Science.gov

Sample records for pulsed power peer

  1. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    SciTech Connect

    BLOOMQUIST,DOUGLAS D.

    2000-12-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2000, a 14-member external peer review panel (the Garwin Committee) was convened on May 17-19, 2000 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of the review included activities in inertial confinement fission (ICF), weapon physics, development of radiation sources for weapons effects simulation, x-ray radiography, basic research in high energy density physics (HEDP), and pulsed power technology research and development. In his charge to the committee, Jeffrey Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (1600) asked that the review be based on four criteria (1) quality of science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions, and (4) performance in the operation and construction of major research facilities. In addition, specific programmatic questions were posed by the director and by the DOE-Defense Programs (DP). The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the committee's findings.

  2. Pulsed power peer review committee report.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    As part of meeting the GRPA (Government Performance and Results Act) requirements and to provide input to Sandia's annual Performance Evaluation Assessment Report (PEAR) to the National Nuclear Security Administration in FY2004, a 14-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 4-6, 2004 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs. The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding.

  3. Pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David H.

    Pulsed power systems are critical elements for such prospective weapons technologies as high-power microwaves, electrothermal and electromagnetic projectile launchers, neutral particle beams, space-based FELs, ground-based lasers, and charged particle beams. Pulsed power will also be essential for the development of nonweapon military systems such as lidars and ultrawideband radars, and could serve as the bases for nuclear weapon effect simulators. The pulsed power generation requirements for each of these systems is considered.

  4. The Power of Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traver, Rob

    2016-01-01

    "Students are naturally inclined to watch one another, to make suggestions and support their peers, to avoid mistakes, to copy what works and modify what doesn't, and to learn from one another," writes Rob Traver in this article. To prove his point, Traver brings readers into three classrooms where teachers tap into students' intrinsic…

  5. The Power of Peer Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingle, Jane

    2006-01-01

    In a religion class of 26 bright creative sixth graders, one student demonstrates the power of peer pressure. Part of the morning ritual is to say prayer petitions. Students seems to be calmed by their expressions of care for their families, friends, pets, their military troops, victims of natural disasters, the homeless, etc. However, one student…

  6. 2009 Water Power Peer Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael; Higgins, Mark; Reed, Mike

    2011-04-01

    This report contains the findings of the 2009 Water Power Peer Review Panel, as well as the Water Power Program's responses to those findings. This Peer Review focused on the Program's marine and hydrokinetic energy projects.

  7. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  8. Pulse power linac

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    A linear acceleration for charged particles is constructed of a plurality of transmission line sections that extend between a power injection region and an accelerating region. Each line section is constructed of spaced plate-like conductors and is coupled to an accelerating gap located at the accelerating region. Each gap is formed between a pair of apertured electrodes, with all of the electrode apertures being aligned along a particle accelerating path. The accelerating gaps are arranged in series, and at the injection region the line sections are connected in parallel. At the injection region a power pulse is applied simultaneously to all line sections. The line sections are graduated in length so that the pulse reaches the gaps in a coordinated sequence whereby pulse energy is applied to particles as they reach each of the gaps along the accelerating path.

  9. Pulsed power packs a punch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldon, W. F.

    1985-03-01

    Utilities supply electric power routinely in a continuous flow, while in certain cases power must be delivered in short, huge bursts, taking into account applications such as thermonuclear-fusion research, high-energy particle accelerators, lasers, and electromagnetic launchers. For the delivery of this 'pulsed power', it is necessary to collect energy at low power, store it, and release it almost instantaneously. During the last decade, pulsed-power technology has become a recognized engineering discipline. Pulsed-power systems can now deliver gigajoules of energy, megamperes of current, or terawatts of power, while pulse widths range from microseconds to several seconds. Attention is given to capacitors as one of the oldest storage devices for electric energy, inductors, the linking of capacitors and inductors, pulse creation, the use of explosives to generate pulsed power, limitations regarding the effectiveness of batteries, low-cost energy storage provided by flywheels, dc machines, ac machines, and new applications for pulsed power.

  10. Microwave and Pulsed Power

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, E.K.

    1993-03-01

    The goals of the Microwave and Pulsed Power thrust area are to identify realizable research and development efforts and to conduct high-quality research in those pulse power and microwave technologies that support existing and emerging programmatic requirements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our main objective is to work on nationally important problems while enhancing our basic understanding of enabling technologies such as component design and testing, compact systems packaging, exploratory physics experiments, and advanced systems integration and performance. During FY-92, we concentrated our research efforts on the six project areas described in this report. (1) We are investigating the superior electronic and thermal properties of diamond that may make it an ideal material for a high-power, solid-state switch. (2) We are studying the feasibility of using advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar technology for reliable non-destructive evaluation of bridges and other high-value concrete structures. These studies include conceptual designs, modeling, experimental verifications, and image reconstruction of simulated radar data. (3) We are exploring the efficiency of pulsed plasma processing techniques used for the removal of NO{sub x} from various effluent sources. (4) We have finished the investigation of the properties of a magnetically delayed low-pressure gas switch, which was designed here at LLNL. (5) We are applying statistical electromagnetic theory techniques to help assess microwave effects on electronic subsystems, by using a mode stirred chamber as our measurement tool. (6) We are investigating the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in proposed CFC replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stresses and breakdown environments.

  11. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  12. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  13. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-08-18

    The Water Power Peer Review Meeting was held February 24-28, 2014 in Arlington, VA. Principle investigators from the Energy Department National Laboratories, academic, and industry representatives presented the progress of their DOE-funded research. This report documents the formal, rigorous evaluation process and findings of nine independent reviewers who examined the technical, scientific, and business results of 96 projects of the Water Power Program, as well as the productivity and management effectiveness of the Water Power Program itself.

  14. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pulsed power offers and efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. We are pursuing two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. This paper describes recent progress in each approach and plans for future development.

  15. Pulse detonation MHD power

    SciTech Connect

    Litchford, R.J.; Thompson, B.R.; Lineberry, J.T.

    1998-07-01

    A series of laboratory scale experiments were conducted to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium-hydroxide/ methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1 m long tube having an inside diameter of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p{sub 2}/p{sub 1} {approximately} 34 and D {approximately} 2400 m/s) and enabled the measurement of current density ({approximately} 2 A/cm{sup 2}) and electrical conductivity ({approximately} 6 mho/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30 cm long continuous electrode Faraday channel having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2.0 cm was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was placed inside a permanent magnet assembly having a nominal magnetic induction of 0.6 Tesla, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit in order to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. In these single-shot experiments, the near-electrode potential drop was found to consume approximately 60% of the effective u x B induced potential. For B = 0.6 Tesla, the authors obtained a peak open circuit voltage of V{sub O}C = Bh {approximately} 10 volts implying an effective burned gas velocity relative to the tube of {approximately} 660 m/s which may be compared with the theoretical equilibrium value for the idealized case (1100 m/s). The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohms. The measured peak electrical energy density ranged from 10 to 10{sup 3} J/m{sup 3} when the effective magnetic induction was varied from 0.6 to 4.2 Tesla. These results

  16. Petawatt pulsed-power accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Stygar, William A.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Headley, Daniel I.; Ives, Harry C.; Ives, legal representative; Berry Cottrell; Leeper, Ramon J.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Olson, Craig L.; Porter, John L.; Wagoner; Tim C.

    2010-03-16

    A petawatt pulsed-power accelerator can be driven by various types of electrical-pulse generators, including conventional Marx generators and linear-transformer drivers. The pulsed-power accelerator can be configured to drive an electrical load from one- or two-sides. Various types of loads can be driven; for example, the accelerator can be used to drive a high-current z-pinch load. When driven by slow-pulse generators (e.g., conventional Marx generators), the accelerator comprises an oil section comprising at least one pulse-generator level having a plurality of pulse generators; a water section comprising a pulse-forming circuit for each pulse generator and a level of monolithic triplate radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, that have variable impedance profiles, for each pulse-generator level; and a vacuum section comprising triplate magnetically insulated transmission lines that feed an electrical load. When driven by LTD generators or other fast-pulse generators, the need for the pulse-forming circuits in the water section can be eliminated.

  17. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  18. Peer Power. Book 2, Applying Peer Helper Skills. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Judith A.

    A step-by-step model for training peer counselors forms the basis of the trainer's manual and accompanying exercises for trainees which are organized into two books for effective skill building. Designed for peer counseling trainees, this document presents the second of these two exercise books. The book begins with a brief introduction to…

  19. Lithium batteries for pulse power

    SciTech Connect

    Redey, L.

    1990-01-01

    New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The R D and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50--300 kW/kg specific power and 80--130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1--10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl{sub 2} primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  1. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1995-07-11

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology.

  2. Solid state pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Fengfeng; Saddoughi, Seyed Gholamali; Herbon, John Thomas

    2014-02-11

    A power generator includes one or more full bridge inverter modules coupled to a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) through an inductive resonant branch. Each module includes a plurality of switches that are switched in a fashion causing the one or more full bridge inverter modules to drive the semiconductor opening switch SOS through the resonant circuit to generate pulses to a load connected in parallel with the SOS.

  3. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  4. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  5. The power of nursing peer review.

    PubMed

    Spiva, Lee Anna; Jarrell, Nicole; Baio, Pamela

    2014-11-01

    This article describes how an integrated healthcare system created a nursing peer-review structure to empower nurses to make practice changes and enhance professional accountability. A nursing peer-review committee and tools supporting the process were developed and implemented. PMID:25340923

  6. Nova pulse power design and operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, K.; Larson, D.; Merritt, B.; Christie, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nova is a 100 TW Nd++ solid state laser designed for experiments with laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The pulsed power for Nova includes a 58 MJ capacitor bank driving 5336 flashlamps with millisecond pulses and subnanosecond high voltages for electro optics. This paper summarizes the pulsed power designs and the operational experience to date.

  7. Prefire identification for pulse-power systems

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, J.L.; Thuot, M.E.; Warren, D.S.

    1982-08-23

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  8. Prefire identification for pulse power systems

    DOEpatents

    Longmire, Jerry L.; Thuot, Michael E.; Warren, David S.

    1985-01-01

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  9. Beamlet pulsed-power system

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.

    1996-06-01

    The 13-MJ Beamlet pulsed-power system provides power to the 512 flash lamps in the cavity and booster amplifiers. Since the flash lamps pump all of the apertures in the 2 x 2 amplifier array, the capacitor bank provides roughly four times the energy required to pump the single active beam line. During the 40 s prior to the shot, the capacitors are charged by constant-current power supplies. Ignitron switches transfer the capacitor energy to the flash lamps via coaxial cables. A preionization system triggers the flash lamps and delivers roughly 1 % of the capacitor energy 200 {mu}s prior to the main discharge. This is the first time flash-lamp preionization has been used in a large facility. Preionization improves the amplifier efficiency by roughly 5% and increases the lifetime of the flash lamps. LabVIEW control panels provide an operator interface with the modular controls and diagnostics. To improve the reliability of the system, high-energy-density, self-healing, metallized dielectric capacitors are used. High-frequency, voltage-regulated switching power supplies are integrated into each module on Beamlet, allowing greater independence among the modules and improved charge voltage accuracy, flexibility, and repeatability.

  10. Nova pulse power system description and status

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, R.W.; Whitham, K.; Merritt, B.T.; Gritton, D.G.; Oicles, J.A.

    1981-06-01

    The Nova laser system is designed to produce critical data in the nation's inertial confinement fusion effort. It is the world's largest peak power laser and presents various unique pulse power problems. In this paper, pulse power systems for this laser are described, the evolutionary points from prior systems are pointed out, and the current status of the hardware is given.

  11. Technology of Pulse Power Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shanshan

    Polymer film of pulse discharge capacitors operated at high repetition rate dissipates substantial power. The thermal conductivity of biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) is measured as a function of metallization resistivity. The thermal conductivity in the plane of the film is about twice that of bulk polypropylene. Thermal design is optimized based on the measurement for large capacitors with multiple windings in a container. High discharge speed results in high current density at the wire arc sprayed end connections which tend to deteriorate gradually, resulting in capacitor failure during operation. To assure the end connection quality before assembly, a test procedure and apparatus for end connection integrity was developed based on monitoring the partial discharge pattern from end connection during discharge. The mechanism of clearing is analyzed which shows arc extinguishes due to the increased arc length and reduced energy so that capacitor can function normally after breakdown. In the case of a clearing discharge, the power dissipation appears to increase with time, although this is not a feature of previous models. Submicrosecond discharge requires minimizing inductance which can be achieved by optimizing the winding structure so that submicrosecond discharge becomes practical. An analysis of the inductance of multisection, very high voltage capacitors is carried out, which identifies low inductance structures for this type of capacitor.

  12. AN UPDATE ON NIF PULSED POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; James, G F; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; McHale, G B; Barbosa, F; Runtal, A S; Stratton, P L

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser fusion driver operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF relies on three large-scale pulsed power systems to achieve its goals: the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), which provides flashlamp excitation for the laser's injection system; the Power Conditioning System (PCS), which provides the multi-megajoule pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers; and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC), which enables NIF to take advantage of a fourpass main amplifier. Years of production, installation, and commissioning of the three NIF pulsed power systems are now complete. Seven-day-per-week operation of the laser has commenced, with the three pulsed power systems providing routine support of laser operations. We present the details of the status and operational experience associated with the three systems along with a projection of the future for NIF pulsed power.

  13. Bullying--And the Power of Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodkin, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This White House report investigates the essential role that peers play in promoting or preventing bullying. Bullies use bullying to attain success and recognition; their success in doing so depends on the characteristics of the bully, the relationship that exists between bullies and those whom they target for harassment, and the reactions of…

  14. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  15. Pulse shortening in high power microwave sources

    SciTech Connect

    Benford, J.; Benford, G.

    1996-12-31

    The authors review the current state of understanding of the universal phenomena that high power microwave pulses are shorter than the applied electrical pulse. Higher power reduces pulse duration, limiting present-day sources to a few hundred joules. Is this limitation fundamental, or are there means to avoid it entirely? There is no reason to think that only one mechanism is responsible. Rather, there are layers of effects which may need to be addressed separately. The authors categories experimental observations in terms of candidate pulse shortening mechanisms such as gap closure, primary and secondary electron bombardment of walls, and RF breakdown. Pulse shortening mechanism theory (microwave field interaction with the beam, resistive filamentation, enhanced closure, etc.) is summarized and compared to observations. They make suggestions for additional experiments and diagnostics to help separate out causes. Finally, means of reducing or eliminating pulse shortening are reviewed.

  16. Pulse power applications of flux compression generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Caird, R. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Freeman, B. L.

    Characteristics are presented for two different types of explosive driven flux compression generators and a megavolt pulse transformer. Status reports are given for rail gun and plasma focus programs for which the generators serve as power sources.

  17. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  18. Low power arcjet thruster pulse ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarmiento, Charles J.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the pulse ignition characteristics of a 1 kW class arcjet using an inductive energy storage pulse generator with a pulse width modulated power converter identified several thruster and pulse generator parameters that influence breakdown voltage including pulse generator rate of voltage rise. This work was conducted with an arcjet tested on hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine. Over all ranges of thruster and pulser parameters investigated, the mean breakdown voltages varied from 1.4 to 2.7 kV. Ignition tests at elevated thruster temperatures under certain conditions revealed occasional breakdowns to thruster voltages higher than the power converter output voltage. These post breakdown discharges sometimes failed to transition to the lower voltage arc discharge mode and the thruster would not ignite. Under the same conditions, a transition to the arc mode would occur for a subsequent pulse and the thruster would ignite. An automated 11 600 cycle starting and transition to steady state test demonstrated ignition on the first pulse and required application of a second pulse only two times to initiate breakdown.

  19. High Power Pulsed Gas Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteman, W. J.

    1987-09-01

    Gas lasers have shown to be capable of delivering tens of terrawatt aspeak power or tens of kilowatt as average power. The efficiencies of most high power gas lasers are relatively high compared with other types of lasers. For instance molecular lasers, oscillating on low lying vibrational levels, and excimer lasers may have intrinsic efficiencies above 10%.The wavelengths of these gas lasers cover the range from the far infrared to the ultra-violet region, say from 12000 to 193 nm. The most important properties are the scalability, optical homogeneity of the excited medium, and the relatively low price per watt of output power. The disadvantages may be the large size of the systems and the relatively narrow line width with limited tunability compared with solid state systems producing the same peak power. High power gas lasers group into three main categories depending on the waste-heat handling capacity.

  20. High-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Vladimir I.; Buyanov, Yuri I.; Koval'chuk, Boris M.; Andreev, Yuri A.; Belichenko, Victor P.; Efremov, Anatoly M.; Plisko, Vyacheslav V.; Sukhushin, Konstantin N.; Vizir, Vadim A.; Zorin, Valery B.

    1997-10-01

    Basing on energetic processes studying in the near-field radiator zone, a new concept of antenna synthesizing for ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation has been suggested. The results of experimental investigations of the antennae developed with using of this concept for high-power applications are presented. The antennae have small dimensions, high electrical strength, cardioid pattern with linear polarization of the pulse radiated and they are ideally adapted to be used as a steering antenna array element. A high-voltage nanosecond bipolar pulse generator design to excite antennae is described.

  1. Pulsed power for electromagnetic launching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, M.

    1980-12-01

    There are system advantages to producing power for electromagnetic propulsion by real-time generation rather than by a sequence of generation-storage-switching. The best type of generator for this purpose is the flux compression generator which have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories are reviewed and their applications to electric launching are discussed. New experimental facilities for producing more powerful generators are described and cost comparisons are made.

  2. Pulsed power for electromagnetic launching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, M.

    1982-01-01

    There are system advantages to producing power for electromagnetic propulsion by real time generation rather than by a sequence of generation-storage-switching. The best type of generator for this purpose is the flux compression generator. Different types of flux compression generator which have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories are reviewed and their applications to electric launching are discussed. New experimental facilities for producing more powerful generators are described and cost comparisons are made.

  3. Pulsed power for electromagnetic launching

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M

    1980-12-01

    There are system advantages to producing power for electromagnetic propulsion by real-time generation rather than by a sequence of generation-storage-switching. The best type of generator for this purpose is the flux compression generator. Different types of flux compression generator which have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories are reviewed and their applications to electric launching are discussed. New experimental facilities for producing more powerful generators are described and cost comparisons are made.

  4. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  5. Pulsed power molten salt battery development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, S. D.; Boos, D. L.; Ryan, D. M.

    The authors describe a program aimed at developing a primary-reserve pulse-power battery design. The program focus at the present time is on developing high-rate chlorine cathodes for the lithium-aluminum/chlorine system. A novel activation treatment has been developed to use porous carbon and graphite materials as chlorine cathodes in this battery system. Results obtained with these electrodes in molten-salt cells are discussed. In molten LiCl-KCl at 450 C, these chlorine electrodes deliver remarkable pulse-power performance, 20-25 W/cm2. The IR-free cell polarization with Li-Al/chlorine cells appears to be ohmic, which is desirable for the pulse power application.

  6. Improving healthcare quality through organisational peer-to-peer assessment: lessons from the nuclear power industry.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Hudson, Daniel W

    2012-10-01

    Healthcare has made great efforts to reduce preventable patient harm, from externally driven regulations to internally driven professionalism. Regulation has driven the majority of efforts to date, and has a necessary place in establishing accountability and minimum standards. Yet they need to be coupled with internally driven efforts. Among professional groups, internally-driven efforts that function as communities of learning and change social norms are highly effective tools to improve performance, yet these approaches are underdeveloped in healthcare. Healthcare can learn much from the nuclear power industry. The nuclear power industry formed the Institute of Nuclear Power Operators following the Three Mile Island accident to improve safety. That organization established a peer-to-peer assessment program to cross-share best practices, safety hazards, problems and actions that improved safety and operational performance. This commentary explores how a similar program could be expanded into healthcare. Healthcare needs a structured, clinician-led, industry-wide process to openly review, identify and mitigate hazards, and share best practices that ultimately improve patient safety. A healthcare version of the nuclear power program could supplement regulatory and other strategies currently used to improve quality and patient safety. PMID:22562877

  7. Pulsed power systems for the DARHT accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.N.; Parsons, W.M.; Earley, L.M.; Melton, J.G.; Moir, D.C.; Carlson, R.L.; Barnes, G.A.; Builta, L.A.; Eversole, S.A.; Keel, G.I.; Rader, D.C.; Romero, J.A.; Shurter, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydro Test (DARHT) Facility is being designed to produce high-resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamics experiments. Two 16- to 20-MeV linear induction accelerators (LIA), with an included angle of 90{degree}, are used to produce intense bremsstrahlung x-ray pulses of short duration (60-ns flat-top). Each accelerator has a 4-MeV electron source that injects an electron beam into a series of 250-kV induction cells. The three major pulsed-power systems are the injectors, the induction-cell pulsed-power (ICPP) units, and the ICPP trigger systems, and are discussed in this paper. 11 refs., 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  8. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, James; Buden, David; Williams, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometeorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length.

  9. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  10. Experimental research on pulse forming based on high-temperature SMES applied in pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yusheng; Kuang, Jianghua; Tang, Yuejin; Song, Meng; Wei, Bin; Cheng, Shijie; Pan, Yuan

    2009-03-01

    To research the key problems of storage energy and pulse forming in pulsed power, a pulse magnet made of Bi2223/Ag high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes applied in pulsed power experiment was developed. After determining electromagnetic characteristics of the magnet, a pulse forming network was designed. HTS magnet was immersed in liquid nitrogen bath, experiments were carried out about discharging pulse current to resistance load based on HTS magnet energy storage (SMES). The results show that pulse current waves were obtained through adjusted circuit construction and magnet parameters by acting delay of switches in the pulse forming network. The technical schemes about pulse forming based on SMES were presented.

  11. High-power pulse propagation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    One of the questions that must be answered in assessing the potential of pulsed microwave beams as directed energy weapons is, ''What is the maximum pulse energy (and/or peak power) that can be delivered from a source to a target.'' Atmospheric breakdown caused by the electromagnetic fields of the pulse sets one limit on energy propagation, and the breakdown threshold was the subject of fairly extensive investigation a number of years ago. The evolution of microwave source technology has extended the parameter range over which propagation needs to be understood, and additional issues that have not previously been investigated experimentally have assumed a new importance. A new generation of experiments is underway, planned, or proposed to investigate these issues. 13 refs.

  12. Pulsed power performance of PBFA Z

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Stygar, W.A.; Seamen, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    PBFA Z is a new 60-TW/5-MJ electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories. The authors use PBFA Z to drive z pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator, water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn and PBFA II accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 60-TW/105-ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.0 MJ and 50 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, the authors attain peak currents of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the z-pinch load through self magnetically-insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electric fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV/cm. The current from the four independent conical-disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. The authors achieved x-ray powers of 200 TW and x-ray energies of 1.9 MJ from tungsten wire-array z-pinch loads.

  13. Replication methods for enhancing search performance in peer-to-peer services on power-law logical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata, Shingo; Murata, Masayuki; Gotoh, Yoshihiro

    2003-08-01

    Many services have recently been offered based on a peer-to-peer (P2P) communication model. Peers connect to each other and build an overlaid logical network and available services are communicated over this network. The robustness of the P2P network against frequent peer failure must be considered. This includes when the peers leave the network and this directly affects the stability of the entire logical network. Replication of the content is one of the most useful techniques to increase robustness. However, the overall effectiveness of replication is heavily dependent on the topology of the logical network. As topology of networks, including the Internet and P2P, follows a Power-Law distribution pattern, we first investigate the effect of the logical network topology (especially of the Power-Law characteristics) on replication methods. We use a search method called "n-walkers random walk" in which multiple queries move randomly across the P2P logical network. We use a "path replication method," to create replicas at all the intermediate nodes on the path between the requesting and responding nodes. Through simulations experiments, we observed that peers with a large number of degrees (e.g., degree > 10) make four times as many replicas as peers with a small number of degrees. In addition, replicas on large degree's peers are used ten times as frequently as those on peers with small degrees. Based on these observations, we propose a query forwarding method that considers the Power-Law property of the network topology in order to improve the performance of the P2P service. In our method the queries are transmitted with different probabilities, dependending on the degree of each adjacent node. Our simulation results show that our proposed method can greatly improve the query performance by considering the characteristics of Power-Law. Our method reduces the average hop count in finding replicas by up to 60% compared with the random forwarding method.

  14. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Austin, K. N.; Waisman, E. M.; Hickman, R. J.; Davis, J.-P.; Haill, T. A.; Knudson, M. D.; Seagle, C. T.; Brown, J. L.; Goerz, D. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Goldlust, J. A.; Cravey, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM), circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  15. High Power Particle Beams and Pulsed Power for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hansjoachim; An, Wladimir; Engelko, Wladimir; Giese, Harald; Frey, Wolfgang; Heinzel, Annette; Hoppé, Peter; Mueller, Georg; Schultheiss, Christoph; Singer, Josef; Strässner, Ralf; Strauß, Dirk; Weisenburger, Alfons; Zimmermann, Fritz

    2002-12-01

    Several industrial scale projects with economic and ecologic potential are presently emanating from research and development in the fields of high power particle beams and pulsed power in Europe. Material surface modifications with large area pulsed electron beams are used to protect high temperature gas turbine blades and steel structures in Pb/Bi cooled accelerator driven nuclear reactor systems against oxidation and corrosion respectively. Channel spark electron beams are applied to deposit bio-compatible or bio-active layers on medical implants. Cell membranes are perforated with strong pulsed electric fields to extract nutritive substances or raw materials from the cells and to kill bacteria for sterilization of liquids. Eletrodynamic fragmentation devices are developed to reutilize concrete aggregates for the production of high quality secondary concrete. All activities have a large potential to contribute to a more sustainable economy.

  16. Power Analysis of Soliton Pulse for ROF-OFDM System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kulwinder; Bhatia, Kamaljit Singh; Ryait, Hardeep Singh; Kaur, Amandeep

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, propagation behavior of Soliton pulse in optical fiber communication is analyzed. Ultra high speed transmission of data over optical fiber is possible by choosing appropriate pulse shape. Soliton pulse transmission using different modulation formats is performed to minimize jitter. Also analysis is done to calculate optical power, electrical power and average peak electrical power at different frequencies.

  17. Characterization of power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Vangordon, James; Kovaleski, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) is used in many types of applications. Although the use of the power IGBT has been well characterized for many continuous operation power electronics applications, little published information is available regarding the performance of a given IGBT under pulsed power conditions. Additionally, component libraries in circuit simulation software packages have a finite number of IGBTs. This paper presents a process for characterizing the performance of a given power IGBT under pulsed power conditions. Specifically, signals up to 3.5 kV and 1 kA with 1-10 {micro}s pulse widths have been applied to a Powerex QIS4506001 IGBT. This process utilizes least squares curve fitting techniques with collected data to determine values for a set of modeling parameters. These parameters were used in the Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model for the IGBT that is utilized in some circuit simulation software packages. After the nominal parameter values are determined, they can be inserted into the Oziemkiewicz implementation to simulate a given IGBT.

  18. Pulse Detonation Rocket Magnetohydrodynamic Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Jones, J. E.; Dobson, C. C.; Cole, J. W.; Thompson, B. R.; Plemmons, D. H.; Turner, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    The production of onboard electrical power by pulse detonation engines is problematic in that they generate no shaft power; however, pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation represents one intriguing possibility for attaining self-sustained engine operation and generating large quantities of burst power for onboard electrical systems. To examine this possibility further, a simple heat-sink apparatus was developed for experimentally investigating pulse detonation driven MHD generator concepts. The hydrogen oxygen fired driver was a 90 cm long stainless steel tube having a 4.5 cm square internal cross section and a short Schelkin spiral near the head end to promote rapid formation of a detonation wave. The tube was intermittently filled to atmospheric pressure and seeded with a CsOH/methanol prior to ignition by electrical spark. The driver exhausted through an aluminum nozzle having an area contraction ratio of A*/A(sub zeta) = 1/10 and an area expansion ratio of A(sub zeta)/A* = 3.2 (as limited by available magnet bore size). The nozzle exhausted through a 24-electrode segmented Faraday channel (30.5 cm active length), which was inserted into a 0.6 T permanent magnet assembly. Initial experiments verified proper drive operation with and without the nozzle attachment, and head end pressure and time resolved thrust measurements were acquired. The exhaust jet from the nozzle was interrogated using a polychromatic microwave interferometer yielding an electron number density on the order of 10(exp 12)/cm at the generator entrance. In this case, MHD power generation experiments suffered from severe near-electrode voltage drops and low MHD interaction; i.e., low flow velocity, due to an inherent physical constraint on expansion with the available magnet. Increased scaling, improved seeding techniques, higher magnetic fields, and higher expansion ratios are expected to greatly improve performance.

  19. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  20. High power UV and VUV pulsed excilamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V.; Erofeev, M.; Lomaev, M.; Rybka, D.

    2008-07-01

    Emission characteristics of a nanosecond discharge in inert gases and its halogenides without preionization of the gap from an auxiliary source have been investigated. A volume discharge, initiated by an avalanche electron beam (VDIAEB) was realized at pressures up to 12 atm. In xenon at pressure of 1.2 atm, the energy of spontaneous radiation in the full solid angle was sim 45 mJ/cm^3, and the FWHM of a radiation pulse was sim 110 ns. The spontaneous radiation power rise in xenon was observed at pressures up to 12 atm. Pulsed radiant exitance of inert gases halogenides excited by VDIAEB was sim 4.5 kW/cm^2 at efficiency up to 5.5 %.

  1. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  2. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has

  3. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  4. Westinghouse programs in pulsed homopolar power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litz, D. C.; Mullan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This document details Westinghouse's ongoing study of homopolar machines since 1929 with the major effort occurring in the early 1970's to the present. The effort has enabled Westinghouse to develop expertise in the technology required for the design, fabrication and testing of such machines. This includes electrical design, electromagnetic analysis, current collection, mechanical design, advanced cooling, stress analysis, transient rotor performance, bearing analysis and seal technology. Westinghouse is using this capability to explore the use of homopolar machines as pulsed power supplies for future systems in both military and commercial applications.

  5. Performance of Low-Power Pulsed Arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Rodney L.

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Propulsion Laboratory at UIUC has in place all the capability and diagnostics required for performance testing of low power pulsed and DC arcjets. The UIUC thrust stand is operating with excellent accuracy and sensitivity at very low thrust levels. An important aspect of the experimental setup is the use of a PID controller to maintain a constant thruster position, which reduces hysterisis effects. Electrical noise from the arcjet induces some noise into the thrust signal, but this does not affect the measurement.

  6. Pulse Power Supply for Plasma Dynamic Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuanzong; Liu, Jian; Feng, Chunhua; Wang, Long

    2008-06-01

    A new concept of a coaxial plasma dynamic accelerator with a self-energized magnetic compressor coil to simulate the effects of space debris impact is demonstrated. A brief description is presented about the pulse power supply system including the charging circuit, start switch and current transfer system along with some of the key techniques for this kind of accelerator. Using this accelerator configuration, ceramic beads of 100 fim in diameter were accelerated to a speed as high as 18 km/sec. The facility can be used in a laboratory setting to study impact phenomena on solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space.

  7. Diagnostics on the COBRA pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Chalenski, D. A.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2006-10-15

    The COBRA pulsed power generator has a variable current pulse wave form and amplitude (95-180 ns rise time, up to 1 MA peak current). It was designed to study wire array Z pinches and X pinches, including plasma formation, pinch implosion dynamics, and pinch plasma parameters as a function of current rise time. These loads have been studied using an extensive set of diagnostics with spatial and/or temporal resolution. The set of electrical diagnostics on the COBRA generator includes Rogowski coils to monitor the total load current and the current through individual return current posts, and there is also an inductive voltage monitor. A set of extreme ultraviolet and x-ray detectors is used to study the load radiation. Wire array and X pinch plasma formation and dynamics are studied using two-frame, point projection X-pinch x-ray imaging as well as with multiframe laser probing. Flat potassium acid phtalate crystal (KAP), convex, extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph, and focusing spectrograph with spatial resolution with mica crystal, pinhole cameras, and a camera with a slit and a step filter set (slip step-wedge camera) can be used in each pulse to monitor the x-ray emission from the X pinch(es) and arrays in several spectral bands.

  8. Diagnostics on the COBRA pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Chalenski, D. A.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2006-10-01

    The COBRA pulsed power generator has a variable current pulse wave form and amplitude (95-180ns rise time, up to 1MA peak current). It was designed to study wire array Z pinches and X pinches, including plasma formation, pinch implosion dynamics, and pinch plasma parameters as a function of current rise time. These loads have been studied using an extensive set of diagnostics with spatial and/or temporal resolution. The set of electrical diagnostics on the COBRA generator includes Rogowski coils to monitor the total load current and the current through individual return current posts, and there is also an inductive voltage monitor. A set of extreme ultraviolet and x-ray detectors is used to study the load radiation. Wire array and X pinch plasma formation and dynamics are studied using two-frame, point projection X-pinch x-ray imaging as well as with multiframe laser probing. Flat potassium acid phtalate crystal (KAP), convex, extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph, and focusing spectrograph with spatial resolution with mica crystal, pinhole cameras, and a camera with a slit and a step filter set (slip step-wedge camera) can be used in each pulse to monitor the x-ray emission from the X pinch(es) and arrays in several spectral bands.

  9. Narrow high power microwave pulses from a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Zhang, T.B.

    1995-11-01

    The authors have explored high power microwave ({lambda} = 1.5mm) pulse amplification along a tapered undulator FEL using the 1D Compton FEL equations with slippage. For an appropriate taper, sideband instabilities are suppressed and a short ({approximately}50psec) Gaussian pulse will propagate in a nearly self-similar way as it grows in power, slipping through a much longer electron pulse (beam energy, 750kV; current, 100A; radius = 2mm; length = 200 radiation periods). This is in contrast to the example of pulse propagation in a constant parameter undulator, where the Gaussian pulse breaks up into irregularities identified with sidebanding. Variation of initial pulse width shows convergence to a 50psec wide output pulse. Because of the slippage of the radiation pulse through the electron pulse, the peak microwave pulse intensity, {approximately}3GW/cm2, is about three times the kinetic energy density of the electron beam.

  10. Direct coupling of pulsed radio frequency and pulsed high power in novel pulsed power system for plasma immersion ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunzhi; Tian, Xiubo; Yang, Shiqin; Fu, Ricky K Y; Chu, Paul K

    2008-04-01

    A novel power supply system that directly couples pulsed high voltage (HV) pulses and pulsed 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) has been developed for plasma processes. In this system, the sample holder is connected to both the rf generator and HV modulator. The coupling circuit in the hybrid system is composed of individual matching units, low pass filters, and voltage clamping units. This ensures the safe operation of the rf system even when the HV is on. The PSPICE software is utilized to optimize the design of circuits. The system can be operated in two modes. The pulsed rf discharge may serve as either the seed plasma source for glow discharge or high-density plasma source for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The pulsed high-voltage glow discharge is induced when a rf pulse with a short duration or a larger time interval between the rf and HV pulses is used. Conventional PIII can also be achieved. Experiments conducted on the new system confirm steady and safe operation. PMID:18447526

  11. Earthquake Triggering by High Power Electric Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Victor; Konev, Yuri; Zeigarnik, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The study carried out by the Joint Institute for High Temperatures in cooperation with the Institute of Physics of the Earth and the Research Station in Bishkek of Russian Academy of Sciences in 1999-2008 showed a response of weak seismicity at field experiments with electric pulsed power systems, as well as acoustic emission of rock specimens under laboratory conditions on high-power electric current pulses applied to the rocks. It was suggested that the phenomenon discovered may be used in practice for partial release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust for earthquake hazard mitigation. Nevertheless, the mechanism of the influence of man-made electromagnetic field on the regional seismicity is not clear yet. One of possible cause of the phenomenon may be pore fluid pressure increase in the rocks under stressed conditions due to Joule heat generation by electric current injected into the Earth crust. It is known that increase of pore fluid pressure in the fault zone over a critical pressure of about 0.05 MPa is sufficient to trigger an earthquake if the fault is near the critical state due to accumulated tectonic deformations. Detailed 3D-calculaton of electric current density in the Earth crust of the Northern Tien Shan provided by pulsed electric high-power system connected to grounded electric dipole showed that at the depth of earthquake epicenters (over 5 km) the electric current density is lower than 10-7 A/m2 that is not sufficient for increase of pressure in the fluid-saturated porous geological medium due to Joule heat generation, which may provide formation of cracks resulting in the fault propagation and release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust. Nevertheless, under certain conditions, when electric current will be injected into the fault through the casing pipes of two deep wells with preliminary injection of conductive fluid into the fault, the current density may be high enough for significant increase of mechanic pressure in the porous two

  12. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p(sub 2)/p(sub 1) approx. 34 and D approx. 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (=6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T. and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohm. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the MHD interaction exerted a

  13. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p2/p1 approximately 34 and D approximately 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (approximately = 6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front, In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Omega. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the NM interaction

  14. Pulse transmission transceiver architecture for low power communications

    DOEpatents

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-08-05

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A method of pulse transmission communications includes: generating a modulated pulse signal waveform; transforming said modulated pulse signal waveform into at least one higher-order derivative waveform; and transmitting said at least one higher-order derivative waveform as an emitted pulse. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  15. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  16. Making Retention Count: The Power of Becoming a Peer Tutor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesler, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: A review of the literature demonstrates that grade retention often fails to improve the academic and socioemotional outcomes of retained students. Although little empirical work on peer tutoring has focused specifically on retained students, the literature suggests that those students who act as peer tutors often experience…

  17. Unleashing the Power of Young Women through Peer Helping Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Richard; Steiner, Mary E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the application of the Positive Peer Culture (PPC) treatment methodology to a population of troubled girls in a residential setting. The peer group utilizes naturally occurring problems as vehicles to teach girls about errors in behavior and thinking. Community activities are used to practice newly obtained prosocial behaviors. (LSR)

  18. Compensating for inconsistent high power vircator microwave radar pulse sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate a vircator as an economical high power pulsed microwave source for radar. Because of the inconsistency of spark gaps in the driver and operation of the tube based vircator, the resulting ringing pulse has a different pulse shape each time a pulse is generated. Therefore every time we pulse the source we must remove the effects of the ringing source pulse from the data resulting from that pulse. Scattering from a scene is considered random (white noise) with a superimposed non-white component due to the pulse. We propose a whitening filter to remove the effects of the ringing pulse from the random data. This produces a similar result as spectral factorization in which we first determine the pulse from the power spectrum of the data and then deconvolve the ringing pulse out of the received data. The removal of pulse specific ringing increases range resolution and allows data from sequential pulses from a single vircator or pulses from separate vircators to be combined for joint processing in a synthetic aperture radar.

  19. High power pulsed magnicon at 34-GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Nezhevenko, O.A.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Ganguly, A.K.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    A high efficiency, high power magnicon amplifier at 34.272 GHz has been designed as a radiation source to drive multi-TeV electron-positron linear colliders. Simulations show peak output power of 45 MW in a 1.5 microsecond wide pulse with an efficiency of 45{percent} and gain of 55 dB. The repetition rate is 10 Hz. The amplifier is a frequency tripler, or third harmonic amplifier, in that the output frequency of 34.272 GHz is three times the input drive frequency of 11.424 GHz. Thus the rotating TM{sub 110} modes in the drive cavity, 3 gain cavities and double decoupled penultimate cavities are resonant near 11.424 GHz; and the rotating TM{sub 310} mode in the output cavity is resonant at 34.272 GHz. A 500 kV, 200 A high area compression electron gun will provide a low emittance electron beam with a diameter of about 0.8 mm. A superconducting solenoid magnet will provide a magnetic field of 13 kG in the deflection system and 22 kG in the output cavity. A collector for the spent beam has also been designed. Detailed simulation results for the operation of the entire magnicon amplifier (gun, magnetic system, rf system and collector) will be given. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent

  1. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 1: Invited papers, pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  2. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  3. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  4. Multirail electromagnetic launcher powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Butov, V. G.; Panchenko, V. P.; Sinyaev, S. V.; Solonenko, V. A.; Shvetsov, G. A.; Yakushev, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The operation of an electromagnetic multirail launcher of solids powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is studied. The plasma flow in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the possibility of launching solids in a rapid-fire mode of launcher operation are considered. It is shown that this mode of launcher operation can be implemented by matching the plasma flow dynamics in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the launching conditions. It is also shown that powerful pulsed MHD generators can be used as a source of electrical energy for rapid-fire electromagnetic rail launchers operating in a burst mode.

  5. Experience of Pseudospark Switch Operation in Pulse Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitenko, N. V.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.; Bochkov, V. D.

    2015-11-01

    The paper demonstrates the results of TDIl-200k/25SN-P pseudospark switch (PSS) developed by Russian company "Pulsed Technologies Ltd" application. PSS was used in pulsed power unit intended for electric-discharge fracture of rocks and concrete blocks and splitting off from monolith. The pulsed power unit has a pulse current generator with the capacity of 560 μF, stored energy of up to 63 kJ, operating voltage of up to15 kV, current pulse amplitude of up to 200 kA and pulse duration more than 200 μsec. The study also shows the current waveforms determined in the short-circuit experiment of the pulse current generator and in the experiments of the electric-discharge fragmentation of concrete at the charging voltage of 13 kV. PSS was operated in ringing single-pulse mode with the exceedance of more than two maximum permissible parameters: current pulse amplitude, current pulse duration and maximum pulse energy. Internal electrode erosion of PSS is shown and possible reasons of asymmetric current feed are discussed.

  6. Pulsed Power: Sandia's Plans for the New Millenium

    SciTech Connect

    QUINTENZ,JEFFREY P.

    2000-07-20

    Pulsed power science and engineering activities at Sandia National Laboratories grew out of a programmatic need for intense radiation sources to advance capabilities in radiographic imaging and to create environments for testing and certifying the hardness of components and systems to radiation in hostile environments. By the early 1970s, scientists in laboratories around the world began utilizing pulsed power drivers with very short (10s of nanoseconds) pulse lengths for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. In the United States, Defense Programs within the Department of Energy has sponsored this research. Recent progress in pulsed power, specifically fast-pulsed-power-driven z pinches, in creating temperatures relevant to ICF has been remarkable. Worldwide developments in pulsed power technologies and increased applications in both defense and industry are contrasted with ever increasing stress on research and development tiding. The current environment has prompted us at Sandia to evaluate our role in the continued development of pulsed power science and to consider options for the future. This presentation will highlight our recent progress and provide an overview of our plans as we begin the new millennium.

  7. Approaches to solar cell design for pulsed laser power receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a laser to beam power from Earth to a photovoltaic receiver in space could be a technology with applications to many space missions. Extremely high average-power lasers would be required in a wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. However, high-power lasers inherently operate in a pulsed format. Existing solar cells are not well designed to respond to pulsed incident power. To better understand cell response to pulsed illumination at high intensity, the PC-1D finite-element computer model was used to analyze the response of solar cells to continuous and pulsed laser illumination. Over 50 percent efficiency was calculated for both InP and GaAs cells under steady-state illumination near the optimum wavelength. The time-dependent response of a high-efficiency GaAs concentrator cell to a laser pulse was modeled, and the effect of laser intensity, wavelength, and bias point was studied. Three main effects decrease the efficiency of a solar cell under pulsed laser illumination: series resistance, L-C 'ringing' with the output circuit, and current limiting due to the output inductance. The problems can be solved either by changing the pulse shape or designing a solar cell to accept the pulsed input. Cell design possibilities discussed are a high-efficiency, light-trapping silicon cell, and a monolithic, low-inductance GaAs cell.

  8. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  9. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-19

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  10. Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems: 1994 Annual PEER Review. Volume 1, Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This is Volume 1 of information presented at the Annual Peer Review of the Superconductivity Program For Electric Power Systems. Topics include: Wire development; powder synthesis; characterization of superconducting materials; electric power applications; and motor cooling issues. Individual reports were processed separately for the database.

  11. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  12. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Hydropower Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Hydropower Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  13. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novac, B. M.; Kumar, R.; Smith, I. R.

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF6), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions.

  14. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator.

    PubMed

    Novac, B M; Kumar, R; Smith, I R

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF(6)), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions. PMID:21034107

  15. Dependences of Generator Parameters on Pulsed Power Ice Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Satoshi; Kominato, Yuichi; Fukuda, Kazuyuki; Yamabe, Chobei; Ushio, Shuki

    In this research, investigation on breaking of ice using a pulsed power generator as a navigation of ice-breaker at ice-covered ocean, was described. In these experiments, pulsed arc discharge was formed by Marx generator. In order to investigate the dependence of input energy required for ice breaking on circuit parameters of generator, the capacitance of generator was changed. The input energy for ice-breaking was calculated from waveforms of electric power. It was found that the input energy for ice-breaking decreased as the peak power increased with decrease of the capacitance of generator.

  16. Experiments with very-high-power RF pulses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, H.A.; Loew, G.A.; Price, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    Experiments in which the powers of two SLAC klystrons were combined and fed into a resonant cavity pulse-compression system (SLED) are described. Pulse powers up to 65 MW into SLED were reached. The corresponding instantaneous peak power out of SLED was 390 MW. After normal initial aging, no persistent RF breakdown problems were encountered. X-radiation at the SLED cavities was generally less than 400 mR/h after aging. The theoretical relationship between x-radiation intensity and RF electric field strength is discussed.

  17. Low Power Pulse Generator Design Using Hybrid Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jin-Fa; Hwang, Yin-Tsung; Sheu, Ming-Hwa

    A low power pulse generator design using hybrid logic realization of a 3-input NAND gate is presented. The hybrid logic approach successfully shortens the critical path along the discharging transistor stack and thus reduces the short circuit power consumption during the pulse generation. The combination of pass transistor and full CMOS logic styles in one NAND gate design also helps minimize the required transistor size, which alleviates the loading capacitance of clock tree as well. Simulation results reveal that, compared with prior work, our design can achieve 20.5% and 23% savings respectively in power and circuit area.

  18. Pulsed power systems for environmental and industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    The development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, free electron lasers, and Inertial Confinement Fusion drivers is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of performing new roles in environmental cleanup and industrial manufacturing processes. We discuss a new class of short-pulse, high average power accelerator that achieves megavolt electron and ion beams with 10`s of kiloamperes of current and average power levels in excess of 100 KW. Large treatment areas are possible with these systems because kilojoules of energy are available in each output pulse. These systems can use large area x-ray converters for applications requiring greater depth of penetration such as food pasteurization and waste treatment. The combined development of this class of accelerators and applications, at Sandia National Laboratories, is called Quantum Manufacturing.

  19. Pulsed power systems for environmental and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neau, E. L.

    1994-10-01

    The development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, free electron lasers, and Inertial Confinement Fusion drivers is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of performing new roles in environmental cleanup and industrial manufacturing processes. We discuss a new class of short-pulse, high average power accelerator that achieves megavolt electron and ion beams with 10's of kiloamperes of current and average power levels in excess of 100 kW. Large treatment areas are possible with these systems because kilojoules of energy are available in each output pulse. These systems can use large area x-ray converters for applications requiring grater depth of penetration such as food pasteurization and waste treatment. The combined development of this class of accelerators and applications, and Sandia National Laboratories, is called Quantum Manufacturing.

  20. Pulsed power requirements for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1984-03-01

    Both linear (railgun) and coaxial (mass driver, etc.) electromagnetic launchers (EMLs) are treated as time-varying impedances to determine the relationships between acceleration force, payload velocity, and power supply voltage and current. These relationships are then examined in the light of electromagnetic parameters associated with each EML type to establish a basis for determining and comparing power supply requirements for various EMLs.

  1. Pulsed power requirements for electromagnetic launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldon, W. F.; Woodson, H. H.

    1986-02-01

    Both linear (railgun) and coaxial (mass driver, etc.) electromagnetic launchers (EMLS) are treated as time-varying impedances to determine the relationships between acceleration force, payload velocity, and power supply voltage and current. These relationships are then examined in the light of electromagnetic parameters associated with each EML type ot establish a basis for determining and comparing power supply requirements for various EMLs.

  2. Preliminary investigation of a low power pulsed arcjet thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Russell D.; Burton, Rodney L.; Wetzel, Kyle K.

    1992-01-01

    A type of pulsed arcjet is examined which operates with gaseous helium propellant at powers from 100 to 1500 W and pulse rats from 360 to 6000 pulses per second. During the pulse, peak power is 50 to 250 kW generating chamber pressures of 10 to 50 atmospheres. The high operating pressure substantially reduces ionization in the 2.5 mm diameter x 12.5 mm long capillary and lowers frozen flow losses in the nozzle. The thruster thermal efficiency, measured calorimetrically, is 43 percent at 440 W and 8 mg/sec helium mass flow rate. Thruster performance trends are predicted by a time-dependent lumped-parameter model which includes heat exchange between the propellant and the wall. The model substantially underpredicts the experimental thermal efficiency values. Alternative thruster configurations yielding significant improvements in thrust efficiency and specific impulse are discussed.

  3. PCF based high power narrow line width pulsed fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Yan, P.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, Y.; Gong, M.

    2012-09-01

    Based on semiconductor diode seeded multi-stage cascaded fiber amplifiers, we have obtained 88-W average power of a 1063-nm laser with high repetition rate of up to 1.5 MHz and a constant 2-ns pulse duration. No stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse or optical damage occurred although the maximum pulse peak power has exceeded 112 kW. The output laser exhibits excellent beam quality (M2x = 1.24 and M2y = 1.18), associated with a spectral line width as narrow as 0.065 nm (FWHM). Additionally, we demonstrate high polarization extinction ratio of 18.4 dB and good pulse stabilities superior to 1.6 % (RMS).

  4. Low power pulsed MPD thruster system analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Domonkos, Matthew; Gilland, James H.

    1993-09-01

    Pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster systems were analyzed for application to solar-electric orbit transfer vehicles at power levels ranging from 10 to 40 kW. Potential system level benefits of pulsed propulsion technology include ease of power scaling without thruster performance changes, improved transportability from low power flight experiments to operational systems, and reduced ground qualification costs. Required pulsed propulsion system components include a pulsed applied-field MPD thruster, a pulse-forming network, a charge control unit, a cathode heater supply, and high speed valves. Mass estimates were obtained for each propulsion subsystem and spacecraft component using off-the-shelf technology whenever possible. Results indicate that for payloads of 1000 and 2000 kg pulsed MPD thrusters can reduce launch mass by between 1000 and 2500 kg over those achievable with hydrogen arcjets, which can be used to reduce launch vehicle class and the associated launch cost. While the achievable mass savings depends on the trip time allowed for the mission, cases are shown in which the launch vehicle required for a mission is decreased from an Atlas IIAS to an Atlas I or Delta 7920.

  5. Low power pulsed MPD thruster system analysis and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Domonkos, Matthew; Gilland, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster systems were analyzed for application to solar-electric orbit transfer vehicles at power levels ranging from 10 to 40 kW. Potential system level benefits of pulsed propulsion technology include ease of power scaling without thruster performance changes, improved transportability from low power flight experiments to operational systems, and reduced ground qualification costs. Required pulsed propulsion system components include a pulsed applied-field MPD thruster, a pulse-forming network, a charge control unit, a cathode heater supply, and high speed valves. Mass estimates were obtained for each propulsion subsystem and spacecraft component using off-the-shelf technology whenever possible. Results indicate that for payloads of 1000 and 2000 kg pulsed MPD thrusters can reduce launch mass by between 1000 and 2500 kg over those achievable with hydrogen arcjets, which can be used to reduce launch vehicle class and the associated launch cost. While the achievable mass savings depends on the trip time allowed for the mission, cases are shown in which the launch vehicle required for a mission is decreased from an Atlas IIAS to an Atlas I or Delta 7920.

  6. Investigation of Input Signal Curve Effect on Formed Pulse of Hydraulic-Powered Pulse Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoseltseva, M. V.; Masson, I. A.; Pashkov, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Well drilling machines should have as high efficiency factor as it is possible. This work proposes factors that are affected by change of input signal pulse curve. A series of runs are conducted on mathematical model of hydraulic-powered pulse machine. From this experiment, interrelations between input pulse curve and construction parameters are found. Results of conducted experiment are obtained with the help of the mathematical model, which is created in Simulink Matlab. Keywords – mathematical modelling; impact machine; output signal amplitude; input signal curve.

  7. Lithium/cobalt sulfide pulse power battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiger, Harvey N.

    The author describes a bipolar battery having a Li alloy anode, CoS2 cathode material, and electrolyte of mixed Li halides. The system is semi-dry because the amount of electrolyte is limited. Fundamental investigations to determine operating voltage limits, active material utilizations, capacity ratios, states of charge, and capacity reserves need to be determined in semi-dry conditions to be unequivocal. This requirement precludes a reference electrode and, instead, the function of a counter-electrode and reference electrodes were combined. The author describes methods and shows comparisons with literature voltammetry data and use of galvanostatic procedures. The results obtained with several Li alloys and with CoS2 electrodes are discussed along with application of these electrochemical design of pulse batteries.

  8. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery.

    PubMed

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K; Jakobsen, Christian; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T

    2016-04-01

    We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30µm was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10µm and a 18µm core diameter photonic band gap hollow-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. PMID:27137004

  9. Evaluation of Light-Triggered Thyristors for Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Fulkerson, E S; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D

    2008-05-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has many needs for high reliability, high peak current, high di/dt switches. Solid-state switch technology offers the demonstrated advantage of reliability under a variety of conditions. Light-triggered switches operate with a reduced susceptibility to electromagnetic interference commonly found within pulsed power environments. Despite the advantages, commercially available solid-state switches are not typically designed for the often extreme pulsed power requirements. Testing was performed to bound the limits of devices for pulsed power applications beyond the manufacturers specified ratings. To test the applicability of recent commercial light-triggered solid-state designs, an adjustable high current switch test stand was assembled. Results from testing and subsequent selected implementations are presented.

  10. Exploring new frontiers in the pulsed power laboratory: Recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamenko, S.; Esaulov, A.; Ulmen, B.; Novikov, V.; Ponomarev, S.; Adamenko, A.; Artyuh, V.; Gurin, A.; Prokopenko, V.; Kolomiyets, V.; Belous, V.; Kim, K.-J.; Miley, G.; Bassuney, A.; Novikov, D.

    One of the most fundamental processes in the Universe, nucleosynthesis of elements drives energy production in stars as well as the creation of all atoms heavier than hydrogen. To harness this process and open new ways for energy production, we must recreate some of the extreme conditions in which it occurs. We present results of experiments using a pulsed power facility to induce collective nuclear interactions producing stable nuclei of virtually every element in the periodic table. A high-power electron beam pulse striking a small metallic target is used to create the extreme dynamic environment. Material analysis studies detect an anomalously high presence of new chemical elements in the remnants of the exploded target supporting theoretical conjectures of the experiment. These results provide strong motivation to continue our research looking for additional proofs that heavy element nucleosynthesis is possible in pulsed power laboratory.

  11. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  12. Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems: 1994 Annual PEER Review. Volume 2, Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This is volume 2 of information that was presented at the 1994 Annual Peer Review, Superconductivity Program For Electric Power. Topics include component development; characterization of high-(Tc) Superconductors; wire development; coils; magnetic refrigerators; motor cooling issues; and magnetic separation. Individual projects were processed separately for the database.

  13. Being in "Bad" Company: Power Dependence and Status in Adolescent Susceptibility to Peer Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Theories of susceptibility to peer influence have centered on the idea that lower status adolescents are likely to adopt the behaviors of high status adolescents. While status is important, social exchange theorists have shown the value of analyzing exchange relations between actors to understand differences in power. To build on status-based…

  14. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates {approximately}500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed {approximately}15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

  15. Pulsed power -- Research and technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-31

    Over the past 15 years, steady and sometimes exciting progress has been made in the hybrid technology called Pulsed Power. Based on both electrical engineering and physics, pulsed power involves the generation, modification, and use of electrical pulses up to the multitrillion-watt and multimillion-volt ranges. The final product of these powerful pulses can take diverse forms--hypervelocity projectiles or imploding liners, energetic and intense particle beams, X-ray and gamma-ray pulses, laser light beams that cover the spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared, or powerful microwave bursts. At first, the needs of specific applications largely shaped research and technology in this field. New the authors are beginning to see the reverse--new applications arising from technical capabilities that until recently were though impossible. Compressing and heating microscopic quantities of matter until they reach ultra-high energy density represents one boundary of their scientific exploration. The other boundary might be a defensive weapon that can project vast amounts of highly directed energy over long distances. Other applications of the technology may range from the use of electron beams to sterilize sewage, to laboratory simulation of radiation effects on electronics, to electromagnetic launchings of projectiles into earth or into solar orbits. Eventually the authors hope to use pulsed power to produce an inexhaustible supply of energy by means of inertial confinement fusion (ICF)--a technique for heating and containing deuterium-tritium fuel through compression. Topics covered here are: (1) inertial confinement fusion; (2) simulation technology; (3) development of new technology; and (4) application to directed energy technologies.

  16. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  17. Accelerating Thick Aluminum Liners Using Pulsed Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Hammerburg, J.E.; Bowers, D.; Stokes, J.; Morgan, D.V.; Anderson, W.E.; Cochrane, J.C.

    1999-06-28

    The authors have investigated the acceleration of very thick cylindrical aluminum liners using the Pegasus II capacitory bank. These accelerated solid liners will be used to impact other objects at velocities below 1.5 km/sec, allowing one to generate and sustain shocks of a few 100 kilobar for a few microseconds. A cylindrical shell of 1100 series aluminum with an initial inner radius of 23.61 mm, an initial thickness of 3.0 mm, and a height of 20 mm, was accelerated using a current pulse of 7.15 MA peak current and a 7.4 microsecond quarter cycle time. The aluminum shell was imploded within confining copper glide planes with decreasing separation with an inward slope of 8 degrees. At impact with a cylindrical target of diameter 3-cm, the liner was moving at 1.4 km/sec and its thickness increased to 4.5 mm. Radial X-ray radiograms of the liner showed both the liner and the glide plane interface. The curvature of the inner surface of the liner was measured before impact with the 15-mm radius target. The radiograms also showed that the copper glide planes distorted as the liner radius decreased and that some axial stress is induced in the liner. The axial stresses did not affect the inner curvature significantly. Post-shot calculations of the liner behavior indicated that the thickness of the glide plane played a significant role in the distortion of the interface between the liner and the glide plane.

  18. High pulse power rf sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1983-09-01

    RF sources with high peak power output and relatively short pulse lengths will be required for future high gradient e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The required peak power and pulse length depend on the operating frequency, energy gradient and geometry of the collider linac structure. The frequency and gradient are in turn constrained by various parameters which depend on the beam-beam collision dynamics, and on the total ac wall-plug power that has been committed to the linac rf system. Various rf sources which might meet these requirements are reviewed. Existing source types (e.g., klystrons, gyrotrons) and sources which show future promise based on experimental prototypes are first considered. Finally, several proposals for high peak power rf sources based on unconventional concepts are discussed. These are an FEL source (two beam accelerator), rf energy storage cavities with switching, and a photocathode device which produces an rf current by direct emission modulation of the cathode.

  19. Environmental and industrial applications of pulsed power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1993-10-01

    The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, free electron lasers (FEL`s), and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) drivers from the early 60`s through the late 80`s is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications and in supporting new types of industrial manufacturing processes. Some of these processes will require very high average beam power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. In this paper we briefly discuss new technology capabilities and then concentrate on specific application areas that may benefit from the high specific energies and high average powers attainable with short-pulse machines.

  20. Possible high power limitations from RF pulsed heating

    SciTech Connect

    Pritzkau, D.P.; Bowden, G.B.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1999-05-01

    One of the possible limitations to achieving high power in RF structures is damage to metal surfaces due to RF pulsed heating. Such damage may lead to degradation of RF performance. An experiment to study RF pulsed heating on copper has been developed at SLAC. The experiment consists of operating two pillbox cavities in the TE{sub 011} mode using a 50 MW X-Band klystron. The estimated temperature rise of the surface of copper is 350&hthinsp;{degree}C for a power input of 20 MW to each cavity with a pulse length of 1.5 {mu}s. Preliminary results from an experiment performed earlier are presented. A revised design for continued experiments is also presented along with relevant theory and calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Warm dense mater: another application for pulsed power hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics (PPH) is an application of low-impedance pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology to the study of advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties. PPH can potentially be applied to the study of the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties of warm dense matter such as equation of state, viscosity, conductivity is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to slightly above solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Conditions characteristic of WDM are difficult to obtain, and even more difficult to diagnose. One approach to producing WDM uses laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers are applying these techniques. Pulsed power hydrodynamic techniques, such as large convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through multiple shock compression and heating of normal density material between a massive, high density, energetic liner and a high density central 'anvil' are possible ways to reach relevant conditions. Another avenue to WDM conditions is through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. In this paper we will examine the challenges to pulsed power technology and to pulsed power systems presented by the opportunity to explore this interesting region of parameter space.

  2. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  3. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%. PMID:27250451

  4. High peak power optical pulses generated with a monolithic master-oscillator power amplifier.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Hans; Schwertfeger, Sven; Klehr, Andreas; Jedrzejczyk, Daniel; Hoffmann, Thomas; Erbert, Götz

    2012-06-01

    We present results on a monolithic semiconductor-based master-oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) combining a distributed-feedback (DFB) laser and a tapered amplifier on a single chip. The MOPA reaches an output power of almost 12 W at an emission wavelength around 1064 nm in continuous-wave operation. Pulses with a length of around 100 ps can be obtained either by injecting nanosecond current pulses into the tapered amplifier alone or into both the DFB laser and the tapered amplifier. In the latter case, pulses with a width of 84 ps, a peak power of 42 W, and a spectral width of 160 pm are generated. PMID:22660042

  5. Plasma regimes in high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Arcos, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    High Power Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (HPPMS) is a relatively recent variation of magnetron sputtering where high power is applied to the magnetron in short pulses. The result is the formation of dense transient plasmas with a high fraction of ionized species, ideally leading to better control of film growth through substrate bias. However, the broad range of experimental conditions accessible in pulsed discharges results in bewildering variations in current and voltage pulse shapes, pulse power densities, etc, which represent different discharge behaviors, making it difficult to identify relevant deposition conditions. The complexity of the plasma dynamics is evident. Within each pulse, plasma characteristics such as plasma composition, density, gas rarefaction, spatial distribution, degree of self-sputtering, etc. vary with time. A recent development has been the discovery that the plasma emission can self-organize into well-defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity above the racetrack (spokes), which rotate in the direction given by the E ×B drift and that significantly influence the transport mechanisms in HPPMS. One seemingly universal characteristic of HPPMS plasmas is the existence of well defined plasma regimes for different power ranges. These regimes are clearly differentiated in terms of plasma conductivity, plasma composition and spatial plasma self-organization. We will discuss the global characteristics of these regimes in terms of current-voltage characteristics, energy-resolved QMS and OES analysis, and fast imaging. In particular we will discuss how the reorganization of the plasma emission into spokes is associated only to specific regimes of high plasma conductivity. We will also briefly discuss the role of the target in shaping the characteristics of the HPPMS plasma, since sputtering is a surface-driven process. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the SFB-TR87.

  6. Pulse Power--A Heart Physiology Program for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinson, Curt

    1994-01-01

    Primary grade students at a Delaware elementary school currently participate in the Pulse Power heart physiology program. Students receive mastery instruction and use heart monitors to exercise performance throughout the 6-phase program. Data from homework and from the heart monitors identify student progress, knowledge, and cardiovascular…

  7. Studies of a repetitively-pulsed laser powered thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, D. I.; Kemp, N. H.; Miller, M.

    1982-01-01

    In this report we present results of continuing analytical and experimental investigations carried out to evaluate the concept of pulsed laser propulsion. This advanced propulsion scheme, which has been the subject of several previous studies, involves supplying propellant energy by beaming short, repetitive laser pulses to a thruster from a remote laser power station. The concept offers the advantages of a remote power source, high specific impulse, high payload to total mass ratio (a consequence of the first two features) and moderate to high thrust (limited primarily by the average laser power available). The present research addresses questions related to thruster performance and optical design. In the thruster scheme under consideration, parabolic nozzle walls focus the incoming laser beam to yield breakdown in a propellant at the focal point of the parabola. The resulting high pressure plasma is characteristic of a detonation wave initiation by high power laser-induced breakdown. With a short laser pulse, the detonation wave quickly becomes a blast wave which propagates to the nozzle exit plane converting the high pressure of the gas behind it to a force on the nozzle wall. Propellant is fed to the focal region from a plenum chamber. The laser-induced blast wave stops the propellant flow through the throat until the pressure at the throat decays to the sonic pressure; then the propellant flow restarts. The process is repeated with each successive laser pulse.

  8. Frequency-Domain Methods for Characterization of Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Ferriera, T J; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    This paper discusses methods of frequency-domain characterization of pulsed power sensors using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer techniques that offer significant simplification over time-domain methods, while mitigating or minimizing the effect of the difficulties present in time domain characterization. These methods are applicable to characterization of a wide variety of sensors.

  9. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  10. Pulsed power driven hohlraum research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Alberts, T.E.; Allshouse, G.A.

    1996-06-01

    Three pulsed power driven hohlraum concepts are being investigated at Sandia for application to inertial fusion research. These hohlraums are driven by intense proton and Li ion beams as well as by two different types of z-pinch x-ray sources. Research on these hohlraum systems will continue on Sandia`s PBFA II-Z facility.

  11. Evaluation of pulse power devices in electric vehicle propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, A.F. ); Dowgiallo, E.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The application of pulse power devices in electric vehicle propulsion systems to load level the main energy storage battery has been studied. Both high energy density capacitors (ultracapacitors) and high power density, bipolar batteries are considered. Computer simulations of vehicle operation with hybrid (two power source) powertrains indicated the energy storage capacities of the pulse power devices required to load level the main battery are 300 to 500 Wh for the capacitors and 5 to 10 Ah for the bipolar batteries can be reduced from 79 W/kg to about 40 W/kg depending on the vehicle gradeability (speed, percent grade, and length of grade) desired. Evaluation of the status of the technology for the pulse power devices indicated that for both devices, improvements in technology are needed before the devices can be used in EV applications. In the case of the ultracapacitor, the energy density of present devices are 1 to 2 Wh/kg. A minimum energy density of about 5 Wh/kg is needed for electric vehicle applications. Progress in increasing the energy density of ultracapacitors has been rapid in recent years and the prospects for meeting the 5 Wh/kg requirement for EVs appear to be good. For bipolar batteries, a minimum power density of 500 W/kg is needed and the internal resistance must be reduced by about a factor of ten from that found in present designs.

  12. Peer Mentoring in Higher Education: Issues of Power and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    In response to widespread support for mentoring schemes in higher education this article calls for a more critical investigation of the dynamics of power and control, which are intrinsic to the mentoring process, and questions presumptions that mentoring brings only positive benefits to its participants. It provides this more critical appraisal by…

  13. High-power megavolt pulse generator with nanosecond rise time

    SciTech Connect

    Basov, G.F.; Bastrikov, A.N.; Koval`chuk, B.M.

    1995-10-01

    A pulse generator with a power of 0.1 TW, an amplitude of up to 2 MV and {approximately}1.5-nsec rise time is described. A Marx voltage pulse generator charges a low-inductance capacitor (1.8 nF) and a radial line (0.9 nF) to a voltage of {approximately}2 MV in 200 nsec. At the peak voltage, a water switch is actuated at the center of the radial line resulting in {approximately} 2.5-MV voltage pulse at the end of the line. This pulse propagates along the oil-insulated line. The line is connected to an oil-filled peaking switch with a metal diaphragm, which reduces the transfer capacitance of the discharge gap to 5 pF to match the radial-line wave impedance to the load connected to the switch output. A crossover switch may be used when operating in the short-pulse mode. A pulse with a width of up to 20 nsec has been generated across a load equivalent matched to the line.

  14. High power amplification of a tailored-pulse fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Caplette, Stéphane; Boula-Picard, Reynald; Drolet, Mathieu; Reid, Benoit; Salin, François

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the amplification of a 1064nm pulse-programmable fiber laser with Large Pitch Rod-Type Fibers of various Mode field diameters from 50 to 70 μm. We have developed a high power fiber amplifier at 1064nm delivering up to 100W/1mJ at 15ns pulses and 30W/300μJ at 2ns with linearly polarized and diffraction limited output beam (M²<1.2). The specific seeder from ESI - Pyrophotonics Lasers used in the experiment allowed us to obtain tailored-pulse programmable on demand at the output from 2ns to 600ns for various repetition rates from 10 to 500 kHz. We could demonstrate square pulses or any other shapes (also multi-pulses) whatever the repetition rate or the pulse duration. We also performed frequency conversion with LBO crystals leading to 50W at 532nm and 25W at 355nm with a diffraction limited output. Similar experiments performed at 1032nm are also reported.

  15. A repetitive long-pulse power generator based on pulse forming network and linear transformer driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingjia; Kang, Qiang; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Faqiang; Luo, Min; Xiang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    A compact module for long-pulse power generator, based on Blumlein pulse forming network (PFN), was designed. Two Blumlein PFNs with L-type configuration and 20 Ω characteristic impedance were connected symmetrically to the primary coil of the linear transformer driver (LTD) and driven by an identical high voltage spark switch to ensure two Blumlein PFNs synchronizing operation. The output pulse of the module connected with 10 Ω water load is about 135 kV in amplitude and 200 ns in duration with a rise time of ˜50 ns and a flat top of ˜100 ns. On this basis, a repetitive long-pulse power generator based on PFN-LTD has been developed, which was composed of four modules. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved on planar diode: output voltage amplitude of ˜560 kV, output current amplitude of ˜10 kA at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The generator operates stable and outputs more than 104 pulses. Meanwhile, the continuous operating time of the generator is up to 60 s.

  16. A repetitive long-pulse power generator based on pulse forming network and linear transformer driver.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjia; Kang, Qiang; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Faqiang; Luo, Min; Xiang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    A compact module for long-pulse power generator, based on Blumlein pulse forming network (PFN), was designed. Two Blumlein PFNs with L-type configuration and 20 Ω characteristic impedance were connected symmetrically to the primary coil of the linear transformer driver (LTD) and driven by an identical high voltage spark switch to ensure two Blumlein PFNs synchronizing operation. The output pulse of the module connected with 10 Ω water load is about 135 kV in amplitude and 200 ns in duration with a rise time of ∼50 ns and a flat top of ∼100 ns. On this basis, a repetitive long-pulse power generator based on PFN-LTD has been developed, which was composed of four modules. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved on planar diode: output voltage amplitude of ∼560 kV, output current amplitude of ∼10 kA at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The generator operates stable and outputs more than 10(4) pulses. Meanwhile, the continuous operating time of the generator is up to 60 s. PMID:27370479

  17. Power limitations and pulse distortions in an Yb : KGW chirped-pulse amplification laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G H; Yang, J; Kulik, A V; Sall, E G; Chizhov, S A; Kang, U; Yashin, V E

    2013-08-31

    We have studied self-action effects (self-focusing and self-phase modulation) and stimulated Raman scattering in an Yb : KGW chirped-pulse amplification laser system. The results demonstrate that self-focusing in combination with thermal lensing may significantly limit the chirped pulse energy in this system (down to 200 μJ) even at a relatively long pulse duration (50 ps). Nonlinear lenses in the laser crystals in combination with thermal lenses bring the regenerative amplifier cavity in the laser system to the instability zone and limit the average output power at pulse repetition rates under 50 kHz. Self-phase modulation, a manifestation of self-action, may significantly distort a recompressed femtosecond pulse at energies near the self-focusing threshold. Stimulated Raman scattering in such a laser has a weaker effect on output parameters than do self-focusing and thermal lensing, and Raman spectra are only observed in the case of pulse energy instability. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Design and construction of a compact portable pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Zheng, Xia; Zou, Jian; Wang, Jian-zhong; Zhang, Tian-jue; Jiang, Xing-dong

    2011-12-01

    The low impedance compact pulsed power generators are considered as potential drivers for X-pinch based phase contrast imaging and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source for lithography. The designed pulsed power generator should provide square-like wave on low impedance load (1-2 Ω) with current amplitude of 100 kA in burst mode. The pulse width of the current wave is 60 ns, and the rise time of the wave should be less than 30 ns. The dimensions of the machine are restricted to be no larger than ˜2 × 1 × 1.5 m, according to the specific potential application of the machine. We adopted a solution based on Marx generator combined with low impedance pulse forming line and V/N type gas switch technology to obtain the required high intensity and fast rise-time current wave. Special efforts have been made to reduce the inductance of V/N switch and low impedance load section, and thus to obtain fast rise time and high peak current, during both physical and mechanical design stages. The high power transient signal diagnostic system, consisting of a capacitive voltage divider and a metal film based current monitor, and the calibration of the diagnostic system are also outlined.

  19. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-08-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  20. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  1. Design and testing of a 320 MW pulsed power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Schillig, J.B.; Boenig, H.J.; Ferner, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    For a 60 Tesla, 100 millisecond long pulse magnet five 64 MW (87.6 MVA) power converter modules have been installed. Each module provides a no-load voltage of 4.18 kV and a full load voltage of 3.20 kV at the rated current of 20 kA. The modules are connected to a 1,430 MVA/650 MJ inertial energy storage generator set, which is operated at 21 kV and frequencies between 60 and 42 Hz. They are designed to provide the rated power output for 2 seconds once every hour. Each module consists of two 21 kV/3.1 kV cast coil transformers and two 6-pulse rectifiers connected in parallel without an interphase reactor, forming a 12-pulse converter module. As far as possible standard high power industrial converter components were used, operated closer to their allowable limits. The converters are controlled by three programmable high speed controllers. In this paper the design of the pulsed converters, including control and special considerations for protection schemes with the converters supplying a mutually coupled magnet system, is detailed. Test results of the converters driving an ohmic-inductive load for 2 seconds at 20 kA and 3.2 kV are presented.

  2. New Pulsed Power Technology for High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-06-27

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  3. Topics in high voltage pulsed power plasma devices and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao

    Pulsed power technology is one of the tools that is used by scientists and engineers nowadays to produce gas plasmas. The transient ultra high power is able to provide a huge pulse of energy which is sometimes greater than the ionization energy of the gas, and therefore separates the ions and electrons to form the plasma. Sometimes, the pulsed power components themselves are plasma devices. For example, the gas type switches can "turn on" the circuit by creating the plasma channel between the switch electrodes. Mini Back Lighted Thyratron, or as we call it, mini-BLT, is one of these gas type plasma switches. The development of the reduced size and weight "mini-BLT" is presented in this dissertation. Based on the operation characteristics testing of the mini-BLT, suggestions of optimizing the design of the switch are proposed. All the factors such as the geometry of the hollow electrodes and switch housing, the gas condition, the optical triggering source, etc. are necessary to consider when we design and operate the mini-BLT. By reducing the diameter of the cylindrical gas path between the electrodes in the BLT, a novel high density plasma source is developed, producing the plasma in the "squeezed" capillary. The pulsed power generator, of course, is inevitably used to provide the ionization energy for hydrogen gas sealed in the capillary. Plasma diagnostics are necessarily analyzed and presented in detail to properly complete and understand the capillary plasma. This high density plasma source (1019 cm-3) has the potential applications in the plasma wakefield accelerator. The resonant oscillation behavior of the particles in plasmas allows for dynamically generated accelerating electric fields that have orders of magnitude larger than those available in the conventional RF accelerators. Finally, the solid state switches are introduced as a comparison to the gas type switch. Pulsed power circuit topologies such as the Marx Bank, magnetic pulse compression and diode

  4. Pulsed high-power yellow-orange VECSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Ranta, Sanna; Tavast, Miki; Guina, Mircea

    2014-05-01

    We report on the development of a pulsed high-power frequency doubled vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) with a peak output power of 14 W and emission spectrum near 588 nm. The semiconductor gain chip was grown by molecular beam epitaxy and comprised 10 GaInAs quantum wells. The gain structure was designed to be antiresonant at 1180 nm. The fundamental wavelength was frequency doubled to the yellow-orange spectral range using a 10-mm long critically phase matched lithium triborate nonlinear crystal, situated at the mode waist of the V-shaped laser cavity. The emission spectrum was narrowed down to FWHM of < 0.2 nm by employing a 1.5 mm birefringent filter and a 100-μm-thick etalon inside the cavity. By directly modulating the pump laser of the VECSEL, we were able to produce pulse widths down to 570 ns with average and peak output power of 81 mW and 14 W, respectively. The repetition rate was kept constant at 10 kHz throughout the measurements. The maximum peak power obtained was pump power limited. In comparison, at the same coolant temperature, a maximum of 8.5 W was achieved in continuous wave. The maximum optical-to-optical conversion efficiency (absorbed peak pump power to peak output power) was calculated to be 20-21 %.

  5. Multiwire X Pinches on the COBRA Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Douglass, Jonathan D.; McBride, Ryan D.; Hammer, David A.

    2006-01-05

    The rebuilt COBRA pulsed power generator, which has a variable current pulse waveform and amplitude (90-150 ns rise time, 0.6 - 1 MA) has extended the range of current pulse parameters that can be used to study X pinches. X pinches with 2 to 12 wires with diameters from 25 to 75 {mu}m of several different wire materials (from Al to W) have been studied. The influence of different current shapes on X pinch plasma formation and pinch implosion dynamics has been studied using a set of diagnostics with spatial and/or temporal resolution. Multiwire X pinches were placed in the diode center and/or two four wire X pinches were places in one of four parallel return current circuits of the diode. Radiographic images of different test objects, wires in the array and the X pinches, themselves, were obtained with {mu}m scale spatial resolution.

  6. Ruthenium Oxide Electrochemical Super Capacitor Optimization for Pulse Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merryman, Stephen A.; Chen, Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Electrical actuator systems are being pursued as alternatives to hydraulic systems to reduce maintenance time, weight and costs while increasing reliability. Additionally, safety and environmental hazards associated with the hydraulic fluids can be eliminated. For most actuation systems, the actuation process is typically pulsed with high peak power requirements but with relatively modest average power levels. The power-time requirements for electrical actuators are characteristic of pulsed power technologies where the source can be sized for the average power levels while providing the capability to achieve the peak requirements. Among the options for the power source are battery systems, capacitor systems or battery-capacitor hybrid systems. Battery technologies are energy dense but deficient in power density; capacitor technologies are power dense but limited by energy density. The battery-capacitor hybrid system uses the battery to supply the average power and the capacitor to meet the peak demands. It has been demonstrated in previous work that the hybrid electrical power source can potentially provide a weight savings of approximately 59% over a battery-only source. Electrochemical capacitors have many properties that make them well-suited for electrical actuator applications. They have the highest demonstrated energy density for capacitive storage (up to 100 J/g), have power densities much greater than most battery technologies (greater than 30kW/kg), are capable of greater than one million charge-discharge cycles, can be charged at extremely high rates, and have non-explosive failure modes. Thus, electrochemical capacitors exhibit a combination of desirable battery and capacitor characteristics.

  7. INPIStron switched pulsed power for dense plasma pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1993-01-01

    The inverse plasma switch INPIStron was employed for 10kJ/40kV capacitor bank discharge system to produce focused dense plasmas in hypocycloidal-pinch (HCP) devices. A single unit and an array of multiple HCP's were coupled as the load of the pulsed power circuit. The geometry and switching plasma dynamics were found advantageous and convenient for commutating the large current pulse from the low impedance transmission line to the low impedance plasma load. The pulse power system with a single unit HCP, the system A, was used for production of high temperature plasma focus and its diagnostics. The radially running down plasma dynamics, revealed in image converter photographs, could be simulated by a simple snow-plow model with a correction for plasma resistivity. The system B with an array of 8-HCP units which forms a long coaxial discharge chamber was used for pumping a Ti-sapphire laser. The intense UV emission from the plasma was frequency shifted with dye-solution jacket to match the absorption band of the Ti crystal laser near 500 nm. An untuned laser pulse energy of 0.6 J/pulse was obtained for 6.4 kJ/40 kV discharge, or near 103 times of the explosion limit of conventional flash lamps. For both systems the advantages of the INPIStron were well demonstrated: a single unit is sufficient for a large current (greater than 50 kA) without increasing the system impedance, highly reliable and long life operation and implied scalability for the high power ranges above I(sub peak) = 1 MA and V(sub hold) = 100 kV.

  8. Pulsed power supply for three APS septum magnets

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, D.G.

    1991-03-24

    Three septum magnets will be operated at a repetition-rate of 2 Hz. Two of the septum magnets are identical and operate at the same values; these are the synchrotron extraction and the storage ring injection magnets. They are transformer septum magnets, with a primary inductance of 23 {mu}H and resistance of 6.3 m{Omega}, and must be pulsed at a 2 Hz rate to extract beam from the synchrotron and inject beam into the storage ring at 7.7 GeV. The third septum magnet is used to inject electrons into the synchrotron at 650 MeV or positrons at 450 MeV. It is also a transformer septum magnet, with a primary inductance of 21 {mu}H and resistance of 6.7 m{Omega}, and must be pulsed at a 2 Hz rate. A design study was performed of the power supply proposed in the APS Title I design. This supply produces a pulse that is approximately a half-sine-wave with a base width of approximately 1/3 ms; its peakcurrent is adjustable from 470 A to 4.7 kA and is repeatable within {plus_minus}0.05%. The septum steel is reset by a half-sine pulse of reverse polarity a few milliseconds after the forward current pulse. No beam is present during reset. The use of the transformer design minimizes the cost of the capacitors used for energy storage.

  9. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  10. A 16 MJ compact pulsed power system for electromagnetic launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ling; Zhang, Qin; Zhong, Heqing; Lin, Fuchang; Li, Hua; Wang, Yan; Su, Cheng; Huang, Qinghua; Chen, Xu

    2015-07-01

    This paper has established a compact pulsed power system (PPS) of 16 MJ for electromagnetic rail gun. The PPS consists of pulsed forming network (PFN), chargers, monitoring system, and current junction. The PFN is composed of 156 pulse forming units (PFUs). Every PFU can be triggered simultaneously or sequentially in order to obtain different total current waveforms. The whole device except general control table is divided into two frameworks with size of 7.5 m × 2.2 m × 2.3 m. It is important to estimate the discharge current of PFU accurately for the design of the whole electromagnetic launch system. In this paper, the on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor have been researched to improve the estimation accuracy. The on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor are expressed as a logarithmic function based on experimental data. The circuit current waveform of the single PFU agrees with the simulating one. On the other hand, the coaxial discharge cable is a quick wear part in PFU because the discharge current will be up to dozens of kA even hundreds of kA. In this article, the electromagnetic field existing in the coaxial cable is calculated by finite element method. On basis of the calculation results, the structure of cable is optimized in order to improve the limit current value of the cable. At the end of the paper, the experiment current wave of the PPS with the load of rail gun is provided.

  11. A 16 MJ compact pulsed power system for electromagnetic launch.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Zhang, Qin; Zhong, Heqing; Lin, Fuchang; Li, Hua; Wang, Yan; Su, Cheng; Huang, Qinghua; Chen, Xu

    2015-07-01

    This paper has established a compact pulsed power system (PPS) of 16 MJ for electromagnetic rail gun. The PPS consists of pulsed forming network (PFN), chargers, monitoring system, and current junction. The PFN is composed of 156 pulse forming units (PFUs). Every PFU can be triggered simultaneously or sequentially in order to obtain different total current waveforms. The whole device except general control table is divided into two frameworks with size of 7.5 m × 2.2 m × 2.3 m. It is important to estimate the discharge current of PFU accurately for the design of the whole electromagnetic launch system. In this paper, the on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor have been researched to improve the estimation accuracy. The on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor are expressed as a logarithmic function based on experimental data. The circuit current waveform of the single PFU agrees with the simulating one. On the other hand, the coaxial discharge cable is a quick wear part in PFU because the discharge current will be up to dozens of kA even hundreds of kA. In this article, the electromagnetic field existing in the coaxial cable is calculated by finite element method. On basis of the calculation results, the structure of cable is optimized in order to improve the limit current value of the cable. At the end of the paper, the experiment current wave of the PPS with the load of rail gun is provided. PMID:26233401

  12. Pamir-3U pulsed portable MHD power system

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigarnik, V.A.; Swallom, D.W.; Gibbs, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    The results of the development of a portable, pulsed MHD power system, called the Pamir-3U, are presented. The maximum operating parameters of the Pamir-3U MHD power system are a net power output of 15 MW and a maximum duration of the electrical pulse at the load of 10 seconds. The work is being performed by the {open_quotes}IVTAN - Association{close_quotes} of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russia) and Textron Defense Systems (USA). Major subcontractors also participating in this effort are Nizhny Novgorod Machine Building Plant (Russia), Lubertsy Scientific and Production Association (Russia) and Aerojet Corporation (USA). Textron Defense Systems is the prime contractor with overall management and systems integration of the project. Aerojet Corporation will provide the test site and perform the acceptance test program. The Russian subcontract team is led by IVTAN, who is responsible for the overall design and integration of the Pamir-3U System and the electrical control and data acquisition. The two subcontractors working for IVTAN are responsible for the magnets, channels, and electrical equipment (Nizhny Novgorod) and the plasma generators (Lubertsy). The Pamir-3U MHD system is a portable power system that can be transported to various operational locations. The power system is self-contained and does not require extensive support equipment to generate the design power.

  13. 10-kA pulsed power supply for superconducting coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, M.; Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new 4-MW inductor-converter bridge (ICB) for supplying power to pulsed superconducting magnets is under construction at Argonne National Laoratory. This is a second-generation ICB built at Argonne Lab. The analytical, design, and control techniques developed for the first prototype have been used in the design of the new system. The paper presents the important considerations in the design of the new ICB. A brief description of the operation of the circuit is also given.

  14. Advances in pulsed-power-driven radiography system design.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Hinshelwood, David D.; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Cordova, Steve Ray; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Weber, Bruce V.; Welch, Dale Robert; Shelton, Bradley Allen; Sceiford, Matthew E.; Cooperstein, Gerald; Gignac, Raymond Edward; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David Vincent; Barker, Dennis L.; Van De Valde, David M.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Wilkins, Frank Lee; Molina, Isidro; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Bailey, Vernon Leslie; Maenchen, John Eric; Johnson, David Lee; Griffin, Fawn A.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Smith, Ian

    2004-07-01

    Flash x-ray radiography has undergone a transformation in recent years with the resurgence of interest in compact, high intensity pulsed-power-driven electron beam sources. The radiographic requirements and the choice of a consistent x-ray source determine the accelerator parameters, which can be met by demonstrated Induction Voltage Adder technologies. This paper reviews the state of the art and the recent advances which have improved performance by over an order of magnitude in beam brightness and radiographic utility.

  15. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-12-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H&CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  16. Investigation of a high power electromagnetic pulse source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2012-09-01

    A high power electromagnetic pulse source with a resonant antenna driven by a compact power supply was investigated in this paper. To match the impedance of the resonant antenna and initial power source, a compact power conditioning circuit based on electro exploding opening switch (EEOS) and pulsed transformer was adopted. In the preliminary experiments, an impulse capacitor was used to drive the system. With the opening of the EEOS at the current of 15 kA flowing trough the primary of the transformer, the resonant antenna was rapidly charged to about -370 kV within a time of about 100 ns. When the switch in the resonant antenna closed at the charging voltage of about -202 kV, the peak intensity of the detected electric field at a distance of about 10 m from the center of the source was 7.2 kV/m. The corresponding peak power of the radiated electromagnetic field reached 76 MW, while the total radiated electromagnetic energy was about 0.65 J. The total energy efficiency of the resonant antenna was about 22% which can be improved by increasing the closing rapidity of the switch in the antenna.

  17. Investigation of a high power electromagnetic pulse source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2012-09-01

    A high power electromagnetic pulse source with a resonant antenna driven by a compact power supply was investigated in this paper. To match the impedance of the resonant antenna and initial power source, a compact power conditioning circuit based on electro exploding opening switch (EEOS) and pulsed transformer was adopted. In the preliminary experiments, an impulse capacitor was used to drive the system. With the opening of the EEOS at the current of 15 kA flowing trough the primary of the transformer, the resonant antenna was rapidly charged to about -370 kV within a time of about 100 ns. When the switch in the resonant antenna closed at the charging voltage of about -202 kV, the peak intensity of the detected electric field at a distance of about 10 m from the center of the source was 7.2 kV∕m. The corresponding peak power of the radiated electromagnetic field reached 76 MW, while the total radiated electromagnetic energy was about 0.65 J. The total energy efficiency of the resonant antenna was about 22% which can be improved by increasing the closing rapidity of the switch in the antenna. PMID:23020399

  18. Pulse swallowing frequency divider with low power and compact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haijun, Gao; Lingling, Sun; Chaobo, Cai; Haiting, Zhan

    2012-11-01

    A pulse swallowing frequency divider with low power and compact structure is presented. One of the DFFs in the divided by 2/3 prescaler is controlled by the modulus control signal, and automatically powered off when it has no contribution to the operation of the prescaler. The DFFs in the program counter and the swallow counter are shared to compose a compact structure, which reduces the power consumption further. The proposed multi-modulus frequency divider was implemented in a standard 65 nm CMOS process with an area of 28 × 22 μm2. The power consumption of the divider is 0.6 mW under 1.2 V supply voltage when operating at 988 MHz.

  19. Determination of modeling parameters for power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Van Gordon, Jim A; Kovaleski, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    While the power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGRT) is used in many applications, it is not well characterized under pulsed power conditions. This makes the IGBT difficult to model for solid state pulsed power applications. The Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model is utilized to simulate IGBTs in some circuit simulation software packages. However, the seventeen parameters necessary for the Oziemkiewicz implementation must be known for the conditions under which the device will be operating. Using both experimental and simulated data with a least squares curve fitting technique, the parameters necessary to model a given IGBT can be determined. This paper presents two sets of these seventeen parameters that correspond to two different models of power IGBTs. Specifically, these parameters correspond to voltages up to 3.5 kV, currents up to 750 A, and pulse widths up to 10 {micro}s. Additionally, comparisons of the experimental and simulated data will be presented.

  20. Sterilizing tissue-materials using pulsed power plasma.

    PubMed

    Heidarkhan Tehrani, Ashkan; Davari, Pooya; Singh, Sanjleena; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the potential of pulsed power to sterilize hard and soft tissues and its impact on their physico-mechanical properties. It hypothesizes that pulsed plasma can sterilize both vascular and avascular tissues and the transitive layers in between without deleterious effects on their functional characteristics. Cartilage/bone laminate was chosen as a model to demonstrate the concept, treated at low temperature, at atmospheric pressure, in short durations and in buffered environment using a purposed-built pulsed power unit. Input voltage and time of exposure were assigned as controlling parameters in a full factorial design of experiment to determine physical and mechanical alteration pre- and post-treatment. The results demonstrated that, discharges of 11 kV sterilized samples in 45 s, reducing intrinsic elastic modules from 1.4 ± 0.9 to 0.9 ± 0.6 MPa. There was a decrease of 14.1 % in stiffness and 27.8 % in elastic-strain energy for the top quartile. Mechanical impairment was directly proportional to input voltage (P value < 0.05). Bacterial inactivation was proportional to treatment time for input voltages above 32 V (P < 0.001; R Sq = 0.98). Thermal analysis revealed that helix-coil transition decelerated with exposure time and collagen fibrils were destabilized as denaturation enthalpy reduced by 200 μV. We concluded by presenting a safe operating threshold for pulsed power plasma as a feasible protocol for effective sterilization of connective tissues with varying level of loss in mechanical robustness which we argue to be acceptable in certain medical and tissue engineering application. PMID:24449024

  1. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges in overhead power lines. Part I. Fast pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ramrus, A.

    1986-02-01

    Objective of the study was to create conceptual designs of high voltage pulsers capable of simulating two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by a high-altitude nuclear burst; the slow rise time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD-EMP) and the fast rise time high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The pulser design was directed towards facilities capable of performing EMP vulnerability testing of components used in the national electric power system.

  2. Tunable pulse width and multi-megawatt peak-power pulses from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryutarou; Maeda, Kazuo; Watanabe, Goro; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jun; Sumida, Shin

    2016-03-01

    We report on tunable pulse width and high peak power pulse generation from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system. The master seed source employs a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator (MZIM). This seed source has operational flexibility with respect to pulse width, 90 ps to 2 ns and repetition rate, 200 kHz to 2 MHz. The seed pulses are amplified by a monolithic three-stage amplifier system based on polarization maintain Yb-doped fibers. The maximum output power was 32 W at the shortest pulse condition, the pulse width of 90 ps and the repetition rate of 750 kHz. A spectral width after amplification was broadened to 0.73 nm at RMS width. Both of ASE and SRS are not observed in the spectrum. After amplification, we also demonstrated pulse compression with a small piece of chirped volume Bragg-grating (CVBG) which has the dispersion rate of 81 ps/nm. As a result of pulse compression, the shortest pulse width was reduced from 90 ps to 3.5 ps, which brought an increase of the peak power up to 3.2 MW. The compressed pulses are clean with little structure in their wings. We can expand the operation range of the monolithic fiber MOPA system in pulse width, 3.5 ps to 2 ns.

  3. Pulse doubling in zigzag-connected autotransformer-based 12-pulse ac-dc converter for power quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Rohollah

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a pulse doubling technique in a 12-pulse ac-dc converter which supplies direct torque controlled motor drives (DTCIMDs) in order to have better power quality conditions at the point of common coupling. The proposed technique increases the number of rectification pulses without significant changes in the installations and yields in harmonic reduction in both ac and dc sides. The 12-pulse rectified output voltage is accomplished via two paralleled six-pulse acdc converters each of them consisting of three-phase diode bridge rectifiers. An autotransformer is designed to supply the rectifiers. The design procedure of magnetics is in a way such that makes it suitable for retrofit applications where a six-pulse diode bridge rectifier is being utilized. Independent operation of paralleled diode-bridge rectifiers, i.e. dc-ripple re-injection methodology, requires a Zero Sequence Blocking Transformer (ZSBT). Finally, a tapped interphase reactor is connected at the output of ZSBT to double the pulse numbers of output voltage up to 24 pulses. The aforementioned structure improves power quality criteria at ac mains and makes them consistent with the IEEE-519 standard requirements for varying loads. Furthermore, near unity power factor is obtained for a wide range of DTCIMD operation. A comparison is made between 6-pulse, 12-pulse, and proposed converters from view point of power quality indices. Results show that input current total harmonic distortion (THD) is less than 5% for the proposed topology at various loads.

  4. Pulsed Power Aspects of the NIF Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A F; Barbosa, F; Fulkerson, E S

    2005-06-09

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) embodies technology essential to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Together with a thin-film polarizer, PEPC functions as an optical switch for the main amplifier cavity, allowing optical pulses to be trapped, and then released, and enabling NIF to take advantage of the attendant gain and cost-savings. Details of the genesis, development, and prototyping of the PEPC are well documented. After moving from its laboratory setting to the NIF facility, PEPC--via its performance during the two-year NIF Early Light (NEL) campaign and its ongoing operation during facility build-out--has proven to be a fully functional system. When complete, NIF will accommodate 192 beams, capable of delivering 1.8 MJ to a fusion target. Forty-eight Plasma Electrode Pockels--driven by nearly 300 high-power, high-voltage pulse generators--will support this complement of beams. As deployed, PEPC is a complex association of state-of-the-art optics; low-voltage and high-voltage electronics; and mechanical, gas, and vacuum subsystems--all under computer control. In this paper, we briefly describe each of these elements, but focus on the pulse power aspects of the PEPC system.

  5. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  6. Development of Large Current High Precision Pulse Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Tomohiro; Koseki, Shoichiro; Kubo, Hiroshi; Katoh, Shuji; Ogawa, Shinichi

    JAEA and KEK are jointly constructing a high intensity proton accelerator project J-PARC. Its main accelerator is 3GeV synchrotron. Its injection bump magnets, especially horizontal paint bump magnets, are excited by large pulse currents. Their rated currents are over 10kA and pulse widths are about 1ms. Tracking errors are required to be less than 1%. Multiple connected two-quadrant IGBT choppers are adopted for their power supplies. Their output currents are controlled by feedback control with minor loop voltage control (m-AVR). When output current of a chopper intermits at small current, its output voltage rises up and current control becomes difficult. In this paper response of m-AVR and output voltage characteristics at current intermittent region are studied and an improved control scheme is proposed. The performance is confirmed by a test.

  7. Laser-Material Interaction of Powerful Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Komashko, A

    2003-01-06

    Laser-material interaction of powerful (up to a terawatt) ultrashort (several picoseconds or shorter) laser pulses and laser-induced effects were investigated theoretically in this dissertation. Since the ultrashort laser pulse (USLP) duration time is much smaller than the characteristic time of the hydrodynamic expansion and thermal diffusion, the interaction occurs at a solid-like material density with most of the light energy absorbed in a thin surface layer. Powerful USLP creates hot, high-pressure plasma, which is quickly ejected without significant energy diffusion into the bulk of the material, Thus collateral damage is reduced. These and other features make USLPs attractive for a variety of applications. The purpose of this dissertation was development of the physical models and numerical tools for improvement of our understanding of the process and as an aid in optimization of the USLP applications. The study is concentrated on two types of materials - simple metals (materials like aluminum or copper) and wide-bandgap dielectrics (fused silica, water). First, key physical phenomena of the ultrashort light interaction with metals and the models needed to describe it are presented. Then, employing one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics code enhanced with models for laser energy deposition and material properties at low and moderate temperatures, light absorption was self-consistently simulated as a function of laser wavelength, pulse energy and length, angle of incidence and polarization. Next, material response on time scales much longer than the pulse duration was studied using the hydrocode and analytical models. These studies include examination of evolution of the pressure pulses, effects of the shock waves, material ablation and removal and three-dimensional dynamics of the ablation plume. Investigation of the interaction with wide-bandgap dielectrics was stimulated by the experimental studies of the USLP surface ablation of water (water is a model of

  8. Hydrodynamics and Material Properties Experiments Using Pulsed Power Techniques*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinovsky, Robert; Trainor, R. James

    1999-06-01

    Within the last few years a new approach for exploring dynamic material properties and advanced hydrodynamics at extreme conditions has joined the traditional techniques of high velocity guns,and explosives. The principle tool is the high precision, magnetically imploded, near-solid density liner. The most attractive pulse power system for driving such experiments is an ultra-highcurrent, low impedance, microsecond time-scale source that is economical both the build and operate. Liner specifications vary but in general share requirements for a high degree of symmetry and uniformity after implosion. When imploded in free flight to velocities 10-30 km/sec and kinetic energies of from one to 25 MJ/cm of height, liners are attractive impactors for producing strong (>10 Mbar) shocks in the target. Simple geometries can, in principle, produce multi-shock environments to reach off-hugoniot states. When filled with a compressible material, liners can deliver almost adiabatic compression to the target. When the liner surrounds a (small)nearly incompressible target material, for example a condensed noble gas, a liner can deliver enormous pressure to the target almost isentropically. When the compressible material is a magnetic field, flux compression can results in compressed fields above 1000 tesla in macroscopic volumes for materials studies.In this paper we will review basic scaling argumentsthat set the scale of environments available. We will mention the pulse power technology under development at Los Alamos and provide a summary of results from experiments testing solid metal liners under magnetic drive and a few examples of experiments performed withinterim systems. Other papers in this conference will provide specific proposals for pulse power driven shock-wave experiments.

  9. Pulsed power and electron beams in the 21st century.

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed power and accelerator technology for high energy density physics, radiography, and simulation has matured to the point that new facilities promise users reliability of quality data return unheard of just a short time ago. By this metric alone these machines and accelerators have graduated from being experiments in their own right, to the solid foundation of a new era of experimental science. The projected performance of a few of these new capabilities will be highlighted, along with some modest speculation concerning their future.

  10. 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar for high power amplifier evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Hunter, Robert I.; Gallacher, Thomas F.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and characterization of a 94 GHz pulsed coherent radar to be used for the evaluation and demonstration of novel wideband, high power vacuum tube amplifier technology. The radar is designed to be fully coherent and exploits a low phase noise architecture to maximize Doppler performance. We selected to use horn-fed Fresnel zone plate lens antennas (FZPs) with 4-level phase quantization as a low cost method of realizing large aperture (0.5 m) antennas. The measured performance of these FZPs agrees closely with the design predictions and exceeds that obtainable with a Cassegrain of an equivalent size.

  11. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, R.

    1985-10-01

    The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

  12. 200W average power 1mJ pulse energy from spectrally combined pulsed sub-5 ns fiber laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, O.; Ortac, B.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Andersen, Thomas V.

    2009-02-01

    In this contribution, we report on spectral combination of four sub-5ns pulsed fiber amplifier systems with an average output power of 200W at 200kHz repetition rate resulting in 1mJ of pulse energy. A dielectric reflection grating is used to combine four individual beams to one output possessing a measured M2 value of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively, independent of power level. Extraction of higher pulse energies and peak powers will be discussed.

  13. Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, G. T.; Wong, C. P. C.; Kapich, D. D.; McDonald, C. F.; Schleicher, R. W.

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankine and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed.

  14. Explosive pulsed power system for new radiation sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Oona, H.; Goforth, J. H.; Idzorek, G. C.; Herrera, D. H.; King, J. C.; Lopez, E. A.; Tasker, D. G.; Torres, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    High explosive pulsed power (HEPP) systems are capable of accessing very high energy densities and can reach conditions that are not possible with capacitor bank systems. The Procyon system was developed and used for experiments over a period of six years, and is exemplary of the capabilities of HEPP systems for state-of-the-art research. In this paper we will summarize some of the more interesting aspects of the work done in the past but will suggest ideas toward applications for future research. One of the main, unique features of HEPP systems is that they integrate easily to a particular physics experiment and the power flow can be optimized for a specific test. Magnetic flux compression generators have been an ideal power source for both high current plasma physics and hydrodynamic experimental loads. These experiments have contributed greatly to the understanding of high temperature and density plasmas and more recently to the understanding of instability growth in thick ({approx}1 mm) imploding metal cylinders. Common to all these experiments is the application of a large current pulse to a cylindrically symmetric load. The resulting Lorenz force compresses the load to produce hydrodynamic motion and/or high temperature, high density plasma. In the plasma physics experiments, plasma thermalizes on axis and a black body distribution of x-rays is produced. To get better access to the radiation pulse, the load electrode geometry was modified. For example, by shaping the plasma implosion glide planes, a mass depletion region was formed along one electrode at pinch time which generated a very large voltage drop across a 1-2 mm segment of the pinch, and also produced a high energy ion beam on axis. These results were predicted by magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) codes and verified with framing camera and x-ray, pinhole, camera pictures. We have not previously published these features but will take another look and propose possible scenarios for studying and generating

  15. Application of repetitive pulsed power technology to chemical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Hamil, R.

    1995-12-31

    The numerous sites of soil and water contaminated with organic chemicals present an urgent environmental concern that continues to grow. Electron and x-ray irradiation have been shown to be effective methods to destroy a wide spectrum of organic chemicals, nitrates, nitrites, and cyanide in water by breaking molecules to non-toxic products or entirely mineralizing the by-products to gas, water, and salts. Sandia National Laboratories is developing Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) technology capable of producing high average power, broad area electron or x-ray beams. The 300 kW RHEPP-II facility accelerates electrons to 2.5 MeV at 25 kA over 1,000 cm{sup 2} in 60 ns pulses at repetition rates of over 100 Hz. Linking this modular treatment capability with the rapid optical-sensing diagnostics and neutral network characterization software algorithms will provide a Smart Waste Treatment (SWaT) system. Such a system would also be applicable for chemical manufacture and processing of industrial waste for reuse or disposal. This talk describes both the HREPP treatment capability and sensing technologies. Measurements of the propagated RHEPP-II beam and dose profiles are presented. Sensors and rapid detection software are discussed with application toward chemical treatment.

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CONVERGING SHOCKS IN PULSED POWER DRIVEN EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    R. KANZLEITER; W. ATCHISON; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The final shot of the current Near Term Liner Experiment (NTLX) series occurred on September 29, 2000. Utilization of a pulsed power source with a standardized liner/target ''cartridge'' produced a uniform implosion to drive hydrodynamic experiments. Diagnostics showed that high quality data of shock propagation can be obtained from pulsed power liner drivers as in the current NTLX series. Very good agreement in calculating shock locations was obtained between the codes used to model the NTLX series, RAGE and RAVEN. RAVEN also accurately predicts liner/target impact as measured by B-Dot probes. Large differences are observed between the calculated and measured positions of converging shock waves even in simple geometrical configurations. Liner/target impact is accurately calculated and similar results are produced for shock velocities in Lucite. RAGE and RAVEN use different hydrodynamic algorithms, yet agree, this focuses current efforts on EOS issues within the outer tin target to resolve discrepancies. Further diagnostics covering shock breakout from the outer tin target and shock propagation shortly thereafter would be highly beneficial.

  17. Soft x-ray diagnostics for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect

    Idzorek, G.C.; Coulter, W.L.; Walsh, P.J.; Montoya, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    A variety of soft x-ray diagnostics are being fielded on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus and Procyon pulsed power systems and also being fielded on joint US/Russian magnetized target fusion experiments known as MAGO (Magnitoye Obzhatiye). The authors have designed a low-cost modular photoemissive detector designated the XRD-96 that uses commercial 1100 series aluminum for the photocathode. In addition to photocathode detectors a number of designs using solid state silicon photodiodes have been designed and fielded. They also present a soft x-ray time-integrated pinhole camera system that uses standard type TMAX-400 photographic film that obviates the need for expensive and no longer produced zero-overcoat soft x-ray emulsion film. In a typical experiment the desired spectral energy cuts, signal intensity levels, and desired field of view will determine diagnostic geometry and x-ray filters selected. The authors have developed several computer codes to assist in the diagnostic design process and data deconvolution. Examples of the diagnostic design process and data analysis for a typical pulsed power experiment are presented.

  18. Pulsed power conditioning system for the Magajoule laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mexmain, Jean-Marc; Rubin de Cervens, D.; Marret, Jean-Pierre; Roos, V.; Cassany, B.; Eyl, P.; Pere, P.; Havre, Sierra S.; Fauvel, J.; Mathieu, P.; Benin, P.; Callu, G.; Vincent, C.; Michalczyk, Pierre

    2003-07-01

    The CEA is responsible for the Megajoule Laser (LMJ) facility. This facility is a large Flashlamp pump laser (1.8 MJ optical output). CEA entered into a contract with THALES to carry out the pulsed power conditioning system for the Megajoule Laser. The pulsed power conditioning system has a modular design which makes the facility more flexible and safer. This complete primary storage is a 450 MJ energy capacitor bank composed of 270 modules of 1.6 MJ energy. Each module is a stand-alone capacitor bank equipped with twelve 100 kJ capacitors and its embedded control/monitor and diagnostic system which is connected by an optical Ethernet link to the Command Control Supervisor of the facility. In the first step of the LMJ program, called "Line Integration Laser" (LIL), one laser chain will be built. The capacitor bank used to drive the LIL is comprised of 10 modules. This paper describes the design of the modules and the results of testing. The overall electrical performance meets the requirements.

  19. Towards Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and MHD Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Thompson, Bryan R.; Lineberry, John T.

    1999-01-01

    The interest in pulse detonation engines (PDE) arises primarily from the advantages that accrue from the significant combustion pressure rise that is developed in the detonation process. Conventional rocket engines, for example, must obtain all of their compression from the turbopumps, while the PDE provides additional compression in the combustor. Thus PDE's are expected to achieve higher I(sub sp) than conventional rocket engines and to require smaller turbopumps. The increase in I(sub sp) and the decrease in turbopump capacity must be traded off against each other. Additional advantages include the ability to vary thrust level by adjusting the firing rate rather than throttling the flow through injector elements. The common conclusion derived from these aggregated performance attributes is that PDEs should result in engines which are smaller, lower in cost, and lighter in weight than conventional engines. Unfortunately, the analysis of PDEs is highly complex due to their unsteady operation and non-ideal processes. Although the feasibility of the basic PDE concept has been proven in several experimental and theoretical efforts, the implied performance improvements have yet to be convincingly demonstrated. Also, there are certain developmental issues affecting the practical application of pulse detonation propulsion systems which are yet to be fully resolved. Practical detonation combustion engines, for example, require a repetitive cycle of charge induction, mixing, initiation/propagation of the detonation wave, and expulsion/scavenging of the combustion product gases. Clearly, the performance and power density of such a device depends upon the maximum rate at which this cycle can be successfully implemented. In addition, the electrical energy required for direct detonation initiation can be significant, and a means for direct electrical power production is needed to achieve self-sustained engine operation. This work addresses the technological issues associated

  20. The Power of Peer Reviewing to Enhance Writing in Horticulture: Greenhouse Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Neil O.; Flash, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is not included in undergraduate horticultural curricula. Our research objectives in an 8- year study, which ranged from 2000 to 2007 in two sections (2000-2002 non-peer reviewed and 2003-2007 peer-reviewed) of Greenhouse Management students at the University of Minnesota were to determine whether iterative peer reviews would result in…

  1. Robust Short-Pulse, High-Peak-Power Laser Transmitter for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a pulsed fiber based master oscillator power amplifier laser at 1550 nm to support moderate data rates with high peak powers in a compact package suitable for interplanetary optical communications. To accommodate pulse position modulation, the polarization maintaining laser transmitter generates pulses from 0.1 to 1 ns with variable duty cycle over a pulse repetition frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz.

  2. High-power pulsed thulium fiber oscillator modulated by stimulated Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yulong Xu, Jianqiu

    2014-01-06

    A pulsed ∼2-μm thulium-doped fiber laser passively modulated by distributed stimulated Brillouin scattering achieves 10.2 W average power and >100 kHz repetition rate with a very simple all-fiber configuration. The maximum pulse energy and peak power surpass 100 μJ and 6 kW, respectively. Another distinct property is that the pulse width is clamped around 17 ns at all power levels. All the average-power, pulse energy, and peak power show the highest values from passively modulated fiber lasers in all wavelength regions.

  3. Multi-pulse power injection and spheromak sustainment in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; Bulmer, R. H.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Woodruff, S.; Sspx Team

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. Spheromak formation (gun injection phase) and sustainment experiments are now routine in SSPX using a multi-bank power system. Gun voltage, impedance, and power coupling show a clear current threshold dependence on gun flux (I_th~=λ_0φ_gun/μ_0), increasing with current above the threshold, and are compared with CTX results. The characteristic gun inductance, L_gun~=0.6 μH, derived from the gun voltage dependence on di/dt, is larger than expected from Corsica modeling of the spheromak equilibrium. It’s value is consistent with the n=1 ‘doughook’ mode structure reported in SPHEX and believed important for helicity injection and toroidal current drive. Results of helicity and power balance calculations of spheromak poloidal field buildup are compared with experiment and used to project sustainment with a future longer pulse power supply. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  4. Ferroelectric opening switches for large-scale pulsed power drivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L.; Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Glover, Steven Frank

    2009-11-01

    Fast electrical energy storage or Voltage-Driven Technology (VDT) has dominated fast, high-voltage pulsed power systems for the past six decades. Fast magnetic energy storage or Current-Driven Technology (CDT) is characterized by 10,000 X higher energy density than VDT and has a great number of other substantial advantages, but it has all but been neglected for all of these decades. The uniform explanation for neglect of CDT technology is invariably that the industry has never been able to make an effective opening switch, which is essential for the use of CDT. Most approaches to opening switches have involved plasma of one sort or another. On a large scale, gaseous plasmas have been used as a conductor to bridge the switch electrodes that provides an opening function when the current wave front propagates through to the output end of the plasma and fully magnetizes the plasma - this is called a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Opening can be triggered in a POS using a magnetic field to push the plasma out of the A-K gap - this is called a Magnetically Controlled Plasma Opening Switch (MCPOS). On a small scale, depletion of electron plasmas in semiconductor devices is used to affect opening switch behavior, but these devices are relatively low voltage and low current compared to the hundreds of kilo-volts and tens of kilo-amperes of interest to pulsed power. This work is an investigation into an entirely new approach to opening switch technology that utilizes new materials in new ways. The new materials are Ferroelectrics and using them as an opening switch is a stark contrast to their traditional applications in optics and transducer applications. Emphasis is on use of high performance ferroelectrics with the objective of developing an opening switch that would be suitable for large scale pulsed power applications. Over the course of exploring this new ground, we have discovered new behaviors and properties of these materials that were here to fore unknown. Some of

  5. A new 40 MA ranchero explosive pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James; Herrera, Dennis; Oona, Hank; Torres, David; Atchison, W L; Colgate, S A; Griego, J R; Guzik, J; Holtkamp, D B; Idzorek, G; Kaul, A; Kirkpatrick, R C; Menikoff, R; Reardon, P T; Reinovsky, R E; Rousculp, C L; Sgro, A G; Tabaka, L J; Tierney, T E; Watt, R G

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a new high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system based on the 1.4 m long Ranchero generator which was developed in 1999 for driving solid density z-pinch loads. The new application requires approximately 40 MA to implode similar liners, but the liners cannot tolerate the 65 {micro}s, 3 MA current pulse associated with delivering the initial magnetic flux to the 200 nH generator. To circumvent this problem, we have designed a system with an internal start switch and four explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches. The integral start switch is installed between the output glide plane and the armature. It functions in the same manner as a standard input crowbar switch when armature motion begins, but initially isolates the load. The circuit is completed during the flux loading phase using post hole convolutes. Each convolute attaches the inner (coaxial) output transmission line to the outside of the outer coax through a penetration of the outer coaxial line. The attachment is made with the conductor of an EFF at each location. The EFFs conduct 0.75 MA each, and are actuated just after the internal start switch connects to the load. EFFs operating at these parameters have been tested in the past. The post hole convolutes must withstand as much as 80 kV at peak dl/dt during the Ranchero load current pulse. We describe the design of this new HEPP system in detail, and give the experimental results available at conference time. In addition, we discuss the work we are doing to test the upper current limits of a single standard size Ranchero module. Calculations have suggested that the generator could function at up to {approx}120 MA, the rule of thumb we follow (1 MA/cm) suggests 90 MA, and simple flux compression calculations, along with the {approx}4 MA seed current available from our capacitor bank, suggests 118 MA is the currently available upper limit.

  6. Pulsed power produced counter-propagating supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Valenzuela, J.; Collins, G.; Mariscal, D.; Narkis, J.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Haque, S.; Hammel, B.; Wallace, M.; Covington, A.; Beg, F.

    2015-11-01

    High-Mach-number, ionized, flowing gases are ubiquitous in the universe, and in many astrophysical environments they take the shape of highly collimated and unidirectional jets. Pulsed power current drivers provide the opportunity to create plasma jets while achieving conditions required to explore radiative cooling, magnetic field advection, shock formation and microinstabilities, all of which are important in the astrophysical environment. We present results from an experimental campaign carried out with the ZEBRA driver (long pulse mode: 0.5 MA in 200 ns current rise) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility where we have performed a comprehensive study of the physics of conical wire array outflows. We have implemented a double conical array configuration in which two counter-propagating jets are produced. Characterization of the jets was done with Faraday rotation, interferometry and an optical streak camera. We will present available data comparing two wire materials (Al and Cu) and the shock formation in different parameter regimes. The work is funded by the Department of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0001063 and DE-NA0001995.

  7. Powerful laser pulse absorption in partly homogenized foam plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, M.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Rupasov, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The internal volume structure of a porous medium of light elements determines unique features of the absorption mechanism of laser radiation; the characteristics of relaxation and transport processes in the produced plasma are affected as well. Porous materials with an average density larger than the critical density have a central role in enhancing the pressure produced during the ablation by the laser pulse; this pressure can exceed the one produced by target direct irradiation. The problem of the absorption of powerful laser radiation in a porous material is examined both analytically and numerically. The behavior of the medium during the process of pore filling in the heated region is described by a model of viscous homogenization. An expression describing the time and space dependence of the absorption coefficient of laser radiation is therefore obtained from the model. A numerical investigation of the absorption of a nanosecond laser pulse is performed within the present model. In the context of numerical calculations, porous media with an average density larger than the critical density of the laser-produced plasma are considered. Preliminary results about the inclusion of the developed absorption model into an hydrodynamic code are presented.

  8. High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

    1980-11-26

    A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

  9. Presumed Pulmonary Embolism Following Power-Pulse Spray Thrombectomy of Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jason; Georgiades, Christos S.; Hong, Kelvin; Kim, Hyun S.

    2006-08-15

    To achieve more effective thrombolysis in a shorter treatment time, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy has been increasingly used in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The power-pulse spray is a new technique to combine chemical and rheolytic effects on clots. We present a case of presumed pulmonary embolism following power-pulse spray treatment for upper extremity DVT which necessitated resuscitation and intubation. The power-pulse spray technique should be used with caution when treating DVT.

  10. NDCX-II PULSED POWER SYSTEM AND INDUCTION CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Leitner, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is currently finalizing the design of NDCX-II, the second phase of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, which will use an ion beam to explore Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target hydrodynamics. The ion induction accelerator will include induction cells and Blumleins from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A test stand has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to test refurbished ATA induction cells and pulsed power hardware for voltage holding and ability to produce various compression and acceleration waveforms. The performance requirements, design modifications, and test results will be presented.

  11. Integrated systems for pulsed-power driven inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, M. E.; Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; McBride, R. D.; Vesey, R. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Vandevender, J. P.; Waisman, E. M.; Hansen, D. L.; Owen, A. C.; Jones, J. F.; Romero, J. A.; McKenney, J.

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed power fusion concepts integrate: (i) directly-magnetically-driven fusion targets that absorb large energies (10 MJ), (ii) efficient, rep-rated driver modules, (iii) compact, scalable, integrated driver architectures, (iv) driver-to-target coupling techniques with standoff and driver protection, and (v) long lifetime fusion chambers shielded by vaporizing blankets and thick liquid walls. Large fusion yields (3-30 GJ) and low rep-rates (0.1-1 Hz) may be an attractive path for IFE. Experiments on the ZR facility are validating physics issues for magnetically driven targets. Scientific breakeven (fusion energy = fuel energy) may be possible in the next few years. Plans for system development and integration will be discussed. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Pulsed-power driven reconnection and the inverse skin effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Zhao, Xuan

    2014-10-01

    The COBRA 1 MA generator at Cornell is used to drive magnetic reconnection experiments using wire plasmas. Typically two parallel wires are driven, accumulating magnetic and thermal energy during the current rise. This stored energy is converted into plasma flow kinetic energy by reconnection, driven by the ``inverse skin effect'' when the driving voltage reverses after peak current. The reversed voltage reverses the Poynting flux so that magnetic energy is being removed from the load, reducing the magnetic field at the boundary on a time scale short compared with resistive penetration time. Reversed current in the outer plasma drives reconnection of flux and creates supersonic and superalfvenic outflows. This effect may have relevance to other pulsed-power driven plasmas, such as the phenomenon of ``trailing mass'' in imploding Z-pinches. Recent measurements including first data from Thomson scattering will be presented. Supported by US DOE NNSA Grant DE-NA0001855.

  13. Mach-Zehnder recording systems for pulsed power diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E. K.; Abbott, R. Q.; McKenna, I.; Macrum, G.; Baker, D.; Tran, V.; Rodriguez, E.; Kaufman, M. I.; Tibbits, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Waltman, T. B.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Caldwell, S. E.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; and others

    2012-10-15

    Fiber-optic transmission and recording systems, based on Mach-Zehnder modulators, have been developed and installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and are being developed for other pulsed-power facilities such as the Z accelerator at Sandia, with different requirements. We present the design and performance characteristics for the mature analog links, based on the system developed for the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at the OMEGA laser and at NIF. For a single detector channel, two Mach-Zehnders are used to provide high dynamic range at the full recording bandwidth with no gaps in the coverage. We present laboratory and shot data to estimate upper limits on the radiation effects as they impact recorded data quality. Finally, we will assess the technology readiness level for mature and developing implementations of Mach-Zehnder links for these environments.

  14. Mach-Zehnder Recording Systems for Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E K; McKenna, I; Macrum, G; Baker, D; Tran, V; Rodriguez, E; Kaufman, M I; Tibbits, A; Silbernagel, C T; Waltman, T B; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Mack, J M; Young, C S; Caldwell, S E; Evans, S C; Sedillo, T J; Stoeffl, W; Grafil, E; Liebman, J; Beeman, B; Watts, P; Carpenter, A; Horsfied, C J; Rubery, M S; Chandler, G A; Torres, J A; Smelser, R M

    2012-10-01

    Fiber-optic transmission and recording systems, based on Mach-Zehnder modulators, have been developed and installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and are being developed for other pulsed-power facilities such as Z-R at Sandia, with different requirements. We present the design and performance characteristics for the mature analog links, based on the system developed for the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at OMEGA and NIF. For a single detector channel, two Mach-Zehnders are used to provide high dynamic range at the full recording bandwidth with no gaps in the coverage. We present laboratory and shot data to estimate upper limits on the radiation effects as they impact recorded data quality. Finally, we will assess the technology readiness level for mature and developing implementations of Mach-Zehnder links for these environments.

  15. Mach-Zehnder recording systems for pulsed power diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Miller, E K; Abbott, R Q; McKenna, I; Macrum, G; Baker, D; Tran, V; Rodriguez, E; Kaufman, M I; Tibbits, A; Silbernagel, C T; Waltman, T B; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Mack, J M; Young, C S; Caldwell, S E; Evans, S C; Sedillo, T J; Stoeffl, W; Grafil, E; Liebman, J; Beeman, B; Watts, P; Carpenter, A; Horsfied, C J; Rubery, M S; Chandler, G A; Torres, J A; Smelser, R M

    2012-10-01

    Fiber-optic transmission and recording systems, based on Mach-Zehnder modulators, have been developed and installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and are being developed for other pulsed-power facilities such as the Z accelerator at Sandia, with different requirements. We present the design and performance characteristics for the mature analog links, based on the system developed for the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at the OMEGA laser and at NIF. For a single detector channel, two Mach-Zehnders are used to provide high dynamic range at the full recording bandwidth with no gaps in the coverage. We present laboratory and shot data to estimate upper limits on the radiation effects as they impact recorded data quality. Finally, we will assess the technology readiness level for mature and developing implementations of Mach-Zehnder links for these environments. PMID:23126893

  16. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  17. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  18. Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; McConnell, B.W.; Van Dyke, J.W.; Tesche, F.M.; Vance, E.F.

    1993-01-01

    A single nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (BENT). This pulse consists of an intense steep-front, short-duration transient electromagnetic field, followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with tens of seconds duration. This latter environment is referred to as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (NMENT). Both the early-time transient and the geomagnetic disturbance could impact the operation of the nation`s power systems. Since 1983, the US Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more BENT events on the nation`s electric energy supply. This report summarizes the results of that program and provides recommendations for enhancing power system reliability under HENT conditions. A nominal HENP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems was developed during the program and is briefly described in this report. This environment was used to provide a realistic indication of BEMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which could significantly disturb the geomagnetic field, may cause the interconnected power network to break up into utility islands with massive power failures in some areas. However, permanent damage would be isolated, and restoration should be possible within a few hours. Multiple bursts would likely increase the blackout areas, component failures, and restoration time. However, a long-term blackout of many months is unlikely because major power system components, such as transformers, are not likely to be damaged by the nominal HEND environment. Moreover, power system reliability, under both HENT and normal operating conditions, can be enhanced by simple, and often low cost, modifications to current utility practices.

  19. Fiber laser pumped high power mid-infrared laser with picosecond pulse bunch output.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kaihua; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Peipei; Yang, Dingzhong; Wu, Bo; Shen, Yonghang

    2013-10-21

    We report a novel quasi-synchronously pumped PPMgLN-based high power mid-infrared (MIR) laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The pump laser is a linearly polarized MOPA structured all fiberized Yb fiber laser with picosecond pulse bunch output. The output from a mode-locked seed fiber laser was directed to pass through a FBG reflector via a circulator to narrow the pulse duration from 800 ps to less than 50 ps and the spectral FWHM from 9 nm to 0.15 nm. The narrowed pulses were further directed to pass through a novel pulse multiplier through which each pulse was made to become a pulse bunch composing of 13 sub-pulses with pulse to pulse time interval of 1.26 ns. The pulses were then amplified via two stage Yb fiber amplifiers to obtain a linearly polarized high average power output up to 85 W, which were then directed to pass through an isolator and to pump a PPMgLN-based optical parametric oscillator via quasi-synchronization pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. High MIR output with average power up to 4 W was obtained at 3.45 micron showing the feasibility of such pump scheme for ps pulse bunch MIR output. PMID:24150378

  20. Pulse power enhancement of the anaerobic digester process

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    A pilot study of the effects of Pulse Power Processing on an anaerobic digester system was completed at the Decatur Utilities Dry Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, in Decatur Alabama, in September, 1995. This patented method generates several significant effects when all biosolids material is treated as it enters the anaerobic system. Intense, high peak-power plasma arcs are created, one at each end of the parabolic processing chamber, to produce an amplified synergy of alterations to the digester sludge flowing between them. The millisecond electric discharges generate localized temperatures as high as 30,000 K{degrees}, followed by a rapid cooling of the flowing liquid, which produces acoustic shock waves with pressures approaching 5,000 atmospheres. This destructive force: ruptures many of the cell walls of the bacteria and other single-cell organisms, releasing their vacuole fluids; breaks carbon bonds to form smaller organic compounds; and pulverizes large particle conglomerates, increasing the overall surface area of the solids. These beneficial results serve to boost the nutrient source for the anaerobes in the digester. In conjunction with LTV radiation, the formation of excited chemical radicals (including OH{sup -}), and the changes in ionic charge through alteration of the zeta potential, the bioreactor system is turbocharged to enhance the conversion of volatile biosolids to methane gas, which is the natural respiratory by-product of anaerobic digestion.

  1. Development of compact rapid charging power supply for capacitive energy storage in pulsed power drivers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surender Kumar; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-02-01

    High energy capacitor bank is used for primary electrical energy storage in pulsed power drivers. The capacitors used in these pulsed power drivers have low inductance, low internal resistance, and less dc life, so it has to be charged rapidly and immediately discharged into the load. A series resonant converter based 45 kV compact power supply is designed and developed for rapid charging of the capacitor bank with constant charging current up to 150 mA. It is short circuit proof, and zero current switching technique is used to commute the semiconductor switch. A high frequency resonant inverter switching at 10 kHz makes the overall size small and reduces the switching losses. The output current of the power supply is limited by constant on-time and variable frequency switching control technique. The power supply is tested by charging the 45 kV/1.67 μF and 15 kV/356 μF capacitor banks. It has charged the capacitor bank up to rated voltage with maximum charging current of 150 mA and the average charging rate of 3.4 kJ/s. The output current of the power supply is limited by reducing the switching frequency at 5 kHz, 3.3 kHz, and 1.7 kHz and tested with 45 kV/1.67 μF capacitor bank. The protection circuit is included in the power supply for over current, under voltage, and over temperature. The design details and the experimental testing results of the power supply for resonant current, output current, and voltage traces of the power supply with capacitive, resistive, and short circuited load are presented and discussed. PMID:25725838

  2. The effects of pulse rate, power, width and coding on signal detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects on the signal detectability of varying the pulse repetition rate (PRF), peak pulse power (p(pk)) and pulse width (tau(p)) (tp) are examined. Both coded and uncoded pulses are considered. The following quantities are assumed to be constant; (1) antenna area, (z)echo reflectivity, (3) Doppler shift, (4) spectral width, (5) spectral resolution, (6) effective sampling rate, and (7) total incoherent spectral averagaing time. The detectability is computed for two types of targets.

  3. Low-pressure pseudospark switches for ICF pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, K.; Bickes, Ch; Ernst, U.; Iberler, M.; Meier, J.; Prucker, U.; Schlaug, M.; Schwab, J.; Urban, J.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    Hollow-electrode pseudospark switches are gas-filled, low-pressure, high-current plasma switches which are based on cold cathode emission. They have the capability to satisfy at least a part of switching requirements for different applications in ICF drivers. The main purpose of the submitted paper is therefore to discuss the following realistic ways for the use of pseudospark switches. There are intense international activities aimed at investigating different approaches for the ignition of an ICF capsule. Most of these efforts utilize lasers of varying wavelengths to deliver the energy to initiate the ablation of the target, the compression and ignition of the fuel, and the propagation of the fusion burn. One alternative to this scheme is to provide the drive energy in form of a light ion beam produced by an efficient pulse power accelerator. A related method uses beams of heavy ion beams from high intensity versions of traditional high-energy accelerators. Dependent on the ICF driver for the power conditioning unit (PCU) arise totally different demands. These extremely different requirements mainly rely on the very specific character of the load. Flashlamps, pumping high power lasers represent a non-linear, low-impedance load. Relatively low switching voltage is necessary, but a high charge-transfer capability. Induction cells or magnetic compression units have a high impedance. Consequently high voltage (up to several 100 kV) is required to feed the energy in Marx modules and the following voltage adders produce megavolt voltages, which determines likewise the specific data of the used switch.

  4. Thulium-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with 2 GW of peak power.

    PubMed

    Gaida, C; Gebhardt, M; Stutzki, F; Jauregui, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2016-09-01

    Thulium-doped fibers with ultra large mode-field areas offer new opportunities for the power scaling of mid-IR ultrashort-pulse laser sources. Here, we present a laser system delivering a pulse-peak power of 2 GW and a nearly transform-limited pulse duration of 200 fs in combination with 28.7 W of average power. This performance level has been achieved by optimizing the pulse shape, reducing the overlap with atmospheric absorption lines, and incorporating a climate chamber to reduce the humidity of the atmospheric environment. PMID:27607990

  5. HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

    2005-05-16

    This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

  6. Thin-disk multipass amplifier for ultrashort laser pulses with kilowatt average output power and mJ pulse energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negel, Jan-Philipp; Voss, Andreas; Abdou Ahmed, Marwan; Bauer, Dominik; Sutter, Dirk; Killi, Alexander; Graf, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    We report on a Yb:YAG thin-disk multipass amplifier for ultrashort laser pulses delivering an average output power of 1.1 kW which to the best of our knowledge is the highest output power reported from such a system so far. A modified commercial TruMicro5050 laser delivers the seed pulses with an average power of 80 W at a wavelength of 1030 nm, a pulse duration of 6.5 ps and a repetition rate of 800 kHz. These pulses are amplified to 1.38 mJ of pulse energy with a duration of 7.3 ps. To achieve this, we developed a scheme in which an array of 40 plane mirrors is used to geometrically fold the seed beam over the pumped thin-disk crystal. Exploiting the incoming linear polarization, an overall number of 40 double-passes through the disk was realized by using the backpath through the amplifier with the orthogonal linear polarization state. Thermal issues on the disk were mitigated by zero-phonon line pumping at a wavelength of 969 nm directly into the upper laser level and by employing a retroreflective mirror pair. The amplifier exhibits an optical efficiency of 44 % and a slope efficiency of 46 %. The beam quality was measured to be better than M2=1.25 at all power levels. As this system can deliver high pulse energies and high average output powers at the same time without the need of a CPA technique, it can be very suitable for high productivity material processing with ultrashort laser pulses.

  7. Basic science with pulsed power & some off-the-wall ideas

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    This paper discusses aspects of pulsed power for use in basic research, with a principal emphasis on ATLAS, a planned 36-MJ pulsed-power machine with a circular architechture designed primarily for z-pinch implosion of cylindrical foils. The objective of the paper is to give an overview and touch on subjects which might test the limits of this technology.

  8. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  9. Spectral variation of high power microwave pulse propagating in a self-generated plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, A.; Kuo, S. P.; Kossey, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A systematic study to understand the spectral variation of a high power microwave pulse propagating in a self-generated plasma is carried out. It includes the theoretical formulation, experimental demonstration, and computer simulations and computer experiments. The experiment of pulse propagation is conducted in a vacuum chamber filled with dry air (approximately 0.2 torr); the chamber is made of a 2 ft. cube of Plexiglas. A rectangular microwave pulse (1 microsec pulse width and 3.27 GHz carrier frequency) is fed into the cube through an S band microwave horn placed at one side of the chamber. A second S-band horn placed at the opposite side of the chamber is used to receive the transmitted pulse. The spectra of the incident pulse and transmitted pulse are then compared. As the power of the incident pulse is only slightly (less than 15%) above the breakdown threshold power of the background air, the peak of the spectrum of the transmitted pulse is upshifted from the carrier frequency 3.27 GHz of the incident pulse. However, as the power of the incident pulse exceeds the breakdown threshold power of the background air by 30%, a different phenomenon appears. The spectrum of the transmitted pulse begins to have two peaks. One is upshifted and the other one downshifted from the single peak location of the incident pulse. The amount of frequency downshift is comparable to that of the upshifted frequency. A theoretical model describing the experiment of pulse propagation in a self-generated plasma is developed. There are excellent agreements between the experimental results and computer simulations based on this theoretical model, which is also used to further carry out computer experiments identifying the role of plasma introduced wave loss on the result of frequency downshift phenomenon.

  10. Two-step pulse triggering of dynistor power switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatyuk, A. V.; Grekhov, I. V.; Korotkov, S. V.

    1985-04-01

    The performance of reversibly switching power dynistors is examined on the basis of physical processes which occur in their structure to determine their dv/dt and di/dt characteristics. Conditions for normal and most efficient operation are established by qualitative and quantiative analysis of available data. Pulse triggering of these thyristor-diode devices is considered, a particularly important parameter here being the lifetime of the high-conductance phase in internal p-N-n(+) diode segments from reverse injection till flow of positive anode current (reverse diode current). The length of this period is calculated according to the conventional simple theory of diffusion with charge storage, which is applied here to a semiinfinite model structure and the transient state with arbitrary waveforms of forward and reverse diode currents. The corresponding equation of ambipolar diffusion is solved for appropriate initial and boundary conditions for the hole concentration and its rate of change. A comparative evaluation of single-step and two-step triggering reveals the advantages of the latter mode with simultaneous uniform injection of initially induced charge.

  11. Ejecta experiments at the Pegasus Pulsed Power facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D.S.; Carpenter, B.; King, N.S.P.

    1997-08-01

    When a shock wave interacts at the surface of a metal target, target material can be emitted from the surface called ejecta. The mass, size, shape, and velocity of ejecta varies depending on the initial shock conditions, and target material properties. In order to understand this phenomena, diagnostics have been developed and implemented at the Pegasus Pulsed Power facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility provides both radial and axial access for making measurements. There exist optical, laser, and x-ray paths for performing measurements on the target assembly located near the center of the machine. The facility can provide many mega amps of current which is transported to a 5.0 cm diameter, 2.0 cm high aluminum cylinder. The current and associated magnetic field set up forces which implode the aluminum cylinder radially inward. As the aluminum cylinder reaches the appropriate velocity it impacts a target cylinder. Due to this impact, a shock wave is set up in the target and eventually interacts at the inner surface of the target cylinder where ejecta are produced. A 1.5 cm diameter collimator cylinder located inside the target cylinder is used to control the number of ejecta particles that arrive at the center region where ejecta measurements are made. Diagnostics have been developed including in-line Fraunhofer holography and visible shadowgraph. Details of these diagnostics are described.

  12. An All Solid-State Pulsed Power Generator for Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kefu; Qiu, Jian; Wu, Yifan

    2009-04-01

    An all solid-state pulsed power generator for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is described. The pulsed power system is based on a Marx circuit configuration and semiconductor switches, which have many advantages in adjustable repetition frequency, pulse width modulation and long serving life compared with the conventional circuit category, tube-based technologies such as gridded vacuum tubes, thyratrons, pulse forming networks and transformers. The operation of PIII with pulse repetition frequencies up to 500 Hz has been achieved at a pulse voltage amplitude from 2 kV to 60 kV, with an adjustable pulse duration from 1 μs to 100 μs. The proposed system and its performance, as used to drive a plasma ion implantation chamber, are described in detail on the basis of the experimental results.

  13. Exploring the limits of broadband excitation and inversion: II. Rf-power optimized pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzar, Kyryl; Skinner, Thomas E.; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.; Luy, Burkhard

    2008-09-01

    In [K. Kobzar, T.E. Skinner, N. Khaneja, S.J. Glaser, B. Luy, Exploring the limits of broadband excitation and inversion, J. Magn. Reson. 170 (2004) 236-243], optimal control theory was employed in a systematic study to establish physical limits for the minimum rf-amplitudes required in broadband excitation and inversion pulses. In a number of cases, however, experimental schemes are not limited by rf-amplitudes, but by the overall rf-power applied to a sample. We therefore conducted a second systematic study of excitation and inversion pulses of varying pulse durations with respect to bandwidth and rf-tolerances, but this time using a modified algorithm involving restricted rf-power. The resulting pulses display a variety of pulse shapes with highly modulated rf-amplitudes and generally show better performance than corresponding pulses with identical pulse length and rf-power, but limited rf-amplitude. A detailed description of pulse shapes and their performance is given for the so-called power-BEBOP and power-BIBOP pulses.

  14. Powerful 170-attosecond XUV pulses generated with few-cycle laser pulses and broadband multilayer optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultze, M.; Goulielmakis, E.; Uiberacker, M.; Hofstetter, M.; Kim, J.; Kim, D.; Krausz, F.; Kleineberg, U.

    2007-07-01

    Single 170-as extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses delivering more than 106 photons/pulse at ~100 eV at a repetition rate of 3 kHz are produced by ionizing neon with waveform-controlled sub-5 fs near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses and spectrally filtering the emerging near-cutoff high-harmonic continuum with a broadband, chirped multilayer molybdenum silicon (Mo/Si) mirror.

  15. Using probabilistic estimation of expression residuals (PEER) to obtain increased power and interpretability of gene expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Stegle, Oliver; Parts, Leopold; Piipari, Matias; Winn, John; Durbin, Richard

    2012-03-01

    We present PEER (probabilistic estimation of expression residuals), a software package implementing statistical models that improve the sensitivity and interpretability of genetic associations in population-scale expression data. This approach builds on factor analysis methods that infer broad variance components in the measurements. PEER takes as input transcript profiles and covariates from a set of individuals, and then outputs hidden factors that explain much of the expression variability. Optionally, these factors can be interpreted as pathway or transcription factor activations by providing prior information about which genes are involved in the pathway or targeted by the factor. The inferred factors are used in genetic association analyses. First, they are treated as additional covariates, and are included in the model to increase detection power for mapping expression traits. Second, they are analyzed as phenotypes themselves to understand the causes of global expression variability. PEER extends previous related surrogate variable models and can be implemented within hours on a desktop computer. PMID:22343431

  16. High power laser pulses with voltage controlled durations of 400 - 1000 ps.

    PubMed

    Harth, F; Ulm, T; Lührmann, M; Knappe, R; Klehr, A; Hoffmann, Th; Erbert, G; L'huillier, J A

    2012-03-26

    We report on the generation and amplification of pulses with pulse widths of 400 - 1000 ps at 1064 nm. For pulse generation an ultra-fast semiconductor modulator is used that modulates a cw-beam of a DFB diode laser. The pulse lengths could be adjusted by the use of a voltage control. The pulses were amplified in a solid state Nd:YVO₄ regenerative amplifier to an average power of up to 47.7 W at 100 - 816 kHz. PMID:22453379

  17. Pulse compression of a high-power thin disk laser using rod-type fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, C J; Heckl, O H; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2011-01-17

    We report on two pulse compressors for a high-power thin disk laser oscillator using rod-type fiber amplifiers. Both systems are seeded by a standard SESAM modelocked thin disk laser that delivers 16 W of average power at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz with a pulse energy of 1.5 μJ and a pulse duration of 1 ps. We discuss two results with different fiber parameters with different trade-offs in pulse duration, average power, damage and complexity. The first amplifier setup consists of a Yb-doped fiber amplifier with a 2200 μm2 core area and a length of 55 cm, resulting in a compressed average power of 55 W with 98-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz. The second system uses a shorter 36-cm fiber with a larger core area of 4500 μm2. In a stretcher-free configuration we obtained 34 W of compressed average power and 65-fs pulses. In both cases peak powers of > 30 MW were demonstrated at several μJ pulse energies. The power scaling limitations due to damage and self-focusing are discussed. PMID:21263681

  18. Web Textbook of Pulsed Power for Technical Education in Graduate Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Naoyuki; Teramoto, Akemi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    To replace paper-based textbooks with web-based textbooks has caused several available features. The textbooks which are provided on the internet can always keep the latest information, and it is facile to include not only texts but also contents using multimedia and special functions. The web-based textbook on pulsed power, which is one of technical and science fields, has been prepared. In the textbook, the parts of pulsed power bases are described in classic text style and the chapter of pulsed power applications is provided by lectures with slides and vocal audios. Specialized calculators on pulsed power and virtual pulsed power laboratory consisting of several simulators are served through the web interface. A function of “Who's Who" is a database of the authors, researchers of pulsed power and users of this textbook in order to provide their communication by e-mails. A formation of the community for pulsed power researchers as well as learners is anticipated by using the database. This textbook will be beneficial to the education in graduate schools and to the COE program as a self-learning material.

  19. Influence of a falling edge on high power microwave pulse combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Zhu, Qi; Xiao, Renzhen; Shao, Hao

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an explanation of the influence of a microwave falling edge on high-power microwave pulse combination. Through particle-in-cell simulations, we discover that the falling edge is the driving factor that limits the output power of the combined pulses. We demonstrate that the space charge field, which accumulates to become comparable to the E-field at the falling edge of the former pulse, will trap the electrons in the gas layer and decrease its energy to attain a high ionization rate. Hence, avalanche discharge, caused by trapped electrons, makes the plasma density to approach the critical density and cuts off the latter microwave pulse. An X-band combination experiment is conducted with different pulse intervals. This experiment confirms that the high density plasma induced by the falling edge can cut off the latter pulse, and that the time required for plasma recombination in the transmission channel is several microseconds. To ensure a high output power for combined pulses, the latter pulse should be moved ahead of the falling edge of the former one, and consequently, a beat wave with high peak power becomes the output by adding two pulses with normal amplitudes.

  20. Considerations for human exposure standards for fast-rise-time high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses.

    PubMed

    Merritt, J H; Kiel, J L; Hurt, W D

    1995-06-01

    Development of new emitter systems capable of producing high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses with very fast rise times and narrow pulse widths is continuing. Such directed energy weapons systems will be used in the future to defeat electronically vulnerable targets. Human exposures to these pulses can be expected during testing and operations. Development of these technologies for radar and communications purposes has the potential for wider environmental exposure, as well. Current IEEE C95.1-1991 human exposure guidelines do not specifically address these types of pulses, though limits are stated for pulsed emissions. The process for developing standards includes an evaluation of the relevant bioeffects data base. A recommendation has been made that human exposure to ultrashort electromagnetic pulses that engender electromagnetic transients, called precursor waves, should be avoided. Studies that purport to show the potential for tissue damage induced by such pulses were described. The studies cited in support of the recommendation were not relevant to the issues of tissue damage by propagated pulses. A number of investigations are cited in this review that directly address the biological effects of electromagnetic pulses. These studies have not shown evidence of tissue damage as a result of exposure to high-peak-power pulsed microwaves. It is our opinion that the current guidelines are sufficiently protective for human exposure to these pulses. PMID:7646411

  1. Preliminary design of atlas pulsed power machine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gribble, R.F.

    1996-04-03

    During the contract period from March 95 to March 96 I participated in the preliminary design of the Atlas pulsed power machine. As part of this task I performed of the order of 1000 circuit simulations for many different bank configurations, opening switches, and loads, and about 100 electrostatic field calculations. Results of the calculations were provided at regular Atlas design meetings or in the form of memorandums. I have almost completed the development of a 2D disk transmission line code to more accurately calculate asymmetric transient current and voltage caused by azimuthal variations, including switch timing jitter and local arc faults. This code is attached as a subroutine to the circuit simulation program. The purpose for most of the simulations was to provide information on bank damping requirements and load energy ranges for the different circuit configurations. A minimum transmission line insulation depth was determined from calculating the maximum expected dynamic load back voltage (I{times}{sup dL}/{sub dt}). Other simulations included fault effects, transmission line heating effects (including diffusion, melting, vaporization, ionization), and transmission line transients under various conditions. The line fault simulations using a lumped constant approximation to the 2D disk line provided useful information but even with about 600 elements, it has an upper limit on mode frequencies and tends to exaggerate some modes. Electrostatic (2D) field calculations were used to estimate fields of the transmission lines, insulators, and rail gap switches. Design of conductor surface contours to minimize the field near an insulator stack was one result of these calculations. Effects of biasing and insulator modifications of the rail gap switch was determined.

  2. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  3. High-power widely tunable sub-20 fs Gaussian laser pulses for ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Bernd; Steinmann, Andy; Giessen, Harald

    2011-11-21

    We demonstrate the generation of widely tunable sub-20 fs Gaussian-shaped laser pulses using a grating-based 4-f pulse shaper and a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Our pump source is an Yb:KGW solitary mode-locked oscillator at 44 MHz repetition rate which is coupled into a large mode area microstructured fiber to generate a broad spectrum from below 900 nm to above 1150 nm. These pulses are precompressed by a prism sequence and subsequently sent into the pulse shaper. We use the multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS) for phase shaping and iterative amplitude optimization to achieve Gaussian-like tunable sub-20 fs pulses with output powers of up to 142 mW as well as nontunable pulses with 310 mW output power as short as 11.5 fs. PMID:22109462

  4. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  5. Power of Peer Review: An Online Collaborative Learning Assignment in Social Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathey, Christie

    2007-01-01

    In a semester-long, peer review assignment, undergraduates enrolled in a social psychology course wrote essays that applied course concepts to life experiences. Students anonymously posted essays for the entire class to view, and peers posted commentaries on classmates' essays using an online discussion board. Students rated the assignment as…

  6. The Power of Friendship: Protection against an Escalating Cycle of Peer Victimization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Ernest V. E.; Boivin, Michel; Vitaro, Frank; Bukowski, William M.

    1999-01-01

    Examined role of friendship aspects in moderating behavioral antecedents and outcomes of peer victimization among fourth and fifth graders. Teacher-reported internalizing and externalizing behaviors predicted increases in peer-reported victimization; relation of internalizing behaviors to increases in victimization was attenuated for children with…

  7. Little People, Big Helpers: Implementing Elementary Peer Programs Is Possible and Powerful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Ashley C.

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, peer programs have grown in popularity around the country, supported by a growing body of research and the rewards of seeing teenagers' lives changed. Elementary peer programs, with their different set of typical issues, schedule demands, and personnel availability, are certainly different from their middle- and high-school…

  8. Combined Flux Compression and Plasma Opening Switch on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felber, Franklin S.; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Mazarakis, Michael G.

    2010-05-07

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 {mu}s. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  9. Peak power tunable mid-infrared oscillator pumped by a high power picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier with bunch output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaihua; Guo, Yan; Lai, Xiaomin; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-01

    A high power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with picosecond pulse bunch output is experimentally demonstrated. The pump source was a high power master oscillation power amplifier (MOPA) picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier. The seed of the MOPA was a gain-switched distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode (LD) with picosecond pulse operation at a high repetition rate. The seed laser was amplified to 50 W by two-stage pre-amplifiers and a large mode area (LMA) Yb fiber based power-amplifier. A fiber-pigtailed acousto-optic modulator with the first order diffraction transmission was inserted into the second pre-amplifier to form a picosecond pulse bunch train and to change the peak power simultaneously. The power-amplified pulse bunches were focused to pump a wavelength-tunable OPO for emitting high power mid-infrared laser. By adjusting the OPO cavity length, the maximum average idler powers obtained at 3.1, 3.3 and 3.5 μm were 7, 6.6 and 6.4 W respectively.

  10. Effect of Pulsed Nd: YAG Laser Powers On 304 Stainless Steel Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Candan, L.; Demir, A.; Akman, E.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, optimum welding parameters are obtained for 1mm thickness type 304 stainless steel welding using the Lumonics JK760TR pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters such as pulse duration, focal position, frequency, laser power, welding speed, and shielding gas (N2) pressure on penetration defining welding quality are investigated. Also comparisons of overlap ratios are presented between theory and experiment for pulse duration, frequency and welding speed.

  11. Average power constraints in AlGaAs semiconductor lasers under pulse-position-modulation conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    In some optical communications systems there are advantages to using low duty-cycle pulsed modulation formats such as pulse-position-modulation. However, because of intrinsic limitations of AlGaAs semiconductor lasers, the average power that they can deliver in a pulsed mode of operation is lower than in a CW mode. The magnitude of this problem and its implications are analyzed in this letter, and one possible solution is mentioned.

  12. Genetic algorithm based optimization of pulse profile for MOPA based high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Tang, Ming; Shi, Jun; Fu, Songnian; Li, Lihua; Liu, Ying; Cheng, Xueping; Liu, Jian; Shum, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Although the Master Oscillator Power-Amplifier (MOPA) based fiber laser has received much attention for laser marking process due to its large tunabilty of pulse duration (from 10ns to 1ms), repetition rate (100Hz to 500kHz), high peak power and extraordinary heat dissipating capability, the output pulse deformation due to the saturation effect of fiber amplifier is detrimental for many applications. We proposed and demonstrated that, by utilizing Genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique, the input pulse profile from the master oscillator (current-driven laser diode) could be conveniently optimized to achieve targeted output pulse shape according to real parameters' constraints. In this work, an Yb-doped high power fiber amplifier is considered and a 200ns square shaped pulse profile is the optimization target. Since the input pulse with longer leading edge and shorter trailing edge can compensate the saturation effect, linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial functions are used to describe the input pulse with limited number of unknowns(<5). Coefficients of the polynomial functions are the optimization objects. With reasonable cost and hardware limitations, the cubic input pulse with 4 coefficients is found to be the best as the output amplified pulse can achieve excellent flatness within the square shape. Considering the bandwidth constraint of practical electronics, we examined high-frequency component cut-off effect of input pulses and found that the optimized cubic input pulses with 300MHz bandwidth is still quite acceptable to satisfy the requirement for the amplified output pulse and it is feasible to establish such a pulse generator in real applications.

  13. Characterization and analysis of a pulse power system based on Marx generator and Blumlein.

    PubMed

    Durga Praveen Kumar, D; Mitra, S; Senthil, K; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K V; Singh, S K; Mondal, J; Roy, Amitava; Chakravarthy, D P

    2007-11-01

    A pulse power system (1 MV, 50 kA, and 100 ns) based on Marx generator and Blumlein pulse forming line has been studied for characterization of a general system. Total erected Marx inductance and series resistance are calculated from modular testing of Marx generator and testing of Marx generator with Blumlein. The complete pulse power system has been tested with the termination of a liquid resistor load for finding the Blumlein characteristic impedance. Equivalent electrical circuits during the charging and discharging of the Blumlein are constructed from the characterized parameters of the system. These equivalent circuits can be used in the analysis of prepulse voltage and droop in the flat top of the main pulse in the pulse power systems based on Marx generator and Blumlein. PMID:18052504

  14. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    PubMed

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power. PMID:24007048

  15. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh, P. H.; Trong, V. D.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  16. Differentiating youth who are bullied from other victims of peer-aggression: the importance of differential power and repetition

    PubMed Central

    Ybarra, Michele L.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Mitchell, Kimberly J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Examine whether: 1) among youth who report being bullied, differential power and repetition are useful in identifying youth who are more or less affected by the victimization experience; and 2) bullying and more generalized peer aggression are distinct or overlapping constructs. Methods Data for the Teen Health and Technology (THT) study were collected online between August 2010 and January 2011 from 3,989 13–18 year olds. Data from the Growing up with Media (GuwM) study (Wave 3) were collected online in 2008 from 1,157 12–17 year olds. Results In the THT study, youth who reported neither differential power nor repetition had the lowest rates of interference with daily functioning. Youth who reported either differential power or repetition had higher rates; but the highest rates of interference with daily functioning were observed among youth who reported both differential power and repetition. In the GuwM study, youth were victims of online generalized peer aggression (30%) or both online generalized peer aggression and cyberbullying (16%), but rarely cyberbullying alone (1%). Conclusions Both differential power and repetition are key in identifying youth who are bullied and at particular risk for concurrent psychosocial challenge. Each feature needs to be measured directly. Generalized peer aggression appears to be a broader form of violence compared to bullying. It needs to be recognized that youth who are victimized but do not meet the criteria of bullying have elevated rates of problems. They are an important, albeit non-bullied, group of victimized youth to be included in research. PMID:24726463

  17. A new digital pulse power supply in heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongkun; Chen, Youxin; Huang, Yuzhen; Gao, Daqing; Zhou, Zhongzu; Yan, Huaihai; Zhao, Jiang; Shi, Chunfeng; Wu, Fengjun; Yan, Hongbin; Xia, Jiawen; Yuan, Youjin

    2013-11-01

    To meet the increasing requirements of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), a new digital pulse power supply, which employs multi-level converter, was designed. This power supply was applied with a multi H-bridge converters series-parallel connection topology. A new control model named digital power supply regulator system (DPSRS) was proposed, and a pulse power supply prototype based on DPSRS has been built and tested. The experimental results indicate that tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of this design. The achievement of prototype provides a perfect model for HIRFL-CSR power supply system.

  18. Long term survival of mice with hepatocellular carcinoma after pulse power ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhuang, J; Kolb, J F; Schoenbach, K H; Beebe, S J

    2012-02-01

    Novel therapies are needed for treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without recurrence in a single procedure. In this work we evaluated anti-neoplastic effects of a pulse power ablation (PPA) with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), a non-thermal, non-drug, local, regional method and investigated its molecular mechanisms for hepatocellular carcinoma tumor ablation in vivo. An ectopic tumor model was established using C57BL/6 mice with Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Pulses with durations of 30 or 100 ns and fast rise times were delivered by a needle or ring electrode with different electric field strengths (33, 50 and 68 kV/cm), and 900 pulses in three treatment sessions (300 pulses each session) or a single 900 pulse treatment. Treated and control tumor volumes were monitored by ultrasound and apoptosis and angiogenesis markers were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Seventy five percent of primary hepatocellular carcinoma tumors were eradicated with 900 hundred pulses at 100 ns pulses at 68 kV/cm in a single treatment or in three treatment sessions without recurrence within 9 months. Using quantitative analysis, tumors in treated animals showed nsPEF-mediated nuclear condensation (3 h post-pulse), cell shrinkage (1 h), increases in active executioner caspases (caspase-3 > -7 > -6) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end-labeling (1 h) with decreases in vascular endothelial growth factor expression (7d) and micro-vessel density (14d). NsPEF ablation eliminated hepatocellular carcinoma tumors by targeting two therapeutic sites, apoptosis induction and inhibition of angiogenesis, both important cancer hallmarks. These data indicate that PPA with nsPEFs is not limited to treating skin cancers and provide a rationale for continuing to investigate pulse power ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma using other models in pre-clinical applications and ultimately in clinical trials. Based on present treatments for specific HCC stages, it

  19. Thor: Modeling of a Megabar Class Pulsed Power Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, T. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Stygar, W. A.; Brown, J. L.; Davis, J.-P.; Waisman, E. M.

    2015-06-01

    Thor is a compact, economical machine to drive megabar-class shockless compression material physics experiments and multi-mega-ampere HEDP experiments for the physics community. It is capable of driving peak currents up to 7 MA with rise times of 200-500 ns, resulting in material pressures between 1 to 5 Mbar depending upon the load design, and incorporates a pulse tailoring capability required to maintain shockless loading of many materials. Thor is modular in nature with 200 capacitive bricks triggered in groups by independent, de-coupled switches. The current pulse at the load is a simple linear combination of the 200 time-shifted basis pulses. This enables a variety of experiments including shockless compression experiments using smooth ramped pulses, shock-ramp compression experiments using tailored pulses, and strength measurement experiments using flat top pulses. This paper overviews the Thor design and describes an equivalent circuit model of the machine that drives MHD simulations of the load region. 3D ALEGRA MHD simulations explore topics such as the uniformity of the magnetic field along the stripline load and the design modifications to improve uniformity. Optimized current drives and simulations of the aforementioned applications are also presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Feasibility study of an intense pulsed neutron source based on a powerful electron accelerator and a pulsed nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bosamykin, V.S.; Voinov, M.A.; Gordeev, V.S.; Kuvshinov, M.I.; Morunov, K.A.; Pavlovskii, A.I.; Selemir, V.D.

    1995-12-31

    A promising candidate for a highly intense neutron source is a system coupling a powerful pulsed electron accelerator and a pulsed fast-neutron nuclear reactor. The LIU-10-GIR complex, located at the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), is described. Experiments were carried out during 1984--1990 to study the joint operation of these two widely differing physical systems and resolve basic scientific research problems. Experimental results are given, and the potential use of such a system as an intense neutron source is suggested.

  1. Modeling of High Efficiency Solar Cells Under Laser Pulse for Power Beaming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells may be used as receivers for laser power beaming. To understand the behavior of solar cells when illuminated by a pulsed laser, the time response of gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells to pulsed monochromatic input has been modeled using a finite element solar cell model.

  2. Propagation of high-power microwave pulses in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.; Kossey, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A chamber experiment is conducted to study the propagation of high-power microwave pulses through the air. Two mechanisms responsible for two different degrees of tail erosion have been identified experimentally. The optimum pulse amplitude for maximum energy transfer through the air has also been determined.

  3. Pulse power generated electric fields as a means to control zebra mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, A.G.; Lange, C.L.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, a study was conducted to determine if pulsed electric fields could reduce zebra mussel settlement rates. The study was a continuation of a study that began in 1991. Several types of fields were generated over the four-year study. The 1994 study concluded that fast rise DC, pulse power signals could stun post-veligers and significantly reduce settlement.

  4. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  5. Influence of the cubic spectral phase of high-power laser pulses on their self-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, V. N.; Kochetkov, A. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.; Mironov, S. Yu; Shaykin, A. A.; Khazanov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral broadening of high-power transform-limited laser pulses under self-phase modulation in a medium with cubic nonlinearity is widely used to reduce pulse duration and to increase its power. It is shown that the cubic spectral phase of the initial pulse leads to a qualitatively different broadening of its spectrum: the spectrum has narrow peaks and broadening decreases. However, the use of chirped mirrors allows such pulses to be as effectively compressed as transform-limited pulses.

  6. Megawatt-scale average-power ultrashort pulses in an enhancement cavity.

    PubMed

    Carstens, H; Lilienfein, N; Holzberger, S; Jocher, C; Eidam, T; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A; Weitenberg, J; Yost, D C; Alghamdi, A; Alahmed, Z; Azzeer, A; Apolonski, A; Fill, E; Krausz, F; Pupeza, I

    2014-05-01

    We investigate power scaling of ultrashort-pulse enhancement cavities. We propose a model for the sensitivity of a cavity design to thermal deformations of the mirrors due to the high circulating powers. Using this model and optimized cavity mirrors, we demonstrate 400 kW of average power with 250 fs pulses and 670 kW with 10 ps pulses at a central wavelength of 1040 nm and a repetition rate of 250 MHz. These results represent an average power improvement of one order of magnitude compared to state-of-the-art systems with similar pulse durations and will thus benefit numerous applications such as the further scaling of tabletop sources of hard x rays (via Thomson scattering of relativistic electrons) and of soft x rays (via high harmonic generation). PMID:24784054

  7. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data of the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  8. Quasitransient backward Raman amplification of powerful laser pulses in dense plasmas with multicharged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, V. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-07-01

    The range of plasma parameters, where the efficient quasitransient backward Raman amplification (QBRA) of powerful laser pulses is possible, is determined for dense plasmas with multicharged ions. Approximate scalings that portray in a simple way the efficient QBRA range in multidimensional parameter space are found. The calculation, applicable to infrared, ultraviolet, soft x-ray, and x-ray laser pulses, takes into account plasma heating by the lasers. It is shown that efficient QBRA can survive even the nonsaturated linear Landau damping of the Langmuir wave mediating the energy transfer from the pump to the seed laser pulse; moreover, this survival does not require very intense seed laser pulses.

  9. Generation of high-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulses in a system with a coaxial tem horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. P.; Korovin, S. D.; Pegel', I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Stepchenko, A. S.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    1996-12-01

    A coaxial TEM horn was designed on the basis of results from nonstationary computer modeling using code KARAT. With its high dielectric strength, this antenna is capable of radiating high-power ultrawideband nanosecond pulses. The pulse source used was a compact generator built around a coaxial forming line with a built-in Tesla transformer, which shapes pulses up to 1 GW high at repetition frequencies up to 1 kHz. The amplitude of the pulses on a matched load was 20 kV at a duration of 4 nsec. Returns of ultrawideband signals from objects with simple geometric shapes were studied in laboratory experiments using this radiator.

  10. Optical ablation by high-power short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Herman, S.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D.

    1996-02-01

    Laser-induced damage threshold measurements were performed on homogeneous and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations {tau} ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Gold coatings were found, both experimentally and theoretically, to be limited to 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, we find qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling that indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional heating and melting for {tau}{approx_gt}50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production by multiphoton ionization, joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulse-width and the wavelength scaling of experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}