Science.gov

Sample records for pulsed slow positron

  1. Possibilities with pulsed polarized high density slow positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, A. P., Jr.

    2014-04-01

    A particularly bright and intense polarized slow positron beam could be formed from isotopically enriched 79Kr produced at a reactor. After moderation with solid Ne, accumulation, compression, and bunching, this type of positron beam would enable a number of experiments including: (1) Long term storage of a neutral polarized electron-positron plasma in a cold box; (2) Pulsed e+ ACAR with a pulsed magnet to measure Fermi surfaces of paramagnetic metals; (3) Single shot measurements of positron annihilation in laser-imploding plasmas; (4) Study of a spin-polarized positronium gas at a density around that of ordinary air to produce a Ps Bose-Einstein condensate at room temperature; (5) High energy polarized positron channelling experiments to study polarized electron spatial wave functions in ferromagnets; and (6) Study of supersonic free expansion spin polarized BEC Ps jets formed from, for example, 1011 m=1 triplet Ps atoms created within an open ended 1 μm diameter cylindrical cavity 100 μm in length.

  2. Optimization of the profile of a pulsed slow positron beam extracted from a buffer-gas positron trap for the production of a variable energy positronium beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladen, R.; Michishio, K.; Chiari, L.; Oshima, N.; Nagashima, Y.

    In this poster we will present some details of steps taken to optimize the beam profile of a pulsed slow positron beam extracted from a buffer-gas positron trap. The beam will be employed for the production of a novel positronium beam by the acceleration and photodetachment of positronium negative ions. The TUS group is planning on using this beam to study positronium diffraction from solid surfaces, providing a unique neutral-particle spectroscopic method with several advantages over conventional neutral-particle spectroscopy, such as a reduced particle mass and, hence, the reduction of damage to the sample surface This work was performed at the Tokyo University of Science. The visit of R. G. to the laboratory was sponsored in part by the NSF EAPSI fellowship and the JSPS Summer Program.

  3. Intense source of slow positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, P.; Rosowsky, A.

    2004-10-01

    We describe a novel design for an intense source of slow positrons based on pair production with a beam of electrons from a 10 MeV accelerator hitting a thin target at a low incidence angle. The positrons are collected with a set of coils adapted to the large production angle. The collection system is designed to inject the positrons into a Greaves-Surko trap (Phys. Rev. A 46 (1992) 5696). Such a source could be the basis for a series of experiments in fundamental and applied research and would also be a prototype source for industrial applications, which concern the field of defect characterization in the nanometer scale.

  4. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  5. Slow-Positron Generator For Studying Polymer Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; St. Clair, Terry L.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1992-01-01

    Aspects of molecular structures probed by positron-annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Slow-positron-beam generator suitable for PAS measurements in thin polymer films. Includes Na22 source of positrons and two moderators made of well-annealed tungsten foil. With proper choice of voltage, positrons emitted by inward-facing surfaces of moderators made to stop in polymer films tested.

  6. Production of slow-positron beams with an electron linac

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.; Stanek, M.

    1982-03-26

    Intense, pulsed beams of low-energy positrons have been produced by a high-energy beam from an electron linac. The production efficiency for low-energy positrons has been determined for electrons with 60 to 120 MeV energy, low-energy positron beams from a linac can be of much higher intensity than those beams currently derived from radioactive sources.

  7. Optimization of drift bias in an UHV based pulsed positron beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Anto, C. Varghese; Rajaraman, R.; Rao, G. Venugopal; Abhaya, S.; Parimala, J.; Amarendra, G.

    2012-06-05

    We report here the design of ultra high vacuum (UHV) compatible pulsed positron beam lifetime system, which combines the principles of a conventional slow positron beam and RF based pulsing scheme. The mechanical design and construction of the UHV system to house the beam has been completed and it has been tested for a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -10} mbar. The voltages applied to the drift tube as a function of positron energies have been optimized using SIMION.

  8. Applications of slow positrons to cancer research: Search for selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Y. C.; Li, Ying; Liu, Gaung; Chen, Hongmin; Zhang, Junjie; Gadzia, Joseph E.

    2006-02-01

    Slow positrons and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been applied to medical research in searching for positron annihilation selectivity to cancer cells. We report the results of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening energy spectroscopies in human skin samples with and without cancer as a function of positron incident energy (up to 8 μm depth) and found that the positronium annihilates at a significantly lower rate and forms at a lower probability in the samples having either basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) than in the normal skin. The significant selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer may open a new research area of developing positron annihilation spectroscopy as a novel medical tool to detect cancer formation externally and non-invasively at the early stages.

  9. Design of a pulsed positron system at Trombay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Maheshwari, Priya; Gupta, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    We present here the design of a pulsed beam setup to deliver narrow time width positron pulses. The major constituents of the setup include- 22Na radioactive source and moderator assembly, ExB deflector for filtering out high energy positron and gamma rays, chopper-prebuncher-buncher assembly for time bunching of the slow positrons. In the ExB section, crossed electric and magnetic fields guide the slow positrons through an off-centered hole in a tungsten block. The initial beam will then be time bunched by using a reflection type chopper and a double gap prebuncher. The main buncheris designed as a quarter wave resonator with base frequency of 150 MHz.To prevent the sagging of the cantilevered inner tube of the resonator, we will support the inner conductor using an alumina post. There will be provision of tuning the frequency by using a tuner made of conducting material. The incident beam energy will be varied by biasing the sample.

  10. A low-neutron background slow-positron source.

    SciTech Connect

    White, M. M.

    1998-10-09

    The addition of a thermionic rf gun [1] and a photocathode rf gun will allow the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator (linac) [2] [3] to become a free-electron laser (FEL) driver [4]. As the FEL project progresses, the existing high-charge DC thermionic gun will no longer be critical to APS operation and could be used to generate high-energy or low-energy electrons to drive a slow-positron source. We investigated possibilities to create a useful low-energy source that could operate semi-independently and would have a low neutron background.

  11. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Preface These proceedings arose from the 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques (SLOPOS12), which was held on Magnetic Island, North Queensland, Australia, between 1-6th August 2010. Meetings in the SLOPOS series are held (roughly) every three years and have now been held on (almost) all continents, indicating the truly international nature of the field. SLOPOS12 marked the second time that the Workshop had been held in the southern hemisphere, and the first time in Australia. SLOPOS12 attracted 122 delegates from 16 countries. Most encouraging was the attendance of 28 student delegates, and that about half of the overall delegates were early career researchers - a good sign for the future of our field. We also enjoyed the company of more than a dozen partners and families of delegates. In a slight departure from previous SLOPOS meetings, the International Advisory Committee approved a broader scope of scientific topics for inclusion in the program for the 2010 Workshop. This broader scope was intended to capture the applications of positrons in atomic, molecular and biomedical areas and was encapsulated in the byeline for SLOPOS-12: The 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques for Solids, Surfaces, Atoms and Molecules. The scientific and social program for the meeting ran over 6 days with delegates gathering on Sunday August 1st and departing on August 6th. The scientific program included plenary, invited, contributed and student lectures, the latter being the subject of a student prize. In all there were 53 oral presentations during the week. There were also two poster sessions, with 63 posters exhibited, and a prize was awarded for the best poster by a student delegate. The standard of the student presentations, both oral and posters, was outstanding, so much so that the judging panel recommended an additional number of prizes be awarded. Topics that were the focus of invited presentations and contributed papers at

  12. Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-08-25

    We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

  13. A new scheme to accumulate positrons in a Penning-Malmberg trap with a linac-based positron pulsed source

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, P.

    2013-03-19

    The Gravitational Behaviour of Antimatter at Rest experiment (GBAR) is designed to perform a direct measurement of the weak equivalence principle on antimatter by measuring the acceleration of anti-hydrogen atoms in the gravitational field of the Earth. The experimental scheme requires a high density positronium (Ps) cloud as a target for antiprotons, provided by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility at CERN. The Ps target will be produced by a pulse of few 10{sup 10} positrons injected onto a positron-positronium converter. For this purpose, a slow positron source using an electron Linac has been constructed at Saclay. The present flux is comparable with that of {sup 22}Na-based sources using solid neon moderator. A new positron accumulation scheme with a Penning-Malmberg trap has been proposed taking advantage of the pulsed time structure of the beam. In the trap, the positrons are cooled by interaction with a dense electron plasma. The overall trapping efficiency has been estimated to be {approx}70% by numerical simulations.

  14. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Preface These proceedings arose from the 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques (SLOPOS12), which was held on Magnetic Island, North Queensland, Australia, between 1-6th August 2010. Meetings in the SLOPOS series are held (roughly) every three years and have now been held on (almost) all continents, indicating the truly international nature of the field. SLOPOS12 marked the second time that the Workshop had been held in the southern hemisphere, and the first time in Australia. SLOPOS12 attracted 122 delegates from 16 countries. Most encouraging was the attendance of 28 student delegates, and that about half of the overall delegates were early career researchers - a good sign for the future of our field. We also enjoyed the company of more than a dozen partners and families of delegates. In a slight departure from previous SLOPOS meetings, the International Advisory Committee approved a broader scope of scientific topics for inclusion in the program for the 2010 Workshop. This broader scope was intended to capture the applications of positrons in atomic, molecular and biomedical areas and was encapsulated in the byeline for SLOPOS-12: The 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques for Solids, Surfaces, Atoms and Molecules. The scientific and social program for the meeting ran over 6 days with delegates gathering on Sunday August 1st and departing on August 6th. The scientific program included plenary, invited, contributed and student lectures, the latter being the subject of a student prize. In all there were 53 oral presentations during the week. There were also two poster sessions, with 63 posters exhibited, and a prize was awarded for the best poster by a student delegate. The standard of the student presentations, both oral and posters, was outstanding, so much so that the judging panel recommended an additional number of prizes be awarded. Topics that were the focus of invited presentations and contributed papers at

  15. PREFACE: 13th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques and Applications (SLOPOS13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    These proceedings originate from the 13th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques and Applications SLOPOS13 which was held at the campus of the Technische Universität München in Garching between 15th-20th September, 2013. This event is part of a series of triennial SLOPOS conferences. In total 123 delegates from 21 countries participated in the SLOPOS13. The excellent scientific program comprised 50 talks and 58 posters presented during two poster sessions. It was very impressive to learn about novel technical developments on positron beam facilities and the wide range of their applications all over the world. The workshop reflected the large variety of positron beam experiments covering fundamental studies, e.g., for efficient production of anti-hydrogen as well as applied research on defects in bulk materials, thin films, surfaces, and interfaces. The topics comprised: . Positron transport and beam technology . Pulsed beams and positron traps . Defect profiling in bulk and layered structures . Nanostructures, porous materials, thin films . Surfaces and interfaces . Positronium formation and emission . Positron interactions with atoms and molecules . Many positrons and anti-hydrogen . Novel experimental techniques The international advisory committee of SLOPOS awarded student prizes for the best presented scientific contributions to a team of students from Finland, France, and the NEPOMUC team at TUM. The conference was overshadowed by the sudden death of Professor Klaus Schreckenbach immediately before the workshop. In commemoration of him as a spiritus rectus of the neutron induced positron source a minutes' silence was hold. We are most grateful for the hard work of the Local Organising Committee, the help of the International Advisory Committee, and all the students for their friendly and efficient support during the meeting. The workshop could not have occurred without the generous support of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Deutsche

  16. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I.; Gidley, David W.

    2013-04-01

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e+-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e+-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  17. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I.; Gidley, David W.

    2013-04-19

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  18. Making relativistic positrons using ultraintense short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Bonlie, J. D.; Chen, S. N.; Cone, K. V.; Elberson, L. N.; Price, D. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Van Maren, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gregori, G.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes a new positron source using ultraintense short pulse lasers. Although it has been theoretically studied since the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons/s ejected at the back of approximately millimeter thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short (approx1 ps) ultraintense (approx1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser-based positron source with its unique characteristics may complement the existing sources based on radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  19. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  20. Positron Creation Using the TITAN Short Pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Liang, E.; Myatt, J.; Cone, K.; Elberson, L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Schneider, M.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D.; Tommasini, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2008-11-01

    Using ultra-intense lasers to generate positrons was theorized some time ago[1] and demonstrated in principle in two previous experiments[2] where small numbers of positrons were measured. Recently, new experiments were performed on the LLNL Titan laser to study positron creation, where the laser pulse length, pre-plasma condition, target material and thickness were varied. Using newly built positron spectrometers, copious positron production was observed with good signal-to-background ratio. Hot electron spectra (out to 100 MeV) and bremsstrahlung photons were measured simultaneously to further constrain models for the experiment. This talk will present detailed experimental results and their comparison with theory and previous experimental data. [1] Shearer et al, PRA,(1973);Liang, AIP Conf. Proc.(1994); Shkolnikov et al, APL,(1997), Liang, Wilks and Tabak, PRL(1998); Nakashima and Takabe, PoP,(2002); Myatt et al,PRE (2008).[2] Cowan et al, LPB(1999); Gahn et al, APL(1998)

  1. High-Intensity Continuous Wave Slow Positron Source at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel concept of an electron linac-based slow positron source with projected intensity on the order of 10^10 slow e^+/s. The key components of this concept are a Continuous Wave (CW) electron beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of positrons into a field-free area through a magnetic field terminator plug for moderation in a solid Neon moderator. The feasibility calculations were completed in the framework of GEANT4 simulation and OPERA-3D magnetic field calculation code.

  2. A high intensity slow positron facility for the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    A slow positron spectroscopy facility, based on {sup 64}Cu activation, has been designed for incorporation in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The ANS is a reactor-based research center planned for construction at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Multiple sources of slow positron beams will be available. One-half mm diameter, copper-coated aluminum microspheres will be activated and transported to a positron spectroscopy building, where they will be dispersed over the surfaces of horizontal pans, 0.1 m{sup 2} in area, located in source chambers. Fast positrons from the pans will be intercepted by cylinders coated inside with inert gas moderators. Yields will approach 10{sup 12} positrons per second before brightness enhancement. Beams will be transported to multiple experiment stations, which will include a 50 meter diameter, 20-detector angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) spectrometer, and other equipment for materials analysis and fundamental science.

  3. A high intensity slow positron facility for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-07-01

    A slow positron spectroscopy facility, based on {sup 64}Cu activation, has been designed for incorporation in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The ANS is a reactor-based research center planned for construction at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Multiple sources of slow positron beams will be available. One-half mm diameter, copper-coated aluminum microspheres will be activated and transported to a positron spectroscopy building, where they will be dispersed over the surfaces of horizontal pans, 0.1 m{sup 2} in area, located in source chambers. Fast positions from the pans will be intercepted by cylinders coated inside with inert gas moderators. Yields will approach 10{sup 12} positrons per second before brightness enhancement. Beams will be transported to multiple experiment stations, which will include a 50 meter diameter, 20-detector angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) spectrometer, and other equipment for materials analysis and fundamental science.

  4. Monte Carlo analysis of germanium detector performance in slow positron beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikinheimo, J.; Tuominen, R.; Tuomisto, F.

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy is one of the most popular positron annihilation vacancy characterization techniques in experimental materials research. The measurements are often carried out with a slow positron beam setup, which enables depth profiling of the samples. The key measurement devices of Doppler broadening spectroscopy setups are high-purity germanium detectors. Since Doppler broadening spectroscopy is one of the standard techniques in defect characterization, there is a demand to evaluate different kinds of factors that might have an effect on the results. Here we report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of detector response in different geometries and compare the data to experiments.

  5. Studies of slow-positron production using low-energy primary electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.

    1999-04-20

    Slow-positron beams produced from negative-work-function solid-state moderators have found numerous applications in condensed matter physics. There are potential advantages in using low-energy primary electron beams for positron production, including reduced radiation damage to single-crystal moderators and reduced activation of nearby components. We present numerical calculations of positron yields and other beam parameters for various target-moderator configurations using the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) [1] and Advanced Photon Source (APS) [2] electron linacs [3] as examples of sources for the primary electron beams. The status of experiments at these facilities is reviewed.

  6. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin; Xu, Jun

    2009-03-10

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow ({approx}3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10{sup 8} positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  7. Slow positron beam study of hydrogen ion implanted ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Xue, Xudong; Wu, Yichu

    2014-08-01

    The effects of hydrogen related defect on the microstructure and optical property of ZnO thin films were investigated by slow positron beam, in combination with x-ray diffraction, infrared and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The defects were introduced by 90 keV proton irradiation with doses of 1×1015 and 1×1016 ions cm-2. Zn vacancy and OH bonding (VZn+OH) defect complex were identified in hydrogen implanted ZnO film by positron annihilation and infrared spectroscopy. The formation of these complexes led to lattice disorder in hydrogen implanted ZnO film and suppressed the luminescence process.

  8. Slow positron beam facility for investigations of plastically deformed metals and surface crystallization of silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heußer, H.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Wider, T.; Maier, K.

    1999-08-01

    The simple slow positron facility at Bonn university and two recent experiments are presented. The following data briefly summarises the technical specifications of the instrument: overall size: 150×150×80 cm 3positron source: 22Na (10 mCi) moderator: Kr (solid)energy filter: magnetic solenoid at 150 eV transport energyvacuum: high vacuum (10 -6 hPa) spot size: 3 mmcount rate: 3000 s -1 in 511 keV photopeak with BGO detector in coincidence for background suppression energy range: 0.15 to 12 keV with the sample at ground potential A sapphire plate which has, at 40 K (close to the moderator temperature of 37 K), a thermal conductivity comparable to that of copper (!) ensures both the electrical isolation and the thermal contact between the positron source and the He cryostat. With the moderator directly frozen onto the 22Na source the instrument reaches an efficiency better than 10 -4. Slow positrons are extremely sensitive probes for investigations on microstructure and on the onset of surface crystallization of anorganic glasses. The formation of crystallization nuclei on the surface and the growth of the nuclei into the bulk material was investigated on amorphous SiO 2. To this end specimens of amorphous silica were isothermally tempered at a temperature of 1773 K. In another experiment the back diffusion of positrons as a function of penetration depth was studied on weakly tensile deformed aluminium polycrystals. The role of dislocations and their effect on the mobility of positrons is in the center of this investigation.

  9. The Intense Slow Positron Source concept: A theoretical perspective on a proposed INEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Makowitz, H.; Abrashoff, J.D.; Landman, W.H.; Albano, R.K.; Tajima, T.; Larson, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    An analysis has been performed of the INEL Intense Slow Positron Source (ISPS) concept. The results of the theoretical study are encouraging. A full-scale device with a monoenergetic 5 KeV positron beam of {ge}10{sup 12} e{sup +}/s on a {le}0.03-cmdiameter target appears feasible and can be obtained within the existing infrastructure of INEL reactor facilities. A 30.0-cm-diameter, large area source dish, moderated at first with thin crystalline W films and later by solid Ne, is proposed as the initial device in order to explore problems with a facility scale system. A demonstration scale beam at {ge}10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s is proposed using a {sup 58}Co source plated on a 6-cm-diameter source dish insert, placed in a 30- cm adapter.

  10. Dynamic wavelength conversion in copropagating slow-light pulses.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Baba, T

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic wavelength conversion (DWC) is obtained by controlling copropagating slow-light signal and control pulse trajectories. Our method is based on the understanding that conventional resonator-based DWC can be generalized, and is linked to cross-phase modulation. Dispersion-engineered Si photonic crystal waveguides produce such slow-light pulses. Free carriers generated by two-photon absorption of the control pulse dynamically shift the signal wavelength. Matching the group velocities of the two pulses enhances the shift, elongating the interaction length. We demonstrate an extremely large wavelength shift in DWC (4.9 nm blueshift) for the signal wavelength. Although DWC is similar to the Doppler effect, we highlight their essential differences. PMID:24949770

  11. Slow positron study of positronium formation and diffusion in crystalline and amorphous ice

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Eldrup, M.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1984-10-01

    The aim of the present work has been to study the interaction of low energy positrons and of Ps with a molecular solid. As a first example we have chosen ice which has been extensively investigated both by conventional positron annihilation methods as well as by many other techniques. Unlike in metals, positrons injected into most molecular solids may have a certain probability to form Ps in the bulk of the material. The process by which Ps is formed in condensed molecular materials has been a matter of strong debate. According to the Ore model of Ps formation, which is recognized as being valid for low density gases, the positron during its slowing down picks off an electron from a molecule with which it simultaneously forms Ps. For energies below E/sub L/ = I-6.8 eV, where I is the lowest ionisation energy and 6.8 eV is the Ps binding energy in vacuum, this process is not energetically possible. Above an energy E/sub u/ approx. I the model predicts a reduction of the yield of stable Ps, because of rapid slowing down of the positron by ionisation or by splitting up again of a Ps atom which may have been formed. The energy range E/sub L/ less than or equal to E approximately less than E/sub u/ is the so-called Ore gap in gases. In the present work both crystalline and amorphous ice have been studied using positrons of energies in the range 0 to 4.5 keV. The experimental methods used were determination of the yields of 3..gamma..-annihilations as well as Doppler broadening measurements in the temperature range 45 to 150 K. The main results obtained were a determination of the Ps diffusion constant, and a demonstration that in the present experiments one contribution to the total Ps yield comes from positrons with typical Ore gap energies, and another contribution, due to spur processes, from positrons with initial energies of several hundred eV. 57 references, 9 figures.

  12. Slow light in ruby: delaying energy beyond the input pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which light is slowed through ruby has been the subject of great debate. To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the problem in the time domain by modulating a laser beam with a chopper to create a clean square wave. By exploring the trailing edge of the pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby, we can determine whether energy is delayed beyond the input pulse. The effects of a time-varying absorber alone cannot delay energy into the trailing edge of the pulse, as a time-varying absorber can only attenuate a coherent pulse. Therefore, our observation of an increase in intensity at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than just pulse reshaping. In addition, investigating the Fourier components of the modulated square wave shows that harmonic components with different frequencies are delayed by different amounts, regardless of the intensity of the component itself. Understanding the difference in delays of the individual Fourier components of the modulated beam reveals the cause of the distortion the pulse undergoes as it propagates through the ruby.

  13. Conceptual design of a slow positron source based on a magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosov, V. I.; Meshkov, O. I.; Mezentsev, N. A.

    2001-09-01

    A unique 10.3 T superconducting wiggler was designed and manufactured at BINP SB RAS. The installation of this wiggler in the SPring-8 storage ring provides a possibility to generate a high-intensity beam of photons (SR) with energy above 1 MeV (Ando et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 5 (1998) 360). Conversion of photons to positrons on high- Z material (tungsten) targets creates an integrated positron flux more than 10 13 particles per second. The energy spectrum of the positrons has a maximum at 0.5 MeV and the half-width about 1 MeV (Plokhoi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38 (1999) 604). The traditional methods of positron moderation have the efficiency ɛ= Ns/ Nf of 10 -4 (metallic moderators) to 10 -2 (solid rare gas moderators) (Mills and Gullikson, Appl. Phys. Lett. 49 (1986) 1121). The high flux of primary positrons restricts the choice to a tungsten moderator that has ɛ≈10 -4only (Schultz, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. B 30 (1988) 94). The aim of our project is to obtain the moderation efficiency ɛ⩾10 -1. We propose to moderate the positrons inside a multi-stage magnetic trap based on several (3-6) electromagnetic traps that are connected in series. Magnetic field of the traps grows consecutively from stage to stage. We propose to release the positrons from the converter with the use of an additional relativistic electron beam passing in synchronism with the SR pulse in the vicinity of the converter. The average electron beam energy and current are 1-2 MeV and 100 mA, respectively. The electrical field of the beam is high enough to distort the positron paths by an amount comparable with the Larmor radius. The further drift of the positrons to the trap axis will occur due to the strengthening of the magnetic field. The magnetic field amplitude of adjacent traps varies in time in the antiphase and increases from 0.9 T in the first stage to 6 T in the last one. The positron transition from stage to stage takes place at the moment of the field equalization. The removal

  14. Study on Defects in H+ion Implanted B2 type Fe-Al Alloy using Slow Positron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komagata, S.; Kawasuso, A.; Yabuuchi, A.; Maekawa, M.; Batchulun, C.; Yasuda, K.; Ishigami, R.; Kume, K.; Iwase, A.; Hori, F.

    Fe48-at.%Al alloy were implanted with 50 keV H+ ions to the fluence of 3×1016 and 1×1018/cm2 at room temperature. Positron annihilation Doppler broadening and lifetime measurements for these alloys have been carried out using slow positron beam apparatus with an energy range of 0.2 to 30.2 keV. The positron annihilation S-parameter decreased by H+ ion irradiation. Also the positron lifetimes for hydrogen deposited region in the alloy decreased by the irradiation. These results show that implanted H atoms were trapped by vacancy type defects.

  15. Source of slow polarized positrons using the brilliant gamma beam at ELI-NP. Converter design and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djourelov, Nikolay; Oprisa, Andreea; Leca, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of slow positron (es+) source based on interaction of a circularly polarized gamma beam with a W converter were performed. The aim of the study was to propose a converter geometry and to determine the expected slow positron beam intensity and its spot size, and the degree of positron spin polarization, as well. The Monte Carlo simulations by means of GEANT4 were used to estimate the fast positron production and the moderation efficiency of the converter working as a self-moderator, as well. Finite element analysis by means of COMSOL Multiphysics was applied to calculate the fraction of extracted moderated positrons from the converter cells and the quality of the beam formation by focusing. Using the low energy (<3.5 MeV) gamma beam at ELI-NP with intensity of 2.4×1010γ/s the production of a slow positron beam with intensity of 1-2×106 es+/s is predicted. For the optimized converter geometry and in case of 100% circular polarization of the gammas the degree of spin polarization of the slow positron beam is expected to be 33%.

  16. Intense positron beam at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yagishita, Akira; Enomoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Shidara, Tetsuo; Shirakawa, Akihiro; Nakahara, Kazuo; Saitou, Haruo; Inoue, Kouji; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Inoue, Yoshi; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Doyama, Masao

    2000-08-01

    A positron beam is a useful probe for investigating the electronic states in solids, especially concerning the surface states. The advantage of utilizing positron beams is in their simpler interactions with matter, owing to the absence of any exchange forces, in contrast to the case of low-energy electrons. However, such studies as low-energy positron diffraction, positron microscopy and positronium (Ps) spectroscopy, which require high intensity slow-positron beams, are very limited due to the poor intensity obtained from a conventional radioactive-isotope-based positron source. In conventional laboratories, the slow-positron intensity is restricted to 10 6 e +/s due to the strength of the available radioactive source. An accelerator based slow-positron source is a good candidate for increasing the slow-positron intensity. One of the results using a high intensity pulsed positron beam is presented as a study of the origins of a Ps emitted from SiO 2. We also describe the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) measurement system with slow-positron beams and a positron microscope.

  17. Slow processes in startup scenarios of long-pulse gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Sinitsyn, O. V.; Antonsen, T. M. Jr.; Vlasov, A. N.; Cauffman, S. R.; Felch, K. L.

    2006-08-15

    A gyrotron startup scenario describes the variation of gyrotron parameters during onset of a pulse. This typically includes variations in beam parameters during the voltage rise, in the course of which the operating mode is excited and then driven to high efficiency operation while suppressing other parasitic modes. For long-pulse gyrotrons, however, additional processes with longer time constants should also be considered as part of the startup scenario. Such slow processes include ion neutralization of the beam space charge, thermal expansion of cavity walls caused by their ohmic heating, and reduction of the beam current due to emission cooling of the cathode. In the present paper, we analyze the importance of these effects on the stability and efficiency of gyrotron operation.

  18. Design of a Pulsed Flux Concentrator for the ILC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Abbott, R; Brown, C; Javedani, J; Piggott, W T; Clarke, J

    2010-05-17

    The Positron Source for the International Linear Collider requires an optical matching device after the target to increase the capture efficiency for positrons. Pulsed flux concentrators have been used by previous machines to improve the capture efficiency but the ILC has a 1 ms long pulse train which is too long for a standard flux concentrator. A pulsed flux concentrator with a 40 ms flat top was created for a hyperon experiment in 1965 which used liquid nitrogen cooling to reduce the resistance of the concentrating plates and extend the lifetime of the pulse. We report on a design for a 1 ms device based on this concept.

  19. ION SOLITARY PULSES IN WARM PLASMAS WITH ULTRARELATIVISTIC DEGENERATE ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zeba, I.; Moslem, W. M.; Shukla, P. K. E-mail: zeba.israr@rub.de E-mail: wmm@tp4.rub.de

    2012-05-01

    The nonlinear propagation of ion solitary pulses in a warm collisionless electron-positron-ion plasma with ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons has been investigated. Arbitrary and small- (but finite-) amplitude ion solitary pulses are investigated by deriving the Korteweg-de Vries equation and an energy-balance-like expression involving a Sagdeev-like pseudopotential. The existence regions for ion solitary pulses have been precisely defined and numerically investigated. The ion solitary pulse profiles are also displayed. Applications to the interior of white dwarf stars and the corona of magnetars are discussed.

  20. High performance hybrid slow positron beam and its user application spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeber, W. B.; Shi, M.

    1997-05-01

    A true hybrid beam is operational at PSI. From a β+ radioisotope source and a premoderation of the positrons to medium energies in a high magnetic field confinement of Tesla order, a 3 keV wide spectrum of positrons is extracted and adiabatically guided to low fields of less than 100 G allowing extraction in a highly efficient and quasi-divergency-free way into field free space by increasing the positron's transverse energy spread by less than 20 eV. Double electrostatic focussing followed each time by W-remoderators (air lock anneal is possible) results in a beam diameter of μm dimensions. The microbeam is then transported through a cylindrical mirror beam switch device to five different user ports (one at a time, within minutes). The first target station is equipped with a retractable beam gun and a high precision sample manipulator with six movements for low (-200°C) and high (+950°C) temperatures (sample introduction by an air lock system). At the target chamber a UHV of 3.5 × 10 -11 mbar has been reached and the chamber can be equipped for surface physics experiments, for example to perform PAES. The sample is always at ground potential and the beam energy can be tuned between a few eV and 60 keV. The facility, initially equipped with a source of 500 mCi 58Co, produces a monoenergetic beam intensity (energy spread < 2 eV) at the target of 3 × 10 6 e +/s with an average transverse phase space corresponding to 100 μm × 50 mrad. In one of the user ports an optional 7 mm diameter beam of intensity 10 7 e +/s will be available. Initial beam experiments and possible applications will be discussed and the full potential of beam performance up-grade (intensity > 10 10e+/ s, pulsing, repolarization) will be outlined.

  1. Implantation-caused open volume defects in Ge after flash lamp annealing (FLA) probed by slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwand, W.; Skorupa, W.; Schumann, Th.; Posselt, M.; Schmidt, B.; Grötzschel, R.; Brauer, G.

    2008-10-01

    B + and P + ions were implanted into Ge wafers covered with a pre-amorphised surface layer of 150 nm. After this, flash lamp annealing (FLA) in Ar atmosphere was used as post-implantation heat treatment. Radiation with Xenon flash lamps, having a spectrum in the visible range of light and a pulse length of 3 ms or 20 ms, allowed an ultra-short heating up of the near surface region. In this way, a modification of the structure of the as-implanted amorphous Ge layer was possible. Depth profiles of defects, especially those of the vacancy-type, were investigated by slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) before and after FLA. It was found that the remaining vacancy-type defect structure depends on the parameters of the process of heat treatment, and that these defects could not be completely removed by FLA. Results are compared with such from SRIM 2006 calculations (stopping and range of ions in matter) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS).

  2. Novel pulsed particle accelerator for energy dependent positron re-emission experiments.

    PubMed

    Grill, Niklas; Piochacz, Christian; Zimnik, Samantha; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    We report on a novel device for particle acceleration based on elevation of the potential energy of beam pulses. This so-called energy elevator is particularly beneficial if both the particle source and the sample have to be near ground potential due to experimental constraints. We applied this new technique to enable depth dependent measurements of re-emitted positrons using the surface spectrometer at the NEPOMUC positron beam facility. First, a two-stage bunching system is used to generate positron pulses with a repetition rate of 5 MHz and a duration of 1.663(5) ns before their energy is raised to several keV. The whole system was shown to work with an exceptional efficiency of 88%. We demonstrated the usability of our setup by investigating the positron re-emission spectra of Ni and Pd as function of positron implantation energy. For Ni the positron work function could be determined to be ΦNi (+)=-1.4(2)eV. In addition, as predicted by theory, our experimental findings imply a positive positron work function for Pd. PMID:27250411

  3. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  4. Radio frequency elevator for a pulsed positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Kögel, Gottfried; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Ackermann, Ulrich; Piochacz, Christian; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-06-01

    An elevator increases the potential energy of a particle beam with respect to ground potential without any alteration of kinetic energy and other beam parameters. This elevator is necessary for the implementation of the Munich Scanning Positron Microscope (SPM) at the intense positron source NEPOMUC at the research reactor FRM II in Munich. The principles of the rf elevator for pure electrostatically guided positrons are described. Measurements of beam quality behind the elevator are reported, which confirm that after the implementation of elevator and SPM at NEPOMUC the SPM can be operated at a considerably improved resolution (~ 0.3 μm) and event rate (~3.7 kHz) compared to the laboratory based β+-source.

  5. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B S; Alonso, A M; Deller, A; Wall, T E; Cassidy, D B

    2015-10-01

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10(5) positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10(7) cm(-3) is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields. PMID:26520934

  6. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B. S. Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Wall, T. E.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2015-10-15

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10{sup 5} positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields.

  7. Magnetic focusing of an intense slow positron beam for enhanced depth-resolved analysis of thin films and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W. H.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Schut, H.; van Veen, A.

    2002-08-01

    The intense reactor-based slow positron beam (POSH) at the Delft research reactor has been coupled to a Two-Dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation (2D-ACAR) setup. The design is discussed with a new target chamber for the 2D-ACAR setup based on Monte Carlo simulations of the positron trajectories, beam energy distribution and beam transmission in an increasing magnetic field gradient. Numerical simulations and experiment show that when the slow positron beam with a FWHM of 11.6 mm travels in an increasing axial magnetic field created by a strong NdFeB permanent magnet, the intensity loss is negligible above ˜6 keV and a focusing factor of 5 in diameter is achieved. Monte Carlo simulations and Doppler broadening experiments in the target region show that in this configuration the 2D-ACAR setup can be used to perform depth sensitive studies of defects in thin films with a high resolution. The positron implantation energy can be varied from 0 to 25 keV before entering the non-uniform magnetic field. 2D-ACAR depth-profiling results in He-irradiated Si obtained with the new setup are presented.

  8. Tungsten moderator of Venetian blinds- and honeycomb-type for the slow positron source on hard synchrotron radiation of SPring-8 storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plokhoi, V. V.; Kandiev, Ya. Z.; Samarin, S. I.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Baidin, G. V.; Litvinenko, I. A.; Nikitin, V. P.

    2001-09-01

    The paper considers designs of moderators where fast positron stopping medium consists of very fine tungsten strips separated by vacuum gaps and the strips are arranged into Venetian blinds- or honeycomb-type structures. Moderator efficiency is evaluated through Monte-Carlo simulations. According to the maximal estimate, the efficiency of conversion of fast positrons into slow ones in the Venetian blinds and honeycomb-type moderators is ˜5×10 -3 for the reasonable thickness of the tungsten foil. If such moderator is used, the intensity of slow positron source on the hard synchrotron of SPring-8 storage ring can reach the level of ˜5×10 10 e +/s.

  9. Status and Perspectives for a Slow Positron Beam Facility at the HH--NIPNE Bucharest

    SciTech Connect

    Straticiuc, Mihai; Craciun, Liviu Stefan; Constantinescu, Olimpiu; Ghita, Ionica Alina; Ionescu, Cristina; Racolta, Petru Mihai; Vasilescu, Angela; Braic, Viorel; Zoita, Catalin; Kiss, Adrian; Bojin, Dionezie

    2009-03-10

    The development of a positron annihilation spectroscopy laboratory at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest-to be used for material studies and applications was started in the last 10 years. In the framework of a national research project extended over the last 3 years, was designed a low energy positron accelerator, as a high-vacuum dedicated beam line with two options: a 25 mCi {sup 22}NaCl source and in line with the NIPNE-cyclotron or a new intense compact cyclotron. The construction of the beam line was planned as a sequence of modules: source- moderator system; magnetical filter for fast positrons in order to select the positrons energies in the range 0.8-1 keV; a modular system for focusing, transport and acceleration of monoenergetic positrons in the energy range 0.8-50 keV and a CDBS analysis chamber. The moderator proposed--is tungsten as a foil of about 3 {mu}m prepared at the Optoelectronics Institute were put into a thermal treatment vacuum chamber and bombarded with electrons from a 100 W electron gun After the treatment, they were tested for changes of elemental composition of the surface and structure at the Polytechnic University. The structure tests were performed on a DRON 3 M diffractometer, with a Co tube ({lambda}{sub K{alpha}} = 1.7903 A) - the angular regions studied were around 34 deg. (1 0 0) and 69 deg. (2 0 0). In the present time, the trajectories of the positron are going to be simulated with dedicated software (an ion and electron optics simulator). For the coincidence measurements (CDBS) set-up we used a home-made {sup 22}NaCl source, by separation without carrier from a metallic Mg target irradiated with 12 MeV protons and separated by columnar cation exchange. A home-made biparametric system for CDBS measurements will be reported, also.

  10. Status and Perspectives for a Slow Positron Beam Facility at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straticiuc, Mihai; Craciun, Liviu Stefan; Constantinescu, Olimpiu; Ghita, Ionica Alina; Ionescu, Cristina; Racolta, Petru Mihai; Vasilescu, Angela; Braic, Viorel; Zoita, Catalin; Kiss, Adrian; Bojin, Dionezie

    2009-03-01

    The development of a positron annihilation spectroscopy laboratory at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest-to be used for material studies and applications was started in the last 10 years. In the framework of a national research project extended over the last 3 years, was designed a low energy positron accelerator, as a high-vacuum dedicated beam line with two options: a 25 mCi 22NaCl source and in line with the NIPNE-cyclotron or a new intense compact cyclotron. The construction of the beam line was planned as a sequence of modules: source- moderator system; magnetical filter for fast positrons in order to select the positrons energies in the range 0.8-1 keV; a modular system for focusing, transport and acceleration of monoenergetic positrons in the energy range 0.8-50 keV and a CDBS analysis chamber. The moderator proposed-is tungsten as a foil of about 3 μm prepared at the Optoelectronics Institute were put into a thermal treatment vacuum chamber and bombarded with electrons from a 100 W electron gun After the treatment, they were tested for changes of elemental composition of the surface and structure at the Polytechnic University. The structure tests were performed on a DRON 3 M diffractometer, with a Co tube (λKα = 1.7903 A)-the angular regions studied were around 34° (1 0 0) and 69° (2 0 0). In the present time, the trajectories of the positron are going to be simulated with dedicated software (an ion and electron optics simulator). For the coincidence measurements (CDBS) set-up we used a home-made 22NaCl source, by separation without carrier from a metallic Mg target irradiated with 12 MeV protons and separated by columnar cation exchange. A home- made biparametric system for CDBS measurements will be reported, also.

  11. Status and Perspectives for a Slow Positron Beam Facility at the HH—NIPNE Bucharest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Florin; Craciun, Liviu Stefan; Constantinescu, Olimpiu; Ghita, Ionica Alina; Ionescu, Cristina; Racolta, Petru Mihai; Straticiuc, Mihai; Vasilescu, Angela; Braic, Viorel; Zoita, Catalin; Kiss, Adrian; Bojin, Dionezie

    2009-03-01

    The development of a positron annihilation spectroscopy laboratory at the HH-NIPNE Bucharest-to be used for material studies and applications was started in the last 10 years. In the framework of a national research project extended over the last 3 years, was designed a low energy positron accelerator, as a high-vacuum dedicated beam line with two options: a 25 mCi 22NaCl source and in line with the NIPNE-cyclotron or a new intense compact cyclotron. The construction of the beam line was planned as a sequence of modules: source- moderator system; magnetical filter for fast positrons in order to select the positrons energies in the range 0.8-1 keV; a modular system for focusing, transport and acceleration of monoenergetic positrons in the energy range 0.8-50 keV and a CDBS analysis chamber. The moderator proposed—is tungsten as a foil of about 3 μm prepared at the Optoelectronics Institute were put into a thermal treatment vacuum chamber and bombarded with electrons from a 100 W electron gun After the treatment, they were tested for changes of elemental composition of the surface and structure at the Polytechnic University. The structure tests were performed on a DRON 3 M diffractometer, with a Co tube (λKα = 1.7903 A)—the angular regions studied were around 34° (1 0 0) and 69° (2 0 0). In the present time, the trajectories of the positron are going to be simulated with dedicated software (an ion and electron optics simulator). For the coincidence measurements (CDBS) set-up we used a home-made 22NaCl source, by separation without carrier from a metallic Mg target irradiated with 12 MeV protons and separated by columnar cation exchange. A home- made biparametric system for CDBS measurements will be reported, also.

  12. Repetitive production of positron emitters using deuterons accelerated by multiterawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Masatoshi; Matsukado, Koji; Takahashi, Hironori; Kawada, Yoichi; Ohsuka, Shinji; Aoshima, Shin-Ichiro

    2009-11-01

    Positron emitters C11, N13, and O15, which can be used in positron emission tomography, were produced using deuterons accelerated by irradiation of laser pulses ˜70 TW in peak power and ˜30 fs in duration with a repetition of 10 Hz during a period of as long as 200 s. Every laser pulse irradiates the fresh surface of a long strip of a solid-state thin film. Deuterons contained in the film are accelerated in the relativistic plasma induced by the pulse. The deuterons are repetitively incident on solid plates, which are placed near the film, to produce positron emitters by nuclear reactions. The radioactivities of the activated plates are measured after the termination of laser irradiation. In activation of graphite, boron-nitride, and melamine plates, the products had total activities of 64, 46, and 153 Bq, respectively. Contamination in the setup was negligible even after several thousands of laser shots. Our apparatus is expected to greatly contribute to the construction of a compact PET diagnostic system in the future.

  13. Slow positron beam and nanoindentation study of irradiation-related defects in reactor vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangbing; Wang, Rongshan; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Yichu; Zhang, Chonghong; Ren, Ai; Xu, Chaoliang; Qian, Wangjie

    2014-08-01

    In order to understand the nature of the hardening after radiation in reactor vessel steels, China A508-3 steels were implanted by proton with an energy of 240 keV up to 2.5 × 1016, 5.5 × 1016, 1.1 × 1017, and 2.5 × 1017 ions cm-2, respectively. Vacancy type defects were detected by energy-variable positron beam Doppler broadening technique and then nanoindentation measurements were performed to investigate proton-induced hardening effects. The results showed that S-parameter increased as a function of positron incident energy after irradiation, and the increasing rate of the S-parameter near the surface was larger than that in the bulk due to radiation damage. The size of vacancy type defects increased with dose. Irradiation induced hardening was shown that the average hardness increased with dose. Moreover a direct correlation between positron annihilation parameter and hardness was found based on Kasada method.

  14. Measurement of the information velocity in fast- and slow-light optical pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenner, Michael David

    This thesis describes a study of the velocity of information on optical pulses propagating through fast- and slow-light media. In fast- and slow-light media, the group velocity vg is faster than the speed of light in vacuum c (vg > c or vg < 0) or slower than c (0 < vg < c) respectively. While it is largely accepted that optical pulses can travel at these extreme group velocities, the velocity of information encoded on them is still the subject of considerable debate. There are many contradictory theories describing the velocity of information on optical pulses, but no accepted techniques for its experimental measurement. The velocity of information has broad implications for the principle of relativistic causality (which requires that information travels no faster than c) and for modern communications and computation. In this thesis, a new technique for measuring the information velocity vi is described and implemented for fast- and slow-light media. The fast- and slow-light media are generated using modern dispersion-tailoring techniques that use large atomic coherences to generate strong normal and anomalous dispersion. The information velocity in these media can then be measured using information-theoretic concepts by creating an alphabet of two distinct pulse symbols and transmitting the symbols through the media. By performing a detailed statistical analysis of the received information as a function of time, it is possible to calculate vi. This new technique makes it possible for the first time to measure the velocity of information on optical pulses. Applying this technique to fast-light pulses, where vg/c = -0.051 +/- 0.002, it is found that vi /c = 0.4(+0.7--0.2). In the slow-light case, where vg/c = 0.0097 +/- 0.0003, information is found to propagate at vi/c = 0.6. In the slow-light case, the error bars are slightly more complicated. The fast bound is -0.5c (which is faster than positive values) and the slow bound is 0.2c . These results represent the

  15. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, R.

    1985-10-01

    The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

  16. An atomic coilgun: using pulsed magnetic fields to slow a supersonic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narevicius, E.; Parthey, C. G.; Libson, A.; Narevicius, J.; Chavez, I.; Even, U.; Raizen, M. G.

    2007-10-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a novel method to slow atoms and molecules with permanent magnetic moments using pulsed magnetic fields. In our experiments, we observe the slowing of a supersonic beam of metastable neon from 461.0 ± 7.7 to 403 ± 16 m s-1 in 18 stages, where the slowed peak is clearly separated from the initial distribution. This method has broad applications as it may easily be generalized, using seeding and entrainment into supersonic beams, to all paramagnetic atoms and molecules.

  17. Storage and retrieval of light pulses in atomic media with 'slow' and 'fast' light

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama, A.; Akulshin, A. M.; Sidorov, A. I.; Hannaford, P.

    2006-03-15

    We report experimental evidence that light storage, understood as the controlled release of a light pulse by an atomic sample dependent on the past presence of a writing pulse, is not restricted to small-group-velocity media but can also occur in a negative-group-velocity medium. We present a numerical modeling in close agreement with our observations and a simple physical picture applicable to light storage experiments in both 'slow' and 'fast' light media.

  18. Large delay-bandwidth product and tuning of slow light pulse in photonic crystal coupled waveguide.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Kawaaski, Takashi; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Adachi, Jun; Mori, Daisuke

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports two advances in a slow light device consisting of chirped photonic crystal slab coupled waveguide on SOI substrate. One is concerning the delay-bandwidth product, indicating the buffering capacity of the device. We experimentally evaluated a record high value of 57 (a 40 ps delay and a 1.4 THz bandwidth). We also observed ~1 ps wide optical pulse transmission in the cross-correlation measurement. Regarding the pulse as a signal and considering the broadening of the pulse width due to the imperfect dispersion compensation in the device, storage of more than 12 signal bits was confirmed. The other is a wide-range tuning of the pulse delay. We propose a technique for externally controlling the chirping to permit variable delay. We demonstrate tuning of the pulse delay up to 23 ps, corresponding to a ~7 mm extension of the free space length. PMID:18545637

  19. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured. PMID:23742543

  20. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  1. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  2. Long-range interactions and entanglement of slow single-photon pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Friedler, Inbal; Kurizki, Gershon; Petrosyan, David; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2005-10-15

    We show that very large nonlocal nonlinear interactions between pairs of colliding slow-light pulses can be realized in atomic vapors in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency. These nonlinearities are mediated by strong, long-range dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg states of the multilevel atoms in a ladder configuration. In contrast to previously studied schemes, this mechanism can yield a homogeneous conditional phase shift of {pi} even for weakly focused single-photon pulses, thereby allowing a deterministic realization of the photonic phase gate.

  3. Study of the effect of annealing on defects in Fe Mn Si Cr Ni C alloy by slow positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Khaled. M.; De Baerdemaeker, J.; Van Caenegem, N.; Segers, D.; Houbaert, Y.

    2008-10-01

    FeMnSi shape memory alloys (SMAs) have received much attention as one-way SMAs due to their cost-effectiveness. Variable-energy (0-30 keV) positron beam studies have been carried out on a Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni-C alloy with different degrees of deformation. Doppler broadening profiles of the positron annihilation as a function of incident positron energy were shown to be quite sensitive to defects introduced by deformation. The variation of the nature and the concentration of defects are studied as a function of isochronal annealing temperature. These results are correlated with the data measured with the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The positron annihilation results are compared to XRD and optical microscopy (OM).

  4. A time-pulsed positronium beam and a study of oxides on silicon using positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    The studies on rare gas solid moderators were carried out with a 350 [mu]Ci [sup 22]Na radioactive source. The corrected efficiency for neon moderator in conical geometrical configuration was as high as (1.4 [+-] 0.2)%. The conical configuration moderator performed better by a factor of (2.2 [+-] 0.2) than the cylindrical configuration. A time pulsed positron beam was built to carry out investigations on the positronium formation processes and positronium beam. This beam has the capability to store low energy e[sup +] in a magnetic bottle, with a magnetic bottle at one end and an electrostatic mirror at the other. These stored e[sup +] are then bunched to form a pulse with a buncher. The bunched beam had a FWHM of 17 nsec and contained 1 to 2 e[sup +]/pulse. A thin carbon foil of 50 [angstrom] thickness was used for positronium formation by process of charge exchange. Positronium Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) was utilized to carry out studies on the activation energy of hydrogen at the interface of oxide and silicon substrate and the effect of irradiation on the oxides in SiO[sub 2]/Si(100) sample. The activation energy of hydrogen at the interface of SiO[sub 2]/Si(100) samples with n- and p-type substrate was measured to be 2.60(6) eV and 2.47(6) eV respectively. The investigations of the samples irradiated with x-ray and [gamma]-ray led to the first time identification of creation of E[prime] centers with PAS.

  5. Positron and Ion Migrations and the Attractive Interactions between like Ion Pairs in the Liquids: Based on Studies with Slow Positron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, I.; Sasaki, T.; Yamada, K.; Imai, E.

    2014-04-01

    We have discussed positron and ion diffusions in liquids by using the gauge-invariant effection Lagrange density with the spontaneously broken density (the hedgehog-like density) with the internal non-linear gauge fields (Yaug-Mills gauge fields), and have presented the relation to the Hubbard-Onsager theory.

  6. Preliminary considerations of an intense slow positron facility based on a sup 78 Kr loop in the high flux isotopes reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.; Peretz, F.J.; Montgomery, B.H.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Suggestions have been made to the National Steering Committee for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) by Mills that provisions be made to install a high intensity slow positron facility, based on a {sup 78}Kr loop, that would be available to the general community of scientists interested in this field. The flux of thermal neutrons calculated for the ANS is E + 15 sec{sup {minus}1} m{sup {minus}2}, which Mills has estimated will produce 5 mm beam of slow positrons having a current of about 1 E + 12 sec {sup {minus}1}. The intensity of such a beam will be a least 3 orders of magnitude greater than those presently available. The construction of the ANS is not anticipated to be complete until the year 2000. In order to properly plan the design of the ANS, strong considerations are being given to a proof-of-principle experiment, using the presently available High Flux Isotopes Reactor, to test the {sup 78}Kr loop technique. The positron current from the HFIR facility is expected to be about 1 E + 10 sec{sup {minus}1}, which is 2 orders of magnitude greater than any other available. If the experiment succeeds, a very valuable facility will be established, and important formation will be generated on how the ANS should be designed. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction, radiation induced due to scattering on the electrostatic septa and limited beam pipe aperture, beam dynamics effects of space charge forces and magnet power supplies ripple. Here we present a novel slow extraction scheme employing a number of non-standard accelerator elements, such as Silicone crystal strips and pulsed stripline dipole correctors, and illustrate practicality of these examples at the 8 GeV proton Recycler Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in simulations. We propose to initiate an R&D program in the Fermilab 8 GeV Recycler to address the key issues of the method: (a) feasibility of very short crystals - from few mm down to 0.2 mm; (b) their efficiency in the channelling and volume reflection regimes; (c) practical aspects of the fast deflectors.

  8. Study of Positronium in Low-k Dielectric Films by means of 2D-Angular Correlation Experiments at a High-Intensity Slow-Positron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gessmann, T; Petkov, M P; Weber, M H; Lynn, K G; Rodbell, K P; Asoka-Kumar, P; Stoeffl, W; Howell, R H

    2001-06-20

    Depth-resolved measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) were performed at the high-intensity slow-positron beam of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We studied the formation of positronium in thin films of methyl-silsesquioxane (MSSQ) spin-on glass containing open-volume defects in the size of voids. Samples with different average void sizes were investigated and positronium formation could be found in all cases. The width of the angular correlation related to the annihilation of parapositronium increased with the void size indicating the annihilation of non-thermalized parapositronium.

  9. Slow slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization of pore fluid: theory and observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss recently developed solutions for steadily propagating self-healing slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization (TP) of pore fluid [Garagash, 2012] on a fault with a constant sliding friction. These pulses are characterized by initial stage of undrained weakening of the fault (when fluid/heat can not yet escape the frictionally heated shear zone), which gives way to partial restrengthening due to increasing hydrothermal diffusion under conditions of diminished rate of heating, leading to eventual locking of the slip. The rupture speed of these pulses is decreasing function of the thickness (h) of the principal shear zone. We find that "thick" shear zones, h >> hdyna, where hdyna = (μ/τ0) (ρc/fΛ)(4α/cs), can support aseismic TP pulses propagating at a fraction hdyna/h of the shear wave speed cs, while "thin" shear zones, h˜hdyna or thinner, can only harbor seismic slip. (Here μ - shear modulus, τ0 - the nominal fault strength, f - sliding friction, ρc - the heat capacity of the fault gouge, Λ - the fluid thermal pressurization factor, α - hydrothermal diffusivity parameter of the gouge). For plausible range of fault parameters, hdyna is between 10s to 100s of micrometers, suggesting that slow slip transients propagating at 1 to 10 km/day may occur in the form of a TP slip pulse accommodated by a meter-thick shear zone. We verify that this is, indeed, a possibility by contrasting the predictions for aseismic, small-slip TP pulses operating at seismologically-constrained, near-lithostatic pore pressure (effective normal stress ≈ 3 to 10 MPa) with the observations (slip duration at a given fault location ≈ week, propagation speed ≈ 15 km/day, and the inferred total slip ≈ 2 to 3 cm) for along-strike propagation of the North Cascadia slow slip events of '98-99 [Dragert et al., 2001, 2004]. Furthermore, we show that the effect of thermal pressurization on the strength of the subduction interface is comparable to or exceeds that of the rate

  10. Complete compensation of pulse broadening in an amplifier-based slow light system using a nonlinear regeneration element.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sanghooon; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel; Thévenaz, Luc

    2009-11-23

    We experimentally demonstrate complete compensation of pulse broadening in an amplifier-based slow light system. The configuration of the delay line basically consists of two stages: a conventional Brillouin slow light system and a nonlinear regeneration element. Signal pulses experienced both time delay and temporal broadening through the Brillouin delay line and then the delayed pulses were delivered into a nonlinear optical loop mirror. Due to the nonlinear response of the transmission of the fiber loop, the inevitably broadened pulses were moderately compressed in the output of the loop, without loss in the capacity to delay the pulses. The overall result is that, for the maximum delay, the width of the pulse could be kept below the input width while the time delays introduced by the slow light element were preserved. Using this delay line, a signal pulse with duration of 27 ns at full width at half maximum was delayed up to 1.3-bits without suffering from signal distortion. PMID:19997435

  11. Generation of relativistic ions, electrons and positrons in high-intensity short-pulse laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Matthew; Allan, Peter; Brown, Colin; Hobbs, Lauren; James, Steven; Oades, Kevin; Hoarty, David; Chen, Hui

    2012-10-01

    The newly-commissioned Orion laser facility at AWE Aldermaston can deliver intense (10^21 W/cm^2), short (0.6 ps) laser pulses at 1φ (1 μ m) and 3x10^20 W/cm^2 at 2φ with pulse contrasts of 10^7 and 10^13, respectively, in addition to ten 3φ, 500 J long-pulse (˜ns) beams. All can be delivered to target synchronized to ˜20 ps. We report on the production and characterization of multi-MeV protons, ions, positrons and electrons at the Orion facility using 500 J, 0.6 ps, 1φ pulses and 100 J, 0.6 ps, 2φ pulses onto both thin (20 μ m) and thick (1 mm) gold targets. Laser intensities were scanned from 10^19 to 10^21 W/cm^2 by altering pulse energy and length while maintaining a consistent focal spot size of 10 μ. Particle energies were recorded by use of a magnetic and a Thomson spectrometer, with X-ray emissions imaged using a time-integrating pinhole camera in addition to time-integrating crystal spectrometers. The implications for future experiments such as investigations into electron transport mechanisms and proton heating are briefly discussed.

  12. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution. A slow positron beam study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. F.; Yang, W.; Qin, Q. L.; Wen, W.; Zhai, T.; Yu, B.; Liu, D. Y.; Luo, A.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-12-15

    The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

  13. Slow positron studies of hydrogen activation/passivation on SiO sub 2 /Si(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    1991-01-01

    The hydrogen atoms are one of the most common impurity species found in semiconductor systems owing to its large diffusivity, and are easily incorporated either in a controlled process like in ion implantation or in an uncontrolled process like the one at the fabrication stage. Hydrogen can passivate dangling bonds and dislocations in these systems and hence can be used to enhance the electrical properties. In a SiO{sub 2}/Si system, hydrogen can passivate electronic states at the interface and can alter the fixed or mobile charges in the oxide layer. Since hydrogen is present in almost all of the environments of SiO{sub 2}/Si wafer fabrication, the activation energy of hydrogen atoms is of paramount importance to a proper understanding of SiO{sub 2}/Si based devices and has not been measured on the technologically most important Si(100) face. There are no direct, nondestructive methods available to observe hydrogen injection into the oxide layer and subsequent diffusion. This study uses the positrons as a sensitive'', nondestructive probe to observe hydrogen interaction in the oxide layer and the interface region. We also describe a new way of characterizing the changes in the density of the interface states under a low-temperature annealing using positrons. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Slow light of subnanosecond pulses via stimulated Brillouin scattering in nonuniform fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalosha, V. P.; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2007-02-15

    We have proposed a way to obtain large optically controlled delay for subnanosecond pulses and simultaneously avoid the pulse distortions via stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fibers at cw pumping by the use of longitudinally nonuniform fibers with the Brillouin frequency linearly varying with distance. If the range of Brillouin frequency variation along the fiber covers the whole pulse spectrum, the delay of subnanosecond pulses is linearly proportional to the gain, could be larger than the pulse duration, and the pulse broadening is minimum. We have shown this by solving three-wave SBS equations for realistic fiber lengths, both single subnanosecond pulses and sequences of subnanosecond pulses.

  15. Expanding the Bandwidth of Slow and Fast Pulse Propagation in Coupled Micro-resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2007-01-01

    Coupled resonators exhibit coherence effects which can be exploited for the delay or advancement of pulses with minimal distortion. The bandwidth and normalized pulse delay are simultaneously enhanced by proper choice of the inter-resonator couplings.

  16. Controlling pulse delay by light and low magnetic fields: slow light in emerald induced by transient spectral hole-burning.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rajitha Papukutty; Riesen, Hans; Rebane, Aleksander

    2013-11-15

    Slow light based on transient spectral hole-burning is reported for emerald, Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18):Cr(3+). Experiments were conducted in π polarization on the R(1)(± 3/2) line (E2 ← A(2)4) at 2.2 K in zero field and low magnetic fields B||c. The hole width was strongly dependent on B||c, and this allowed us to smoothly tune the pulse delay from 40 to 154 ns between zero field and B||c = 15.2 mT. The latter corresponds to a group velocity of 16 km/s. Slow light in conjunction with a linear filter theory can be used as a powerful and accurate technique in time-resolved spectroscopy, e.g., to determine spectral hole-widths as a function of time. PMID:24322070

  17. Raman-induced slow-light delay of THz-bandwidth pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustard, Philip J.; Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G.; Spanner, Michael; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to generate optically controlled delays based on off-resonant Raman absorption. Dispersion in a transparency window between two neighboring, optically activated Raman absorption lines is used to reduce the group velocity of broadband 765 nm pulses. We implement this approach in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide at room temperature, and demonstrate Raman-induced delays of up to 140 fs for a 650-fs duration, 1.8-THz bandwidth, pulse. Our approach should be applicable to single-photon signals, offers wavelength tunability, and is a step toward processing ultrafast photons.

  18. A simple velocity-tunable pulsed atomic source of slow metastable argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Loize, T.; Aljunid, S. A.; Correia, F.; Fabre, N.; Perales, F.; Tualle, J. M.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.; Dutier, G.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed beam of metastable argon atoms having a low tunable velocity (10 to 150 m s-1) is produced with a very substantial brightness (9  ×  108Ar* s-1 sr-1). The present original experimental configuration leads to a variable velocity dispersion that can be smaller than the standard Brownian one. This behaviour, analysed using Monte Carlo simulations, exhibits momentum stretching (heating) or narrowing (cooling) entirely due to a subtle combination of Doppler and Zeeman effects.

  19. Slow and Go: Pulsing slip rates on the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ryan C.; Shirzaei, Manoochehr; Nadeau, Robert M.; Bürgmann, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Rising and falling slip rates on the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault have been inferred from variations of recurrence intervals of characteristically repeating microearthquakes, but this observation has not previously been confirmed using modern geodetic data. Here we report on observations of this "pulsing" slip obtained from advanced multitemporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data, confirmed using continuous GPS sites of the Plate Boundary Observatory. The surface deformation time series show a strong correlation to the previously documented slip rate variations derived from repeating earthquakes on the fault interface, at various spatial and temporal scales. Time series and spectral analyses of repeating earthquake and InSAR data reveal a quasiperiodic pulsing with a roughly 2 year period along some sections of the fault, with the earthquakes on the fault interface lagging behind the far-field deformation by about 6 months. This suggests a temporal delay between the pulsing crustal strain generated by deep-seated shear and the time-variable slip on the shallow fault interface, and that at least in some places this process may be cyclical. There exist potential impacts for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasting in California and, as it becomes better validated in the richly instrumented natural laboratory of the central San Andreas Fault, the process used here will be even more helpful in characterizing hazard and fault zone rheology in areas without California's geodetic infrastructure.

  20. Slow Ca2+ wave stimulation using low repetition rate femtosecond pulsed irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanaga, S.; Smith, N. I.; Fujita, K.; Kawata, S.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated stimulation of Ca2+ in living cells by near-infrared laser pulses operated at sub-MHz repetition rates. HeLa cells were exposed to focused 780 nm femtosecond pulses, generated by a titanium-sapphire laser and adjusted by an electro-optical modulator. We found that the laser-induced Ca2+ waves could be generated over three orders of magnitude in repetition rates, with required laser pulse energy varying by less than one order of magnitude. Ca2+ wave speed and gradients were reduced with repetition rate, which allows the technique to be used to modulate the strength and speed of laser-induced effects. By lowering the repetition rate, we found that the laser-induced Ca2+ release is partially mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of ROS was successful only at low repetition rates, with the implication that ROS scavengers may in general be depleted in experiments using high repetition rate laser irradiation.

  1. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Chen, W.; Ikuta, R.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er3+) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  2. The formation and evolution of vacancy-type defects in Ar-implanted silicon studied by slow-positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B. S.; Zhang, C. H.; Zhong, Y. R.; Wang, D. N.; Zhou, L. H.; Yang, Y. T.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, L. Q.

    2009-07-01

    The Doppler broadening spectrum of a silicon wafer was measured using a variable-energy positron beam to investigate the effects of vacancy-type defects induced by 180 keV Ar ion implantation. The S-parameter in the damaged layer decreases with annealing temperature up to 673 K, and then increases with annealing temperature from 673 to 1373 K. At low annealing temperatures ranging from room temperature to 673 K, argon-decorated vacancies are formed by argon atoms combining with open-volume defects at inactive positron sites. With further increase of annealing temperature, argon-decorated vacancies dissociate and subsequently migrate and coalesce, leading to an increase of S-parameter. Furthermore, the buried vacancy-layer becomes narrow with increasing annealing temperature. At 1373 K, the buried vacancy-layer moved towards the sample surface.

  3. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  4. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  5. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  6. EDITORIAL: Slow light Slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert; Hess, Ortwin; Denz, Cornelia; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    storage, optical memories, quantum information devices, and optical communication systems in which the use of slow light will allow all-optical processing with less wasted heat. To implement these applications, devices such as buffers, memories, interferometers and switches that utilize slow light need to be developed. Future challenges include the need for improved coupling of light into slow light modes, overcoming propagation losses, and mitigating the influence of large dispersion of the group velocity. The collection of papers in this special issue of Journal of Optics features a broad spectrum of articles that highlight actual developments in many of the material types and schemes described above. It represents therefore an excellent up to date snapshot of the current state of the field of slow light research. References [1] Lorentz H A 1880 Uber die Beziehung zwischen der Fortpflanzung des Lichtes und der Körperdichte Wiedemann Ann. 9 641-64 [2] McCall S L and Hahn E L 1967 Self-induced transparency by pulsed coherent light Phys. Rev. Lett. 18 908-11 [3] Vestergaard Hau L, Harris S E, Dutton Z and Behroozi C H 1999 Nature 397 594 [4] Philips D F, Fleischhauer A, Mair A, Walsworth R L and Lukin M D 2001 Storage of light in atomic vapor Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 783-6

  7. On the method of positron lifetime measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiyama, F.; Shizuma, K.; Nasai, H.; Nishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    A fast-slow coincidence system was constructed for the measurement of positron lifetimes in material. The time resolution of this system was 270 ps for the (60)Co gamma rays. Positron lifetime spectra for 14 kinds of alkali halides were measured with this system. Two lifetime components and their intensities were derived from analyses of the lifetime spectra.

  8. Slow liner fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    {open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

  9. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  10. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  11. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  12. The Pulse of the Crust: Slow fracture and rapid healing during the seismic cycle (Louis Néel Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake ruptures and volcanic eruptions are the most dramatic manifestations of the dynamic failure of a critically stressed crust. However, these are actually very rare events in both space and time; and most of the crust spends most of its time in a highly stressed but subcritical state. Under upper crustal conditions most rocks accommodate applied stresses in a brittle manner through cracking, fracturing and faulting. Cracks can grow at all scales from the grain scale to the crustal scale, and under different stress regimes. Under tensile stresses, single, long cracks tend to grow at the expense of shorter ones; while under all-round compressive, multiple microcracks tend to coalesce to form macroscopic fractures or faults. Deformation in the crust also occurs over a wide range of strain rates, from the very slow rates associated with tectonic loading up to the very fast rates occurring during earthquake rupture. It is now well-established that reactions between chemically-active pore fluids and the rock matrix can lead to time-dependent, subcritical crack propagation and failure in rocks. In turn, this can allow them to deform and fail over extended periods of time at stresses well below their short-term strength, and even at constant stress; a process known as brittle creep. Such cracking at constant stress eventually leads to accelerated deformation and critical, dynamic failure. However, in the period between sequential dynamic failure events, fractures can become subject to chemically-enhanced time-dependent strength recovery processes such as healing or the growth of mineral veins. We show that such strengthening can be much faster than previously suggested and can occur over geologically very short time-spans. These observations of ultra-slow cracking and ultra-fast healing have profound implications for the evolution and dynamics of the Earth's crust. To obtain a complete understanding of crustal dynamics we require a detailed knowledge of all these

  13. Positron microanalysis with high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more common applications for a high intensity slow positron facility will be microanalysis of solid materials. In the first section of this paper some examples are given of procedures that can be developed. Since most of the attendees of this workshop are experts in positron spectroscopy, comprehensive descriptions will be omitted. With the exception of positron emission microscopy, most of the procedures will be based on those already in common use with broad beams. The utility of the methods have all been demonstrated, but material scientists use very few of them because positron microbeams are not generally available. A high intensity positron facility will make microbeams easier to obtain and partially alleviate this situation. All microanalysis techniques listed below will have a common requirement, which is the ability to locate the microscopic detail or area of interest and to focus the positron beam exclusively on it. The last section of this paper is a suggestion of how a high intensity positron facility might be designed so as to have this capability built in. The method will involve locating the specimen by scanning it with the microbeam of positrons and inducing a secondary electron image that will immediately reveal whether or not the positron beam is striking the proper portion of the specimen. This scanning positron microscope' will be a somewhat prosaic analog of the conventional SEM. It will, however, be an indispensable utility that will enhance the practicality of positron microanalysis techniques. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Development of a transmission positron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuya, M.; Jinno, S.; Ootsuka, T.; Inoue, M.; Kurihara, T.; Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Fujinami, M.

    2011-07-01

    A practical transmission positron microscope (TPM) JEM-1011B has been developed to survey differences in the interaction of positron and electron beams with materials, and is installed in the Slow Positron Facility of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The TPM can share positron and electron beams, and can also be used as a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Positron transmission images up to magnification 10,000× (resolution: 50 nm) and positron diffraction patterns up to 044 family were successfully obtained by the TPM comparing them with those of electrons. The differences in material transmittances for both beams have been measured, and can be explained by the calculated results of the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE-2008.

  15. Positron Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    I will give a review of the history of low-energy positron physics, experimental and theoretical, concentrating on the type of work pioneered by John Humberston and the positronics group at University College. This subject became a legitimate subfield of atomic physics under the enthusiastic direction of the late Sir Harrie Massey, and it attracted a diverse following throughout the world. At first purely theoretical, the subject has now expanded to include high brightness beams of low-energy positrons, positronium beams, and, lately, experiments involving anti-hydrogen atoms. The theory requires a certain type of persistence in its practitioners, as well as an eagerness to try new mathematical and numerical techniques. I will conclude with a short summary of some of the most interesting recent advances.

  16. Conceptual design of an intense positron source based on an LIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ji-Dong; Yang, Zhen; Dong, Pan; Shi, Jin-Shui

    2012-04-01

    Accelerator based positron sources are widely used due to their high intensity. Most of these accelerators are RF accelerators. An LIA (linear induction accelerator) is a kind of high current pulsed accelerator used for radiography. A conceptual design of an intense pulsed positron source based on an LIA is presented in the paper. One advantage of an LIA is its pulsed power being higher than conventional accelerators, which means a higher amount of primary electrons for positron generations per pulse. Another advantage of an LIA is that it is very suitable to decelerate the positron bunch generated by bremsstrahlung pair process due to its ability to adjustably shape the voltage pulse. By implementing LIA cavities to decelerate the positron bunch before it is moderated, the positron yield could be greatly increased. These features may make the LIA based positron source become a high intensity pulsed positron source.

  17. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  18. Low energy positron flux generator for lifetime studies in thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; St. Clair, Terry L.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1991-01-01

    A slow positron flux generator for positron annihilation spectroscopic measurements in thin polymer films is described. The advantages of this generator include operability at room temperature and atmospheric pressure without special test film preparaton requirements.

  19. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Holt, W.H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  20. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  1. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  2. Positron Production at JLab Simulated Using Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Kossler, W. J.; Long, S. S.

    2009-09-02

    The results of a Geant4 Monte-Carlo study of the production of slow positrons using a 140 MeV electron beam which might be available at Jefferson Lab are presented. Positrons are produced by pair production for the gamma-rays produced by bremsstrahlung on the target which is also the stopping medium for the positrons. Positrons which diffuse to the surface of the stopping medium are assumed to be ejected due to a negative work function. Here the target and moderator are combined into one piece. For an osmium target/moderator 3 cm long with transverse dimensions of 1 cm by 1 mm, we obtain a slow positron yield of about 8.5centre dot10{sup 10}/(scentre dotmA) If these positrons were remoderated and re-emitted with a 23% probability we would obtain 2centre dot10{sup 10}/(scentre dotmA) in a micro-beam.

  3. Positron acceleration in plasma bubble wakefield driven by an ultraintense laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ya-Juan; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of positrons accelerating in electron-positron-ion plasma bubble fields driven by an ultraintense laser is investigated. The bubble wakefield is obtained theoretically when laser pulses are propagating in the electron-positron-ion plasma. To restrict the positrons transversely, an electron beam is injected. Acceleration regions and non-acceleration ones of positrons are obtained by the numerical simulation. It is found that the ponderomotive force causes the fluctuation of the positrons momenta, which results in the trapping of them at a lower ion density. The energy gaining of the accelerated positrons is demonstrated, which is helpful for practical applications.

  4. Decremental response to high-frequency trains of acetylcholine pulses but unaltered fractional Ca2+ currents in a panel of "slow-channel syndrome" nicotinic receptor mutants.

    PubMed

    Elenes, Sergio; Decker, Michael; Cymes, Gisela D; Grosman, Claudio

    2009-02-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS) is a disorder of the neuromuscular junction caused by gain-of-function mutations to the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (AChR). Although it is clear that the slower deactivation time course of the ACh-elicited currents plays a central role in the etiology of this disease, it has been suggested that other abnormal properties of these mutant receptors may also be critical in this respect. We characterized the kinetics of a panel of five SCCMS AChRs (alphaS269I, betaV266M, epsilonL221F, epsilonT264P, and epsilonL269F) at the ensemble level in rapidly perfused outside-out patches. We found that, for all of these mutants, the peak-current amplitude decreases along trains of nearly saturating ACh pulses delivered at physiologically relevant frequencies in a manner that is consistent with enhanced entry into desensitization during the prolonged deactivation phase. This suggests that the increasingly reduced availability of activatable AChRs upon repetitive stimulation may well contribute to the fatigability and weakness of skeletal muscle that characterize this disease. Also, these results emphasize the importance of explicitly accounting for entry into desensitization as one of the pathways for burst termination, if meaningful mechanistic insight is to be inferred from the study of the effect of these naturally occurring mutations on channel function. Applying a novel single-channel-based approach to estimate the contribution of Ca(2+) to the total cation currents, we also found that none of these mutants affects the Ca(2+)-conduction properties of the AChR to an extent that seems to be of physiological importance. Our estimate of the Ca(2+)-carried component of the total (inward) conductance of wild-type and SCCMS AChRs in the presence of 150 mM Na(+), 1.8 mM Ca(2+), and 1.7 mM Mg(2+) on the extracellular side of cell-attached patches turned out be in the 5.0-9.4 pS range, representing a fractional Ca

  5. Slow inactivation of Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged depolarizing pulses that last seconds to minutes cause slow inactivation of Na(+) channels, which regulates neuron and myocyte excitability by reducing availability of inward current. In neurons, slow inactivation has been linked to memory of previous excitation and in skeletal muscle it ensures myocytes are able to contract when K(+) is elevated. The molecular mechanisms underlying slow inactivation are unclear even though it has been studied for 50+ years. This chapter reviews what is known to date regarding the definition, measurement, and mechanisms of voltage-gated Na(+) channel slow inactivation. PMID:24737231

  6. Slow-Frequency Pulsed Transcranial Electrical Stimulation for Modulation of Cortical Plasticity Based on Reciprocity Targeting with Precision Electrical Head Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Phan; Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Anderson, Erik; Gunn, Amanda; Rech, Dennis; Turovets, Sergei; Tucker, Don M.

    2016-01-01

    In pain management as well as other clinical applications of neuromodulation, it is important to consider the timing parameters influencing activity-dependent plasticity, including pulsed versus sustained currents, as well as the spatial action of electrical currents as they polarize the complex convolutions of the cortical mantle. These factors are of course related; studying temporal factors is not possible when the spatial resolution of current delivery to the cortex is so uncertain to make it unclear whether excitability is increased or decreased with anodal vs. cathodal current flow. In the present study we attempted to improve the targeting of specific cortical locations by applying current through flexible source-sink configurations of 256 electrodes in a geodesic array. We constructed a precision electric head model for 12 healthy individuals. Extraction of the individual’s cortical surface allowed computation of the component of the induced current that is normal to the target cortical surface. In an effort to replicate the long-term depression (LTD) induced with pulsed protocols in invasive animal research and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies, we applied 100 ms pulses at 1.9 s intervals either in cortical-surface-anodal or cortical-surface-cathodal directions, with a placebo (sham) control. The results showed significant LTD of the motor evoked potential as a result of the cortical-surface-cathodal pulses in contrast to the placebo control, with a smaller but similar LTD effect for anodal pulses. The cathodal LTD after-effect was sustained over 90 min following current injection. These results support the feasibility of pulsed protocols with low total charge in non-invasive neuromodulation when the precision of targeting is improved with a dense electrode array and accurate head modeling. PMID:27531976

  7. Slow-Frequency Pulsed Transcranial Electrical Stimulation for Modulation of Cortical Plasticity Based on Reciprocity Targeting with Precision Electrical Head Modeling.

    PubMed

    Luu, Phan; Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Anderson, Erik; Gunn, Amanda; Rech, Dennis; Turovets, Sergei; Tucker, Don M

    2016-01-01

    In pain management as well as other clinical applications of neuromodulation, it is important to consider the timing parameters influencing activity-dependent plasticity, including pulsed versus sustained currents, as well as the spatial action of electrical currents as they polarize the complex convolutions of the cortical mantle. These factors are of course related; studying temporal factors is not possible when the spatial resolution of current delivery to the cortex is so uncertain to make it unclear whether excitability is increased or decreased with anodal vs. cathodal current flow. In the present study we attempted to improve the targeting of specific cortical locations by applying current through flexible source-sink configurations of 256 electrodes in a geodesic array. We constructed a precision electric head model for 12 healthy individuals. Extraction of the individual's cortical surface allowed computation of the component of the induced current that is normal to the target cortical surface. In an effort to replicate the long-term depression (LTD) induced with pulsed protocols in invasive animal research and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies, we applied 100 ms pulses at 1.9 s intervals either in cortical-surface-anodal or cortical-surface-cathodal directions, with a placebo (sham) control. The results showed significant LTD of the motor evoked potential as a result of the cortical-surface-cathodal pulses in contrast to the placebo control, with a smaller but similar LTD effect for anodal pulses. The cathodal LTD after-effect was sustained over 90 min following current injection. These results support the feasibility of pulsed protocols with low total charge in non-invasive neuromodulation when the precision of targeting is improved with a dense electrode array and accurate head modeling. PMID:27531976

  8. Positron bunching and electrostatic transport system for the production and emission of dense positronium clouds into vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A. S.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Evans, C.; Fesel, J.; Fontana, A.; Forslund, O. K.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.; Guatieri, F.; Haider, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jernelv, I. L.; Jordan, E.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Koetting, T.; Krasnicky, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lebrun, P.; Lansonneur, P.; Lehner, S.; Liberadzka, J.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Marx, L.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nedelec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Pagano, D.; Penasa, L.; Petracek, V.; Pistillo, C.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Rienäcker, B.; Røhne, O. M.; Rosenberger, S.; Rotondi, A.; Sacerdoti, M.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Sorrentino, F.; Spacek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Testera, G.; Tietje, I.; Vamosi, S.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe a system designed to re-bunch positron pulses delivered by an accumulator supplied by a positron source and a Surko-trap. Positron pulses from the accumulator are magnetically guided in a 0.085 T field and are injected into a region free of magnetic fields through a μ -metal field terminator. Here positrons are temporally compressed, electrostatically guided and accelerated towards a porous silicon target for the production and emission of positronium into vacuum. Positrons are focused in a spot of less than 4 mm FWTM in bunches of ∼8 ns FWHM. Emission of positronium into the vacuum is shown by single shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

  9. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  10. Bremsstrahlung pair-production of positrons with low neutron background.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.

    1998-09-16

    Minimization of component activation is highly desirable at accelerator-based positron sources. Electrons in the 8- to 14-MeV energy range impinging on a target produce photons energetic enough to create electron-positron pairs; however, few of the photons are energetic enough to produce photoneutrons. Slow positron production by low-energy electrons impinging on a multilayer tungsten target with and without electromagnetic extraction between the layers was studied by simulation. The neutron background from 14-MeV electrons is expected to be significantly lower than that encountered with higher-energy electron beams. Numerical results are presented and some ideas for a low-activation slow-positron source are discussed.

  11. Positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E J; Phelps, M E

    1979-01-01

    Conventional nuclear imaging techniques utilizing lead collimation rely on radioactive tracers with little role in human physiology. The principles of imaging based on coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation produced in positron decay indicate that this mode of detection is uniquely suited for use in emission computed tomography. The only gamma-ray-emitting isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are positron emitters, which yield energies too high for conventional imaging techniques. Thus development of positron emitters in nuclear medicine imaging would make possible the use of a new class of physiologically active, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The application of these principles is described in the use of a physiologically active compound labeled with a positron emitter and positron-emission computed tomography to measure the local cerebral metabolic rate in humans. PMID:440173

  12. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron–positron pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron–positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 1016 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 1018 cm-3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  13. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  14. Positrons in the Galaxy: Their Births, Marriages and Deaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    High energy (approximately GeV) positrons are seen within cosmic rays and observation of a narrow line at 511 keV shows that positrons are annihilating in the galaxy after slowing down to approximately keV energies or less. Our state of knowledge of the origin of these positrons, of the formation of positronium 'atoms', and of the circumstances of their annihilation or escape from the galaxy are reviewed and the question of whether the two phenomena are linked is discussed.

  15. A combined matrix isolation spectroscopy and cryosolid positron moderation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Molek, Christopher D.; Michael Lindsay, C.; Fajardo, Mario E.

    2013-03-15

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a novel apparatus for investigating efficiency improvements in thin-film cryogenic solid positron moderators. We report results from solid neon, argon, krypton, and xenon positron moderators which illustrate the capabilities and limitations of our apparatus. We integrate a matrix isolation spectroscopy diagnostic within a reflection-geometry positron moderation system. We report the optical thickness, impurity content, and impurity trapping site structures within our moderators determined from infrared absorption spectra. We use a retarding potential analyzer to modulate the flow of slow positrons, and report positron currents vs. retarding potential for the different moderators. We identify vacuum ultraviolet emissions from irradiated Ne moderators as the source of spurious signals in our channel electron multiplier slow positron detection channel. Our design is also unusual in that it employs a sealed radioactive Na-22 positron source which can be translated relative to, and isolated from, the cryogenic moderator deposition substrate. This allows us to separate the influences on moderator efficiency of surface contamination by residual gases from those of accumulated radiation damage.

  16. Slow erosional response of a steep wet tropical mountain to a pulse of rock uplift in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocard, G. Y.; Willenbring, J.; Scatena, F. N.

    2013-12-01

    The Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory occupies a 15-km-wide, 1100-m-tall isolated massif at the eastern tip of Puerto Rico. The site receives up to 5,000 mm of annual precipitation over very steep slopes, which are covered by mature primary forests. Remnants of an uplifted, regionally extensive shore platform are perched at mid-elevations around the massif (Fig.1). Rivers flowing over quartz diorite systematically exhibit dramatic knickpoints that separate an upland relict landscape characterized by a thick saprolite and transport-limited streams, from highly dissected lower slopes, thinner soils and detachment-limited rivers. The knickpoint lips lie at the elevation of the uplifted platform and therefore likely represent erosion waves that nucleated at the coast following the uplift the platform millions of years ago. Highly degraded fault scarps and lack of detectable recent coastal uplift suggest that rock uplift has ended. Low erodibility of the quartz diorite combined with fine bedload grain size may account for the slow transmission of the erosional signal and for the persistence of these conspicuous knickpoints. We used Be-10 concentrations in river-borne quartz to compare denudation rates above and below the knickpoints. Integrated over 10-100 kyr, denudation rates are up to three times higher downstream. The change in erosion rate is associated with a change in the dominant erosional processes. Upstream of the knickpoint we observe a strong decoupling between slope erosion and ridge top erosion, which is not observed downstream. The knickpoints separate an upland dominated by chemical weathering from a downstream landscape dominated by mechanical weathering. Figure 1: Correlation between the elevation of the platform and knickpoints on rivers flowing over the quartz diorite

  17. A high intensity positron beam at the Brookhaven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Lynn, K.G.; Roellig, L.O.; Mills, A.P. Jr.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a high intensity, low energy positron beam utilizing high specific activity /sup 64/Cu sources (870 Ci/g) produced in a reactor with high thermal neutron flux. Fast-to-slow moderation can be performed in a self moderation mode or with a transmission moderator. Slow positron rates up to 1.6 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s with a half life of 12.8 h are calculated. Up to 1.0 x 10/sup 8/ e/sup +//s have been observed. New developments including a Ne moderator and an on-line isotope separation process are discussed. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  19. Threshold for Trapping Positrons in the Wake Driven by a Ultra-relativistic Electron Bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Ischebeck, R.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-01-22

    We have recently proposed a new concept for generating, injecting and accelerating positrons in a plasma using a double-pulse electron bunch. Monte Carlo simulations show that the number of the positrons produced in a foil target has an exponentially decay energy spectrum. The energy threshold for the trapping of these positrons in a ultra-relativistic electron wake is investigated numerically. For a typical 28.5 GeV electron drive bunch, the trapping threshold for the positrons is a few MeV, and therefore a majority of positrons generated in the foil target are focused and accelerated by the plasma wake.

  20. Nonlinear Laser Driven Donut Wakefields for Positron and Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J.; Mendonça, J. T.

    2014-05-01

    We show analytically and through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that nonlinear wakefields driven by Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses can lead to hollow electron self-injection and positron acceleration. We find that higher order lasers can drive donut shaped blowout wakefields with strong positron accelerating gradients comparable to those of a spherical bubble. Corresponding positron focusing forces can be more than an order of magnitude stronger than electron focusing forces in a spherical bubble. Required laser intensities and energies to reach the nonlinear donut shaped blowout are within state-of-the-art experimental conditions.

  1. Positron binding to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    While there is theoretical evidence that positrons can bind to atoms, calculations for molecules are much less precise. Unfortunately, there have been no measurements of positron-atom binding, due primarily to the difficulty in forming positron-atom bound states in two-body collisions. In contrast, positrons attach to molecules via Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which a vibrational mode absorbs the excess energy. Using a high-resolution positron beam, this VFR process has been studied to measure binding energies for more than 40 molecules. New measurements will be described in two areas: positron binding to relatively simple molecules, for which theoretical calculations appear to be possible; and positron binding to molecules with large permanent dipole moments, which can be compared to analogous, weakly bound electron-molecule (negative-ion) states. Binding energies range from 75 meV for CS2 (no dipole moment) to 180 meV for acetonitrile (CH3CN). Other species studied include aldehydes and ketones, which have permanent dipole moments in the range 2.5 - 3.0 debye. The measured binding energies are surprisingly large (by a factor of 10 to 100) compared to those for the analogous negative ions, and these differences will be discussed. New theoretical calculations for positron-molecule binding are in progress, and a recent result for acetonitrile will be discussed. This ability to compare theory and experiment represents a significant step in attempts to understand positron binding to matter. In collaboration with A. C. L. Jones, J. J. Gosselin, and C. M. Surko, and supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  2. Slow Pseudotachylites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, M.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2011-12-01

    Tectonic pseudotachylites as solidified, friction induced melts are believed to be the only unequivocal evidence for paleo-earthquakes. Earthquakes occur when fast slip (1 - 3 m/s) propagates on a localized failure plane and are always related with stress drops. The mechanical work expended, together with the rock composition and the efficiency of thermal dissipation, controls whether the temperature increase on a localized slip plane will be sufficient to induce fusion. We report the formation of pseudotachylites during steady-state plastic flow at slow bulk shear strain rates (~10^-3 to ~10^-5 /s corresponding to slip rates of ~10^-6 to ~10^-8 m/s) in experiments performed at high confining pressures (500 MPa) and temperatures (300°C) corresponding to a depth of ~15 km. Crushed granitioid rock (Verzasca gneiss), grain size ≤ 200 μm, with 0.2 wt% water added was placed between alumina forcing blocks pre-cut at 45°, weld-sealed in platinum jackets and deformed with a constant displacement rate in a solid medium deformation apparatus (modified Griggs rig). Microstructural observations show the development of a S-C-C' fabric with C' slip zones being the dominant feature. Strain hardening in the beginning of the experiment is accompanied with compaction which is achieved by closely spaced R1 shears pervasively cutting the whole gouge zone and containing fine-grained material (d < 100 nm). The peak strength is achieved at γ ~ 2 at shear stress levels of 1350-1450 MPa when compaction ceases. During further deformation, large local displacements (γ > 10) are localized in less densely spaced, ~10 μm thick C'-C slip zones which develop predominantly in feldspars and often contain micas. In TEM, they appear to have no porosity consisting of partly amorphous material and small crystalline fragments with the average grain size of 20 nm. After the peak strength, the samples weaken by ~20 MPa and continue deforming up to γ ~ 4 without any stress drops. Strain

  3. Positron annihilation characteristics in mesostructural silica films with various porosities

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Bangyun; Mao, Wenfeng; Tang, Xiuqin; He, Chunqing

    2014-03-07

    Porous silica films with various porosities were prepared via a sol-gel method using a nonionic amphiphilic triblock copolymer F127 as the structure-directing agent. Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation (DBAR) spectra were collected for the prepared films using a variable energy slow positron beam. Different linear relationships between positron annihilation line shape parameters S and W are found for the as-deposited films and calcined ones, indicative of the decomposition of the copolymer porogen in the as-deposited films upon calcination. This also reveals the variation of positron annihilation sites as a function of F127 loading or porosity. Strong correlations between positronium 3γ annihilation fraction, S parameter and porosity of the mesoporous silica films with isolated pores are obtained, which may provide a complementary method to determine closed porosities of mesoporous silica films by DBAR.

  4. Advanced positron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variola, A.

    2014-03-01

    Positron sources are a critical system for the future lepton colliders projects. Due to the large beam emittance at the production and the limitation given by the target heating and mechanical stress, the main collider parameters fixing the luminosity are constrained by the e+ sources. In this context also the damping ring design boundary conditions and the final performance are given by the injected positron beam. At present different schemes are being taken into account in order to increase the production and the capture yield of the positron sources, to reduce the impact of the deposited energy in the converter target and to increase the injection efficiency in the damping ring. The final results have a strong impact not only on the collider performance but also on its cost optimization. After a short introduction illustrating their fundamental role, the basic positron source scheme and the performance of the existing sources will be illustrated. The main innovative designs for the future colliders advanced sources will be reviewed and the different developed technologies presented. Finally the positrons-plasma R&D experiments and the futuristic proposals for positron sources will reviewed.

  5. Positrons from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1993-01-01

    Positrons are produced in the ejecta of supernovae by the decay of nucleosynthetic Co-56, Ti-44, and Al-26. We calculate the probability that these positrons can survive without annihilating in the supernova ejecta, and we show that enough of these positrons should escape into the interstellar medium to account for the observed diffuse Galactic annihilation radiation. The surviving positrons are carried by the expanding ejecta into the interstellar medium where their annihilation lifetime of 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr is much longer than the average supernovae occurrence time of about 100 yr. Thus, annihilating positrons from thousands of supernovae throughout the Galaxy produce a steady diffuse flux of annihilation radiation. We further show that combining the calculated positron survival fractions and nucleosynthetic yields for current supernova models with the estimated supernova rates and the observed flux of diffuse Galactic annihilation radiation suggests that the present Galactic rate of Fe-56 nucleosynthesis is about 0.8 +/- 0.6 solar mass per 100 yr.

  6. Development of a dedicated superconducting accelerator for positron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Oshima, N.; Kuroda, R.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.; Kinomura, A.; Hayashizaki, N.; Minehara, E.; Yamauchi, H.; Fukamizu, Y.; Shikibu, M.; Kawamoto, T.; Minehara, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the current status of a project to develop a dedicated superconducting accelerator for slow positron production at AIST. Two 500 MHz, 5 cell cavities will form the basis of the new accelerator. Initial set-up and preliminary design activities are reported.

  7. Ion acoustic solitons in dense magnetized plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadiq, Safeer; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2014-09-20

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is investigated. The linear dispersion relation is obtained for slow and fast electrostatic waves in the EPI plasma. The limiting cases for ion acoustic wave (slow) and ion cyclotron wave (fast) are also discussed. Using the reductive perturbation method, two-dimensional propagation of ion acoustic solitons is found for both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons. The effects of positron concentration, magnetic field, and mass of ions on ion acoustic solitons are shown in numerical plots. The proper form of Fermi temperature for nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is employed, which has not been used in earlier published work. The present investigation is useful for the understanding of linear and nonlinear electrostatic wave propagation in the dense magnetized EPI plasma of compact stars. For illustration purposes, we have applied our results to a pulsar magnetosphere.

  8. Laser Ponderomotive Electron-Positron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2004-12-07

    Relativistic ultrahigh laser fields can produce plasmas through quantum mechanical tunneling ionization mechanism, and accelerate produced electrons and ions to generate a relativistic electron beam and energetic ions in plasmas. This process will be followed by creation of electron-positron pairs through interaction of relativistic electrons with a Coulomb field of a nucleus in plasma ions or a strong laser field. In a relativistic strong laser field, the longitudinal accelerating force exerted on an electron is proportional to the square of the electric field, whereas the transverse quivering force is just linearly proportional to it. This is essence of the relativistic ponderomotive acceleration that dominantly produces energetic particles in interaction of ultraintese laser fields with particle beams and plasma. Therefore a tightly focused laser field can accelerate an electron-positron bunch longitudinally up to a remarkable energy and at the same time confines it transversely in the superposed ponderomotive potential of an intense ultrashort laser pulse. Here we propose acceleration and focusing of the electron-positron pair beam by the ponderomotive acceleration scheme to compose a high energy electron-positron collider with very high luminosity.

  9. Luminal pulse velocity in a superluminal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Heisuke; Tomita, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the physical meaning of pulse peak in fast and slow light media, we investigated propagation of differently shaped pulses experimentally, controlling the sharpness of the pulse peak. Symmetric behavior with respect to fast and slow light was observed in traditional Gaussian pulses; that is, propagated pulses were advanced or delayed, respectively, whereas the pulse shape remained unchanged. This symmetry broke down when the pulse peak was sharpened; in the fast light medium, the sharp pulse peak propagated with luminal velocity, and the transmitted pulse deformed into a characteristic asymmetric profile. In contrast, in the slow light medium, a time-delayed smooth peak appeared with a bending point at t =0 . This symmetry breaking with respect to fast and slow light is a universal characteristic of pulse propagation in causal dispersive systems. The sharp pulse peak can be recognized as a bending nonanalytical point and may be capable of transferring information.

  10. Magnetoacoustic solitons in dense astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas are investigated by using three fluid quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. The quantum mechanical effects of electrons and positrons are taken into account due to their Fermionic nature (to obey Fermi statistics) and quantum diffraction effects (Bohm diffusion term) in the model. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for low amplitude magnetoacoustic soliton in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is found that positron concentration has significant impact on the phase velocity of magnetoacoustic wave and on the formation of single pulse nonlinear structure. The numerical results are also illustrated by taking into account the plasma parameters of the outside layers of white dwarfs and neutron stars/pulsars.

  11. Positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y. Lucas; Thompson, Christopher J.; Diksic, Mirko; Meyer, Ernest; Feindel, William H.

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. This review analyzes the most recent trends in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography.

  12. Alternative positron-target design for electron-positron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J. ); Nelson, W.R. )

    1991-04-01

    Current electron-positron linear colliders are limited in luminosity by the number of positrons which can be generated from targets presently used. This paper examines the possibility of using an alternate wire-target geometry for the production of positrons via an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade shower. 39 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Positron lifetimes in TTF-TCNQ and κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2Cu(NCS) 2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Shoji; Tokumoto, Madoka; Kinoshita, Nobumori; Terada, Norio; Ihara, Hideo; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Ohdaira, Toshiyuki; Mikado, Tomohisa; Anzai, Hiroyuki

    1997-05-01

    Positron lifetimes in TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2Cu(SCN) 2 (BEDT-TTF: bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene) single crystals have been measured utilizing a pulsed variable-energy positron beam. The bulk positron lifetimes are 338 and 357 ps, respectively. The incident positron energy dependence of the lifetime is rather weak for both materials. Theoretical simulations have been also performed with several descriptions of the electronic wave functions and the electron-positron correlation. Results are compared with each other and the experiments.

  14. Numerical simulation study of positron production by intense laser-accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yonghong; Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 ; Dong, Kegong; Wu, Yuchi; Zhang, Bo; Gu, Yuqiu; Yao, Zeen

    2013-10-15

    Positron production by ultra-intense laser-accelerated electrons has been studied with two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations. The dependence of the positron yield on plasma density, plasma length, and converter thickness was investigated in detail with fixed parameters of a typical 100 TW laser system. The results show that with the optimal plasma and converter parameters a positron beam containing up to 1.9 × 10{sup 10} positrons can be generated, which has a small divergence angle (10°), a high temperature (67.2 MeV), and a short pulse duration (1.7 ps)

  15. Electromagnetic solitary structures in dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Hussain, S.; Rizvi, H.; Mushtaq, A.; Ayub, M.

    2010-12-01

    The linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of low-frequency obliquely propagating magnetoacoustic waves in dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas are studied in this paper by using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. A quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The dependence of the fast and slow magnetoacoustic solitary waves on the positron concentration, the obliqueness parameter θ and the magnetic field is also investigated. The present investigation may have relevance to dense astrophysical environments where the quantum effects are expected to dominate.

  16. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  17. Synchronized Ion Acceleration by Ultraintense Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Govras, E. A.; Kovalev, V. F.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    An effective scheme of synchronized laser-triggered ion acceleration and the corresponding theoretical model are proposed for a slow light pulse of relativistic intensity, which penetrates into a near-critical-density plasma, strongly slows, and then increases its group velocity during propagation within a target. The 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm this concept for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse experiencing relativistic self-focusing, quantify the characteristics of the generated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from optimized ultrathin solid dense foils.

  18. Synchronized Ion Acceleration by Ultraintense Slow Light.

    PubMed

    Brantov, A V; Govras, E A; Kovalev, V F; Bychenkov, V Yu

    2016-02-26

    An effective scheme of synchronized laser-triggered ion acceleration and the corresponding theoretical model are proposed for a slow light pulse of relativistic intensity, which penetrates into a near-critical-density plasma, strongly slows, and then increases its group velocity during propagation within a target. The 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm this concept for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse experiencing relativistic self-focusing, quantify the characteristics of the generated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from optimized ultrathin solid dense foils. PMID:26967421

  19. Positron sensing of distribution of defects in depth materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    It was developed a non-destructive method of positron sensing, which allows to determine the distribution of defects in the depth of the material. From the analysis we can conclude that the angular distribution curves of annihilation photons (well as and on the characteristics in experiments on the lifetime, 3γ - angular correlation, Doppler effect) is influenced by three main factors: a) The distribution of defects in the depth of the material, their dimensions as well as parameters of the interaction of positrons with defects. With increasing the concentration of defects the intensity Jγ(a, ξ) varies more; b) Modification of the energy spectrum of slow positrons due to the influence of defects, wherein the spectrum of positrons becomes softer, and the average energy of the positron annihilation is reduced; c) Deformation of the momentum distribution of the electrons in the region of defect. The energy spectrum of electrons is also becomes softer, and the average energy of the electrons (on which positrons annihilate) is less. The experimentally were measured spectra of photons in the zone of annihilation and were calculated the distribution of defects in depth for a number of metals.

  20. The Japanese Positron Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Sunaga, H.; Kaneko, H.; Takizawa, H.; Kawasuso, A.; Yotsumoto, K.; Tanaka, R.

    1999-06-01

    The Positron Factory has been planned at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The factory is expected to produce linac-based monoenergetic positron beams having world-highest intensities of more than 1010e+/sec, which will be applied for R&D of materials science, biotechnology and basic physics & chemistry. In this article, results of the design studies are demonstrated for the following essential components of the facilities: 1) Conceptual design of a high-power electron linac with 100 MeV in beam energy and 100 kW in averaged beam power, 2) Performance tests of the RF window in the high-power klystron and of the electron beam window, 3) Development of a self-driven rotating electron-to-positron converter and the performance tests, 4) Proposal of multi-channel beam generation system for monoenergetic positrons, with a series of moderator assemblies based on a newly developed Monte Carlo simulation and the demonstrative experiment, 5) Proposal of highly efficient moderator structures, 6) Conceptual design of a local shield to suppress the surrounding radiation and activation levels.

  1. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  2. Positron clouds within thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.; Smith, David M.; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Kelley, Nicole A.; Lowell, Alexander W.; Schaal, Meagan M.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2015-08-01

    We report the observation of two isolated clouds of positrons inside an active thunderstorm. These observations were made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, which flew on a Gulfstream V jet aircraft through the top of an active thunderstorm in August 2009. ADELE recorded two 511 keV gamma-ray count rate enhancements, 35 s apart, each lasting approximately 0.2 s. The enhancements, which were approximately a factor of 12 above background, were both accompanied by electrical activity as measured by a flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft. The energy spectra were consistent with a source mostly composed of positron annihilation gamma rays, with a prominent 511 keV line clearly visible in the data. Model fits to the data suggest that the aircraft was briefly immersed in clouds of positrons, more than a kilometre across. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm, but it is possible they were caused by the presence of the aircraft in the electrified environment.

  3. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  4. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  5. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    ... leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements ... The slow twisting movements of muscles (athetosis) or jerky muscle ... including: Cerebral palsy Drug side effects Encephalitis ...

  6. Formation mechanisms and optimization of trap-based positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natisin, M. R.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    Described here are simulations of pulsed, magnetically guided positron beams formed by ejection from Penning-Malmberg-style traps. In a previous paper [M. R. Natisin et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 033501 (2015)], simulations were developed and used to describe the operation of an existing trap-based beam system and provided good agreement with experimental measurements. These techniques are used here to study the processes underlying beam formation in more detail and under more general conditions, therefore further optimizing system design. The focus is on low-energy beams (˜eV) with the lowest possible spread in energies (<10 meV), while maintaining microsecond pulse durations. The simulations begin with positrons trapped within a potential well and subsequently ejected by raising the bottom of the trapping well, forcing the particles over an end-gate potential barrier. Under typical conditions, the beam formation process is intrinsically dynamical, with the positron dynamics near the well lip, just before ejection, particularly crucial to setting beam quality. In addition to an investigation of the effects of beam formation on beam quality under typical conditions, two other regimes are discussed; one occurring at low positron temperatures in which significantly lower energy and temporal spreads may be obtained, and a second in cases where the positrons are ejected on time scales significantly faster than the axial bounce time, which results in the ejection process being essentially non-dynamical.

  7. Temporally controlled modulation of antihydrogen production and the temperature scaling of antiproton-positron recombination.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M C; Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate temporally controlled modulation of cold antihydrogen production by periodic RF heating of a positron plasma during antiproton-positron mixing in a Penning trap. Our observations have established a pulsed source of atomic antimatter, with a rise time of about 1 s, and a pulse length ranging from 3 to 100 s. Time-sensitive antihydrogen detection and positron plasma diagnostics, both capabilities of the ATHENA apparatus, allowed detailed studies of the pulsing behavior, which in turn gave information on the dependence of the antihydrogen production process on the positron temperature T. Our data are consistent with power law scaling T (-1.1+/-0.5) for the production rate in the high temperature regime from approximately 100 meV up to 1.5 eV. This is not in accord with the behavior accepted for conventional three-body recombination. PMID:18764390

  8. Positron acceleration in doughnut wakefields in the blowout regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Jorge; Mendonca, Jose; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Most important plasma acceleration results were reached in the so called bubble or blowout regime. Although ideally suited for electron acceleration, it has been recognized that non-linear regimes are not adequate to accelerate positrons. New configurations enabling positron acceleration in non-linear regimes would therefore open new research paths for future plasma based collider configurations. In this work, we explore, analytically and through 3D OSIRIS simulations, a novel configuration for positron acceleration in strongly non-linear laser wakefield excitation regimes using Laguerre-Gaussian laser drivers to drive doughnut shaped wakefields with positron focusing and accelerating fields. We demonstrate that positron focusing-fields can be up to an order of magnitude larger than electron focusing in the spherical blowout regime. The amplitude of the accelerating fields is similar to the spherical blowout. Simulations demonstrate laser self-guiding and stable positron acceleration until the laser energy has been exhausted to the plasma. Other realisations of the scheme, using two Gaussian laser pulses, will also be explored. FCT Grant No EXPL/FIS-PLA/0834/2012 and European Research Council ERC-2010-AdG Grant No. 267841.

  9. Positron Injector Accelerator and RF System for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bowden, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Sheppard, J.C.; /SLAC

    2007-03-28

    Due to the extremely high energy deposition from positrons, electrons, photons and neutrons behind the positron target, and because a solenoid is required to focus the large emittance positron beam, the 1.3 GHz preaccelerator has to use normal conducting structures up to energy of 400 MeV. There are many challenges in the design of the normal-conducting portion of the ILC positron injector system such as obtaining high positron yield with required emittance, achieving adequate cooling with the high RF and particle loss heating, and sustaining high accelerator gradients during millisecond-long pulses in a strong magnetic field. Considering issues of feasibility, reliability and cost savings for the ILC, the proposed design for the positron injector contains both standing-wave (SW) and traveling-wave (TW) L-band accelerator structures. A short version of the new type of the SW section is under fabrication and testing. An updated status report is given. This paper also covers acceleration vs. deceleration for pre-accelerator sections, SW vs. TW structures, as well as longitudinal matching from target to linac and linac to damping ring.

  10. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.

    1985-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a new technique for noninvasively assessing myocardial metabolism and perfusion. It has provided new insight into the dynamics of myocardial fatty acid and glucose metabolism in normal subjects, patients with ischemic heart disease and those with cardiomyopathies, documenting regionally depressed fatty acid metabolism during myocardial ischemia and infarction and spatial heterogeneity of fatty acid metabolism in patients with cardiomyopathy. Regional myocardial perfusion has been studied with PET using water, ammonia and rubidium labeled with positron emitters, permitting the noninvasive detection of hypoperfused zones at rest and during vasodilator stress. With these techniques the relationship between perfusion and the metabolism of a variety of substrates has been studied. The great strides that have been made in developing faster high-resolution instruments and producing new labeled intermediates indicate the promise of this technique for facilitating an increase in the understanding of regional metabolism and blood flow under normal and pathophysiologic conditions. 16 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Positrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A W

    2009-09-01

    We review the compelling case for establishing a capability to accelerate positrons at Jefferson Lab. The potential appplications range from the study of two-photon exchange and deeply-virtual Compton scattering to exploiting the charge current weak interaction to probe the flavor structure of hadrons and nuclei. There are also fascinating ideas for using such a capability to discover new physics beyond the Standard Model of nuclear and particle physics.

  12. Positron fraction, electron and positron spectra measured by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolotto, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    A precise measurement by AMS-02 of the electron spectrum up to 700 GeV and of the positron spectrum and positron fraction in primary cosmic rays up 500 GeV are presented. The combined measurement of the cosmic-ray electron and positron energy spectra and fraction provide a unique tool to improve our understanding of the production, acceleration and propagation mechanism of cosmic rays.

  13. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  14. Slow and fast light propagation in nonlinear Kerr media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Ma, Seongmin; Wang, Huitian; Jung, S. S.

    2005-04-01

    Sub- and superluminal propagation of light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 millimeter per second to as fast as negative several hundreds meters per second can be easily obtained in Kerr medium, which possesses large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr doped Alexandrite, Ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse. The new mechanism of slowing down pulses as well as producing superluminal pulses enlarges the very specific materials to all kinds of nonlinear optical materials.

  15. Positron Implantation Profile in Kapton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.

    2006-11-01

    The discussion presented in the paper focuses on processes accompanying positron implantation in condensed matter. They finally constitute the positron implantation profile which generally does not exhibit the exponential behavior as it is concluded from the Monte Carlo simulation made using the EGSnrc 4.0 code. The simulation was performed for the kapton and two commonly used positron sources 22Na and 68Ge\\68Ga. New formula for the implantation profile was proposed.

  16. Nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia

    2009-07-15

    The problem of nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves involving the dynamics of mobile cold positrons is addressed. A theoretical work is presented to show their existence and possible realization in a simple four-component plasma model. The results should be useful for the understanding of the localized structures that may occur in space and laboratory plasmas as new sources of cold positrons are now well developed.

  17. The ATLAS Positron Experiment -- APEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Dunford, R.; Kutschera, W.; Rhein, M.D.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wilt, P.; Wuosmaa, A.; Austin, S.M.; Kashy, E.; Winfield, J.S.; Yurkon, J.E.; Bazin, D.; Calaprice, F.P.; Young, A.; Chan, K.C.; Chisti, A.; Chowhury, P.; Greenberg, J.S.; Kaloskamis, N.; Lister, C.J.; Fox, J.D.; Roa, E.; Freedman, S.; Maier, M.R.; Freer, M.; Gazes, S.; Hallin, A.L.; Liu, M.; Happ, T.; Perera, A.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Trainor, T.; Wolanski, M. |

    1994-03-01

    APEX -- the ATLAS Positron Experiment -- is designed to measure electrons and positrons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. Its scientific goal is to gain insight into the puzzling positron-line phenomena observed at the GSI Darmstadt. It is in operation at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab. The assembly of the apparatus is finished and beginning 1993 the first positrons produced in heavy-ion collisions were observed. The first full scale experiment was carried out in December 1993, and the data are currently being analyzed. In this paper, the principles of operation are explained and a status report on the experiment is given.

  18. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  19. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore » beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  20. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  1. Positron-Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy using Electron Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2015-06-01

    A new type of an intense source of positrons for materials research has been set up at the superconducting electron linear. The source employs hard X-rays from electron- bremsstrahlung production generating energetic electron-positron pairs inside the sample under investigation. CW-operation allows performing experiments with significantly reduced pile-up artefacts in the detectors compared to pulsed mode operation in conventional accelerators. The high-resolution timing of the accelerator with bunch lengths below 10 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) allows positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) measurements with high time resolution. A single-component annihilation lifetime of Kaptonhas been measured as (381.3 ± 0.3) ps. Employing segmented detectors for the detection of both annihilation photons allows for the first time to perform a 4D tomographic reconstruction of the annihilation sites including the annihilation lifetime.

  2. Coincidence Doppler Broadening of Positron Annihilation Radiation in Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, E.; Vanin, V. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Helene, O.

    2013-06-01

    We measured the Doppler broadening annihilation radiation spectrum in Fe, using 22NaCl as a positron source, and two Ge detectors in coincidence arrangement. The two-dimensional coincidence energy spectrum was fitted using a model function that included positron annihilation with the conduction band and 3d electrons, 3s and 3p electrons, and in-flight positron annihilation. Detectors response functions included backscattering and a combination of Compton and pulse pileup, ballistic deficit and shaping effects. The core electrons annihilation intensity was measured as 16.4(3) %, with almost all the remainder assigned to the less bound electrons. The obtained results are in agreement with published theoretical values.

  3. Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2013-03-19

    Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  6. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  7. Development of mini linac-based positron source and an efficient positronium convertor for positively charged antihydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, T.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Liszkay, L.; Mansoulie, B.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J. M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Crivelli, P.; Gendotti, U.; Rubbia, A.

    2010-04-01

    We have installed in Saclay a facility for an intense positron source in November 2008. It is based on a compact 5.5 MeV electron linac connected to a reaction chamber with a tungsten target inside to produce positrons via pair production. The expected production rate for fast positrons is 5·1011 per second. The study of moderation of fast positrons and the construction of a slow positron trap are underway. In parallel, we have investigated an efficient positron-positronium convertor using porous silica materials. These studies are parts of a project to produce positively charged antihydrogen ions aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of a free fall antigravity measurement of neutral antihydrogen.

  8. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  9. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  11. Positron production within our atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Positrons are commonly produced within our atmosphere by cosmic rays and the decay radioactive isotopes. Energetic positrons are also produced by pair production from the gamma rays generated by relativistic runaway electrons. Indeed, such positrons have been detected in Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs) in the inner magnetosphere by Fermi/GBM. In addition, positrons play an important role in relativistic feedback discharges (also known as dark lightning). Relativistic feedback models suggest that these discharges may be responsible for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and some gamma-ray glows. When producing TGFs, relativistic feedback discharges may generate large, lightning-like currents with current moments reaching hundreds of kA-km. In addition, relativistic feedback discharges also may limit the electric field that is possible in our atmosphere, affecting other mechanisms for generating runaway electrons. It is interesting that positrons, often thought of as exotic particles, may play an important role in thunderstorm processes. In this presentation, the role of positrons in high-energy atmospheric physics will be discussed. The unusual observation of positron clouds inside a thunderstorm by the ADELE instrument on an NCAR/NSF Gulfstream V aircraft will also be described. These observations illustrate that we still have much to learn about positron production within our atmosphere.

  12. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of Positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Spencer

    2016-03-01

    Recent particle beam and laser-driven plasma wakefield experiments have produced high-quality electron beams accelerated by a GeV or more in less than a meter. Efforts are underway to put these beams to work as sources for free-electron lasers. By contrast, little work has been done to demonstrate the tractability of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) of positrons beams. The reasons for this are threefold: 1) positron beams are only useful for high-energy physics experiments, whereas electron beams are also useful as light sources, 2) there is a dearth of positron sources for PWFA experiments, and 3) the dynamics of accelerating positron beams in plasma is fundamentally different than that of electron beams. This talk will focus on the physics of accelerating positrons in plasma and contrast the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven nonlinear plasma wakes. We describe recent experiments at the FACET test facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that for the first time demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of a positron beams in plasma. We also discuss an alternative acceleration technique called hollow channel acceleration that aims to symmetrize the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven wakes.

  13. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. Positron driven plasma wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; Huang, C.; An, W.; Mori, W. B.; Muggli, P.

    2010-11-01

    The LHC is producing high-energy, high-charge proton bunches (1e11 protons at 1-7 TeV each) that could be used to accelerate ``witness'' electron bunches to TeV range eneregies via a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). Simulations [1] suggest that a proton ``drive'' bunch is able to excite large wakefields if the bunch size is on the order of 100 μm; however, the LHC paramters are currently on the 1 cm scale. SLAC'S FACET is able to supply positorn bunchs with the ideal parameters for driving a PWFA. Although at lower energy (2e10 positrons at 23 GeV each), initial simiulations in QuickPIC show that the physics of a positron drive bunch is very similar to that of a proton drive bunch. Differences in the physics arise from the mass difference: slower dephasing but faster transverse bunch evolution. Other considerations include driver head erosion and purity of the wakefield ion column. The physics of positive drivers for PWFA and the viability of this scheme for future high-energy colliders will be investigated at SLAC's FACET.[4pt] [1] Caldwell, et al. Nature Physics 5, 363 (2009).[0pt] [2] C.H. Huang, et al., J. Comp. Phys., 217(2), 658, (2006).

  15. Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lameka, Katherine; Farwell, Michael D; Ichise, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a minimally invasive imaging procedure with a wide range of clinical and research applications. PET allows for the three-dimensional mapping of administered positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (for imaging glucose metabolism). PET enables the study of biologic function in both health and disease, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), that are more suited to study a body's morphologic changes, although functional MRI can also be used to study certain brain functions by measuring blood flow changes during task performance. This chapter first provides an overview of the basic physics principles and instrumentation behind PET methodology, with an introduction to the merits of merging functional PET imaging with anatomic CT or MRI imaging. We then focus on clinical neurologic disorders, and reference research on relevant PET radiopharmaceuticals when applicable. We then provide an overview of PET scan interpretation and findings in several specific neurologic disorders such as dementias, epilepsy, movement disorders, infection, cerebrovascular disorders, and brain tumors. PMID:27432667

  16. Ultrashort megaelectronvolt positron beam generation based on laser-accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tongjun; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Li, Shun; Yu, Yong; Li, Jinfeng; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xinliang; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-03-01

    Experimental generation of ultrashort MeV positron beams with high intensity and high density using a compact laser-driven setup is reported. A high-density gas jet is employed experimentally to generate MeV electrons with high charge; thus, a charge-neutralized MeV positron beam with high density is obtained during laser-accelerated electrons irradiating high-Z solid targets. It is a novel electron-positron source for the study of laboratory astrophysics. Meanwhile, the MeV positron beam is pulsed with an ultrashort duration of tens of femtoseconds and has a high peak intensity of 7.8 × 1021 s-1, thus allows specific studies of fast kinetics in millimeter-thick materials with a high time resolution and exhibits potential for applications in positron annihilation spectroscopy.

  17. ELECTRON-POSITRON FLOWS AROUND MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-11-10

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the 'radiatively locked' outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e {sup ±} flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  18. A positron trap and beam apparatus for atomic and molecular scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J P; Jones, A; Caradonna, P; Makochekanwa, C; Buckman, S J

    2008-11-01

    An instrument has been designed and constructed to provide new insights into fundamental, low energy positron scattering processes. The design is based on the Surko trap system and produces a pulsed positron beam with an energy resolution of as good as 54 meV. The design and operation of the apparatus is explained, while the first experimental results from this apparatus have been demonstrated in recent publications. PMID:19045887

  19. Towards laboratory-produced relativistic electron-positron pair-plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Beiersdorfer, P; Cauble, R; Dollar, F; Falk, K; Hazi, A; Murphy, C D; Park, J; Seely, J; Szabo, C I; Shepherd, R; Tommasini, R; Zulick, K

    2010-08-31

    Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the last few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, respectively. With the advent of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a charge-neutral, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter. This talk will present some details of the laser-produced pair-plasma experiments.

  20. Positron-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Obliquely propagating positron-acoustic solitary waves (PASWs) in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma (containing nonthermal hot positrons and electrons, inertial cold positrons, and immobile positive ions) are precisely investigated by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the PASWs are significantly modified by the effects of external magnetic field, obliqueness, nonthermality of hot positrons and electrons, temperature ratio of hot positrons and electrons, and respective number densities of hot positrons and electrons. The findings of our results can be employed in understanding the localized electrostatic structures and the characteristics of PASWs in various space and laboratory plasmas.

  1. Positron emission mammography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Damage Characteristics of TiD2 Films Irradiated by a Mixed Pulsed Beam of Titanium and Hydrogen Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; He, Tie; Yan, Jie; Ke, Jianlin; Lin, Jufang; Lu, Biao

    2016-07-01

    Titanium deuteride is an important nuclear material used in the field of nuclear technology, and further research is needed into TiD2 films irradiated by pulsed ion beams of the vacuum arc discharge with hydrogen. In the current study, these irradiated TiD2 films have been investigated using scanning electronic microscopy and slow positron annihilation techniques. Both the thermal effect and irradiation defects of TiD2 films were studied, following their irradiation with mixed pulsed ion beams of titanium and hydrogen ions. It is found that the thermal effect is trivial on the irradiated surfaces, and the dominant effect is irradiation defects which can be enhanced by repetitive shots and is characterized by the inner diffusion of irradiation defects.

  3. Cosmic Ray Positrons from Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are potential Galactic sources of positrons through pair cascades in their magnetospheres. There are, however, many uncertainties in establishing their contribution to the local primary positron flux. Among these are the local density of pulsars, the cascade pair multiplicities that determine the injection rate of positrons from the pulsar, the acceleration of the injected particles by the pulsar wind termination shock, their rate of escape from the pulsar wind nebula, and their propagation through the interstellar medium. I will discuss these issues in the context of what we are learning from the new Fermi pulsar detections and discoveries.

  4. [Fundamentals of positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Ostertag, H

    1989-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The method is based on: (1) radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. PMID:2667029

  5. Transformer Industry Productivity Slows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Phyllis Flohr

    1981-01-01

    Annual productivity increases averaged 2.4 percent during 1963-79, slowing since 1972 to 1.5 percent; computer-assisted design and product standardization aided growth in output per employee-hour. (Author)

  6. Nonlinear propagation of broadband intense electromagnetic waves in an electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, M.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2006-08-15

    A kinetic equation describing the nonlinear evolution of intense electromagnetic pulses in electron-positron (e-p) plasmas is presented. The modulational instability is analyzed for a relativistically intense partially coherent pulse, and it is found that the modulational instability is inhibited by the spectral pulse broadening. A numerical study for the one-dimensional kinetic photon equation is presented. Computer simulations reveal a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-type recurrence phenomenon for localized broadband pulses. The results should be of importance in understanding the nonlinear propagation of broadband intense electromagnetic pulses in e-p plasmas in laser-plasma systems as well as in astrophysical plasma settings.

  7. Slow medical education.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese; Zarconi, Joseph; Kumagai, Arno; Cole-Kelly, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Slow medical education borrows from other "slow" movements by offering a complementary orientation to medical education that emphasizes the value of slow and thoughtful reflection and interaction in medical education and clinical care. Such slow experiences, when systematically structured throughout the curriculum, offer ways for learners to engage in thoughtful reflection, dialogue, appreciation, and human understanding, with the hope that they will incorporate these practices throughout their lives as physicians. This Perspective offers several spaces in the medical curriculum where slowing down is possible: while reading and writing at various times in the curriculum and while providing clinical care, focusing particularly on conducting the physical exam and other dimensions of patient care. Time taken to slow down in these ways offers emerging physicians opportunities to more fully incorporate their experiences into a professional identity that embodies reflection, critical awareness, cultural humility, and empathy. The authors argue that these curricular spaces must be created in a very deliberate manner, even on busy ward services, throughout the education of physicians. PMID:25426738

  8. Submillimeter focusing of the University of Hong Kong positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, P. Y.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.

    2002-06-01

    The slow positron beam facility Hong Kong submillimeter electron annihilator (HOSEA) at the University of Hong Kong has now been in operation for 6 years with a beam diameter of ˜6 mm and intensity ˜10 4e + s -1. It is now planned to improve the facility by narrowing the beam diameter to less than 1 mm, while increasing the intensity to ˜5×10 5e + s -1. The motivation behind the submillimeter beam is to make it a more effective tool in the study of MOS and MS systems that are hard to fabricate in larger than millimeter dimensions. In particular the development of positron deep level transient (thermal) spectroscopy (PDLTS) could also benefit from a beam of submillimeter dimensions. While consisting of a hybrid electric/magnetic lens structure close to the moderator to produce low canonical momentum phase space, the guidance to the target is purely magnetic. The beam structure is however unusual, consisting as it does of a recurrent re-focusing of the first primary positron focus produced by the hybrid focusing lens close to the moderator. The simulation program, SIMION, is employed to simulate the trajectories of positrons through possible hybrid lens structures and optimize the working parameters of the facility. The simulations show that an outstanding focusing diameter and a repetitive focusing can be obtained all the way to the target above beam energies of 1 keV.

  9. Positron annihilation spectroscopy with magnetically analyzed beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetime measurements with magnetically analyzed positron beams were made in condensed media with uniform and non-uniform properties. As expected, the lifetime values with magnetically analyzed positron beams in uniform targets are similar to those obtained with conventional positron sources. The lifetime values with magnetically analyzed beams in targets which have non-uniform properties vary with positron energy and are different from the conventional positron source derived lifetime values in these targets.

  10. High Power Polarized Positron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailichenko, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the basics of polarized positron production by low energy polarized electrons. Efficiency of conversion ˜0.1-1% might be interesting for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the International Linear Collider (ILC).

  11. Positrons from accelerated particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1987-01-01

    Positron production from the decay of radioactive nuclei produced in nuclear interactions of accelerated particles is treated in detail. Laboratory data as well as theoretical considerations are used to construct energy-dependent cross sections for the production of a large number of radioactive positron emitters resulting from proton and alpha-particle interactions with ambient cosmic matter. Using these cross sections, positron production rates are calculated for a variety of energetic particle spectra, assuming solar abundances for both the energetic particles and the ambient medium. These results can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which emit annihilation radiation. In particular, the results have been applied to solar flares, where the observed 0.511 MeV line is shown to be due to positrons resulting from accelerated particle reactions.

  12. Modelling Positron Interactions with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G.; Petrovic, Z.; White, R.; Buckman, S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work we link fundamental measurements of positron interactions with biomolecules, with the development of computer codes for positron transport and track structure calculations. We model positron transport in a medium from a knowledge of the fundamental scattering cross section for the atoms and molecules comprising the medium, combined with a transport analysis based on statistical mechanics and Monte-Carlo techniques. The accurate knowledge of the scattering is most important at low energies, a few tens of electron volts or less. The ultimate goal of this work is to do this in soft condensed matter, with a view to ultimately developing a dosimetry model for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The high-energy positrons first emitted by a radionuclide in PET may well be described by standard formulas for energy loss of charged particles in matter, but it is incorrect to extrapolate these formulas to low energies. Likewise, using electron cross-sections to model positron transport at these low energies has been shown to be in serious error due to the effects of positronium formation. Work was supported by the Australian Research Council, the Serbian Government, and the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Spain.

  13. SHORT PULSE STRETCHER

    DOEpatents

    Branum, D.R.; Cummins, W.F.

    1962-12-01

    >A short pulse stretching circuit capable of stretching a short puise to enable it to be displayed on a relatively slow sweeping oscilloscope is described. Moreover, the duration of the pulse is increased by charging a capacitor through a diode and thereafter discharging the capacitor at such time as is desired. In the circuit the trigger pulse alone passes through a delay line, whereas the main signal passes through the diode only, and results in over-all circuit losses which are proportional to the low losses of the diode only. (AEC)

  14. Ultra-Intense Short-Pulse Pair Creation Using the Texas Petawatt Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Edison; Henderson, Alexander; Clarke, Taylor; Taylor, Devin; Chaguine, Petr; Serratto, Kristina; Riley, Nathan; Dyer, Gilliss; Donovan, Michael; Ditmire, Todd

    2013-10-01

    We report results from the 2012 pair creation experiment using the Texas Petawatt Laser. Up to 1011 positrons per steradian were detected using 100 Joule pulses from the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate gold targets, with peak laser intensities up to 1.9 × 1021W/cm2 and pulse durations as short as 130 fs. Positron-to-electron ratios exceeding 20% were measured on some shots. The positron energy, positron yield per unit laser energy, and inferred positron density are significantly higher than those reported in previous experiments. This confirms that, for a given laser energy, higher intensity and shorter pulses irradiating thicker targets are more favorable for pair creation. Narrow-band high-energy positrons up to 23 MeV were observed from thin targets. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC-0001481 and Rice FIF.

  15. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  16. Slow and fast light in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, Forrest Grant

    within an optical link and we study the limitations of the fast light effect using practical metrics such as bit error rate and power penalty. Finally we present some preliminary experimental results. Our third study revolves around ultrafast intraband effects of spectral hole burning and carrier heating in SOAs. These experiments employ sub-picosecond pulses, demonstrating record-breaking bandwidth for slow and fast light of 1 THz. Our initial demonstration of fast light based on intraband processes achieves an advance of 2.5 times the input pulse width, an important milestone and a record for slow and fast light in semiconductors. Finally, we demonstrate a novel technique for improving performance by chirping the pulse at the input and then recompressing the pulse at the output. In addition to improving the fast light advance observed at gain bias, we observe an unexpected tunable delay effect by changing the sign of the chirp at the input. When both the delay and advance are employed we observe a five-fold increase in temporal shift, more than 10 times the input pulse duration.

  17. Low-energy scattering of electrons and positrons in liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of low energy electrons and positrons is described for the liquid phase and compared and contrasted with that for the gas phase. Similarities as well as differences are noted. The loci of scattering sites, called spurs in the liquid phase, are considered in detail. In particular, their temporal and spatial evolution is considered from the point of view of scattering. Two emphases are made: one upon the stochastic calculation of the distribution of distances required for slowing down to thermal velocities, and the other upon the calculation of cross sections for energy loss by means of quantum mechanics.

  18. Positron spectroscopy for materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    One of the more active areas of research on materials involves the observation and characterization of defects. The discovery of positron localization in vacancy-type defects in solids in the 1960's initiated a vast number of experimental and theoretical investigations which continue to this day. Traditional positron annihilation spectroscopic techniques, including lifetime studies, angular correlation, and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation, are still being applied to new problems in the bulk properties of simple metals and their alloys. In addition new techniques based on tunable sources of monoenergetic positron beams have, in the last 5 years, expanded the horizons to studies of surfaces, thin films, and interfaces. In the present paper we briefly review these experimental techniques, illustrating with some of the important accomplishments of the field. 40 refs., 19 figs.

  19. E166: Polarized Positrons & Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, K.Peter; /DESY

    2011-12-06

    A proof-of-principle experiment has been carried out in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to demonstrate production of polarized positrons in a manner suitable for implementation at the International Linear Collider (ILC). A helical undulator of 2.54 mm period and 1 -m length produced circularly polarized photons with a first harmonic endpoint energy of 8 MeV when traversed by a 46.6 GeV electron beam. The polarized photons were converted to polarized positrons in a 0.2-radiation-length tungsten target. The polarization of these positrons was measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter to have peak value in excess of 80%.

  20. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  2. Instrumentation for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Budinger, T F; Derenzo, S E; Huesman, R H

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 mm full width at half maximum for quantitation in regions of interest 4 mm in diameter will become possible with the development of detectors that achieve ultrahigh resolution. Improved resolution will be possible using solid-state photodetectors for crystal identification or photomultiplier tubes with many small electron multipliers . Temporal resolution of 2 seconds and gating of cyclic events can be accomplished if statistical requirements are met. The major physical considerations in achieving high-resolution positron emission tomography are the degradation in resolution resulting from positron range, emission angle, parallax error, detector sampling density, the sensitivity of various detector materials and packing schemes, and the trade off between temporal resolution and statistical accuracy. The accuracy of data required for physiological models depends primarily on the fidelity of spatial sampling independent of statistical constraints. PMID:6611124

  3. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  4. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  5. Instrumentation in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional medical imaging technique that noninvasively measures the concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the body that are labeled with positron emitters. With the proper compounds, PET can be used to measure metabolism, blood flow, or other physiological values in vivo. The technique is based on the physics of positron annihilation and detection and the mathematical formulations developed for x-ray computed tomography. Modern PET systems can provide three-dimensional images of the brain, the heart, and other internal organs with resolutions on the order of 4 to 6 mm. With the selectivity provided by a choice of injected compounds, PET has the power to provide unique diagnostic information that is not available with any other imaging modality. This is the first five reports on the nature and uses of PET that have been prepared for the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs by an authoritative panel.

  6. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Here, experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  7. Particle physics. Positrons ride the wave

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-08-26

    Experiments reveal that positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — can be rapidly accelerated using a plasma wave. The findings pave the way to high-energy electron–positron particle colliders.

  8. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO4 scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO4 for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized soon after production. This is due to the much higher light output for LYSO (75% and 1% of NaI for LYSO and PbWO4 respectively). We conclude that LYSO is an ideal scintillator for single-shot measurements of positronium production and excitation performed using a low-intensity pulsed positron beam.

  9. The energy storage in the formation of slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhmuratov, R. N.

    2010-08-01

    Slow light formation in media with (i) an electromagnetically induced transparency, (ii) a doublet structure, and (iii) a single absorption line, detuned from resonance, is considered with the help of a simple model. The model is based on the description of particles in these media by a pseudospin 1/2, which is subject to two 'orthogonal fields'. We mainly focus on the analysis of the reversible process of the particle excitation-de-excitation resulting in the temporal storage of the light-pulse energy without the pulse corruption. The influence of irreversible relaxation processes on the slow light formation is studied.

  10. Electrostatic Nonplanar Positron-Acoustic Shock Waves in Superthermal Electron-Positron-Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. J., Uddin; M. S., Alam; A. A., Mamun

    2015-06-01

    The basic properties of the nonlinear propagation of the nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma containing immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated both analytically and numerically. The modified Burgers equation (mBE) is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic features of PA SHWs are significantly modified by the cold positron kinematic viscosity (η), superthermal parameter of electrons (κe), superthermal parameter of hot positrons (κp), the ratio of the electron temperature to hot positron temperature (σ), the ratio of the electron number density to cold positron number density and the ratio of the hot positron number density to cold positron number density (μph). This study could be useful to identify the basic properties of nonlinear electrostatic disturbances in dissipative space and laboratory plasmas.

  11. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image...

  12. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, M. J.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  13. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  14. Slow microwaves in left-handed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, E.; Parimi, P. V.; Lu, W. T.; Sridhar, S.; Derov, J. S.; Turchinetz, B.

    2005-07-01

    Remarkably slow propagation of microwaves in two different classes of left-handed materials (LHM’s) is reported from microwave-pulse and continuous-wave transmission measurements. Microwave dispersion in a composite LHM made of split-ring resonators and wire strips reveals group velocity vg˜c/50 , where c is the free-space light velocity. Photonic crystals (PhC’s) made of dielectric Al2O3 rods reveal vg˜c/10 . Group delay dispersion of both the composite LHM and PhC’s determined from the experiment is in complete agreement with that obtained from theory. The slow group velocities are quantitatively described by the strong dispersion observed in these materials.

  15. Initial results from the Donner 600 crystal positron tomograph

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.; Uber, D.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1987-02-01

    The authors describe a positron tomography using a single ring of 600 close-packed 3 mm wide bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to 14 mm phototubes. The phototube preamplifier circuit derives a timing pulse from the first photoelectron, and sends it to address and coincidence circuits only if the integrated pulse height is within a pre-set window. The timing delays and pulse height windows for all 600 detectors and the coincidence timing windows are computer adjustable. An orbiting positron source is used for transmission measurements and look-up table is used to reject scattered and random coincidences that do not pass through the source. Data can be acquired using a stationary mode for 1.57 mm lateral sampling or the two-position clam sampling mode for 0.79 mm lateral sampling. High maximum data rates are provided by 45 parallel coincidence circuits and 4 parallel histogram memory units. With two-position sampling and 1.57 mm bins, the reconstructed point spread function (PSF) of a 0.35 mm diam /sup 22/Na wire source at the center of the tomograph is circular with 2.9 mm full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) and the PSF at a distance of 8 cm from the center is elliptical with a radial fwhm of 4.0 mm and tangential fwhm of 3.0 mm.

  16. Initial results from the Donner 600 crystal positron tomograph

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.; Uber, D.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-10-01

    We describe a positron tomograph using a single ring of 600 close-packed 3 mm wide bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to 14 mm phototubes. The phototube preamplifier circuit derives a timing pulse from the first photoelectron, and sends it to address and coincidence circuits only if the integrated pulse height is within a pre-set window. The timing delays and pulse height windows for all 600 detectors and the coincidence timing windows are computer adjustable. An orbiting positron source is used for transmission measurements and a look-up table is used to reject scattered and random coincidences that do not pass through the source. Data can be acquired using a stationary mode for 1.57 mm lateral sampling or the two-position clam sampling mode for 0.79 mm lateral sampling. High maximum data rates are provided by 45 parallel coincidence circuits and 4 parallel histogram memory units. With two-position sampling and 1.57 mm bins, the reconstructed point spread function (PSF) of a 0.35 mm diam /sup 22/Na wire source at the center of the tomograph is circular with 2.9 mm full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) and the PSF at a distance of 8 cm from the center is elliptical with a radial fwhm of 4.0 mm and tangential fwhm of 3.0 mm. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, D.

    2003-03-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a state of the art variable energy positron beam under construction at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL). Projected intensities on the order of the order of 10^7 e+/second using ^64Cu as the positron source are expected. Owing to is short half-life (t1/2 12.8 hrs), plans are to produce the ^64Cu isotope on-site using beam port 1 of NETL TRIGA Mark II reactor. Following tungsten moderation, the positrons will be electrostatically focused and accelerated from few 10's of eV up to 30 keV. This intensity and energy range should allow routine performance of several analytical techniques of interest to surface scientists (PALS, PADB and perhaps PAES and LEPD.) The TIPS project is being developed in parallel phases. Phase I of the project entails construction of the vacuum system, source chamber, main beam line, electrostatic/magnetic focusing and transport system as well as moderator design. Initial construction, testing and characterization of moderator and beam transport elements are underway and will use a commercially available 10 mCi ^22Na radioisotope as a source of positrons. Phase II of the project is concerned primarily with the Cu source geometry and thermal properties as well as production and physical handling of the radioisotope. Additional instrument optimizing based upon experience gained during Phase I will be incorporated in the final design. Current progress of both phases will be presented along with motivations and future directions.

  18. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  19. Go, Slow, and Whoa Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... quick tips for seasonal health, safety and fun Go, Slow, and Whoa Foods Past Issues / Summer 2007 ... of California and Flaghouse, Inc. 2002 Food Group GO Almost anytime foods SLOW Sometimes foods WHOA Once ...

  20. Nonlinear electromagnetic perturbations in a degenerate ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    El-Taibany, W F; Mamun, A A

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear propagation of fast and slow magnetosonic perturbation modes in an ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron positron (EP) plasma (containing ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate electron and positron fluids) has been investigated by the reductive perturbation method. The Alfvén wave velocity is modified due to the presence of the enthalpy correction in the fluid equations of motion. The degenerate EP plasma system (under consideration) supports the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons, which are associated with either fast or slow magnetosonic perturbation modes. It is found that the ultrarelativistic model leads to compressive (rarefactive) electromagnetic solitons corresponding to the fast (slow) wave mode. There are certain critical angles, θ(c), at which no soliton solution is found corresponding to the fast wave mode. For the slow mode, the magnetic-field intensity affects both the soliton amplitude and width. It is also illustrated that the basic features of the electromagnetic solitary structures, which are found to exist in such a degenerate EP plasma, are significantly modified by the effects of enthalpy correction, electron and positron degeneracy, magnetic-field strength, and the relativistic effect. The applications of the results in a pair-plasma medium, which occurs in many astrophysical objects (e.g., pulsars, white dwarfs, and neutron stars) are briefly discussed. PMID:22463336

  1. Design of the NLC positron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Emma, P.; Gross, G.; Kulikov, A.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Rinolfi, L.; Turner, J.; Yeremian, D.

    1996-08-01

    The design of the positron source for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is presented. The key features of this design include accelerating positrons at an L-band frequency (1428 MHz) and using a rotating positron target with multi-stage differential pumping. Positron yield simulations show that the L-band design yields at the source 2.5 times the beam intensity required at the interaction point and is easily upgrade to higher intensities required for the 1 TeV NLC upgrade. Multi-bunch beam loading compensation schemes in the positron capture and booster accelerators and the optics design of the positron booster accelerator are described. For improved source efficiency, the design boasts two parallel positron vaults adequately shielded from each other such that one serves as an on-line spare.

  2. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-08-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented.

  3. Slow-light-based optical frequency shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Bao, Yupan; Thuresson, Axel; Nilsson, Adam N.; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a controllable way of shifting the frequency of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, slow light effect, and linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. We claim that the solid angle of acceptance of a frequency shift structure can be close to 2 π , which means that the frequency shifter could work not only for optical pulses propagating in a specific spatial mode but also for randomly scattered light. As the frequency shift is controlled solely by an external electric field, it works also for weak coherent light fields and can be used, for example, as a frequency shifter for quantum memory devices in quantum communication.

  4. Comparison of direct and indirect positron-generation by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yonghong; Zhang, Bo; Wu, Yuchi; Dong, Kegong; Gu, Yuqiu; Yao, Zeen

    2013-10-15

    An extensive comparison of the properties of positron beams produced by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser in direct and indirect schemes has been performed with two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the positron beam generated in the indirect scheme has a higher yield (10{sup 10}), a higher temperature (28.8 MeV), a shorter pulse duration (5 ps), and a smaller divergence (8°) than in the direct case (10{sup 9} yield, 4.4 MeV temperature, 40 ps pulse duration, and 60° divergence). In addition, it was found that the positron/gamma ratio in the indirect scheme is one order of magnitude higher than that in the direct one, which represents a higher signal/noise ratio in positron detection. Nevertheless, the direct generation method still has its own unique advantage, the so-called target normal sheath acceleration, which can result in quasi-monoenergetic positron beams that may serve in some specialized applications.

  5. Comparison of direct and indirect positron-generation by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yonghong; Zhang, Bo; Wu, Yuchi; Dong, Kegong; Yao, Zeen; Gu, Yuqiu

    2013-10-01

    An extensive comparison of the properties of positron beams produced by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser in direct and indirect schemes has been performed with two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the positron beam generated in the indirect scheme has a higher yield (1010), a higher temperature (28.8 MeV), a shorter pulse duration (5 ps), and a smaller divergence (8°) than in the direct case (109 yield, 4.4 MeV temperature, 40 ps pulse duration, and 60° divergence). In addition, it was found that the positron/gamma ratio in the indirect scheme is one order of magnitude higher than that in the direct one, which represents a higher signal/noise ratio in positron detection. Nevertheless, the direct generation method still has its own unique advantage, the so-called target normal sheath acceleration, which can result in quasi-monoenergetic positron beams that may serve in some specialized applications.

  6. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  7. The scaling of electron and positron generation in intense laser-solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Link, A.; Fiuza, F.; Hazi, A.; Heeter, R. F.; Kemp, A. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Tommasini, R.; Williams, G. J.; Sentoku, Y.; Audebert, P.; Hill, M.; Hobbs, L.; Kerr, S.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents experimental scalings of the electrons and positrons produced by intense laser-target interactions at relativistic laser intensities (10{sup 18}–10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}). The data were acquired from three short-pulse laser facilities with laser energies ranging from 80 to 1500 J. We found a non-linear (≈E{sub L}{sup 2}) scaling of positron yield [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 215001 (2015)] and a linear scaling of electron yield with the laser energy. These scalings are explained by theoretical and numerical analyses. Positron acceleration by the target sheath field is confirmed by the positron energy spectrum, which has a pronounced peak at energies near the sheath potential, as determined by the observed maximum energies of accelerated protons. The parameters of laser-produced electron-positron jets are summarized together with the theoretical energy scaling. The measured energy-squared scaling of relativistic electron-positron jets indicates the possibility to create an astrophysically relevant experimental platform with such jets using multi-kilojoule high intensity lasers currently under construction.

  8. Positron Annihilation 3-D Momentum Spectrometry by Synchronous 2D-ACAR and DBAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burggraf, Larry W.; Bonavita, Angelo M.; Williams, Christopher S.; Fagan-Kelly, Stefan B.; Jimenez, Stephen M.

    2015-05-01

    A positron annihilation spectroscopy system capable of determining 3D electron-positron (e--e+) momentum densities has been constructed and tested. In this technique two opposed HPGe strip detectors measure angular coincidence of annihilation radiation (ACAR) and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) in coincidence to produce 3D momentum datasets in which the parallel momentum component obtained from the DBAR measurement can be selected for annihilation events that possess a particular perpendicular momentum component observed in the 2D ACAR spectrum. A true 3D momentum distribution can also be produced. Measurement of 3-D momentum spectra in oxide materials has been demonstrated including O-atom defects in 6H SiC and silver atom substitution in lithium tetraborate crystals. Integration of the 3-D momentum spectrometer with a slow positron beam for future surface resonant annihilation spectrometry measurements will be described. Sponsorship from Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  9. The annihilation of positrons in the cold phase of the interstellar medium revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallyn, P.; Durouchoux, PH.; Chapuis, C.; Leventhal, M.

    1994-01-01

    The positron cross sections in H and H2 media are reevaluated, taking into account new experimental results. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, we find a positronium fraction before thermalization of 0.90 for H2, in good agreement with the previous experimental result given by Brown et al. (1986). For H we obtain an upper limit of 0.98. We study the behavior of the charge exchange annihilation in a cold phase (molecular cloud). We calculate a formula for the slowing-down time t, before annihilation lasting Delta t, via charge exchange, of a positron beam with a given energy for different medium densities and initial energies. An upper limit of 0.7 MeV for the initial energy of the positrons, annihilating in the molecular cloud G0.86 - 0.08 near the gamma ray source positronium and gives new time constraints on their possible observation.

  10. A field-assisted moderator for low-energy positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beling, C. D.; Simpson, R. I.; Charlton, M.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Griffith, T. C.; Moriarty, P.; Fung, S.

    1987-01-01

    A new positron field-assisted (FA) moderator based on the drift of positrons across a cooled silicon crystal is proposed. Using estimates for both the β + implantation profile and attainable drift velocities, the efficiency of drift to a slow e+ emitting surface is calculated using a diffusion equation which incorporates terms describing positron drift and annihilation. It is conjectured that efficiencies of up to 10% can be achieved. The use of epitaxially grown metallic suicide contacts to facilitate the application of the electric field is described and the consequences of using such contacts are fully discussed. Applications of the FA transmission mode moderator described here to produce timed brightness enhanced beams are briefly discussed.

  11. The annihilation of positrons in the cold phase of the interstellar medium revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallyn, P.; Durouchoux, Ph.; Chapuis, C.; Leventhal, M.

    1994-02-01

    The positron cross sections in H and H2 media are reevaluated, taking into account new experimental results. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, we find a positronium fraction before thermalization of 0.90 for H2, in good agreement with the previous experimental result given by Brown et al. (1986). For H we obtain an upper limit of 0.98. We study the behavior of the charge exchange annihilation in a cold phase (molecular cloud). We calculate a formula for the slowing-down time t, before annihilation lasting Delta t, via charge exchange, of a positron beam with a given energy for different medium densities and initial energies. An upper limit of 0.7 MeV for the initial energy of the positrons, annihilating in the molecular cloud G0.86 - 0.08 near the gamma ray source positronium and gives new time constraints on their possible observation.

  12. Time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy study of relaxation dynamics of ion damage in fused quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Hidetsugu; Mizuno, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Hironori; Kinomura, Atsushi; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Itoh, Akio

    2016-05-01

    Relaxation dynamics of ion damage in fused quartz is investigated by our newly developed pump–probe technique combining energetic ions (pump) with slow positrons (probe). This method enables determination of time-resolved positron lifetime. We study the time-dependent relaxation of ion damage, by analyzing the intensity variation in the ortho-positronium lifetime component associated with irradiation damage. For irradiation with 160 keV He ions in the temperature range of 300–573 K, the positron annihilation lifetime spectra are obtained as a function of time after ion irradiation. We observe that the relaxation time of ion damage is strongly influenced by specimen temperatures; the relaxation time constant is approximately 400 ms at room temperature (300 K) and becomes smaller with an increasing temperature. Analysis for the effect of temperature on damage accumulation reveals that the activation energy for thermal annealing of the observed damage is approximately 0.1 eV.

  13. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  14. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, L.; Zecca, A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Beer-Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C4H6O2) in the incident positron energy range 0.15-50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1-1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ˜2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect.

  15. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  16. Data acquisition with a positron emission tomograph

    SciTech Connect

    Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a clinical imaging modality used in Nuclear Medicine. PET measures functionality rather than anatomical features and is therefore invaluable in the treatment of diseases which are characterized by functional changes in organs rather than anatomical changes. Typical diseases for which PET is used are cancer, epilepsy, and heart disease. While the scanners are not very complex, the performance demands on the devices are high. Excellent spatial resolution, 4-5 mm, and high sensitivity are key to maintaining high image quality. Compensation or suppression of scattered radiation is also necessary for good image quality. The ability to acquire data under high counting rates is also necessary in order to minimize the injected dose to the patient, minimize the patient`s time in the scanner, and finally to minimize blurring due to patient motion. We have adapted various techniques in our data acquisition system which will be reported on in this talk. These include pulse clipping using lumped delay lines, flash ADCs with short sampling time, the use of a local positioning algorithm to limit the number of data words being used in subsequent second level software triggers and calculations, and finally the use of high speed dedicated calculator boards for on-line rebinning and reduction of the data. Modifications to the system to allow for transmission scanning will also be discussed.

  17. Resonance method to produce a polarisation asymmetry in electron-positron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed solenoids of a few tens of ampere turns, operated in synchronism with the ..gamma..(g-2/2) 'th harmonic of the orbit period, can be used to prevent a stored electron beam from becoming polarised through the emission of synchrotron radiation. With such low fields it is easy to arrange that only some of the stored bunches are affected. This makes it possible to produce collisions between counter-rotating electrons and positrons stored in a single ring in which the electron and positron polarisations are not equal and opposite. 8 refs.

  18. Slow waves in mutually inhibitory neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalics, Jozsi

    2004-05-01

    A variety of experimental and modeling studies have been performed to investigate wave propagation in networks of thalamic neurons and their relationship to spindle sleep rhythms. It is believed that spindle oscillations result from the reciprocal interaction between thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons. We consider a network of TC and RE cells reduced to a one-layer network model and represented by a system of singularly perturbed integral-differential equations. Geometric singular perturbation methods are used to prove the existence of a locally unique slow wave pulse that propagates along the network. By seeking a slow pulse solution, we reformulate the problem to finding a heteroclinic orbit in a 3D system of ODEs with two additional constraints on the location of the orbit at two distinct points in time. In proving the persistence of the singular heteroclinic orbit, difficulties arising from the solution passing near points where normal hyperbolicity is lost on a 2D critical manifold are overcome by employing results by Wechselberger [Singularly perturbed folds and canards in R3, Thesis, TU-Wien, 1998].

  19. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  20. Oblique propagation of electrostatic waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Mamun, A. A.

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to understand the basic features of linear and nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) waves subjected to an external magnetic field in an electron-positron-ion plasma which consists of a cold magnetized ion fluid, Boltzmann distributed positrons, and superthermal electrons. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes (fast and slow) and their evolution are investigated. It is shown that the electron superthermality and the relative fraction of positrons cause both modes to propagate with smaller phase velocities. Also, two special cases of dispersion relation are found, which are related to the direction of the wave propagation. In the nonlinear regime, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the propagation of fast and slow IA waves is derived. The latter admits a solitary wave solution with only negative potential in the weak amplitude limit. It is found that the effects of external magnetic field (obliqueness), superthermal electrons, positron concentration, and temperature ratio significantly modify the basic features of solitary waves.

  1. Positron annihilation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal; Ramaty, Reuven; Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Positronium formation and annihilation are studied in a model for the interstellar medium consisting of cold cloud cores, warm partially ionized cloud envelopes, and hot intercloud gas. The gamma-ray spectra resulting from positron annihilation in these components of the interstellar medium are calculated. The spectra from the individual components are then combined, using two limiting assumptions for the propagation of the positrons, namely, that the positrons propagate freely throughout the interstellar medium, and that the positrons are excluded from the cold cloud cores. In the first case, the bulk of the positrons annihilate in the cloud cores and the annihilation line exhibits broad wings resulting from the annihilation of positronium formed by charge exchange in flight. In the second case, the positrons annihilate mainly in the warm envelopes, and the line wings are suppressed.

  2. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  3. Petawatt pulsed-power accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Stygar, William A.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Headley, Daniel I.; Ives, Harry C.; Ives, legal representative; Berry Cottrell; Leeper, Ramon J.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Olson, Craig L.; Porter, John L.; Wagoner; Tim C.

    2010-03-16

    A petawatt pulsed-power accelerator can be driven by various types of electrical-pulse generators, including conventional Marx generators and linear-transformer drivers. The pulsed-power accelerator can be configured to drive an electrical load from one- or two-sides. Various types of loads can be driven; for example, the accelerator can be used to drive a high-current z-pinch load. When driven by slow-pulse generators (e.g., conventional Marx generators), the accelerator comprises an oil section comprising at least one pulse-generator level having a plurality of pulse generators; a water section comprising a pulse-forming circuit for each pulse generator and a level of monolithic triplate radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, that have variable impedance profiles, for each pulse-generator level; and a vacuum section comprising triplate magnetically insulated transmission lines that feed an electrical load. When driven by LTD generators or other fast-pulse generators, the need for the pulse-forming circuits in the water section can be eliminated.

  4. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig; Rowland, Mark S.

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  5. Positron scattering and annihilation in hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. G.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2013-09-01

    Diagrammatic many-body theory is used to calculate the scattering phase shifts, normalized annihilation rates Zeff, and annihilation γ spectra for positron collisions with the hydrogenlike ions He+, Li2+, B4+, and F8+. Short-range electron-positron correlations and longer-range positron-ion correlations are accounted for by evaluating nonlocal corrections to the annihilation vertex and the exact positron self-energy. The numerical calculation of the many-body theory diagrams is performed using B-spline basis sets. To elucidate the role of the positron-ion repulsion, the annihilation rate is also estimated analytically in the Coulomb-Born approximation. It is found that the energy dependence and magnitude of Zeff are governed by the Gamow factor that characterizes the suppression of the positron wave function near the ion. For all of the H-like ions, the correlation enhancement of the annihilation rate is found to be predominantly due to corrections to the annihilation vertex, while the corrections to the positron wave function play only a minor role. Results of the calculations for s-, p-, and d-wave incident positrons of energies up to the positronium-formation threshold are presented. Where comparison is possible, our values are in excellent agreement with the results obtained using other, e.g., variational, methods. The annihilation-vertex enhancement factors obtained in the present calculations are found to scale approximately as 1+(1.6+0.46ℓ)/Zi, where Zi is the net charge of the ion and ℓ is the positron orbital angular momentum. Our results for positron annihilation in H-like ions provide insights into the problem of positron annihilation with core electrons in atoms and condensed matter systems, which have similar binding energies.

  6. Low energy positron interactions with biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanniarachchi, Indika L.

    Calculations of the positron density distribution which can be used for positrons bound to midsize and larger molecules have been tested for smaller molecules and subsequently applied to investigate the most likely e +e-- annihilation sites for positrons interacting with biological molecules containing C, H, O, and N. In order to allow consideration of positrons bound to extended molecules with regions of different character and no particular symmetry, atom-centered positron basis sets of Gaussian-type functions were developed for positrons bound to molecules containing O, N, C, H, Li, Na, and Be. Testing shows that there is no need to scale the positron basis functions to take into account different effective charges on the atoms in different molecules. Even at the HF level of theory the calculated positron and the contact density of e+LiH system is in qualitative agreement with the most accurate calculation was done in ECG method. Also it has been found that for larger biological molecules such as derivation of formaldehyde can leave out positron basis sets centered on H atoms and still get qualitatively acceptable contact density distribution. According to our results, the electronic and positronic wavefunctions have the most overlap in the regions of most negative electrostatic potential in the parent molecule, and we can expect that a positron bound to the molecule will be more likely to annihilate with one of the electrons in these regions. Also we find that the highest energy occupied electronic orbital often does not make the largest contribution to e+e -- annihilation, and that the energy liberated by subsequent electronic relaxation is sufficient to break the backbone in several places in di-peptides and other organic molecules.

  7. Positron emission tomography and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazziotta, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This a text on cerebral and myocardial imaging using positron emission tomography and autoradiography. Authorities in nuclear medicine and biophysics define the central principles of these complex and rapidly evolving imagine technologies-their theoretical foundations, the nature of the biochemical events being measured, the basis for constructing tracer kinetic models, the criteria governing radiopharmaceutical design, and the rationale for PET in the clinical setting. After reviewing the characteristics of cerebral and myocardial hemodynamics, transport, and metabolism, the contributors detail the theory of PET and autoradiography, the instrumentation required, and the procedures involved.

  8. Source modeling sleep slow waves

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael; Riedner, Brady A.; Huber, Reto; Massimini, Marcello; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Slow waves are the most prominent electroencephalographic (EEG) feature of sleep. These waves arise from the synchronization of slow oscillations in the membrane potentials of millions of neurons. Scalp-level studies have indicated that slow waves are not instantaneous events, but rather they travel across the brain. Previous studies of EEG slow waves were limited by the poor spatial resolution of EEGs and by the difficulty of relating scalp potentials to the activity of the underlying cortex. Here we use high-density EEG (hd-EEG) source modeling to show that individual spontaneous slow waves have distinct cortical origins, propagate uniquely across the cortex, and involve unique subsets of cortical structures. However, when the waves are examined en masse, we find that there are diffuse hot spots of slow wave origins centered on the lateral sulci. Furthermore, slow wave propagation along the anterior−posterior axis of the brain is largely mediated by a cingulate highway. As a group, slow waves are associated with large currents in the medial frontal gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus, the anterior cingulate, the precuneus, and the posterior cingulate. These areas overlap with the major connectional backbone of the cortex and with many parts of the default network. PMID:19164756

  9. REVIEW ARTICLE: Slow light enhanced nonlinear optics in periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, C.; de Sterke, M.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2010-10-01

    We review recent advances related to slow light in periodic structures, where the refractive index varies along one or two directions, i.e. gratings and planar photonic crystals. We focus on how these geometries are conducive to enhancing the nonlinear interaction between light and matter. We describe the underlying theory developed for shallow gratings, but whose conclusions can be extended to planar photonic crystal waveguides, in particular the enhancement of third-order nonlinear processes with slow light. We review some experiments showing how gratings have been used for pulse compression and the generation of slow gap solitons. We then present recent nonlinear experiments performed in photonic crystal waveguides that demonstrate the strong reinforcement of nonlinear third-order optical phenomena with slow light. We discuss the challenges associated with slow light in these 2D structures and their unique advantage—dispersion engineering—for creating broadband nonlinear devices for all-optical signal processing. By breaking down the relation between dispersion and group velocity imposed in gratings, these structures also offer new opportunities for generating soliton-like effects over short length scales, at low powers and with short pulses.

  10. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A...