the relaxation time of the photoelectron energy spectrum in xenon. Using the slowly varying amplitude approximation, we analyse the propagation and amplification of an rf pulse in a plasma channel, in particular when the rf field influences the electron energy distribution function in the plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. The effect of argon gas pressure on structural, morphological and photoluminescence properties of pulsed laser deposited KY3F10:Ho3+ thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debelo, N. G.; Dejene, F. B.; Roro, Kittessa; Pricilla, M. P.; Oliphant, Clive

    2016-06-01

    KY3F10:Ho3+ thin films were deposited by a pulsed laser deposition technique with Nd-YAG laser radiation ( λ = 266 nm) on (100) silicon substrate. The XRD and FE-SEM results show improved crystalline structure for the film deposited at a pressure of 1 Torr. The AFM results show that the RMS roughness of the films increases with rise in argon gas pressure. The EDS elemental mapping shows Y-excess for all the films deposited under all pressures, and this is attributed to its higher mass and low volatility as compared to K and F. XPS analysis further confirmed Y-excess in the deposited films. Green PL emission at 540 nm was investigated at three main excitation wavelengths, namely 362, 416 and 454 nm. The PL emission peaks increase with rise in background argon gas pressure for all excitation wavelengths. The highest PL intensity occurred at excitation of 454 nm for all the thin films. In addition, faint red (near infrared) emission was observed at 750 nm for all the excitations. The green emission at 540 nm is ascribed to the 5F4-5I8 and 5S2-5I8 transitions, and the faint red emission at 750 nm is due to the 5F4-5I7 and 5S2-5I7 transitions of Ho3+.

  7. ACTIVE MEDIA: Gain dynamics in a pulsed laser amplifier on CO-He, CO-N2 and CO-O2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetoshkin, S. V.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Klimachev, Yu M.; Kozlov, A. Yu; Kotkov, A. A.; Rulev, O. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2007-02-01

    Small-signal gain (SSG) dynamics G(t) in the active medium of a pulsed laser amplifier operating on the v+1→vP(J) vibrational-rotational transitions of the CO molecule, including high (v > 15) vibrational transitions, is studied experimentally. It is demonstrated that as the vibrational number increases from 7 to 31, G changes with time slower, while Gmax decreases in this case by three times. It is found that at a fixed value of v the rate of the SSG rise increases with increasing the rotational number J > 6. It is shown that in oxygen-containing gas mixtures (CO:O2 = 1:19) the value of Gmax at low vibrational levels (for v < 13) can substantially exceed Gmax in mixtures containing nitrogen (CO:N2 = 1:19) instead of oxygen. It is found that the efficiency (47%) of a CO laser on mixtures with a high concentration of oxygen considerably exceeds the efficiency (30%) of a CO laser operating on a nitrogen-containing mixture.

  8. Gain dynamics in a pulsed laser amplifier on CO-He, CO-N{sub 2} and CO-O{sub 2} gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Vetoshkin, S V; Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Rulev, O A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2007-02-28

    Small-signal gain (SSG) dynamics G(t) in the active medium of a pulsed laser amplifier operating on the v+1{yields}vP(J) vibrational-rotational transitions of the CO molecule, including high (v > 15) vibrational transitions, is studied experimentally. It is demonstrated that as the vibrational number increases from 7 to 31, G changes with time slower, while G{sub max} decreases in this case by three times. It is found that at a fixed value of v the rate of the SSG rise increases with increasing the rotational number J > 6. It is shown that in oxygen-containing gas mixtures (CO:O{sub 2} = 1:19) the value of G{sub max} at low vibrational levels (for v < 13) can substantially exceed G{sub max} in mixtures containing nitrogen (CO:N{sub 2} = 1:19) instead of oxygen. It is found that the efficiency (47%) of a CO laser on mixtures with a high concentration of oxygen considerably exceeds the efficiency (30%) of a CO laser operating on a nitrogen-containing mixture. (active media)

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of zeolitic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Ries, P.D.

    1995-02-01

    The pulsed laser deposition of zeolites to form zeolitic thin films is described. Films were grown using both mordenite and faujasite targets and were deposited on various substrates. The optimal films were obtained when the target and substrate were separated by 5 cm. These films are comprised of small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the amorphous material is largely porous and that the pores appear to be close to the same size as the parent zeolite. Zeolotic thin films are of interest for sensor, gas separation, and catalytic applications.

  10. Generation of quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with 80-fs laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Hidding, B; Amthor, K-U; Liesfeld, B; Schwoerer, H; Karsch, S; Geissler, M; Veisz, L; Schmid, K; Gallacher, J G; Jamison, S P; Jaroszynski, D; Pretzler, G; Sauerbrey, R

    2006-03-17

    Highly collimated, quasimonoenergetic multi-MeV electron bunches were generated by the interaction of tightly focused, 80-fs laser pulses in a high-pressure gas jet. These monoenergetic bunches are characteristic of wakefield acceleration in the highly nonlinear wave breaking regime, which was previously thought to be accessible only by much shorter laser pulses in thinner plasmas. In our experiment, the initially long laser pulse was modified in underdense plasma to match the necessary conditions. This picture is confirmed by semianalytical scaling laws and 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Our results show that laser-plasma interaction can drive itself towards this type of laser wakefield acceleration even if the initial laser and plasma parameters are outside the required regime. PMID:16605744

  11. Pulse shaping on the Nova laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.K.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Weiland, T.L.

    1989-02-06

    Inertial confinement fusion requires temporally shaped pulses to achieve high gain efficiency. Recently, we demonstrated the ability to produce complex temporal pulse shapes at high power at 0.35 microns on the Nova laser system. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Photoemission using femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Fischer, J.

    1991-10-01

    Successful operation of short wavelength FEL requires an electron bunch of current >100 A and normalized emittance < 1 mm-mrad. Recent experiments show that RF guns with photocathodes as the electron source may be the ideal candidate for achieving these parameters. To reduce the emittance growth due to space charge and RF dynamics effects, the gun may have to operate at high field gradient (hence at high RF frequency) and a spot size small compared to the aperture. This may necessitate the laser pulse duration to be in the subpicosecond regime to reduce the energy spread. We will present the behavior of metal photocathodes upon irradiation with femtosecond laser beams, comparison of linear and nonlinear photoemission, and scalability to high currents. Theoretical estimate of the intrinsic emittance at the photocathode in the presence of the anomalous heating of the electrons, and the tolerance on the surface roughness of the cathode material will be discussed.

  13. Short-pulse photolytic iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Ralph F.; Harris, Melvin; Anderson, Brian T.; Hager, Gordon D.

    2000-08-01

    A compact, short pulse photolytic iodine laser (PIL) system designed for use as a source in Raman conversion experiments is described. The single-shot, flashlamp-pumped laser outputs 10 Joules in a 3 microsecond(s) FWHM pulse at a wavelength of 1.315 micrometer and uses n-C3F7I as the renewable laser fuel. Laser design and performance characteristics are presented.

  14. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW. PMID:18699678

  15. Quantitative analysis of deuterium in zircaloy using double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) and helium gas plasma without a sample chamber.

    PubMed

    Suyanto, H; Lie, Z S; Niki, H; Kagawa, K; Fukumoto, K; Rinda, Hedwig; Abdulmadjid, S N; Marpaung, A M; Pardede, M; Suliyanti, M M; Hidayah, A N; Jobiliong, E; Lie, T J; Tjia, M O; Kurniawan, K H

    2012-03-01

    A crucial safety measure to be strictly observed in the operation of heavy-water nuclear power plants is the mandatory regular inspection of the concentration of deuterium penetrated into the zircaloy fuel vessels. The existing standard method requires a tedious, destructive, and costly sample preparation process involving the removal of the remaining fuel in the vessel and melting away part of the zircaloy pipe. An alternative method of orthogonal dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) is proposed by employing flowing atmospheric helium gas without the use of a sample chamber. The special setup of ps and ns laser systems, operated for the separate ablation of the sample target and the generation of helium gas plasma, respectively, with properly controlled relative timing, has succeeded in producing the desired sharp D I 656.10 nm emission line with effective suppression of the interfering H I 656.28 nm emission by operating the ps ablation laser at very low output energy of 26 mJ and 1 μs ahead of the helium plasma generation. Under this optimal experimental condition, a linear calibration line is attained with practically zero intercept and a 20 μg/g detection limit for D analysis of zircaloy sample while creating a crater only 10 μm in diameter. Therefore, this method promises its potential application for the practical, in situ, and virtually nondestructive quantitative microarea analysis of D, thereby supporting the more-efficient operation and maintenance of heavy-water nuclear power plants. Furthermore, it will also meet the anticipated needs of future nuclear fusion power plants, as well as other important fields of application in the foreseeable future. PMID:22283593

  16. Dynamic pulsing of a MOPA fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Rosa; Guerreiro, Paulo T.; Hendow, Sami T.; Salcedo, José R.

    2011-05-01

    Dynamic Pulsing is demonstrated using a pulsed MOPA fiber laser at 1064nm. The output of the MOPA laser is a pulsed profile consisting of a burst of closely spaced pulses. Tests were performed under several materials with pulse bursts ranging from 10ns to 1μs and operating from 500kHz down to single shot. In particular, percussion drilling in stainless steel is demonstrated showing improvements in quality and speed of the process. These profiles allow high flexibility and optimization of the process addressing the specificity of the end application. Dynamic Pulsing allows the same MOPA fiber laser to be used in diverse materials as well as different processes such us marking, drilling, scribing and engraving. The pulsed fiber laser used in this study is a MOPA-DY by Multiwave Photonics. It is based on a modulated seed laser followed by a series of fiber amplifiers and ending with an optically isolated collimator. This pulsed laser model has an output in such a way that each trigger produces a fast burst of pulses, with a repetition frequency within the burst of the order of tens of MHz. Within the burst it is possible to change the number of pulses, the individual pulse profile, burst pulse period and even to generate non-periodic burst pulse separations. The laser allows full freedom for all these combinations. The study here reported compares the impact of pulse peak power, number of pulses within a burst and the pulse burst period, on process quality (heat affected zone, debris, hole uniformity) and drilling yield.

  17. Study of x-rays produced from debris-free sources with Ar, Kr and Kr/Ar mixture linear gas jets irradiated by UNR Leopard laser beam with fs and ns pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Schultz, K. A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Safronova, A. S.; Shrestha, I. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Moschella, J. J.; Petkov, E. E.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Weller, M. E.; Cline, W.; Wiewior, P.; Chalyy, O.

    2016-06-01

    Experiments of x-ray emission from Ar, Kr, and Ar/Kr gas jet mixture were performed at the UNR Leopard Laser Facility operated with 350 fs pulses at laser intensity of 2 × 1019 W/cm2 and 0.8 ns pulses at an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. Debris free x-ray source with supersonic linear nozzle generated clusters/monomer jet with an average density of ≥1019 cm-3 was compared to cylindrical tube subsonic nozzle, which produced only monomer jet with average density 1.5-2 times higher. The linear (elongated) cluster/gas jet provides the capability to study x-ray yield anisotropy and laser beam self-focusing with plasma channel formation that are interconnecting with efficient x-ray generation. Diagnostics include x-ray diodes, pinhole cameras and spectrometers. It was observed that the emission in the 1-9 keV spectral region was strongly anisotropic depending on the directions of laser beam polarization for sub-ps laser pulse and supersonic linear jet. The energy yield in the 1-3 keV region produced by a linear nozzle was an order of magnitude higher than from a tube nozzle. Non-LTE models and 3D molecular dynamic simulations of Ar and Kr clusters irradiated by sub-ps laser pulses have been implemented to analyze obtained data. A potential evidence of electron beam generation in jets' plasma was discussed. Note that the described debris-free gas-puff x-ray source can generate x-ray pulses in a high repetition regime. This is a great advantage compared to solid laser targets.

  18. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  19. Cluster ion control by simultaneous irradiations of femtosecond laser and nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, H.; Hiratani, Y.; Toyoda, K.

    2002-09-01

    Generation of multiply charged ions and molecular ions have been investigated using simultaneous irradiation of high intensity and ultrashort pulse of Ti:sapphire laser and fourth harmonics of Q-switched nanosecond pulse of Nd:YAG laser on carbon targets [Morimoto et al., in: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on High-Power Particles Beams (BEAMS2000),Vol. PB-89, Nagaoka, 2000, p. 359; Toyoda et al., in: Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Gas Flow and Chemical Lasers and High-Power Laser Conference (GCL-HPL2000), Vol. P1.60, 2000, p. 101]. The ion current waveforms have been analyzed by means of time-of-flight (tof) mass measurement. Simultaneous irradiation of high intensity and ultrashort pulse of Ti:sapphire laser and fourth harmonics of Q-switched nanosecond pulse of Nd:YAG laser on carbon targets was found to generate molecular ions of carbon.

  20. Note: External multipass optical trap for counterpropagating pulsed laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graul, J. S.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Andersen, G. P.; Lilly, T. C.

    2013-07-01

    Pulses from a 12 mJ, frequency doubled, 5 ns FWHM, pulsed Nd:YAG laser were split and injected into opposing sides of a symmetric 2.44 m (96 in.) optical ring trap. Using a Pockels cell, the counterpropagating pulses were "locked" into the trap for ≥50 round trips. This optical trap has potential applications ranging from established cavity processes, e.g., laser-based absorption spectroscopy and x-ray production, to new processes such as non-resonant optical lattice gas heating and time-resolved coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering diagnostic studies.

  1. Note: external multipass optical trap for counterpropagating pulsed laser applications.

    PubMed

    Graul, J S; Ketsdever, A D; Andersen, G P; Lilly, T C

    2013-07-01

    Pulses from a 12 mJ, frequency doubled, 5 ns FWHM, pulsed Nd:YAG laser were split and injected into opposing sides of a symmetric 2.44 m (96 in.) optical ring trap. Using a Pockels cell, the counterpropagating pulses were "locked" into the trap for ≥50 round trips. This optical trap has potential applications ranging from established cavity processes, e.g., laser-based absorption spectroscopy and x-ray production, to new processes such as non-resonant optical lattice gas heating and time-resolved coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering diagnostic studies. PMID:23902119

  2. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trelenberg, T. W.; Dinh, L. N.; Saw, C. K.; Stuart, B. C.; Balooch, M.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of femtosecond-pulsed laser deposited GaAs nanoclusters were investigated. Nanoclusters of GaAs were produced by laser ablating a single crystal GaAs target in vacuum or in a buffer gas using a Ti-sapphire laser with a 150 fs minimum pulse length. For in-vacuum deposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the average cluster size was approximately 7 nm for laser pulse lengths between 150 fs and 25 ps. The average cluster size dropped to approximately 1.5 nm at a pulse length of 500 ps. It was also observed that film thickness decreased with increasing laser pulse length. A reflective coating, which accumulated on the laser admission window during ablation, reduced the amount of laser energy reaching the target for subsequent laser shots and developed more rapidly at longer pulse lengths. This observation indicates that non-stoichiometric (metallic) ablatants were produced more readily at longer pulse lengths. The angular distribution of ejected material about the target normal was well fitted to a bi-cosine distribution of cos 47 θ+ cos 4 θ for ablation in vacuum using 150 fs pulses. XPS and AES revealed that the vacuum-deposited films contained excess amorphous Ga or As in addition to the stoichiometric GaAs nanocrystals seen with XRD. However, films containing only the GaAs nanocrystals were produced when ablation was carried out in the presence of a buffer gas with a pressure in excess of 6.67 Pa. At buffer gas pressure on the order of 1 Torr, it was found that the stoichiometry of the ablated target was also preserved. These experiments indicate that both laser pulse length and buffer gas pressure play important roles in the formation of multi-element nanocrystals by laser ablation. The effects of gas pressure on the target's morphology and the size of the GaAs nanocrystals formed will also be discussed.

  3. High-pulse-repetition-rate HF laser with plate electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Andramanov, A V; Kabaev, S A; Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A; Pisetskaya, A V; Selemir, Victor D

    2006-03-31

    A high-pulse-repetition-rate electric-discharge HF laser with inductive-capacitive discharge stabilisation in the active H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6}-He mixture is studied. The multisectional discharge gap with a total length of 250 mm is formed by pairs of anode-cathode plates arranged in a zigzag pattern. The width of the discharge gap between each pair of plates is {approx}1 mm and its height is {approx}12 mm. The laser-beam cross section at the output cavity mirror is {approx}9 mm x 11 mm. The maximum laser pulse energy and the maximum laser efficiency for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6} mixture are 14.3 mJ and 2.1%, respectively. The addition of He to the mixture reduced the laser pulse energy by 10%-15%. The maximum gas velocity in the gap between the electrodes achieves 20 m s{sup -1}. The limiting pulse repetition rate f{sub lim} for which a decrease in the laser pulse energy is still not observed is {approx}2kHz for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6} mixture and {approx}2.4kHz for the H{sub 2}-SF{sub 6}-He mixture. The average output power {approx}27 W is obtained for a pulse repetition rate of 2.4 kHz. (lasers)

  4. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Physics and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Naskrecki, Ryszard

    2007-11-26

    Study of physical and chemical events accompanying light-matter interaction in pico- and femtosecond time scale have become possible with the use of ultrashort laser pulses. With the progress in generation of ultrashort laser pulses, the ultrafast optical spectroscopy, as a tool for dynamic study, is still evolving rapidly.

  5. 2D numerical modelling of the gas temperature in a high-temperature high-power strontium atom laser excited by nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in a He-SrBr2 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2014-05-01

    Assuming axial symmetry and a uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed numerically for determination of the gas temperature in the case of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in He-SrBr2 formed in a newly-designed large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge-free zone, in order to find the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. The model determines the gas temperature of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  6. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary. PMID:25801546

  7. Flexible pulse-controlled fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Controlled flexible pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber telecommunication, optical sensing, metrology, and microscopy. Here, we report a compact pulse-controlled all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity fiber Bragg grating (FBG) system as a flexible filter. The width and wavelength of pulses can be tuned independently by vertically and horizontally translating a cantilever beam, respectively. The pulse width of the laser can be tuned flexibly and accurately from ~7 to ~150 ps by controlling the bandwidth of FBG. The wavelength of pulse can be tuned precisely with the range of >20 nm. The flexible laser is precisely controlled and insensitive to environmental perturbations. This fiber-based laser is a simple, stable, and low-cost source for various applications where the width-tunable and/or wavelength-tunable pulses are necessary. PMID:25801546

  8. Heating of solid targets with laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the heat-conduction equation are obtained for the heating of absorbing media with pulsed lasers. The spatial and temporal form of the temperature is determined using several different models of the laser irradiance. Both surface and volume generation of heat are discussed. It is found that if the depth of thermal diffusion for the laser-pulse duration is large compared to the optical-attenuation depth, the surface- and volume-generation models give nearly identical results. However, if the thermal-diffusion depth for the laser-pulse duration is comparable to or less than the optical-attenuation depth, the surface-generation model can give significantly different results compared to the volume-generation model. Specific numerical results are given for a tungsten target irradiated by pulses of different temporal durations and the implications of the results are discussed with respect to the heating of metals by picosecond laser pulses.

  9. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  10. Stimulated light forces using picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Immanuel; Goepfert, A.; Haubrich, D.; Lison, F.; Schuetze, R.; Wynands, Robert; Meschede, Dieter

    1997-05-01

    Using the stimulated force exerted by counterpropagating picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser we were able to focus a beam of laser-cooled cesium atoms along one dimension to about 57% of its original width in the detection zone. The force profile was measured outside and inside the overlap region of the pulses and found to be in agreement with an earlier theoretical prediction. A brief theoretical account of the interaction of atoms with pulsed laser light based on the optical Bloch equations is given.

  11. Measurements of multiple gas parameters in a pulsed-detonation combustor using time-division-multiplexed Fourier-domain mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Andrew W; Roy, Sukesh; An, Xinliang; Sanders, Scott T; Schauer, Frederick R; Gord, James R

    2013-04-20

    Hyperspectral absorption spectroscopy is being used to monitor gas temperature, velocity, pressure, and H(2)O mole fraction in a research-grade pulsed-detonation combustor (PDC) at the Air Force Research Laboratory. The hyperspectral source employed is termed the TDM 3-FDML because it consists of three time-division-multiplexed (TDM) Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers. This optical-fiber-based source monitors sufficient spectral information in the H(2)O absorption spectrum near 1350 nm to permit measurements over the wide range of conditions encountered throughout the PDC cycle. Doppler velocimetry based on absorption features is accomplished using a counterpropagating beam approach that is designed to minimize common-mode flow noise. The PDC in this study is operated in two configurations: one in which the combustion tube exhausts directly to the ambient environment and another in which it feeds an automotive-style turbocharger to assess the performance of a detonation-driven turbine. Because the enthalpy flow [kilojoule/second] is important in assessing the performance of the PDC in various configurations, it is calculated from the measured gas properties. PMID:23669701

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of additive pulse modelocked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sucha, G.; Bolton, S.R.; Chemla, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics have been studied in a number of modelocked laser systems, primarily in actively modelocked systems. However, less attention has been paid to the dynamics of passively modelocked laser systems. With the recent revolutionary advances in femtosecond modelocked laser technology, the understanding of instabilities and dynamics in passively modelocked lasers is an important issue. Here, the authors present experimental and numerical studies of the dynamics of an additive-pulse modelocked (APM) color-center laser.

  13. Studies of a repetitively-pulsed laser powered thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, D. I.; Kemp, N. H.; Miller, M.

    1982-01-01

    In this report we present results of continuing analytical and experimental investigations carried out to evaluate the concept of pulsed laser propulsion. This advanced propulsion scheme, which has been the subject of several previous studies, involves supplying propellant energy by beaming short, repetitive laser pulses to a thruster from a remote laser power station. The concept offers the advantages of a remote power source, high specific impulse, high payload to total mass ratio (a consequence of the first two features) and moderate to high thrust (limited primarily by the average laser power available). The present research addresses questions related to thruster performance and optical design. In the thruster scheme under consideration, parabolic nozzle walls focus the incoming laser beam to yield breakdown in a propellant at the focal point of the parabola. The resulting high pressure plasma is characteristic of a detonation wave initiation by high power laser-induced breakdown. With a short laser pulse, the detonation wave quickly becomes a blast wave which propagates to the nozzle exit plane converting the high pressure of the gas behind it to a force on the nozzle wall. Propellant is fed to the focal region from a plenum chamber. The laser-induced blast wave stops the propellant flow through the throat until the pressure at the throat decays to the sonic pressure; then the propellant flow restarts. The process is repeated with each successive laser pulse.

  14. Note: 15-fs, 15-μJ green pulses from two-stage temporal compressor of ytterbium laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Konyashchenko, A V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, L L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2012-10-01

    15-fs, 15-μJ light pulses at the central wavelength of 515 nm were generated by two-stage nonlinear compression of 300-fs, 150-μJ ytterbium laser pulses. The compression was based on the pulse spectrum broadening by self-phase modulation in gas filled capillary and second harmonic generation in crystal. PMID:23126820

  15. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  16. Monitoring of Ethylene by a Pulsed Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, Damien; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Roller, Chad; Curl, Robert F.; Fraser, Matthew P.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2004-06-01

    We report on the development and performance of a gas sensor based on a quantum cascade laser operating at a wavelength of ~10 µm to measure ethylene (C2H4) concentrations by use of a rotational component of the fundamental nu_7 band. The laser is thermoelectrically cooled and operates in a pulsed mode. The influence of pulse-to-pulse fluctuations is minimized by use of a reference beam and a single detector with time discriminating electronics. Gas absorption is recorded in a 100-m optical path-length astigmatic Herriott cell. With a 10-kHz pulse repetition rate and an 80-s total acquisition time, a noise equivalent sensitivity of 30 parts per billion has been demonstrated. The sensor has been applied to monitor C2H4 in vehicle exhaust as well as in air collected in a high-traffic urban tunnel.

  17. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  18. Dynamics of the spectral behaviour of an ultrashort laser pulse in an argon-gas-filled capillary discharge-preformed plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Higashiguchi, T.; Yugami, N.; Bobrova, N.; Sentoku, Y.; Kodama, R.

    2013-11-01

    We have reported the argon plasma waveguide produced in an alumina (Al2O3) capillary discharge and used to guide ultrashort laser pulses at intensities of the order of 1016 W/cm2. A one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code was used to evaluate the average degree of ionization of Ar in the preformed plasma channel. The spectrum of the propagated laser pulse in the Ar plasma waveguide was not modified and was well reproduced by a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation under initial ion charge state of Ar3+ in the preformed plasma waveguide. The optimum timing for the laser pulse injection was around 150 ns after initiation of a discharge with a peak current of 200 A.

  19. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ˜100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  20. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ∼100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  1. Generation of laser pulse trains for tests of multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Arran, C.; Cowley, J.; Cheung, G.; Thornton, C.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    In multi-pulse laser wakefield acceleration (MP-LWFA) a plasma wave is driven by a train of low-energy laser pulses separated by the plasma period, an approach which offers a route to driving plasma accelerators with high efficiency and at high pulse repetition rates using emerging technologies such as fibre and thin-disk lasers. Whilst these laser technologies are in development, proof-of-principle tests of MP-LWFA require a pulse train to be generated from a single, high-energy ultrafast pulse. Here we demonstrate the generation of trains of up to 7 pulses with pulse separations in the range 150-170 fs from single 40 fs pulses produced by a Ti:sapphire laser.

  2. MOPA pulsed fiber laser for silicon scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Limei; Huang, Wei; Deng, Mengmeng; Li, Feng

    2016-06-01

    A 1064 nm master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) pulsed fiber laser is developed with flexible control over the pulse width, repetition frequency and peak power, and it is used to investigate the dependence of mono-crystalline silicon scribe depth on the laser pulse width, scanning speed and repeat times. Experimental results indicate that long pulses with low peak powers lead to deep ablation depths. We also demonstrate that the ablation depth grows fast with the scanning repeat times at first and progressively tends to be saturated when the repeat times reach a certain level. A thermal model considering the laser pulse overlapping effect that predicts the silicon temperature variation and scribe depth is employed to verify the experimental conclusions with reasonably close agreement. These conclusions are of great benefits to the optimization of the laser material processing with high efficiency.

  3. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica. PMID:23482031

  4. Gain dynamics of a free-space nitrogen laser pumped by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Li, Guihua; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Jing, Chenrui; Zhang, Chaojin; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate ultrafast dynamic of generation of a strong 337-nm nitrogen laser by injecting an external seed pulse into a femtosecond laser filament pumped by a circularly polarized laser pulse. In the pump-probe scheme, it is revealed that the population inversion between the excited and ground states of N2 for the free-space 337-nm laser is firstly built up on the timescale of several picoseconds, followed by a relatively slow decay on the timescale of tens of picoseconds, depending on the nitrogen gas pressure. By measuring the intensities of 337-nm signal from nitrogen gas mixed with different concentrations of oxygen gas, it is also found that oxygen molecules have a significant quenching effect on the nitrogen laser signal. Our experimental observations agree with the picture of electron-impact excitation.

  5. Gain dynamics of a free-space nitrogen laser pumped by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Li, Guihua; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Jing, Chenrui; Zhang, Chaojin; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-08-11

    We experimentally demonstrate ultrafast dynamic of generation of the 337-nm nitrogen laser by injecting an external seed pulse into a femtosecond laser filament pumped by a circularly polarized laser pulse. In the pump-probe scheme, it is revealed that the population inversion between the C(3)Π(u) and B(3)Π(g) states of N(2) for the free-space 337-nm laser is firstly built up on the timescale of several picoseconds, followed by a relatively slow decay on the timescale of tens of picoseconds, depending on the nitrogen gas pressure. By measuring the intensities of 337-nm signal from nitrogen gas mixed with different concentrations of oxygen gas, it is also found that oxygen molecules have a significant quenching effect on the nitrogen laser signal. Our experimental observations agree with the picture of electron-impact excitation. PMID:25320986

  6. Relativistic plasma shutter for ultraintense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Stephen A.; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Tampo, Motonobu; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Kodama, Ryousuke; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Krushelnick, Karl; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2009-01-01

    A relativistic plasma shutter technique is proposed and tested to remove the sub-100 ps pedestal of a high-intensity laser pulse. The shutter is an ultrathin foil placed before the target of interest. As the leading edge of the laser ionizes the shutter material it will expand into a relativistically underdense plasma allowing for the peak pulse to propagate through while rejecting the low intensity pedestal. An increase in the laser temporal contrast is demonstrated by measuring characteristic signatures in the accelerated proton spectra and directionality from the interaction of 30 TW pulses with ultrathin foils along with supporting hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:19654882

  7. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  8. Pulse front tilt measurement of femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Stoyanov, Lyubomir; Stefanov, Ivan; Dreischuh, Alexander; Hansinger, Peter; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we report experimental investigations of an intentionally introduced pulse front tilt on femtosecond laser pulses by using an inverted field correlator/interferometer. A reliable criterion for the precision in aligning (in principle) dispersionless systems for manipulating ultrashort pulses is developed, specifically including cases when the pulse front tilt is a result of a desired spatio-temporal coupling. The results obtained using two low-dispersion diffraction gratings are in good qualitative agreement with the data from a previously developed analytical model and from an independent interferometric measurement.

  9. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  10. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Itina, Tatian E.

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  11. Effect of nitrogen surrounding gas and plasma assistance on nitrogen incorporation in a-C:N films by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourquard, F.; Maddi, C.; Donnet, C.; Loir, A.-S.; Barnier, V.; Wolski, K.; Garrelie, F.

    2016-06-01

    In the context of nitrogen-rich amorphous carbon thin films ultrafast pulsed laser deposition from graphite targets in inert nitrogen or nitrogen plasma ambient, this study assesses the correlation between the ablation plume composition and dynamics and the thin films contents and structures. The use of both optical emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved 2D imaging, coupled with intensified CCD temporal resolution, allows to precisely follow such species of the plume as CN and C2 molecules, from their apparition to their deposition on the substrate. The results show that carbon-nitrogen bonding arises at the early time of expansion with little changes in quantity thereafter. The key role of the DC-bias is in lowering the molecular weight of the ambient gas, thus easing molecules way toward the target and interfering with the chemical reaction for CN generation. Depending on the ambient pressure, these processes will have drastically different effects on the thin films properties and contents. This work thus explains the origin of high nitrogen contents in a-C:N thin films obtained using DC-bias, and proposes an easy in situ optical observation-based way to predict and look for the best conditions to maximize those contents in future work.

  12. Laser lithotripsy using double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfmann, Juergen; Doerschel, Klaus; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1990-07-01

    There are currntly several methods in the field of laser lithotripsy which operate not only at different wavelengths and pulse lengths but also with various types of optical front ends and various irrigation fluids'6. The methods can be divided into two main groups: First, those which utilize stone absorption and plasma formation on the stone surface to initiate stone fragmentation, such as dye lasers. Second, those which generate shock waves and caviatation in the surrounding fluid and which require additional means to produce aplasma (e.g. irrigation, focussing fiber end or metal surfaces). The pulsed Nd:YAG laser belongs to this group. The method presented here is the double pulse technique which is a combination of both methods. It uses two laser pulses with a short time delay transmitted by means of a fiber to destroy body concrements. The first pulse is the first harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser (532nm) which improves the coupling efficiency of the laser radiation with the stone. The second pulse is in the fundamental mode of the laser (1064 nm) delivering the high energy for the stone disruption.

  13. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  14. Pulsed Laser Ablation of Soft Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Alfred; Venugopalan, Vasan

    In this chapter we focus on the key elements that form our current understanding of the mechanisms of pulsed laser ablation of soft biological tissues. We present a conceptual framework providing mechanistic links between various ablation applications and the underlying thermodynamic and phase change processes [1]. We define pulsed laser ablation as the use of laser pulses with duration of ~1 ms or less for the incision or removal of tissue regardless of the photophysical or photochemical processes involved. However, we will confine this presentation to pulsed ablation performed on a tissue level that does not involve laser-induced plasma formation. Ablation processes within transparent tissues or cells resulting from non-linear absorption have been considered in reviews by Vogel and Venugopalan [1] and by Vogel and co-workers [2].

  15. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  16. Effect of Pulsed Nd: YAG Laser Powers On 304 Stainless Steel Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Candan, L.; Demir, A.; Akman, E.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, optimum welding parameters are obtained for 1mm thickness type 304 stainless steel welding using the Lumonics JK760TR pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters such as pulse duration, focal position, frequency, laser power, welding speed, and shielding gas (N2) pressure on penetration defining welding quality are investigated. Also comparisons of overlap ratios are presented between theory and experiment for pulse duration, frequency and welding speed.

  17. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.

    2010-11-04

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA). In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  18. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations [8]. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  19. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, M.; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma.

  20. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

  1. The dynamics of compact laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Tucker, R. W.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the use of a class of exact finite energy solutions to the vacuum source-free Maxwell equations as models for multi- and single cycle laser pulses in classical interaction with relativistic charged point particles. These compact solutions are classified in terms of their chiral content and their influence on particular charge configurations in space. The results of such classical interactions motivate a phenomenological quantum description of a propagating laser pulse in a medium in terms of an effective quantum Hamiltonian.

  2. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.

    1998-05-26

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures. 18 figs.

  3. Pulsed lasers in dentistry: sense or nonsense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.; Frentzen, Matthias

    1991-05-01

    The great interest in the field of laser applications in dentistry provokes the question, if all these new techniques may really fulfill advantages, which are expected after initial in-vitro studies. Whereas laser surgery of soft oral tissues has been developed to a standard method, laser treatment of dental hard tissues and the bone are attended with many unsolved problems. Different laser types, especially pulsed lasers in a wide spectrum of wavelengths have been proofed for dental use. Today neither the excimer lasers, emitting in the far uv-range from 193 to 351 nm, nor the mid-infrared lasers like Nd:YAG (1,064 μm), Ho:YAG (2,1 μm) and Er:YAG (2,96 μm) or the C02-laser (10,6 μm) show mechanism of interaction more carefully and faster than a preparation of teeth with diamond drillers. The laser type with the most precise and considerate treatment effects in the moment is the short pulsed (15 ns) ArF-excimer laser with a wavelength of 193 nm. However this laser type has not yet the effectivity of mechanical instruments and it needs a mirror system to deliver the radiation. Histological results point out, that this laser shows no significant pathological alterations in the adjacent tissues. Another interesting excimer laser, filled with XeCI and emitting at a wavelength of 308 nm has the advantage to be good to deliver through quartz fibers. A little more thermal influence is to be seen according to the longer wavelength. Yet the energy density, necessary to cut dental hard tissues will not be reached with the laser systems available now. Both the pulsed Er:YAG- (2,94 μm, pulse duration 250 s) and the Ho:YAG -laser (2,1 μm, pulse duration 250 μs) have an effective coupling of the laser energy to hydrogeneous tissues, but they do not work sufficient on healthy enamel and dentine. The influence to adjacent healthy tissue is not tolerable, especially in regard of the thermal damage dentine and pulp tissues. Moreover, like the 193 nm ArF-excimer laser

  4. Laser fusion neutron source employing compression with short pulse lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sefcik, Joseph A; Wilks, Scott C

    2013-11-05

    A method and system for achieving fusion is provided. The method includes providing laser source that generates a laser beam and a target that includes a capsule embedded in the target and filled with DT gas. The laser beam is directed at the target. The laser beam helps create an electron beam within the target. The electron beam heats the capsule, the DT gas, and the area surrounding the capsule. At a certain point equilibrium is reached. At the equilibrium point, the capsule implodes and generates enough pressure on the DT gas to ignite the DT gas and fuse the DT gas nuclei.

  5. Pulsed Laser Illumination of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland; Jenkins, Philip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. The induction FEL and the radio-frequency (RF) FEL both produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work, we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format, producing 50 ps pulses at a frequency of 78 MHz. A variety of Si, GaAs, CaSb and CdInSe2 (CIS) solar cells are tested at average incident powers between 4 mW/sq cm and 425 mW/sq cm. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced by using a pulsed laser source compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. Because the pulse separation is less than or approximately equal to the minority carrier lifetime, the illumination conditions are effectively those of a continuous wave laser. The time dependence of the voltage and current response of the cells are also measured using a sampling oscilloscope equipped with a high frequency voltage probe and current transformer. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments shows that the RF FEL pulse format yields much more efficient photovoltaic conversion of light than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  6. Pulsed laser processing of electronic materials in micro/nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David Jen

    2005-08-01

    Time-resolved pump-and-probe side-view imaging has been performed to investigate the energy coupling to the target specimen over a wide range of fluences. Plasmas generated during the laser ablation process are visualized and the decrease of the ablation efficiency in the high fluence regime (>10 J/cm2) is attributed to the strong interaction of the laser pulse with the laser-induced plasmas. The high intensity ultra-short laser pulses also trigger volumetric multi-photon absorption (MPA) processes that can be beneficial in applications such as three-dimensional bulk modification of transparent materials. Femtosecond laser pulses were used to fabricate straight and bent through-channels in the optical glass. Drilling was initiated from the rear surface to preserve consistent absorbing conditions of the laser pulse. Machining in the presence of a liquid solution assisted the debris ejection. Drilling process was further enhanced by introducing ultrasonic waves, thereby increasing the aspect ratio of drilled holes and improving the quality of the holes. In conventional lens focusing schemes, the minimum feature size is determined by the diffraction limit. Finer resolution is accomplished by combining pulsed laser radiation with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) probes. Short laser pulses are coupled to a fiber-based NSOM probes in order to ablate thin metal films. A detailed parametric study on the effects of probe aperture size, laser pulse energy, temporal width and environment gas is performed. The significance of lateral thermal diffusion is highlighted and the dependence of the ablation process on the imparted near-field distribution is revealed. As a promising application of laser ablation in nanoscale, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system has been built up based on NSOM ablation configuration. NSOM-LIBS is demonstrated with nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on Cr sample. Far-field collecting scheme by top objective lens was chosen as

  7. Formation of ultrasmooth thin silver films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Garaeva, M. Ya.; Mamichev, D. A. Grishchenko, Yu. V.; Zanaveskin, M. L.

    2013-09-15

    Ultrasmooth thin silver films have been formed on a quartz substrate with a buffer yttrium oxide layer by pulsed laser deposition. The dependence of the surface morphology of the film on the gas (N{sub 2}) pressure in the working chamber and laser pulse energy is investigated. It is found that the conditions of film growth are optimal at a gas pressure of 10{sup -2} Torr and lowest pulse energy. The silver films formed under these conditions on a quartz substrate with an initial surface roughness of 0.3 nm had a surface roughness of 0.36 nm. These films can be used as a basis for various optoelectronics and nanoplasmonics elements.

  8. Closed cycle high-repetition-rate pulsed HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Morris, A. V.; Gorton, Eric K.

    1997-04-01

    The design and performance of a closed cycle high repetition rate HF laser is described. A short pulse, glow discharge is formed in a 10 SF6:1 H2 gas mixture at a total pressure of approximately 110 torr within a 15 by 0.5 by 0.5 cm3 volume. Transverse, recirculated gas flow adequate to enable repetitive operation up to 3 kHz is imposed by a centrifugal fan. The fan also forces the gas through a scrubber cell to eliminate ground state HF from the gas stream. An automated gas make-up system replenishes spent gas removed by the scrubber. Typical mean laser output powers up to 3 W can be maintained for extended periods of operation.

  9. Feedback control of pulsed laser deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, S. J. P.; Stark, E. F.

    1993-10-01

    Implementation of closed loop feedback on PLD (pulsed laser deposition) requires actuators and sensors. Improvements in quality and reproducibility of material depositions are achieved by actuating the process towards desired operating regions. Empirical relationships are experimentally determined for describing the complex dynamical interactions of laser parameters. Feedback control based on this description can then be implemented to reduce process disorder.

  10. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  11. Modeling of pulsed lasers for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed lasers are useful for remote sensing of wind and greenhouse gases to better understand the atmosphere and its impact on weather patterns and the environment. It is not always practical to develop and optimize new laser systems empirically due to the time and expense associated with such endeavors. A practical option is to use a laser model to predict various performance parameters and compare these with the needs required for a particular remote sensing application. This approach can be very useful in determining the efficacy of potential laser systems, saving both time and money before proceeding with the actual construction of a laser device. As a pedagogical example, the modeling of diode pumped Tm:Ho:YLF and Tm:Ho:LuLF lasers are examined. Tm:Ho lasers operating around 2.0 μm have been used for wind measurements such as clear air turbulence and wake vortices. The model predictions for the laser systems examined here are compared to the actual laser performance, validating the usefulness of the modeling approach. While Tm:Ho fluoride lasers are used as a pedagogical example, the model is applicable to any lanthanide series pulsed laser system. This provides a useful tool for investigating potential laser systems that meet the requirements desired for a variety of remote sensing applications.

  12. Ignition experiment design based on γ-pumping gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonyushkin, E. K.; Il'kaev, R. I.; Morovov, A. P.; Pavlovskii, A. I.; Lazhintsev, B. V.; Basov, N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Rosanov, V. B.; Zmitrenko, N. V.

    1996-05-01

    Comparative analysis of gas lasers pumped by γ-radiation for ignition experiment is carried out. The possibilities of frequency-time pulse shaping are discussed for these kinds of laser drivers. New type of ICF target (LIGHT-target), which is able to provide an uniform deposition of laser driver energy is proposed as a target for ignition experiment.

  13. Quantifying pulsed laser induced damage to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Marc; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Bezares, Francisco J.; Robinson, Jeremy; Anderson, Travis; Chun, Hayden; Tadjer, Marko

    2011-11-21

    As an emerging optical material, graphene's ultrafast dynamics are often probed using pulsed lasers yet the region in which optical damage takes place is largely uncharted. Here, femtosecond laser pulses induced localized damage in single-layer graphene on sapphire. Raman spatial mapping, SEM, and AFM microscopy quantified the damage. The resulting size of the damaged area has a linear correlation with the optical fluence. These results demonstrate local modification of sp{sup 2}-carbon bonding structures with optical pulse fluences as low as 14 mJ/cm{sup 2}, an order-of-magnitude lower than measured and theoretical ablation thresholds.

  14. Laser pulse shaping for high gradient accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Galletti, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Moreno, M.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2016-09-01

    In many high gradient accelerator schemes, i.e. with plasma or dielectric wakefield induced by particles, many electron pulses are required to drive the acceleration of one of them. Those electron bunches, that generally should have very short duration and low emittance, can be generated in photoinjectors driven by a train of laser pulses coming inside the same RF bucket. We present the system used to shape and characterize the laser pulses used in multibunch operations at Sparc_lab. Our system gives us control over the main parameter useful to produce a train of up to five high brightness bunches with tailored intensity and time distribution.

  15. Pulse-to-pulse polarization-switching method for high-repetition-rate lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahne, Steffen; Johnston, Benjamin F.; Withford, Michael J.

    2007-02-01

    We report a method that enables dynamic switching of the pulse-to-pulse linear polarization orientation of a high-pulse-rate laser. The implications for laser micromachining, where polarization direction can be important, are also discussed.

  16. Modification of chirped laser pulses via delayed rotational nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, D. A.; Odhner, J. H.; Levis, R. J.

    2016-03-01

    To interpret single-shot measurements of rotational revival patterns in molecular gases excited by an ultrashort laser pulse, an analytical description of the probe pulse modulation by the impulsively excited medium is developed. A femtosecond pump laser pulse prepares a rotational wavepacket in a gas-phase sample, and the resulting periodic revivals are mapped into the frequency domain by using a substantially chirped continuum probe pulse. Since the standard approximate descriptions of probe pulse propagation are inapplicable (such as the slowly varying envelope approximation and the slowly evolving wave approximation), we propose an approach capable of incorporating both the substantial chirp of the pulse and the temporal dispersion of the medium response. Theory is presented for the case where the frequency change of the probe during the probe pulse duration is comparable with the carrier frequency. Analytical expressions are obtained for the probe signal modulation over the pump-probe interaction region and for the resulting heterodyned transient birefringence spectra. The approach is illustrated using the case of nitrogen gas.

  17. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Döbeli, Max; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially 18O substituted La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  18. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas; Döbeli, Max

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  19. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Petin, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF6 and CF3I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF6 molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation.

  20. Pulsed solid state lasers for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertesz, Ivan; Danileiko, A. Y.; Denker, Boris I.; Kroo, Norbert; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1994-02-01

    The effect on living tissues of different pulsed solid state lasers: Nd:YAG ((lambda) equals 1.06 micrometers ) Er:glass (1.54 micrometers ), Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) and Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ) is compared with the continuous wave Nd:YAG- and CO2-lasers used in operating theaters. Portable Er:glass- and Er:YAG-lasers are developed for surgery/cosmetics and HIV-safe blood testing.

  1. Classical dynamics of free electromagnetic laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, S.; Tucker, R. W.; Walton, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a class of exact finite energy solutions to the vacuum source-free Maxwell field equations as models for multi- and single cycle laser pulses in classical interaction with relativistic charged test particles. These solutions are classified in terms of their chiral content based on their influence on particular charge configurations in space. Such solutions offer a computationally efficient parameterization of compact laser pulses used in laser-matter simulations and provide a potential means for experimentally bounding the fundamental length scale in the generalized electrodynamics of Bopp, Landé and Podolsky.

  2. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived. PMID:24921828

  3. Beyond the single-atom response in absorption line shapes: probing a dense, laser-dressed helium gas with attosecond pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the absorption line shapes of laser-dressed atoms beyond the single-atom response, by using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains to probe an optically thick helium target under the influence of a strong infrared (IR) field. We study the interplay between the IR-induced phase shift of the microscopic time-dependent dipole moment and the resonant-propagation-induced reshaping of the macroscopic XUV pulse. Our experimental and theoretical results show that as the optical depth increases, this interplay leads initially to a broadening of the IR-modified line shape, and subsequently, to the appearance of new, narrow features in the absorption line. PMID:25910116

  4. Initiation of ignition of a combustible gas mixture in a closed volume by the radiation of a high-power pulsed CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Kossyi, I A; Popov, N A; Tarasova, N M; Firsov, K N

    2012-01-31

    The results of experiments on initiating the ignition of a CH{sub 4} - O{sub 2} - SF{sub 6} triple gas mixture in a closed volume by the radiation of a high-power CO{sub 2} laser are presented. It is shown that spatially nonuniform (in the direction of the laser beam) gas heating by the laser radiation leads to formation of a fast combustion wave, propagating along the chamber axis and giving rise to 'instantaneous' ignition. At the threshold value 16.5 J of the laser radiation energy the fast combustion wave is transformed into a detonation wave, which causes an explosion and destruction of the reaction chamber.

  5. Guiding of high intensity ultrashort laser pulses in plasma channels produced with the dual laser pulse ignitor-heater technique

    SciTech Connect

    Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.P.

    1998-07-01

    The authors present results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme is proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It makes use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort (< 100 fs) laser pulse, is brought to a line focus using a cylindrical lens to ionize the gas. The Heater pulse (160 ps long) is used subsequently to heat the existing spark via inverse Bremsstrahlung. The hydrodynamic shock expansion creates a partially evacuated plasma channel with a density minimum on axis. Such a channel has properties of an optical waveguide. This technique allows creation of plasma channels in low atomic number gases, such as hydrogen, which is of importance for guiding of highly intense laser pulses. The channel density was diagnosed with time resolved longitudinal interferometry. From these measurements the plasma temperature was inferred. The guiding properties of the channels were tested by injecting a > 5 {times} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, 75 fs laser pulse.

  6. A pulsed-laser calibration system for the laser backscatter diagnostics at the Omega laser

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P; Sorce, C; Froula, D H; Rekow, V; Loughman, K; Knight, R; Glenzer, S H; Bahr, R; Seka, W

    2009-10-09

    A calibration system has been developed that allows a direct determination of the sensitivity of the laser backscatter diagnostics at the Omega laser. A motorized mirror at the target location redirects individual pulses of a mJ-class laser onto the diagnostic to allow the in-situ measurement of the local point response of the backscatter diagnostics. Featuring dual wavelength capability at the 2nd and 3rd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser, both spectral channels of the backscatter diagnostics can be directly calibrated. In addition, channel cross-talk and polarization sensitivity can be determined. The calibration system has been employed repeatedly over the last two years and has enabled precise backscatter measurements of both stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering in gas-filled hohlraum targets that emulate conditions relevant to those in inertial confinement fusion targets.

  7. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL provide FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  8. Fundamentals and industrial applications of ultrashort pulsed lasers at Bosch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Jens; Bauer, Thorsten

    2011-03-01

    Fundamental results of ablation processes of metals with ultrashort laser pulses in the far threshold fluence regime are shown and discussed. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma transmission exhibit two distinctive minima. The minima occurring within the first nanoseconds can be attributed to electrons and sublimated material emitted from the target surface, whereas the subsequent minimum after several 10 ns is due to particles and droplets after a thermal boiling process. Industrial applications of ultrashort pulsed laser micro machining in the Bosch Group are also shown with the production of exhaust gas sensors and common rail diesel systems. Since 2007, ultrashort laser pulses are used at the BOSCH plant in Bamberg for producing lambda-probes, which are made of a special ceramic layer system and can measure the exhaust gas properties faster and more accurately. This enables further reduction of emissions by optimized combustion control. Since 2009, BOSCH uses ultrashort pulsed lasers for micro-structuring the injector of common rail diesel systems. A drainage groove allows a tight system even at increased pressures up to 2000 bar. Diesel injection is thus even more reliable, powerful and environment-friendly.

  9. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Scarisoreanu, N. D.; Filipescu, M. (Morar); Epurescu, G. N.; Matei, D. G.; Verardi, P.; Craciun, F.; Dinescu, M.

    2004-10-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) emerged as an attractive technique for growth of thin films with different properties as metals, semiconductors, ferroelectrics, biocompatibles, polymers, etc., due to its important advantages: (i) the stoichiometric transfer of a complex composition from target to film and film crystallization at lower substrate temperature respect to other techniques (due to the high energy of species in the laser plasma); (ii) single step process, synthesis and deposition; (iii) creation in plasma of species impossible to be obtained by other processes; (iv) possibility of "in situ" heterostructure deposition using a multi-target system, etc. Simple or complex oxides are between the materials widely studied for their applications. PMN is the most known relaxor ferroelectric material: it exhibits a high dielectric constant value around the (diffuse) maximum phase transition temperature, of more than 35 000 in bulk form. Other oxides as lead zirconate titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 simple or La doped exhibit exceptional properties as large remanent polarization, high dielectric permittivity, high piezoelectric coefficient. SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) is characterized by a high "fatigue resistance" (constant remanent polarization until 1012 switching cycles), low imprint, and low leakage current. The physical properties of zirconium oxide (or zirconia) -- high strength, stability at high temperatures -- make it useful for applications involving gas sensors, corrosion or heat resistant mechanical parts, high refractive index optical coatings. Of particular interest is its use as an alternative gate dielectric in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices or capacitor in dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips. All these oxides have been deposited by laser ablation in oxygen reactive atmosphere and some of their properties will be presented in this paper.

  10. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this effort is to develop code to enable the accurate prediction of the performance of pulsed transversely excited (TE) CO2 lasers prior to their construction. This is of particular benefit to the NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) project. A benefit of the completed code is that although developed specifically for the pulsed CO2 laser much of the code can be modified to model other laser systems of interest to the lidar community. A Boltzmann equation solver has been developed which enables the electron excitation rates for the vibrational levels of CO2 and N2, together with the electron ionization and attachment coefficients to be determined for any CO2 laser gas mixture consisting of a combination of CO2, N2, CO, He and CO. The validity of the model has been verified by comparison with published material. The results from the Boltzmann equation solver have been used as input to the laser kinetics code which is currently under development. A numerical code to model the laser induced medium perturbation (LIMP) arising from the relaxation of the lower laser level has been developed and used to determine the effect of LIMP on the frequency spectrum of the LAWS laser output pulse. The enclosed figures show representative results for a laser operating at 0.5 atm. with a discharge cross-section of 4.5 cm to produce a 20 J pulse with aFWHM of 3.1 microns. The first four plots show the temporal evolution of the laser pulse power, energy evolution, LIMP frequency chirp and electric field magnitude. The electric field magnitude is taken by beating the calculated complex electric field and beating it with a local oscillator signal. The remaining two figures show the power spectrum and energy distribution in the pulse as a function of the varying pulse frequency. The LIMP theory has been compared with experimental data from the NOAA Windvan Lidar and has been found to be in good agreement.

  11. Nonequilibrium Interlayer Transport in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Eres, Gyula; Larson, Ben C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Zschack, P.; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    We use time-resolved surface x-ray diffraction measurements with microsecond range resolution to study the growth kinetics of pulsed laser deposited SrTiO3. Time-dependent surface coverages corresponding to single laser shots were determined directly from crystal truncation rod intensity transients. Analysis of surface coverage evolution shows that extremely fast nonequilibrium interlayer transport, which occurs concurrently with the arrival of the laser plume, dominates the deposition process. A much smaller fraction of material, which is governed by the dwell time between successive laser shots, is transferred by slow, thermally driven interlayer transport processes.

  12. Ophthalmic applications of ultrashort pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Tibor; Spooner, Greg; Sacks, Zachary S.; Suarez, Carlos G.; Raksi, Ferenc; Zadoyan, Ruben; Sarayba, Melvin; Kurtz, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses can be used to create high precision incision in transparent and translucent tissue with minimal damage to adjacent tissue. These performance characteristics meet important surgical requirements in ophthalmology, where femtosecond laser flap creation is becoming a widely used refractive surgery procedure. We summarize clinical findings with femtosecond laser flaps as well as early experiments with other corneal surgical procedures such as corneal transplants. We also review laser-tissue interaction studies in the human sclera and their consequences for the treatment of glaucoma.

  13. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Smithers, Martin E.; Murty, Rom

    1991-01-01

    The experimental results will enable a comparison of the numerical code output with experimental data. This will ensure verification of the validity of the code. The measurements were made on a modified commercial CO2 laser. Results are listed as following. (1) The pulse shape and energy dependence on gas pressure were measured. (2) The intrapulse frequency chirp due to plasma and laser induced medium perturbation effects were determined. A simple numerical model showed quantitative agreement with these measurements. The pulse to pulse frequency stability was also determined. (3) The dependence was measured of the laser transverse mode stability on cavity length. A simple analysis of this dependence in terms of changes to the equivalent fresnel number and the cavity magnification was performed. (4) An analysis was made of the discharge pulse shape which enabled the low efficiency of the laser to be explained in terms of poor coupling of the electrical energy into the vibrational levels. And (5) the existing laser resonator code was changed to allow it to run on the Cray XMP under the new operating system.

  14. Efficient gas lasers pumped by generators with inductive energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Panchenko, Alexei N.; Tel'minov, Alexei E.

    2008-05-01

    Laser and discharge parameters in mixtures of rare gases with halogens driven by a pre-pulse-sustainer circuit technique are studied. Inductive energy storage with semiconductor opening switch was used for the high-voltage pre-pulse formation. It was shown that the pre-pulse with a high amplitude and short rise-time along with sharp increase of discharge current and uniform UV- and x-ray preionization allow to form long-lived stable discharge in halogen containing gas mixtures. Improvement of both pulse duration and output energy was achieved for XeCl-, XeF-, KrCl- and KrF excimer lasers. Maximal laser output was as high as 1 J at efficiency up to 4%. Increase both of the radiation power and laser pulse duration were achieved in N2-NF3 (SF6) and He-F2 (NF3) gas mixtures, as well.

  15. Cornea surgery with nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Wang, Bagui; Riemann, Iris; Kobow, Jens

    2005-04-01

    We report on a novel optical method for (i) flap-generation in LASIK procedures as well as (ii) for flap-free intrastromal refractive surgery based on nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses. The near infrared 200 fs pulses for multiphoton ablation have been provided by ultracompact turn-key MHz laser resonators. LASIK flaps and intracorneal cavities have been realized with high precision within living New Zealand rabbits using the system FemtoCutO (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany) at 800 nm laser wavelength. Using low-energy sub-2 nJ laser pulses, collateral damage due to photodisruptive and self-focusing effects was avoided. The laser ablation system consists of fast galvoscanners, focusing optics of high numerical aperture as well as a sensitive imaging system and provides also the possibility of 3D multiphoton imaging of fluorescent cellular organelles and SHG signals from collagen. Multiphoton tomography of the cornea was used to determine the exact intratissue beam position and to visualize intraocular post-laser effects. The wound healing process has been investigated up to 90 days after instrastromal laser ablation by histological analysis. Regeneration of damaged collagen structures and the migration of inflammation cells have been detected.

  16. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL format.

  17. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Tremaine, A.; Musumeci, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200 MV /m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti :Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  18. Multi-MeV Electron Acceleration by Subterawatt Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Goers, A J; Hine, G A; Feder, L; Miao, B; Salehi, F; Wahlstrand, J K; Milchberg, H M

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate laser-plasma acceleration of high charge electron beams to the ∼10  MeV scale using ultrashort laser pulses with as little energy as 10 mJ. This result is made possible by an extremely dense and thin hydrogen gas jet. Total charge up to ∼0.5  nC is measured for energies >1  MeV. Acceleration is correlated to the presence of a relativistically self-focused laser filament accompanied by an intense coherent broadband light flash, associated with wave breaking, which can radiate more than ∼3% of the laser energy in a ∼1  fs bandwidth consistent with half-cycle optical emission. Our results enable truly portable applications of laser-driven acceleration, such as low dose radiography, ultrafast probing of matter, and isotope production. PMID:26588390

  19. Multi-MeV Electron Acceleration by Subterawatt Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, A. J.; Hine, G. A.; Feder, L.; Miao, B.; Salehi, F.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate laser-plasma acceleration of high charge electron beams to the ˜10 MeV scale using ultrashort laser pulses with as little energy as 10 mJ. This result is made possible by an extremely dense and thin hydrogen gas jet. Total charge up to ˜0.5 nC is measured for energies >1 MeV . Acceleration is correlated to the presence of a relativistically self-focused laser filament accompanied by an intense coherent broadband light flash, associated with wave breaking, which can radiate more than ˜3 % of the laser energy in a ˜1 fs bandwidth consistent with half-cycle optical emission. Our results enable truly portable applications of laser-driven acceleration, such as low dose radiography, ultrafast probing of matter, and isotope production.

  20. Energy distribution of fast electrons accelerated by high intensity laser pulse depending on laser pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Morace, Alessio; Hata, Masayasu; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakata, Shohei; Lee, Seung Ho; Matsuo, Kazuki; Farley Law, King Fai; Tosaki, Shota; Yogo, Akifumi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of high-energy electron generation on the pulse duration of a high intensity LFEX laser was experimentally investigated. The LFEX laser (λ = 1.054 and intensity = 2.5 – 3 x 1018 W/cm2) pulses were focused on a 1 mm3 gold cubic block after reducing the intensities of the foot pulse and pedestal by using a plasma mirror. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) duration of the intense laser pulse could be set to either 1.2 ps or 4 ps by temporally stacking four beams of the LFEX laser, for which the slope temperature of the high-energy electron distribution was 0.7 MeV and 1.4 MeV, respectively. The slope temperature increment cannot be explained without considering pulse duration effects on fast electron generation.

  1. Ultrashort pulsed laser technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Navy has been pursuing a technology development program for advanced, all-fiber, Ultra Short Pulsed Laser (USPL) systems via Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs. Multiple topics have been published to promote and fund research that encompasses every critical component of a standard USPL system and enable the demonstration of mJ/pulse class systems with an all fiber architecture. This presentation will summarize published topics and funded programs.

  2. Addition of HCl to the double-pulse copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, A. A.; Nerheim, N. M.

    1977-01-01

    Addition of small amounts of hydrogen chloride to the buffer gas of a double-pulse CuCl laser causes an increase in the production of copper atoms in the ground state. A maximum laser energy increase of 15% was observed and the span of delay times for which laser action occurred increased.

  3. Polyethylene welding by pulsed visible laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.; Visco, A. M.; Campo, N.

    2011-01-01

    Laser welding of plastics is a relatively new process that induces locally a fast polymer heating. For most applications, the process involves directing a pulsed beam of visible light at the weld joint by going through one of the two parts. This is commonly referred to as “through transmission visible laser welding”. In this technique, the monochromatic visible light source uses a power ns pulsed laser in order to irradiate the joint through one part and the light is absorbed in the vicinity of the other part. In order to evaluate the mechanical resistance of the welded joint, mass quadrupole spectrometry, surface profilometry, microscopy techniques and mechanical shear tests were employed. The welding effect was investigated as a function of the laser irradiation time, nature of the polyethylene materials and temperature.

  4. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  5. Ultrashort pulse laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Banks, Paul S.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2002-01-01

    Short pulse PLD is a viable technique of producing high quality films with properties very close to that of crystalline diamond. The plasma generated using femtosecond lasers is composed of single atom ions with no clusters producing films with high Sp.sup.3 /Sp.sup.2 ratios. Using a high average power femtosecond laser system, the present invention dramatically increases deposition rates to up to 25 .mu.m/hr (which exceeds many CVD processes) while growing particulate-free films. In the present invention, deposition rates is a function of laser wavelength, laser fluence, laser spot size, and target/substrate separation. The relevant laser parameters are shown to ensure particulate-free growth, and characterizations of the films grown are made using several diagnostic techniques including electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Single laser pulse compression via strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H.; Wu, Z. H.; Zuo, Y. L.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhou, K. N.; Su, J. Q.

    2016-07-01

    Laser amplification in plasma, including stimulated Raman scattering amplification and strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering (sc-SBS) amplification, is very promising to generate ultrahigh-power and ultrashort laser pulses. But both are quite complex in experiments: at least three different laser pulses must be prepared; temporal delay and spatial overlap of these three pulses are difficult. We propose a single pulse compression scheme based on sc-SBS in plasma. Only one moderately long laser is applied, the front part of which ionizes the gas to produced plasma, and gets reflected by a plasma mirror at the end of the gas channel. The reflected front quickly depletes the remaining part of the laser by sc-SBS in the self-similar regime. The output laser is much stronger and shorter. This scheme is at first considered theoretically, then validated by using 1D PIC simulations.

  7. Trident Pair Production in Strong Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ilderton, Anton

    2011-01-14

    We calculate the trident pair production amplitude in a strong laser background. We allow for finite pulse durations, while still treating the laser fields nonperturbatively in strong-field QED. Our approach reveals explicitly the individual contributions of the one-step and two-step processes. We also expose the role gauge invariance plays in the amplitudes and discuss the relation between our results and the optical theorem.

  8. Compact pulsed laser having improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A highly efficient, compact pulsed laser having high energy to weight and volume ratios is provided. The laser utilizes a cavity reflector that operates as a heat sink and is essentially characterized by having a high heat conductivity, by being a good electrical insulator and by being substantially immune to the deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation. Manual portability is accomplished by eliminating entirely any need for a conventional circulating fluid cooling system.

  9. Intense Nanosecond-Pulsed Cavity-Dumped Laser Radiation at 1.04 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We report first results of intense far-infrared (FIR) nanosecond-pulsed laser radiation at 1.04 THz from a previously described[2] cavity-dumped, optically-pumped molecular gas laser. The gain medium, methyl fluoride, is pumped by the 9R20 line of a TEA CO2 laser[3] with a pulse energy of 200 mJ. The THz laser pulses contain of 30 kW peak power in 5 nanosecond pulse widths at a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. The line width, measured by a scanning metal-mesh FIR Fabry-Perot interferometer, is 100 MHz. The novel THz laser is being used in experiments to resonantly excite coherent ns-pulsed 1.04 THz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping-superlattices. The research is supported by NASA EPSCoR NNX11AM04A and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0100 awards.

  10. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  11. Evaluation of catalyst for closed cycle operation of high energy pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Miller, I. M.; Wood, G.; Schryer, D. R.; Hess, R. V.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Several catalyst materials have been tested for efficiency of converting CO and O2 to CO2 for use in a high energy CO2 laser. The composition of the gas mixtures was monitored by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. A copper/copper oxide catalyst and a platinum/tin oxide catalyst were used for closed cycle operation of a CO2 laser (0.7 joules/pulse), operating at 10 pulses/sec.

  12. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P.sub.2 O.sub.5, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules.

  13. Ultrafast pulsed laser utilizing broad bandwidth laser glass

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.

    1997-09-02

    An ultrafast laser uses a Nd-doped phosphate laser glass characterized by a particularly broad emission bandwidth to generate the shortest possible output pulses. The laser glass is composed primarily of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO, and possesses physical and thermal properties that are compatible with standard melting and manufacturing methods. The broad bandwidth laser glass can be used in modelocked oscillators as well as in amplifier modules. 7 figs.

  14. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  15. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  16. Capillary compressor of femtosecond laser pulses with nonlinear rotation of polarisation ellipse

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2012-03-31

    The process of nonlinear rotation of the polarisation ellipse of laser radiation, occurring simultaneously with the broadening of the pulse spectrum due to nonlinear self-phase modulation in a gas-filled capillary, is studied. It is shown that the maximal rotation of the polarisation ellipse is experienced by the spectral components, shifted towards the short-wavelength side with respect to the central wavelength of the initial laser pulse. Using the effect of polarisation ellipse rotation, an eightfold increase in the energy contrast ratio of a 28-fs light pulse, obtained by compression of the radiation pulse from an ytterbium laser with the duration 290 fs, is implemented.

  17. Lasers and Intense Pulsed Light Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Saunte, Ditte M; Lapins, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment are useful for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Carbon dioxide lasers are used for cutting or vaporization of the affected area. It is a effective therapy for the management of severe and recalcitrant HS with persistent sinus tract and scarring, and can be performed under local anesthesia. HS has a follicular pathogenesis. Lasers and IPL targeting the hair have been found useful in treating HS by reducing the numbers of hairs in areas with HS. The methods have few side effects, but the studies are preliminary and need to be repeated. PMID:26617364

  18. Thomson scattering in short pulse laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2012-08-15

    Thomson scattering is well used as a diagnostic in many areas of high energy density physics. In this paper, we quantitatively demonstrate the practicality of using Thomson scattering as a diagnostic of short-pulse laser-plasma experiments in the regime, where the plasmas probed are at solid density and have temperatures of many hundreds of eV using a backlighter produced with an optical laser. This method allows a diagnosis both spatially and temporally of the density and temperature distributions in high energy density laser-plasma interactions which is independent from, and would act as a useful complement to, the existing spectroscopic methods.

  19. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-13

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  20. Plasma mirrors for short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanovksy, V.P.; Perry, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-06-11

    We show experimentally and theoretically that plasmas created by a sufficiently (1014 1015 2 short (<500 fs) intense W/cm ) laser pulse on the surface of dielectric material act as nearly perfect mirrors: reflecting p to 90% of the incident radiation with a wavefront quality equal to that of the initial solid surface.

  1. Pulse solid state lasers in aesthetic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobryakov, Boris S.; Greben'kova, Ol'ga B.; Gulev, Valerii S.

    1996-04-01

    The emission of a pulse-periodic laser on alumo-ittrium garnet applied for preventive and medical treatment of a capsule contracture round implanted prostheses in xenoplastics is described in the present paper. The results obtained testify to a high efficiency of suggested method.

  2. Temporal laser-pulse-shape effects in nonlinear Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, V. Yu.; Seipt, D.; Rykovanov, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the laser-pulse temporal shape on the nonlinear Thomson scattering on-axis photon spectrum is analyzed in detail. Using the classical description, analytical expressions for the temporal and spectral structure of the scattered radiation are obtained for the case of symmetric laser-pulse shapes. The possibility of reconstructing the incident laser pulse from the scattered spectrum averaged over interference fringes in the case of high peak intensity and symmetric laser-pulse shape is discussed.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  4. Ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in nitrogen atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez del Pino, Ángel Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard; György, Enikö; Ballesteros, Belén

    2014-03-07

    Laser irradiation of randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks has been carried out using a pulsed Nd:YAG UV laser in nitrogen gas environment. The evolution of the MWCNT morphology and structure as a function of laser fluence and number of accumulated laser pulses has been studied using electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes are discussed and correlated with thermal simulations. The obtained results indicate that laser irradiation induces very fast, high temperature thermal cycles in MWCNTs which produce the formation of different nanocarbon forms, such as nanodiamonds. Premelting processes have been observed in localized sites by irradiation at low number of laser pulses and low fluence values. The accumulation of laser pulses and the increase in the fluence cause the full melting and amorphization of MWCNTs. The observed structural changes differ from that of conventional high temperature annealing treatments of MWCNTs.

  5. Pulse distortion and modulation instability in laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Singh, Ram Gopal; Upadhyay, Ajay K.

    2009-01-15

    The present paper deals with the propagation of a short, intense, Gaussian laser pulse in plasma. Using a one dimensional model, a wave equation including finite pulse length and group velocity dispersion is set up and solved to obtain the intensity distribution across the laser pulse. It is shown that the pulse profile becomes asymmetric as it propagates through plasma. Further, the growth rate of modulation instability and range of unstable frequencies across the laser pulse have been derived and graphically analyzed.

  6. Laser zona dissection using short-pulse ultraviolet lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Tadir, Yona; Ho, Peter D.; Whalen, William E.; Asch, Richardo H.; Ord, Teri; Berns, Michael W.

    1992-06-01

    The interaction of pulsed ultraviolet radiation with the zona pellucida of human oocytes which had failed to fertilize in standard IVF cycles, was investigated. Two lasers were studied: a 100 ps pulsed Nd:YAG with a nonlinear crystal emitting light at 266 nm, and a 15 ns XeCl excimer laser with 308 nm radiation. Incisions in the zona were made by aiming the beam tangentially to the oocyte. The results indicate superior, high precision performance by the excimer laser creating trenches as narrow as 1 micrometers and as shallow as 1 micrometers . The incision size was found to be sensitive to the laser's energy and to the position of the microscope's objective focal plane, but relatively insensitive to the laser pulse repetition rate. Once the minimum spot size was defined by the system parameters, the laser beam was used to curve out any desired zona shape. This laser microsurgery technique as applied to partial zone dissection or zona drilling could prove very useful as a high-precision, non-contact method for treatments of low fertilization rate and for enhancing embryo implantation rates in patients undergoing IVF treatments.

  7. Thrust Generating Mechanism of Nozzle Powered by Single Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Hong, Yanji; She, Jinhu; Cao, Zhengrui; Wang, Junhua

    2006-05-01

    Using Sedov's strong explosion theory, the process of gas dynamics after air is broken down under the irradiation of single laser pulse is analyzed, and the analytic formulas of the fluid field parameters of the gas disturbed by shock wave inside the nozzle are educed. The theoretical values are validated by numerical simulation, and the thrust generating mechanism is disclosed. The result indicates that the thrust generated by the interaction of laser induced shock wave and nozzle is equal to the one generated by the reactive jet on nozzle exit during a period, but the trends of the thrust-time evolvement are different, which provides some available information for further study of the mechanism of air-breathing laser propulsion.

  8. Hemifusion of cells using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katchinskiy, Nir; Godbout, Roseline; Goez, Helly R.; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y.

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of single cells via hemifusion of cellular membranes using femtosecond laser pulses is reported in this manuscript. This is a method to attach single cells using sub-10 femtosecond laser pulses, with 800 nm central wavelength delivered from a Ti:Sapphire laser is described. A fluorescent dye, Calcein AM, was used to verify that the cell's cytoplasm did not migrate from a dyed cell to a non-dyed cell, in order to ascertain that the cells did not go through cell-fusion process. An optical tweezer was used in order to assess the mechanical integrity of the attached joint membranes. Hemifusion of cellular membranes was successful without initiating full cell fusion. Attachment efficiency of 95% was achieved, while the cells' viability was preserved. The attachment was performed via the delivery of one to two trains of sub-10 femtosecond laser pulses lasting 15 milliseconds each. An ultrafast reversible destabilization of the phospholipid molecules in the cellular membranes was induced due to a laser-induced ionization process. The inner phospholipid cell membrane remained intact during the attachment procedure, and cells' cytoplasm remained isolated from the surrounding medium. The unbounded inner phospholipid molecules bonded to the nearest free phospholipid molecule, forming a joint cellular membrane at the connection point. The cellular membrane hemifusion technique can potentially provide a platform for the creation of engineered tissue and cell cultures.

  9. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a datamore » file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.« less

  10. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a data file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.