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Sample records for pulses initial structural

  1. Fast initial continuous current pulses versus return stroke pulses in tower-initiated lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadifar, Mohammad; Rachidi, Farhad; Rubinstein, Marcos; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Paolone, Mario; Pavanello, Davide; Metz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    We present a study focused on pulses superimposed on the initial continuous current of upward negative discharges. The study is based on experimental data consisting of correlated lightning current waveforms recorded at the instrumented Säntis Tower in Switzerland and electric fields recorded at a distance of 14.7 km from the tower. Two different types of pulses superimposed on the initial continuous current were identified: (1) M-component-type pulses, for which the microsecond-scale electric field pulse occurs significantly earlier than the onset of the current pulse, and (2) fast pulses, for which the onset of the field matches that of the current pulse. We analyze the currents and fields associated with these fast pulses (return-stroke type (RS-type) initial continuous current (ICC) pulses) and compare their characteristics with those of return strokes. A total of nine flashes containing 44 RS-type ICC pulses and 24 return strokes were analyzed. The median current peaks associated with RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes are, respectively, 3.4 kA and 8 kA. The associated median E-field peaks normalized to 100 km are 1.5 V/m and 4.4 V/m, respectively. On the other hand, the electric field peaks versus current peaks for the two data sets (RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes) are characterized by very similar linear regression slopes, namely, 3.67 V/(m kA) for the ICC pulses and 3.77 V/(m kA) for the return strokes. Assuming the field-current relation based on the transmission line model, we estimated the apparent speed of both the RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes to be about 1.4 × 108 m/s. A strong linear correlation is observed between the E-field risetime and the current risetime for the ICC pulses, similar to the relation observed between the E-field risetime and current risetime for return strokes. The similarity of the RS-type ICC pulses with return strokes suggests that these pulses are associated with the mixed mode of charge transfer to ground.

  2. EVOLUTION OF FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC PULSES IN RANDOMLY STRUCTURED CORONAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, D.; Li, B.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Keppens, R. E-mail: bbl@sdu.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured plasmas, in the context of large-scale propagating waves in the solar atmosphere. We perform one-dimensional numerical simulations of fast wave pulses propagating perpendicular to a constant magnetic field in a low-β plasma with a random density profile across the field. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are considered. We study how the evolution of the pulse amplitude and width depends on their initial values and the parameters of the random structuring. Acting as a dispersive medium, a randomly structured plasma causes amplitude attenuation and width broadening of the fast wave pulses. After the passage of the main pulse, secondary propagating and standing fast waves appear. Width evolution of both linear and nonlinear pulses can be well approximated by linear functions; however, narrow pulses may have zero or negative broadening. This arises because narrow pulses are prone to splitting, while broad pulses usually deviate less from their initial Gaussian shape and form ripple structures on top of the main pulse. Linear pulses decay at an almost constant rate, while nonlinear pulses decay exponentially. A pulse interacts most efficiently with a random medium with a correlation length of about half of the initial pulse width. This detailed model of fast wave pulses propagating in highly structured media substantiates the interpretation of EIT waves as fast magnetoacoustic waves. Evolution of a fast pulse provides us with a novel method to diagnose the sub-resolution filamentation of the solar atmosphere.

  3. Ultrashort pulse propagation in multiple-grating fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, L R; Benjamin, S D; Smith, P W; Sipe, J E; Juma, S

    1997-03-15

    We propose a multiple-grating fiber structure that decomposes an ultrashort broadband optical pulse simultaneously in both wavelength and time. As an initial demonstration, we used a transform-limited 1-ps Gaussian pulse centered at 1.55 mu;m as the ultrashort broadband input into a three-grating fiber structure and generated three output pulses separated in wavelength and time with good correlation between experimental results and simulations. This device structure can be used to generate a multiwavelength train of pulses for use in wavelength-division-multiplexed systems or to implement frequency-domain encoding of coherent pulses for optical code-division multiple access. PMID:18183215

  4. Initial Black Pulse Findings, Bulletin No. l.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban League, Inc., Washington, DC. Research Dept.

    In 1979, the National Urban League and its local affiliates launched the Black Pulse, a nationwide survey designed to (1) assess the needs and status of blacks in such areas as employment, housing, child care, education, health, crime, political participation, family patterns, and discrimination; and (2) determine the extent to which major…

  5. A physics-based model of the electric field pulses occurring during the lightning initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Petr; Santolik, Ondrej; Kolmasova, Ivana

    2016-04-01

    We investigate properties of the electric field pulses observed during the lightning initiation using a generalization of electrostatic and transmission-line models. In the model, the initial leader has a finite conductivity, the current in the channel is inducted owing to an ambient field generated by charge structure inside a thundercloud, and the electric field is computed by a formula derived from exact solution of the Maxwell's equations for a given inducted current. We show how the shape of electric field waveform of individual pulses depends on various parameters of the model with an emphasis on the thundercloud charge structure. We generalize the model to include sequences of several electric field pulses. We show how the peak current pulse is related to the preliminary breakdown electric field peak pulse and we compare this estimation with observations.

  6. Physical Mechanism of Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, C.; Pasko, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The initial breakdown stage of a lightning flash encompasses its first several to tens of milliseconds and it is characterized by a sequence of pulses typically detected with electric field change sensors on the ground [e.g., Villanueva et al., JGR, 99, D7, 1994]. A typical (referred to as "classical") initial breakdown pulse (IBP) has duration of tens of microseconds and it is one of the largest pulses at the beginning of a lightning flash, but a wide range of pulse durations and amplitudes also occur [e.g., Nag et al., Atmos. Res., 91, 316, 2009]. Recent results by Marshall et al. [JGR, 119, 445, 2014] suggest that IBPs should be observable in all lightning discharges. Complementarily, Stolzenburg et al. [JGR, 118, 2918, 2013] correlated individual IBPs to bursts of light that appear to be illumination of a lightning leader channel and Karunarathne et al. [JGR, 118, 7129, 2013] have determined that as a flash evolves the location of IBP sources inside the cloud coincide with the position of negative leaders as determined by a VHF lightning mapping system. In view of the above listed properties of IBPs, we have developed a new numerical model to investigate the electromagnetic signatures associated with these events and to relate them to the initial lightning leader development. The model is built on a bidirectional (zero-net-charge) lightning leader concept [e.g., Mazur and Ruhnke, JGR, 103, D18, 1998]. We simulate a finite-length finite-conductivity leader elongating in the thunderstorm electric field and we solve a set of integro-differential equations to retrieve the full dynamics of charges and currents induced in it. Our proposed approach is a generalization of the transmission-line [e.g., Nag and Rakov, JGR, 115, D20102, 2010] and electrostatic [e.g., Pasko, GRL, 41, 179, 2014] approximations used for analysis of in-cloud discharge processes. We also allow for different propagation mechanisms at the different polarity leader extremities, i.e., continuous

  7. Luminosity Coincident with Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, M.; Marshall, T.; Karunarathne, S.; Karunarathna, N.; Vickers, L.; Warner, T. A.; Orville, R. E.; Betz, H.

    2012-12-01

    Time correlated high-speed video and electromagnetic data for 15 cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning flashes reveal bursts of light, bright enough to be seen through intervening cloud, during the initial breakdown (IB) stage and within the first 3 ms after flash initiation. Each sudden increase in luminosity is coincident with a CG-type (12 cases) or IC-type (3 cases) IB pulse in fast electric field change records. Some of these IB pulses have a coincident VLF/LF (LINET) or a VHF (LDAR2) radiation source. The luminosity bursts of 14 CG flashes occur 11-340 ms before the first return stroke, at altitudes of 4-8 km, and at 4-41 km range from the camera. In seven cases, streamer-type linear segments visibly advance away from the first light burst for 55-200 μs, then the entire length dims, then the luminosity sequence repeats along the same path. These visible initial streamers lengthen intermittently to about 300-1500 m. Their estimated 2-D speeds are 4 to 18 x 10^5 m/s over the first few hundred microseconds and decrease by about 50% over the first 2 ms. In other cases, only a bright spot or a broad area of diffuse light, presumably scattered by intervening cloud, is visible. The bright area grows larger over 20-60 μs before the luminosity fades in about 100 μs, then this sequence may repeat several times. In several of the flashes a 1-2 ms period of little or no luminosity and small E-change is observed following the IB stage prior to stepped leader development. In this presentation we will show examples of the IB luminosity and coincident electromagnetic data.

  8. Locating initial breakdown pulses using electric field change network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Marshall, Thomas C.; Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Karunarathna, Nadeeka; Vickers, Lauren E.; Warner, Tom A.; Orville, Richard E.

    2013-07-01

    Initial breakdown pulses (IBPs) observed in the fast electric field change (E-change) at the beginning of intracloud (IC) and cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes are located using a time-of-arrival technique called Position By Fast Antenna (PBFA) with data from a network of 10 E-change sensors located at Kennedy Space Center. Location errors, estimated using a Monte Carlo method, are usually less than 100 m for horizontal coordinates and several hundreds of meters for altitude, depending on distance to the sensors and altitude of the source. Comparison of PBFA source locations to locations from a VHF lightning mapping system (Lightning Detection and Ranging II (LDAR2)) shows that PBFA locates most of the "classic" IBPs while LDAR2 locates only a few percent of them. As the flash develops during the IB stage, PBFA and LDAR2 obtain similar locations when they detect the same IBPs. The overall vertical motion indicated by the PBFA positions of IBPs was downward with time for CG flashes and upward with time for IC flashes. Location of the fast pulses due to return strokes of CG flashes is also determined using PBFA. Comparison to locations from the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) shows that PBFA reliably locates ground strokes. These results are verified using ground truth data acquired with a high-speed video camera. After cross calibration with the CGLSS data set, peak currents of return strokes are also determined.

  9. Spacecraft attitude pulse-width control at initial, service and emergency modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, Sergey

    2012-11-01

    Problems of nonlinear modeling, dynamic analysis and simulation of spatial motion by a spacecraft with a flexible weak damping structure, are considered. Attitude motion of a flexible spacecraft with pulse-width control, spin-up rotors of six single-gimbal control moment gyros (CMGs) at the initial, service and emergency modes, is studied. Results on analysis of the spacecraft nutation and flexible oscillations, are represented.

  10. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications. PMID:27150739

  11. Preliminary breakdown of intracloud lightning: Initiation altitude, propagation speed, pulse train characteristics, and step length estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting; Yoshida, Satoru; Akiyama, Yasuhiro; Stock, Michael; Ushio, Tomoo; Kawasaki, Zen

    2015-09-01

    Using a low-frequency lightning location system comprising 11 sites, we located preliminary breakdown (PB) processes in 662 intracloud (IC) lightning flashes during the summer of 2013 in Osaka area of Japan. On the basis of three-dimensional location results, we studied initiation altitude and upward propagation speed of PB processes. PB in most IC flashes has an initiation altitude that ranges from 5 to 10 km with an average of 7.8 km. Vertical speed ranges from 0.5 to 17.8 × 105 m/s with an average of 4.0 × 105 m/s. Vertical speed is closely related with initiation altitude, with IC flashes initiated at higher altitude having lower vertical speed during PB stage. Characteristics of PB pulse trains including pulse rate, pulse amplitude, and pulse width are also analyzed. The relationship between pulse rate and vertical speed has the strongest correlation, suggesting that each PB pulse corresponds to one step of the initial leader during the PB stage. Pulse rate, pulse amplitude, and pulse width all show decreasing trends with increasing initiation altitude and increasing trends with increasing vertical speed. Using a simple model, the step length of the initial leader during the PB stage is estimated. Most of initial leaders have step lengths that range from 40 to 140 m with an average of 113 m. Estimated step length has a strong correlation with initiation altitude, indicating that leaders initiated at higher altitude have longer steps. Based on the results of this study, we speculate that above certain altitude (~12 km), initial leaders in PB stages of IC flashes may only have horizontal propagations. PB processes at very high altitude may also have very weak radiation, so detecting and locating them would be relatively difficult.

  12. Pulsed dye laser fragmentation of ureteral calculi: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Dretler, S P; Watson, G; Parrish, J A; Murray, S

    1987-03-01

    The pulsed dye laser, emitting at wavelengths of 504 nm. for 1 microsecond. at a frequency of 5 Hz. transmitted via a 250 mu in diameter silicon-coated quartz fiber, was passed into the ureter through the working channel of a 9.5F rigid ureteroscope. Seventeen patients with ureteral calculi too large to be extracted directly, who were unable to be treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or who otherwise would have required transureteral or percutaneous ultrasonic stone removal, underwent attempted stone fragmentation by pulsed dye laser application. Of the 17 calculi 16 were fragmented to spontaneously passable or easily extractable fragments. There was no significant ureteral injury, thermal or otherwise, attributable to laser energy action. At 3-month followup 15 of the 17 ureters had improved and 2 showed evidence of ureterscopic injury. The mechanism of stone fragmentation by laser is small volume "shock wave" formation. PMID:3820363

  13. Initiation complex structure and promoter proofreading.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Huang, Xuhui; Kornberg, Roger D

    2011-07-29

    The initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II is a multistage process. X-ray crystal structures of transcription complexes containing short RNAs reveal three structural states: one with 2- and 3-nucleotide RNAs, in which only the 3'-end of the RNA is detectable; a second state with 4- and 5-nucleotide RNAs, with an RNA-DNA hybrid in a grossly distorted conformation; and a third state with RNAs of 6 nucleotides and longer, essentially the same as a stable elongating complex. The transition from the first to the second state correlates with a markedly reduced frequency of abortive initiation. The transition from the second to the third state correlates with partial "bubble collapse" and promoter escape. Polymerase structure is permissive for abortive initiation, thereby setting a lower limit on polymerase-promoter complex lifetime and allowing the dissociation of nonspecific complexes. Abortive initiation may be viewed as promoter proofreading, and the structural transitions as checkpoints for promoter control. PMID:21798951

  14. Pulsed oxygen-iodine chemical laser initiated by an electrical discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Rongyao; Chen Fang; Song Xueqin; Xu Qingzhou; Huan Changqing; Zhuang Qi; Zhang Cunhao

    1988-08-01

    This paper demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of an electrically initiated, pulsed oxygen-iodine laser which can be initiated efficiently by low energy electrons. By electrical initiation, an O/sub 2/(/sup 1/..delta..)--CH/sub 3/I--N/sub 2/ mixture has been made to lase with an output energy of 130 mJ. The efficiency of the electrical initiation is 350 times higher than that obtained with photo-initiation.

  15. Polarization sensitive anisotropic structuring of silicon by ultrashort light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyu; Drevinskas, Rokas Beresna, Martynas; Kazansky, Peter G.

    2015-07-27

    Imprinting of anisotropic structures on the silicon surface by double pulse femtosecond laser irradiation is demonstrated. The origin of the polarization-induced anisotropy is explained in terms of interaction of linearly polarized second pulse with the wavelength-sized symmetric crater-shaped structure generated by the linearly polarized first pulse. A wavefront sensor is fabricated by imprinting an array of micro-craters. Polarization controlled anisotropy of the structures can be also explored for data storage applications.

  16. Charge Migration in Phenylalanine Initiated by Attosecond Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Jason; Trabattoni, Andrea; Ayuso, David; Belshaw, Louise; de Camillis, Simone; Anumula, Sunil; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Palacios, Alicia; Declava, Piero; Martin, Fernando; Calegari, Francesca; Nisoli, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years attosecond techniques have been implemented for the investigation of ultrafast dynamics in molecules. The generation of isolated attosecond pulses characterized by a relatively high photon flux has opened up new possibilities in the study of molecular dynamics. We report on experimental and theoretical results of ultrafast charge dynamics in a biochemically relevant molecule, namely, the amino acid phenylalanine. The data represent the first experimental demonstration of the generation and observation of a charge migration process in a complex molecule, where electron dynamics precede nuclear motion. The application of attosecond technology to the investigation of electron dynamics in biologically relevant molecules represents a multidisciplinary work, which can open new research frontiers: those in which few femtosecond and even sub-femtosecond electron processes determine the fate of biomolecules.

  17. Quantitative effect of initial current rise on pumping the double-pulsed copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    The laser energy at optimum time delay of a double-pulsed CuCl laser was experimentally determined to be a logarithmic function of the initial current rise of the pumping pulse over the total circuit inductance range 1 to 12 microhenrys. The minimum delay was found to decrease with initial current rise, which implies that faster rising current pulses are more efficient at pumping copper atoms from the ground state to the upper laser level because lasing threshold occurs with a higher population in the lower laser level.

  18. Real-time study of bulk damage formation in glass initiated by intense femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudriašov, V.; Gaižauskas, E.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2005-12-01

    Dynamics of damage formation by focusing intense femtosecond pulses inside the fused silica glass is studied in wide energy range. Damage usually is initiated in the zone near geometrical focus, which is preceded by the zone where beam propagates in the form of multiple filaments. For high repetition rate pulses damage appears as an extended narrow track along the beam path, which forms due to the propagation of the initial damage zone toward the laser source. For low repetition rate pulses extended damage tracks don't form.

  19. Probabilistic SSME blades structural response under random pulse loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael; Rubinstein, Robert; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to develop models of random impacts on a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump blade and to predict the probabilistic structural response of the blade to these impacts. The random loading is caused by the impact of debris. The probabilistic structural response is characterized by distribution functions for stress and displacements as functions of the loading parameters which determine the random pulse model. These parameters include pulse arrival, amplitude, and location. The analysis can be extended to predict level crossing rates. This requires knowledge of the joint distribution of the response and its derivative. The model of random impacts chosen allows the pulse arrivals, pulse amplitudes, and pulse locations to be random. Specifically, the pulse arrivals are assumed to be governed by a Poisson process, which is characterized by a mean arrival rate. The pulse intensity is modelled as a normally distributed random variable with a zero mean chosen independently at each arrival. The standard deviation of the distribution is a measure of pulse intensity. Several different models were used for the pulse locations. For example, three points near the blade tip were chosen at which pulses were allowed to arrive with equal probability. Again, the locations were chosen independently at each arrival. The structural response was analyzed both by direct Monte Carlo simulation and by a semi-analytical method.

  20. Anode initiated impulse breakdown in water: the dependence on pulse rise time for nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulses and initiation mechanism based on electrostriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan; Fridman, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-10-01

    The effect of the voltage rise time on nanosecond and sub-nanosecond impulse breakdown of distilled water is studied. The dependence of anode initiated streamer inception on this parameter is shown to be more intricate than previously reported, particularly as it relates to mechanisms directly in the liquid phase. Dynamics of the emission phase for sub-nanosecond pulses with 600 ps rise time are presented to enable comparison with previous work on nanosecond initiation features. Schlieren imaging is also used to show the development of optical density perturbations and rarefactions as a result of electrostriction in the liquid which were previously found for nanosecond pulses as well. The mechanism of nanopore generation in the liquid due to fast impulses proposed by Shneider, Pekker and Fridman is used to explain the results.

  1. Sprite streamer initiation from natural mesospheric structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningyu; Dwyer, Joseph R; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C; McHarg, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Sprites are large, luminous electrical discharges in the upper atmosphere caused by intense cloud-to-ground lightning flashes, manifesting an impulsive coupling mechanism between lower and upper atmospheric regions. Their dynamics are governed by filamentary streamer discharges whose propagation properties have been well studied by past work. However, how they are initiated is still under active debate. It has recently been concluded that ionospheric/mesospheric inhomogeneities are required for their initiation, but it is an open question as to what the sources of those inhomogeneities are. Here we present numerical simulation results to demonstrate that naturally-existing, small-scale mesospheric structures such as those created by gravity waves via instability and breaking are viable sources. The proposed theory is supported by a recent, unique high-speed observation from aircraft flying at 14-km altitude. The theory naturally explains many aspects of observed sprite streamer initiation and has important implications for future observational work. PMID:26118893

  2. Intensity improvement in the attosecond pulse generation with the coherent superposition initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liqiang; Chu, Tianshu

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the coherent superposition initial state effect and found that when the initial active electron state is prepared in the coherent superposition of the 1s and 2s states of the He+ ion and the chirp parameter of the fundamental field in the two-color scheme is chosen to be β=0.3, the harmonic cutoff energy is remarkably extended and the harmonic yield is enhanced by at least 6 orders of magnitude compared with the case of the single 1s ground state with chirp-free pulse. An ultrabroad supercontinuum with a 458 eV bandwidth is formed, directly producing an intense isolated 34 as pulse.

  3. On the percentage of lightning flashes that begin with initial breakdown pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T.; Schulz, W.; Karunarathna, N.; Karunarathne, S.; Stolzenburg, M.; Vergeiner, C.; Warner, T.

    2014-01-01

    The initial breakdown (IB) stage of lightning flashes typically occurs in the first 20 ms of a flash and includes a series of IB pulses often detected with electric field change sensors. There is disagreement about the percentage of negative cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes that begin with IB pulses. This study includes new data on IB pulses in 198 CG flashes in Austria (latitude ~48˚N), Florida, USA (~29˚N) and South Dakota, USA (~44˚N) with, respectively, 100%, 100%, and 95% of the flashes having IB pulses. The data indicate that the amplitude of the largest IB pulse, range normalized to 100 km, is often weak, < 0.5 V m-1, with the lower latitude having a greater percentage (36%) of these weak maximum IB pulses than the higher latitude (11%). Since sensor noise levels are often larger than this value, detection of smaller amplitude IB pulses may be difficult. A similar result is seen in the amplitude ratio of the largest IB pulse to the first return stroke: at the lower latitude, 50% of flashes had a ratio < 0.1 versus 8% of flashes at the higher latitude. However, comparisons of the amplitude ratios from Austria (~48˚) and South Dakota (~44˚) do not support a simple latitude dependence. The data also show that 5-10% of IB pulses occur more than 100 ms before the first return stroke. These findings may explain why some previous studies found percentages <100%. Overall, the results indicate that all negative CG flashes probably begin with IB pulses.

  4. Dislocation structure produced by an ultrashort shock pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomoki Hirose, Akio; Sano, Tomokazu; Arakawa, Kazuto

    2014-11-14

    We found an ultrashort shock pulse driven by a femtosecond laser pulse on iron generates a different dislocation structure than the shock process which is on the nanosecond timescale. The ultrashort shock pulse produces a highly dense dislocation structure that varies by depth. According to transmission electron microscopy, dislocations away from the surface produce microbands via a network structure similar to a long shock process, but unlike a long shock process dislocations near the surface have limited intersections. Considering the dislocation motion during the shock process, the structure near the surface is attributed to the ultrashort shock duration. This approach using an ultrashort shock pulse will lead to understanding the whole process off shock deformation by clarifying the early stage.

  5. Double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of explosives: Initial study towards improved discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Frank C.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2007-12-01

    Detecting trace explosive residues at standoff distances in real-time is a difficult problem. One method ideally suited for real-time standoff detection is laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). However, atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen contributes to the LIBS signal from the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing explosive compounds, complicating the discrimination of explosives from other organic materials. While bathing the sample in an inert gas will remove atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen interference, it cannot practically be applied for standoff LIBS. Alternatively, we have investigated the potential of double pulse LIBS to improve the discrimination of explosives by diminishing the contribution of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen to the LIBS signal. These initial studies compare the close-contact (< 1 m) LIBS spectra of explosives using single pulse LIBS in argon with double pulse LIBS in atmosphere. We have demonstrated improved discrimination of an explosive and an organic interferent using double pulse LIBS to reduce the air entrained in the analytical plasma.

  6. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Zhang, H.; Yang, A.; Shen, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J.

    2014-06-01

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2-3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation.

  7. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source.

    PubMed

    Xia, L; Zhang, H; Yang, A; Shen, Y; Wang, W; Wen, L; Zhang, K; Shi, J; Zhang, L; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2-3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation. PMID:24985872

  8. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation in HMX-based explosives with reactive meso-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Reaugh, J. E.; May, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    We performed reactive meso-scale simulations of short-pulse experiments to study the influence of flyer velocity and pore structure on shock initiation of LX-10 (95wt% HMX, 5wt% Viton A). Our calculations show that the reaction evolution fit a power law relationship in time and increases with increasing porosity, decreasing pore size, and increasing flyer velocity. While heterogeneous shock initiation modes, dependent on hot spot mechanisms, are predicted at lower flyer velocities, mixed heterogeneous-homogeneous shock initiation modes, less dependent on hot spots, are predicted at higher velocities. These studies are important because they enable the development of predictive shock initiation models that incorporate complex microstructure and can be used to optimize performance-safety characteristics of explosives.

  9. Luminosity with Intracloud-Type Initial Breakdown Pulses and Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Orville, Richard

    2016-04-01

    High-speed video data for three hybrid lightning flashes show luminosity increases at visible wavelengths that are time-correlated with large, intracloud (IC) type initial breakdown (IB) pulses in electric field change (E-change) data. In one case, a diffuse luminosity increase is visible for 280-300 us, apparently centered near 9 km altitude. At the same time, locations of VHF sources and E-change pulses indicate breakdown activity occurring at altitudes of 9.2-10.2 km altitude, and the initial leader was developing rapidly upward. The second case has a diffuse luminosity increase at the time of three large IC-type IB pulses, while the initial leader is advancing upward from about 7 km altitude. In the third example, a series of luminosity bursts are visible at the times of several large-amplitude IC-type IB pulses, although the center of the activity is apparently above the video frame. In all three hybrid flashes, the luminous IC-type IB pulses are relatively complicated and large in E-change amplitude, and most have distinct electrostatic offset at horizontal distances of 20-25 km from a sensor. Such large amplitude IB pulses have been associated with the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) in prior work [Marshall et al., 2013, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50866]. No satellite or ground-based TGF observations were available for these events, hence it is not known if these TGF candidates produced gammas or other high energy radiation. This presentation describes the video and E-change observations during the intracloud and cloud-to-ground initial breakdown periods of these flashes and implications for TGF production.

  10. Transcription initiation complex structures elucidate DNA opening.

    PubMed

    Plaschka, C; Hantsche, M; Dienemann, C; Burzinski, C; Plitzko, J; Cramer, P

    2016-05-19

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes begins with assembly of the RNA polymerase (Pol) II initiation complex and promoter DNA opening. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of yeast initiation complexes containing closed and open DNA at resolutions of 8.8 Å and 3.6 Å, respectively. DNA is positioned and retained over the Pol II cleft by a network of interactions between the TATA-box-binding protein TBP and transcription factors TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIE, and TFIIF. DNA opening occurs around the tip of the Pol II clamp and the TFIIE 'extended winged helix' domain, and can occur in the absence of TFIIH. Loading of the DNA template strand into the active centre may be facilitated by movements of obstructing protein elements triggered by allosteric binding of the TFIIE 'E-ribbon' domain. The results suggest a unified model for transcription initiation with a key event, the trapping of open promoter DNA by extended protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts. PMID:27193681

  11. Implementation of STUD Pulses at the Trident Laser and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Montgomery, D. S.; Afeyan, B.; Hüller, S.

    2012-10-01

    Controlling and mitigating laser-plasma instabilities such as stimulated Brillouin scattering, stimulated Raman scattering, and crossed-beam energy transfer is important to achieve high-gain inertial fusion using laser drivers. Recent theory and simulations show that these instabilities can be largely controlled using laser pulses consisting of spike trains of uneven duration and delay (STUD) by modulating the laser on a picosecond time scale [1,2]. We have designed and implemented a STUD pulse generator at the LANL Trident Laser Facility using Fourier synthesis to produce a 0.5-ns envelope of psec-duration STUD pulses using a spatial light modulator. Initial results from laser propagation tests and measurements as well as initial laser-plasma characterization experiments will be presented.[4pt] [1] B. Afeyan and S. H"uller, ``Optimal Control of Laser Plasma Instabilities using STUD pulses,'' IFSA 2011, P.Mo.1, to appear in Euro. Phys. J. Web of Conf. (2012).[2] S. H"uller and B. Afeyan, ``Simulations of drastically reduced SBS with STUD pulses,'' IFSA 2011, O.Tu8-1, to appear in Euro. Phys. J. Web of Conf. (2012).

  12. Receiver Function Study of the Peruvian Flat-Slab Region: Initial Results from PULSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, B.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Kumar, A.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    corresponding to locations of Miocene and Pleistocene to Holocene volcanics. The most prominent low velocity body occurs northeast of Lima under the Western Cordillera arc that shut off ~10 Ma presumably due to the onset of flat subduction. Deeper, we interpret a discontinuous P-to-S conversion at ~ 80 km as the Moho in the downgoing slab. South of the Nazca Ridge this correlates well with relocated intermediate depth earthquakes recorded by PULSE, and is similar to prior estimates of the slab depth based on global subduction zone models. North of the ridge, the slab Moho appears more discontinuous and 'broken' and potentially shallower than estimated in global models. We compare these initial findings with available studies of the structural geology and magmatism in the region and kinematic reconstructions of the subduction of the Nazca Ridge to better understand the nature of the interaction between the flat slab and the upper plate.

  13. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge in Water without Bubbles: A Fundamental Study of Initiation, Propagation and Plasma Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan

    The state of plasma is widely known as a gas-phase phenomenon, but plasma in liquids have also received significant attention over the last century. Generating plasma in liquids however is theoretically challenging, and this problem is often overcome via liquid-gas phase transition preceding the actual plasma formation. In this sense, plasma forms in gas bubbles in the liquid. Recent work at the Drexel Plasma Institute has shown that nanosecond pulsed electric fields can initiate plasma in liquids without any initial cavitation phase, at voltages below theoretical direct-ionization thresholds. This unique regime is poorly understood and does not fit into any current descriptive mechanisms. As with all new phenomena, a complete fundamental description is paramount to understanding its usefulness to practical applications. The primary goals of this research were to qualitatively and quantitatively understand the phenomenon of nanosecond pulsed discharge in liquids as a means to characterizing properties that may open up niche application possibilities. Analysis of the plasma was based on experimental results from non-invasive, sub-nanosecond time-resolved optical diagnostics, including direct imaging, transmission imaging (Schlieren and shadow), and optical emission spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of variations in the electric field amplitude and polarity, liquid permittivity, and pulse duration. It was found that the plasma size and emission intensity was dependent on the permittivity of the liquid, as well as the voltage polarity, and the structure and dynamics were explained by a 'cold-lightning' mechanism. The under-breakdown dynamics at the liquid-electrode interface were investigated by transmission imaging to provide evidence for a novel mechanism for initiation based on the electrostriction. This mechanism was proposed by collaborators on the project and developed alongside the experimental work in this

  14. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed.

  15. Radiative Characteristics of the Pulse-Periodic Discharge Plasma Initiated by Runaway Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Sorokin, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Results of experimental investigations of amplitude-temporal and spectral characteristics of radiation of a pulse-periodic discharge plasma initiated in nitrogen by runaway electrons are presented. The discharge was initiated by high-voltage nanosecond voltage pulses with repetition frequency of 60 Hz in a sharply inhomogeneous electric field in a gap between the conic potential cathode and the planar grounded aluminum anode. It is established that intensive lines of Al I atoms and Al II atomic ions, lines of N I atoms and N II ions, bands of the first (1+) and second positive (2+) nitrogen systems, as well as bands of cyanogen CN are observed in the emission spectrum of the discharge plasma under the given excitation conditions.

  16. Optimization of single attosecond x-ray pulses by genetic algorithm control of the chirp and initial phase of 5 fs laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Jun; Sun Zhenrong; Zhang Xiangyun; Wang Yufeng; Zhang Weiping; Wang Zugeng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2006-04-15

    We show that the peak intensity of single attosecond x-ray pulses is enhanced by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude, the pulse duration is greatly compressed, and the optimal propagation distance is shortened by genetic algorithm optimization of the chirp and initial phase of 5 fs laser pulses. However, as the laser intensity increases, more efficient nonadiabatic self-phase matching can lead to a dramatically enhanced harmonic yield, and the efficiency of optimization decreases in the enhancement and compression of the generated attosecond pulses.

  17. Fibonacci-like photonic structure for femtosecond pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Makarava, L N; Nazarov, M M; Ozheredov, I A; Shkurinov, A P; Smirnov, A G; Zhukovsky, S V

    2007-03-01

    The compression of femtosecond laser pulses by linear quasiperiodic and periodic photonic multilayer structures is studied both experimentally and theoretically. We compare the compression performance of a Fibonacci and a periodic structure with similar total thickness and the same number of layers, and find the performance to be higher in the Fibonacci case, as predicted by numerical simulation. This compression enhancement takes place due to the larger group velocity dispersion at a defect resonance of the transmission spectrum of the Fibonacci structure. We demonstrate that the Fibonacci structure with the thickness of only 2.8 microm can compress a phase-modulated laser pulse by up to 30%. The possibility for compression of laser pulses with different characteristics in a single multilayer is explored. The operation of the compressor in the reflection regime has been modeled, and we show numerically that the reflected laser pulse is subjected to real compression: not only does its duration decrease but also its amplitude rises. PMID:17500811

  18. The initial stage of surface modification of magnesium alloys by high intensity pulse ions beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.

    2016-06-01

    The initial stage of high intensity pulsed ion beam irradiated magnesium alloys was studied by MD simulation. Specimens containing Mg17Al12 precipitation were modeled to investigate the evolution of magnesium alloys during several picoseconds after a high-energy ion impacting. It was found that the Mg17Al12 precipitation has little effects on the kinetic energy evolution in the heat zone, but considerable effects on strength of kinetic energy peak moving to the deep matrix and on the surface morphology of the magnesium alloy at thermal equilibrium state. The thickness of the heat zone is independent on the temperature of surface region.

  19. Ultrashort pulse lasers for precise processing: overview on a current German research initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, S.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses provide a powerful means of processing a wide variety of materials with highest precision and minimal damage. In order to exploit the full potential of this technology, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research has launched an initiative with 20 Million EUR funding about two years ago. Within 9 joint research projects, different aspects from novel concepts for robust and powerful laser sources to reliable components with high damage thresholds and dynamic beam shaping and steering are investigated. Applications include eye surgery as well as the processing of semiconductors, carbon fiber reinforced plastics and metals. The paper provides an overview on the different projects and highlights first results.

  20. Health monitoring of operational structures: Initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, G.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.; Simmermacher, T.; Goodding, J.

    Two techniques for damage localization (structural translational and rotational error checking - STRECH, and matrix completion - MAXCON) are described and applied to operational structures. The structures include a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) blade undergoing a fatigue test and a highway bridge undergoing an induced damage test. STRECH is seen to provide a global damage indicator to assess the global damage state of a structure. STRECH is also seen to provide damage localization for static flexibility shapes or the first mode of simple structures. MAXCON is a robust damage localization tool using the higher order dynamics of a structure. Several options arc available to allow the procedure to be tailored to a variety of structures.

  1. Health monitoring of operational structures -- Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.; Simmermacher, T.; Goodding, J.

    1995-03-01

    Two techniques for damage localization (Structural Translational and Rotational Error Checking -- STRECH and MAtriX COmpletioN -- MAXCON) are described and applied to operational structures. The structures include a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) blade undergoing a fatigue test and a highway bridge undergoing an induced damage test. STRECH is seen to provide a global damage indicator to assess the global damage state of a structure. STRECH is also seen to provide damage localization for static flexibility shapes or the first mode of simple structures. MAXCON is a robust damage localization tool using the higher order dynamics of a structure. Several options arc available to allow the procedure to be tailored to a variety of structures.

  2. A Search for Structure in Gamma Ray Burst X-ray Flares Confirming Whether They Are Similar To The Three Pulse Structure Found In Propt Emission Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Jason; Racusin, Judith L.; Morris, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the the most luminous electromagnetic events known to occur throughout the Universe. These violent explosions produce relativistic jets in a short burst of prompt emission and are followed by an afterglow emitted across the electromagnetic spectrum. During the afterglow, there are periods of sporadic increase in the X-ray flux, known as flares. Only ~1/2 of all GRBs produce flares. We present a sample selection of the brightest isolated flares observed by the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT). Using light curves from the XRT Team repository at the University of Leicester between 2005 and 2014, and our own light curve fits, the sample was filtered using a stringent set of criteria. We selected bursts that: 1) had a high peak flare flux to afterglow ratio, and/or 2) a high fluence (integrated flux). By further analyzing these flares, we will study the structure of flares, searching for the three components that have been seen in isolated prompt emission pulses: an initial small rapidly decaying pulse, followed by the main flare which then decays over time and is followed by another small but slower decaying pulse. Seeing a similar behavior in X-ray flares as we see in prompt pulses will inform models for the physics of relativistic shocks.

  3. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  4. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  5. Initial carrier-envelope phase of few-cycle pulses determined by terahertz emission from air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rongjie; Bai, Ya; Song, Liwei; Liu, Peng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-08-01

    The evolution of THz waveform generated in air plasma provides a sensitive probe to the variation of the carrier envelope phase (CEP) of propagating intense few-cycle pulses. Our experimental observation and calculation reveal that the number and positions of the inversion of THz waveform are dependent on the initial CEP, which is near 0.5π constantly under varied input pulse energies when two inversions of THz waveform in air plasma become one. This provides a method of measuring the initial CEP in an accuracy that is only limited by the stability of the driving few-cycle pulses.

  6. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  7. Experimental investigation of jet pulse control on flexible vibrating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, Grigorios; Papanicolaou, Panos; Zacharopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of applying on-line fluid jet pulses to actively control the vibrations of flexible structures subjected to harmonic and earthquake-like base excitations provided by a shake table is explored. The operating principles and capabilities of the control system applied have been investigated in a simplified small-scale laboratory model that is a mass attached at the top free end of a vertical flexible slender beam with rectangular cross-section, the other end of which is mounted on an electrodynamic shaker. A pair of opposite jets placed on the mass at the top of the cantilever beam applied the appropriate forces by ejecting pressurized air pulses controlled by on/off solenoid electro-valves via in house developed control software, in order to control the vibration caused by harmonic, periodic and random excitations at pre-selected frequency content provided by the shaker. The dynamics of the structure was monitored by accelerometers and the jet impulses by pressure sensors. The experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness and reliability of Jet Pulse Control Systems (JPCS). It was verified that the measured root mean square (RMS) vibration levels of the controlled structure from harmonic and earthquake base excitations, could be reduced by approximately 50% and 33% respectively.

  8. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  9. Effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation for a focused laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.

    2015-09-14

    We have investigated the effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation to study electron acceleration by a focused laser pulse in vacuum using a three dimensional test-particle simulation code. The error is obtained by comparing the energy of the electron for paraxial approximation and seventh-order correction description of the fields of Gaussian laser. The paraxial approximation predicts wrong laser divergence and wrong electron escape time from the pulse which leads to prediction of higher energy. The error shows strong phase dependence for the electrons lying along the axis of the laser for linearly polarized laser pulse. The relative error may be significant for some specific values of initial phase even at moderate values of laser spot sizes. The error does not show initial phase dependence for a circularly laser pulse.

  10. Effect of powerful pulsed and continuous ion beams on the Al- Cu-Mg alloy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchina, N. V.; Makhin'ko, F. F.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Gusel'nikov, V. I.; Remnev, G. E.

    2016-02-01

    The paper considers the results of an electron microscopy study of the VD1 alloy of the Al-Cu-Mg system after cold working and subsequent irradiation with a powerful pulsed ion beam (70% C+ + 30% H+, E = 180 keV) in the pulsed-periodic mode (t = 80 ns, f = 0.1 Hz, j = 200 A/cm2, F = 1-1014 cm-2) and under the conditions of the generation of only one pulse (t = 180 ns, j = 100 A/cm2, F = 2-1015 cm-2). It is established that this irradiation noticeably affects the microstructure of the cold-worked 3 mm thick sheets of VD1 alloy. The initial cellular dislocation structure transforms into a subgrain one. The intensity of structural transformations in the alloy increases with ion current density of a pulse. A similar transformation of a dislocation structure over the entire thickness of the sample is observed under irradiation with continuous Ar+ ion beams (E = 20-40 keV) with not high fluences (1015-1016 cm-2).

  11. Investigation of honeycomb structure using pulse infrared thermography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan

    2010-11-01

    To reduce weight and improve strength in the aerospace industry, composite structure has gained popularity as a replacement for conventional materials and structures, such as adhesive bonding and honeycomb structure. Honeycomb structures composed by a honeycomb core between two facesheets are very common on aerospace parts. However, the adhesive bonding process is more susceptible to quality variations during manufacturing than traditional joining methods. With the large increase in the use of composite materials and honeycomb structures, the need for high speed, large area inspection for fracture critical, sub-surface defects in aircraft, missiles and marine composites led to broad acceptance of infrared based NDT methods. Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials. Infrared thermography can be potentially useful, as it is quick, real time, non-contact and can examine over a relatively large area in one inspection procedure. In this paper, two kinds of defects which are of various size, shape and location below the test surface are planted in the honeycomb structure, they are all tested by pulsed thermography, analyze the thermal sequence and intensity graph got by this methods, it shows that pulsed thermography is an effective nondestructive technique for inspecting disbonding defect, can distinguish the location and the dimension of the defect exactly.

  12. Dispersion, damping and confinement of propagating pulses in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1988-01-01

    Pulse propagations in large space structures caused by repeated pulse excitations are studied analytically (by using the Z-transforms) and numerically. It is found that resonance regimes can be generated not only by periodical, but also by non-periodical repeated pulses; the conditions for such regimes are derived. Special attention is paid to the dispersion of propagating pulses due to structural irregularities, to damping of pulses due to appropriate combination of elastic and viscous properties of joints between structural members, and to the protection of certain areas of Large Space Structures (LSS) from impacts provided by a pulse trapping effect.

  13. Magnetic structures of actinide materials by pulsed neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Goldstone, J.A.; Huber, J.G.; Giorgi, A.L.; Conant, J.W.; Severing, A.; Cort, B.; Robinson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We describe some attempts to observe magnetic structure in various actinide (5f-electron) materials. Our experimental technique is neutron powder diffraction as practiced at a spallation (pulsed) neutron source. We will discuss our investigations of {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, {alpha}-UD{sub 3} and {beta}-UD{sub 3}. {beta}-UD{sub 3} is a simple ferromagnet: surprisingly, the moments on the two non-equivalent uranium atoms are the same within experimental error. {alpha}-UD{sub 3}, {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu are non-magnetic, within the limits of our observations. Our work with pulsed neutron diffraction shows that it is a useful technique for research on magnetic materials.

  14. Structure of Microgravity Transitional and Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Hegde, Uday; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained in a study of pulsed gas jet diffusion flames to better characterize the recently observed vortex/flame interactions in microgravity transitional and turbulent diffusion flames, and to improve the understanding of large-scale structures in corresponding normal-gravity flames. In preparation for a space experiment, tests were conducted in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of the NASA Lewis Research Center. Both unpulsed and pulsed laminar flames were studied and numerical modeling of these flames was carried out for data comparison and model validation. In addition, complementary tests for a series of unpulsed flames were conducted on-board the NASA KC-135 research aircraft. The microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames have been observed to be dominated by large-scale disturbances, or structures. These structures first appear intermittently in the flame at Reynolds numbers (based on the cold jet injection properties) of about 2100. With increase in injection Reynolds number, the rate of intermittent disturbances increases until the generation becomes continuous at Reynolds numbers of 3000 and higher. The behavior of these structures depends upon the velocity and temperature characteristics of the jet/flame shear layer. These characteristics are different in normal gravity and microgravity.

  15. Generation of Rydberg states of hydrogen atoms with intense laser pulses: The roles of Coulomb force and initial lateral momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the generation of Rydberg states of hydrogen atoms with intense laser pulses by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and by means of classical-trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. Both linearly polarized multicycle pulses and pairs of optical half-cycle pulses are used. Comparisons between these methods show that both the Coulomb force and initial lateral momentum, which have effects on the n distribution and l distribution of the population of excited states, are important in the generation of Rydberg states.

  16. Surface mico-structures on amorphous alloys induced by vortex femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Ling-Ling; Qu, Shi-Liang; Guo, Zhong-Yi

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates the generation of self-organized surface structures on amorphous alloys by vortex femtosecond laser pulses. The scanning electron microscope characterizations show that the as-formed structures are periodic ripples, aperiodic ripples, and 'coral-like' structures. Optimal conditions for forming these surface structures are determined in terms of pulses number at a given pulse energy. The applicable mechanism is suggested to interpret the formation and evolution of the 'coral-like' structures.

  17. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:23351273

  18. Ultra-short Pulse Laser Structuring of Molding Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Richter, Lars

    The machining of highly filled abrasive polymer plastics in injection molding processes determines high resistant tools in the industrial production. One of the most important points is a long durability of the molding tools to reduce the costs of production. Thus, the adhesion force and abrasion will be reduced with the help of defined surface properties. To achieve appropriate surface conditions, an ultra-short pulse laser is used for a micro structuring. Additional a laser polishing of the micro-structured surfaces to optimize the frictional properties is presented. This paper shows the research results of investigations on the laser modification of steel surfaces, to generate high-quality and wear-resistant surfaces for injection molding tools.

  19. Pulse swallowing frequency divider with low power and compact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haijun, Gao; Lingling, Sun; Chaobo, Cai; Haiting, Zhan

    2012-11-01

    A pulse swallowing frequency divider with low power and compact structure is presented. One of the DFFs in the divided by 2/3 prescaler is controlled by the modulus control signal, and automatically powered off when it has no contribution to the operation of the prescaler. The DFFs in the program counter and the swallow counter are shared to compose a compact structure, which reduces the power consumption further. The proposed multi-modulus frequency divider was implemented in a standard 65 nm CMOS process with an area of 28 × 22 μm2. The power consumption of the divider is 0.6 mW under 1.2 V supply voltage when operating at 988 MHz.

  20. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  1. Monitoring of concrete structures using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, G.; Deraemaeker, A.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2015-11-01

    Concrete is the material most produced by humanity. Its popularity is mainly based on its low production cost and great structural design flexibility. Its operational and ambient loadings including environmental effects have a great impact in the performance and overall cost of concrete structures. Thus, the quality control, the structural assessment, the maintenance and the reliable prolongation of the operational service life of the existing concrete structures have become a major issue. In the recent years, non-destructive testing (NDT) is becoming increasingly essential for reliable and affordable quality control and integrity assessment not only during the construction of new concrete structures, but also for the existing ones. Choosing the right inspection technique is always followed by a compromise between its performance and cost. In the present paper, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) method, which is the most well known and widely accepted ultrasonic concrete NDT method, is thoroughly reviewed and compared with other well-established NDT approaches. Their principles, inherent limitations and reliability are reviewed. In addition, while the majority of the current UPV techniques are based on the use of piezoelectric transducers held on the surface of the concrete, special attention is paid to a very promising technique using low-cost and aggregate-size piezoelectric transducers embedded in the material. That technique has been evaluated based on a series of parameters, such as the ease of use, cost, reliability and performance.

  2. Control structure interactions in large space structures Analysis using energy approach. [for constant and pulsed thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, S. K.; Ried, R. C.; Manoharan, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    A simple energy approach to study the problem of control structure interactions in large space structures is presented. For the illustrative cases of free-free beam and free rectangular plate, the vibrational energy imparted during operation of constant and pulsed thrusters is found in a nondimensional form. Then based on a parametric study, suggestions are made on the choice of the thruster location and parameters to minimize the control structure interactions.

  3. Dying Pulse Trains in Cygnus XR-1: Initial Results of X-Ray Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.

    2003-01-01

    Dying pulse trains (DPT's) are a signature of a black hole as described by general relativity. Detecting DPT's would establish the existence of black holes by ruling out more exotic objects in systems in which a neutron star or white dwarf component has already been excluded by maximum mass arguments. The positive identification of a black hole would also be an additional test of general relativity. Two possible DPT's were detected in W photometry of Cygnus XR-1, the leading candidate for a stellar mass sized BH, in 3 hours of observational data. A search of X-ray photometry of Cygnus XR-1 from the Ross1 X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has begun. No DPT's have been detected in the first 4 hours of data searched. Because of the low event rate detected in the W data, these initial results are consistent with such disparate scenarios as the rate of DPT occurrence being dependent on the luminosity state of the system; or being more difficult to detect in the X-ray region relative to the W region; or occurring at the same rate in the W and X-ray regions; or even not occurring at all from Cygnus XR-1. The search for DPT's in RXTE photometry is continuing.

  4. The structure and photoconductivity of SiGe/Si epitaxial layers modified by single-pulse laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivlev, G. D.; Kazuchits, N. M.; Prakopyeu, S. L.; Rusetsky, M. S.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanosecond pulses of ruby laser radiation on the structural state and morphology of the epitaxial layers of a SiO0.5Ge0.5 solid solution on silicon with the initiation of a crystal-melt phase transition has been studied by electron microscopy. Data on the photoelectric parameters of the laser-modified layers having a cellular structure owing to the segregation of germanium during the solidification of the binary melt have been derived.

  5. Spatial structure of the arc in a pulsed GMAW process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakov, R.; Gött, G.; Schöpp, H.; Uhrlandt, D.; Schnick, M.; Häßler, M.; Füssel, U.; Rose, S.

    2013-06-01

    A pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process of steel under argon shielding gas in the globular mode is investigated by measurements and simulation. The analysis is focussed on the spatial structure of the arc during the current pulse. Therefore, the radial profiles of the temperature, the metal vapour species and the electric conductivity are determined at different heights above the workpiece by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). It is shown that under the presence of metal vapour the temperature minimum occurs at the centre of the arc. This minimum is preserved at different axial positions up to 1 mm above the workpiece. In addition, estimations of the electric field in the arc from the measurements are given. All these results are compared with magneto-hydrodynamic simulations which include the evaporation of the wire material and the change of the plasma properties due to the metal vapour admixture in particular. The experimental method and the simulation model are validated by means of the satisfactory correspondence between the results. Possible reasons for the remaining deviations and improvements of the methods which should be aspired are discussed.

  6. Pulsed phase thermography for defect detection of honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Feng, Lichun; Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Cunlin

    2009-07-01

    Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) has been reported as a powerful technique of the thermal NDE. In this paper, the authors show that the original phase-images of two kinds of honeycomb structure defects by PPT based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) for the signal of temperature-time of each pixel. One is the artificial defects in honeycomb structure core under surface skin, and the defects can be identified easily. The other is disbonding defect between surface skin and core, and the difference is apparent compared with bonding and no-bonding between surface skin and core. To improve the signal to noise ratio for defect inspection of honeycomb structure, the temperature decay curve of each pixel is smoothed by moving average filter and then fitted by exponential function. After FFT on the fitted data of temperature, the fitted phase-images of two kinds of honeycomb structure defects are given. Compared with the original thermal-images of PT and original phase-images, the calculated phase-images are much more improved. Another advantage is the data could be represented by coefficients of fitting functions, and the storage of data could be greatly reduced. At last, the calculation process of temperature decay curve and analysis of the influence caused by increasing sampling time and frequency are given.

  7. Initial Results From The Micro-pulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Berkoff, T. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Ginoux, P.

    2001-12-01

    The micro-pulse lidar system (MPL) was developed in the early 1990s and was the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar built for fulltime monitoring of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions. In 2000, a new project using MPL systems was started at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This new project, the Micro-pulse Lidar Network or MPL-Net, was created to provide long-term observations of aerosol and cloud vertical profiles at key sites around the world. This is accomplished using both NASA operated sites and partnerships with other organizations owning MPL systems. The MPL-Net sites are co-located with NASA AERONET sunphotometers to provide aerosol optical depth data needed for calibration of the MPL. In addition to the long-term sites, MPL-Net provides lidar support for a limited number of field experiments and ocean cruises each year. We will present an overview of the MPL-Net project and show initial results from the first two MPL-Net sites at the South Pole and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Observations of dust layers transported from the desert regions of China, across the Pacific Ocean, to the east coast of the United States will also be shown. MPL-Net affiliated instruments were in place at the desert source region in China, on a research vessel in the Sea of Japan, at ARM sites in Alaska and Oklahoma, and finally at our home site in Maryland (GSFC) during the massive dust storms that occurred in April 2001. The MPL observations of dust layers at each location are shown in comparison to dust layers predicted using the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). Finally, the MPL-Net project is the primary ground-validation program for the Geo-Science Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite lidar project (launch date 2002). We will present an overview demonstrating how MPL-Net results are used to help prepare the GLAS data processing algorithms and assist in the calibration/validation of the GLAS data

  8. Initial Results from the Micro-pulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ginoux, Paul; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The micro-pulse lidar system (MPL) was developed in the early 1990s and was the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar built for full time monitoring of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions. In 2000, a new project using MPL systems was started at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This new project, the Micro-pulse Lidar Network or MPL-Net, was created to provide long-term observations of aerosol and cloud vertical profiles at key sites around the world. This is accomplished using both NASA operated sites and partnerships with other organizations owning MPL systems. The MPL-Net sites are co-located with NASA AERONET sunphotometers to provide aerosol optical depth data needed for calibration of the MPL. In addition to the long-term sites, MPL-Net provides lidar support for a limited number of field experiments and ocean cruises each year. We will present an overview of the MPL-Net project and show initial results from the first two MPL-Net sites at the South Pole and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Observations of dust layers transported from the Gobi desert, across the Pacific Ocean, to the east coast of the United States will also be shown. MPL-Net affiliated instruments were in place at the desert source region in China, on a research vessel in the Sea of Japan, at ARM sites in Alaska and Oklahoma, and finally at our home site in Maryland (GSFC) during the massive dust storms that occurred in April 2001. The MPL observations of dust layers at each location are shown in comparison to dust layers predicted using the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). Finally, the MPL-Net project is the primary ground-validation program for the Geo-Science Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite lidar project (launch date 2002). We will present an overview demonstrating how MPL-Net results are used to help prepare the GLAS data processing algorithms and assist in the calibration/validation of the GLAS data products.

  9. Spectral evolution of pulse structures in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Dennis, B. R.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data from the Solar Maximum Mission satellite have been searched for gamma-ray bursts with sufficient intensities and relatively simple time profiles such that their spectral behavior may be studied on a time scale of about 1 s. Ten such events were observed with the GRS experiment, and four of these were also detected within the HXRBS field of view. Details are presented for two moderately intense bursts with relatively simple structure. The spectral evolutions of the remaining events are summarized briefly. Results suggest a pattern in the spectral evolution within burst pulses: a tendency for the high-energy emission to lead the low-energy emission, in contrast to the correlation of intensity and spectral hardness reported by Golenetskii et al. (1983).

  10. Characterization of multiple twinned structural units in pulse-electrodeposited nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, U.; Kahrimanidis, A.; Yao, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The investigation was performed on pulse-electrodeposited Nickel with submicrocrystalline microstructure containing slightly elongated grains having a <110> fibre texture in growth direction. Structural units in form of groups of elongated grains possessing a common <110>-zone axis in growth direction and CSL boundaries (in some cases twins) between them have been found in the microstructure by use of EBSD. Grain growth sets in above 325°C but the texture is conserved up to at least 600°C. This means that the arrangement of twins and other CSL boundaries stabilized the structural units; there is no orientation change (by further twinning) when grain growth occurs as seen in previous studies on Ni and Ni-Fe of different initial texture. The observed structural units were characterized in detail and the occurring grains and grain boundaries are described.

  11. The impact of structure dimensions on initial bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Helbig, Ralf; Günther, Denise; Friedrichs, Jens; Rößler, Florian; Lasagni, Andrés; Werner, Carsten

    2016-07-21

    Substrate topography can have profound effects on initial bacterial adhesion during biofilm formation. We applied Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli cells onto periodically structured substrates with different structure dimensions, structure types and wetting properties. We found a strong dependence of cell retention on the structure dimensions of the applied substrates. Periodicities in the range of the cell size increased, whereas smaller periodicities decreased cell retention, independent of contact time (minutes to hours) and hydrophobicity. These novel insights on the role of surface topography on bacterial retention might facilitate the development of non-fouling surfaces in the future. PMID:27232637

  12. Sensitivity of a Wave Structure to Initial Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Duval, Walter M. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity experiments aimed at quantifying effects of gentler via controlled sinusoidal forcing transmitted on the interface between two miscible liquids have shown the evolution of a quasi -stationary four-mode wave structure oriented vertically. The sensitivity of the wave structure to phase angle variation is investigated computationally. We show that a slight variation of the phase angle is sufficient to cause a bifurcation to a two-mode structure. The dependence of phase angle on wave structure is attributed to sensitivity on initial conditions due to the strong nonlinearity of the coupled field equations for the parametric space of interest.

  13. Saturable inductor and transformer structures for magnetic pulse compression

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    Saturable inductor and transformer for magnetic compression of an electronic pulse, using a continuous electrical conductor looped several times around a tightly packed core of saturable inductor material.

  14. Sub-diffraction limited structuring of solid targets with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Korte, F; Adams, S; Egbert, A; Fallnich, C; Ostendorf, A; Nolte, S; Will, M; Ruske, J P; Chichkov, B; Tuennermann, A

    2000-07-17

    Possibilities to produce sub-diffraction limited structures in thin metal films and bulk dielectric materials using femtosecond laser pulses are investigated. The physics of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solids is outlined. Results on the fabrication of sub-micrometer structures in 100-200 nm chrome-coated surfaces by direct ablative writing are reported. Polarization maintaining optical waveguides produced by femtosecond laser pulses inside crystalline quartz are demonstrated. PMID:19404368

  15. INITIAL EVALUATION OF A PULSED WHITE SPECTRUM NEUTRON GENERATOR FOR EXPLOSIVE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel,, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-06-02

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is acritical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designedand fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set ofparallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80 - 120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing.

  16. Open Access Initiatives in Africa--Structure, Incentives and Disincentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwagwu, Williams E.

    2013-01-01

    Building open access in Africa is imperative not only for African scholars and researchers doing scientific research but also for the expansion of the global science and technology knowledgebase. This paper examines the structure of homegrown initiatives, and observes very low level of awareness prevailing in the higher educational institutions…

  17. Multiple attractors in stage-structured population models with birth pulses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sanyi; Chen, Lansun

    2003-05-01

    In most models of population dynamics, increases in population due to birth are assumed to be time-independent, but many species reproduce only during a single period of the year. A single species stage-structured model with density-dependent maturation rate and birth pulse is formulated. Using the discrete dynamical system determined by its Poincaré map, we report a detailed study of the various dynamics, including (a) existence and stability of nonnegative equilibria, (b) nonunique dynamics, meaning that several attractors coexist, (c) basins of attraction (defined as the set of the initial conditions leading to a certain type of attractor), (d) supertransients, and (e) chaotic attractors. The occurrence of these complex dynamic behaviour is related to the fact that minor changes in parameter or initial values can strikingly change the dynamic behaviours of system. Further, it is shown that periodic birth pulse, in effect, provides a natural period or cyclicity that allows multiple oscillatory solutions in the continuous dynamical systems. PMID:12749535

  18. Generation and structure of extremely large clusters in pulsed jets.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Flückiger, Leonie; Gorkhover, Tais; Müller, Jan Philippe; Müller, Maria; Sauppe, Mario; Wolter, David; Schorb, Sebastian; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas

    2014-07-28

    Extremely large xenon clusters with sizes exceeding the predictions of the Hagena scaling law by several orders of magnitude are shown to be produced in pulsed gas jets. The cluster sizes are determined using single-shot single-particle imaging experiments with short-wavelength light pulses from the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Scanning the time delay between the pulsed cluster source and the intense femtosecond x-ray pulses first shows a main plateau with size distributions in line with the scaling laws, which is followed by an after-pulse of giant clusters. For the extremely large clusters with radii of several hundred nanometers the x-ray scattering patterns indicate a grainy substructure of the particles, suggesting that they grow by cluster coagulation. PMID:25084909

  19. Generation and structure of extremely large clusters in pulsed jets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, Daniela Adolph, Marcus; Flückiger, Leonie; Müller, Jan Philippe; Müller, Maria; Sauppe, Mario; Wolter, David; Möller, Thomas; Gorkhover, Tais; Schorb, Sebastian; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-07-28

    Extremely large xenon clusters with sizes exceeding the predictions of the Hagena scaling law by several orders of magnitude are shown to be produced in pulsed gas jets. The cluster sizes are determined using single-shot single-particle imaging experiments with short-wavelength light pulses from the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Scanning the time delay between the pulsed cluster source and the intense femtosecond x-ray pulses first shows a main plateau with size distributions in line with the scaling laws, which is followed by an after-pulse of giant clusters. For the extremely large clusters with radii of several hundred nanometers the x-ray scattering patterns indicate a grainy substructure of the particles, suggesting that they grow by cluster coagulation.

  20. Narrow bipolar pulse locations compared to thunderstorm radar echo structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathna, Nadeeka; Marshall, Thomas C.; Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Karunarathne, Sumedhe

    2015-11-01

    The locations of 172 positive narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs) found on one day in Florida are superimposed on radar reflectivity data from that day. All 172 NBPs were found within the reflectivity of a thundercloud or at the edge of the reflectivity. The NBPs were classified into three groups: (I) in or above the high-reflectivity core of the storm, (II) in the convective region but not Group I, or (III) in the anvil region. Groups I, II, and III had, respectively, 79%, 17%, and 4% of the NBPs. Of the 136 NBPs in Group I, 43% occurred within the reflectivity core and 57% occurred above the core. A sequence of 34 positive NBPs during 1 h of one thunderstorm suggests that the majority of NBPs occurred during the rapid growth of two thunderstorm cells. Positive NBPs seem to recur in some storm locations; 67 (39%) of the NBPs were part of a recurrent set. We found 28 cases of NBPs recurring in approximately the same location, including 22 doublets, 3 triplets, 2 quadruplets, and 1 sextuplet. Analyses of one quadruplet and one sextuplet showed that these 10 positive NBPs occurred just above and/or right beside the high-reflectivity core on the downshear side of the core. Our data lead us to a hypothesis that NBPs occurring between the thunderstorm's upper positive charge and upper negative screening charge are initiated by small-scale charge regions with positive charge above negative charge, or opposite the orientation of the large-scale storm charges.

  1. Template Reproduction of GRB Pulse Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon E.; Preece, R. D.; Loredo, T. J.; Wolpert, R. L.; Broadbent, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    A study of well-isolated pulses in gamma ray burst light curves indicates that simple models having smooth and monotonic pulse rises and decays are inadequate. Departures from the Norris et al. (2005) pulse shape are in the form of a wave-like pre-peak residual that is mirrored and stretched following the peak. Pulse shape departures are present in GRB pulses of all durations, but placement of the departures relative to pulse peaks correlates with asymmetry. This establishes an additional link between temporal structure and spectral evolution, as pulse asymmetry is related to initial hardness while pulse duration indicates the rate of hard-to-soft pulse evolution.

  2. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C. M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-01

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  3. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C. M. Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-10

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  4. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse.

    PubMed

    Szlachetko, J; Milne, C J; Hoszowska, J; Dousse, J-Cl; Błachucki, W; Sà, J; Kayser, Y; Messerschmidt, M; Abela, R; Boutet, S; David, C; Williams, G; Pajek, M; Patterson, B D; Smolentsev, G; van Bokhoven, J A; Nachtegaal, M

    2014-03-01

    Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10(-18) s) to femtoseconds (10(-15) s) and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS), we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments. PMID:26798772

  5. Structures of heterogeneous systems determined using XFEL pulses in the face of radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Linda; Ho, Phay; Knight, Chris; Bostedt, Christoph; Faigl, Gyula; Tegze, Miklos

    2016-05-01

    Intense, femtosecond x-ray free-electron laser pulses are a promising tool for studying the structure and dynamics of complex systems at atomic resolution. Our previous efforts, using an atomistic quantum/classical model to track the dynamical evolution of ions and electrons throughout a femtosecond x-ray pulse and out to picosecond timescales, focused on quantifying the effects of radiation damage on homogeneous rare gas clusters for imaging applications in an ideal situation. In these studies, the entire 3D Q-space scattering pattern was computed and available for reconstruction of the initial structure. However, a realistic representation of an experiment would feature a collection of noisy 2D scattering patterns, from which orientation would first be required to generate the 3D Q-space distribution from which solution of the phase problem and reconstruction would then proceed. We will present the first results of these efforts on heterogeneous systems. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  6. Communication: The electronic structure of matter probed with a single femtosecond hard x-ray pulse

    PubMed Central

    Szlachetko, J.; Milne, C. J.; Hoszowska, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Błachucki, W.; Sà, J.; Kayser, Y.; Messerschmidt, M.; Abela, R.; Boutet, S.; David, C.; Williams, G.; Pajek, M.; Patterson, B. D.; Smolentsev, G.; van Bokhoven, J. A.; Nachtegaal, M.

    2014-01-01

    Physical, biological, and chemical transformations are initiated by changes in the electronic configuration of the species involved. These electronic changes occur on the timescales of attoseconds (10−18 s) to femtoseconds (10−15 s) and drive all subsequent electronic reorganization as the system moves to a new equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium state. The ability to detect the dynamics of these electronic changes is crucial for understanding the potential energy surfaces upon which chemical and biological reactions take place. Here, we report on the determination of the electronic structure of matter using a single self-seeded femtosecond x-ray pulse from the Linac Coherent Light Source hard x-ray free electron laser. By measuring the high energy resolution off-resonant spectrum (HEROS), we were able to obtain information about the electronic density of states with a single femtosecond x-ray pulse. We show that the unoccupied electronic states of the scattering atom may be determined on a shot-to-shot basis and that the measured spectral shape is independent of the large intensity fluctuations of the incoming x-ray beam. Moreover, we demonstrate the chemical sensitivity and single-shot capability and limitations of HEROS, which enables the technique to track the electronic structural dynamics in matter on femtosecond time scales, making it an ideal probe technique for time-resolved X-ray experiments. PMID:26798772

  7. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges in Liquid Phase: Optical diagnostics of positive versus negative modes of initiation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan; Fridman, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil; Applied Physics Group Team

    2013-09-01

    Recent work on nanosecond pulsed discharges in liquids has shown the possibility of producing plasma directly in the liquid phase without bubble formation or heating of the liquid. Paramount to understanding the physical processes leading to this phenomenon is a thorough understanding of the way these discharges behave under various conditions. This work explores the development of nanosecond pulsed discharges in water, for both positively and negatively applied pulses in a pin-to-plane configuration. Time resolved nanosecond ICCD imaging is used to trace the development of the discharge for applied voltages up to 24 kV. From the results we are able to identify breakdown thresholds at which discharge is initiated for both modes. At voltages below the critical breakdown value, Schlieren and shadowgraphy techniques are used to investigate perturbations in the liquid layers near the electrode tip as a consequence of these fat rising pulses. This work was supported by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (grant #DARPA-BAA-11-31).

  8. Mechanisms of three-dimensional structuring of photo-polymers by tightly focussed femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Zukauskas, Albertas; Bickauskaite, Gabija; Gadonas, Roaldas; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2010-05-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nano-structuring of photo-resists is systematically studied at the close-to-dielectric- breakdown irradiance. It is demonstrated that avalanche absorption is playing a major part in free electron generation and chemical bond breaking at these conditions. The steps of photo-initiation and chemical bond breaking in propagation of polymerization are altered as compared with photo-polymerization at low-irradiance and one-photon stereo-lithography. The avalanche dominates radical generation and promotion of polymerization at tight focusing and a high approximately TW/cm(2) irradiance. The rates of electron generation by two-photon absorption and avalanche are calculated for the experimental conditions. Simulation results are corroborated by 3D polymerization in three resists with different photo-initiators at two different wavelengths and pulse durations. The smallest feature sizes of 3D polymerized logpile structures are consistent with spectral dependencies of the two photon nonlinearities. Implications of these findings for achieving sub-100 nm resolution in 3D structuring of photo-polymers are presented. PMID:20588875

  9. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Kenneth R. Crimaldi, John P.; Meiss, James D.

    2015-03-15

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement.

  10. Modeling the initiation and growth of delaminations in composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Mello, F.J.; Guess, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    A method for modeling the initiation and growth of discrete delaminations in shell-like composite structures is presented. The laminate is divided into two or more sublaminates, with each sublaminate modeled with 4-noded quadrilateral shell elements. A special, 8-noded hex constraint element connects the sublaminates and makes them act as a single laminate until a prescribed failure criterion is attained. When the failure criterion is reached, the connection is broken, and a discrete delamination is initiated or grows. This approach has been implemented in a three-dimensional, finite element code. This code uses explicit time integration, and can analyze shell-like structures subjected to large deformations and complex contact conditions. Tensile, compressive, and shear laminate failures are also modeled. This paper describes the 8-noded hex constraint element used to model the initiation and growth of a delamination, and discusses associated implementation issues. In addition, calculated results for double cantilever beam and end notched flexure specimens are presented and compared to measured data to assess the ability of the present approach to reproduce observed behavior. Results are also presented for a diametrally compressed ring to demonstrate the capacity to analyze progressive failure in a highly deformed composite structure.

  11. Air nonlinear dynamics initiated by ultra-intense lambda-cubic terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, Mostafa E-mail: christoph.hauri@psi.ch; Hauri, Christoph P. E-mail: christoph.hauri@psi.ch

    2015-05-04

    We report on the measurement of the instantaneous Kerr nonlinearity and the retarded alignment of air molecules CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} triggered by an intense, lambda-cubic terahertz pulse, a diffraction- and transform-limited single-cycle pulse. The strong-field, impulsive low-frequency excitation (3.9 THz) leads to field-free alignment dynamics of these molecules thanks to the terahertz-induced transient dipole moments in the otherwise non-polar molecules. The strong coupling to the terahertz electric transient results in the excitation of coherent large amplitude long-living rotational states at room temperature and ambient pressure. Beyond fundamental investigations of nonlinear properties in gases, our results suggest a route towards field-free molecular alignment at laser intensity well below the ionization threshold.

  12. Air nonlinear dynamics initiated by ultra-intense lambda-cubic terahertz pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the measurement of the instantaneous Kerr nonlinearity and the retarded alignment of air molecules CO2, N2, and O2 triggered by an intense, lambda-cubic terahertz pulse, a diffraction- and transform-limited single-cycle pulse. The strong-field, impulsive low-frequency excitation (3.9 THz) leads to field-free alignment dynamics of these molecules thanks to the terahertz-induced transient dipole moments in the otherwise non-polar molecules. The strong coupling to the terahertz electric transient results in the excitation of coherent large amplitude long-living rotational states at room temperature and ambient pressure. Beyond fundamental investigations of nonlinear properties in gases, our results suggest a route towards field-free molecular alignment at laser intensity well below the ionization threshold.

  13. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  14. Initial electronic coherence in molecular dissociation induced by an attosecond pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medišauskas, Lukas; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Harvey, Alex; Brambila, Danilo S.; Neidel, Christian; Klei, Jesse; Rouzée, Arnaud; Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the influence of the attosecond electron dynamics of photoionization on the femtosecond fragmentation of the molecular ion left behind. We consider the dissociative photoionization dynamics of the N2 molecule, induced by an attosecond extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulse in the presence of a moderately strong infrared (IR) laser field. We show that the kinetic energy spectrum of N+ fragments depends on (i) the phases between the different electronic states of N2 + established by the photoionization process and (ii) phases associated with the vibrational dynamics in the dissociating molecular ion. We show that the phase acquired during the photoionization can be obtained from the dependence of the N+ ion kinetic energy release spectra on the time delay between the XUV and IR pulses.

  15. Structural insights into transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Sebastian; Hahn, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is one of the most important steps in control of cell identity, growth, differentiation and development. Many signaling pathways controlling these processes ultimately target the core transcription machinery that, for protein coding genes, consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors (GTFs). New studies on the structure and mechanism of the core assembly and how it interfaces with promoter DNA and coactivator complexes have given tremendous insight into early steps in the initiation process, genome-wide binding, and mechanisms conserved for all nuclear and archaeal Pols. Here we review recent developments in dissecting the architecture of the Pol II core machinery with a focus on early and regulated steps in transcription initiation. PMID:24120742

  16. Structural basis of initial RNA polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Alan C M; Sainsbury, Sarah; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    During transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II, a transient open promoter complex (OC) is converted to an initially transcribing complex (ITC) containing short RNAs, and to a stable elongation complex (EC). We report structures of a Pol II–DNA complex mimicking part of the OC, and of complexes representing minimal ITCs with 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 nucleotide (nt) RNAs, with and without a non-hydrolyzable nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) in the insertion site +1. The partial OC structure reveals that Pol II positions the melted template strand opposite the active site. The ITC-mimicking structures show that two invariant lysine residues anchor the 3′-proximal phosphate of short RNAs. Short DNA–RNA hybrids adopt a tilted conformation that excludes the +1 template nt from the active site. NTP binding induces complete DNA translocation and the standard hybrid conformation. Conserved NTP contacts indicate a universal mechanism of NTP selection. The essential residue Q1078 in the closed trigger loop binds the NTP 2′-OH group, explaining how the trigger loop couples catalysis to NTP selection, suppressing dNTP binding and DNA synthesis. PMID:22056778

  17. Monitoring of initial patterns and structures in an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Biemelt, Detlef; Fischer, Anton

    2010-05-01

    To combine process-oriented research on initial development of ecosystems with interactions and co-development of spatial patterns and structures the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR) 38 (www.tu-cottbus.de/sfb_trr) was established as an initiative of three universities (BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich). The objective of the SFB/TRR 38 is to enhance our understanding of structure genesis in ecosystems and of process dynamics as well as their interactions during the initial development phase. The aim is to integrate these feedback mechanisms in the analysis of water and element budgets at the catchment scale and to implement them into models. To allow the clear definition of starting conditions at ´point zeró and to be able to integrate spatially distributed processes and patterns to larger units, an artificial catchment was constructed in the mining area of Lusatia/Germany as the main research site (Gerwin et al. 2009a). With an area of about 6 ha, this catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ is to our knowledge the largest artificial catchment worldwide. It was constructed as a 2-4 m layer of post-glacial sandy to loamy sediments overlying a 1-2 m layer of Tertiary clay that forms a shallow pan and seals the whole catchment at the base. No further measures of restoration like planting, amelioration or fertilization were carried out to allow natural succession and undisturbed development. Due to the artificial construction, boundary conditions of this site are clearly defined including well documented inner structures as compared to natural catchments. It is assumed that the interaction of patterns and processes during initial development will proceed from simpler to more complex states of the systems and that different stages along this phase can be identified at the catchment level. Changes within the catchment are intensively monitored since 2005, when construction finished (Gerwin et al. 2009b), including intensive on-site measurements and micro

  18. Development and initial testing of a pulse oximetry prototype for measuring dental pulp vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, M.; Ferreira, M.; Caramelo, F.

    2015-05-01

    The guiding principle of endodontic treatment is to preserve teeth while maintaining its aesthetic and functional roles. To accomplish this goal the assessment of teeth pulp vitality is very important since it will determine the procedures that should be adopted and define the therapy strategy. Currently, the most commonly tests for determining dental pulp state are the thermal and the electrical tests, which are based on nerve response and, because of that, have a relatively high rate of false positives and false negatives cases. In this work we present a simple test to be used in the clinical setting for evaluating noninvasively the existence of blood perfusion in dental pulp. This test is based on pulse oximetry principle that was devised to indirectly measure the amount of oxygen in blood. Although pulse oximetry has already demonstrated its usefulness in clinical environment its usage for the determination of dental pulp vitality has been frustrated by several factors, notably the absence of a suitable sensor to the complex shape of the various coronary teeth. We developed a suitable sensor and present the first trials with promising results, regarding the ability for distinguish teeth with and without blood perfusion.

  19. Structure of Shocks in Burgers Turbulencewith Stable Noise Initial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoin, Jean

    Burgers equation can be used as a simplified model for hydrodynamic turbulence. The purpose of this paper is to study the structure of the shocks for the inviscid equation in dimension 1 when the initial velocity is given by a stable Lévy noise with index α∈ (1/2,2]. We prove that Lagrangian regular points exist (i.e. there are fluid particles that have not participated in shocks at any time between 0 and t) if and only if α<= 1 and the noise is not completely asymmetric, and that otherwise the shock structure is discrete. Moreover, in the Cauchy case α= 1, we show that there are no rarefaction intervals, i.e. at time t >0$, there are fluid particles in any non-empty open interval.

  20. Initial temporal and spatial changes of the refractive index induced by focused femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation inside a glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakura, Masaaki; Terazima, Masahide

    2005-01-01

    The temporal and spatial developments of the refractive-index change in a focal region of a femtosecond-laser pulse inside a soda-lime glass is investigated by the transient lens (TrL) method with a time resolution of subpicosecond. In the TrL signal, the oscillation with about an 800-ps period is observed until about 2000 ps. In order to explain the oscillation, the thermoelastic response of a heated material by a short pulsed laser is calculated. It is found that the TrL signal calculated based on the thermoelastic calculation reproduces the observed oscillating signal very well, even though the calculated density at the focal region does not oscillate. The essential feature of the oscillation can be explained in terms of the pressure wave generation and propagation in the outward direction from the irradiated region. Based on the pressure-wave propagation and the phase-retrieval method, the temporal evolution of the refractive-index distribution inside a glass is obtained from the probe-beam deformation (TrL image) at various delay times between the pump and probe pulses. Two phases of the refractive-index increase at the laser focal region were observed in a range of 20-100 and 500-700 ps, which may cause a permanent refractive-index increase in the laser focal region inside a glass. We discuss the effect of the laser pulse duration on the material deformation process in the laser-irradiated region. This study clearly shows the initial process of the material deformation dynamics inside a glass after femtosecond laser irradiation.

  1. Laser induced periodic surface structuring on Si by temporal shaped femtosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Almeida, G F B; Martins, R J; Otuka, A J G; Siqueira, J P; Mendonca, C R

    2015-10-19

    We investigated the effect of temporal shaped femtosecond pulses on silicon laser micromachining. By using sinusoidal spectral phases, pulse trains composed of sub-pulses with distinct temporal separations were generated and applied to the silicon surface to produce Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS). The LIPSS obtained with different sub-pulse separation were analyzed by comparing the intensity of the two-dimensional fast Fourier Transform (2D-FFT) of the AFM images of the ripples (LIPSS). It was observed that LIPSS amplitude is more emphasized for the pulse train with sub-pulses separation of 128 fs, even when compared with the Fourier transform limited pulse. By estimating the carrier density achieved at the end of each pulse train, we have been able to interpret our results with the Sipe-Drude model, that predicts that LIPSS efficacy is higher for a specific induced carrier density. Hence, our results indicate that temporal shaping of the excitation pulse, performed by spectral phase modulation, can be explored in fs-laser microstructuring. PMID:26480419

  2. Pulsed UV and ultrafast laser micromachining of surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Paul; Sykes, Neil

    2015-07-01

    We describe and compare the cutting and patterning of various "difficult" materials using pulsed UV Excimer, picosecond and femtosecond laser sources. Beam delivery using both fast galvanometer scanners and scanning mask imaging are described. Each laser source has its own particular strengths and weaknesses, and the optimum choice for an application is also decided by financial constraints. With some materials notable improvements in process quality have been observed using femtosecond lasers compared to picosecond lasers, which makes for an interesting choice now that cost effective reliable femtosecond systems are increasingly available. By contrast Pulsed UV Excimer lasers offer different imaging characteristics similar to mask based Lithographic systems and are particularly suited to the processing of polymers. We discuss optimized beam delivery techniques for these lasers.

  3. Domain structure of a human general transcription initiation factor, TFIIF.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Aso, T; Kobayashi, Y; Vasavada, H; Yasukochi, Y; Weissman, S M; Kitajima, S

    1993-01-01

    The structural and functional domains of a general transcription initiation factor, TFIIF (RAP30/74, FC), have been investigated using various deletion mutants of each subunit, both in vivo and in vitro. An in vivo assay showed that the N-terminal sequence containing residues of 1-110 of RAP30 that is located close to a sigma homology region interacts with a minimum sequence of residues 62-171 of RAP74 to form a heteromeric interaction. Reconstitution of in vitro transcription activity by deletion mutants of RAP74 clearly indicated that both N-terminal residues 73-205 and C-terminal residues 356-517 are essential for full activity, the former interacting with RAP30, thus complexing with RNA polymerase II. From these data, the functional significance of domain structure of TFIIF is discussed in terms of its sigma homology sequences and complex formation with RNA polymerase II in the initiation and elongation of transcription. Images PMID:8441635

  4. Pulse-Like Rupture Induced by Three-Dimensional Fault Zone Flower Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, Christian; Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-05-01

    Faults are often embedded in low-velocity fault zones (LVFZ) caused by material damage. Previous 2D dynamic rupture simulations (H uang and A mpuero, 2011; H uang et al., 2014) showed that if the wave velocity contrast between the LVFZ and the country rock is strong enough, ruptures can behave as pulses, i.e. with local slip duration (rise time) much shorter than whole rupture duration. Local slip arrest (healing) is generated by waves reflected from the LVFZ-country rock interface. This effect is robust against a wide range of fault zone widths, absence of frictional healing, variation of initial stress conditions, attenuation, and off-fault plasticity. These numerical studies covered two-dimensional problems with fault-parallel fault zone structures. Here, we extend previous work to 3D and geometries that are more typical of natural fault zones, including complexities such as flower structures with depth-dependent velocity and thickness, and limited fault zone depth extent. This investigation requires high resolution and flexible mesh generation, which are enabled here by the high-order accurate arbitrary high-order derivatives discontinuous Galerkin method with an unstructured tetrahedral element discretization (P elties et al., 2012). We show that the healing mechanism induced by waves reflected in the LVFZ also operates efficiently in such three-dimensional fault zone structures and that, in addition, a new healing mechanism is induced by unloading waves generated when the rupture reaches the surface. The first mechanism leads to very short rise time controlled by the LVFZ width to wave speed ratio. The second mechanism leads to generally longer, depth-increasing rise times, is also conditioned by the existence of an LVFZ, and persists at some depth below the bottom of the LVFZ. Our simulations show that the generation of slip pulses by these two mechanisms is robust to the depth extent of the LVFZ and to the position of the hypocenter. The first healing

  5. Effect of laser-pulse structure and wavelength on wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortune, D. S.; Huang, Shan; Bryant, G. L.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Reinisch, Lou

    1998-07-01

    We have investigated wound healing of incisions in the buccal mucosa of a canine model created with the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser tuned to 6.1, 6.45 and 6.8 microns. We have also used a carbon dioxide laser, continuous wave and with a short-pulse structure (100 microseconds) to access wavelength and pulse structure components to wound healing from laser incisions. The tissue was evaluated histologically and with tensiometry acutely and at post operative days 3, 7, and 14. The data indicate that shorter laser pulse durations create less lateral thermal injury and wounds with greater tensile strength, resulting in earlier wound healing. Wound healing was only slightly dependent upon the wavelength of the laser. These results demonstrate that surgical carbon dioxide lasers with a short-pulse structure of approximately 100 microseconds or less could offer more prompt wound healing while maintaining the advantages of a 10.6 micron wavelength laser.

  6. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd M.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several KaptonTM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  7. Initial Mechanical Testing of Superalloy Lattice Block Structures Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    2002-01-01

    , which were not considered in the simplified computer models. The fatigue testing proved the value of redundancies since specimen strength was maintained even after the fracture of one or two ligaments. This ongoing test program is planned to continue through high-temperature testing. Also scheduled for testing are IN 718 lattice block panels with integral face sheets, as well as specimens cast from a higher temperature alloy. The initial testing suggests the value of this technology for large panels under low and moderate pressure loadings and for high-risk, damage-tolerant structures. Potential aeropropulsion uses for lattice blocks include turbine-engine actuated panels, exhaust nozzle flaps, and side panel structures.

  8. A spectroscopic study of the initial stages of pulsed glow discharges in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Williamson, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of the rapid growth of electron and metastable atom densities at the beginning of a pulsed dc discharge in argon was explored by investigating the relationship between the strength of the applied electric field and the measured emission line intensities at 419.8 and 420.1 nm. Data showed that when the electric field strength was low, the growth of the metastable atom density began before the growth of the electron density. The opposite relationship was observed when a higher strength electric field was applied. This observed dependence can be confirmed by modeling the argon dc discharge. Furthermore, similar measurements for the 345.4 and 347.3 nm spectral lines in neon and the 480.7 and 467.2 nm spectral lines in xenon suggest analogous behaviors in these noble gases. Thus, spectral measurements of the above lines could be a sensitive indicator of the presence of noble gas metastable atoms in plasmas. This relationship could be used to control plasma properties, a tool that would be useful for many technological applications. This work was supported by the DOE (DE-SC0001939), NSF CBET-0903635, GK 14.740.11.0893 and AFOSR.

  9. Simulation and initial experiments of a high power pulsed TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, R.; Saghafifar, H.; Koushki, A. M.; Ganjovi, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the output characteristics of a UV pin array pre-ionized TEA CO2 laser have been simulated and compared with the associated experimental data. In our simulation, a new theoretical model has been improved for transient behavior analysis of the discharge current pulse. The laser discharge tube was modeled by a nonlinear RLC electric circuit as a real model for electron density calculation. This model was coupled with a six-temperature model (6TM) in order to simulation dynamic emission processes of the TEA CO2 laser. The equations were solved numerically by the fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical method and some important variables such as current and voltage of the main discharge, resistance of the plasma column and electron density in the main discharge region, were calculated as functions of time. The effects of non-dissociation factor, rotational quantum number and output coupler reflectivity were also studied theoretically. The experimental and simulation results are in good agreement.

  10. Calibration of Tests for Time-Dilation in GRB Pulse Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Scargle, J. D.; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts are at cosmological distances, then not only their constituent pulses but also the intervals between pulses should be time-dilated. Unlike time-dilation measures of pulse emission, intervals would appear to require less "K-correction" for redshift of narrower temporal structure from higher energy into the band of observation. However, stretching of pulse intervals is intrinsically difficult to measure without incurring a timescale-dependent bias since, as time profiles are stretched, more structure can appear at the limit of resolution. This problem is compounded in dimmer bursts since identification of significant structures is problematic. We have attempted to minimize brightness bias problems by equalizing the signal-to-noise level of all bursts. Then, analyzing wavelet-denoised profiles binned to several resolutions, we identify significant (3 - 4 sigma) fluctuations between pulse structures and interjacent valleys. When bursts are ranked by peak flux, an interval time-dilation signature is evident, but its measure is dependent upon choice of temporal resolution. This result appears to tentatively and qualitatively confirm the work of Davis, who found such a signature using a pulse fitting approach.

  11. Mean maps for cosmic web structures in cosmological initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aung, Han; Cohn, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Haloes, filaments, sheets and voids in the cosmic web can be defined in terms of the eigenvalues of the smoothed shear tensor and a threshold λth. Using analytic methods, we construct mean maps centred on these types of structures for Gaussian random fields corresponding to cosmological initial conditions. Each map also requires a choice of shear at the origin; we consider three possibilities. We find characteristic sizes, shapes and other properties of the central objects in these mean maps and explore how these properties change with varying the threshold and smoothing scale, i.e. varying the separation of the cosmic web into different kinds of components. The mean maps become increasingly complex as the threshold λth decreases to zero. We also describe scatter around these mean maps, subtleties which can arise in their construction, and some comparisons between haloes in the maps and collapsed haloes at final times.

  12. Enhancement of initial equivalency for protein structure alignment based on encoded local structures.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth; Wang, Jui-Chih; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Tsai, Kun-Nan; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Most alignment algorithms find an initial equivalent residue pair followed by an iterative optimization process to explore better near-optimal alignments in the surrounding solution space of the initial alignment. It plays a decisive role in determining the alignment quality since a poor initial alignment may make the final alignment trapped in an undesirable local optimum even with an iterative optimization. We proposed a vector-based alignment algorithm with a new initial alignment approach accounting for local structure features called MIRAGE-align. The new idea is to enhance the quality of the initial alignment based on encoded local structural alphabets to identify the protein structure pair whose sequence identity falls in or below twilight zone. The statistical analysis of alignment quality based on Match Index (MI) and computation time demonstrated that MIRAGE-align algorithm outperformed four previously published algorithms, i.e., the residue-based algorithm (CE), the vector-based algorithm (SSM), TM-align, and Fr-TM-align. MIRAGE-align yields a better estimate of initial solution to enhance the quality of initial alignment and enable the employment of a non-iterative optimization process to achieve a better alignment. PMID:22717522

  13. Structural Analysis Using Phase-Stepped, Double Pulsed ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrer, John R.

    1990-04-01

    Optical whole-field testing techniques have been carrots dangled in front of engineers' noses for a considerable period of time. The promise of acquiring meaningful data without upsetting the component nor its environment, has significant attractions. ESPI technology has been modified and pursued with these goals in mind. This paper presents some of the recent work containing several developments which now make the engineering realisations a near term possibility. An overview of the correlation imaging mechanism is presented with a discussion on how this principle type of optical interferometer can be configured to provide the data necessary for analytical use. Attempts to produce instrumentation able to function outside the laboratory have required replacement of continuous wave lasers with Nd.YAG pulsed lasers. The new pulsed lasers are able to be combined with the computer based fringe pattern analysis which has been produced to suit the requirements of the engineer. Experimental results using such equipment are presented and further work is included which demonstrates the ability for speckle interferometry to produce three-dimensional analysis with the data being presented in conventional cartesian form.

  14. Pulse number controlled laser annealing for GeSn on insulator structure with high substitutional Sn concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moto, Kenta; Matsumura, Ryo; Sadoh, Taizoh; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Miyao, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Crystalline GeSn-on-insulator structures with high Sn concentration (>8%), which exceeds thermal equilibrium solid-solubility (˜2%) of Sn in Ge, are essential to achieve high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices. We investigate non-thermal equilibrium growth of Ge1-xSnx (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) on quartz substrates by using pulsed laser annealing (PLA). The window of laser fluence enabling complete crystallization without film ablation is drastically expanded (˜5 times) by Sn doping above 5% into Ge. Substitutional Sn concentration in grown layers is found to be increased with decreasing irradiation pulse number. This phenomenon can be explained on the basis of significant thermal non-equilibrium growth achieved by higher cooling rate after PLA with a lower pulse number. As a result, GeSn crystals with substitutional Sn concentration of ˜12% are realized at pulse irradiation of single shot for the samples with the initial Sn concentration of 15%. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy measurements reveal the high quality of the grown layer. This technique will be useful to fabricate high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices on insulating substrates.

  15. Temporal femtosecond pulse shaping dependence of laser-induced periodic surface structures in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xuesong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin Zhang, Kaihu; Yu, Dong; Yu, Yanwu; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-21

    The dependence of periodic structures and ablated areas on temporal pulse shaping is studied upon irradiation of fused silica by femtosecond laser triple-pulse trains. Three types of periodic structures can be obtained by using pulse trains with designed pulse delays, in which the three-dimensional nanopillar arrays with ∼100–150 nm diameters and ∼200 nm heights are first fabricated in one step. These nanopillars arise from the break of the ridges of ripples in the upper portion, which is caused by the split of orthogonal ripples in the bottom part. The localized transient electron dynamics and corresponding material properties are considered for the morphological observations.

  16. Classical-quantum correspondence in atomic ionization by midinfrared pulses: Multiple peak and interference structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemell, Christoph; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Gräfe, Stefanie; Dimitriou, Konstantinos I.; Arbó, Diego G.; Tong, Xiao-Min

    2013-01-01

    Atomic ionization by strong and ultrashort laser pulses with frequencies in the midinfrared spectral region have revealed novel features such as the low-energy structures. We have performed fully three-dimensional quantum dynamical as well as classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations for pulses with wavelengths from λ=2000 to 6000 nm. Furthermore, we apply distorted-wave quantum approximations. This allows to explore the quantum-classical correspondence as well as the (non) perturbative character of the ionization dynamics driven by long-wavelength pulses. We observe surprisingly rich structures in the differential energy and angular momentum distribution which sensitively depend on λ, the pulse duration τp, and the carrier-envelope phase ϕCEP.

  17. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  18. Time-resolved detection of structural change in polyethylene films using mid-infrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, Eduard; Mizobata, Keisuke; Nakajima, Takashi Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2015-07-27

    Some of the vibrational modes of crystalline organic polymers are known to be sensitive to the structural change from the crystalline phase to the amorphous phase, and vice versa. Using a mid-infrared (mid-IR) pulse from a free-electron laser as a probe, we demonstrate the time-resolved detection of structural change in crystalline polymer (polyethylene) films upon laser heating by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Transmittance of the resonant mid-IR pulse almost instantaneously changes before and after the Nd:YAG laser pulse if its fluence is sufficient to induce the structural change in the film. The developed technique would be useful to study the time-dependent dynamics of the structural change in various materials.

  19. Magnetic structure of nickel nanowires after the high-density current pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgazizov, N. I.; Bizyaev, D. A.; Bukharaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Changes in the magnetic structure of nickel nanowires formed on a nonconductive surface after the high-density current pulse have been investigated using magnetic force microscopy and voltammetry. Based on the obtained experimental data and results of the computer simulation, it has been concluded that the main reason for the change in the magnetic structure is the heating of the nanowire by a current pulse. It has been shown that, during the subsequent cooling, the newly formed magnetic structure is pinned by surface roughnesses of the relief of the nanowire under investigation.

  20. Layered structure in the interaction of thin foil with two laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yahong; Shen, Baifei E-mail: jill@siom.ac.cn; Yu, Wei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Xiaomei; Ji, Liangliang E-mail: jill@siom.ac.cn; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Zhang, Lingang; Wen, Meng

    2014-02-15

    An interesting layered structure of multiple high density layers are formed when two counter-propagating circularly polarized laser pulses with the same polarization direction irradiate on an ultra-thin foil. This structure changes periodically. For light atoms most of which electrons may be fully ionized, this layered structure can keep for dozens of laser periods after the laser-foil interaction. This interesting structure may have potential applications.

  1. Breakdown voltages for discharges initiated from plasma pulses produced by high-frequency excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2006-06-19

    The triggering ability under the different electric field was investigated using a KrF excimer laser with a high repetition rate of kilohertz order. Measurements were made of the magnitude of impulse voltages that were required to initiate a discharge from plasmas produced by a high-frequency excimer laser. Breakdown voltages were found to be reduced by 50% through the production of plasmas in the discharge gap by a high-frequency excimer laser. However, under direct-current electric field, triggering ability decreased drastically due to low plasma density. It is considered that such laser operation applied for laser-triggered lightning due to the produced location of plasma channel is formed under the impulse electric field since an electric field of the location drastically reduces temporary when the downward leader from thunderclouds propagates to the plasma channel.

  2. Local field enhancement on metallic periodic surface structures produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kudryashov, Sergei I; Ligachev, A E; Makarov, Sergei V; Mel'nik, N N; Rudenko, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Khmelnitskii, R A

    2013-04-30

    Periodic surface structures on aluminium are produced by femtosecond laser pulses for efficient excitation of surface electromagnetic waves using a strong objective (NA = 0.5). The local electromagnetic field enhancement on the structures is measured using the technique of surface-enhanced Raman scattering from pyridine molecules. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  3. Crystal structure of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mari; Nishimoto, Madoka; Hiyama, Takuya B; Higo, Toshiaki; Umehara, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Ito, Takuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells restrict protein synthesis under various stress conditions, by inhibiting the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). eIF2B is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for eIF2, a heterotrimeric G protein consisting of α-, β- and γ-subunits. eIF2B exchanges GDP for GTP on the γ-subunit of eIF2 (eIF2γ), and is inhibited by stress-induced phosphorylation of eIF2α. eIF2B is a heterodecameric complex of two copies each of the α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ε-subunits; its α-, β- and δ-subunits constitute the regulatory subcomplex, while the γ- and ε-subunits form the catalytic subcomplex. The three-dimensional structure of the entire eIF2B complex has not been determined. Here we present the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe eIF2B with an unprecedented subunit arrangement, in which the α2β2δ2 hexameric regulatory subcomplex binds two γε dimeric catalytic subcomplexes on its opposite sides. A structure-based in vitro analysis by a surface-scanning site-directed photo-cross-linking method identified the eIF2α-binding and eIF2γ-binding interfaces, located far apart on the regulatory and catalytic subcomplexes, respectively. The eIF2γ-binding interface is located close to the conserved 'NF motif', which is important for nucleotide exchange. A structural model was constructed for the complex of eIF2B with phosphorylated eIF2α, which binds to eIF2B more strongly than the unphosphorylated form. These results indicate that the eIF2α phosphorylation generates the 'nonproductive' eIF2-eIF2B complex, which prevents nucleotide exchange on eIF2γ, and thus provide a structural framework for the eIF2B-mediated mechanism of stress-induced translational control. PMID:26901872

  4. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  5. Nanofractal structure consisting of nanoparticles produced by ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Kumiko; Takano, Kei; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Kawamura, Tohru; Okino, Akitoshi; Hotta, Eiki; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fujii, Takashi; Wang, Xiaofang; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2006-12-11

    By irradiating subpicosecond laser onto an iron plate, a nanofibrous structure consisting of iron nanoparticles with diameters less than 12 nm was produced. The nanofibrous structure was found to be three-dimensional fractal, and its fractal dimension measured from field-emission scanning electron microscopy images conserved the same fractal dimension of 1.73 in the wide-scale range from 30 nm to 60 {mu}m, and the smallest fractal structure was less than 10 nm. The growth of this fractal is related to the cluster-cluster aggregation model, and it suggests that the fractal structure grew by the attachment of clusters consisting of nanoparticles.

  6. Nonlinear magnetoelectric response of planar ferromagnetic-piezoelectric structures to sub-millisecond magnetic pulses.

    PubMed

    Kreitmeier, Florian; Chashin, Dmitry V; Fetisov, Yury K; Fetisov, Leonid Y; Schulz, Irene; Monkman, Gareth J; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    The magnetoelectric response of bi- and symmetric trilayer composite structures to pulsed magnetic fields is experimentally investigated in detail. The structures comprise layers of commercially available piezoelectric (lead zirconate titanate) and magnetostrictive (permendur or nickel) materials. The magnetic-field pulses have the form of a half-wave sine function with duration of 450 µs and amplitudes ranging from 500 Oe to 38 kOe. The time dependence of the resulting voltage is presented and explained by theoretical estimations. Appearance of voltage oscillations with frequencies much larger than the reciprocal pulse length is observed for sufficiently large amplitudes (~1-10 kOe) of the magnetic-field pulse. The origin of these oscillations is the excitation of bending and planar acoustic oscillations in the structures. Dependencies of the magnetoelectric voltage coefficient on the excitation frequency and the applied magnetic field are calculated by digital signal processing and compared with those obtained by the method of harmonic field modulation. The results are of interest for developing magnetoelectric sensors of pulsed magnetic fields as well as for rapid characterization of magnetoelectric composite structures. PMID:23202188

  7. Nonlinear Magnetoelectric Response of Planar Ferromagnetic-Piezoelectric Structures to Sub-Millisecond Magnetic Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kreitmeier, Florian; Chashin, Dmitry V.; Fetisov, Yury K.; Fetisov, Leonid Y.; Schulz, Irene; Monkman, Gareth J.; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    The magnetoelectric response of bi- and symmetric trilayer composite structures to pulsed magnetic fields is experimentally investigated in detail. The structures comprise layers of commercially available piezoelectric (lead zirconate titanate) and magnetostrictive (permendur or nickel) materials. The magnetic-field pulses have the form of a half-wave sine function with duration of 450 μs and amplitudes ranging from 500 Oe to 38 kOe. The time dependence of the resulting voltage is presented and explained by theoretical estimations. Appearance of voltage oscillations with frequencies much larger than the reciprocal pulse length is observed for sufficiently large amplitudes (∼1–10 kOe) of the magnetic-field pulse. The origin of these oscillations is the excitation of bending and planar acoustic oscillations in the structures. Dependencies of the magnetoelectric voltage coefficient on the excitation frequency and the applied magnetic field are calculated by digital signal processing and compared with those obtained by the method of harmonic field modulation. The results are of interest for developing magnetoelectric sensors of pulsed magnetic fields as well as for rapid characterization of magnetoelectric composite structures. PMID:23202188

  8. Fabrication of a periodic structure with a high refractive-index difference by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshima, Nobuhito; Kuroiwa, Yutaka; Narita, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shuhei; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2004-08-01

    A microfabrication process using ultrafast laser pulses in glass was investigated. We investigated the formation of semiconductors by the irradiation of glasses with femtosecond laser pulses. ZnS- or PbS-doped SiO2-Al2O3-B2O3-CaO-ZnO-Na2O-K2O glasses were prepared by a melting method and irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. Periodic structures in the sample glasses with a high refractive index difference were produced by femtosecond laser pulses. The maximum relative refractive index difference between the irradiated area and the nonirradiated areas was 20%. Diffraction gratings were also fabricated inside the ZnS- or PbS-doped silicate glasses. The diffraction efficiency of these gratings was approximately 90% in the infrared region.

  9. Universal pulse dependence of the low-energy structure in strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Lai, Yu Hang; Diesen, Elias; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Xu, Junliang; Gorman, Timothy T.; Légaré, Françis; Saalmann, Ulf; Agostini, Pierre; Rost, Jan M.; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-02-01

    We determine quantitatively the laser pulse duration dependence of the low-energy structure (LES) in strong-field atomic ionization and establish its universal character. The electron energy measurement is performed on krypton and argon by varying the duration of a 1.8 μ m midinfrared pulse from two to ten cycles. Comparing the experiment with analytical and numerical results, the soft-recollision mechanism leading to electron momentum bunching is confirmed as the origin of the LES. The universal behavior of the LES peak energy on pulse duration emerges from an analytical description as a product of two factors: one contains the influence of the laser parameters and the target, while the other one describes the pulse duration dependence in terms of optical cycles.

  10. Structure Fragmentation in a Subsurface Nickel Titanium Layer Caused by its Irradiation with Pulsed Silicon ion Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, S. N.

    2014-07-01

    Using the methods of electron backscatter diffraction, an investigation of variations in microstructure of the subsurface nickel titanium layer after its irradiation with pulsed, medium-energy silicon ion fluxes is performed. It is shown that following this ion-beam irradiation of the specimen surfaces, the subsurface-layer structure changes and undergoes fragmentation down to as deep as 5-15 μm, which is smaller than the average grain size of the initial alloy. It is found out that the fragmented-structure layer is characterized by the presence of a martensitic В19' phase and a high concentration of interfaces and grain boundaries; the linear dimensions of the fragments exceed 1 μm, the structure refinement in the layer below the irradiated surface is nonuniform and depends on crystallographic orientation of the initial grain. A reason for intensive fragmentation of individual grains of the initial B2 phase after ion-beam treatment is assumed to be the proximity of the orientation axes of the principal slip planes to that of the incident ion beam flux. This might have resulted in an earlier, compared to other grains, onset of plastic deformation in these grains and, as a result, partial fragmentation of their structure.

  11. Nanofabrication of tailored surface structures in dielectrics using temporally shaped femtosecond-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Götte, Nadine; Siegel, Jan; Soccio, Michelina; Zielinski, Bastian; Sarpe, Cristian; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Ezquerra, Tiberio A; Baumert, Thomas; Solis, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the use of tightly focused, temporally shaped femtosecond (fs)-laser pulses for producing nanostructures in two dielectric materials (sapphire and phosphate glass) with different characteristics in their response to pulsed laser radiation. For this purpose, laser pulses shaped by third-order dispersion (TOD) were used to generate temporally asymmetric excitation pulses, leading to the single-step production of subwavelength ablative and subablative surface structures. When compared to previous works on the interaction of tightly focused TOD-shaped pulses with fused silica, we show here that this approach leads to very different nanostructure morphologies, namely, clean nanopits without debris surrounding the crater in sapphire and well-outlined nanobumps and nanovolcanoes in phosphate glass. Although in sapphire the debris-free processing is associated with the much lower viscosity of the melt compared to fused silica, nanobump formation in phosphate glass is caused by material network expansion (swelling) upon resolidification below the ablation threshold. The formation of nanovolcanoes is a consequence of the combined effect of material network expansion and ablation occurring in the periphery and central part of the irradiated region, respectively. It is shown that the induced morphologies can be efficiently controlled by modulating the TOD coefficient of the temporally shaped pulses. PMID:25762003

  12. Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2007-04-03

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  13. Electronic and Structural Response of InSb to Ultra-short and Ultra-intense Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzo, Andrea; Allen, Roland

    2002-03-01

    The present work is motivated in part by the increasing interest in a better understanding of the optical properties of InSb, the main material used to manufacture infrared detectors. In addition, there have been recent experimental studies of the behavior of InSb following application of ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulses. Motivated directly by these experiments, we have performed simulations of the electron-ion dynamics of InSb subjected to femtosecond-scale laser pulses. These simulations employ a tight-binding approximation, and the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved with an adapted Cayley algorithm which conserves probability. The atomic forces are obtained from a generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem, which may be also interpreted as a generalized Ehrenfest theorem. We find that above a certain threshold intensity the lattice loses its tetrahedral structure and becomes disrupted. In addition, the band gap collapses and the material becomes metallic. Comparison of our simulations with experiments involving measurements of the imaginary part of the dielectric function shows good agreement in all important aspects. Further investigation of microscopic quantities, such as the atomic pair correlation function, the occupancies of excited states, and the displacement of atoms from their initial positions, strengthens our conclusion that the semiconductor exhibits a nonthermal phase transition as the intensity of the laser pulse is increased.

  14. Pulsed Electron Double Resonance in Structural Studies of Spin-Labeled Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, O. S.; Tsvetkov, Yu. D.

    2013-01-01

    This review deals with the application of the pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) method to studies of spin-labeled DNA and RNA with complicated spatial structures, such as tetramers, aptamers, riboswitches, and three- and four-way junctions. The use of this method for studying DNA damage sites is also described. PMID:23556128

  15. Pulsed terahertz time domain spectroscopy of vertically structured photoconductive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulks, R.; Rihani, S.; Beere, H. E.; Evans, M. J.; Ritchie, D. A.; Pepper, M.

    2010-02-01

    We present a terahertz (THz) photoconductive emitter structure, which employs a n-doped layer underneath a low-temperature-grown GaAs region to enable the THz transient to couple vertically through a defined mesa. A nonlinear bias dependence is observed, yielding an order in magnitude improvement in power for a mesa device with a 100 μm2 area over a conventional planar control reference device at 32 V and 5 mW illumination power. We relate the bias dependence of the THz signal to the breakdown voltage observed in the current-voltage characteristic. Reducing the antenna gap size through reducing the thickness of the low temperature-GaAs region below 1 μm shows a large improvement in the bandwidth of the device, with an enhancement of the normalized intensity between 0.2 to 2 THz for a bow-tie antenna geometry.

  16. Low-Energy Peak Structure in Strong-Field Ionization by Mid-Infrared Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemell, C.; Dimitriou, K. I.; Arbó, D. G.; Tong, X.-M.; Kartashov, D.; Burgdörfer, J.; Gräfe, S.

    2013-03-01

    Using a quasiclassical approach, we demonstrate that the formation of the low-energy structure in above-threshold ionization spectra by intense, midinfrared laser pulses originates from a two-dimensional focusing of the strong-field dynamics in the energy-angular-momentum plane. We show that the low-energy structure is very sensitive to the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field.

  17. Structural properties of silicon nanoparticles formed by pulsed laser ablation in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshova, O. I.; Perminov, P. A.; Zabotnov, S. V.; Gongal'skii, M. B.; Ezhov, A. A.; Golovan', L. A.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Silicon nanoparticles have been formed as a result of the irradiation of single-crystal silicon targets in distilled water and liquid nitrogen, by, respectively, picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses. The main structural properties of these nanoparticles have been investigated by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. These particles are found to be mainly spherical. The presence of crystalline and amorphous silicon phases under picosecond ablation in water is established experimentally. Irradiation by femtosecond pulses in liquid nitrogen can yield nanoparticles smaller than 5 nm in size, which are quantum dots with a characteristic photoluminescence peak near 750 nm.

  18. Analysis of Crystallographic Structure of a Japanese Sword by the Pulsed Neutron Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, K.; Ayukawa, N.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Uchida, T.; Uno, S.; Grazzi, F.; Scherillo, A.

    We measured two-dimensional transmission spectra of pulsed neutron beams for a Japanese sword sample. Atom density, crystalline size, and preferred orientation of crystals were obtained using the RITS code. The position dependence of the atomic density is consistent with the shape of the sample. The crystalline size is very small and shows position dependence, which is understood by the unique structure of Japanese swords. The preferred orientation has strong position dependence. Our study shows the usefulness of the pulsed neutron transmission method for cultural metal artifacts.

  19. Three-dimensional micro-/nano-structuring via direct write polymerization with picosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Danilevičius, Paulius; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2011-03-14

    We demonstrate capability to structure photo-polymers with sub-wavelength resolution, ∼200-500 nm, and retrieve three-dimensional (3D) structures using a picosecond laser exposure. This alternative to commonly used ultra-short femtosecond lasers extends accessibility of 3D direct write. A popular hybrid sol-gel resist SZ2080 was used for quantitative determination of structuring resolution at 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelengths and for pulses of 8-25 ps duration at the repetition rates of 0.2-1 MHz. Systematic study of feature size dependence of 3D suspended nano-rods shows that linear power dependence of photopolymerization on the dose-per-pulse becomes dominant at higher repetition rates (≥0.5 MHz) while the two-photon nonlinear absorption is still distinguishable at rates lower than 0.2 MHz and shorter pulses (≤8 ps). Thermal accumulation defines polymerization when cooling time of the focal volume is larger than separation between pulses. Photopolymerization and its scaling mechanisms, quality, and fidelity at tight focusing of fs-, ps-, and cw-laser radiation are revealed and explained. 3D scaffolds for biomedicine and microlenses for optical applications are fabricated by the ps-laser direct write. PMID:21445200

  20. Structure of the dense cores and ablation plasmas in the initiation phase of tungsten wire-array Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, J. D.; Hammer, D. A.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Bland, S. N.; Bott, S. C.

    2007-01-15

    The early stages of tungsten (W) wire-array Z-pinch implosions have been studied using two-frame point projection x-ray backlighting on the 1 MA COBRA pulsed power generator [J. D. Douglass, J. B. Greenly, D. A. Hammer, and B. R. Kusse, in Proceedings of the 15th IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, 2005 (to be published)]. X-pinch backlighter images with subnanosecond time resolution and 4-10 {mu}m spatial resolution have been obtained of individual W exploding wires in 8-wire arrays that show evolution of wire-core and coronal plasma structures. The timing of the X-pinch x-ray bursts relative to the Z-pinch initiation time was adjusted over a 50 ns time interval by varying the X-pinch mass per unit length. Wire-cores seen in two images separated in view by 120 deg. show that the expansion is remarkably azimuthally symmetric. A strong correlation is observed between the structure on the dense exploding wire-cores and the structure of the {>=}10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3} ablation plasma being drawn from radial prominences. Plasma ablation velocity was estimated to have a lower bound of 24 km/s. The wire-core expansion rate was found to be approximately constant with time over the interval 50-100 ns after the start of the current pulse. Finally, micron-scale axial gaps, seen as early as 70 ns into the current pulse and persisting from that time, were observed along the wire-core.

  1. Time-Resolved Pulsed Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Probes Gaseous Proteins Structural Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX.

  2. Time-resolved pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes gaseous proteins structural kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX. PMID:25318698

  3. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  4. Time-resolved structural dynamics of thin metal films heated with femtosecond optical pulses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Chen, Wei-Kan; Tang, Jau; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    We utilize 100 fs optical pulses to induce ultrafast disorder of 35- to 150-nm thick single Au(111) crystals and observe the subsequent structural evolution using 0.6-ps, 8.04-keV X-ray pulses. Monitoring the picosecond time-dependent modulation of the X-ray diffraction intensity, width, and shift, we have measured directly electron/phonon coupling, phonon/lattice interaction, and a histogram of the lattice disorder evolution, such as lattice breath due to a pressure wave propagating at sonic velocity, lattice melting, and recrystallization, including mosaic formation. Results of theoretical simulations agree and support the experimental data of the lattice/liquid phase transition process. These time-resolved X-ray diffraction data provide a detailed description of all the significant processes induced by ultrafast laser pulses impinging on thin metallic single crystals. PMID:22065752

  5. Structural Influences on Initial Accent Placement in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astesano, Corine; Bard, Ellen Gurman; Turk, Alice

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the phrase-final accent (FA), the French phonological system includes a phonetically distinct Initial Accent (IA). The present study tested two proposals: that IA marks the onset of phonological phrases, and that it has an independent rhythmic function. Eight adult native speakers of French were instructed to read syntactically…

  6. Turbulent structure and emissions of strongly-pulsed jet diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, Mathieu

    This current research project studied the turbulent flame structure, the fuel/air mixing, the combustion characteristics of a nonpremixed pulsed (unsteady) and unpulsed (steady) flame configuration for both normal- and microgravity conditions, as well as the flame emissions in normal gravity. The unsteady flames were fully-modulated, with the fuel flow completely shut off between injection pulses using an externally controlled valve, resulting in the generation of compact puff-like flame structures. Conducting experiments in normal and microgravity environments enabled separate control over the relevant Richardson and Reynolds numbers to clarify the influence of buoyancy on the flame behavior, mixing, and structure. Experiments were performed in normal gravity in the laboratory at the University of Washington and in microgravity using the NASA GRC 2.2-second Drop Tower facility. High-speed imaging, as well as temperature and emissions probes were used to determine the large-scale structure dynamics, the details of the flame structure and oxidizer entrainment, the combustion temperatures, and the exhaust emissions of the pulsed and steady flames. Of particular interest was the impact of changes in flame structure due to pulsing on the combustion characteristics of this system. The turbulent flame puff celerity (i.e., the bulk velocity of the puffs) was strongly impacted by the jet-off time, increasing markedly as the time between pulses was decreased, which caused the degree of puff interaction to increase and the strongly-pulsed flame to more closely resemble a steady flame. This increase occurred for all values of injection time as well as for constant fuelling rate and in both the presence and absence of buoyancy. The removal of positive buoyancy in microgravity resulted in a decrease in the flame puff celerity in all cases, amounting to as much as 40%, for both constant jet injection velocity and constant fuelling rate. The mean flame length of the strongly-pulsed

  7. Formation of nanoporous structures in metallic materials by pulse-periodic laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzin, Serguei P.

    2015-09-01

    A method of the formation of nanoporous structures in metallic materials by pulse-periodic laser treatment was developed. In this study, the multicomponent aluminum-iron brass was considered and the nanoporous structure across the entire cross section of the material with a thickness of 50 μm was formed. The method was implemented using a CO2 laser processing unit. The pulse-periodic laser treatment of the Cu-Zn-Al-Fe alloy with pulse frequency of 5 Hz has led to the formation of nanosized cavities due to accumulation of internal stresses during cyclic heating and cooling at high speeds. It was determined that the pores of a channel type with average widths of 80-100 nm are formed in the central region of the heat-affected zone during laser action with thermocycling. When implementing the chosen conditions of the pulse-periodic laser processing, the localness in depth and area of the physical processes occurring in the heat-affected zone is ensured, while maintaining the original properties of the material and the absence of significant deformations in the rest of the volume. This patented process is perspective for the production not only catalysts for chemical reactions, but for ultrafiltration and microfiltration membranes as well.

  8. Mathematical Constraints on the Use of Transmission Line Models for Simulating Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, C. L.; Merrill, R. A.; Pasko, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    A significant portion of the in-cloud lightning development is observed as a series of initial breakdown pulses (IBPs) that are characterized by an abrupt change in the electric field at a remote sensor. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have attributed this process to the stepwise elongation of an initial lightning leader inside the thunderstorm [da Silva and Pasko, JGR, 120, 4989-5009, 2015, and references therein]. Attempts to visually observe these events are hampered due to the fact that clouds are opaque to optical radiation. Due to this reason, throughout the last decade, a number of researchers have used the so-called transmission line models (also commonly referred to as engineering models), widely employed for return stroke simulations, to simulate the waveshapes of IBPs, and also of narrow bipolar events. The transmission line (TL) model approach is to prescribe the source current dynamics in a certain manner to match the measured E-field change waveform, with the purpose of retrieving key information about the source, such as its height, peak current, size, speed of charge motion, etc. Although the TL matching method is not necessarily physics-driven, the estimated source characteristics can give insights on the dominant length- and time-scales, as well as, on the energetics of the source. This contributes to better understanding of the environment where the onset and early stages of lightning development takes place.In the present work, we use numerical modeling to constrain the number of source parameters that can be confidently inferred from the observed far-field IBP waveforms. We compare different modified TL models (i.e., with different attenuation behaviors) to show that they tend to produce similar waveforms in conditions where the channel is short. We also demonstrate that it is impossible to simultaneously retrieve the speed of source current propagation and channel length from an observed IBP waveform, in contrast to what has been

  9. Structure of the Jovian Magnetodisk Current Sheet: Initial Galileo Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Huddleston, D. E.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The ten-degree tilt of the Jovian magnetic dipole causes the magnetic equator to move back and forth across Jupiter's rotational equator and tile Galileo orbit that lies therein. Beyond about 24 Jovian radii, the equatorial current sheet thins and tile magnetic structure changes from quasi-dipolar into magnetodisk-like with two regions of nearly radial but antiparallel magnetic field separated by a strong current layer. The magnetic field at the center of the current sheet is very weak in this region. Herein we examine tile current sheet at radial distances from 24 55 Jovian radii. We find that the magnetic structure very much resembles tile structure seen at planetary magnetopause and tail current sheet crossings. Tile magnetic field variation is mainly linear with little rotation of the field direction, At times there is almost no small-scale structure present and the normal component of the magnetic field is almost constant through the current sheet. At other times there are strong small-scale structures present in both the southward and northward directions. This small-scale structure appears to grow with radial distance and may provide the seeds for tile explosive reconnection observed at even greater radial distances oil tile nightside. Beyond about 40 Jovian radii, the thin current sheet also appears to be almost constantly in oscillatory motion with periods of about 10 min. The amplitude of these oscillations also appears to grow with radial distance. The source of these fluctuations may be dynamical events in tile more distant magnetodisk.

  10. Differences between intra- and extra-cavity pulse time structure in a hole-coupled free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Weits, H.H.; Knippels, G.M.H.; Werkhoven, G.H.C. van; Oepts, D.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1997-03-01

    In the strong-slippage regime of a free-electron laser, the optical pulse inside the resonator is composed of a series of subsequently growing and decaying subpulses due to a limit-cycle oscillation. The picosecond time structure of the outcoupled pulses can be quite different from that of the intracavity pulse, in case of outcoupling through a hole and for specific resonator parameters. This is demonstrated by autocorrelation measurements and corroborated by simulations.

  11. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction.

    PubMed

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like 'supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation. PMID:27278687

  12. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    PubMed Central

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like ‘supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation. PMID:27278687

  13. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-06-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like `supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation.

  14. Spatial Moran models, II: cancer initiation in spatially structured tissue

    PubMed Central

    Foo, J; Leder, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the accumulation and spread of advantageous mutations in a spatial stochastic model of cancer initiation on a lattice. The parameters of this general model can be tuned to study a variety of cancer types and genetic progression pathways. This investigation contributes to an understanding of how the selective advantage of cancer cells together with the rates of mutations driving cancer, impact the process and timing of carcinogenesis. These results can be used to give insights into tumor heterogeneity and the “cancer field effect,” the observation that a malignancy is often surrounded by cells that have undergone premalignant transformation. PMID:26126947

  15. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  16. Membrane-initiated estradiol actions mediate structural plasticity and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul; Christensen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, our ideas about estrogen signaling have greatly expanded. In addition to estradiol having direct nuclear actions that mediate transcription and translation, more recent experiments have demonstrated membrane-initiated signaling. Both direct nuclear and estradiol membrane signaling can be mediated by the classical estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, which are two of the numerous putative membrane estrogen receptors. Thus far, however, only ERα has been shown to play a prominent role in regulating female reproduction and sexual behavior. Because ERα is a ligand-gated transcription factor and not a typical membrane receptor, trafficking to the cell membrane requires post-translational modifications. Two necessary modifications are palmitoylation and association with caveolins, a family of scaffolding proteins. In addition to their role in trafficking, caveolin proteins also serve to determine ERα interactions with metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). It is through these complexes that ERα, which cannot by itself activate G proteins, is able to initiate intracellular signaling. Various combinations of ERα-mGluR interactions have been demonstrated throughout the nervous system from hippocampus to striatum to hypothalamus to dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in both neurons and astrocytes. These combinations of ER and mGluR allow estradiol to have both facilitative and inhibitory actions in neurons. In hypothalamic astrocytes, the estradiol-mediated release of intracellular calcium stores regulating neurosteroid synthesis requires ERα-mGluR1a interaction. In terms of estradiol regulation of female sexual receptivity, activation of ERα-mGluR1a signaling complex leads to the release of neurotransmitters and alteration of neuronal morphology. This review will examine estradiol membrane signaling (EMS) activating a limbic-hypothalamic lordosis regulating circuit, which involves ERα trafficking, internalization, and modifications of neuronal morphology

  17. A novel structure of transmission line pulse transformer with mutually coupled windings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binxiong; Su, Jiancang; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xibo; Wang, Junjie

    2014-03-01

    A novel structure of transmission line transformer (TLT) with mutually coupled windings is described in this paper. All transmission lines except the first stage of the transformer are wound on a common ferrite core for the TLT with this structure. A referral method was introduced to analyze the TLT with this structure, and an analytic expression of the step response was derived. It is shown that a TLT with this structure has a significantly slower droop rate than a TLT with other winding structures and the number of ferrite cores needed is largely reduced. A four-stage TLT with this structure was developed, whose input and output impedance were 4.2 Ω and 67.7 Ω, respectively. A frequency response test of the TLT was carried out. The test results showed that pulse response time of the TLT is several nanoseconds. The TLT described in this paper has the potential to be used as a rectangle pulse transformer with very fast response time. PMID:24689623

  18. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  19. Structural basis for angiopoietin-1–mediated signaling initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xuehong; Seegar, Tom C. M.; Dalton, Annamarie C.; Tzvetkova-Robev, Dorothea; Goldgur, Yehuda; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Barton, William A.

    2013-04-30

    Angiogenesis is a complex cellular process involving multiple regulatory growth factors and growth factor receptors. Among them, the ligands for the endothelial-specific tunica intima endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Tie2) receptor kinase, angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and Ang2, play essential roles in balancing vessel stability and regression during both developmental and tumor-induced angiogenesis. Despite possessing a high degree of sequence identity, Ang1 and Ang2 have distinct functional roles and cell-signaling characteristics. Here, we present the crystal structures of Ang1 both unbound and in complex with the Tie2 ectodomain. Comparison of the Ang1-containing structures with their Ang2-containing counterparts provide insight into the mechanism of receptor activation and reveal molecular surfaces important for interactions with Tie2 coreceptors and associated signaling proteins. Using structure-based mutagenesis, we identify a loop within the angiopoietin P domain, adjacent to the receptor-binding interface, which confers the specific agonist/antagonist properties of the molecule. We demonstrate using cell-based assays that an Ang2 chimera containing the Ang1 loop sequence behaves functionally similarly to Ang1 as a constitutive Tie2 agonist, able to efficiently dissociate the inhibitory Tie1/Tie2 complex and elicit Tie2 clustering and downstream signaling.

  20. Periodic structure formation and surface morphology evolution of glassy carbon surfaces applying 35-fs-200-ps laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csontos, J.; Toth, Z.; Pápa, Z.; Budai, J.; Kiss, B.; Börzsönyi, A.; Füle, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this work laser-induced periodic structures with lateral dimensions smaller than the central wavelength of the laser were studied on glassy carbon as a function of laser pulse duration. To generate diverse pulse durations titanium-sapphire (Ti:S) laser (center wavelength 800 nm, pulse durations: 35 fs-200 ps) and a dye-KrF excimer laser system (248 nm, pulse durations: 280 fs, 2.1 ps) were used. In the case of Ti:S laser treatment comparing the central part of the laser-treated areas a striking difference is observed between the femtoseconds and picoseconds treatments. Ripple structure generated with short pulse durations can be characterized with periodic length significantly smaller than the laser wavelength (between 120 and 165 nm). At higher pulse durations the structure has a higher periodic length (between 780 and 800 nm), which is comparable to the wavelength. In case of the excimer laser treatment the different pulse durations produced similar surface structures with different periodic length and different orientation. One of the structures was parallel with the polarization of the laser light and has a higher periodic length (~335 nm), and the other was perpendicular with smaller periodic length (~78-80 nm). The possible mechanisms of structure formation will be outlined and discussed in the frame of our experimental results.

  1. Initiation of simian virus 40 DNA replication in vitro: Pulse-chase experiments identify the first labeled species as topologically unwound

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, P.A.; Seo, Yeon Soo; Hurwitz, J. )

    1989-06-01

    A distinct unwound form of DNA containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin is produced in replication reactions carried out in mixtures containing crude fractions prepared from HeLa cells. This species, termed form U{sub R}, comigrates on chloroquine-containing agarose gels with the upper part of the previously described heterogeneous highly unwound circular DNA, form U. As with form U, formation of form U{sub R} is dependent upon the SV40 tumor (T) antigen. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that the first species to incorporate labeled deoxyribonucleotides comigrates with form U{sub R}. Restriction analyses of the products of the pulse-chase experiments show that initiation occurs at the SV40 origin and then proceeds outward in a bidirectional manner. These experiments establish form U{sub R} as the earliest detectable substrate for SV40 DNA replication and suggest that SV40 DNA replication initiates on an unwound species.

  2. Micro/Nano-Structuring of Medical Stainless Steel using Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Cheng, C. W.; Ou, K. L.

    The medical stainless steel (SUS 304) surface is irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses with linear or circular polarization to form nanostructure-covered conical microstructures. The mean spacing of the conical microstructures and the type of the nanostructure can be controlled by the laser-processing parameters. The liquid test (water and normal-saline solution) demonstrates that the process provides a fast single-step structuring method to generate hydrophobic-enhanced metal parts. The biocompatibility test demonstrated that the femtosecond laser micro/nano- structuring surfaces have excellent biocompatibility properties compared to an untreated surface.

  3. Initial phases for the development of a Structural Geology database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, Basil; Babaie, Hassan; Clark, Ryan; Newman, Juile; Walker, Doug

    2014-05-01

    We are at the beginning stages of developing a Data System for Structural Geology and Tectonics (SG&T). This activity is prompted by the necessity of reporting our data from government-funded projects and the lack of any existing database. SG&T data is complex for a variety of reasons, including the wide range of temporal and spatial scales (many orders of magnitude each), the complex three-dimensional geometry of some geological structures, inherent spatial nature of the data, and the difficulty of making temporal inferences from spatial observations. To successful implement the step of developing a SG&T data system, we must simultaneously solve three problems: 1) How to digitize SG&T data; 2) How to design a software system that is applicable; and 3) How to construct a very flexible user interface. To address the first problem, we introduce the "Spot" concept, which allows tracking of hierarchical and spatial relations between structures at all scales, and will link map scale, mesoscale, and laboratory scale data. A Spot, in this sense, is analogous to the beam size of analytical equipment used for in situ analysis of rocks; it is the size over which a measurement or quantity is applicable. A Spot can be a single measurement, an aggregation of individual measurements, or even establish relationships between numerous other Spots. We propose to implement both a Spot and a more traditional Mapping mode for data input. The final challenge is to construct a user interface that is intuitive, open source, and spans as many operating systems and devices as possible. For these reasons, we propose to develop a web-application that can run in both a connected (on the internet) and disconnected mode. Our hope is to have extensive and international community input into the data system development process.

  4. Structural basis for DNA binding by replication initiator Mcm10

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Eric M.; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Haworth, Justin; Greer, Briana; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-06-30

    Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic DNA replication protein required for assembly and progression of the replication fork. The highly conserved internal domain (Mcm10-ID) has been shown to physically interact with single-stranded (ss) DNA, DNA polymerase alpha, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The crystal structure of Xenopus laevis Mcm10-ID presented here reveals a DNA binding architecture composed of an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-fold followed in tandem by a variant and highly basic zinc finger. NMR chemical shift perturbation and mutational studies of DNA binding activity in vitro reveal how Mcm10 uses this unique surface to engage ssDNA. Corresponding mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae result in increased sensitivity to replication stress, demonstrating the functional importance of DNA binding by this region of Mcm10 to replication. In addition, mapping Mcm10 mutations known to disrupt PCNA, polymerase alpha, and DNA interactions onto the crystal structure provides insight into how Mcm10 might coordinate protein and DNA binding within the replisome.

  5. Lightning initiation from a tall structure in the Basque Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J.; Montanyà, J.; Maruri, M.; De la Vega, D.; Aranda, J. A.; Gaztelumendi, S.

    2012-11-01

    Lightning detection in the Spanish Basque Country is performed using the LF TOA, VHF interferometer and the VLF lightning detection technologies in which two independent networks are based, providing a better detection quality due to the combination of these different techniques. Total lightning activity related to the tall structure of the weather radar operated by the Basque Meteorology Agency (Euskalmet) is presented. The tall structure is a 50 m tower located on the top of Kapildui Mountain (at about 1169.48 m ASL). Remarkable electrical activity associated to this place has been witnessed in the last two years. Two particular flashes during November 30th 2009 caused damage to the weather radar. Two different lightning detection networks detected five and six cloud-to-ground strokes, respectively. Only nine VHF sources were detected in the first flash without any VLF detection classified as intracloud. But for the second flash non VHF source was detected and two detections were reported by the VLF system. In both cases some intracloud detections were reported before cloud-to-ground strokes and some others during the flash. This paper presents the study of a winter episode with a special impact in the tower, the research carried out for characterizing the lightning events and the measures taken in order to achieve a better protection mechanism for the radar site.

  6. Pulsed modification of germanium films on silicon, sapphire, and quartz substrates: Structure and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, H. A.; Batalov, R. I. Bayazitov, R. M.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.; Lyadov, N. M.; Shustov, V. A.; Galkin, K. N.; Galkin, N. G.; Chernev, I. M.; Ivlev, G. D.; Prokop’ev, S. L.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2015-06-15

    The structural and optical properties of thin Ge films deposited onto semiconducting and insulating substrates and modified by pulsed laser radiation are studied. The films are deposited by the sputtering of a Ge target with a low-energy Xe{sup +} ion beam. Crystallization of the films is conducted by their exposure to nanosecond ruby laser radiation pulses (λ = 0.694 μm) with the energy density W = 0.2−1.4 J cm{sup −2}. During pulsed laser treatment, the irradiated area is probed with quasi-cw (quasi-continuous-wave) laser radiation (λ = 0.532 and 1.064 μm), with the reflectance recorded R(t). Experimental data on the lifetime of the Ge melt are compared with the results of calculation, and good agreement between them is demonstrated. Through the use of a number of techniques, the dependences of the composition of the films, their crystal structure, the level of strains, and the reflectance and transmittance on the conditions of deposition and annealing are established.

  7. Structural Biology of Replication Initiation Factor Mcm10

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenyue; Stauffer, Melissa E.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2016-01-01

    Minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) is a non-enzymatic replication factor required for proper assembly of the eukaryotic replication fork. Mcm10 interacts with single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, polymerase α, and Mcm2-7, and is important for activation of the pre-replicative complex and recruitment of subsequent proteins to the origin at the onset of S-phase. In addition, Mcm10 has recently been implicated in coordination of helicase and polymerase activities during replication fork progression. The nature of Mcm10's involvement in these activities, whether direct or indirect, remains unknown. However, recent biochemical and structural characterization of Mcm10 from multiple organisms has provided insights into how Mcm10 utilizes a modular architecture to act as a replisome scaffold, which helps to define possible roles in origin DNA melting, pol α recruitment and coordination of enzymatic activities during elongation. PMID:22918587

  8. Refractive index-modified structures in glass written by 266nm fs laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Saliminia, Ali; Bérubé, Jean-Philippe; Vallée, Réal

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the inscription of embedded waveguides, anti-waveguides and Bragg gratings by use of intense femtosecond (fs) UV laser pulses at 266nm in pure fused silica, and for the first time, in bulk fused quartz and ZBLAN glasses. The magnitude of induced index changes, depends, besides pulse energy and translation speed, largely on writing depth and varies from ~10(-4) for smooth modifications to ~10(-3) for damaged structures. The obtained results are promising as they present the feasibility of fabrication of short (< 0.2μm) period first-order fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) for applications such as in realization of all-fiber lasers operating at short wavelengths. PMID:23262691

  9. Resistance to deformation of structural steels exposed to current pulses and cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhalo, V.A.; Novogrudskii, L.S.; Znachkovskii, O.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the resistance to deformation of structural materials acted upon by electric current at cryogenic temperatures in dependence on the magnitude of residual deformation, the degree of preliminary deformation, and other factors. The authors used an installation UTN-10 at temperatures of 293, 77, and 4.2 degrees K with fivefold specimens of chromenickel steel and chrome-manganese steel. The dependence of the change of resistance to deformation of steels on the residual deformation at which a current pulse was applied is shown. Lowering the temperature to 77 degrees K or less strengthens the role of the interaction between electrons and dislocations in reducing the resistance to deformation of steels 12Kh18N10T and 03Kh13AG19 at the instant when an electric-current pulse acts.

  10. Resolution enhancement in long pulse OTDR for application in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrampour, Ali Reza; Maasoumi, Fatemeh

    2010-08-01

    To improve the range resolution in inexpensive conventional long pulse optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) for application in structural health monitoring (SHM) and robotic neural network, the Fourier Wavelet Regularized Deconvolution (ForWaRD) based on the adaptive wavelet method is employed. Since Deconvolution is a noise sensitive process, employing the (ForWaRD) method enhances the signal to noise ratio. Simulation for long pulse OTDR system is done and ForWaRD method is employed to improve the resolution of the OTDR system to the order of several centimeters. In this method the resolution is limited by the bandwidth of detector, bandwidth of electronic circuit, and the sampling rate of analog to digital convertor.

  11. Generation of periodic accelerating structures in plasma by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Shvets, G; Fisch, N J; Pukhov, A; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    1999-08-01

    A mechanism for generating large (>1 GeV/m) accelerating wakes in a plasma is proposed. Two slightly detuned counterpropagating laser beams, an ultrashort timing pulse and a long pump, exchange photons and deposit the recoil momentum in plasma electrons. This produces a localized region of electron current, which acts as a virtual electron beam, inducing intense plasma wakes with phase velocity equal to the group velocity of the short pulse. Modulating the pumping beam generates periodic accelerating structures in the plasma ("plasma linac") which can be used for particle acceleration unlimited by the dephasing between the particles and the wake. An important difference between this type of plasma accelerator and the conventional wakefield accelerators is that this type can be achieved with laser intensities I<10(18) W/cm(2). PMID:11970016

  12. Origin of double-line structure in nonsequential double ionization by few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng; Zhong, Mingmin; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-07-01

    We investigate nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of molecules by few-cycle laser pulses at the laser intensity of 1.2-1.5 × 1014 W/cm2 using the classical ensemble model. The same double-line structure as the lower intensity (1.0 × 1014 W/cm2) is also observed in the correlated electron momentum spectra for 1.2-1.4 × 1014 W/cm2. However, in contrast to the lower intensity where NSDI proceeds only through the recollision-induced double excitation with subsequent ionization (RDESI) mechanism, here, the recollision-induced excitation with subsequent ionization (RESI) mechanism has a more significant contribution to NSDI. This indicates that RDESI is not necessary for the formation of the double-line structure and RESI can give rise to the same type of structure independently. Furthermore, we explore the ultrafast dynamics underlying the formation of the double-line structure in RESI.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of paramecium dynein: initial studies.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J; Barkalow, K; Hamasaki, T; Satir, P

    1991-01-01

    Dynein arms and isolated dynein from Paramecium tetraurelia ciliary axonemes are comparable in structure, direction of force generation, and microtubule translocation ability to other dyneins. In situ arms have dimensions and substructure similar to those of Tetrahymena. Based on spoke arrangement in intact axonemes, arms translocate axonemal microtubules in sliding such that active dynein arms are (-) end directed motors and the doublet to which the body and cape of the arms binds (N) translocates the adjacent doublet (N + 1) tipward. After salt extraction, based on ATPase activity, paramecium dynein is found as a 22S and a 14S species. The 22S dynein is a three-headed molecule that has unfolded from the in situ dimensions; the 14S dynein is single headed. Both dyneins can be photocleaved by UV light (350 nm) in the presence of Mg2+, ATP and vanadate; the photocleavage pattern of 22S dynein differs from that seen with Tetrahymena. Both isolated dyneins translocate taxol-stabilized, bovine brain microtubules in vitro. Under standard conditions, 22S dynein, like comparable dyneins from other organisms, translocates at velocities that are about three times faster than 14S dynein. PMID:1825507

  14. Surface pressure profiles, vortex structure and initialization for hurricane prediction. Part II: numerical simulations of track, structure and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Noel E.; Ma, Yimin

    2012-07-01

    In part 1 of this study, an assessment of commonly used surface pressure profiles to represent TC structures was made. Using the Australian tropical cyclone model, the profiles are tested in case studies of high-resolution prediction of track, structure and intensity. We demonstrate that: (1) track forecasts are mostly insensitive to the imposed structure; (2) in some cases [here Katrina (2005)], specification of vortex structure can have a large impact on prediction of structure and intensity; (3) the forecast model mostly preserves the characteristics of the initial structure and so correct structure at t = 0 is a requirement for improved structure forecasting; and (4) skilful prediction of intensity does not guarantee skilful prediction of structure. It is shown that for Ivan (2004) the initial structure from each profile is preserved during the simulations, and that markedly different structures can have similar intensities. Evidence presented suggests that different initial profiles can sometimes change the timing of intensification. Thus, correct initial vortex structure is an essential ingredient for more accurate intensity and structure prediction.

  15. An investigation for structure transformation in electric pulse modified liquid aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jingang; Wang, Jianzhong; He, Lijia; Zhao, Zuofu; Du, Huiling

    2011-02-01

    The electric pulse (EP) modification of liquid metal is a novel method for grain refinement. In this work, the structure tests of EP-modified liquid aluminum were conducted and investigated using high-temperature X-ray diffractometer by virtue of the outstanding structural heredity of EP-modified liquid aluminum. The results show that the EP-modified liquid structure tends to be slack and unordered with increasing temperature similar to that of the unmodified. Nevertheless, the quantitative characterization denoted by the liquid structural parameters exhibits its discrepancy. At the modifying temperature of 750 °C, the order of degree of EP-modified liquid aluminum is remarkably strengthened and the value of average atomic number per cluster changes from 119 (no EP) up to 174 (EP) by an increase of 46%. These tests experimentally testified Wang's electric pulse modification (EPM) model that was built only by phenomenology, and hereby the mechanism of grain refinement resulting from EPM is further elucidated.

  16. Reversible Phase Change Characteristics of Cr-Doped Sb2Te3 Films with Different Initial States Induced by Femtosecond Pulses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Jiang, Minghui; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yang; Zheng, Yonghui; Song, Sannian; Wu, Yiqun; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin

    2016-08-17

    As a kind of chalcogenide alloy, phase change material has been widely used as novel storage medium in optical disk or electrical memory. In this paper, femtosecond pulses are used to study the reversible phase transition processes of Cr-doped Sb2Te3 films with different initial states. The SET processes are all induced by multiple pulses and relate to the increase of crystallized partial in the irradiated spot. When the Cr concentration is 5.3 at % or 10.5 at %, the crystallization mechanism is still growth-dominated as Sb2Te3, which is beneficial for high speed and high density storage, whereas the necessary crystallization energy increases with more Cr-dopants, leading to higher amorphous thermal stability. RESET results by multiple pulses show that Cr-dopants will not increase the power consumption, and the increase in Cr-dopants could greatly increase the antioxidant capacity. Single-pulse experiments show that the RESET process involves the competition of melting/amorphization and recrystallization. The reversible SET/RESET results on different initial states are quite different from each other, which is mainly due to the different surroundings around the irradiated spot. Crystalline surroundings provide higher thermal conductivity and lead to easier crystallization, whereas amorphous surroundings were the reverse. All in all, Cr-doped Sb2Te3 films with suitable composition have advantages for storage with high density, better thermal stability, and lower power consumption; and the suitable initial states could ensure better reversible phase transition performances. PMID:27459421

  17. Epitaxial Structure of (001)- and (111)-Oriented Perovskite Ferrate Films Grown by Pulsed-Laser Deposition.

    PubMed

    Chakraverty, Suvankar; Ohtomo, Akira; Okude, Masaki; Ueno, Kazunori; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2010-04-01

    The epitaxial structures of SrFeO(2.5) films grown on SrTiO(3) (001) and (111) substrates by PLD are reported. A layer-by-layer growth mode was achieved in the initial stage on both substrates. The films were stabilized with a monoclinic structure, where we identified the in-plane domain structures and orientation relationship. Our study presents a guide to control the heteroepitaxy of (111)-oriented noncubic perovskites. PMID:20383295

  18. Ultrafast gigantic photo-response in (EDO-TTF)2PF6 initiated by 10-fs laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert William; Itatani, Jiro; Rini, Matteo; Cavalleri, Andrea; Onda, Ken; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Shao, Xiangfeng; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2006-08-07

    We photo-exited a charge-ordered organic salt (EDO-TTF)2PF6 with sub-10-fs optical pulses. The photo-induced metallic phase appeared within 80-fs after pumping, characterized by large changes in reflectivity (DELTA R/R~0.8) followed by strong coherent phonon modulation

  19. Resistive pulse sensing of magnetic beads and supraparticle structures using tunable pores

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, Geoff R.; Platt, Mark; Lee, Gil U.

    2012-01-01

    Tunable pores (TPs) have been used for resistive pulse sensing of 1 μm superparamagnetic beads, both dispersed and within a magnetic field. Upon application of this field, magnetic supraparticle structures (SPSs) were observed. Onset of aggregation was most effectively indicated by an increase in the mean event magnitude, with data collected using an automated thresholding method. Simulations enabled discrimination between resistive pulses caused by dimers and individual particles. Distinct but time-correlated peaks were often observed, suggesting that SPSs became separated in pressure-driven flow focused at the pore constriction. The distinct properties of magnetophoretic and pressure-driven transport mechanisms can explain variations in the event rate when particles move through an asymmetric pore in either direction, with or without a magnetic field applied. Use of TPs for resistive pulse sensing holds potential for efficient, versatile analysis and measurement of nano- and microparticles, while magnetic beads and particle aggregation play important roles in many prospective biosensing applications. PMID:22662090

  20. Investigating natural organic carbon removal and structural alteration induced by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Yusaf, Talal; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Bowtell, Leslie

    2016-01-15

    The application of pulsed ultrasound for DOC removal from natural water samples has been thoroughly investigated in this work. Natural water samples were treated with ultrasound at power levels of 48 and 84 W with treatment times of 5 and 15 min. Chemical fractionation was conducted for both untreated and treated samples to clearly identify the change in DOC structure caused by ultrasonic treatments. Statistical analyses applying 2(3) factorial design were performed to study the behaviour of the response (i.e. DOC removal) under different operating conditions. Overall, ultrasonic treatments resulted in DOC removal of 7-15% depending on the applied operating conditions. The treated water had high microbial loading that interfered with DOC removal due primarily to the release of microbial products when exposed to ultrasound. Pulse ultrasound was found to be more effective than the continuous mode for DOC removal at the same effective power level. A regression model was developed and tested for DOC removal prediction. The model was adequate in predicting DOC removal with a maximum deviation from the experimental data of <11%. Pulsed ultrasound at low power levels and short treatment times was found to be the most energy efficient treatment for DOC removal. PMID:26473704

  1. Laser pulse duration dependence of the low-energy structure in strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu Hang; Zhang, Kaikai; Blaga, Cosmin; Xu, Junliang; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis; Schmidt, Bruno; Légaré, François; The Ohio State University Team; Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique Team

    2015-05-01

    Low-energy structure (LES) in strong field ionization is a spike-like feature appearing in the low energy part (a few eV) of photoelectron spectra along the laser polarization. It has been observed in rare gas atoms and diatomic molecules. In the classical picture, the formation of LES is due to the Coulomb interaction between the ionized electron and its parent ion via the process of multiple forward scattering, which can happen only if the electron is ionized with a small drift momentum. We have studied the LES in rare gas atoms with few-cycle laser pulses centered at 1800nm. We observed that the LES peak shifts to lower energy as the pulse duration decreases from 5 down to 2 optical cycles, which is in qualitative agreement with classical-trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. Classically, the shift could be attributed to the dependence of the ratio between the field amplitude of the central cycle and the adjacent cycle on the pulse duration. Our data support the classical nature of the LES.

  2. A psychological pulse train: how young children use this cognitive framework to structure simple rhythms.

    PubMed

    Drake, C; Gérard, C

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the reproduction of both regular rhythms and irregular sequences by 5- and 7-year-old children, concentrating on the important role played by their organization around a pulse train. It is shown that: (a) the closer rhythms are to a regular beat the easier they are to reproduce and the greater are the improvements with age; (b) memory capacity is limited by the number of pulses around which the rhythm is organized rather than by the number of elements it contains; (c) all the children's productions contain two interval lengths that are in a ratio close to 1:2 and arranged in preferential sequences which we have called "stereotypes"; (d) arrhythmic sequences can only be reproduced if the intervals undergo a systematic distortion towards regularity. These results are interpreted in relation to a pulse-train hypothesis which states that on hearing a rhythm an "internal clock" or "time base" is evoked around which the rhythm is structured. PMID:2756070

  3. Long-term signal of population disturbance after pulse exposure to an insecticide: rapid recovery of abundance, persistent alteration of structure.

    PubMed

    Liess, Matthias; Pieters, Barry Johan; Duquesne, Sabine

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the effect of pulse exposure to toxicants on populations when density regulation is present. Yet, for a more realistic risk assessment, it is necessary to include effect and recovery at the population level. Here, we investigate the long-term and delayed effects as well as the subsequent recovery of populations of Daphnia magna. A 24-h pulse of the pyrethroid fenvalerate reduced the abundance at a concentration of 1.0 microg/L and higher. However, abundance recovered and reached control levels after one to two generation times (GTs) following reproduction of surviving individuals (GT = 8 d, from birth until first reproduction). At high concentrations above the acute median lethal concentration (3.2 micorg/L), abundance initially decreased even more strongly but was then elevated compared to control values for an extended period of time. Population structure (size distribution) was affected at lower concentrations than abundance (> 0.8 microg/L). In addition, the alteration of population structure lasted for a long time, so that control levels were approached only after approximately six or seven GTs. Our results show that pulse exposure to toxicants may lead to a long-term alteration of population structure even at sublethal concentrations. Possible mechanisms that sustain the effects of toxicants may be delayed life-history effects on the individual level and elevated competition because of altered population structure on the population level. PMID:16704065

  4. Structural properties and digestibility of pulsed electric field treated waxy rice starch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Feng; Gao, Qun-Yu; Han, Zhong; Zeng, Xin-An; Yu, Shu-Juan

    2016-03-01

    Waxy rice starch was subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at intensity of 30, 40 and 50kVcm(-1). The impact of PEF treatment on the granular morphology, molecular weight, semi-crystalline structure, thermal properties, and digestibility were investigated. The micrographs suggested that electric energy could act on the granule structure of starch granule, especially at high intensity of 50kVcm(-1). Gelatinization onset temperature, peak temperature, conclusion temperature and enthalpy value of PEF treated starches were lower than that of native starch. The 9nm lamellar peak of PEF treated starches decreased as revealed by small angle X-ray scattering. The relative crystallinity of treated starches decreased as the increase of electric field intensity. Increased rapidly digestible starch level and decreased slowly digestible starch level was found on PEF treated starches. These results would imply that PEF treatment induced structural changes in waxy rice starch significantly affected its digestibility. PMID:26471687

  5. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of pulsed laser deposition CIGSS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan-Bin; Kang, Y. Zhen-Feng; Fan, Yue; Xiao, Ling-ling; Bo, Qing-Rui; Ding, Tie-Zhu

    2015-12-01

    High-quality CuIn0.75Ga0.25(Se0.75S0.25)2 (CIGSS) thin films were synthesized on the soda-lime glass (SLG) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The structural and optical properties of CIGSS thin films were studied by experiments and theoretical calculations. XRD result reveals that the films are of chalcopyrite structure. The experiments and theory show that CIGSS is a semiconductor with a direct band gap. The direct band gap energy of the deposited CIGSS thin films are in the solar energy range. The band structure and density of states of the CIGSS crystals were studied by the first principles density functional theory. The experimental data and theoretical data have demonstrated good agreement.

  6. Process-structure-property correlations in pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtered vanadium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, Chandrasekaran; Cabarcos, Orlando M.; Drawl, William R.; Allara, David L.; Ashok, S.; Horn, Mark W.; Bharadwaja, S. S. N.

    2011-11-15

    Cathode hysteresis in the reactive pulsed dc sputtering of a vanadium metal target was investigated to correlate the structural and electrical properties of the resultant vanadium oxide thin films within the framework of Berg's model [Berg et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 5, 202 (1987)]. The process hysteresis during reactive pulsed dc sputtering of a vanadium metal target was monitored by measuring the cathode (target) current under different total gas flow rates and oxygen-to-argon ratios for a power density of {approx}6.6.W/cm{sup 2}. Approximately 20%-25% hysteretic change in the cathode current was noticed between the metallic and oxidized states of the V-metal target. The extent of the hysteresis varied with changes in the mass flow of oxygen as predicted by Berg's model. The corresponding microstructure of the films changed from columnar to equiaxed grain structure with increased oxygen flow rates. Micro-Raman spectroscopy indicates subtle changes in the film structure as a function of processing conditions. The resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and charge transport mechanism, obeying the Meyer-Neldel relation [Meyer and Neldel, Z. Tech. Phys. (Leipzig) 12, 588 (1937)], were correlated with the cathode current hysteric behavior.

  7. Molecular Structure and Chirality Determination from Pulsed-Jet Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Perez, Cristobal; Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks; Lehmann, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy has been used for many years as one of the most accurate methods to determine gas-phase structures of molecules and small molecular clusters. In the last years two pioneering works ushered in a new era applications. First, by exploiting the reduced measurement time and the high sensitivity, the development of chirped-pulse CP-FTMW spectrometers enabled the full structural determination of molecules of increasing size as well as molecular clusters. Second, and more recently, Patterson et al. showed that rotational spectroscopy can also be used for enantiomer-specific detection. Here we present an experimental approach that combines both in a single spectrometer. This set-up is capable to rapidly obtain the full heavy-atom substitution structure using the CP-FTMW features. The inclusion of an extra set of broadband horns allows for a chirality-sensitive measurement of the sample. The measurement we implement is a three-wave mixing experiment that uses time-separated pulses to optimally create the chiral coherence - an approach that was proposed recently. Using samples of R-, S- and racemic Solketal, the physical properties of the three-wave mixing experiment were studied. This involved the measurement of the corresponding nutation curves (molecular signal intensity vs excitation pulse duration) to demonstrate the optimal pulse sequence. The phase stability of the chiral signal, required to assign the absolute stereochemistry, has been studied as a function of the measurement signal-to-noise ratio using a "phasogram" method. G. G. Brown, B. C. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman, B. H. Pate, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2008, 79, 053103. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J. M. Doyle, Nature 2013, 497, 475-477. D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 023008. V. A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 1152-1155. J.-U. Grabow, Angew. Chem. 2013, 125, 11914

  8. Pulsed laser deposition to synthesize the bridge structure of artificial nacre: Comparison of nano- and femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal

    2012-11-01

    Nature offers inspiration to new adaptive technologies that allow us to build amazing shapes and structures such as nacre using synthetic materials. Consequently, we have designed a pulsed laser ablation manufacturing process involving thin film deposition and micro-machining to create hard/soft layered "brick-bridge-mortar" nacre of AlMgB14 (hard phase) with Ti (soft phase). In this paper, we report pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to mimic brick and bridge structures of natural nacre in AlMgB14. Particulate formation inherent in PLD is exploited to develop the bridge structure. Mechanical behavior analysis of the AlMgB14/Ti system revealed that the brick is to be 250 nm thick, 9 μm lateral dimensions while the bridge (particle) is to have a diameter of 500 nm for a performance equivalent to natural nacre. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) pulsed lasers were employed for PLD in an iterative approach that involves varying pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and target-to-substrate distance to achieve the desired brick and bridge characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical profilometer were used to evaluate the film thickness, particle size and density, stoichiometry, and surface roughness of thin films. Results indicated that both ns-pulsed and fs-pulsed lasers produce the desired nacre features. However, each laser may be chosen for different reasons: fs-pulsed laser is preferred for much shorter deposition time, better stoichiometry, uniform-sized particles, and uniform film thickness, while ns-pulsed laser is favored for industrial acceptance, reliability, ease of handling, and low cost.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition to synthesize the bridge structure of artificial nacre: Comparison of nano- and femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal

    2012-11-15

    Nature offers inspiration to new adaptive technologies that allow us to build amazing shapes and structures such as nacre using synthetic materials. Consequently, we have designed a pulsed laser ablation manufacturing process involving thin film deposition and micro-machining to create hard/soft layered 'brick-bridge-mortar' nacre of AlMgB{sub 14} (hard phase) with Ti (soft phase). In this paper, we report pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to mimic brick and bridge structures of natural nacre in AlMgB{sub 14}. Particulate formation inherent in PLD is exploited to develop the bridge structure. Mechanical behavior analysis of the AlMgB{sub 14}/Ti system revealed that the brick is to be 250 nm thick, 9 {mu}m lateral dimensions while the bridge (particle) is to have a diameter of 500 nm for a performance equivalent to natural nacre. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) pulsed lasers were employed for PLD in an iterative approach that involves varying pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and target-to-substrate distance to achieve the desired brick and bridge characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical profilometer were used to evaluate the film thickness, particle size and density, stoichiometry, and surface roughness of thin films. Results indicated that both ns-pulsed and fs-pulsed lasers produce the desired nacre features. However, each laser may be chosen for different reasons: fs-pulsed laser is preferred for much shorter deposition time, better stoichiometry, uniform-sized particles, and uniform film thickness, while ns-pulsed laser is favored for industrial acceptance, reliability, ease of handling, and low cost.

  10. Pulse- and time-dependent observation of UV-laser-induced structures on polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesting, Wolfgang; Knittel, Dierk; Bahners, Thomas; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation of highly absorbing polymers with a pulsed excimer laser can change the surface topography under certain conditions. Fibres made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and polyamide show a characteristic roll-like morphology after treatment with 193 or 248 nm laser irradiation, which promises interesting applications in industrial processing of textile fibres. For a systematic study of the influences of the various parameters monofilaments made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) and poly(propylene) were irradiated in place in a microscope. This allowed the observation of the evolution of the structure shot by shot. Quantitative data were taken by use of an image analysing system. The study was done with various laser fluences, wavelengths and in dependence on mechanical stress (draw) on the sample. With increasing number of shots the morphology gets more coarse due to a sort of "combining" of the rolls showing a logarithmic dependence of the mean roll-distance on the number of pulses applied. Characteristically, the fibre decomposes into ellipsoidal pieces after a sufficient number of shots. The polyolefinic material cannot be modified directly with 193 or 248 nm laser radiation due to the low absorption coefficient for these wavelenghts. By using a 157 nm F 2 laser certain surface modifications were observed on fibres and films. The structures were similar to the effects previously found on poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  11. Semiclassical modelling of finite-pulse effects on non-adiabatic photodynamics via initial condition filtering: The predissociation of NaI as a test case

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-05-21

    Femtosecond-laser pulse driven non-adiabatic spectroscopy and dynamics in molecular and condensed phase systems continue to be a challenge for theoretical modelling. One of the main obstacles is the “curse of dimensionality” encountered in non-adiabatic, exact wavepacket propagation. A possible route towards treating complex molecular systems is via semiclassical surface-hopping schemes, in particular if they account not only for non-adiabatic post-excitation dynamics but also for the initial optical excitation. One such approach, based on initial condition filtering, will be put forward in what follows. As a simple test case which can be compared with exact wavepacket dynamics, we investigate the influence of the different parameters determining the shape of a laser pulse (e.g., its finite width and a possible chirp) on the predissociation dynamics of a NaI molecule, upon photoexcitation of the A(0{sup +}) state. The finite-pulse effects are mapped into the initial conditions for semiclassical surface-hopping simulations. The simulated surface-hopping diabatic populations are in qualitative agreement with the quantum mechanical results, especially concerning the subpicosend photoinduced dynamics, the main deviations being the relative delay of the non-adiabatic transitions in the semiclassical picture. Likewise, these differences in the time-dependent electronic populations calculated via the semiclassical and the quantum methods are found to have a mild influence on the overall probability density distribution. As a result, the branching ratios between the bound and the dissociative reaction channels and the time-evolution of the molecular wavepacket predicted by the semiclassical method agree with those computed using quantum wavepacket propagation. Implications for more challenging molecular systems are given.

  12. Structural and phase transformations in zinc and brass wires under heating with high-density current pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The work is focused on revealing the mechanism of structure and phase transformations in the metal wires under heating with a high-density current pulse (the electric explosion of wires, EEWs). It has been demonstrated on the example of brass and zinc wires that the transition of a current pulse with the density of j ≈ 3.3 × 107 A/cm2 results in homogeneous heating of the crystalline structure of the metal/alloy. It has been determined that under heating with a pulse of high-density current pulse, the electric resistance of the liquid phases of zinc and brass decreases as the temperature increases. The results obtained allow for a conclusion that the presence of the particles of the condensed phase in the expanding products of EEW is the result of overheating instabilities in the liquid metal.

  13. Influence of laser pulse duration on the electrochemical performance of laser structured LiFePO4 composite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangang, M.; Seifert, H. J.; Pfleging, W.

    2016-02-01

    Lithium iron phosphate is a promising cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, despite its low electrical conductivity and lithium-ion diffusion kinetic. To overcome the reduced rate performance, three dimensional (3D) architectures were generated in composite cathode layers. By using ultrashort laser radiation with pulse durations in the femtosecond regime the ablation depth per pulse is three times higher compared to nanosecond laser pulses. Due to the 3D structuring, the surface area of the active material which is in direct contact with liquid electrolyte, i.e. the active surface, is increased. As a result the capacity retention and the cycle stability were significantly improved, especially for high charging/discharging currents. Furthermore, a 3D structure leads to higher currents during cyclic voltammetry. Thus, the lithium-ion diffusion kinetic in the cell was improved. In addition, using ultrashort laser pulses results in a high aspect ratio and further improvement of the cell kinetic was achieved.

  14. Flame Structure and Emissions of Strongly-Pulsed Turbulent Diffusion Flames with Swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Hao

    This work studies the turbulent flame structure, the reaction-zone structure and the exhaust emissions of strongly-pulsed, non-premixed flames with co-flow swirl. The fuel injection is controlled by strongly-pulsing the fuel flow by a fast-response solenoid valve such that the fuel flow is completely shut off between pulses. This control strategy allows the fuel injection to be controlled over a wide range of operating conditions, allowing the flame structure to range from isolated fully-modulated puffs to interacting puffs to steady flames. The swirl level is controlled by varying the ratio of the volumetric flow rate of the tangential air to that of the axial air. For strongly-pulsed flames, both with and without swirl, the flame geometry is strongly impacted by the injection time. Flames appear to exhibit compact, puff-like structures for short injection times, while elongated flames, similar in behaviors to steady flames, occur for long injection times. The flames with swirl are found to be shorter for the same fuel injection conditions. The separation/interaction level between flame puffs in these flames is essentially governed by the jet-off time. The separation between flame puffs decreases as swirl is imposed, consistent with the decrease in flame puff celerity due to swirl. The decreased flame length and flame puff celerity are consistent with an increased rate of air entrainment due to swirl. The highest levels of CO emissions are generally found for compact, isolated flame puffs, consistent with the rapid quenching due to rapid dilution with excess air. The imposition of swirl generally results in a decrease in CO levels, suggesting more rapid and complete fuel/air mixing by imposing swirl in the co-flow stream. The levels of NO emissions for most cases are generally below the steady-flame value. The NO levels become comparable to the steady-flame value for sufficiently short jet-off time. The swirled co-flow air can, in some cases, increase the NO

  15. Effect of gel structure of matrix orientation in pulsed alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stellwagen, N.C.; Stellwagen, J.

    1993-12-31

    Four polymeric gels with different structures, LE agarose, HEEO agarose, beta-carrageenan, and polyacrylamide, were studied by transient electric birefringence to determine the importance of various structural features on the orientation of the gels in pulsed alternating electric fields. The birefrigence relaxation times observed for agarose gels in low voltage electric fields suggest that long fibers and/or domains, ranging up to tens of microns in size, are oriented by the electric field. The sign of the birefringence reverses when the direction of the electric field is reversed, suggesting that the oriented domains change their direction of orientation from parallel to perpendicular (or vice versa) when the polarity of the electric field is reversed. These anamalous orientation effects are observed with both types of agarose gels, but not with beta-carrageenan or polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that the alternating D,L galactose residues in the agarose backbone are responsible for the anomalies.

  16. Superlattice CoCrPt/Ru/CoFe structure fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X. F.; Liang, Q.; Li, H. Q.; He, X. X.; Wang, Xiaoru; Zhang, W.

    2006-04-01

    The synthetic antiferromagnets (SAF) have been used in spin-valve sensor in data storage industry [1]. We report a new hard/Ru/soft sandwich structure (SHBL) fabricated by pulsed lased deposition to replace current single layer structure for information recording application. SHBL consists of two magnetic layers separated by thin nonmagnetic layers, typically with Ru layers of 0.7-1.2 nm, through which antiferromagnetic coupling is induced. Varying the relative thickness of the magnetic layers, the spacer layers, and the type of magnetic materials can alter magnetic properties of CoCrPt/Ru/CoFe superlattice. The coercivity Hc and grain size of magnetic layer is also dependent on the laser fluence. High laser fluence results in both small grain size and high Hc. The observed phenomena are related to high quenching and deposition rates during PLD at high fluence, resulting in more pronounced phase segregation.

  17. Propagation of the Ultra-Short Laser Pulses Through the Helical 1D Photonic Crystal Structure with Twist Defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, Dmitrii V.; Iegorov, Roman

    2016-02-01

    The presence of the photonic band-gap is a featured property of the cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC). It can be practically realized for almost any reasonable wavelengths with very high degree of tunability. We have investigated theoretically the influence of the twist defect of the CLC helical structure onto the bandwidth-limited ultra-short laser pulse propagating inside the photonic band-gap. The changes of both pulse duration and peak power with defect angle were observed together with pulse acceleration and retardation for a case of normal incidence of the light.

  18. Production of Multi-Terawatt Time-Structured CO{sub 2} Laser Pulses for Ion Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Haberberger, Dan; Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong Chao; Joshi, Chan

    2010-11-04

    The UCLA Neptune Laboratory CO{sub 2} laser system has been recently upgraded to produce 3ps multi-terawatt 10{mu}m laser pulses. The laser energy is distributed over several 3 ps pulses separated by 18 ps. These temporally structured pulses are applied for laser driven ion acceleration in an H{sub 2} gas jet at a measured plasma density of 2x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Protons in excess of 20 MeV have been observed in the forward direction and with energy spreads ({Delta}E/E{approx}10%).

  19. A novel method for finding the initial structure parameters of optical systems via a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, LIU; Huang, Wei; Hongjie, Fan

    2016-02-01

    A novel method for finding the initial structure parameters of an optical system via the genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed in this research. Usually, optical designers start their designs from the commonly used structures from a patent database; however, it is time consuming to modify the patented structures to meet the specification. A high-performance design result largely depends on the choice of the starting point. Accordingly, it would be highly desirable to be able to calculate the initial structure parameters automatically. In this paper, a method that combines a genetic algorithm and aberration analysis is used to determine an appropriate initial structure of an optical system. We use a three-mirror system as an example to demonstrate the validity and reliability of this method. On-axis and off-axis telecentric three-mirror systems are obtained based on this method.

  20. Efficient Cherenkov emission of broadband terahertz radiation from an ultrashort laser pulse in a sandwich structure with nonlinear core

    SciTech Connect

    Bodrov, S. B.; Bakunov, M. I.; Hangyo, M.

    2008-11-01

    A scheme for efficient generation of broadband terahertz radiation by a femtosecond laser pulse propagating in a planar sandwichlike structure is proposed. The structure consists of a thin nonlinear core cladded with prisms made of a material with low terahertz absorption. The focused into a line laser pulse propagates in the core as a leaky or waveguide mode and emits Cherenkov wedge of terahertz waves in the cladding. We developed a theory that describes terahertz generation in such a structure and calculated spatial distribution of the generated terahertz field, its energy spectrum and optical-to-terahertz conversion efficiency. The developed theory predicts the conversion efficiency of up to several percent in a 1 cm long and 1 cm wide Si-LiNbO{sub 3}-Si sandwich structure with a 20 {mu}m thick nonlinear layer pumped by 8.5 {mu}J Ti:sapphire laser with pulse duration of 100 fs.

  1. Structures of ribosome-bound initiation factor 2 reveal the mechanism of subunit association.

    PubMed

    Sprink, Thiemo; Ramrath, David J F; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kaori; Loerke, Justus; Ismer, Jochen; Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Spahn, Christian M T

    2016-03-01

    Throughout the four phases of protein biosynthesis-initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling-the ribosome is controlled and regulated by at least one specified translational guanosine triphosphatase (trGTPase). Although the structural basis for trGTPase interaction with the ribosome has been solved for the last three steps of translation, the high-resolution structure for the key initiation trGTPase, initiation factor 2 (IF2), complexed with the ribosome, remains elusive. We determine the structure of IF2 complexed with a nonhydrolyzable guanosine triphosphate analog and initiator fMet-tRNAi (Met) in the context of the Escherichia coli ribosome to 3.7-Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. The structural analysis reveals previously unseen intrinsic conformational modes of the 70S initiation complex, establishing the mutual interplay of IF2 and initator transfer RNA (tRNA) with the ribsosome and providing the structural foundation for a mechanistic understanding of the final steps of translation initiation. PMID:26973877

  2. Structures of ribosome-bound initiation factor 2 reveal the mechanism of subunit association

    PubMed Central

    Sprink, Thiemo; Ramrath, David J. F.; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kaori; Loerke, Justus; Ismer, Jochen; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Scheerer, Patrick; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Spahn, Christian M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the four phases of protein biosynthesis—initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling—the ribosome is controlled and regulated by at least one specified translational guanosine triphosphatase (trGTPase). Although the structural basis for trGTPase interaction with the ribosome has been solved for the last three steps of translation, the high-resolution structure for the key initiation trGTPase, initiation factor 2 (IF2), complexed with the ribosome, remains elusive. We determine the structure of IF2 complexed with a nonhydrolyzable guanosine triphosphate analog and initiator fMet-tRNAiMet in the context of the Escherichia coli ribosome to 3.7-Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. The structural analysis reveals previously unseen intrinsic conformational modes of the 70S initiation complex, establishing the mutual interplay of IF2 and initator transfer RNA (tRNA) with the ribsosome and providing the structural foundation for a mechanistic understanding of the final steps of translation initiation. PMID:26973877

  3. Super-hydrophobicity of PMMA and PDMS surfaces structured by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hong-Myeong; Lee, Woon-Young; Lee, Jin-Ho; Yang, Deok-Cho; Lim, Ki-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Surface wettability depends on both physical surface structure and chemical material. In this report, we demonstrate super-hydrophobic surface of cast polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheet by femtosecond laser fabrication. Twodimensional micro-array structures of square-typed pillars with various heights, widths, and intervals were fabricated on the PMMA surface by femtosecond laser irradiation and chemical etching. The Yb:KGW femtosecond laser processing system (λ=1030 nm) delivering 250 fs pulses at a repetition rate 100 kHz was employed for fabrication. The contact angle of PMMA changed 64° (hydrophilic plane) to 150° (super-hydrophobic structure). We also improved superhydrophobicity up to 170° contact angle by spin-coating PMMA surface with PDMS and fabricating regular microstructures including irregular nano-structures. We also coated the structured PMMA surface with a car ash spray material to use another combination of surface morphology and chemistry. All the experimental results were compared with those expected values by Cassie-Baxter model.

  4. Initiation of Translation in Bacteria by a Structured Eukaryotic IRES RNA

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Zhu, Jianyu; Donohue, John Paul; Korostelev, Andrei A.; Jaafar, Zane A.; Plank, Terra-Dawn M.; Noller, Harry F.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of gene expression (DNA→RNA→protein) is universal, but in different domains of life there are fundamental mechanistic differences within this pathway. For example, the canonical molecular signals used to initiate protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes are mutually exclusive1,2. However, the core structures and conformational dynamics of ribosomes that are responsible for the steps of translation following initiation are ancient and conserved across the domains of life3,4. We asked whether an undiscovered RNA-based signal might be able to use these conserved features, bypassing mechanisms specific to each domain of life, and initiate protein synthesis in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Although structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs can manipulate ribosomes to initiate translation in eukaryotic cells, an analogous RNA structure-based mechanism has not been observed in bacteria. Here, we report our discovery that a eukaryotic viral IRES can initiate translation in live bacteria. We solved the crystal structure of this IRES bound to a bacterial ribosome to 3.8 Å resolution, revealing that despite differences between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes this IRES binds directly to both and occupies the space normally used by tRNAs. Initiation in both bacteria and eukaryotes depends on the structure of the IRES RNA but in bacteria this RNA uses a different mechanism that includes a form of ribosome repositioning after initial recruitment. This IRES RNA bridges billions of years of evolutionary divergence as an example of an RNA structure-based translation initiation signal capable of operating in two domains of life. PMID:25652826

  5. Initiation of translation in bacteria by a structured eukaryotic IRES RNA.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Zhu, Jianyu; Donohue, John Paul; Korostelev, Andrei A; Jaafar, Zane A; Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Noller, Harry F; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    The central dogma of gene expression (DNA to RNA to protein) is universal, but in different domains of life there are fundamental mechanistic differences within this pathway. For example, the canonical molecular signals used to initiate protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes are mutually exclusive. However, the core structures and conformational dynamics of ribosomes that are responsible for the translation steps that take place after initiation are ancient and conserved across the domains of life. We wanted to explore whether an undiscovered RNA-based signal might be able to use these conserved features, bypassing mechanisms specific to each domain of life, and initiate protein synthesis in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Although structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs can manipulate ribosomes to initiate translation in eukaryotic cells, an analogous RNA structure-based mechanism has not been observed in bacteria. Here we report our discovery that a eukaryotic viral IRES can initiate translation in live bacteria. We solved the crystal structure of this IRES bound to a bacterial ribosome to 3.8 Å resolution, revealing that despite differences between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes this IRES binds directly to both and occupies the space normally used by transfer RNAs. Initiation in both bacteria and eukaryotes depends on the structure of the IRES RNA, but in bacteria this RNA uses a different mechanism that includes a form of ribosome repositioning after initial recruitment. This IRES RNA bridges billions of years of evolutionary divergence and provides an example of an RNA structure-based translation initiation signal capable of operating in two domains of life. PMID:25652826

  6. Structural Engineering of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Photonic Crystals by Sawtooth-like Pulse Anodization.

    PubMed

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel; Nemati, Mahdieh; Losic, Dusan

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a sawtooth-like pulse anodization approach aiming to create a new type of photonic crystal structure based on nanoporous anodic alumina. This nanofabrication approach enables the engineering of the effective medium of nanoporous anodic alumina in a sawtooth-like manner with precision. The manipulation of various anodization parameters such as anodization period, anodization amplitude, number of anodization pulses, ramp ratio and pore widening time allows a precise control and fine-tuning of the optical properties (i.e., characteristic transmission peaks and interferometric colors) exhibited by nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals (NAA-PCs). The effect of these anodization parameters on the photonic properties of NAA-PCs is systematically evaluated for the establishment of a fabrication methodology toward NAA-PCs with tunable optical properties. The effective medium of the resulting NAA-PCs is demonstrated to be optimal for the development of optical sensing platforms in combination with reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). This application is demonstrated by monitoring in real-time the formation of monolayers of thiol molecules (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid) on the surface of gold-coated NAA-PCs. The obtained results reveal that the adsorption mechanism between thiol molecules and gold-coated NAA-PCs follows a Langmuir isotherm model, indicating a monolayer sorption mechanism. PMID:27171214

  7. Temporal structure of attosecond pulses from intense laser-atom interactions.

    PubMed

    Pukhov, A; Gordienko, S; Baeva, T

    2003-10-24

    We find that the high harmonics have a power-law spectrum I(omega) approximately omega(-3.3+/-0.25) in a wide frequency domain starting at the ionization potential I(p) and down to the plateau beginning. Our spectrotemporal analysis of the emitted radiation displays clear bowlike structures in the (t,omega) plane. These "bows" correspond to Corkum's reencounters of the freed electron with the atom. We find that the bows are not filled and thus cannot be due to any bremsstrahlung. Rather, it is a resonant process that we call stimulated recombination (SR). It occurs when an electron with momentum p reencounters the incompletely ionized atom, and interferes with itself still remaining in the ground state. The SR leads to a highly efficient resonant emission at Planck's over 2pi omega=p(2)/2m+I(p) in the form of attosecond pulses. The SR relies on a low level of ionization and strongly benefits from the use of few-cycle laser pulses. PMID:14611340

  8. Mechanism of DNA Trapping in Nanoporous Structures during Asymmetric Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ya; Harrison, D. Jed

    2014-03-01

    DNA molecules (>100kbp) are trapped in separation sieves when high electric fields are applied in pulsed field electrophoresis, seriously limiting the speed of separation. Using crystalline particle arrays, to generate interstitial pores for molecular sieving, allows higher electric fields than in gels, (e.g 40 vs 5 V/cm), however trapping still limits the field strength. Using reverse pulses, which release DNA from being fully-stretched, allows higher fields (140 V/cm). We investigate the trapping mechanism of individual DNA molecules in ordered nanoporous structures. Two prerequisites for trapping are revealed by the dynamics of single trapped DNA, hernia formation and fully-stretched U/J shapes. Fully stretched DNA has longer unhooking times than expected by simple models. We propose a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force reduces the mobility of segments at the apex of the U or J, where field gradients are highest, based on simulations. A modified model for unhooking time is obtained after the DEP force is introduced. The new model explains the unhooking time data by predicting an infinite trapping time when the ratio of arm length differences (of the U or J) to molecule length Δx / L < β . β is a DEP parameter that is found to strongly increase with electric field. The work was supported by grant from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT).

  9. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  10. Dynamic adjustment of echolocation pulse structure of big-footed myotis (Myotis macrodactylus) in response to different habitats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Luo, Jinhong; Wang, Hongna; Ou, Wei; Jiang, Tinglei; Liu, Ying; Lyle, Dennis; Feng, Jiang

    2014-02-01

    Studying relationships between characteristics of sonar pulses and habitat clutter level is important for the understanding of signal design in bat echolocation. However, most studies have focused on overall spectral and temporal parameters of such vocalizations, with focus less on potential variation in frequency modulation rates (MRs) occurring within each pulse. In the current study, frequency modulation (FM) characteristics were examined in echolocation pulses recorded from big-footed myotis (Myotis macrodactylus) bats as these animals searched for prey in five habitats differing in relative clutter level. Pulses were analyzed using ten parameters, including four structure-related characters which were derived by dividing each pulse into three elements based on two knees in the FM sweep. Results showed that overall frequency, pulse duration, and MR all varied across habitat. The strongest effects were found for MR in the body of the pulse, implying that this particular component plays a major role as M. macrodactylus, and potentially other bat species, adjust to varying clutter levels in their foraging habitats. PMID:25234900

  11. Origin of double-line structure in nonsequential double ionization by few-cycle laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Zhong, Mingmin; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-07-28

    We investigate nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of molecules by few-cycle laser pulses at the laser intensity of 1.2-1.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2) using the classical ensemble model. The same double-line structure as the lower intensity (1.0 × 10(14) W/cm(2)) is also observed in the correlated electron momentum spectra for 1.2-1.4 × 10(14) W/cm(2). However, in contrast to the lower intensity where NSDI proceeds only through the recollision-induced double excitation with subsequent ionization (RDESI) mechanism, here, the recollision-induced excitation with subsequent ionization (RESI) mechanism has a more significant contribution to NSDI. This indicates that RDESI is not necessary for the formation of the double-line structure and RESI can give rise to the same type of structure independently. Furthermore, we explore the ultrafast dynamics underlying the formation of the double-line structure in RESI. PMID:27475356

  12. Simultaneous observation of ultrafast structural dynamics and transient electrical field by picosecond electron pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Run-Ze; Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Long; Chen, Jie; Cao, Jianming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy are very promising methods to study transient structural dynamics with atomic spatial-temporal resolution. However, in these laser-pump electron-probe studies of structural dynamics, a transient electric field induced by laser excitation of the sample could deflect probing electrons, which may eventually leads to a misinterpretation of the diffraction data. Here, picosecond structural dynamics and transient surface electric field evolution, excited by femtosecond laser interaction with a metallic thin film, have been observed simultaneously in real time by ultrashort electron pulses in a transmission configuration. By tracing time dependent changes of electron diffraction and deflection angles, these two processes are found to be significantly different and distinguishable in their temporal behavior. This observation provides an effective approach to extract the otherwise obscured ultrafast structural dynamics and may help to improve the spatiotemporal resolution in ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy studies. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  13. An Improved Chirped Pulse Ftmw Analysis of the Structures of Phenol Dimer and Trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Perez, Cristobal; Steber, Amanda L.; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Lesarri, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    With the recent improvements for chirped pulse FTMW (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy between 2-18 GHz, substitution structures of molecules and clusters with more than 10 heavy atoms are becoming routine. While previous CP-FTMW results for phenol dimer reported at this conference by Steber et al. necessitated reduced-band measurements in order to achieve the sensitivity to detect the carbon isotopologues, the latest improvements for the 2-8 GHz arrangement have enabled full band detection of all 12 ^{13}C and 2 ^{18}O isotopologues of phenol dimer in natural abundance, with improved fits for all detected species. In addition, the added sensitivity of this new 2-8 GHz configuration has enabled a full carbon substitution structure of phenol trimer. The experimental structure of phenol trimer, in agreement with the M06-2X/6-311++g(d,p) ab initio structure, is a C_{3} oblate symmetric top with 21 heavy atoms; however, all possible isotopic substitutions are off-symmetry axis, so the resulting detected isotopologues have been fit as c-type prolate asymmetric tops. Use of Kraitchman's equations for structural determination of a symmetric top molecule require some assumptions from the ab initio structure for the complete r_{s} structure of the trimer. A detailed summary of these methods, as well as the microwave results for both species, will be presented. A. L. Steber, J. L. Neill, D. P. Zaleski, B. H. Pate, A. Lesarri. 67th OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2012, MH13.

  14. Surface pressure profiles, vortex structure and initialization for hurricane prediction. Part I: analysis of observed and synthetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yimin; Kafatos, Menas; Davidson, Noel E.

    2012-07-01

    Without detailed reconnaissance, consistent representation of hurricane-like vortices in initial conditions for operational prediction and research simulations still remains elusive. It is thus often necessary, particularly for high-resolution intensity forecasting, to use synthetic tropical cyclone circulations to initialize forecast models. Variants on three commonly used surface pressure profiles are evaluated for possible use. Enhancements to the original profiles are proposed that allows definition of both the inner-core and outer circulation. The latter improvement creates a vortex more consistent with the estimated outer structure which sometimes appears to be crucial to the evolving intensity of the storm. It also allows smoother merging of the synthetic vortex with the environment. Comparisons of the profiles against (a) structure estimates, (b) each other, (c) structures obtained via conservation of angular momentum, and (d) observed vorticity structures, suggest that a new enhanced Fujita profile best represents real TC structures. Student- t tests indicate that improved fitting to the observations is statistically significant.

  15. On study fine atmospheric structure by using of the method of decomposition of infrasonic signals from pulsed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulichkov, Sergey; Chunchuzov, Igor; Demin, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    The proposed method are based on the decomposition of infrasonic signals from pulse sources. In this method, the recorded infrasonic signal is modeled by the sequence of single acoustic pulse having the form of a U and N waves. Each pulse U and N wave corresponds to the reflection of sound from atmospheric inhomogeneities at different altitudes in the atmosphere. By determining time intervals between such pulses U and N waves it is possible to determine vertical gradients of the effective sound speed at the different altitudes in the atmosphere. The method to determine the vertical profiles of the vertical gradients of effective sound velocity in the atmosphere by using data from infrasound monitoring are proposed. The obtained data are corresponds to the theory of the fine structure in the upper atmosphere.

  16. Compositional and structural properties of pulsed laser-deposited ZnS:Cr films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematollahi, Mohammadreza; Yang, Xiaodong; Seim, Eivind; Vullum, Per Erik; Holmestad, Randi; Gibson, Ursula J.; Reenaas, Turid W.

    2016-02-01

    We present the properties of Cr-doped zinc sulfide (ZnS:Cr) films deposited on Si(100) by pulsed laser deposition. The films are studied for solar cell applications, and to obtain a high absorption, a high Cr content (2.0-5.0 at.%) is used. It is determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy that Cr is relatively uniformly distributed, and that local Cr increases correspond to Zn decreases. The results indicate that most Cr atoms substitute Zn sites. Consistently, electron energy loss and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the films contain mainly Cr2+ ions. Structural analysis showed that the films are polycrystalline and textured. The films with ~4 % Cr are mainly grown along the hexagonal [001] direction in wurtzite phase. The average lateral grain size decreases with increasing Cr content, and at a given Cr content, increases with increasing growth temperature.

  17. Structural and morphological properties of metallic thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition for photocathode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Gontad, F.; Caricato, A. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work yttrium and lead thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique and characterized by ex situ different diagnostic methods. All the films were adherent to the substrates and revealed a polycrystalline structure. Y films were uniform with a very low roughness and droplet density, while Pb thin films were characterized by a grain morphology with a relatively high roughness and droplet density. Such metallic materials are studied because they are proposed as a good alternative to copper and niobium photocathodes which are generally used in radiofrequency and superconducting radiofrequency guns, respectively. The photoemission performances of the photocathodes based on Y and Pb thin films have been also studied and discussed.

  18. A comparative study of experimental and simulated ultrasonic pulse-echo signals from multilayered structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the system acoustic response of variations in the adhesive thickness, coupling thickness, and paint thickness is considered. Both simulations and experimental measurements are used to characterize and classify A-scans from test regions, and to study the effects of various parameters such as paint thickness and epoxy thickness on the variations in the reflected signals. A 1D model of sound propagation in multilayered structures is used to verify the validity of the measured signals, and is also used to computationally generate signals for a class of test locations with gradually varying parameters. This approach exploits the ability of numerical simulations to provide a good understanding of the ultrasonic pulses reflected at disbonds.

  19. Photonic bandgap amorphous chalcogenide thin films with multilayered structure grown by pulsed laser deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-qian; Němec, Petre; Nazabal, Virginie; Jin, Yu-qi

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous chalcogenide thin films were fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition technique. Thereafter, the stacks of multilayered thin films for reflectors and microcavity were designed for telecommunication wavelength. The prepared multilayered thin films for reflectors show good compatibility. The microcavity structure consists of Ge25Ga5Sb10S65 (doped with Er3+) spacer layer surrounded by two 5-layer As40Se60/Ge25Sb5S70 reflectors. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy results show good periodicity, great adherence and smooth interfaces between the alternating dielectric layers, which confirms a suitable compatibility between different materials. The results demonstrate that the chalcogenides can be used for preparing vertical Bragg reflectors and microcavity with high quality.

  20. Structural analysis of infinite layer superlattices grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, A.; Tapfer, L.; Aruta, C.; Balestrino, G.; Petrocelli, G.

    1996-07-01

    In this work we investigate the structural properties of SrCuO2/CaCuO2 infinite layer superlattices by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and x-ray specular reflectivity measurements. The infinite layer superlattices are grown by pulsed laser deposition on slightly misoriented (001) SrTiO3 substrates. We demonstrate that good quality superlattices with few monolayers thick constituent SrCuO2 and CaCuO2 layers can be grown having an interface roughness of less than 3-4 Å. A strain analysis of the epitaxial film shows that the SrCuO2 layers are completely relaxed with respect to the substrate. However, the CaCuO2 layers are elastically strained with respect to the SrCuO2 layer. The Poisson ratio of the CaCuO2 is estimated to be 0.40±0.08.

  1. Robust integral variable structure controller and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated input shaper design for flexible spacecraft with mismatched uncertainty/disturbance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a dual-stage control system design method for the flexible spacecraft attitude maneuvering control by use of on-off thrusters and active vibration control by input shaper. In this design approach, attitude control system and vibration suppression were designed separately using lower order model. As a stepping stone, an integral variable structure controller with the assumption of knowing the upper bounds of the mismatched lumped perturbation has been designed which ensures exponential convergence of attitude angle and angular velocity in the presence of bounded uncertainty/disturbances. To reconstruct estimates of the system states for use in a full information variable structure control law, an asymptotic variable structure observer is also employed. In addition, the thruster output is modulated in pulse-width pulse-frequency so that the output profile is similar to the continuous control histories. For actively suppressing the induced vibration, the input shaping technique is used to modify the existing command so that less vibration will be caused by the command itself, which only requires information about the vibration frequency and damping of the closed-loop system. The rationale behind this hybrid control scheme is that the integral variable structure controller can achieve good precision pointing, even in the presence of uncertainties/disturbances, whereas the shaped input attenuator is applied to actively suppress the undesirable vibrations excited by the rapid maneuvers. Simulation results for the spacecraft model show precise attitude control and vibration suppression. PMID:17706218

  2. Silicon structuring by etching with liquid chlorine and fluorine precursors using femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, C.; Simion, S.; Zamfirescu, M.; Ulmeanu, M.; Enculescu, M.; Radoiu, M.

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the micrometer and submicrometer scale structuring of silicon by liquid chlorine and fluorine precursors with 200 fs laser pulses working at both fundamental (775 nm) and frequency doubled (387 nm) wavelengths. The silicon surface was irradiated at normal incidence by immersing the Si (111) substrates in a glass container filled with liquid chlorine (CCl{sub 4}) and fluorine (C{sub 2}Cl{sub 3}F{sub 3}) precursors. We report that silicon surfaces develop an array of spikes with single step irradiation processes at 775 nm and equally at 387 nm. When irradiating the Si surface with 400 pulses at 330 mJ/cm{sup 2} laser fluence and a 775 nm wavelength, the average height of the formed Si spikes in the case of fluorine precursors is 4.2 {mu}m, with a full width at half maximum of 890 nm. At the same irradiation wavelength chlorine precursors develop Si spikes 4 {mu}m in height and with a full width at half maximum of 2.3 {mu}m with irradiation of 700 pulses at 560 mJ/cm{sup 2} laser fluence. Well ordered areas of submicrometer spikes with an average height of about 500 nm and a width of 300 nm have been created by irradiation at 387 nm by chlorine precursors, whereas the fluorine precursors fabricate spikes with an average height of 700 nm and a width of about 200 nm. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the surface show that the formation of the micrometer and sub-micrometer spikes involves a combination of capillary waves on the molten silicon surface and laser-induced etching of silicon, at both 775 nm and 387 nm wavelength irradiation. The energy-dispersive x-ray measurements indicate the presence of chlorine and fluorine precursors on the structured surface. The fluorine precursors create a more ordered area of Si spikes at both micrometer and sub-micrometer scales. The potential use of patterned Si substrates with gradient topography as model scaffolds for the systematic exploration of the role of 3D

  3. Multistage plasma initiation process by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti sample in an ambient gas (He, Ar, or N2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Dubreuil, B.

    1993-02-01

    New experimental results are reported on plasma initiation in front of a titanium sample irradiated by ir (λ=10.6 μm) laser pulses in an ambient gas (He, Ar, and N2) at pressures ranging from several Torr up to the atmosphere. The plasma is studied by space- and time-resolved emission spectroscopy, while sample vaporization is probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Threshold laser intensities leading to the formation of a plasma in the vapor and in the ambient gases are determined. Experimental results support the model of a vaporization mechanism for the plasma initiation (vaporization-initiated plasma breakdown). The plasma initiation is described by simple numerical criteria based on a two-stage process. Theoretical predictions are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the experiment. This study provides also a clear explanation of the influence of the ambient gas on the laser beam-metal surface energy transfer. Laser irradiation always causes an important vaporization when performed in He, while in the case of Ar or N2, the interaction is reduced in heating and vaporization of some surface defects and impurities.

  4. Advances in Protein NMR Impacting Drug Discovery Provided by the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rational drug design relies on three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, especially proteins. Structural genomics high-throughput (HTP) structure determination platforms established by the NIH Protein Structure Initiative are uniquely suited to provide these structures. NMR plays a critical role since (i) many important protein targets do not form single crystals required for X-ray diffraction and (ii) NMR can provide valuable structural and dynamic information on proteins and their drug complexes that cannot be obtained with X-ray crystallography. In this article, recent advances of NMR driven by structural genomics projects are reviewed. These advances promise that future pharmaceutical discovery and design of drugs can increasingly rely on protocols for rapid and accurate NMR structure determination. PMID:20443167

  5. Investigating the Structural Properties of Integral Membrane Proteins with Pulsed EPR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorigan, Gary

    2013-03-01

    Very limited structural and dynamic information on proteins embedded inside a membrane currently exist, because they are difficulty to crystalize. New biophysical/structural biology methods are needed to probe these systems in a lipid bilayer. The Lorigan lab is applying unique hybrid NMR and spin-label EPR spectroscopic techniques to study membrane proteins. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic data of 15N-, 2H-labeled and/or spin-labeled membrane proteins incorporated into vesicles and bicelles will be presented. State-of-the-art pulsed EPR techniques such as Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy, and Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy will be used. The ESEEM technique can determine short to medium range distances (out to about 8 Å) between a site-specific nitroxide spin label and a nearby NMR-active isotopic labeled residue for a variety of different peptides and proteins which ultimately can be used to determine the difference between an α-helical and β-sheet secondary structure. DEER can be used to measure distances between 2 spin labels out to about 70 Å. We have shown a huge improvement is sensitivity with DEER measurements at Q-band when compared to X-band.

  6. Maternal, Infant Characteristics, Breastfeeding Techniques, and Initiation: Structural Equation Modeling Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Tha Pyai; Lim, Peng Im; Ho-Lim, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among maternal and infant characteristics, breastfeeding techniques, and exclusive breastfeeding initiation in different modes of birth using structural equation modeling approaches. Methods We examined a hypothetical model based on integrating concepts of a breastfeeding decision-making model, a breastfeeding initiation model, and a social cognitive theory among 952 mother-infant dyads. The LATCH breastfeeding assessment tool was used to evaluate breastfeeding techniques and two infant feeding categories were used (exclusive and non-exclusive breastfeeding). Results Structural equation models (SEM) showed that multiparity was significantly positively associated with breastfeeding techniques and the jaundice of an infant was significantly negatively related to exclusive breastfeeding initiation. A multigroup analysis in the SEM showed no difference between the caesarean section and vaginal delivery groups estimates of breastfeeding techniques on exclusive breastfeeding initiation. Breastfeeding techniques were significantly positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding initiation in the entire sample and in the vaginal deliveries group. However, breastfeeding techniques were not significantly associated with exclusive breastfeeding initiation in the cesarean section group. Maternal age, maternal race, gestations, birth weight of infant, and postnatal complications had no significant impacts on breastfeeding techniques or exclusive breastfeeding initiation in our study. Overall, the models fitted the data satisfactorily (GFI = 0.979–0.987; AGFI = 0.951–0.962; IFI = 0.958–0.962; CFI = 0.955–0.960, and RMSEA = 0.029–0.034). Conclusions Multiparity and jaundice of an infant were found to affect breastfeeding technique and exclusive breastfeeding initiation respectively. Breastfeeding technique was related to exclusive breastfeeding initiation according to the mode of birth. This

  7. Feedbacks between structures and processes during initial ecosystem development in an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Elemer, Michael; Gerwin, Werner; Fischer, Anton; Zaplata, Markus; Neneov, Rossen

    2013-04-01

    We studied the role of strutures and processes and their feedbacks during initial ecosystem development in the artificial catchment Chicken Creek. During the first seven years, considerable changes within the catchment were observed. Both internal and external factors could be identified as driving forces for the formation of structures and patterns in the artificial catchment. Initial structures formed by the construction process and initial substrate characteristics were decisive for the distribution and flow of water. External factors like episodic events triggered erosion and dissection during this initial phase, promoted by the low vegetation cover and the unconsolidated sandy substrate. The transformation of the initial geo-system into areas with evolving terrestrial or aquatic characteristics and from a very episodic to a more permanent stream network and discharge, together with the observed vegetation dynamics increased site diversity and heterogeneity with respect to water and nutrient availability and transformation processes compared to the more homogenous conditions at point zero. The processes and feedback mechanisms in the initial development of a new landscape may deviate in rates, intensity and dominance from those known from mature ecosystems. It is therefore crucial to understand these early phases of ecosystem development and to disentangle the increasingly complex interactions between the evolving terrestrial and aquatic, biotic and abiotic compartments of the system. Artificially created catchments could be a suitable tool to study these initial developments at the landscape scale under known, designed and defined boundary conditions.

  8. Bi-stable states of initially stressed elastic cylindrical shell structures with two piezoelectric surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Nie, Guo-Hua

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical model is proposed in this paper to predict the bi-stable states of initially stressed cylindrical shell structures attached by surface anisotropic piezoelectric layers. The condition for existence of bi-stability of the shell structural system is presented and analytical expressions for corresponding rolled-up radii of the stable shell are given based on the principle of minimum strain energy. The resulting solution indicates that the shell system may have two stable configurations besides its initial state under a combined action of the actuating electric field and initial stresses characterized by the bending moment. If the piezoelectric layer materials act as only sensor materials without the actuating electric field, initial stresses may produce the bi-stable states, but one corresponding to its initial state. For the shell without initial stresses, the magnitude in the actuating electric field determines the number of the stable states, one or two stable configurations besides the initial state. The theoretical prediction for the bi-stable states is verified by finite element method (FEM) simulation by using the ABAQUS code.

  9. Dielectric structure pyrotechnic initiator realized by integrating Ti/CuO-based reactive multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng; Shen, Ruiqi; Fiadosenka, N. N.; Ye, Yinghua; Hu, Yan

    2011-04-01

    A dielectric structure pyrotechnic initiator was proposed and the initiator samples were designed and realized by integrating Ti/CuO-based reactive multilayer films on ceramic substrate. The dielectric structure consists of essentially two titanium films separated by a copper oxide (CuO) film, which is just like as a capacitor guaranteeing the initiator will not be discharged until the external voltage has exceeded the breakdown strength of the CuO film. Results of the electrical explosion experiment show that the breakdown strength of 1-μm-thick CuO film is 60 V, and the initiator has "late time discharge" characteristics, which will improve the conversion ratio of the electricity greatly, and there is a nanoscale exothermic reaction in the electrical explosion process. A systematic temperature measurement model based on the "double-line atomic emission spectroscopy of copper element" was presented and used to test the explosion temperature and duration. The ejected explosion flame was seen clearly with a potential temperature exceeding 4500 K for 0.1 ms, 4250 K for 0.35 ms, and 4000 K for 0.5 ms. Besides, electric energy and exothermic reaction create high-temperature products, which discharge to a distance of 1 cm or more. The high temperature and ejected products may be able to ignite the attached energetic materials even if the initiator makes no physical contact. These characteristics of the initiator may open a door to the preparation of the highly efficient and insensitive initiating explosive device.

  10. Fundamental studies on initiation and evolution of multi-channel discharges and their application to next generation pulsed power machines.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jens; Savage, Mark E.; Lucero, Diego Jose; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Seals, Kelly Gene; Pitts, Todd Alan; Hautzenroeder, Brenna M.; Laine, Mark Richard; Karelitz, David B.; Porter, John L.

    2014-09-01

    Future pulsed power systems may rely on linear transformer driver (LTD) technology. The LTD's will be the building blocks for a driver that can deliver higher current than the Z-Machine. The LTD's would require tens of thousands of low inductance ( %3C 85nH), high voltage (200 kV DC) switches with high reliability and long lifetime ( 10 4 shots). Sandia's Z-Machine employs 36 megavolt class switches that are laser triggered by a single channel discharge. This is feasible for tens of switches but the high inductance and short switch life- time associated with the single channel discharge are undesirable for future machines. Thus the fundamental problem is how to lower inductance and losses while increasing switch life- time and reliability. These goals can be achieved by increasing the number of current-carrying channels. The rail gap switch is ideal for this purpose. Although those switches have been extensively studied during the past decades, each effort has only characterized a particular switch. There is no comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics that would allow predictive capability for arbitrary switch geometry. We have studied rail gap switches via an extensive suite of advanced diagnostics in synergy with theoretical physics and advanced modeling capability. Design and topology of multichannel switches as they relate to discharge dynamics are investigated. This involves electrically and optically triggered rail gaps, as well as discrete multi-site switch concepts.

  11. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, Dana Mitra, Kalyan Yoti Ueberfuhr, Peter; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-02-17

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate.

  12. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Dana; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Ueberfuhr, Peter; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate.

  13. Using Data on Vegetation Structure to Initialize and Test Ecosystem Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.; Fisk, J.; Dolan, K. A.; Shugart, H. H.

    2010-12-01

    Scientists have long recognized the importance of vegetation structure in forest dynamics, but relevant data and models have generally not been available for large-scale applications. Now future satellite missions utilizing lidar and radar technologies have the potential to provide globally consistent data on vegetation structure, and new models are being developed to track the dynamics of vegetation 3-D structure over large scales. Used together, these advances have the potential to revolutionize the initialization and testing of terrestrial models, and thereby reduce key uncertainties and improve model predictions of carbon cycle dynamics. Here, using both theoretical models and an advanced mechanistic ecosystem model, we investigate the use, and potential use, of data on various forest structural metrics for initializing and testing terrestrial models. Focus is on quantifying the potential utility of various metrics, and the resolution and accuracy with which these measurements need to be made.

  14. Structure and composition of oligohaline marsh plant communities exposed to salinity pulses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, R.J.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    The response of two oligohaline marsh macrophyte communities to pulses of increased salinity was studied over a single growing season in a greenhouse experiment. The plant communities were allowed a recovery period in freshwater following the pulse events. The experimental treatments included: (1) salinity influx rate (rate of salinity increase from 0 to 12 gl-1); (2) duration of exposure to elevated salinity; and (3) water depth. The communities both included Sagittaria lancifolia L.; the codominant species were Eleocharis palustris (L.) Roemer and J.A. Schultes in community 1 and Schoenoplectus americanus (Pers.) Volk. ex Schinz and R. Keller in community 2. Effects of the treatments on sediment chemical characteristics (salinity, pH, redox potential, and sulfide and ammonium concentrations) and plant community attributes (aboveground and belowground biomass, stem density, leaf tissue nutrients, and species richness) were examined. The treatment effects often interacted to influence sediment and plant communities characteristics following recovery in fresh water. Salinity influx rate per se, however, had little effect on the abiotic or biotic response variables; significant influx effects were found when the 0 gl-1 (zero influx) treatment was compared to the 12 gl-1 treatments, regardless of the rate salinity was raised. A salinity level of 12 gl-1 had negative effects on plant community structure and composition; these effects were usually associated with 3 months of salinity exposure. Water depth often interacted with exposure duration, but increased water depth did independently decrease the values of some community response measures. Community 1 was affected more than community 2 in the most extreme salinity treatment (3 months exposure/15-cm water depth). Although species richness in both communities was reduced, structural changes were more dramatic in community 1. Biomass and stem density were reduced in community 1 overall and in both dominant species

  15. Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), including sulfite oxidase (SO) and bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), catalyze the oxidation of sulfite (SO32-) to sulfate (SO42-). The active sites of SO and SDH are nearly identical, each having a 5-coordinate, pseudo-square-pyramidal Mo with an axial oxo ligand and three equatorial sulfur donor atoms. One sulfur is from a conserved Cys residue and two are from a pyranopterindithiolene (molybdopterin, MPT) cofactor. The identity of the remaining equatorial ligand, which is solvent-exposed, varies during the catalytic cycle. Numerous in vitro studies, particularly those involving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the Mo(V) states of SOEs, have shown that the identity and orientation of this exchangeable equatorial ligand depends on the buffer pH, the presence and concentration of certain anions in the buffer, as well as specific point mutations in the protein. Until very recently, however, EPR has not been a practical technique for directly probing specific structures in which the solvent-exposed, exchangeable ligand is an O, OH-, H2O, SO32-, or SO42- group, because the primary O and S isotopes (16O and 32S) are magnetically silent (I = 0). This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of isotopic labeling, variable-frequency high resolution pulsed EPR spectroscopy, synthetic model compounds, and DFT calculations to elucidate the roles of various anions, point mutations, and steric factors in the formation, stabilization, and transformation of SOE active site structures.

  16. Pure, single crystal Ge nanodots formed using a sandwich structure via pulsed UV excimer laser annealing.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ting-Wei; Chen, Hung-Ming; Shen, Kuan-Yuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2015-04-24

    In this paper, a sandwich structure comprising a SiO2 capping layer, amorphous Germanium (a-Ge) nanodots (NDs), and a pit-patterned Silicon (Si) substrate is developed, which is then annealed by utilizing a pulsed ultraviolet excimer laser in order to fabricate an array of pure, single crystal Ge NDs at room temperature. A wide bandgap SiO2 capping layer is used as a transparent thermally isolated layer to prevent thermal loss and Si-Ge intermixing. The two-dimensional pit-patterned Si substrate is designed to confine the absorbed laser energy, reduce the melting point, and block the surface migration of the Ge. After optimizing the laser radiation parameters such that the laser energy density is 200 mJ cm(-2), the laser annealing period is 10 s, and the number of laser shots is 10, pure, single crystal Ge NDs that have both a regular arrangement and a uniform size distribution are obtained in the pits of the Si substrates. The Raman spectrum shows a highly symmetric Ge transversal optical peak with a full width at half maximum of 4.2 cm(-1) at 300.7 cm(-1), which is close to that of the original Ge wafer. In addition, the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image for the Ge NDs and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction pattern shows a clear single crystalline structure without any impurities. PMID:25815515

  17. Pure, single crystal Ge nanodots formed using a sandwich structure via pulsed UV excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ting-Wei; Chen, Hung-Ming; Shen, Kuan-Yuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a sandwich structure comprising a SiO2 capping layer, amorphous Germanium (a-Ge) nanodots (NDs), and a pit-patterned Silicon (Si) substrate is developed, which is then annealed by utilizing a pulsed ultraviolet excimer laser in order to fabricate an array of pure, single crystal Ge NDs at room temperature. A wide bandgap SiO2 capping layer is used as a transparent thermally isolated layer to prevent thermal loss and Si-Ge intermixing. The two-dimensional pit-patterned Si substrate is designed to confine the absorbed laser energy, reduce the melting point, and block the surface migration of the Ge. After optimizing the laser radiation parameters such that the laser energy density is 200 mJ cm-2, the laser annealing period is 10 s, and the number of laser shots is 10, pure, single crystal Ge NDs that have both a regular arrangement and a uniform size distribution are obtained in the pits of the Si substrates. The Raman spectrum shows a highly symmetric Ge transversal optical peak with a full width at half maximum of 4.2 cm-1 at 300.7 cm-1, which is close to that of the original Ge wafer. In addition, the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image for the Ge NDs and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction pattern shows a clear single crystalline structure without any impurities.

  18. Structural, morphological and Raman studies of pulse electrosynthesised indium antimonide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Joginder; Chandel, Tarun; Rajaram, P.

    2015-08-01

    InSb films deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by a pulse elctrodeposition technique. The deposition was carried out at an applied potential -1.3V versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Structural, morphological and optical studies were performed on the electrodeposited InSb. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show that the deposited InSb films are polycrystalline in nature having the zinc blend structure. The crystallite size (D), dislocation density (δ) and strain (ɛ) were calculated using XRD results. The EDAX analysis shows that chemical composition of In3+ and Sb3+ ions is close to the required stoichiometry. The surface morphology of the deposited films was examined using scanning electron scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM studies reveal that the surface of the films is uniformly covered with submicron sized spherical particles. However, the crystallite size determined by the Scherrer method shows a size close to 30 nm. Surface morphology studies of the InSb films were also performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The average surface roughness as measured by AFM is around 40 nm. Hot probe studies show that all the electrodeposited thin films have n type conductivity and the thickness of the films is calculated using electrochemical formula.

  19. Structural, morphological and Raman studies of pulse electrosynthesised indium antimonide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Joginder Chandel, Tarun; Rajaram, P.

    2015-08-28

    InSb films deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by a pulse elctrodeposition technique. The deposition was carried out at an applied potential −1.3V versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Structural, morphological and optical studies were performed on the electrodeposited InSb. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show that the deposited InSb films are polycrystalline in nature having the zinc blend structure. The crystallite size (D), dislocation density (δ) and strain (ε) were calculated using XRD results. The EDAX analysis shows that chemical composition of In{sup 3+} and Sb{sup 3+} ions is close to the required stoichiometry. The surface morphology of the deposited films was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM studies reveal that the surface of the films is uniformly covered with submicron sized spherical particles. However, the crystallite size determined by the Scherrer method shows a size close to 30 nm. Surface morphology studies of the InSb films were also performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The average surface roughness as measured by AFM is around 40 nm. Hot probe studies show that all the electrodeposited thin films have n type conductivity and the thickness of the films is calculated using electrochemical formula.

  20. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  1. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure.

    PubMed

    Balzovsky, E V; Buyanov, Yu I; Koshelev, V I; Nekrasov, E S

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well. PMID:27036799

  2. The Clause-Initial Position in L2 German Declaratives: Transfer of Information Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnacker, Ute; Rosen, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the information structure of verb-second (V2) declaratives in Swedish, German, and nonnative German. Even though almost any type of element can occur in the so-called prefield, the clause-initial preverbal position of V2 declaratives, we have found language-specific patterns in native-speaker corpora: The frequencies of…

  3. Mitochondrial iron supply is required for the developmental pulse of ecdysone biosynthesis that initiates metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Jose V; Metzendorf, Christoph; Missirlis, Fanis; Lind, Maria I

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of ecdysone, the key hormone that signals the termination of larval growth and the initiation of metamorphosis in insects, is carried out in the prothoracic gland by an array of iron-containing cytochrome P450s, encoded by the halloween genes. Interference, either with iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in the prothoracic gland or with the ferredoxins that supply electrons for steroidogenesis, causes a block in ecdysone synthesis and developmental arrest in the third instar larval stage. Here we show that mutants in Drosophila mitoferrin (dmfrn), the gene encoding a mitochondrial carrier protein implicated in mitochondrial iron import, fail to grow and initiate metamorphosis under dietary iron depletion or when ferritin function is partially compromised. In mutant dmfrn larvae reared under iron replete conditions, the expression of halloween genes is increased and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), the active form of ecdysone, is synthesized. In contrast, addition of an iron chelator to the diet of mutant dmfrn larvae disrupts 20E synthesis. Dietary addition of 20E has little effect on the growth defects, but enables approximately one-third of the iron-deprived dmfrn larvae to successfully turn into pupae and, in a smaller percentage, into adults. This partial rescue is not observed with dietary supply of ecdysone's precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol, a precursor in the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway. The findings reported here support the notion that a physiological supply of mitochondrial iron for the synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme is required in the prothoracic glands of insect larvae for steroidogenesis. Furthermore, mitochondrial iron is also essential for normal larval growth. PMID:26468126

  4. Radiography of magnetically-driven implosions of initially solid beryllium cylindrical shells for equation-of-state studies at the Z pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    The Z accelerator delivers approximately 4-MV, 26-MA electrical pulses with adjustable current rise times of 100--600 ns, as well as adjustable pulse waveforms. The magnetic pressure produced is used for various applications, including magnetically-driven implosions. The Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL) is a pulsed (0.3-1.5 ns), multi-kJ, TW-class Nd:glass laser system that provides x-ray radiography capabilities for Z experiments. This talk focuses primarily on the radiography diagnostic used to study the magnetically-driven implosions of initially solid cylindrical shells (also referred to as ``liners''). Specifically, we discuss the 6.151-keV monochromatic backlighting system and its use in obtaining radiographs of imploding beryllium (Be) liners. The high transmission efficiency of 6.151-keV photons in Be allowed us to obtain radiographs with finite transmission throughout the radial extent of the imploding liners. Abel inverting these data, we have obtained time-resolved measurements of the imploding liner's density as a function of both axial and radial location throughout the field of view. These data are allowing us to study magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) growth for inertial-confinement-fusion applications, as well as compression-wave propagation for equation-of-state studies (see talks by R.L. Lemke and M.R. Martin). Additionally, Z's pulse-shaping capabilities have enabled us to obtain data for both shock- and quasi-isentropically-compressed Be. Example data from MRT, shock-compression, and quasi-isentropic-compression experiments will be shown. We will also discuss planned upgrades to 25-keV radiography that will allow us to study materials with opacities beyond that of beryllium. This work was done in collaboration with R.W. Lemke, M.R. Martin, J.-P. Davis, M.D. Knudson, D.B. Sinars, S.A. Slutz, C.A. Jennings, M.E. Cuneo, D.G. Flicker, and M.C. Herrmann. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin company, for the US

  5. Redistribution of Kv1 and Kv7 enhances neuronal excitability during structural axon initial segment plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kuba, Hiroshi; Yamada, Rei; Ishiguro, Go; Adachi, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Structural plasticity of the axon initial segment (AIS), the trigger zone of neurons, is a powerful means for regulating neuronal activity. Here, we show that AIS plasticity is not limited to structural changes; it also occurs as changes in ion-channel expression, which substantially augments the efficacy of regulation. In the avian cochlear nucleus, depriving afferent inputs by removing cochlea elongated the AIS, and simultaneously switched the dominant Kv channels at the AIS from Kv1.1 to Kv7.2. Due to the slow activation kinetics of Kv7.2, the redistribution of the Kv channels reduced the shunting conductance at the elongated AIS during the initiation of action potentials and effectively enhanced the excitability of the deprived neurons. The results indicate that the functional plasticity of the AIS works cooperatively with the structural plasticity and compensates for the loss of afferent inputs to maintain the homeostasis of auditory circuits after hearing loss by cochlea removal. PMID:26581625

  6. Startup and initial operation of a DFGD and pulse jet fabric filter system on Cokenergy's Indiana Harbor coke oven off gas system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.J.; Gansley, R.R.; Schaddell, J.G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the design, initial operation and performance testing of a Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization (DFGD) and Modular Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (MPJFF) system installed at Cokenergy's site in East Chicago, Indiana. The combined flue gas from the sixteen (16) waste heat recovery boilers is processed by the system to control emissions of sulfur dioxide and particulates. These boilers recover energy from coke oven off gas from Indiana Harbor Coke Company's coke batteries. The DFGD system consists of two 100% capacity absorbers. Each absorber vessel uses a single direct drive rotary atomizer to disperse the lime slurry for SO{sub 2} control. The MPJFF consists of thirty two (32) modules arranged in twin sixteen-compartment (16) units. The initial start up of the DFGD/MPJFF posed special operational issues due to the low initial gas flows through the system as the four coke oven batteries were cured and put in service for the first time. This occurred at approximately monthly intervals beginning in March 1998. A plan was implemented to perform a staged startup of the DFGD and MPJFF to coincide with the staged start up of the coke batteries and waste heat boilers. Operational issues that are currently being addressed include reliability of byproduct removal. Performance testing was conducted in August and September 1998 at the inlet of the system and the outlet stack. During these tests, particulate, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, and HCI emissions were measured simultaneously at the common DFGD inlet duct and the outlet stack. Measurements were also taken for average lime, water, and power consumption during the tests as well as system pressure losses. These results showed that all guarantee parameters were achieved during the test periods. The initial operation and performance testing are described in this paper.

  7. Interactions between surface structures, runoff and erosion in an artificial watershed during the initial ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwin, W.; Raab, T.; Dimitrov, M.

    2009-04-01

    In its initial phase an ecosystem can be characterized as a Geo-(Hydro-)System since biotic compartments are still missing to a large extent. In this very first stage of the ecosystem development the hydrological processes forming the first surface structures are mainly controlled by runoff patterns and by the physical properties of the surface and the substrate. Based on that, it can be hypothesized that the initially formed structures are responsible for the future development of the ecosystem and define later structures. However, initial structures are very dynamic, and few alterations of surface properties may initiate the development of completely new patches and patterns which again control surface processes like erosion and sedimentation. Loose sand and other fine particles are transported directly by wind and water from the upper initial soil surface and a first physical soil crust is formed very quickly. This new surface exhibits clearly different properties compared with the original initial surface. For example, infiltration can be minimized and surface runoff is promoted by this crusting. In contrast, sandy or silty substrate that has been relocated by erosion processes into small hollows of the surface changes the soil physical properties of these parts of the landscape as well but into another direction. In these parts of the system the sedimentation may create small patches with higher infiltration rates and eventually better water storage capacities. This may result into the formation of initial vegetation patches and patterns which in turn influence the further quality and quantity as well as the location of soil surface processes. Against this background this paper presents a recently launched research project using an artificially created water catchment of 6 ha in size. This site called ‘Chicken Creek' (‘Hühnerwasser') was established in 2005 in Lusatia (Germany) and is the central research site of a German-Swiss Collaborative Research

  8. Chirped Pulse Adiabatic Passage in CARS for Imaging of Biological Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.

    2007-12-26

    We propose the adiabatic passage control scheme implementing chirped femtosecond laser pulses to maximize coherence in a predetermined molecular vibrational mode using two-photon Raman transitions. We investigate vibrational energy relaxation and collisional dephasing as factors of coherence loss, and demonstrate the possibility for preventing decoherence by the chirped pulse train. The proposed method may be used to advance noninvasive biological imaging techniques.

  9. Analysis of pulsed eddy current data using regression models for steam generator tube support structure inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, J. A.; Underhill, P. R.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear steam generators (SGs) are a critical component for ensuring safe and efficient operation of a reactor. Life management strategies are implemented in which SG tubes are regularly inspected by conventional eddy current testing (ECT) and ultrasonic testing (UT) technologies to size flaws, and safe operating life of SGs is predicted based on growth models. ECT, the more commonly used technique, due to the rapidity with which full SG tube wall inspection can be performed, is challenged when inspecting ferromagnetic support structure materials in the presence of magnetite sludge and multiple overlapping degradation modes. In this work, an emerging inspection method, pulsed eddy current (PEC), is being investigated to address some of these particular inspection conditions. Time-domain signals were collected by an 8 coil array PEC probe in which ferromagnetic drilled support hole diameter, depth of rectangular tube frets and 2D tube off-centering were varied. Data sets were analyzed with a modified principal components analysis (MPCA) to extract dominant signal features. Multiple linear regression models were applied to MPCA scores to size hole diameter as well as size rectangular outer diameter tube frets. Models were improved through exploratory factor analysis, which was applied to MPCA scores to refine selection for regression models inputs by removing nonessential information.

  10. Enhancing pulsed eddy current for inspection of P-3 Orion lap-joint structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, D. M.; Underhill, P. R.; Krause, T. W.

    2016-02-01

    During flight, aircraft are subjected to cyclic loading. In the Lockheed P-3 Orion airframe, this cyclic loading can lead to development of fatigue cracks at steel fastener locations in the top and second layers of aluminum wing skin lap-joints. An inspection method that is capable of detecting these cracks, without fastener removal, is desirable as this can minimize aircraft downtime, while subsequently reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks has been demonstrated using a Pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) probe design that utilizes the ferrous fastener as a flux conduit. This allows for deeper penetration of flux into the lap-joint second layer and consequently, sensitivity to the presence of cracks. Differential pick-up coil pairs are used to sense the eddy current response due to the presence of a crack. The differential signal obtained from pick-up coils on opposing sides of the fastener is analyzed using a Modified Principal Components Analysis (MPCA). This is followed by a cluster analysis of the resulting MPCA scores to separate fastener locations with cracks from those without. Probe design features, data acquisition system parameters and signal post-processing can each have a strong impact on crack detection. Physical probe configurations and signal analysis processes, used to enhance the PEC system for detection of cracks in P-3 Orion lap-joint structures, are investigated and an enhanced probe design is identified.