Science.gov

Sample records for pulstar instrumentation power

  1. Coded source neutron imaging at the PULSTAR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Ziyu; Mishra, Kaushal; Hawari, Ayman; Bingham, Philip R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2011-01-01

    A neutron imaging facility is located on beam-tube No.5 of the 1-MW PULSTAR reactor at North Carolina State University. An investigation of high resolution imaging using the coded source imaging technique has been initiated at the facility. Coded imaging uses a mosaic of pinholes to encode an aperture, thus generating an encoded image of the object at the detector. To reconstruct the image data received by the detector, the corresponding decoding patterns are used. The optimized design of coded mask is critical for the performance of this technique and will depend on the characteristics of the imaging beam. In this work, a 34 x 38 uniformly redundant array (URA) coded aperture system is studied for application at the PULSTAR reactor neutron imaging facility. The URA pattern was fabricated on a 500 ?m gadolinium sheet. Simulations and experiments with a pinhole object have been conducted using the Gd URA and the optimized beam line.

  2. Radiant Power Measuring Instrument (RPMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The radiant power measuring instrument is a rugged, hand-carried instrument which provides an ERTS investigator with a capability of obtaining radiometric measurements needed to determine solar and atmospheric parameters that affect the ERTS radiance measurements. With these parameters, ERTS data can be transformed into absolute target reflectance signatures, making accurate unambiguous interpretations possible.

  3. Aircraft Power-Plant Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sontag, Harcourt; Brombacher, W G

    1934-01-01

    This report supersedes NACA-TR-129 which is now obsolete. Aircraft power-plant instruments include tachometers, engine thermometers, pressure gages, fuel-quantity gages, fuel flow meters and indicators, and manifold pressure gages. The report includes a description of the commonly used types and some others, the underlying principle utilized in the design, and some design data. The inherent errors of the instrument, the methods of making laboratory tests, descriptions of the test apparatus, and data in considerable detail in the performance of commonly used instruments are presented. Standard instruments and, in cases where it appears to be of interest, those used as secondary standards are described. A bibliography of important articles is included.

  4. Mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, C.W.; Verghese, K.; Huo, Y.G.

    1997-12-01

    The North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor license was renewed for an additional 20 years of operation on April 30, 1997. The relicensing period added additional years to the facility operating time through the end of the second license period, increasing the excess reactivity needs as projected in 1988. In 1995, the Nuclear Reactor Program developed a strategic plan that addressed the future maintenance, development, and utilization of the facility. Goals resulting from this plan included increased academic utilization of the facility in accordance with its role as a university research facility, and increased industrial service use in accordance with the mission of a land grant university. The strategic plan was accepted, and it is the intent of the College of Engineering to operate the PULSTAR Reactor as a going concern through at least the end of the current license period. In order to reach the next relicensing review without prejudice due to low excess reactivity, it is desired to maintain sufficient excess reactivity so that, if relicensed again, the facility could continue to operate without affecting users until new fuel assistance was provided. During the NC State University license renewal, the operation of the PULSTAR Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo) was terminated. At that time, the SUNY Buffalo facility had about 240 unused PULSTAR Reactor fuel pins with 6% enrichment. The objective of the work reported here was to develop a mixed enrichment core design for the NC State University PULSTAR reactor which would: (1) demonstrate that 6% enriched SUNY buffalo fuel could be used in the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor within the existing technical specification safety limits for core physics parameters; (2) show that use of this fuel could permit operating the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor to 2017 with increased utilization; and (3) assure that the decision whether or not to relicense the facility would

  5. Aeronautic Instruments. Section V : Power Plant Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, G E; Sylvander, R C; Mueller, E F; Wilhelm, R M; Eaton, H N; Warner, John A C

    1923-01-01

    Part 1 gives a general discussion of the uses, principles, construction, and operation of airplane tachometers. Detailed description of all available instruments, both foreign and domestic, are given. Part 2 describes methods of tests and effect of various conditions encountered in airplane flight such as change of temperature, vibration, tilting, and reduced air pressure. Part 3 describes the principal types of distance reading thermometers for aircraft engines, including an explanation of the physical principles involved in the functioning of the instruments and proper filling of the bulbs. Performance requirements and testing methods are given and a discussion of the source of error and results of tests. Part 4 gives methods of tests and calibration, also requirements of gauges of this type for the pressure measurement of the air pressure in gasoline tanks and the engine oil pressure on airplanes. Part 5 describes two types of gasoline gauges, the float type and the pressure type. Methods of testing and calibrating gasoline depth gauges are given. The Schroeder, R. A. E., and the Mark II flowmeters are described.

  6. New generation low power radiation survey instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, D.A.; Bjarke, G.O.; Trujillo, F.; Umbarger, C.J.; Wolf, M.A.

    1984-02-01

    A number of new, ultra-low-powered radiation instruments have recently been developed at Los Alamos. Among these are two instruments which use a novel power source to eliminate costly batteries. The newly developed gamma detecting radiac, nicknamed the Firefly, and the alpha particle detecting instrument, called the Simple Cordless Alpha Monitor, both use recent advances in miniaturization and powersaving electronics to yield devices which are small, rugged, and very power-frugal. The two instruments consume so little power that the need for batteries to run them is eliminated. They are, instead, powered by a charged capacitor which will operate the instruments for an hour or more. Use of a capacitor as a power source eliminates many problems commonly associated with battery-operated instruments, such as having to open the case to change batteries, battery storage life, availability of batteries in the field, and some savings in weight. Both line power and mechanical sources are used to charge the storage capacitors which power the instruments.

  7. Ultracold neutron source at the PULSTAR reactor: Engineering design and cryogenic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkina, E.; Medlin, G.; Wehring, B.; Hawari, A. I.; Huffman, P. R.; Young, A. R.; Beaumont, B.; Palmquist, G.

    2014-12-01

    Construction is completed and commissioning is in progress for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The source utilizes two stages of neutron moderation, one in heavy water at room temperature and the other in solid methane at ~ 40 K, followed by a converter stage, solid deuterium at 5 K, that allows a single down scattering of cold neutrons to provide UCN. The UCN source rolls into the thermal column enclosure of the PULSTAR reactor, where neutrons will be delivered from a bare face of the reactor core by streaming through a graphite-lined assembly. The source infrastructure, i.e., graphite-lined assembly, heavy-water system, gas handling system, and helium liquefier cooling system, has been tested and all systems operate as predicted. The research program being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source includes the physics of UCN production, fundamental particle physics, and material surface studies of nanolayers containing hydrogen. In the present paper we report details of the engineering and cryogenic design of the facility as well as results of critical commissioning tests without neutrons.

  8. Investigation of Coded Source Neutron Imaging at the North Carolina State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Ziyu; Mishra, Kaushal; Hawari, Ayman; Bingham, Philip R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2010-10-01

    A neutron imaging facility is located on beam-tube #5 of the 1-MWth PULSTAR reactor at the North Carolina State University. An investigation has been initiated to explore the application of coded imaging techniques at the facility. Coded imaging uses a mosaic of pinholes to encode an aperture, thus generating an encoded image of the object at the detector. To reconstruct the image recorded by the detector, corresponding decoding patterns are used. The optimized design of coded masks is critical for the performance of this technique and will depend on the characteristics of the imaging beam. In this work, Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations were utilized to explore the needed modifications to the PULSTAR thermal neutron beam to support coded imaging techniques. In addition, an assessment of coded mask design has been performed. The simulations indicated that a 12 inch single crystal sapphire filter is suited for such an application at the PULSTAR beam in terms of maximizing flux with good neutron-to-gamma ratio. Computational simulations demonstrate the feasibility of correlation reconstruction methods on neutron transmission imaging. A gadolinium aperture with thickness of 500 m was used to construct the mask using a 38 34 URA pattern. A test experiment using such a URA design has been conducted and the point spread function of the system has been measured.

  9. 14 CFR 23.1331 - Instruments using a power source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... installation and power supply systems must be designed so that— (1) The failure of one instrument will not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Instruments using a power source. 23.1331... Instruments: Installation § 23.1331 Instruments using a power source. For each instrument that uses a...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... instrument must, in the event of the failure of one power source, be supplied by another power source. This... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Instruments using a power supply. 25.1331....1331 Instruments using a power supply. (a) For each instrument required by § 25.1303(b) that uses...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....1331 Instruments using a power supply. For category A rotorcraft— (a) Each required flight instrument... power source; and (3) A visual means integral with each instrument to indicate when the power adequate to sustain proper instrument performance is not being supplied. The power must be measured at or...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....1331 Instruments using a power supply. For category A rotorcraft— (a) Each required flight instrument... power source; and (3) A visual means integral with each instrument to indicate when the power adequate to sustain proper instrument performance is not being supplied. The power must be measured at or...

  13. Power control electronics for cryogenic instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Myers, Ira T.

    1995-01-01

    In order to achieve a high-efficiency high-density cryogenic instrumentation system, the power processing electronics should be placed in the cold environment along with the sensors and signal-processing electronics. The typical instrumentation system requires low voltage dc usually obtained from processing line frequency ac power. Switch-mode power conversion topologies such as forward, flyback, push-pull, and half-bridge are used for high-efficiency power processing using pulse-width modulation (PWM) or resonant control. This paper presents several PWM and multiresonant power control circuits, implemented using commercially available CMOS and BiCMOS integrated circuits, and their performance at liquid-nitrogen temperature (77 K) as compared to their room temperature (300 K) performance. The operation of integrated circuits at cryogenic temperatures results in an improved performance in terms of increased speed, reduced latch-up susceptibility, reduced leakage current, and reduced thermal noise. However, the switching noise increased at 77 K compared to 300 K. The power control circuits tested in the laboratory did successfully restart at 77 K.

  14. 14 CFR 29.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Instruments using a power supply. 29.1331....1331 Instruments using a power supply. For category A rotorcraft— (a) Each required flight instrument using a power supply must have— (1) Two independent sources of power; (2) A means of selecting...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1331 - Instruments using a power source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Instruments using a power source. 23.1331 Section 23.1331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Instruments: Installation § 23.1331 Instruments using a power source. For each instrument that uses a...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1331 - Instruments using a power source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... from the airplane's primary electrical power system. ... where it enters the instrument. For electric and vacuum/pressure instruments, the power is considered to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Instruments using a power source....

  17. 14 CFR 23.1331 - Instruments using a power source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... from the airplane's primary electrical power system. ... where it enters the instrument. For electric and vacuum/pressure instruments, the power is considered to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Instruments using a power source....

  18. 14 CFR 25.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Instruments using a power supply. 25.1331 Section 25.1331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 25.1331 Instruments using a power supply. (a)...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Instruments using a power supply. 29.1331 Section 29.1331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 29.1331 Instruments using a power supply....

  20. 14 CFR 29.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Instruments using a power supply. 29.1331 Section 29.1331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 29.1331 Instruments using a power supply....

  1. 14 CFR 23.1331 - Instruments using a power source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... from the airplane's primary electrical power system. ... movement. The power must be sensed at or near the point where it enters the instrument. For electric and... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Instruments using a power source....

  2. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin; Xu, Jun

    2009-03-10

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow ({approx}3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10{sup 8} positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  3. Trends in power quality measuring instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.

    1995-06-01

    A new power monitoring system has been designed which uses the latest digital signal processing technology to provide complete power analysis of power consumption, power disturbances, harmonics, and flicker in a single system. A database approach to the organization of stored data provides the ability to select and sort information in any order. A new technique to measure impedances in real-time and under dynamic operating conditions is also introduced.

  4. New-generation low-power radiation survey instruments. [Powered by capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, D.A.; Bjarke, G.O.; Wolf, M.A.; Trujillo, F.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    A number of new, ultra-low-powered radiation instruments have recently been developed at Los Alamos. Among these are two instruments which use a novel power source to eliminate costly batteries. The newly developed gamma detecting radiac, nicknamed the Firefly, and the alpha particle detecting instrument, called the Simple Cordless Alpha Monitor, both use recent advances in miniaturization and power-saving electronics to yield devices which are small, rugged, and very power-frugal. The two instruments consume so little power that the need for batteries to run them is eliminated. They are, instead, powered by a charged capacitor which will operate the instruments for an hour or more. Both line power and mechanical sources are used to charge the storage capacitors which power the instruments.

  5. 78 FR 55118 - Seismic Instrumentation for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Seismic Instrumentation for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Standard review plan-draft section revision; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear...

  6. Accelerators - instruments and symbols for power

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, E.

    1985-10-01

    I examine the cult of accelerator physics, describe the laws which govern its development, compare and contrast it with other similar cults in the past, and search for its driving force. It is a story of sheer power. Not only of grand projects whose scale dwarfs everything we have imagined, whose funds deplete federal treasuries and whose real estate transcends national boundaries, but also of the very symbols of human power, directly connected to the destiny of our race.

  7. Electric vehicle power train instrumentation: Some constraints and considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triner, J. E.; Hansen, I. G.

    1977-01-01

    The application of pulse modulation control (choppers) to dc motors creates unique instrumentation problems. In particular, the high harmonic components contained in the current waveforms require frequency response accommodations not normally considered in dc instrumentation. In addition to current sensing, accurate power measurement requires not only adequate frequency response but must also address phase errors caused by the finite bandwidths and component characteristics involved. The implications of these problems are assessed.

  8. In-line process instrumentation for geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, D.W.; Robertus, R.J.; Sullivan, R.G.; Kindle, C.H.; Pierce, D.D.

    1985-05-01

    The economics of geothermal power depend on satisfactory plant reliability of continuous operation. Plant problems and extended downtime due to corrosion failures, scale buildup, or injection well plugging have affected many past geothermal projects. If in-line instrumentation can be developed to alert plant operators to correctable problems, then the cost and reliability of geothermal power will be improved. PNL has completed a problem of development of in-line corrosion and chemical instrumentation for binary cycle plants, and this technology has been used to set up a monitoring program at the Heber Binary Demonstration Power Plant. The current emphasis has shifted to development of particle meters for use on injection lines and CO/sub 2/ and pH probes for use in control of calcite scaling. Plans have been outlined to develop and demonstrate flash plant instrumentation for corrosion monitoring, scaling, steam purity, and injection line particle counting. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  9. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course G...—Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating... following ratings: (a) Flight Instructor Instrument—Airplane. (b) Flight Instructor...

  10. Electric vehicle power train instrumentation - Some constraints and considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triner, J. E.; Hansen, I. G.

    1977-01-01

    The application of pulse modulation control (choppers) to dc motors creates unique instrumentation problems. In particular, the high-harmonic components contained in the current waveforms require frequency-response accommodations not normally considered in dc instrumentation. In addition to current sensing, accurate power measurement not only requires adequate frequency response but also must address phase errors caused by the finite bandwidths and component characteristics involved. This paper discusses the implications of these problems and reports on the degree to which they have been solved at Lewis Research Center.

  11. Solar electric power for instruments at remote sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McChesney, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Small photovoltaic (PV) systems are the preferred method to power instruments operating at permanent locations away from the electric power grid. The low-power PV power system consists of a solar panel or small array of panels, lead-acid batteries, and a charge controller. Even though the small PV power system is simple, the job of supplying power at a remote site can be very demanding. The equipment is often exposed to harsh conditions. The site may be inaccessible part of the year or difficult and expensive to reach at any time. Yet the system must provide uninterrupted power with minimum maintenance at low cost. This requires good design. Successful small PV systems often require modifications by a knowledgeable fieldworker to adapt to conditions at the site. Much information is available in many places about solar panels, lead-acid batteries, and charging systems but very little of it applies directly to low power instrument sites. The discussion here aims to close some of the gap. Each of the major components is described in terms of this application with particular attention paid to batteries. Site problems are investigated. Finally, maintenance and test procedures are given. This document assumes that the reader is engaged in planning or maintaining low-power PV sites and has basic electrical and electronic knowledge. The area covered by the discussion is broad. To help the reader with the many terms and acronyms used, they are shown in bold when first used and a glossary is provided at the end of the paper.

  12. Wireless Instrumentation System and Power Management Scheme Therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor); Eckhoff, Anthony (Inventor); Mata, Carlos T. (Inventor); Blalock, Norman N. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A wireless instrumentation system enables a plurality of low power wireless transceivers to transmit measurement data from a plurality of remote station sensors to a central data station accurately and reliably. The system employs a relay based communications scheme where remote stations that cannot communicate directly with the central station due to interference, poor signal strength, etc., are instructed to communicate with other of the remote stations that act as relays to the central station. A unique power management scheme is also employed to minimize power usage at each remote station and thereby maximize battery life. Each of the remote stations prefembly employs a modular design to facilitate easy reconfiguration of the stations as required.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Power Quality Instruments in Measuring Power under Distorted Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belchior, Fernando; Galvão, Thiago Moura; Ribeiro, Paulo Fernando; Silveira, Paulo Márcio

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the performance of commercial power quality (PQ) instruments. By using a high precision programmable voltage and current source, five meters from different manufacturers are analyzed and compared. At first, three-phase voltage signals are applied to those PQ instruments, considering harmonic distortion, voltage dip, voltage swell, as well as unbalanced voltages. These events are measured, compared and evaluated considering the different instruments. In addition, voltage and current signals are applied under different conditions, with and without harmonic and unbalances, in order to obtain the measurements of electrical power. After analyzing the data generated in all these tests, efforts are focused on establishing a relationship between the accuracy of the measurements. Considering the percentages of errors, a score is assigned to each instrument. The tests have shown "excellent" and "good" results regarding measuring active and apparent power, as well as power factor. However, for non-active power, almost all instruments had lower performance. This work is relevant considering that Brazil is deploying standardization in terms of power quality measurements aiming towards regulatory procedures and index limits.

  14. Instrumentation and Controls evaluation for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.; Oakes, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    Design of control and protection systems should be coordinated with the design of the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and mechanical aspects of the core and plant at the earliest possible stage of concept development. An integrated systematic design approach is necessary to prevent uncoordinated choices in one technology area from imposing impractical or impossible requirements in another. Significant development and qualification will be required for virtually every aspect of reactor control and instrumentation. In-core instrumentation widely used in commercial light water reactors will not likely be usable in the higher temperatures of a space power plant. Thermocouples for temperature measurement and gamma thermometers for flux measurement appear to be the only viable candidates. Recent developments in ex-core neutron detectors may provide achievable alternatives to in-core measurements. Reliable electronic equipment and high-temperature actuators will require major development efforts.

  15. Root instrumentation. Power-driven versus manual scalers, which one?

    PubMed

    Drisko, C H

    1998-04-01

    The literature is clear that periodontal therapies aimed at altering the progression of inflammatory periodontal diseases must include meticulous subgingival mechanical débridement during both the nonsurgical and the surgical phases of treatment as the basis of most anti-infective therapy. In the past, infection control was achieved by the mechanical removal of subgingival deposits of plaque, calculus, and endotoxin with curets, files, and hoes. Historically, it was also generally agreed that aggressive scaling and root planing with hand instruments was necessary to remove tenacious calculus deposits to produce roots as smooth as possible for removal of the endotoxins previously thought to be deeply embedded into the root surfaces. Based on current evidence in the literature, it is now known that endotoxin is a weakly adherent surface phenomenon and that sonic and ultrasonic (power-driven) instruments can be used to accomplish definitive root detoxification and maximal wound healing without overinstrumentation of root and without extensive cementum removal. Power-driven scalers may have unique advantages because of the cavitational activity associated with ultrasonics thought to supplement removal of root surface plaques. In addition, the constant flushing activity of the lavage used to cool the tips results in disruption of the unattached and weakly attached subgingival plaques. The ability to flush the pocket during subgingival instrumentation with water or other chemical irrigating solutions is unique to ultrasonic and sonic scalers and has been shown to enhance pocket depth reduction and gain in clinical attachment beyond that achieved with hand scaling. The added benefit of chemical lavage during ultrasonic instrumentation shows great promise and may enhance the overall effect of nonsurgical anti-infective periodontal therapy. Other major advantages of power-driven scalers may include better access to difficult areas, such as deep narrow defects, root grooves

  16. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I.; Gidley, David W.

    2013-04-19

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  17. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I.; Gidley, David W.

    2013-04-01

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e+-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e+-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  18. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs is reported. The data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems are described. How the systems were used is described and the challenges encountered to make them work are covered. Examples of raw data and derived results are shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems are discussed. For some flight research applications where miniaturized instrumentation is a requirement, the authors conclude that commercially available data loggers and sensors are viable alternatives. In fact, the data loggers and sensors make it possible to gather research-quality data in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  19. Power plant performance monitoring and improvement. Volume 3. Power plant performance instrumentation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, H.G.; Westcott, J.C.; de Mello, R.W.; Brandon, R.E.; Parkinson, D.W.; Czuba, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    PEPCO's Morgantown Unit 2 and the PJM system control center are serving as the test facilities for this project. This first phase of the project utilizes currently (or soon to be) available instrumentation for monitoring and analyzing plant and system performance on a continuous basis. The overall approach is to demonstrate in one facility all sensors, monitoring devices, and necessary computer hardware and software for on-line performance monitoring and dispatch purposes. Significant developments include turbine packing leakage measurement, condenser back-pressure measurement, power cycle testing, and studies of the application of advanced instrumentation to system dispatch.

  20. Flight Technology Improvement. [spaceborne optical radiometric instruments, attitude control, and electromechanical and power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Shortcomings in spaceborne instrumentation technology are analyzed and recommendations are given for corrections and technology development. The technologies discussed are optical radiometric instruments and calibration, attitude control and determination, and electromechanical and power subsystems.

  1. The effects of nuclear power generators upon electronic instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1970-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of electronic instruments susceptible to neutron and gamma radiation is evaluated by means of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator /RTG/. The gamma field of the RTG affects instrument operation and requires shielding, the neutron field does not affect operation via secondary capture-gamma production.

  2. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course G Appendix G to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. G Appendix G to Part...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course G Appendix G to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. G Appendix G to Part...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course G Appendix G to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. G Appendix G to Part...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course G Appendix G to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. G Appendix G to Part...

  10. Report of the Power Sub systems Panel. [spacecraft instrumentation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Problems in spacecraft power system design, testing, integration, and operation are identified and solutions are defined. The specific technology development problems discussed include substorm and plasma design data, modeling of the power subsystem and components, power system monitoring and degraded system management, rotary joints for transmission of power and signals, nickel cadmium battery manufacturing and application, on-array power management, high voltage technology, and solar arrays.

  11. Design and Construction of the Ultracold Neutron Source at the NC State PULSTAR Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Grant R.

    An ultracold neutron (UCN) source using solid deuterium is being constructed at the 1MWPULSTAR nuclear reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The final stages of assembly and commissioning are underway. The overall design, status of construction, and benchmarking measurements are presented. The UCN source design is based on detailed simulations including MCNP, UCN transport Monte Carlo, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the cryogenic systems. The source will be useful for developing UCN technologies, including guides and detectors, and in support of current projects including measurements of neutron beta-decay asymmetry coefficients and the electric dipolemoment of the neutron. The facility will also be available for testing new techniques using UCN in material and surface physics, as well as new fundamental physics measurements such as neutron lifetime and beta decay measurements. The expected experimental density of UCN/cm3 in a storage volume will be competitive with currently available sources, including those at significantly more powerful reactors.

  12. Specifying and calibrating instrumentations for wideband electronic power measurements. [in switching circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, D. J.; Weikle, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The wideband electric power measurement related topics of electronic wattmeter calibration and specification are discussed. Tested calibration techniques are described in detail. Analytical methods used to determine the bandwidth requirements of instrumentation for switching circuit waveforms are presented and illustrated with examples from electric vehicle type applications. Analog multiplier wattmeters, digital wattmeters and calculating digital oscilloscopes are compared. The instrumentation characteristics which are critical to accurate wideband power measurement are described.

  13. A low power 12-bit ADC for nuclear instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, R.; Landis, D.; Madden, N. ); Silver, E.; LeGros, M. )

    1992-10-01

    A low power, successive approximation, analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for low rate, low cost, battery powered applications is described. The ADC is based on a commercial 50 mW successive approximation CMOS device (CS5102). An on-chip self-calibration circuit reduces the inherent differential nonlinearity to 7%. A further reduction of the differential nonlinearity to 0.5% is attained with a four bit Gatti function. The Gatti function is distributed to minimize battery power consumption. All analog functions reside with the ADC while the noisy digital functions reside in the personal computer based histogramming memory. Fiber optic cables carry afl digital information between the ADC and the personal computer based histogramming memory.

  14. A closed-loop inductive power control system for an instrumented strain sensing tibial implant.

    PubMed

    Shiying Hao; Taylor, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Inductively-powered implantable biomedical devices are widely used nowadays, however the power variations due to the coil misalignment can significantly affect the device performance. A closed-loop power control system is proposed in this paper, which is implemented in a Subject-Carried Implant Monitoring Inductive Telemetric Ambulatory Reader (SCIMITAR) for remote strain data acquisition from an instrumented ovine tibia implant. The output power of the energizer is adaptively adjusted via a feedback circuitry connected the demodulator with the power energizer. Lab results showed that feedback suppressed variations in induced power caused by coil misalignment and extended the functional range of the device in axial and planar directions. PMID:25571497

  15. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  19. Diversity Strategies for Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi; Loebl, Andy; Mays, Gary T; Muhlheim, Michael David; Mullens, James Allen; Poore III, Willis P; Qualls, A L; Wilson, Thomas L; Waterman, Michael E.

    2010-02-01

    This report presents the technical basis for establishing acceptable mitigating strategies that resolve diversity and defense-in-depth (D3) assessment findings and conform to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. The research approach employed to establish appropriate diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on D3 methods and experience from nuclear power and nonnuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of best practices, and assessment of the nature of common-cause failures (CCFs) and compensating diversity attributes. The research described in this report does not provide guidance on how to determine the need for diversity in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs. Rather, the scope of this report provides guidance to the staff and nuclear industry after a licensee or applicant has performed a D3 assessment per NUREG/CR-6303 and determined that diversity in a safety system is needed for mitigating the consequences of potential CCFs identified in the evaluation of the safety system design features. Succinctly, the purpose of the research described in this report was to answer the question, 'If diversity is required in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs, how much diversity is enough?' The principal results of this research effort have identified and developed diversity strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria. Technology, which corresponds to design diversity, is chosen as the principal system characteristic by which diversity criteria are grouped to form strategies. The rationale for this classification framework involves consideration of the profound impact that technology-focused design diversity provides. Consequently, the diversity usage classification scheme involves three families of strategies: (1) different technologies, (2) different approaches within the same

  20. Data processing unit and power system for the LANL REM instrument package. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, W.

    1994-03-01

    The NEPSTP spacecraft needs highly reliable instrumentation to measure the nuclear reactor health and performance. These reactor measurements are essential for initial on-orbit phase operations and documentation of performance over time. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), under the guidance of W. C. Feldman, principal investigator, has designed the Radiation Environment Monitoring (REM) package to meet these needs. The instrumentation package contains two neutron detectors, one gamma-ray detector, a data processing unit, and an instrument power system. The REM package is an integration of quick turn-around, state of the practice technology for detectors, data processors, and power systems. A significant portion of REM consists of subsystems with flight history. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has been tasked by LANL to design support electronics, including the Data Processing Unit (DPU) and Power System for REM. The goal for this project is to use technologies from current programs to speed up and simplify the design process. To meet these design goals, the authors use an open architecture VME bus for the DPU and derivatives of CASSINI power supplies for the instrument power system. To simplify integration and test activities, they incorporate a proven software development strategy and tool kits from outside vendors. The objective of this report is to illustrate easily incorporated system level designs for the DPU, power system and ground support electronics (GSE) in support of the important NEPSTP program.

  1. Validation of smart sensor technologies for instrument calibration reduction in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H M; Mitchell, D W; Petersen, K M; Shell, C S

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary results of a research and development project on the validation of new techniques for on-line testing of calibration drift of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants. These techniques generally involve a computer-based data acquisition and data analysis system to trend the output of a large number of instrument channels and identify the channels that have drifted out of tolerance. This helps limit the calibration effort to those channels which need the calibration, as opposed to the current nuclear industry practice of calibrating essentially all the safety-related instrument channels at every refueling outage.

  2. A Dynamic Instrumentation Amplifier for Low-Power and Low-Noise Biopotential Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongpal; Ko, Hyoungho

    2016-01-01

    A low-power and low-noise dynamic instrumentation amplifier (IA) for biopotential acquisition is presented. A dynamic IA that can reduce power consumption with a timely piecewise power-gating method, and noise level with an alternating input and chopper stabilization technique is fabricated with a 0.13-μm CMOS. Using the reconfigurable architecture of the IA, various combinations of the low-noise schemes are investigated. The combination of power gating and chopper stabilization shows a lower noise performance than the combination of power gating and alternating input switching scheme. This dynamic IA achieved a power reduction level of 50% from 10 µA to 5 µA and a noise reduction of 90% from 9.1 µVrms to 0.92 µVrms with the combination of the power gating and chopper stabilization scheme.

  3. Assessment of instrumentation needs for advanced coal power plant applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.T.; Fischer, W.H.; Lipka, J.V.; Rutkowski, M.D.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify contaminants, identify instrumentation needs, assess available instrumentation and identify instruments that should be developed for controlling and monitoring gas streams encountered in the following power plants: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell. Emphasis was placed on hot gas cleanup system gas stream analysis, and included process control, research and environmental monitoring needs. Commercial process analyzers, typical of those currently used for process control purposes, were reviewed for the purpose of indicating commercial status. No instrument selection guidelines were found which were capable of replacing user interaction with the process analyzer vendors. This study leads to the following conclusions: available process analyzers for coal-derived gas cleanup applications satisfy current power system process control and regulatory requirements, but they are troublesome to maintain; commercial gas conditioning systems and in situ analyzers continue to be unavailable for hot gas cleanup applications; many research-oriented gas stream characterization and toxicity assessment needs can not be met by commercially available process analyzers; and greater emphasis should be placed on instrumentation and control system planning for future power plant applications. Analyzers for specific compounds are not recommended other than those needed for current process control purposes. Instead, some generally useful on-line laser-based and inductively coupled plasma methods are recommended for further development because of their potential for use in present hot gas cleanup research and future optimization, component protection and regulation compliance activities. 48 refs., 21 figs., 26 tabs.

  4. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  5. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards §...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and...

  7. Energy transducer for hydraulic wind power conversion system and instrumentation therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhull, W. M.

    1985-05-07

    A manually adjustable constriction or orifice to provide a means for optimizing the hydraulic power being converted to heat in a hydraulic windpower conversion system. The hydraulics and constriction are arranged to obtain the proer conditions necessary so that pressure head is converted to velocity head with the sum of the two remaining constant. Instrumentation to facilitate this optimizing adjustment process. A combination of a pump-speed transducer and a pressure-sensing transducer, along with appropriate electronic circuitry is described which provides an output display of the power being converted to heat. Instrumentation to accumulate and display the total energy converted to heat. Electronic devices and display equipment transform hydraulic power signals into energy signals, totalize the energy signals over time, and periodically display the accumulated energy count.

  8. Power and sample size calculations for Mendelian randomization studies using one genetic instrument.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Guy; Cowling, Benjamin J; Schooling, C Mary

    2013-08-01

    Mendelian randomization, which is instrumental variable analysis using genetic variants as instruments, is an increasingly popular method of making causal inferences from observational studies. In order to design efficient Mendelian randomization studies, it is essential to calculate the sample sizes required. We present formulas for calculating the power of a Mendelian randomization study using one genetic instrument to detect an effect of a given size, and the minimum sample size required to detect effects for given levels of significance and power, using asymptotic statistical theory. We apply the formulas to some example data and compare the results with those from simulation methods. Power and sample size calculations using these formulas should be more straightforward to carry out than simulation approaches. These formulas make explicit that the sample size needed for Mendelian randomization study is inversely proportional to the square of the correlation between the genetic instrument and the exposure and proportional to the residual variance of the outcome after removing the effect of the exposure, as well as inversely proportional to the square of the effect size. PMID:23934314

  9. On-line calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    An on-line instrumentation monitoring system was developed and validated for use in nuclear power plants. This system continuously monitors the calibration status of instrument channels and determines whether or not they require manual calibrations. This is accomplished by comparing the output of each instrument channel to an estimate of the process it is monitoring. If the deviation of the instrument channel from the process estimate is greater than an allowable limit, then the instrument is said to be {open_quotes}out of calibration{close_quotes} and manual adjustments are made to correct the calibration. The success of the on-line monitoring system depends on the accuracy of the process estimation. The system described in this paper incorporates both simple intercomparison techniques as well as analytical approaches in the form of data-driven empirical modeling to estimate the process. On-line testing of the calibration of process instrumentation channels will reduce the number of manual calibrations currently performed, thereby reducing both costs to utilities and radiation exposure to plant personnel.

  10. Ultra Low Temperature Ultra Low Power Instrument Packages for Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Beaman, B.; Yeh, P. S.; Cooper, L.; Feng, S.; Young, E.

    2010-01-01

    Achievement of solar system exploration roadmap goals will involve robotic or human deployment and longterm operation of surface science packages remote from human presence, thus requiring autonomous, self-powered operation. The major challenge such packages face will be operating during long periods of darkness in extreme cold potentially without the Pu238 based power and thermal systems available to Apollo era packages (ALSEP). Development of such science payloads will thus require considerable optimization of instrument and subsystem design, packaging and integration for a variety of planetary surface environments in order to support solar system exploration fully. Our work supports this process through the incorporation of low temperature operational components and design strategies which radically minimize power, mass, and cost while maximizing the performance under extreme surface conditions that are in many cases more demanding than those routinely experienced by spacecraft in deep space. Chief instruments/instrument package candidates include those which could provide long-term monitoring of the surface and subsurface environments for fundamental science and human crew safety. The initial attempt to design a 10 instrument environmental monitoring package with a solar/battery based power system led to a package with a unacceptably large mass (500 kg) of which over half was battery mass. In phase 1, a factor of 5 reduction in mass was achieved, first through the introduction of high performance electronics capable of operating at far lower temperature and then through the use of innovative thermal balance strategies involving the use of multi-layer thin materials and gravity-assisted heat pipes. In phase 2, reported here, involves strategies such as universal incorporation of ULT/ULP digital and analog electronics, and distributed or non-conventionally packaged power systems. These strategies will be required to meet the far more challenging thermal

  11. Real-time digital simulator with digital/analog conversion interface for testing power instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Taoka, Hisao; Iyoda, Isao; Noguchi, Hideo ); Sato, Nobuyuki; Nakazawa, Taro; Yamazaki, Akira )

    1994-05-01

    The need for real-time simulation stems from the fact that in many practical situations it is desirable to analyze the dynamic behavior of a large power system with advanced equipment that has complex and high-speed performance. Analog simulators are effective, however they impose serious limitations on the size of the system that is being modeled. The authors have studied and developed a real-time digital simulator using a hypercube computer, and realized a real-time performance available for the analysis of large power systems. Now as the second step of their study, they developed a digital/analog conversion interface for testing actual power instruments. The interface exchanges the variables of fundamental frequency domain in the real-time digital simulator, and the variables of exact time domain in the analog equipment connected to the simulator. In this paper, the authors describe the detail of their digital/analog conversion interface of a real-time digital simulator for testing advanced power instruments. Its conversion algorithm, system configuration of the simulator with the interface, experimental results are also presented in it.

  12. Instrument failure detection and estimation methodology for the nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, D.Y.; No, H.C. )

    1990-02-01

    To detect instrument failures in the nuclear power plant, a failure detection and isolation (FDI) method based on the Kalman filter is developed. As soon as the residual (difference between an estimated value and its measurement) exceeds the predetermined bound, the Kalman filter indicates the possibility of failures. Various simulations were performed to verify and validate the FDI logic in detecting steam generator pressurizer instrument failures. It is proved that the FDI technique can detect not only a single failure but also simultaneous common-mode and sequential multiple failures of several direct redundancies. Also it can correctly estimate the physical states in real time and the remaining time may be used for control with signal validation.

  13. Self-calibrating power angle instrument: Volume 1, A functional overview: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Demcko, J.A.; Chrysty, J.P.

    1989-08-01

    This report provides functional documentation of the development of a second generation electronic power angle instrument (PAI) for synchronous machines. The first generation device, also developed by EPRI funded research, proved the viability of the measurement concept but required human intervention for recalibration each time an input quantity was removed or the instrument power supply was lost. Loss of input intelligence also occurs each time a synchronous motor or generator is removed from service, thereby forcing additional recalibrations. The self-calibrating PAI automatically recalibrates itself for any contingency and as its predecessor, provides accurate low cost steady state and transient power angle measurements for both synchronous motors and generators. The report covering EPRI sponsored research project RP2591-1 includes a detailed PAI functional block diagram description as well as autocal PAI performance specification as measured in the lab. Several ancillary equipments were developed in support of the autocal project. These include an infrared optoprobe which replaces toothed wheel PAI input, an optoelectronic probe and tooth wheel test bed, and an electronic turbine generator simulator for PAI functional test and calibration. 24 figs.

  14. A new low-power, open-path instrument for measuring methane flux by eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermitt, D.; Burba, G.; Xu, L.; Anderson, T.; Komissarov, A.; Riensche, B.; Schedlbauer, J.; Starr, G.; Zona, D.; Oechel, W.; Oberbauer, S.; Hastings, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a new low-power instrument for measuring methane flux by eddy covariance method at sites without grid power. Design and field performance of the LI-7700 Methane Analyzer (LI-COR Biosciences) are examined in this study. The instrument uses 8 W of power in steady-state operation and employs a tunable diode laser in an open Herriott cell configuration with 0.47 m base path and 30 m optical path length. Methane number density is measured using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with 2f detection. Typical signal noise is <5 ppb rms at 10 Hz. Corrections for variations in temperature, pressure and water vapor are described. Data losses due to mirror contamination and condensation are minimized by a radiation shield and automatic mirror cleaning system and are shown to be small. Measured spectra and co-spectra are shown to follow the Kaimal model at deployment sites meeting classical criteria, and to follow sensible heat flux co-spectra from the sonic anemometer in most other cases, including difficult ones. Measured fluxes are similar in magnitude to those expected from the literature, and zero flux was measured during both summer and winter at a site known to have fluxes at or very near zero.

  15. Instrumentation and Control Needs for Reliable Operation of Lunar Base Surface Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James; Chicatelli, Amy; Bajwa, Anupa

    2005-01-01

    As one of the near-term goals of the President's Vision for Space Exploration, establishment of a multi-person lunar base will require high-endurance power systems which are independent of the sun, and can operate without replenishment for several years. These requirements may be obtained using nuclear power systems specifically designed for use on the lunar surface. While it is envisioned that such a system will generally be supervised by humans, some of the evolutions required maybe semi or fully autonomous. The entire base complement for near-term missions may be less than 10 individuals, most or all of which may not be qualified nuclear plant operators and may be off-base for extended periods thus, the need for power system autonomous operation. Startup, shutdown, and load following operations will require the application of advanced control and health management strategies with an emphasis on robust, supervisory, coordinated control of, for example, the nuclear heat source, energy conversion plant (e.g., Brayton Energy Conversion units), and power management system. Autonomous operation implies that, in addition to being capable of automatic response to disturbance input or load changes, the system is also capable of assessing the status of the integrated plant, determining the risk associated with the possible actions, and making a decision as to the action that optimizes system performance while minimizing risk to the mission. Adapting the control to deviations from design conditions and degradation due to component failures will be essential to ensure base inhabitant safety and mission success. Intelligent decisions will have to be made to choose the right set of sensors to provide the data needed to do condition monitoring and fault detection and isolation because of liftoff weight and space limitations, it will not be possible to have an extensive set of instruments as used for earth-based systems. Advanced instrumentation and control technologies will be

  16. The Predictive Power of SIMION/SDS Simulation Software for Modeling Ion Mobility Spectrometry Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Hanh Lai; Timothy R. McJunkin; Carla J. Miller; Jill R. Scott; Jose R. Almirall

    2008-09-01

    The combined use of SIMION 7.0 and the statistical diffusion simulation (SDS) user program in conjunction with SolidWorks® with COSMSOFloWorks® fluid dynamics software to model a complete, commercial ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was demonstrated for the first time and compared to experimental results for tests using compounds of immediate interest in the security industry (e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and cocaine). The effort of this research was to evaluate the predictive power of SIMION/SDS for application to IMS instruments. The simulation was evaluated against experimental results in three studies: 1) a drift:carrier gas flow rates study assesses the ability of SIMION/SDS to correctly predict the ion drift times; 2) a drift gas composition study evaluates the accuracy in predicting the resolution; and 3) a gate width study compares the simulated peak shape and peak intensity with the experimental values. SIMION/SDS successfully predicted the correct drift time, intensity, and resolution trends for the operating parameters studied. Despite the need for estimations and assumptions in the construction of the simulated instrument, SIMION/SDS was able to predict the resolution between two ion species in air within 3% accuracy. The preliminary success of IMS simulations using SIMION/SDS software holds great promise for the design of future instruments with enhanced performance.

  17. The predictive power of SIMION/SDS simulation software for modeling ion mobility spectrometry instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hanh; McJunkin, Timothy R.; Miller, Carla J.; Scott, Jill R.; Almirall, José R.

    2008-09-01

    The combined use of SIMION 7.0 and the statistical diffusion simulation (SDS) user program in conjunction with SolidWorks® with COSMSOSFloWorks® fluid dynamics software to model a complete, commercial ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was demonstrated for the first time and compared to experimental results for tests using compounds of immediate interest in the security industry (e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,7-dinitrofluorene, and cocaine). The effort of this research was to evaluate the predictive power of SIMION/SDS for application to IMS instruments. The simulation was evaluated against experimental results in three studies: (1) a drift:carrier gas flow rates study assesses the ability of SIMION/SDS to correctly predict the ion drift times; (2) a drift gas composition study evaluates the accuracy in predicting the resolution; (3) a gate width study compares the simulated peak shape and peak intensity with the experimental values. SIMION/SDS successfully predicted the correct drift time, intensity, and resolution trends for the operating parameters studied. Despite the need for estimations and assumptions in the construction of the simulated instrument, SIMION/SDS was able to predict the resolution between two ion species in air within 3% accuracy. The preliminary success of IMS simulations using SIMION/SDS software holds great promise for the design of future instruments with enhanced performance.

  18. Powerful low-cost laser lab instrumentation using 32-bit microcontrollers and an Android tablet interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, Edward

    2012-06-01

    Recently, our laboratory has developed several homemade instruments based on 16-bit microcontrollers.ootnotetextE.E. Eyler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 013105 (2011). Since then, powerful 32-bit microcontrollers have become available, often including host-mode USB interfaces. Concurrently, Android-based tablets with high-resolution graphical displays have become commonplace. With appropriate programming, some tablets can communicate via USB, allowing them to serve as bidirectional touch-screen interfaces. I will describe ramp and timing sequence generators with resolution up to 12.5 ns that can be constructed with very little cost or effort, by making minor additions to commercial development boards. With these instruments, a graphical tablet interface is used mainly for parameter entry, but it is even more useful as a data display for applications such as laser frequency locking or signal monitoring. To minimize programming for the Android devices, my approach is to develop just a few general-purpose ``apps'' that can operate a wide range of instruments. When the USB interface is connected, the microcontroller informs the tablet of its display requirements. This arrangement can eliminate the need for dedicated computers, custom data entry units, or oscilloscopes.

  19. Design Challenges of Power Systems for Instrumented Spacecraft with Very Low Perigees in the Earth's Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Vickie Eakin; Manzer, Dominic D.; Pfaff, Robert E.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Gervin, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    Designing a solar array to power a spacecraft bus supporting a set of instruments making in situ plasma and neutral atmosphere measurements in the ionosphere at altitudes of 120km or lower poses several challenges. The driving scientific requirements are the field-of-view constraints of the instruments resulting in a three-axis stabilized spacecraft, the need for an electromagnetically unperturbed environment accomplished by designing an electrostatically conducting solar array surface to avoid large potentials, making the spacecraft body as small and as symmetric as possible, and body-mounting the solar array. Furthermore, the life and thermal constraints, in the midst of the effects of the dense atmosphere at low altitude, drive the cross-sectional area of the spacecraft to be small particularly normal to the ram direction. Widely varying sun angles and eclipse durations add further complications, as does the growing desire for multiple spacecraft to resolve spatial and temporal variations packaged into a single launch vehicle. Novel approaches to insure adequate orbit-averaged power levels of approximately 250W include an oval-shaped cross section to increase the solar array collecting area during noon-midnight orbits and the use of a flywheel energy storage system. The flywheel could also be used to help maintain the spacecraft's attitude, particularly during excursions to the lowest perigee altitudes. This paper discusses the approaches used in conceptual power designs for both the proposed Dipper and the Global Electrodynamics Connections (GEC) Mission currently being studied at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

  20. An Adaptable Multiple Power Source for Mass Spectrometry and other Scientific Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Anderson, Gordon A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Leach, Franklin E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2015-09-18

    Power supplies are commonly used in the operation of many types of scientific equipment, including mass spectrometers and ancillary instrumentation. A generic modern mass spectrometer comprises an ionization source, such as electrospray ionization (ESI), ion transfer devices such as ion funnels and multipole ion guides, and ion signal detection apparatus. Very often such platforms include, or are interfaced with ancillary elements in order to manipulate samples before or after ionization. In order to operate such scientific instruments, numerous direct current (DC) channels and radio frequency (RF) signals are required, along with other controls such as temperature regulation. In particular, DC voltages in the range of ±400 V, along with MHz range RF signals with peak-to-peak amplitudes in the hundreds of volts range are commonly used to transfer ionized samples under vacuum. Additionally, an ESI source requires a high voltage (HV) DC source capable of producing several thousand volts and heaters capable of generating temperatures up to 300°C. All of these signals must be properly synchronized and managed in order to carry out ion trapping, accumulation and detection.

  1. An adaptable multiple power source for mass spectrometry and other scientific instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T.-Y.; Anderson, G. A.; Norheim, R. V.; Prost, S. A.; LaMarche, B. L.; Leach, F. E.; Auberry, K. J.; Smith, R. D.; Koppenaal, D. W.; Robinson, E. W.; Paša-Tolić, L.

    2015-09-01

    An Adaptable Multiple Power Source (AMPS) system has been designed and constructed. The AMPS system can provide up to 16 direct current (DC) (±400 V; 5 mA), 4 radio frequency (RF) (two 500 VPP sinusoidal signals each, 0.5-5 MHz) channels, 2 high voltage sources (±6 kV), and one ˜40 W, 250 °C temperature-regulated heater. The system is controlled by a microcontroller, capable of communicating with its front panel or a computer. It can assign not only pre-saved fixed DC and RF signals but also profiled DC voltages. The AMPS system is capable of driving many mass spectrometry components and ancillary devices and can be adapted to other instrumentation/engineering projects.

  2. An instrument for measuring the modulation transfer functions of low power telescopes and telemicroscopes.

    PubMed

    Katz, M; Citek, K; Arditi, A

    1988-03-01

    An instrument using an electro-optical Fourier method for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of low power telescopes and telemicroscopes is described. Because these devices are afocal, or nearly so, relay optics are needed to form real images at the detection section of the apparatus. The system is capable of measuring the MTF in monochromatic and white light, at any target azimuth, across the field of view, and through focus. The target system contains 14 square-wave gratings with spatial frequencies that range from 2.5 to 156 cpd. Images of these gratings are scanned across a slit. The output data are fed to a first-order recursive digital Butterworth bandpass filter for MTF analysis. The apparatus is diffraction limited at f/31.4. Therefore, it negligibly affects the measurement of the MTF of telescopes and telemicroscopes tested with exit pupils of up to 6.4 mm. PMID:3364527

  3. An adaptable multiple power source for mass spectrometry and other scientific instruments.

    PubMed

    Lin, T-Y; Anderson, G A; Norheim, R V; Prost, S A; LaMarche, B L; Leach, F E; Auberry, K J; Smith, R D; Koppenaal, D W; Robinson, E W; Paša-Tolić, L

    2015-09-01

    An Adaptable Multiple Power Source (AMPS) system has been designed and constructed. The AMPS system can provide up to 16 direct current (DC) (±400 V; 5 mA), 4 radio frequency (RF) (two 500 VPP sinusoidal signals each, 0.5-5 MHz) channels, 2 high voltage sources (±6 kV), and one ∼40 W, 250 °C temperature-regulated heater. The system is controlled by a microcontroller, capable of communicating with its front panel or a computer. It can assign not only pre-saved fixed DC and RF signals but also profiled DC voltages. The AMPS system is capable of driving many mass spectrometry components and ancillary devices and can be adapted to other instrumentation/engineering projects. PMID:26429459

  4. Technical evaluation of the station and instrument ground grid systems at the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Selan, J.C.

    1981-06-29

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the station and instrument ground grid systems at the Davis Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The evaluation is to determine that there are no inadvertent ties between the instrument and station ground grid systems, that any identified inadvertent ties are corrected, and to assure that the installation meets design criteria. The information submitted by the licensee indicates that there are no inadvertent ties between the station and instrument ground grid systems and that the installation meets design criteria.

  5. Compact Low Power DPU for Plasma Instrument LINA on the Russian Luna-Glob Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Walter; Riihelä, Pekka; Kallio, Esa

    2013-04-01

    The Swedish Institute for Space Physics in Kiruna is bilding a Lunar Ions and Neutrals Analyzer (LINA) for the Russian Luna-Glob lander mission and its orbiter, to be launched around 2016 [1]. The Finnish Meteorological Institute is responsible for designing and building the central data processing units (DPU) for both instruments. The design details were optimized to serve as demonstrator also for a similar instrument on the Jupiter mission JUICE. To accommodate the originally set short development time and to keep the design between orbiter and Lander as similar as possible, the DPU is built around two re-programmable flash-based FPGAs from Actel. One FPGA contains a public-domain 32-bit processor core identical for both Lander and orbiter. The other FPGA handles all interfaces to the spacecraft system and the detectors, somewhat different for both implementations. Monitoring of analog housekeeping data is implemented as an IP-core from Stellamar inside the interface FPGA, saving mass, volume and especially power while simplifying the radiation protection design. As especially on the Lander the data retention before transfer to the orbiter cannot be guaranteed under all conditions, the DPU includes a Flash-PROM containing several software versions and data storage capability. With the memory management implemented inside the interface FPGA, one of the serial links can also be used as test port to verify the system, load the initial software into the Flash-PROM and to control the detector hardware directly without support by the processor and a ready developed operating system and software. Implementation and performance details will be presented. Reference: [1] http://www.russianspaceweb.com/luna_glob_lander.html.

  6. Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) for remote high latitude geospace data collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Kim, H.; Deshpande, K.; Xu, Z.; Weimer, D.; Musko, S.; Crowley, G.; Fish, C.; Nealy, R.; Humphreys, T. E.; Bhatti, J. A.; Ridley, A. J.

    2014-06-01

    We present the development considerations and design for ground based instrumentation that is being deployed on the East Antarctic Plateau along a 40° magnetic meridian chain to investigate interhemispheric magnetically conjugate geomagnetic coupling and other space weather related phenomena. The stations are magnetically conjugate to geomagnetic stations along the west coast of Greenland. The autonomous adaptive low-power instrument platforms being deployed in the Antarctic are designed to operate unattended in remote locations for at least 5 years. They utilize solar power and AGM storage batteries for power, two-way Iridium satellite communication for data acquisition and program/operation modification, support fluxgate and induction magnetometers as well as dual-frequency gps receiver and an HF radio experiment. Size and weight considerations are considered to enable deployment by a small team using small aircraft. Considerable experience has been gained in the development and deployment of remote polar instrumentation that is reflected in the present generation of instrumentation discussed here. We conclude with the lessons learned from our experience in the design, deployment and operation of remote polar instrumentation.

  7. An autonomous adaptive low-power instrument platform (AAL-PIP) for remote high-latitude geospace data collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Kim, H.; Deshpande, K.; Xu, Z.; Weimer, D.; Musko, S.; Crowley, G.; Fish, C.; Nealy, R.; Humphreys, T. E.; Bhatti, J. A.; Ridley, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    We present the development considerations and design for ground-based instrumentation that is being deployed on the East Antarctic Plateau along a 40° magnetic meridian chain to investigate interhemispheric magnetically conjugate geomagnetic coupling and other space-weather-related phenomena. The stations are magnetically conjugate to geomagnetic stations along the west coast of Greenland. The autonomous adaptive low-power instrument platforms being deployed in the Antarctic are designed to operate unattended in remote locations for at least 5 years. They utilize solar power and AGM storage batteries for power, two-way Iridium satellite communication for data acquisition and program/operation modification, support fluxgate and induction magnetometers as well as a dual-frequency GPS receiver and a high-frequency (HF) radio experiment. Size and weight considerations are considered to enable deployment by a small team using small aircraft. Considerable experience has been gained in the development and deployment of remote polar instrumentation that is reflected in the present generation of instrumentation discussed here. We conclude with the lessons learned from our experience in the design, deployment and operation of remote polar instrumentation.

  8. Lobular capillary hemangioma formation: An unusual complication of submucous resection with power instrumentation of the inferior turbinate.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Luciano L; Wu, Chin-Lee; Busaba, Nicolas Y

    2015-12-01

    Submucous resection with powered instrumentation (SRPI) is an effective surgical method to achieve inferior turbinate (IT) reduction with minimal morbidity. We describe a series of two cases of capillary hemangioma (pyogenic granuloma) that developed in the posterior third of the IT as a late complication after SRPI. PMID:26403945

  9. 14 CFR 91.205 - Powered civil aircraft with standard category U.S. airworthiness certificates: Instrument and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powered civil aircraft with standard category U.S. airworthiness certificates: Instrument and equipment requirements. 91.205 Section 91.205 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL...

  10. 14 CFR 91.205 - Powered civil aircraft with standard category U.S. airworthiness certificates: Instrument and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powered civil aircraft with standard category U.S. airworthiness certificates: Instrument and equipment requirements. 91.205 Section 91.205 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL...

  11. Cordless Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Black & Decker's new cordless lightweight battery powered precision instruments, adapted from NASA's Apollo Lunar Landing program, have been designed to give surgeons optimum freedom and versatility in the operating room. Orthopedic instrument line includes a drill, a driver/reamer and a sagittal saw. All provide up to 20 minutes on a single charge. Power pack is the instrument's handle which is removable for recharging. Microprocessor controlled recharging unit can recharge two power packs together in 30 minutes. Instruments can be gas sterilized, steam-sterilized in an autoclave or immersed for easy cleaning.

  12. Validation of the Efficacy of a Solar-Thermal Powered Autoclave System for Off-Grid Medical Instrument Wet Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Kaseman, Tremayne; Boubour, Jean; Schuler, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave used for the wet sterilization of medical instruments in off-grid settings where electrical power is not readily available. Twenty-seven trials of the solar-thermal powered system were run using an unmodified non-electric autoclave loaded with a simulated bundle of medical instruments and biological test agents. Results showed that in 100% of the trials the autoclave achieved temperatures in excess of 121°C for 30 minutes, indicator tape displayed visible reactions to steam sterilization, and biological tests showed that microbial agents had been eliminated, in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requirements for efficacious wet sterilization. PMID:22848098

  13. Validation of the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave system for off-grid medical instrument wet sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kaseman, Tremayne; Boubour, Jean; Schuler, Douglas A

    2012-10-01

    This work describes the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave used for the wet sterilization of medical instruments in off-grid settings where electrical power is not readily available. Twenty-seven trials of the solar-thermal powered system were run using an unmodified non-electric autoclave loaded with a simulated bundle of medical instruments and biological test agents. Results showed that in 100% of the trials the autoclave achieved temperatures in excess of 121°C for 30 minutes, indicator tape displayed visible reactions to steam sterilization, and biological tests showed that microbial agents had been eliminated, in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requirements for efficacious wet sterilization. PMID:22848098

  14. Constellation nuclear instrument analysis required in support of the Extended Power Up-rate for Ginna Station

    SciTech Connect

    Guider, J.; Quinn, E. L.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the Instrumentation and Control design changes required for the Extended Power Up-rate (EPU) at the R.E. Ginna Nuclear Station in Ontario, N.Y. Ginna is a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) plant of the Westinghouse 2-loop design. The request for the EPU was filed on July 7, 2005 and approved by NRC on July 11, 2006 and included an increase in the maximum steady-state reactor core power level from 1520 megawatts thermal to 1775 MWt, which is an increase of approximately 17%. (authors)

  15. The effect of the size of the opening on the acoustic power radiated by a reed woodwind instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilloteau, Alexis; Guillemain, Philippe; Kergomard, Jean; Jousserand, Michael

    2015-05-01

    For a given note, the maker of woodwind instruments can choose between different sizes for the toneholes under the condition that the location is appropriate. The present paper aims at analyzing the consequences of this choice on the power radiated by a hole, which depends on the coupling between the acoustic resonator and the excitation mechanism of the self-sustained oscillation, thus on the blowing pressure. For that purpose a simplified reed instrument is investigated, with a cylindrical pipe and a unique orifice at the pipe termination. The orifice diameter was varied between the pipe diameter and a size such that the instrument did not play. The pipe length was in each case adjusted to keep the resonance frequency constant. A simple analytical model predicts that, for a given mouth pressure of the instrumentalist, the radiated power does not depend on the size of the hole if it is wide enough and if resonator losses are ignored. Numerical solution of a model including losses confirms this result: the difference in radiated power between two diaphragm sizes remains smaller than the difference obtained if the radiated power would be proportional to the orifice cross section area. This is confirmed by experiments using an artificial mouth, but the results show that the linear losses are underestimated, and that significant nonlinear losses occur. The measurements are limited to the acoustic pressure at a given distance of the orifice. Experiments also show that rounding edges of the orifice reduces nonlinear losses resulting in an increase of the power radiated and of the extinction threshold, and resulting in a larger dynamical range.

  16. Development and evaluation of a new bicycle instrument for measurements of pedal forces and power output in cycling.

    PubMed

    Stapelfeldt, B; Mornieux, G; Oberheim, R; Belli, A; Gollhofer, A

    2007-04-01

    Determination of pedal forces is a prerequisite to analyse cycling performance capability from a biomechanical point of view. Comparing existing pedal force measurement systems, there are methodological or practical limitations regarding the requirements of scientific sports performance research and enhancement. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and to validate a new bicycle instrument that enables pedal forces as well as power output measurements with a free choice of pedal system. The instrument (Powertec-System) is based on force transducer devices, using the Hall-Effect and being mounted between the crank and the pedal. Validation of the method was evaluated by determining the accuracy, the cross talk effect, the influence of lateral forces, the reproducibility and, finally, a possible drift under static conditions. Dynamic tests were conducted to validate the power output measurement in reference to the SRM-System. The mean error of the present system was -0.87 +/- 4.09 % and -1.86 +/- 6.61 % for, respectively, the tangential and radial direction. Cross talk, lateral force influence, reproducibility and drift mean values were < +/- 7 %, < or = 2.4 %, < 0.8 % and 0.02 N x min (-1), respectively. In dynamic conditions, the power output measurement error could be kept below 2.35 %. In conclusion, this method offers the possibility for both valid pedal forces and power output measurements. Moreover, the instrument allows measurements with every pedal system. This method has an interesting potential for biomechanical analyses in cycling research and performance enhancement. PMID:17024643

  17. The power of a musical instrument: Franklin, the Mozarts, Mesmer, and the glass armonica.

    PubMed

    Gallo, D A; Finger, S

    2000-11-01

    In 1761 Benjamin Franklin invented the armonica (often referred to as the glass harmonica), an instrument designed to simplify the playing of the musical glasses. The instrument immediately became popular and inspired compositions by Wolfgang Mozart, who had the opportunity to hear and play one at the house of Franz Anton Mesmer. Armonica music was used by Mesmer in his séances, because he felt it could promote healing by propagating a mystical fluid that he called animal magnetism through the body. After Mesmer's theories were debunked by a highly respected panel of scientists, the armonica fell out of vogue. Because Franklin was on the panel that examined the discredited mesmerism, he indirectly contributed to his own invention's demise. PMID:11855437

  18. Use of a New Low-Power Laser-Based Instrumentation to Measure Methane Emissions from Remote Permafrost Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; Sturtevant, Cove; Peltola, Olli; Schreiber, Peter; Zulueta, Rommel; Haapanala, Sami; Mammarella, Ivan; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; McDermitt, Dayle; Oechel, Walt

    2013-04-01

    . Remote permafrost wetlands of Arctic tundra, northern boreal peatlands of Canada and Siberia, and other highly methanogenic ecosystems have few eddy covariance methane measurement stations. Those existing are often located near grid power sources and roads rather than in the middle of the methane-producing ecosystem, while those that are placed appropriately may require extraordinary efforts to build and maintain them, with large investments into man-power and infrastructure. Alternatively, open-path instrumentation allows methane flux measurements at normal pressure without a need for a pump. As a result, the measurements can be done with very low-power (e.g., 7-10 Watts) light (5 .2 kg) instruments permitting solar- and wind- powered remote deployments in hard-to-reach sites from permanent, portable or mobile stations, and cost-effective additions of a methane measurement to the present array of CO2 and H2O measurements. The low-power operation and light weight of open-path eddy covariance station is important for number of ecosystems (rice fields, landfills, wetlands, cattle yards, etc.), but it is especially important for permafrost and other cold regions where grid power and access roads are generally not available, and logistics of running the experiment is particularly expensive. Emerging research using low-power laser-based instrumentation to measure CH4 emissions are presented from several permafrost ecosystems with contrasting setups, weather, and moisture conditions. Principles of open-path instrument operation, station characteristics and requirements are also discussed, as well as concurrent measurements of CO2 and H2O emissions using open-path and enclosed instrumentation.

  19. IFU simulator: a powerful alignment and performance tool for MUSE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Boudon, Didier; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Jarno, Aurélien; Kosmalski, Johan; Piqueras, Laure; Remillieux, Alban; Renault, Edgard

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transferred in monolithic way without dismounting onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame. This talk describes the IFU Simulator which is the main alignment and performance tool for MUSE instrument. The IFU Simulator mimics the optomechanical interface between the MUSE pre-optic and the 24 IFUs. The optomechanical design is presented. After, the alignment method of this innovative tool for identifying the pupil and image planes is depicted. At the end, the internal test report is described. The success of the MUSE alignment using the IFU Simulator is demonstrated by the excellent results obtained onto MUSE positioning, image quality and throughput. MUSE commissioning at the VLT is planned for September, 2014.

  20. Recent Large Reduction in Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Chinese Power Plants Observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Can; Zhang, Qiang; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Streets, David G.; He, Kebin; Tsay, Si-Chee; Gleason, James F.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard NASA's Aura satellite observed substantial increases in total column SO2 and tropospheric column NO2 from 2005 to 2007, over several areas in northern China where large coal-fired power plants were built during this period. The OMI-observed SO2/NO2 ratio is consistent with the SO2/ NO2, emissions estimated from a bottom-up approach. In 2008 over the same areas, OMI detected little change in NO2, suggesting steady electricity output from the power plants. However, dramatic reductions of S0 2 emissions were observed by OMI at the same time. These reductions confirm the effectiveness of the flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices in reducing S02 emissions, which likely became operational between 2007 and 2008. This study further demonstrates that the satellite sensors can monitor and characterize anthropogenic emissions from large point sources.

  1. Qualification issues associated with the use of advanced instrumentation and control systems hardware in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-10-01

    The instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and Tiber-optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I&C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying I&C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I&C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light water reactor. The template was then used to address reliability issues for microprocessor-based protection systems. Standards (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I&C systems were also identified. This approach addresses in part issues raised in Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy document SECY-91-292. which recognizes that advanced I&C systems for the nuclear industry are ``being developed without consensus standards, as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.``

  2. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Radiation safety in the Russian atomic power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, Aleksandr S.; Kiselev, Gennadii V.

    2003-07-01

    Of all the radioactive wastes known in nuclear power industry and engineering, long-lived actinides and fission products from spent nuclear fuel are the most hazardous. One way to reduce their radiation hazard is to resort to nuclear transmutation, which can be performed either in reactors of various types or in accelerator-driven subcritical systems, whose nuclear safety is superior to that of conventional reactors. Fundamentally resolving the problem of the destruction of long-lived radioactive wastes is likely to stimulate progress in the development of the nuclear power industry.

  3. HBCU/MI instrumentation for the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Laboratory at the University of New Mexico, FY92-93

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamiloglu, Edi; Fledderman, Charles; Galhl, John; Shiffler, Donald

    1994-11-01

    The Pulsed Power & Plasma Science Laboratory at the University of New Mexico (UNM) is pleased to have equipped its laboratory with modern instrumentation in support of its AFOSR-funded program on high power microwave sources. The instrumentation acquired can be broken broadly into three categories: (1) microwave measurement/calibration (network analyzer and components); (2) data acquisition (digital oscilloscopes, computers, LabView); and (3) high vacuum capabilities (turbo pumps, residual gas analyzer). This report describes the instrumentation and how it is used in support of the research program.

  4. INSTRUMENTATION, RECORDING, AND PROCESSING OF METEOROLOGICAL DATA NEAR PORTAGE, WISCONSIN: WISCONSIN POWER PLANT IMPACT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Columbia Power Plant Impact Study meteorological data were collected at a network of monitoring sites from 1972 through 1977. The data were the basis for a series of studies whose purpose was to elucidate the transport of airborne pollutants and to assess the clima...

  5. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Medical instruments based on high-power diode and fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapontsev, V. P.; Minaev, V. P.; Savin, V. I.; Samartsev, I. E.

    2002-11-01

    The characteristics and possible applications of scalpels based on diode and fibre lasers emitting at 0.97, 1.06, 1.56, and 1.9 μm, which are produced and developed by the IRE-Polyus Co., are presented. The advantages of such devices and the possibilities for increasing their output power and extending their spectral range are shown.

  6. The parallel globe: a powerful instrument to perform investigations of Earth’s illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Sabrina; Giordano, Enrica; Lanciano, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers have documented the difficulties for learners of different ages and preparations in understanding basic astronomical concepts. Traditional instructional strategies and communication media do not seem to be effective in producing meaningful understanding, or even induce misconceptions and misinterpretations. In line with recent proposals for pedagogical sequences and learning progressions about core concepts and basic procedures in physics and astronomy education, in this paper we suggest an intermediate, essential step in the teaching path from the local geocentric view of the Earth-Sun system to a heliocentric one. With this aim we present data collected over a day and a year from an instrument we call the ‘parallel globe’, a globe positioned locally homothetic to the Earth. Some analyses are suggested, in particular of the phenomenon of illumination of the Earth and its variations, that are consistent with the proposed instructional objectives.

  7. Space Power Program, Instrumentation and Control System Architecture, Pre-conceptual Design, for Information

    SciTech Connect

    JM Ross

    2005-10-20

    The purpose of this letter is to forward the Prometheus preconceptual Instrumentation and Control (I&C) system architecture (Enclosure (1)) to NR for information as part of the Prometheus closeout work. The preconceptual 1&C system architecture was considered a key planning document for development of the I&C system for Project Prometheus. This architecture was intended to set the technical approach for the entire I&C system. It defines interfaces to other spacecraft systems, defines hardware blocks for future development, and provides a basis for accurate cost and schedule estimates. Since the system requirements are not known at this time, it was anticipated that the architecture would evolve as the design of the reactor module was matured.

  8. Instrumental sensing of stationary source emissions. [sulphur dioxide remote sensing for coal-burning power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herget, W. F.; Conner, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A variety of programs have been conducted within EPA to evaluate the capability of various ground-based remote-sensing techniques for measuring the SO2 concentration, velocity, and opacity of effluents from coal-burning power plants. The results of the remote measurements were compared with the results of instack measurements made using EPA reference methods. Attention is given to infrared gas-filter correlation radiometry for SO2 concentration, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy for SO2 concentration, ultraviolet matched-filter correlation spectroscopy for SO2 concentration, infrared and ultraviolet television for velocity and SO2 concentration, infrared laser-Doppler velocimetry for plume velocity, and visible laser radar for plume opacity.

  9. Multiple Unit Instrumentation and Control (I and C) Systems for Generation IV Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Don W.; Fiorino, Michael M.; Quinn, Edward 'Ted'; Mauck, Jerry L.

    2002-07-01

    Several Generation IV design concepts involve compact modular reactor configurations that can significantly reduce the overall cost of construction of a nuclear plant. However, the operating costs of independent smaller units are increased on a per-MW basis versus larger scale reactors. To offset this economic penalty, Generation IV nuclear plants will benefit economically from a multi-unit (or multi-module) configuration, where some facilities or power conversion system resources are shared; balance of plant systems, auxiliary systems, and the main control room are all candidates for shared or integrated implementation. However, these multi-modular configurations introduce safety and operational challenges that must be addressed at an early stage in the design process. The goal of this paper is the identification and evaluation of the regulatory, operational, and monitoring issues arising from multi-unit nuclear plant implementations. The paper will provide an overview of a research approach that uses a model of a generic module as a basis for integration of design and monitoring, alongside regulatory requirements, for these proposed configurations. (authors)

  10. Present status of aircraft instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    This report gives a brief description of the present state of development and of the performance characteristics of instruments included in the following group: speed instruments, altitude instruments, navigation instruments, power-plant instruments, oxygen instruments, instruments for aerial photography, fog-flying instruments, general problems, summary of instrument and research problems. The items considered under performance include sensitivity, scale errors, effects of temperature and pressure, effects of acceleration and vibration, time lag, damping, leaks, elastic defects, and friction.

  11. Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of the ICS/NNI electric power distribution circuitry at the Oconee 1 Nuclear Plant. [Integrated control system/nonnuclear instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, A.F.; Mayo, C.W.; Battle, R.E.

    1985-10-01

    The effects of nonnuclear instrumentation (NNI) and integrated control system (ICS) electric power supply failures have been analyzed for the Oconee Unit 1 nuclear plant. The instrument and control system power distribution circuits were analyzed to define a comprehensive set of 19 single-point failure modes. For each power supply failure, the failed and operating control system signal inputs were propagated through the partially energized control system circuits as well as the energized and deenergized output control devices to evaluate the initial plant response. In addition, the effects of the power supply failures on the principal control room parameter displays were combined with the initial plant response to the automatic control circuits to evaluate possible control room operator response. Plant responses to the defined power supply failures are described in detail.

  12. Prospects in Nuclear Structure and Reactions with New Generation of High Power Accelerators and Innovative Instrumentation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2014-09-01

    The advent of high power light and heavy ion accelerators producing intense secondary radioactive ion beams (RIB) made possible the exploration of a new territory of nuclei with extreme in Mass and/or N/Z ratios. To pursue the investigation of this "terra incognita" several projects, based on second generation accelerators producing intense stables and RIB, all aiming at the increase by several orders of magnitude of the RIB intensities are now under construction and/or planned for the end of this decade in the world. In Europe RIB production at SPES@Legnaro, SPIRAL2@GANIL, ALTO@Orsay and HIE-ISOLDE@CERN are based on the ISOL method, whereas FAIR@GSI with the new Super-FRS fragment-separator takes advantage of the "In Flight" technique. Projects of high intensity heavy ions, and low energy drivers (< 10 MeV/n) are also foreseen at Flerov Laboratory @DUBNA, GSI, and GANIL. Technical performances, innovative new instrumentation and methods, and keys experiments in connection with these second generation high intensity facilities will be reviewed.

  13. On-line testing of calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1995-11-01

    The nuclear industry is interested in automating the calibration of process instrumentation channels; this report provides key results of one of the sponsored projects to determine the validity of automated calibrations. Conclusion is that the normal outputs of instrument channels in nuclear plants can be monitored over a fuel cycle while the plant is operating to determine calibration drift in the field sensors and associated signal conversion and signal conditioning equipment. The procedure for on-line calibration tests involving calculating the deviation of each instrument channel from the best estimate of the process parameter that the instrument is measuring. Methods were evaluated for determining the best estimate. Deviation of each signal from the best estimate is updated frequently while the plant is operating and plotted vs time for entire fuel cycle, thereby providing time history plots that can reveal channel drift and other anomalies. Any instrument channel that exceeds allowable drift or channel accuracy band is then scheduled for calibration during a refueling outage or sooner. This provides calibration test results at the process operating point, one of the most critical points of the channel operation. This should suffice for most narrow-range instruments, although the calibration of some instruments can be verified at other points throughout their range. It should be pointed out that the calibration of some process signals such as the high pressure coolant injection flow in BWRs, which are normally off- scale during plant operation, can not be tested on-line.

  14. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  15. The Observed Response of Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 Columns to NOx Emission Controls on Power Plants in the United States: 2005-2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; deFoy, Benjamin; Lamsal, Lok N.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.

    2013-01-01

    We show that Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) tropospheric column data may be used to assess changes of the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from power plants in the United States, though careful interpretation of the data is necessary. There is a clear response for OMI NO2 data to NOx emission reductions from power plants associated with the implementation of mandated emission control devices (ECDs) over the OMI record (2005e2011). This response is scalar for all intents and purposes, whether the reduction is rapid or incremental over several years. However, it is variable among the power plants, even for those with the greatest absolute decrease in emissions. We document the primary causes of this variability, presenting case examples for specific power plants.

  16. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  17. Inspector-instrument interface in portable NDA instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    Recent electronics technology advances make it possible to design sophisticated instruments in small packages for convenient field implementation. This report describes an inspector-instrument interface design which allows communication of procedures, responses, and results between the instrument and user. The interface has been incorporated into new spent-fuel instrumentation and a battery-powered multichannel analyzer.

  18. Inspector-instrument interface in portable NDA instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    Recent electronics technology advances make it possible to design sophisticated instruments in small packages for convenient field implementation. An inspector-instrument interface design that allows communication of procedures, responses, and results between the instrument and user is presented. This capability has been incorporated into new spent-fuel instrumentation and a battery-powered multichannel analyzer.

  19. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument... of fluids would not create a hazard. (3) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that... position. (f) Fuel pressure indicator. There must be means to measure fuel pressure, in each...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument... of fluids would not create a hazard. (3) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that... position. (f) Fuel pressure indicator. There must be means to measure fuel pressure, in each...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument... of fluids would not create a hazard. (3) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that... position. (f) Fuel pressure indicator. There must be means to measure fuel pressure, in each...

  2. Ozone Monitoring Instrument Observations of Interannual Increases in SO2 Emissions from Indian Coal-fired Power Plants During 2005-2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David D.; de Foy, Benjamin; Krotkov, Nickolay A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rapid growth of electricity demand and the absence of regulations, sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from coal-fired power plants in India have increased notably in the past decade. In this study, we present the first interannual comparison of SO2 emissions and the satellite SO2 observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for Indian coal-fired power plants during the OMI era of 2005-2012. A detailed unit-based inventory is developed for the Indian coal-fired power sector, and results show that its SO2 emissions increased dramatically by 71 percent during 2005-2012. Using the oversampling technique, yearly high-resolution OMI maps for the whole domain of India are created, and they reveal a continuous increase in SO2 columns over India. Power plant regions with annual SO2 emissions greater than 50 Gg year-1 produce statistically significant OMI signals, and a high correlation (R equals 0.93) is found between SO2 emissions and OMI-observed SO2 burdens. Contrary to the decreasing trend of national mean SO2 concentrations reported by the Indian Government, both the total OMI-observed SO2 and average SO2 concentrations in coal-fired power plant regions increased by greater than 60 percent during 2005-2012, implying the air quality monitoring network needs to be optimized to reflect the true SO2 situation in India.

  3. Instrument development to search for biomarkers on mars: Terrestrial acidophile, iron-powered chemolithoautotrophic communities as model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, V.; Rodríguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Briones, C.; Compostizo, C.; Herrero, P. L.; Vez, E.; Sebastián, E.; Moreno-Paz, M.; García-Villadangos, M.; Fernández-Calvo, P.; González-Toril, E.; Pérez-Mercader, J.; Fernández-Remolar, D.; Gómez-Elvira, J.

    2005-06-01

    Recent findings by the MER rover opportunity confirming the presence of iron minerals that can only be formed in the presence of water emphasize the study of analogous environments to Mars on Earth. The study of chemolithoautotrophic communities living in acidic iron-rich habitats is highly relevant in order to identify Mars analog environment-specific biomarkers. Iron oxidizing bacteria like Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans have ways of life for which it is feasible to identify a past or present hypothetical niche on Mars. We have developed a strategy for biomarker identification based on: (i) search for biosignatures on acid and metal-rich environments; (ii) development of an immunosensor microarray; and (iii) integration into an instrument for autonomous and remote operation. The instrument that we have built, called Signs Of LIfe Detector (SOLID), is capable of processing a variety of samples for the detection of specific biomarkers. Antibodies against several bacterial strains have been developed and tested in a microarray biosensor on SOLID. Tests with field samples have been successfully performed, allowing the detection of L. ferrooxidans, A. ferrooxidans present in sediment samples.

  4. The effects of modification of a high-latitude ionosphere by high-power HF radio waves. Part 1. Results of multi-instrument ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, f. T. D.; Yeoman, T. K.; Rietveld, M. T.

    2011-02-01

    We present the results of multi-instrument experiments related to studying the phenomena in the high-latitude ionosphere affected by high-power radio waves using the EISCAT technical facilities. It was found for the first time that strong small-scale artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) are excited when the ionospheric F region is heated by a high-power HF radio wave with X-mode polarization near the altitude at which the critical frequency {f_{x{F_2}}} of the F 2 layer is equal to the frequency f H of the heating accompanied by an up to 50% increase in the electron temperature. The spatial structure of the artificially perturbed ionospheric F region is examined in detail using an incoherent scatter radar operated in the regime of scanning over elevation angles from 92° to 74° with a 2° step. It is shown that the spatial size of the heated patch strongly depends on the angle of the HF pumping relative to the Earth's magnetic field. The phenomena occurring in the artificially modified ionospheric F region heated at frequencies near the third electron gyroharmonic, i.e., at f H = 3 f ce = f UH, where f UH is the upper-hybrid frequency, are explored on the basis of multi-instrument observation data.

  5. Micro-Inspector Avionics Module (MAM): A Self-Contained Low Power, Reconfigurable Avionics Platform for Small Spacecrafts and Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtijou, Mohammad; He, Yutao; Watson, R. Kevin; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes development of a radiation tolerant, low power, reconfigurable avionics module aimed at meeting the avionics needs of the JPL Micro-Inspector spacecraft. This module represents a complete avionics system, consisting of two PowerPC 405 CPUs embedded within a reconfigurable FPGA fabric of over 8 Million logic gates, 64MB of EDAC protected Flash storage and 128MB of EDAC protected DDR SDRAM or SDRAM memories, along with FPGA SEU mitigation logic, and all necessary power conversion. Processor SEU mitigation is achieved by running the two processors in a lock-step and compare configuration. All of these building blocks are integrated into a double sided circuit board that takes as little as 6 square inches of board space. This module can be embedded into a user system as part of a bigger circuit assembly or as a self contained module. This module is being developed as part of a JPL led Micro-Inspector Program, funded by NASA ESMD aimed at producing a 10Kg micro spacecraft.

  6. Gyroscopic Instruments for Instrument Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brombacher, W G; Trent, W C

    1938-01-01

    The gyroscopic instruments commonly used in instrument flying in the United States are the turn indicator, the directional gyro, the gyromagnetic compass, the gyroscopic horizon, and the automatic pilot. These instruments are described. Performance data and the method of testing in the laboratory are given for the turn indicator, the directional gyro, and the gyroscopic horizon. Apparatus for driving the instruments is discussed.

  7. VIRUS instrument enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Mondrik, N.; Rheault, J. P.; Sauseda, M.; Boster, E.; James, M.; Rodriguez-Patino, M.; Torres, G.; Ham, J.; Cook, E.; Baker, D.; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Hill, G. J.; Perry, D.; Savage, R. D.; Good, J. M.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument will be installed at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope† in the near future. The instrument will be housed in two enclosures that are mounted adjacent to the telescope, via the VIRUS Support Structure (VSS). We have designed the enclosures to support and protect the instrument, to enable servicing of the instrument, and to cool the instrument appropriately while not adversely affecting the dome environment. The system uses simple HVAC air handling techniques in conjunction with thermoelectric and standard glycol heat exchangers to provide efficient heat removal. The enclosures also provide power and data transfer to and from each VIRUS unit, liquid nitrogen cooling to the detectors, and environmental monitoring of the instrument and dome environments. In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication of the VIRUS enclosures and their subsystems.

  8. "Chiron": A Proposed Remote Sensing Prompt Gamma Ray Activation Analysis Instrument for a Nuclear Powered Prometheus Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Samuel R.; Keller, John W.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Mildner, David F. R.

    2004-01-01

    Prompt Gamma Ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) from neutron capture is an important experimental method that yields information on the elemental abundance of target materials. Gamma ray analysis has been used in planetary exploration missions by taking advantage of the production of neutrons as a result of Galactic Cosmic Ray interaction within the planetary surfaces. The .gamma ray signal that can be obtained from the GCR production of neutrons is very low, so we seek a superior neutron source. NASA s Project Prometheus and the Dept. of Energy aim to develop a nuclear power system for planetary exploration. This provides us with a tremendous opportunity to harness the reactor as a source of neutrons that can be used for PGAA. We envision a narrow stream of neutrons from the reactor directed toward the surface of an asteroid or comet producing the prompt gamma ray signal for analysis. Under ideal conditions of neutron flux and spacecraft orbit, both the signal strength and the spatial resolution will improved by several orders of magnitude over previously missions.

  9. Contribution to the safety assessment of instrumentation and control software for nuclear power plants: Application to SPIN N4

    SciTech Connect

    Soubies, B.; Henry, J.Y.; Le Meur, M.

    1995-04-01

    1300 MWe pressurised water reactors (PWRs), like the 1400 MWe reactors, operate with microprocessor-based safety systems. This is particularly the case for the Digital Integrated Protection System (SPIN), which trips the reactor in an emergency and sets in action the safeguard functions. The softwares used in these systems must therefore be highly dependable in the execution of their functions. In the case of SPIN, three players are working at different levels to achieve this goal: the protection system manufacturer, Merlin Gerin; the designer of the nuclear steam supply system, Framatome; the operator of the nuclear power plants, Electricite de France (EDF), which is also responsible for the safety of its installations. Regulatory licenses are issued by the French safety authority, the Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate (French abbreviation DSIN), subsequent to a successful examination of the technical provisions adopted by the operator. This examination is carried out by the IPSN and the standing group on nuclear reactors. This communication sets out: the methods used by the manufacturer to develop SPIN software for the 1400 MWe PWRs (N4 series); the approach adopted by the IPSN to evaluate the safety software of the protection system for the N4 series of reactors.

  10. Conjugate High Latitude Measurements along the 40 degree magnetic meridian: Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platforms on the East Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, Robert; Kim, Hyomin; Deshpande, Kshitija; Xu, Zhonghua; Fish, Chad; Musko, Steve; Crowley, Geoff; Humphreys, Todd; Bhatti, Jahshan; Bust, Grary

    2013-04-01

    We report on the development, testing and deployment of the next generation of autonomous adaptive low-power instrument platforms (AAL-PIP) for use in remote Antarctic locations. Specifically, we are in the process of deploying a dense chain on the east Antarctic plateau along the 40 degree magnetic meridian. These stations are magnetically conjugate to the west coast of Greenland and enable us to investigate solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere coupling simultaneously in both polar regions. The Antarctic stations on this chain provide data from fluxgate and induction magnetometers, dual-frequency GPS receivers as well as a variety of engineering and environmental parameters. Two-way communication with the stations is achieved using the Iridium satellite system. This enables acquisition of the data and the ability to change the operational parameters of the data collection programs. The stations are solar powered with battery storage for winter operation. We will discuss the design, technical characteristics, and operation results. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation through a Major Research Infrastructure (MRI) grant ATM-922979 and a research grant ANT0839858.

  11. Monitoring Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology (Environmental Control Issue), 1977

    1977-01-01

    This section contains a listing of the manufacturers of environmental monitoring instruments. The manufacturers are listed alphabetically under product headings. Addresses are included in a different section. (MA)

  12. Modification of the high latitude F region of the ionosphere by X-mode powerful HF radio waves: Experimental results from multi-instrument diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly; Rietveld, Michael; Haggstrom, Ingemar; Borisova, Tatiana; Yeoman, Tim

    We present the experimental results for strong plasma modifications induced by the X-mode powerful HF radio waves injected towards the magnetic zenith into the high latitude F region of the ionosphere. A large number of experiments in the course of Russian EISCAT heating campaigns were conducted in 2009 - 2013 under different background conditions in a wide heater frequency range from 4 to 8 MHz. The EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar at Tromsø, the CUTLASS (SuperDARN) HF coherent radar in Finland, SEE receiver at Tromsø, the HF Doppler equipment near St. Petersburg, and the EISCAT ionosonde (dynasonde) were used as diagnostic instruments. The results show that the X-mode HF pump wave can generate: (1) strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities (AFAIs); (2) HF-induced plasma and HF-enhanced ion lines (HFPLs and HFILs) from UHF radar spectra; (3) strong electron density enhancements along magnetic field line in a wide altitude range; (4) spectral components (few tens of Hz) in the Doppler spectra of the heater signal measured at a distance of 1200 km from the Tromsø HF heating facility. The experimental results obtained points to the strong magnetic zenith effect due to self-focusing powerful HF radio wave with X-mode polarization. For heater frequencies in the range of about 4 - 6 MHz the mentioned above phenomena are generated when the heater frequency is equal or above the ordinary-mode critical frequency (foF2). Under high background electron density and the heater frequencies used of 6.5 - 8.0 MHz, the strong X-mode HF-induced phenomena were observed both when the heater frequency is equal or above the foF2 and the heater frequency is below the foF2.

  13. SURVEY INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C J

    1954-01-19

    This pulse-type survey instrument is suitable for readily detecting {alpha} particles in the presence of high {beta} and {gamma} backgrounds. The instruments may also be used to survey for neutrons, {beta} particles and {gamma} rays by employing suitably designed interchangeable probes and selecting an operating potential to correspond to the particular probe.

  14. Experience gained with development of the instrumentation and control system for the PGU-410 power unit at the Krasnodar cogeneration station on the basis of the tornado-n distributed control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyukov, O. V.; Nestulya, R. V.; Kulagin, S. A.; Skvortsov, A. N.; Timoshin, A. I.; Zhuravleva, L. V.; Paseko, S. M.; Kamochkin, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The development of the instrumentation and control system for the PGU-410 power unit at the Krasnodar cogeneration station is discussed. Problems encountered in designing the process control system of a complex facility are considered, in particular, the need to integrate local control systems. Special attention is paid to the importance of setting up a united control area at such facilities.

  15. Instrumentation '79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Surveys the state of commerical development of analytical instrumentation as reflected by the Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy. Includes optical spectroscopy, liquid chromatography, magnetic spectrometers, and x-ray. (Author/MA)

  16. Instrument Measures Ocular Counterrolling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitan, Barry M.; Reschke, Millard F.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, battery-powered, noninvasive unit replaces several pieces of equipment and operator. Instrument that looks like pair of goggles with small extension box measures ocular counterrotation. Called "otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation" (OTTR) goggles, used in studies of space motion sickness. Also adapted to use on Earth and determine extent of impairment in patients who have impaired otolith functions.

  17. Astronomical instruments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R. N.

    Indian astronomers have devised a number of instruments and the most important of these is the armillary sphere. The earliest armillary spheres were very simple instruments. Ptolemy in his Almagest enumerates at least three. The simplest of all was the equinoctial armilla. They had also the solstitial armilla which was a double ring, erected in the plane of the meridian with a rotating inner circle. This was used to measure the solar altitude.

  18. Oceanographic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Developed under NASA contract, the Fast Repetition Rate (FRR) fluorometer is a computer-controlled instrument for measuring the fluorescence of phytoplankton, microscopic plant forms that provide sustenance for animal life in the oceans. The fluorometer sensor is towed by ship through the water and the resulting printouts are compared with satellite data. The instrument is non-destructive and can be used in situ, providing scientific information on ocean activity and productivity.

  19. 47 CFR 73.688 - Indicating instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... system. (b) The function of each instrument shall be clearly and permanently shown on the instrument..., the station may be operated without the defective instrument pending its repair or replacement for a... instrument is the transmission line meter used for determining the output power by the direct method,...

  20. 47 CFR 73.688 - Indicating instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... system. (b) The function of each instrument shall be clearly and permanently shown on the instrument..., the station may be operated without the defective instrument pending its repair or replacement for a... instrument is the transmission line meter used for determining the output power by the direct method,...

  1. 47 CFR 73.688 - Indicating instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... system. (b) The function of each instrument shall be clearly and permanently shown on the instrument..., the station may be operated without the defective instrument pending its repair or replacement for a... instrument is the transmission line meter used for determining the output power by the direct method,...

  2. 47 CFR 73.688 - Indicating instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... system. (b) The function of each instrument shall be clearly and permanently shown on the instrument..., the station may be operated without the defective instrument pending its repair or replacement for a... instrument is the transmission line meter used for determining the output power by the direct method,...

  3. 47 CFR 73.688 - Indicating instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... system. (b) The function of each instrument shall be clearly and permanently shown on the instrument..., the station may be operated without the defective instrument pending its repair or replacement for a... instrument is the transmission line meter used for determining the output power by the direct method,...

  4. Remote Monitoring of Instrumentation in Sealed Compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Landron, Clinton; Moser, John C.

    1999-05-20

    The Instrumentation and Telemetry Departments at Sandia National Laboratories have been exploring the instrumentation of sealed canisters where the flight application will not tolerate either the presence of a chemical power source or penetration by power supply wires. This paper will describe the application of a low power micro-controller based instrumentation system that uses magnetic coupling for both power and data to support a flight application.

  5. Research Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The GENETI-SCANNER, newest product of Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc. (PSI), rapidly scans slides, locates, digitizes, measures and classifies specific objects and events in research and diagnostic applications. Founded by former NASA employees, PSI's primary product line is based on NASA image processing technology. The instruments karyotype - a process employed in analysis and classification of chromosomes - using a video camera mounted on a microscope. Images are digitized, enabling chromosome image enhancement. The system enables karyotyping to be done significantly faster, increasing productivity and lowering costs. Product is no longer being manufactured.

  6. Instrumented SSH

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Scott; Campbell, Scott

    2009-05-27

    NERSC recently undertook a project to access and analyze Secure Shell (SSH) related data. This includes authentication data such as user names and key fingerprints, interactive session data such as keystrokes and responses, and information about noninteractive sessions such as commands executed and files transferred. Historically, this data has been inaccessible with traditional network monitoring techniques, but with a modification to the SSH daemon, this data can be passed directly to intrusion detection systems for analysis. The instrumented version of SSH is now running on all NERSC production systems. This paper describes the project, details about how SSH was instrumented, and the initial results of putting this in production.

  7. Geoscience instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, E. A. (Editor); Mercanti, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Geoscience instrumentation systems are considered along with questions of geoscience environment, signal processing, data processing, and design problems. Instrument platforms are examined, taking into account ground platforms, airborne platforms, ocean platforms, and space platforms. In situ and laboratory sensors described include acoustic wave sensors, age sensors, atmospheric constituent sensors, biological sensors, cloud particle sensors, electric field sensors, electromagnetic field sensors, precision geodetic sensors, gravity sensors, ground constituent sensors, horizon sensors, humidity sensors, ion and electron sensors, magnetic field sensors, tide sensors, and wind sensors. Remote sensors are discussed, giving attention to sensing techniques, acoustic echo-sounders, gamma ray sensors, optical sensors, radar sensors, and microwave radiometric sensors.

  8. Advanced sensors and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Zimmerman, Joe E.; Douglas, Kevin R.; Morrison, Rusty

    1990-01-01

    NASA is currently investigating the readiness of Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation to meet the requirements of new initiatives in space. The following technical objectives and technologies are briefly discussed: smart and nonintrusive sensors; onboard signal and data processing; high capacity and rate adaptive data acquisition systems; onboard computing; high capacity and rate onboard storage; efficient onboard data distribution; high capacity telemetry; ground and flight test support instrumentation; power distribution; and workstations, video/lighting. The requirements for high fidelity data (accuracy, frequency, quantity, spatial resolution) in hostile environments will continue to push the technology developers and users to extend the performance of their products and to develop new generations.

  9. Spectroelectrochemical Instrument Measures TOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Sam

    2011-01-01

    A spectroelectrochemical instrument has been developed for measuring the total organic carbon (TOC) content of an aqueous solution. Measurements of TOC are frequently performed in environmental, clinical, and industrial settings. Until now, techniques for performing such measurements have included, various ly, the use of hazardous reagents, ultraviolet light, or ovens, to promote reactions in which the carbon contents are oxidized. The instrument now being developed is intended to be a safer, more economical means of oxidizing organic carbon and determining the TOC levels of aqueous solutions and for providing a low power/mass unit for use in planetary missions.

  10. Weather Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  11. Characterization and determination of 28 elements in fly ashes collected in a thermal power plant in Argentina using different instrumental techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Julieta; Polla, Griselda; Jiménez Rebagliati, Raúl; Plá, Rita; Gómez, Darío; Smichowski, Patricia

    2007-02-01

    Different techniques were selected for comprehensive characterization of seven samples of fly ashes collected from the electrostatic precipitator of the San Nicolás thermal power plant (Buenos Aires, Argentina). Particle size was measured using laser based particle size analyzer. X-ray diffraction powder (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the mineral phase present in the matrix consisting basically of aluminosilicates and large amounts of amorphous material. The predominant crystalline phases were mullite and quartz. Major and minors elements (Al, Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Si and Ti) were detected by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V and Zn) content was quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Different acid mixtures and digestion procedures were compared for subsequent ICP OES measurements of the dissolved samples. The digestion procedures used were: i) a mixture of FH + HNO 3 + HClO 4 (open system digestion); ii) a mixture of FH + HNO 3 (MW-assisted digestion); iii) a mixture of HF and aqua regia (MW-assisted digestion). Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was employed for the determination of As, Ba, Co, Cr, Ce, Cs, Eu, Fe, Gd, Hf, La, Lu, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U and Yb. The validation of the procedure was performed by the analysis of two certified materials namely, i) NIST 1633b, coal fly ash and ii) GBW07105, rock. Mean elements content spanned from 41870 μg g - 1 for Fe to 1.14 μg g - 1 for Lu. The study showed that Fe (41870 μg g - 1 ) ≫ V (1137 μg g - 1 ) > Ni (269 μg g - 1 ) > Mn (169 μg g - 1 ) are the main components. An enrichment, with respect to crustal average, in many elements was observed especially for As, V and Sb that deserve particular interest from the environmental and human health point of view.

  12. Instrument Remote Control via the Astronomical Instrument Markup Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sall, Ken; Ames, Troy; Warsaw, Craig; Koons, Lisa; Shafer, Richard

    1998-01-01

    The Instrument Remote Control (IRC) project ongoing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Information Systems Center (ISC) supports NASA's mission by defining an adaptive intranet-based framework that provides robust interactive and distributed control and monitoring of remote instruments. An astronomical IRC architecture that combines the platform-independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of Extensible Markup Language (XML) to express hierarchical data in an equally platform-independent, as well as human readable manner, has been developed. This architecture is implemented using a variety of XML support tools and Application Programming Interfaces (API) written in Java. IRC will enable trusted astronomers from around the world to easily access infrared instruments (e.g., telescopes, cameras, and spectrometers) located in remote, inhospitable environments, such as the South Pole, a high Chilean mountaintop, or an airborne observatory aboard a Boeing 747. Using IRC's frameworks, an astronomer or other scientist can easily define the type of onboard instrument, control the instrument remotely, and return monitoring data all through the intranet. The Astronomical Instrument Markup Language (AIML) is the first implementation of the more general Instrument Markup Language (IML). The key aspects of our approach to instrument description and control applies to many domains, from medical instruments to machine assembly lines. The concepts behind AIML apply equally well to the description and control of instruments in general. IRC enables us to apply our techniques to several instruments, preferably from different observatories.

  13. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-10

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  14. RHIC instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 1011 protons to 250 GeV, or 109 fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  15. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Witkover, R.L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Instrumentation for interstellar exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntman, M.

    The time has arrived for designing, building, and instrumenting a spacecraft for a dedicated foray into interstellar space surrounding our star, the Sun. This region was probed in the past by remote techniques and it will be explored in situ by the Interstellar Probe mission. The mission will significantly advance our understanding of the nature of the local interstellar medium and explore the distant frontier of the solar system by revealing the details of the interaction between the Sun and Galaxy. This mission will also be an important practical step toward interstellar flight of the future. Reaching interstellar space in reasonable time requires high escape velocities and will likely be enabled by non-chemical propulsion such as nuclear-powered electric propulsion or solar sailing. Unusually high spacecraft velocities, enormous distances from the Sun, and non-chemical propulsion will significantly influence the design of the mission, spacecraft and scientific instrumentation. We will review measurement objectives of the first mission into interstellar space and outline constrains on the instrumentation. Measurement of particles, fields, and dust in the interstellar medium will be complemented by search for complex molecules and remote sensing capabilities in various spectral bands. A "look" back at our solar system will also be a glimpse of wh at a flyby mission of the distant future would encounter in approaching another star. The instrumentation for interstellar exploration presents numerous challenges. Mass, telemetry, and power constraints would place a premium on miniaturization and autonom . There are, however,y physical limits on how small the sensors could be. New instrument concepts may be required to achieve the desired measurement capabilities under the stringent constraints of a realistic interstellar mission.

  17. Instrumentation for interstellar exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntman, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The time has arrived for designing, building, and instrumenting a spacecraft for a dedicated foray into the galactic environment surrounding our star, the sun. This region was probed in the past by remote techniques and it will be explored in situ by the NASA's planned Interstellar Probe mission. The mission will significantly advance our understanding of the nature of the local interstellar medium and explore the distant frontier of the solar system by revealing the details of the interaction between the sun and the Galaxy. This mission will also be an important practical step toward interstellar flight of the future. Reaching interstellar space in reasonable time requires high escape velocities and will likely be enabled by non-chemical propulsion such as nuclear-powered electric propulsion or solar sailing. Unusually high spacecraft velocities, enormous distances from the Sun, and non-chemical propulsion will significantly influence design of the mission, spacecraft, and scientific instrumentation. We will review measurement objectives of the first dedicated mission into interstellar space and outline constraints on the instrumentation. Measurement of particles, fields, and dust in the interstellar medium will be complemented by search for complex organic molecules and remote sensing capabilities in various spectral bands. A "look" back at our solar system will also be a glimpse of what a truly-interstellar mission of the distant future would encounter in approaching a target star. The instrumentation for interstellar exploration presents numerous challenges. Mass, telemetry, and power constraints would place a premium on miniaturization and autonomy. There are, however, physical limits on how small the sensors could be. New instrument concepts may be required to achieve the desired measurement capabilities under the stringent constraints of a realistic interstellar mission.

  18. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  19. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  20. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  1. Optical Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    Precision Lapping and Optical Co. has developed a wide variety of hollow retroreflector systems for applications involving the entire optical spectrum; they are, according to company literature, cheaper, more accurate, lighter and capable of greater size than solid prisms. Precision Lapping's major customers are aerospace and defense companies, government organizations, R&D and commercial instrument companies. For example, Precision Lapping supplies hollow retroreflectors for the laser fire control system of the Army's Abrams tank, and retroreflectors have been and are being used in a number of space tests relative to the Air Force's Strategic Defense Initiative research program. An example of a customer/user is Chesapeake Laser Systems, producer of the Laser Tracker System CMS-2000, which has applications in SDI research and industrial robotics. Another customer is MDA Scientific, Inc., manufacturer of a line of toxic gas detection systems used to monitor hazardous gases present in oil fields, refineries, offshore platforms, chemical plants, waste storage sites and other locations where gases are released into the environment.

  2. FHR Process Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactors (FHRs) are entering into early phase engineering development. Initial candidate technologies have been identified to measure all of the required process variables. The purpose of this paper is to describe the proposed measurement techniques in sufficient detail to enable assessment of the proposed instrumentation suite and to support development of the component technologies. This paper builds upon the instrumentation chapter of the recently published FHR technology development roadmap. Locating instruments outside of the intense core radiation and high-temperature fluoride salt environment significantly decreases their environmental tolerance requirements. Under operating conditions, FHR primary coolant salt is a transparent, low-vapor-pressure liquid. Consequently, FHRs can employ standoff optical measurements from above the salt pool to assess in-vessel conditions. For example, the core outlet temperature can be measured by observing the fuel s blackbody emission. Similarly, the intensity of the core s Cerenkov glow indicates the fission power level. Short-lived activation of the primary coolant provides another means for standoff measurements of process variables. The primary coolant flow and neutron flux can be measured using gamma spectroscopy along the primary coolant piping. FHR operation entails a number of process measurements. Reactor thermal power and core reactivity are the most significant variables for process control. Thermal power can be determined by measuring the primary coolant mass flow rate and temperature rise across the core. The leading candidate technologies for primary coolant temperature measurement are Au-Pt thermocouples and Johnson noise thermometry. Clamp-on ultrasonic flow measurement, that includes high-temperature tolerant standoffs, is a potential coolant flow measurement technique. Also, the salt redox condition will be monitored as an indicator of its corrosiveness. Both

  3. Radiological instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Seibentritt, C.R. Jr.

    1986-12-23

    An instrument is described for measuring radiation, particularly nuclear radiation, comprising: a radiation sensitive structure pivoted toward one end and including a pair of elongated solid members contiguously joined together along their length dimensions and having a common planar interface therebetween. One of the pairs of members is comprised of radiochromic material whose index of refraction changes due to anomolous dispersion as a result of being exposed to nuclear radiation. The pair of members further has mutually different indices of refraction with the member having the larger index of refraction further being transparent for the passage of light and of energy therethrough; means located toward the other end of the structure for varying the angle of longitudinal elevation of the pair of members; means for generating and projecting a beam of light into one end of the member having the larger index of refraction. The beam of light is projected toward the planar interface where it is reflected out of the other end of the same member as a first output beam; means projecting a portion of the beam of light into one end of the member having the larger index of refraction where it traverses therethrough without reflection and out of the other end of the same member as a second output beam; and means adjacent the structure for receiving the first and second output beams, whereby a calibrated change in the angle of elevation of the structure between positions of equal intensity of the first and second output beams prior to and following exposure provides a measure of the radiation sensed due to a change of refraction of the radiochromic material.

  4. Spectroscopic Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Hans-Joachim

    The selection of a spectrographic system including the detector is governed by several aspects: - Wavelength region of interest - Low or high-resolution studies, survey spectra, line intensities only or detailed line profiles - Weak or strong emitter, which usually is equivalent to having a plasma of low or high density - Low or high time resolution, which basically determines the detector and only to a lesser degree the throughput of the system - Stigmatic or astigmatic image of the plasma in the exit plane Spectrometers with the exception of instruments for the X-ray region typically consist of: - An entrance slit (width w en, area A E) - A dispersive element - An optical system, which forms a spectrally dispersed image of the entrance slit in the exit plane - A detector in the exit plane Figure 3.1 illustrates a schematic layout. Dispersing elements are prisms, gratings, interferometers, and crystals. The imaging system consists usually of a lens L1 (or mirror M1) collimating the radiation from the entrance slit, and a lens L2 (or mirror M2) focusing the radiation in the exit (image) plane. Mirrors have the advantage of no chromatic aberration and can also be used at shorter wavelengths where glasses, quartz, and crystals absorb the radiation. Unfortunately, their reflectivity decreases at short wavelengths; this can be remedied to some degree by reducing the number of reflecting surfaces and employing spherical or even toroidal gratings which combine focusing and dispersing properties. The optical system (L1, L2) or (M1, M2) becomes unnecessary.

  5. Constructing an Evidence-Base for Future CALL Design with "Engineering Power": The Need for More Basic Research and Instrumental Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Zöe

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues that the goal of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) research should be to construct a reliable evidence-base with "engineering power" and generality upon which the design of future CALL software and activities can be based. In order to establish such an evidence base for future CALL design, it suggests that CALL…

  6. Embedded instrumentation systems architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visnevski, Nikita A.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the operational concept of the Embedded Instrumentation Systems Architecture (EISA) that is being developed for Test and Evaluation (T&E) applications. The architecture addresses such future T&E requirements as interoperability, flexibility, and non-intrusiveness. These are the ultimate requirements that support continuous T&E objectives. In this paper, we demonstrate that these objectives can be met by decoupling the Embedded Instrumentation (EI) system into an on-board and an off-board component. An on-board component is responsible for sampling, pre-processing, buffering, and transmitting data to the off-board component. The latter is responsible for aggregating, post-processing, and storing test data as well as providing access to the data via a clearly defined interface including such aspects as security, user authentication and access control. The power of the EISA architecture approach is in its inherent ability to support virtual instrumentation as well as enabling interoperability with such important T&E systems as Integrated Network-Enhanced Telemetry (iNET), Test and Training Enabling Architecture (TENA) and other relevant Department of Defense initiatives.

  7. Solid motor diagnostic instrumentation. [design of self-contained instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Arens, W. E.; Wuest, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    A review of typical surveillance and monitoring practices followed during the flight phases of representative solid-propellant upper stages and apogee motors was conducted to evaluate the need for improved flight diagnostic instrumentation on future spacecraft. The capabilities of the flight instrumentation package were limited to the detection of whether or not the solid motor was the cause of failure and to the identification of probable primary failure modes. Conceptual designs of self-contained flight instrumentation packages capable of meeting these reqirements were generated and their performance, typical cost, and unit characteristics determined. Comparisons of a continuous real time and a thresholded hybrid design were made on the basis of performance, mass, power, cost, and expected life. The results of this analysis substantiated the feasibility of a self-contained independent flight instrumentation module as well as the existence of performance margins by which to exploit growth option applications.

  8. WISDOM GPR aboard the ExoMars rover : a powerful instrument to investigate the state and distribution of water in the Martian shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorizon, S.; Ciarletti, V.; Clifford, S. M.; Plettemeier, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Water Ice Subsurface Deposits Observation on Mars (WISDOM) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been selected as part of the Pasteur payload for the European Space Agency (ESA) ExoMars 2018 mission. The main scientific objectives of the mission are to search for evidence of past or present life and to characterize the water/geochemical environment as a function of depth in the shallow subsurface. A rover equipped with a 2 meters capacity drill and a suite of instruments will land on Mars in 2018, collect and analyze samples from outcrops and at depth. The WISDOM GPR will support these activities by sounding the subsurface and provide understanding of the geologic context and evolution of the local environment. When operated on the ExoMars rover, WISDOM will offer the possibility to understand the 3D geology in terms of stratigraphy and structure, spatial heterogeneities as well as the compositional and electromagnetic properties of the subsurface. According to these scientific objectives, this radar has been designed as a polarimetric step frequency GPR, operating from 0.5 GHz to 3GHz, which allows the sounding of the first 3 meters of the subsurface with a vertical resolution of a few centimeters. The importance of this GPR is particularly enhanced by its ability to investigate the water content, state (ice or liquid) and distribution in the subsurface, which are crucial clues to constrain the possibility of life traces evidence. In addition, WISDOM will be operated at a distance of 30 cm above the ground. This configuration allows the monitoring of potential transient liquid water that could appear on Mars surface. Results from several laboratory tests and a campaign in alpine ice caves in Austria are consistent with the expected performances of WISDOM regarding the question of water characterization. The specific configuration of the antennas allows the retrieval of the first layer permittivity value from the surface echo, which is related to the water content

  9. Research and development studies for MHD/coal power flow train components. Part II. Diagnostics and instrumentation MHD channel combutor. Progres report. [Flow calculations for combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, M.H.; Lederman, S.; Sforza, P.; Matalon, M.

    1980-01-01

    This is Part II of the Technical Progress Report on Tasks II-IV of the subject contract. It deals sequentially with Diagnostics and Instrumentation, the MHD Channel and the Combustor. During this period, a significant effort has gone into establishing a schematic design of a laser diagnostic system which can be applied to the flow-train of the MHD system, and to acquiring, assembling and shaking down a laboratory set-up upon which a prototype can be based. With further reference to the MHD Channel, a model analysis has been initiated of the two-dimensional MHD boundary layer between two electrodes in the limit of small magnetic Reynolds numbers with negligible effect of the flow on the applied magnetic field. An objective of this model study is the assessment of variations in initial conditions on the boundary layer behavior. Finally, the problem of combustion modeling has been studied on an initial basis. The open reports on this subject depict a high degree of empiricism, centering attention on global behavior mainly. A quasi-one-dimensional model code has been set-up to check some of the existing estimates. Also a code for equilibrium combustion has been activated.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Roadmap on Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies in Current and Future Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) recently sponsored the creation of a roadmap for instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) technology development. The roadmap represents the collective efforts of a group of subject matter experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, vendors, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and utilities. It is intended to provide the underpinnings to the government sponsored ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) performed in the United States for the next several years. A distinguishing feature of this roadmapping effort is that it is not limited to a technology progression plan but includes a detailed rationale, aimed at the nonspecialist, for the existence of a focused ICHMI RD&D program. Eight specific technology areas were identified for focused RD&D as follows: (1) sensors and electronics for harsh environments,(2) uncertainty characterization for diagnostics/prognostics applications, (3) quantification of software quality for high-integrity digital applications, (4) intelligent controls for nearly autonomous operation of advanced nuclear plants, (5) plant network architecture, (6) intelligent aiding technology for operational support, (7) human system interaction models and analysis tools, and (8) licensing and regulatory challenges and solutions.

  11. Spacecraft instrument technology and cosmochemistry.

    PubMed

    McSween, Harry Y; McNutt, Ralph L; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2011-11-29

    Measurements by instruments on spacecraft have significantly advanced cosmochemistry. Spacecraft missions impose serious limitations on instrument volume, mass, and power, so adaptation of laboratory instruments drives technology. We describe three examples of flight instruments that collected cosmochemical data. Element analyses by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have revealed the nature of volcanic rocks and sedimentary deposits on Mars. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Lunar Prospector orbiter provided a global database of element abundances that resulted in a new understanding of the Moon's crust. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini has analyzed the chemical compositions of the atmosphere of Titan and active plumes on Enceladus. PMID:21402932

  12. Spacecraft instrument technology and cosmochemistry

    PubMed Central

    McSween, Harry Y.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements by instruments on spacecraft have significantly advanced cosmochemistry. Spacecraft missions impose serious limitations on instrument volume, mass, and power, so adaptation of laboratory instruments drives technology. We describe three examples of flight instruments that collected cosmochemical data. Element analyses by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have revealed the nature of volcanic rocks and sedimentary deposits on Mars. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Lunar Prospector orbiter provided a global database of element abundances that resulted in a new understanding of the Moon’s crust. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini has analyzed the chemical compositions of the atmosphere of Titan and active plumes on Enceladus. PMID:21402932

  13. Earl Wood--a research career noted for development of novel instruments driven by the power of the indicator dilution concept.

    PubMed

    Ritman, Erik L

    2014-11-01

    During World War 2, Earl Wood was charged with elucidating the biomedical factors in acceleration-induced loss of consciousness experienced by pilots in high-performance aircraft. For this, he developed devices for measurement and recording of blood pressure and tissue blood content. Those data lead to the design and fabrication of successful countermeasures to acceleration-induced loss of consciousness with an inflatable "G-suit" and "M1" breath-holding maneuver. After World War 2, he utilized and modified these instruments and made use of indicator dilution techniques by continuous intracardiac blood sampling to greatly increase the specificity and sensitivity of diagnosis of intracardiac anatomic and functional abnormalities in patients with congenital heart disease. This contributed to the greatly increased success rate of open-heart surgery in the 1950s. In the 1960s, he built on the then recently available video-coupled electronic X-ray image intensifier to develop X-ray fluoroscopy-based recording of indicator dilution signals in all cardiac chambers and surrounding great vessels without the need for placing catheter tips at those locations for blood sampling. However, these blood flow-related data were of limited value, as they were not measured concurrent with myocardial functional demand for perfusion. In the 1970s, he overcame this limitation by developing a high-speed multislice X-ray imaging scanner to provide tomographic images of concurrent dynamic cardiac anatomy and the indicator dilution-based estimates of blood flow distributions. On his retirement at age 70 in 1982, he had accomplished his 2 decade-old goal of the ability to make accurate concurrent, minimally invasive, and indicator dilution-based measurement of cardiovascular structure to function relationships. PMID:25190740

  14. 21 CFR 886.1425 - Lens measuring instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1425 Lens measuring instrument. (a) Identification. A lens measuring instrument is an AC-powered device intended to measure the power of lenses... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lens measuring instrument. 886.1425 Section...

  15. 21 CFR 886.1425 - Lens measuring instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1425 Lens measuring instrument. (a) Identification. A lens measuring instrument is an AC-powered device intended to measure the power of lenses... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lens measuring instrument. 886.1425 Section...

  16. 21 CFR 886.1425 - Lens measuring instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1425 Lens measuring instrument. (a) Identification. A lens measuring instrument is an AC-powered device intended to measure the power of lenses... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lens measuring instrument. 886.1425 Section...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1337 - Powerplant instruments installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument line must meet the requirements of... other safety devices at the source of pressure to prevent the escape of excessive fluid if the line...) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that utilizes flammable fluids must be...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1337 - Powerplant instruments installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument line must meet the requirements of... other safety devices at the source of pressure to prevent the escape of excessive fluid if the line...) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that utilizes flammable fluids must be...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1337 - Powerplant instruments installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument line must meet the requirements of... other safety devices at the source of pressure to prevent the escape of excessive fluid if the line...) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that utilizes flammable fluids must be...

  20. Diagnostic instrumentation development program for the heat recovery/seed recovery system of the open-cycle, coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Murphree, D.L.; Cook, R.L.; Bauman, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Highly efficient and environmentally acceptable, the coal-fired MHD power plant is an attractive facility for producing electricity. The design of its downstream system, however, presents technological risks which must be corrected if such a plant is to be commercially viable before the end of the century. The heat recovery/seed recovery system (HRSR) at its present stage is vulnerable to corrosion on the gas side of the radiant furnace, the secondary superheater, and the intermediate temperature air heater. Slagging and fouling of the heat transfer surface have yet to be eliminated. Gas chemistry, radiant heat transfer, and particulate removal are other problematic areas which are being researched in a DOE development program whose test activities at three facilities are contributing to an MHD/HRSR data base. In addition, a 20 MWt system to study HRSR design, is being now assembled in Tennessee.

  1. GEO Sounding Using Microwave Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James; Krimchansky, Sergey; Susskind, Joel; Krimchansky, Alexander; Chu, Donald; Davis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    There are several microwave instruments in low Earth orbit (LEO) that are used for atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding in conjunction with companion IR sounders as well as by themselves. These instruments have achieved a certain degree of maturity and undergoing a redesign to minimize their size, mass, and power from the previous generation instruments. An example of these instruments is the AMSU-A series, now flying on POES and AQUA spacecraft with the IR sounders HIRS and AIRS. These older microwave instruments are going to be replaced by the ATMS instruments that will fly on NPP and NPOESS satellites with the CrIS sounder. A number of techniques learned from the ATMS project in instrument hardware design and data processing are directly applicable to a similar microwave sounder on a geosynchronous platform. These techniques can significantly simplify the design of a Geostationary orbit (GEO) microwave instrument, avoiding costly development and minimizing the risk of not being able to meet the scientific requirements. In fact, some of the 'enabling' technology, such as the use of MMIC microwave components (which is the basis for the ATMS' much reduced volume) can be directly applied to a GEO sounder. The benefits of microwave sounders are well known; for example, they penetrate non-precipitating cloud cover and allow for use of colocated IR observations in up to 80% cloud cover. The key advantages of a microwave instrument in GEO will be the ability to provide high temporal resolution as well as uniform spatial resolution and extend the utility of a colocated advanced IR sounder to cases in which partial cloud cover exists. A footprint of the order of 100 km by 100 km resolution with hemispherical coverage within one hour can be easily achieved for sounding channels in the 50 to 59 GHz range. A GEO microwave sounder will also allow mesoscale sampling of select regions.

  2. Low activated incore instrument

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.

    1994-04-19

    Instrumentation is described for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials. 9 figures.

  3. Evaluating musical instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. Murray

    2014-04-01

    Scientific measurements of sound generation and radiation by musical instruments are surprisingly hard to correlate with the subtle and complex judgments of instrumental quality made by expert musicians.

  4. Instrument Packages for Cold, Dark, High Radiation Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Yeh, P. S.; Beaman, B.; Brigham, D.; Feng, S.

    2011-03-01

    We are developing a small cold temperature in-strument package concept that integrates cold tempera-ture power system and radhard ULT ULP electronics into a ‘cold temperature surface operational’ version of a planetary surface instrument package.

  5. Instrumentation System Diagnoses a Thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose; Santiago, Josephine; Mata, Carlos; Vokrot, Peter; Zavala, Carlos; Burns, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    An improved self-validating thermocouple (SVT) instrumentation system not only acquires readings from a thermocouple but is also capable of detecting deterioration and a variety of discrete faults in the thermocouple and its lead wires. Prime examples of detectable discrete faults and deterioration include open- and short-circuit conditions and debonding of the thermocouple junction from the object, the temperature of which one seeks to measure. Debonding is the most common cause of errors in thermocouple measurements, but most prior SVT instrumentation systems have not been capable of detecting debonding. The improved SVT instrumentation system includes power circuitry, a cold-junction compensator, signal-conditioning circuitry, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) thermocouple-excitation circuitry, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a digital data processor, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. The system can operate in any of the following three modes: temperature measurement, thermocouple validation, and bonding/debonding detection. The software running in the processor includes components that implement statistical algorithms to evaluate the state of the thermocouple and the instrumentation system. When the power is first turned on, the user can elect to start a diagnosis/ monitoring sequence, in which the PWM is used to estimate the characteristic times corresponding to the correct configuration. The user also has the option of using previous diagnostic values, which are stored in an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory so that they are available every time the power is turned on.

  6. Instrumentation for measuring energy inputs to implements

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, F.D.; Wilhelm, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    A microcomputer-based instrumentation system for monitoring tractor operating parameters and energy inputs to implements was developed and mounted on a 75-power-takeoff-KW tractor. The instrumentation system, including sensors and data handling equipment, is discussed. 10 refs.

  7. 47 CFR 73.58 - Indicating instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... defective instrument is the antenna current meter of a nondirectional station which does not employ a remote antenna ammeter, or if the defective instrument is the common point meter of a station which employs a directional antenna and does not employ a remote common point meter, the operating power shall be...

  8. 47 CFR 73.58 - Indicating instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... defective instrument is the antenna current meter of a nondirectional station which does not employ a remote antenna ammeter, or if the defective instrument is the common point meter of a station which employs a directional antenna and does not employ a remote common point meter, the operating power shall be...

  9. INSTRUMENTATION FOR FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFITHS, P.R.; HOMES, C.

    2001-05-04

    Fourier transform spectrometers developed in three distinct spectral regions in the early 1960s. Pierre Connes and his coworkers in France developed remarkably sophisticated step-scan interferometers that permitted near-infrared spectra to be measured with a resolution of better than 0.0 1 cm{sup {minus}1}. These instruments may be considered the forerunners of the step-scan interferometers made by Bruker, Bio-Rad (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Nicolet although their principal application was in the field of astronomy. Low-resolution rapid-scanning interferometers were developed by Larry Mertz and his colleagues at Block Engineering (Cambridge, MA, USA) for remote sensing. Nonetheless, the FT-IR spectrometers that are so prevalent in chemical laboratories today are direct descendants of these instruments. The interferometers that were developed for far-infrared spectrometry in Gebbie's laboratory ,have had no commercial counterparts for at least 15 years. However, it could be argued that these instruments did as much to demonstrate the power of Fourier transform spectroscopy to the chemical community as any of the instruments developed for mid- and near-infrared spectrometry. Their performance was every bit as good as today's rapid-scanning interferometers. However, the market for these instruments is so small today that it has proved more lucrative to modify rapid-scanning interferometers that were originally designed for mid-infrared spectrometry than to compete with these instruments with slow continuous scan or step-scan interferometers.

  10. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Christian, David E.

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  11. Modification of the high latitude ionosphere F region by X-mode powerful HF radio waves: Experimental results from multi-instrument diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Yeoman, T. K.; Häggström, I.; Kalishin, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results concentrating on a variety of phenomena in the high latitude ionosphere F2 layer induced by an extraordinary (X-mode) HF pump wave at high heater frequencies (fH=6.2-8.0 MHz), depending on the pump frequency proximity to the ordinary and extraordinary mode critical frequencies, foF2 and fxF2. The experiments were carried out at the EISCAT HF heating facility with an effective radiated power of 450-650 MW in October 2012 and October-November 2013. Their distinctive feature is a wide diapason of critical frequency changes, when the fH/foF2 ratio was varied through a wide range from 0.9 to 1.35. It provides both a proper comparison of X-mode HF-induced phenomena excited under different ratios of fH/foF2 and an estimation of the frequency range above foF2 in which such X-mode phenomena are still possible. It was shown that the HF-enhanced ion and plasma lines are excited above foF2 when the HF pump frequency is lying in range between the foF2 and fxF2, foF2≤fH≤fxF2, whereas small-scale field-aligned irregularities continued to be generated even when fH exceeded fxF2 by up to 1 MHz and an X-polarized pump wave cannot be reflected from the ionosphere. Another parameter of importance is the magnetic zenith effect (HF beam/radar angle direction) which is typical for X-mode phenomena under fH/foF2 >1 as well as fH/foF2 ≤1. We have shown for the first time that an X-mode HF pump wave is able to generate strong narrowband spectral components in the SEE spectra (within 1 kHz of pump frequency) in the ionosphere F region, which were recorded at distance of 1200 km from the HF heating facility. The observed spectral lines can be associated with the ion acoustic, electrostatic ion cyclotron, and electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves (otherwise known as neutralized ion Bernstein waves). The comparison between the O- and X-mode SEE spectra recorded at distance far from HF heating facility clearly demonstrated that variety of the narrowband

  12. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  13. Astronomical Instruments in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Sreeramula Rajeswara

    The earliest astronomical instruments used in India were the gnomon and the water clock. In the early seventh century, Brahmagupta described ten types of instruments, which were adopted by all subsequent writers with minor modifications. Contact with Islamic astronomy in the second millennium AD led to a radical change. Sanskrit texts began to lay emphasis on the importance of observational instruments. Exclusive texts on instruments were composed. Islamic instruments like the astrolabe were adopted and some new types of instruments were developed. Production and use of these traditional instruments continued, along with the cultivation of traditional astronomy, up to the end of the nineteenth century.

  14. Afterword: Instruments as media, media as instruments.

    PubMed

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2016-06-01

    The collection of essays comes under the heading of two catchwords: instruments and media. This Afterword looks at their interaction and roles in exploring the characteristics of living beings throughout history, especially their melding and gliding into each other. Before turning to the papers, I will make some more general remarks on instruments and media in scientific, and in particular, biological research. PMID:27053536

  15. Piping inspection instrument carriage

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1993-09-20

    This invention is comprised of a pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler or other locomotion means for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has means mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and means for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has means for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  16. Instrument Packages for the Cold, Dark, High Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Yeh, P. S.; Beamna, B.; Brigham, D.; Feng, S.

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a small cold temperature instrument package concept that integrates a cold temperature power system and radhard ultra low temperature ultra low power electronics components and power supplies now under development into a cold temperature surface operational version of a planetary surface instrument package. We are already in the process of developing a lower power lower tem-perature version for an instrument of mutual interest to SMD and ESMD to support the search for volatiles (the mass spectrometer VAPoR, Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith) both as a stand alone instrument and as part of an environmental monitoring package.

  17. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  18. Woodwind Instrument Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperl, Gary

    1980-01-01

    The author presents a simple maintenance program for woodwind instruments which includes the care of tendon corks, the need for oiling keys, and methods of preventing cracks in woodwind instruments. (KC)

  19. On Representative Spaceflight Instrument and Associated Instrument Sensor Web Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Patel, Umeshkumar; Vootukuru, Meg

    2007-01-01

    Sensor Web-based adaptation and sharing of space flight mission resources, including those of the Space-Ground and Control-User communication segment, could greatly benefit from utilization of heritage Internet Protocols and devices applied for Spaceflight (SpaceIP). This had been successfully demonstrated by a few recent spaceflight experiments. However, while terrestrial applications of Internet protocols are well developed and understood (mostly due to billions of dollars in investments by the military and industry), the spaceflight application of Internet protocols is still in its infancy. Progress in the developments of SpaceIP-enabled instrument components will largely determine the SpaceIP utilization of those investments and acceptance in years to come. Likewise SpaceIP, the development of commercial real-time and instrument colocated computational resources, data compression and storage, can be enabled on-board a spacecraft and, in turn, support a powerful application to Sensor Web-based design of a spaceflight instrument. Sensor Web-enabled reconfiguration and adaptation of structures for hardware resources and information systems will commence application of Field Programmable Arrays (FPGA) and other aerospace programmable logic devices for what this technology was intended. These are a few obvious potential benefits of Sensor Web technologies for spaceflight applications. However, they are still waiting to be explored. This is because there is a need for a new approach to spaceflight instrumentation in order to make these mature sensor web technologies applicable for spaceflight. In this paper we present an approach in developing related and enabling spaceflight instrument-level technologies based on the new concept of a representative spaceflight Instrument Sensor Web (ISW).

  20. Instrument Modeling and Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Andrew B.; Beauchamp, James W.

    During the 1970s and 1980s, before synthesizers based on direct sampling of musical sounds became popular, replicating musical instruments using frequency modulation (FM) or wavetable synthesis was one of the “holy grails” of music synthesis. Synthesizers such as the Yamaha DX7 allowed users great flexibility in mixing and matching sounds, but were notoriously difficult to coerce into producing sounds like those of a given instrument. Instrument design wizards practiced the mysteries of FM instrument design.

  1. The Instrumental Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeates, Devin Rodney

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to enable better predictive models by engaging raw experimental data through the Instrumental Model. The Instrumental Model captures the protocols and procedures of experimental data analysis. The approach is formalized by encoding the Instrumental Model in an XML record. Decoupling the raw experimental data from…

  2. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument. (a) Identification. A visual field laser instrument is an AC-powered device intended to...

  3. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument. (a) Identification. A visual field laser instrument is an AC-powered device intended to...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument. (a) Identification. A visual field laser instrument is an AC-powered device intended to...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1860 - Ophthalmic instrument stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic instrument stand. 886.1860 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1860 Ophthalmic instrument stand. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic instrument stand is an AC-powered or nonpowered device intended to store...

  6. 21 CFR 886.4855 - Ophthalmic instrument table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic instrument table. 886.4855 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4855 Ophthalmic instrument table. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic instrument table is an AC-powered or manual device on which ophthalmic...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument. (a) Identification. A visual field laser instrument is an AC-powered device intended to...

  8. 21 CFR 886.1360 - Visual field laser instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visual field laser instrument. 886.1360 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1360 Visual field laser instrument. (a) Identification. A visual field laser instrument is an AC-powered device intended to...

  9. The Clementine instrument complement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    The recent successes of the Galileo solid-state imaging (SSI) experiment at the Moon and Gaspra show the utility of multispectral imaging of planetary objects. 'Clementine' is the planetary community's 'code name' for the SDIO (Space Defense Initiative Organization), mission to the Moon and the asteroid Geographos. This mission is designed as a long term stressing test on sensors and space systems developed for SDIO. In the course of this test Clementine will obtain science data using a varied and powerful array of remote sensing instruments which were developed by or for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. Clementine carries five cameras, one for navigation and four for science experiments. In addition, a laser ranger is included which will serve as a laser altimeter. The Clementine cameras cover a wider range of spatial resolutions and wavelength range than did Galileo and are almost ideally suited to mapping of mafic rock types as are present on the Moon and expected at Geographos. Calibration of the cameras will occur at the sensor calibration laboratory at LLNL. In flight calibrations, using standard stars and other standards should improve the stated accuracies. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) include the following noise sources: shot noise, calibration error, digitization noise, readout noise, and frame transfer noise (where applicable). The achieved SNRs are a balance between detector saturation and acceptable image smear. The 'worst' case uses the longest possible integration times.

  10. Mobile Instruments Measure Atmospheric Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    As a part of NASA's active research of the Earth s atmosphere, which has included missions such as the Atmospheric Laboratory of Applications and Science (ATLAS, launched in 1992) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS, launched on the Earth Probe satellite in 1996), the Agency also performs ground-based air pollution research. The ability to measure trace amounts of airborne pollutants precisely and quickly is important for determining natural patterns and human effects on global warming and air pollution, but until recent advances in field-grade spectroscopic instrumentation, this rapid, accurate data collection was limited and extremely difficult. In order to understand causes of climate change and airborne pollution, NASA has supported the development of compact, low power, rapid response instruments operating in the mid-infrared "molecular fingerprint" portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These instruments, which measure atmospheric trace gases and airborne particles, can be deployed in mobile laboratories - customized ground vehicles, typically - to map distributions of pollutants in real time. The instruments must be rugged enough to operate rapidly and accurately, despite frequent jostling that can misalign, damage, or disconnect sensitive components. By measuring quickly while moving through an environment, a mobile laboratory can correlate data and geographic points, revealing patterns in the environment s pollutants. Rapid pollutant measurements also enable direct determination of pollutant sources and sinks (mechanisms that remove greenhouse gases and pollutants), providing information critical to understanding and managing atmospheric greenhouse gas and air pollutant concentrations.

  11. 21 CFR 878.4820 - Surgical instrument motors and accessories/attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical instrument motors and accessories....4820 Surgical instrument motors and accessories/attachments. (a) Identification. Surgical instrument motors and accessories are AC-powered, battery-powered, or air-powered devices intended for use...

  12. Prototype ultrasonic instrument for quantitative testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Dubois, J. L.; Kranz, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    A prototype ultrasonic instrument has been designed and developed for quantitative testing. The complete delivered instrument consists of a pulser/receiver which plugs into a standard oscilloscope, an rf power amplifier, a standard decade oscillator, and a set of broadband transducers for typical use at 1, 2, 5 and 10 MHz. The system provides for its own calibration, and on the oscilloscope, presents a quantitative (digital) indication of time base and sensitivity scale factors and some measurement data.

  13. The USNA MIDN Microdosimeter Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisacane, V. L.; Ziegler, J. F.; Nelson, M. E.; Dolecek, Q.; Heyne, J.; Veade, T.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Zaider, M.; Dicello, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the MIcroDosimetry iNstrument (MIDN) mission now under development at the United States Naval Academy. The instrument is manifested to fly on the MidSTAR-1 spacecraft, which is the second spacecraft to be developed and launched by the Academy s faculty and midshipmen. Launch is scheduled for 1 September 2006 on an ATLAS-5 launch vehicle. MIDN is a rugged, portable, low power, low mass, solid-state microdosimeter designed to measure in real time the energy distributions of energy deposited by radiation in microscopic volumes. The MIDN microdosimeter sensor is a reverse-biased silicon p-n junction array in a Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) configuration. Microdosimetric frequency distributions as a function of lineal energies determine the radiation quality factors in support of radiation risk estimation to humans.

  14. Review of Instrumented Indentation

    PubMed Central

    VanLandingham, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Instrumented indentation, also known as depth-sensing indentation or nanoindentation, is increasingly being used to probe the mechanical response of materials from metals and ceramics to polymeric and biological materials. The additional levels of control, sensitivity, and data acquisition offered by instrumented indentation systems have resulted in numerous advances in materials science, particularly regarding fundamental mechanisms of mechanical behavior at micrometer and even sub-micrometer length scales. Continued improvements of instrumented indentation testing towards absolute quantification of a wide range of material properties and behavior will require advances in instrument calibration, measurement protocols, and analysis tools and techniques. In this paper, an overview of instrumented indentation is given with regard to current instrument technology and analysis methods. Research efforts at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) aimed at improving the related measurement science are discussed.

  15. Isotopic CO2 Instrumentation for UAV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Silver, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the largest component of anthroprogenic green house gas emissions. Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important for understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Instrumentation mounted on UAV aircraft would enable important spatial isotopic CO2 information. However, current isotopic CO2 instrumentation have unfavorable attributes for UAV use, such as high power requirements, high cost, high weight, and large size. Here we present the early development of a compact isotopic CO2 instrument that is designed to nullify effects of pressure, temperature and moisture, and will ultimately be suitable for UAV deployment.

  16. Particle size distribution instrument. Topical report 13

    SciTech Connect

    Okhuysen, W.; Gassaway, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The development of an instrument to measure the concentration of particles in gas is described in this report. An in situ instrument was designed and constructed which sizes individual particles and counts the number of occurrences for several size classes. Although this instrument was designed to detect the size distribution of slag and seed particles generated at an experimental coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic power facility, it can be used as a nonintrusive diagnostic tool for other hostile industrial processes involving the formation and growth of particulates. Two of the techniques developed are extensions of the widely used crossed beam velocimeter, providing simultaneous measurement of the size distribution and velocity of articles.

  17. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  18. Instrument performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Swinth, K.L.

    1993-03-01

    Deficiencies exist in both the performance and the quality of health physics instruments. Recognizing the implications of such deficiencies for the protection of workers and the public, in the early 1980s the DOE and the NRC encouraged the development of a performance standard and established a program to test a series of instruments against criteria in the standard. The purpose of the testing was to establish the practicality of the criteria in the standard, to determine the performance of a cross section of available instruments, and to establish a testing capability. Over 100 instruments were tested, resulting in a practical standard and an understanding of the deficiencies in available instruments. In parallel with the instrument testing, a value-impact study clearly established the benefits of implementing a formal testing program. An ad hoc committee also met several times to establish recommendations for the voluntary implementation of a testing program based on the studies and the performance standard. For several reasons, a formal program did not materialize. Ongoing tests and studies have supported the development of specific instruments and have helped specific clients understand the performance of their instruments. The purpose of this presentation is to trace the history of instrument testing to date and suggest the benefits of a centralized formal program.

  19. Satellite oceanography - The instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that no instrument is sensitive to only one oceanographic variable; rather, each responds to a combination of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena. This complicates data interpretation and usually requires that a number of observations, each sensitive to somewhat different phenomena, be combined to provide unambiguous information. The distinction between active and passive instruments is described. A block diagram illustrating the steps necessary to convert data from satellite instruments into oceanographic information is included, as is a diagram illustrating the operation of a radio-frequency radiometer. Attention is also given to the satellites that carry the various oceanographic instruments.

  20. Instrument validation project

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, B.A.; Daymo, E.A.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Zhang, J.

    1996-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company Project W-211 is responsible for providing the system capabilities to remove radioactive waste from ten double-shell tanks used to store radioactive wastes on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The project is also responsible for measuring tank waste slurry properties prior to injection into pipeline systems, including the Replacement of Cross-Site Transfer System. This report summarizes studies of the appropriateness of the instrumentation specified for use in Project W-211. The instruments were evaluated in a test loop with simulated slurries that covered the range of properties specified in the functional design criteria. The results of the study indicate that the compact nature of the baseline Project W-211 loop does not result in reduced instrumental accuracy resulting from poor flow profile development. Of the baseline instrumentation, the Micromotion densimeter, the Moore Industries thermocouple, the Fischer and Porter magnetic flow meter, and the Red Valve Pressure transducer meet the desired instrumental accuracy. An alternate magnetic flow meter (Yokagawa) gave nearly identical results as the baseline fischer and Porter. The Micromotion flow meter did not meet the desired instrument accuracy but could potentially be calibrated so that it would meet the criteria. The Nametre on-line viscometer did not meet the desired instrumental accuracy and is not recommended as a quantitative instrument although it does provide qualitative information. The recommended minimum set of instrumentation necessary to ensure the slurry meets the Project W-058 acceptance criteria is the Micromotion mass flow meter and delta pressure cells.

  1. Space applications instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzner, R. A.; Oberholtzer, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A compendium of resumes of 158 instrument systems or experiments, of particular interest to space applications, is presented. Each resume exists in a standardized format, permitting entries for 26 administrative items and 39 scientific or engineering items. The resumes are organized into forty groups determined by the forty spacecraft with which the instruments are associated. The resumes are followed by six different cross indexes, each organized alphabetically according to one of the following catagories: instrument name, acronym, name of principal investigator, name of organization employing the principal investigator, assigned experiment number, and spacecraft name. The resumes are associated with a computerized instrument resume search and retrieval system.

  2. Magnetospheric multiprobes: Investigations and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Fields, S. A.; Falthammar, C. G.; Winningham, J. D.; Hanson, W. B.; Heelis, R. A.; Heikkila, W. J.; Sugira, M.; Farthing, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The multiprobe scientific objectives are to: (1) determine the spatial structure of plasma phenomena such as the aurora, convection reversals, and ion troughs; (2) separate spatial and temporal variations in these phenomena; (3) determine field aligned current densities; (4) perform multiple point analysis of particle beams, wave fields, and plasma clouds that are injected into the ionosphere and magnetosphere by Spacelab active experiment facilities. Trade studies described include: instrument accommodations, power, attitude determination, electric field antennas, storage and ejection, thermal control, tracking communications, command and data management, payload and mission specialist support, functional objectives, and orbital analysis.

  3. MISR Instrument Data Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David; Garay, Michael; Diner, David; Thompson, Charles; Hall, Jeffrey; Rheingans, Brian; Mazzoni, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The MISR Interactive eXplorer (MINX) software functions both as a general-purpose tool to visualize Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument data, and as a specialized tool to analyze properties of smoke, dust, and volcanic plumes. It includes high-level options to create map views of MISR orbit locations; scrollable, single-camera RGB (red-greenblue) images of MISR level 1B2 (L1B2) radiance data; and animations of the nine MISR camera images that provide a 3D perspective of the scenes that MISR has acquired. NASA Tech Briefs, September 2008 55 The plume height capability provides an accurate estimate of the injection height of plumes that is needed by air quality and climate modelers. MISR provides global high-quality stereo height information, and this program uses that information to perform detailed height retrievals of aerosol plumes. Users can interactively digitize smoke, dust, or volcanic plumes and automatically retrieve heights and winds, and can also archive MISR albedos and aerosol properties, as well as fire power and brightness temperatures associated with smoke plumes derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Some of the specialized options in MINX enable the user to do other tasks. Users can display plots of top-of-atmosphere bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) versus camera-angle for selected pixels. Images and animations can be saved to disk in various formats. Also, users can apply a geometric registration correction to warp camera images when the standard processing correction is inadequate. It is possible to difference the images of two MISR orbits that share a path (identical ground track), as well as to construct pseudo-color images by assigning different combinations of MISR channels (angle or spectral band) to the RGB display channels. This software is an interactive application written in IDL and compiled into an IDL Virtual Machine (VM) ".sav" file.

  4. Inclusion Practice Priorities Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montie, Jo; And Others

    This instrument was developed to assist individuals or teams to review best practice indicators regarding the development of inclusive school communities and to establish priority targets for improvement. The instrument covers three areas: (1) school community issues, (2) team issues, and (3) classroom issues. For each area, there is a review…

  5. Affective Involvement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1970-01-01

    The Affective Involvement Instrument (AII) describes and classifies affective involvement in the process of decision-making as it occurs during classroom activities such as role-playing or group discussions. The thirty-celled instrument behaviorizes the six processes involved in decision-making and combines them with the taxonomic levels of the…

  6. Developments in Electrochemical Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteryoung, Janet

    1982-01-01

    Discusses developments in electrochemical instrumentation, including the role of computers, measurement/control instruments, present needs and future prospects. Indicates that microprocessors are used primarily for data processing, and that progress depends on noninstrumental factors such as electrode materials. (Author/JN)

  7. Instrumentation, Control, and Intelligent Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    Abundant and affordable energy is required for U.S. economic stability and national security. Advanced nuclear power plants offer the best near-term potential to generate abundant, affordable, and sustainable electricity and hydrogen without appreciable generation of greenhouse gases. To that end, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been charged with leading the revitalization of nuclear power in the U.S. The INL vision is to become the preeminent nuclear energy laboratory with synergistic, world-class, multi-program capabilities and partnerships by 2015. The vision focuses on four essential destinations: (1) Be the preeminent internationally-recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory; (2) Be a major center for national security technology development and demonstration; (3) Be a multi-program national laboratory with world-class capabilities; (4) Foster academic, industry, government, and international collaborations to produce the needed investment, programs, and expertise. Crucial to that effort is the inclusion of research in advanced instrumentation, control, and intelligent systems (ICIS) for use in current and advanced power and energy security systems to enable increased performance, reliability, security, and safety. For nuclear energy plants, ICIS will extend the lifetime of power plant systems, increase performance and power output, and ensure reliable operation within the system's safety margin; for national security applications, ICIS will enable increased protection of our nation's critical infrastructure. In general, ICIS will cost-effectively increase performance for all energy security systems.

  8. Thermally isolated well instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Engelder, P.D.

    1984-04-03

    A well instrument is isolated from the high temperatures of a surrounding earth formation by enclosing the instrument within a heat insulative jacket structure, preferably a dewar having spaced walls with a vacuum therebetween, with a heat sink contained in the jacket above the instrument assembly, and with a heat pipe extending upwardly from the instrument assembly to the heat sink and containing a fluid which by evaporation at a lower point and condensation at a higher point will conduct heat upwardly from the instrument assembly to the heat sink but not downwardly therebetween. The heat pipe preferably projects upwardly beyond a top portion of the insulating jacket to the location of a convector element which is exposed to the temperature of fluid or air at the outside of the insulating jacket to transmit heat from within the jacket to its exterior but not in a reverse direction.

  9. Aeronautic Instruments. Section II : Altitude Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mears, A H; Henrickson, H B; Brombacher, W G

    1923-01-01

    This report is Section two of a series of reports on aeronautic instruments (Technical Report nos. 125 to 132, inclusive). This section discusses briefly barometric altitude determinations, and describes in detail the principal types of altimeters and barographs used in aeronautics during the recent war. This is followed by a discussion of performance requirements for such instruments and an account of the methods of testing developed by the Bureau of Standards. The report concludes with a brief account of the results of recent investigations. For accurate measurements of altitude, reference must also be made to thermometer readings of atmospheric temperature, since the altitude is not fixed by atmospheric pressure alone. This matter is discussed in connection with barometric altitude determination.

  10. Innovative Technology in Hearing Instruments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hearing instrument technology research is almost entirely focused on the projected needs of the consumer market in the developed world. However, two thirds of the world’s population with hearing impairment live in developing countries and this proportion will increase in future, given present demographic trends. In developing regions, amplification and other hearing health needs may differ from those in industrialized nations, for cultural, health, or economic reasons. World Health Organization estimates indicate that at present only a small percentage of individuals in developing countries who are in need of amplification have access to hearing aid provision. New technologies, such as trainable hearing aids, advanced noise reduction algorithms, feedback reduction circuitry, nano coatings for hearing aid components, and innovative power options, may offer considerable potential benefits, both for individuals with hearing impairment in developing countries and for those who provide hearing health care services in these regions. This article considers the possible supporting role of innovative hearing instrument technologies in the provision of affordable hearing health care services in developing countries and highlights the need for research that considers the requirements of the majority of the world population in need of hearing instrument provision. PMID:22068223

  11. The DKIST Instrumentation Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woeger, Friedrich

    2016-05-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope with its four meter diameter aperture will be the largest telescope in the world for solar observations when it is commissioned in the year 2019. In order to harness its scientific potential immediately, DKIST will integrate five instruments that each will provide unique functionality to measure properties of the solar atmosphere at unprecedented spatial resolution.In this paper we discuss the unique capabilities in the DKIST instrument suite that consists of the Visible Broadband Imager (VBI), the Visible Spectro-Polarimeter (ViSP), the Visible Tunable Filter (VTF), the Diffraction-Limited Near-Infrared Spectro-Polarimeter (DL-NIRSP), and the Cryogenic Near-Infrared Spectro-Polarimeter (Cryo-NIRSP).In addition, we will explain the facility's approach to supporting high spatial resolution data acquisition with multiple instruments simultaneously by means of the Facility Instrument Distribution Optics. This system of wavelength separating and interchangeable beamsplitters will enable a variety of different ways to optically configure the light beam to the instruments. This approach ensures that the DKIST instruments can use their individual advantages in a multitude of different observing scenarios. The DKIST instrumentation suite will enable crucial new insights into complex physical processes that occur on spatial scales that are smaller than any solar structure observed in the past.

  12. BICEP2 III: Instrumental systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.

    2015-11-23

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection," for filtering the leading order beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ~10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. Lastly, the contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10–3.

  13. BICEP2 III: Instrumental Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BICEP2 Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R. W.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W., IV; Orlando, A.; Pryke, C.; Richter, S.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Tolan, J. E.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the BICEP2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection," for filtering the leading order beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in BICEP2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ∼10× below BICEP2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. The contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3-6) × 10-3.

  14. BICEP2 III: Instrumental systematics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ade, P. A. R.

    2015-11-23

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection," for filtering the leading ordermore » beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ~10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. Lastly, the contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10–3.« less

  15. Instrument Attitude Precision Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is presented in this paper to analyze attitude precision and control for an instrument gimbaled to a spacecraft subject to an internal disturbance caused by a moving component inside the instrument. Nonlinear differential equations of motion for some sample cases are derived and solved analytically to gain insight into the influence of the disturbance on the attitude pointing error. A simple control law is developed to eliminate the instrument pointing error caused by the internal disturbance. Several cases are presented to demonstrate and verify the concept presented in this paper.

  16. Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1933-01-01

    This report presents a concise survey of the measurement of air speed and ground speed on board aircraft. Special attention is paid to the pitot-static air-speed meter which is the standard in the United States for airplanes. Air-speed meters of the rotating vane type are also discussed in considerable detail on account of their value as flight test instruments and as service instruments for airships. Methods of ground-speed measurement are treated briefly, with reference to the more important instruments. A bibliography on air-speed measurement concludes the report.

  17. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  18. Instrument intercomparisons and assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, D. L.; Zander, R. J.; Farmer, C. B.; Hilsenrath, E.; Mankin, W. G.; Murcray, D. G.; Pollitt, S.; Robbins, D. E.; Roscoe, H.

    Over the past few years, several field campaigns were devoted to the goal of assessing instrument reliability, as opposed to solely obtaining data to answer a geophysical question. Some examples of the formal instrument intercomparisons that have occurred in the past decade and those that are planned for the very near future are listed chronologically. Balloon-borne techniques and instruments that address the height profiles of the trace species in the lower stratosphere are emphasized. Beginning with the most extensively studied trace constituent, the approach taken and the results obtained, are described. The current status of the measurement capabilities are summarized, and the needs for future intercomparisons and assessments are listed.

  19. Writing Instrument Profiles for Mastery of Instrumental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Daniel; Fernandez, Jorge; Nalliah, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Because of the rapidly changing nature of chemical instrumentation, students must be trained in how to learn and understand new instruments. Toward this end, students are asked to create small instrument manuals, or instrument profiles, for the major pieces of equipment studied during an instrumental analysis course. This writing-intensive process…

  20. XML in an Adaptive Framework for Instrument Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an extensible framework for instrument command and control, known as Instrument Remote Control (IRC), that combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML). A key aspect of the architecture is software that is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML). IML is an XML dialect used to describe interfaces to control and monitor the instrument, command sets and command formats, data streams, communication mechanisms, and data processing algorithms.

  1. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  2. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  3. NPP: The Five Instruments

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NPP satellite has 5 instruments on board: VIIRS, CERES, CrIS, ATMS, and OMPS. Each one will deliver a specific set of data helping weather prediction and climate studies. This video is a quick ...

  4. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  5. AIR Instrument Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Goldhagen, P.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    The large number of radiation types composing the atmospheric radiation requires a complicated combination of instrument types to fully characterize the environment. A completely satisfactory combination has not as yet been flown and would require a large capital outlay to develop. In that the funds of the current project were limited to essential integration costs, an international collaboration was formed with partners from six countries and fourteen different institutions with their own financial support for their participation. Instruments were chosen to cover sensitivity to all radiation types with enough differential sensitivity to separate individual components. Some instruments were chosen as important to specify the physical field component and other instruments were chosen on the basis that they could be useful in dosimetric evaluation. In the present paper we will discuss the final experimental flight package for the ER-2 flight campaign.

  6. CALIPSO Instrument Operational

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-09-18

    CALIPSO Instrument Operational Thursday, September 11, 2014 The CALIPSO payload is back in data acquisition mode as of Wednesday, September 17, 2014.  CALIPSO data processing has returned to a nominal state, and...

  7. Cardiovascular instrumentation for spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Ganiaris, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The observation mechanisms dealing with pressure, flow, morphology, temperature, etc. are discussed. The approach taken in the performance of this study was to (1) review ground and space-flight data on cardiovascular function, including earlier related ground-based and space-flight animal studies, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and recent bed-rest studies, (2) review cardiovascular measurement parameters required to assess individual performance and physiological alternations during space flight, (3) perform an instrumentation survey including a literature search as well as personal contact with the applicable investigators, (4) assess instrumentation applicability with respect to the established criteria, and (5) recommend future research and development activity. It is concluded that, for the most part, the required instrumentation technology is available but that mission-peculiar criteria will require modifications to adapt the applicable instrumentation to a space-flight configuration.

  8. Aeronautic Instruments. Section III : Aircraft Speed Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Franklin L; Stearns, H O

    1923-01-01

    Part 1 contains a discussion and description of the various types of air speed measuring instruments. The authors then give general specifications and performance requirements with the results of tests on air speed indicators at the Bureau of Standards. Part 2 reports methods and laboratory apparatus used at the Bureau of Standards to make static tests. Methods are also given of combining wind tunnel tests with static tests. Consideration is also given to free flight tests. Part 3 discusses the problem of finding suitable methods for the purpose of measuring the speed of aircraft relative to the ground.

  9. Experimenting with woodwind instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presto, Michael C.

    2007-05-01

    Simple experiments involving musical instruments of the woodwind family can be used to demonstrate the basic physics of vibrating air columns in resonance tubes using nothing more than straightforward measurements and data collection hardware and software. More involved experimentation with the same equipment can provide insight into the effects of holes in the tubing and other factors that make simple tubes useful as musical instruments.

  10. Modeling of Musical Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Rolf; Hansen, Uwe

    Signal processing techniques in acoustics address many concerns. Included are such things as wave propagation variables, amplitude considerations, spectral content, wavelength, and phase. Phase is primarily of concern when waves interact with each other, as well as with a medium, and the imposition of boundary conditions leads to normal mode vibrations. Such conditions are prevalent in all musical instruments, and thus relevant signal processing techniques are essential to both understanding and modeling the structure of musical instruments and the sound radiated.

  11. Instrumentation in Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barp, Eric A; Erickson, John G; Reese, Eric R

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, arthroscopic procedures of the foot and ankle have seen a significant increase in both indications and popularity. Furthermore, technological advances in video quality, fluid management, and other arthroscopy-specific instruments continue to make arthroscopic procedures more effective with reproducible outcomes. As surgeons continue to use this approach, it is important that they have a complete understanding of the instrumentation available to them, including their indications and limitations. PMID:27599434

  12. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  13. [The instrument for thermography].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    Thermography is an imaging method using the instrument to detect infrared rays emitted from the body surface, and to plot them as a distribution diagram of the temperature information. Therefore, a thermographic instrument can be assumed to measure the skin temperature of the diseased region. Such an instrument is a useful device for noninvasive and objective assessment of various diseases. Examination using a thermographic instrument can assess the autonomic dysfunction by measuring the skin blood flow involved with the sympathetic innervation. Thermography is useful in assisting the determination of the therapeutic effect. However, autonomic dysfunction should be confirmed correctly with the assessment of thermatome that shows abnormal thermal distribution in the region of the disease. Thermography should make noticeable the difference between the body temperature of abnormal and normal sites, and show the alteration of temperature. Monitoring using thermography is useful to determine the effect of sympathetic nerve block. If a thermographic instrument is used, it is important that examiners should understand the function of the instrument, as well as its advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25098130

  14. 18 CFR 367.1750 - Account 175, Derivative instrument assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Account 175, Derivative instrument assets. 367.1750 Section 367.1750 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS...

  15. The keyboard instruments.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Ralph A

    2014-06-01

    Now that the field of performing arts medicine has been in existence for over three decades, we are approaching a key point: we should start to see more articles that bring together the data that have been collected from several studies in order to draw more robust conclusions. Review articles and their more structured relative, the meta-analysis, can help to improve our understanding of a particular topic, comparing and synthesizing the results of previous research that has been done on that subject area. One way this could be done would be to review the research that has been carried out on the performance-related problems associated with playing a particular instrument or group of instruments. While I am not going to do that myself, I hope that others will. In this editorial, I will do a very selective review of the playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs) associated with one instrument group (the keyboard instruments), focusing on the most played instrument in that group (the piano;). PMID:24925170

  16. Issues in Shuttle System Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George

    2004-01-01

    The purose: a) Customer's perspective on Space Shuttle Return to Flight instrumentation; b) Focus on the difficult instrumentation issues; and c) Enable a discussion of new technologies (i.e.- NANO/MEMS/Small Tech) that could enhance Shuttle instrumentation posture. The T-10 Umbilical allows the vehicle instruments to be monitored and recorded prior to each launch and retract during launch.Launch Complex Instrumentation are instruments needed for assessment of Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) Salt-air and launch environments are issues. Instrumentation (Drag-On Instrumentation) can be added as needed to the vehicle for non-flight use. The current Roll-out Fatigue Testing is a primary example.

  17. Nuclear instrumentation system design in FFTF and CRBRP

    SciTech Connect

    Warrick, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    The Nuclear Instrumentation System installed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is described. The Nuclear Instrumentation System includes equipment for monitoring neutron flux levels from shutdown to full power. Detector location and mounting provisions are described. The design basis for equipment design is provided. Detailed discussion of startup testing in FFTF follows a brief discussion of pre-delivery development work and testing. Finally, a description of the Nuclear Instrumentation System planned for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is provided.

  18. Instrumentation of sampling aircraft for measurement of launch vehicle effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D. E.; Woods, D. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Tyson, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    An aircraft was selected and instrumented to measure effluents emitted from large solid propellant rockets during launch activities. The considerations involved in aircraft selection, sampling probes, and instrumentation are discussed with respect to obtaining valid airborne measurements. Discussions of the data acquisition system used, the instrument power system, and operational sampling procedures are included. Representative measurements obtained from an actual rocket launch monitoring activity are also presented.

  19. Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Johan

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument is a trace gas monitoring instrument in the line of GOME (ERS-2) and Sciamachy (ENVISAT). Following these instruments, OMI provides UV-visible spectroscopy with a resolution sufficient to separate out the various absorbing trace gases (using DOAS or `Full' retrieval), but shaped as an imaging spectrometer. This means that a two dimensional detector is used where one dimension records the spectrum and the other images the swath. The scanning mechanism from the GOME and Sciamachy is not required anymore and there are considerable advantages with respect to simultaneous measurement of swath pixels, polarisation and obtainable swath width. The OMI consortium for a phase B is formed by Fokker Space & Systems and TPD in the Netherlands and VTT in Finland. In the presentation UV-visible atmospheric remote sensing will be placed in perspective and the OMI will be explaned.

  20. Nonmetallic Diaphragms for Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, H N; Buckingham, C T

    1925-01-01

    This report, the second of a series of reports relating to the general subject of instrument diaphragms. The first report of the series was published as Technical Report no. 165, "diaphragms for aeronautic instruments," and comprised an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles. The present report relates entirely to nonmetallic diaphragms, the use of which in certain types of pressure elements has been increasing for some time. Little, if any, information has been available to aid the designer of instruments using this form of pressure element. It was to attempt to meet the need for such information that the investigation reported in this paper was undertaken. The report describes the various materials which have been used as nonmetallic diaphragms, discusses the factors which affect the performance of the diaphragms and gives the results of tests made for the purpose of investigating the effect produced by these factors.

  1. Eigenvalues and musical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howle, V. E.; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2001-10-01

    Most musical instruments are built from physical systems that oscillate at certain natural frequencies. The frequencies are the imaginary parts of the eigenvalues of a linear operator, and the decay rates are the negatives of the real parts, so it ought to be possible to give an approximate idea of the sound of a musical instrument by a single plot of points in the complex plane. Nevertheless, the authors are unaware of any such picture that has ever appeared in print. This paper attempts to fill that gap by plotting eigenvalues for simple models of a guitar string, a flute, a clarinet, a kettledrum, and a musical bell. For the drum and the bell, simple idealized models have eigenvalues that are irrationally related, but as the actual instruments have evolved over the generations, the leading five or six eigenvalues have moved around the complex plane so that their relative positions are musically pleasing.

  2. Influence of playing wind instruments on activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Gotouda, A; Yamaguchi, T; Okada, K; Matsuki, T; Gotouda, S; Inoue, N

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of change in sound tone of playing wind instruments on activity of jaw-closing muscles and the effect of sustained playing for a long time on fatigue of jaw-closing muscles. Electromyograms (EMG) of 19 brass instrument players and 14 woodwind instrument players were measured while playing instruments in tuning tone and high tone and under other conditions. Nine brass instrument players and nine woodwind instrument players played instruments for 90 min. Before and after the exercise, power spectral analyses of EMG from masseter muscles at 50% of maximum voluntary clenching level were performed and mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Root mean square (RMS) of EMG in masseter and temporal muscles while playing were slightly larger than those at rest but extremely small in comparison with those during maximum clenching. Root mean square in orbicularis oris and digastric muscles were relatively large when playing instruments. In the brass instrument group, RMS in high tone was significantly higher than that in tuning tone in all muscles examined. In the woodwind instrument group, RMS in high tone was not significantly higher than that in tuning tone in those muscles. Mean power frequency was not decreased after sustained playing in both instrument groups. These findings indicate that contractive load to jaw-closing muscles when playing a wind instrument in both medium and high tone is very small and playing an instrument for a long time does not obviously induce fatigue of jaw-closing muscles. PMID:17716263

  3. Electrical instrument measures position and velocity of shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.; Humphry, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument employs a sensor consisting of twin-electrode probe mounted in shock tube wall, with small dc voltage impressed across electrodes. Power supply, amplifier, and gate pulse generator complete the system. Instrument provides data for construction of wave diagrams, as well as measurement of shock velocity.

  4. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  5. [Hardening of dental instruments].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, G P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented. PMID:7300627

  6. Instrumentation in medical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1995-05-01

    The demand for clinical use of accelerated heavy charged-particle (proton and light-ion) beams for cancer treatment is now burgeoning worldwide. Clinical trials are underway at more than a dozen accelerators. Several hospital-based accelerator facilities dedicated to radiation treatment of human cancer have been constructed, and their number is growing. Many instruments in medical systems have been developed for modifying extracted particle beams for clinical application, monitoring the delivery of the treatment beams, and controlling the treatment processes to ensure patient safety. These in turn demand new developments of instruments in controlling beam extraction, beam tuning, and beam transportation at the medical systems.

  7. Lightning Instrumentation at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Jose L.; Eng, D.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes lightning phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at launching Pads 39 A&B for measurements of lightning effects is included with alternatives and recommendations to improve the protection system and upgrade the actual instrumentation system. An architecture for a new data collection system to replace the present one is also included. A novel architecture to obtain lightning current information from several sensors using only one high speed recording channel while monitoring all sensors to replace the actual manual lightning current recorders and a novel device for the protection system are described.

  8. Ocean Observation Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Airborne Ocean Color Imager (AOCI) was developed by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. for Ames Research Center under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract as a simulator for an advanced oceanographic satellite instrument. The instrument measures water temperature and detects water color in nine wavelengths. Water color indicates chlorophyll content or phytoplankton. After EOCAP assistance and technical improvements, the AOCI was successfully commercialized by Daedalus Enterprises, Inc. One version provides commercial fishing fleets with information about fish locations, and the other is used for oceanographic research.

  9. Standard NIM instrumentation system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    NIM is a standard modular instrumentation system that is in wide use throughout the world. As the NIM system developed and accommodations were made to a dynamic instrumentation field and a rapidly advancing technology, additions, revisions and clarifications were made. These were incorporated into the standard in the form of addenda and errata. This standard is a revision of the NIM document, AEC Report TID-20893 (Rev. 4) dated July 1974. It includes all the addenda and errata items that were previously issued as well as numerous additional items to make the standard current with modern technology and manufacturing practice.

  10. Microtechnology for instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R.

    1998-01-01

    For the last two decades, the majority of research and development at LLNL in microtechnology has focused on photonics devices and bulk micromachining, including miccroelectro-mechanical systems and associated areas. For the last ten years, we have used these capabilities to address our analytical instrumentation needs. Just as the miniature photonics have enable the fabrication of analytical instruments that are either higher performance, smaller, more portable, or are combinations of these. Examples of these are our portable thermal cyclers for DNA analysis, our hand-held gas chromatograph, our flow-stream-waveguide-based flow cytometer, and our etched-microchannel electrophoresis systems. This presentation will describe these and related developments.

  11. Instrumentation in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements in designing instrumentation systems and measurements of various physical quantities in wind tunnels are surveyed. Emphasis is given to sensors used for measuring pressure, temperature, and angle, and the measurements of air turbulence and boundary layers. Instrumentation in wind tunnels require accuracy, fast response, diversity and operational simplicity. Measurements of force, pressure, attitude angle, free flow, pressure distribution, and temperature are illustrated by a table, and a block diagram. The LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) method for measuring air turbulence and flow velocity and measurement of skin friction and flow fields using laser holograms are discussed. The future potential of these techniques is studied.

  12. Instrumentation for Sensitive Gas Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OKeefe, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    An improved instrument for optical absorption spectroscopy utilizes off-axis paths in an optical cavity in order to increase detection sensitivity while suppressing resonance effects. The instrument is well suited for use in either cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) [in which one pulses an incident light beam and measures the rate of decay of light in the cavity] or integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) [in which one uses a continuous-wave incident light beam and measures the power of light in the cavity as a function of wavelength]. Typically, in optical absorption spectroscopy, one seeks to measure absorption of a beam of light in a substance (usually a gas or liquid) in a sample cell. In CRDS or ICOS, the sample cell is placed in (or consists of) an optical cavity, so that one can utilize multiple reflections of the beam to increase the effective optical path length through the absorbing substance and thereby increase the sensitivity for measuring absorption. If an absorbing substance is not present in the optical cavity, one can utilize the multiple passes of the light beam to increase the sensitivity for measuring absorption and scattering by components of the optical cavity itself. It is desirable to suppress the effects of resonances in the cavity in order to make the spectral response of the cavity itself as nearly constant as possible over the entire wavelength range of interest. In the present instrument, the desired flattening of the spectral response is accomplished by utilizing an off-axis beam geometry to effectively decrease the frequency interval between longitudinal electromagnetic modes of the cavity, such that the resulting transmission spectrum of the cavity is nearly continuous: in other words, the cavity becomes a broad-band optical device.

  13. Readability as Applied to an ABE Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. C.; Wahlstrom, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the procedure for applying the Fog, Flesch, and Fry readability formulas to the Internal, Powerful Others, and Chance Scales and for modifying the instrument for use with adult basic education (ABE) students. (Author/CH)

  14. New Instruments Shed Light On Astronomy's Future.

    PubMed

    Travis, J

    1994-04-15

    KONA, HAWAII-The snowy 14,000-foot summit of Mauna Kea, with its bevy of powerful telescopes including the just-completed Keck, provided an appropriate backdrop for a recent ocean-side gathering of astronomers and engineers to discuss "Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation for the 21st Century." Last month's meeting was organized by the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, and included a status report on liquid mirror telescopes, discussion of a space observatory that may make optical and x-ray astronomers best friends, and a modest proposal to cover the globe with a network of small, automated telescopes. PMID:17836897

  15. Distributed Framework for Dynamic Telescope and Instrument Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy J.; Case, Lynne

    2002-01-01

    Traditionally, instrument command and control systems have been developed specifically for a single instrument. Such solutions are frequently expensive and are inflexible to support the next instrument development effort. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an extensible framework, known as Instrument Remote Control (IRC) that applies to any kind of instrument that can be controlled by a computer. IRC combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML). A key aspect of the architecture is software that is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML). IML is an XML dialect used to describe graphical user interfaces to control and monitor the instrument, command sets and command formats, data streams, communication mechanisms, and data processing algorithms. The IRC framework provides the ability to communicate to components anywhere on a network using the JXTA protocol for dynamic discovery of distributed components. JXTA (see httD://www.jxta.org,) is a generalized protocol that allows any devices connected by a network to communicate in a peer-to-peer manner. IRC uses JXTA to advertise a device's IML and discover devices of interest on the network. Devices can join or leave the network and thus join or leave the instrument control environment of IRC. Currently, several astronomical instruments are working with the IRC development team to develop custom components for IRC to control their instruments. These instruments include: High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC), a first light instrument for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA); Submillimeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE), a Principal Investigator instrument for SOFIA; and Fabry-Perot Interferometer Bolometer Research Experiment (FIBRE), a prototype of the SAFIRE instrument, used at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). Most recently, we have

  16. Evaluation of 1047-nm photoacoustic instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs from gasoline and diesel powered vehicles.

    PubMed

    Arnott, W P; Zielinska, B; Rogers, C F; Sagebiel, J; Park, Kihong; Chow, Judith; Moosmüller, Hans; Watson, John G; Kelly, K; Wagner, D; Sarofim, A; Lighty, J; Palmer, G

    2005-07-15

    A series of measurements have been performed at Hill Air Force Base to evaluate real-time instruments for measurements of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs emitted from spark and ignition compression vehicles. Vehicles were operated at idle or fast idle in one set of measurements and were placed under load on a dynamometer during the second series. Photoacoustic instruments were developed that operated at a wavelength of 1047 nm where gaseous interference is negligible, although sensitivity to black carbon is good. Compact, efficient, solid-state lasers with direct electronic modulation capabilities are used in these instruments. Black carbon measurements are compared with samples collected on quartz fiber filters that were evaluated using the thermal optical reflectance method. A measure of total particle-bound PAH was provided by photoelectric aerosol sensors (PAS) and is evaluated against a sum of PAH mass concentrations obtained with a filter-denuder combination. The PAS had to be operated with a dilution system held at approximately 150 degrees C for most of the source sampling to prevent spurious behavior, thus perhaps compromising detection of lighter PAHs. PA and PAS measurements were found to have a high degree of correlation, perhaps suggesting that the PAS can respond to the polycyclic nature of the black carbon aerosol. The PAS to PA ratio for ambient air in Fresno, CA is 3.7 times as large in winter than in summer months, suggesting that the PAS clearly does respond to compounds other than BC when the instrument is used without the heated inlet. PMID:16082972

  17. Instrument for Textbook Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huetteman, Julie Doidge

    An instrument to assist in assessing textbooks was created to provide a concise format for comparison and evaluation. Textbook characteristics were selected to illustrate content and proportion of characteristics of textbooks. Nine textbook characteristics were selected for quantifying the content areas of textbooks: (1) number of pages in the…

  18. Music: Instrumental Techniques, Percussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Jesse

    A course in introduction to music emphasizing harmony is presented. The approach used is a laboratory approach in which pupils will develop skill in playing percussion instruments, sing, listen to, read and compose music with emphasis on elementary concepts of harmony. Course objectives include: (1) The student will recognize duple, triple,…

  19. Music: Instrumental Techniques, Strings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Philip

    A course in music which emphasizes harmony is presented. The approach used is a laboratory one in which pupils will develop skill in playing orchestral string instruments, sing, listen to, read and compose music with emphasis on elementary concepts of harmony. Course objectives include: (1) The student will select the title of a familiar melody…

  20. Portable dynamic fundus instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gerald R. (Inventor); Meehan, Richard T. (Inventor); Hunter, Norwood R. (Inventor); Caputo, Michael P. (Inventor); Gibson, C. Robert (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A portable diagnostic image analysis instrument is disclosed for retinal funduscopy in which an eye fundus image is optically processed by a lens system to a charge coupled device (CCD) which produces recordable and viewable output data and is simultaneously viewable on an electronic view finder. The fundus image is processed to develop a representation of the vessel or vessels from the output data.

  1. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  2. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  3. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  4. Elementary Instrumental Music Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dolores A.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Our former Elementary Instrumental Music Program for 4th-6th graders was costly and ineffective. Students were bused to a high school in the middle of the instructional day--costs (time and transportation) were not compensatory with the program, which was experiencing a significant drop-out rate.…

  5. HARMONI instrument control electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigante, José V.; Rodríguez Ramos, Luis F.; Zins, Gerard; Schnetler, Hermine; Pecontal, Arlette; Herreros, José Miguel; Clarke, Fraser; Bryson, Ian; Thatte, Niranjan

    2014-07-01

    HARMONI is an integral field spectrograph working at visible and near-infrared wavelengths over a range of spatial scales from ground layer corrected to fully diffraction-limited. The instrument has been chosen to be part of the first-light complement at the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). This paper describes the instrument control electronics to be developed at IAC. The large size of the HARMONI instrument, its cryogenic operation, and the fact that it must operate with enhanced reliability is a challenge from the point of view of the control electronics design. The present paper describes a design proposal based on the current instrument requirements and intended to be fully compliant with the ESO E-ELT standards, as well as with the European EMC and safety standards. The modularity of the design and the use of COTS standard hardware will benefit the project in several aspects, as reduced costs, shorter schedule by the use of commercially available components, and improved quality by the use of well proven solutions.

  6. University Reactor Instrumentation Grant

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Bajorek

    2000-02-01

    A noble gas air monitoring system was purchased through the University Reactor Instrumentation Grant Program. This monitor was installed in the Kansas State TRIGA reactor bay at a location near the top surface of the reactor pool according to recommendation by the supplier. This system is now functional and has been incorporated into the facility license.

  7. Designing Intelligent Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Erner, Philip M.; Frasso, Scott

    2007-11-01

    Remote science operations require automated systems that can both act and react with minimal human intervention. One such vision is that of an intelligent instrument that collects data in an automated fashion, and based on what it learns, decides which new measurements to take. This innovation implements experimental design and unites it with data analysis in such a way that it completes the cycle of learning. This cycle is the basis of the Scientific Method. The three basic steps of this cycle are hypothesis generation, inquiry, and inference. Hypothesis generation is implemented by artificially supplying the instrument with a parameterized set of possible hypotheses that might be used to describe the physical system. The act of inquiry is handled by an inquiry engine that relies on Bayesian adaptive exploration where the optimal experiment is chosen as the one which maximizes the expected information gain. The inference engine is implemented using the nested sampling algorithm, which provides the inquiry engine with a set of posterior samples from which the expected information gain can be estimated. With these computational structures in place, the instrument will refine its hypotheses, and repeat the learning cycle by taking measurements until the system under study is described within a pre-specified tolerance. We will demonstrate our first attempts toward achieving this goal with an intelligent instrument constructed using the LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT robotics platform.

  8. Experimenting with Woodwind Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Simple experiments involving musical instruments of the woodwind family can be used to demonstrate the basic physics of vibrating air columns in resonance tubes using nothing more than straightforward measurements and data collection hardware and software. More involved experimentation with the same equipment can provide insight into the effects…

  9. University Reactor Instrumentation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1992-11-01

    Recognizing that the University Reactor Instrumentation Program was developed in response to widespread needs in the academic community for modernization and improvement of research and training reactors at institutions such as the University of Florida, the items proposed to be supported by this grant over its two year period have been selected as those most likely to reduce foreed outages, to meet regulatory concerns that had been expressed in recent years by Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors or to correct other facility problems and limitations. Department of Energy Grant Number DE-FG07-90ER129969 was provided to the University of Florida Training Reactor(UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Instrumentation Program. The original proposal submitted in February, 1990 requested support for UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment upgrades for seven items in the amount of $107,530 with $13,800 of this amount to be the subject of cost sharing by the University of Florida and $93,730 requested as support from the Department of Energy. A breakdown of the items requested and total cost for the proposed UFTR facility instrumentation and equipment improvements is presented.

  10. Instrument measures cloud cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight solar sensing cells comprise inexpensive monitoring instrument. Four cells always track Sun while other four face sky and clouds. On overcast day, cloud-irradiance sensors generate as much short-circuit current as Sun sensor cells. As clouds disappear, output of cloud sensors decreases. Ratio of two sensor type outputs determines fractional cloud cover.

  11. Process Instrumentation. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, A. O., III; Fowler, Malcolm

    This module provides instructional materials that are designed to help teachers train students in job skills for entry-level jobs as instrumentation technicians. This text addresses the basics of troubleshooting control loops, and the transducers, transmitters, signal conditioners, control valves, and controllers that enable process systems to…

  12. Flaws of drug instrumentalization.

    PubMed

    Swendsen, Joel; Le Moal, Michel

    2011-12-01

    The adaptive use of drugs, or "drug instrumentalization," is presented as a reality that the scientific literature has largely ignored. In this commentary, we demonstrate why this concept has limited value from the standpoint of nosology, why it should not be viewed as "adaptive," and why it has dangerous implications for policy and public health efforts. PMID:22074977

  13. Analytical Instrument Obsolescence Examined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggin, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The threat of instrument obsolescence and tight federal budgets have conspired to threaten the existence of research analytical laboratories. Despite these and other handicaps most existing laboratories expect to keep operating in support of basic research, though there may be serious penalties in the future unless funds are forthcoming. (Author)

  14. Music: Instrumental Techniques, Woodwinds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Melvin

    A course in introduction to music emphasizing modes and forms is presented. The approach used is a laboratory approach in which pupils will develop skill in playing wood-wind instruments, sing, listen to, read and compose music with emphasis on identification of elementary concepts of mode and form. Course objectives include: (1) pupil will select…

  15. A Quantitative Evaluation of Dissolved Oxygen Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pijanowski, Barbara S.

    1971-01-01

    The implications of the presence of dissolved oxygen in water are discussed in terms of its deleterious or beneficial effects, depending on the functional consequences to those affected, e.g., the industrialist, the oceanographer, and the ecologist. The paper is devoted primarily to an examination of the performance of five commercially available dissolved oxygen meters. The design of each is briefly reviewed and ease or difficulty of use in the field described. Specifically, the evaluation program treated a number of parameters and user considerations including an initial check and trial calibration for each instrument and a discussion of the measurement methodology employed. Detailed test results are given relating to the effects of primary power variation, water-flow sensitivity, response time, relative accuracy of dissolved-oxygen readout, temperature accuracy (for those instruments which included this feature), error and repeatability, stability, pressure and other environmental effects, and test results obtained in the field. Overall instrument performance is summarized comparatively by chart.

  16. Data acquisition instruments: Psychopharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.S. III

    1998-01-01

    This report contains the results of a Direct Assistance Project performed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., for Dr. K. O. Jobson. The purpose of the project was to perform preliminary analysis of the data acquisition instruments used in the field of psychiatry, with the goal of identifying commonalities of data and strategies for handling and using the data in the most advantageous fashion. Data acquisition instruments from 12 sources were provided by Dr. Jobson. Several commonalities were identified and a potentially useful data strategy is reported here. Analysis of the information collected for utility in performing diagnoses is recommended. In addition, further work is recommended to refine the commonalities into a directly useful computer systems structure.

  17. THE ARCADE 2 INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Mirel, P.; Wollack, E.; Levin, S.; Seiffert, M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-04-01

    The second generation Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) instrument is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the radiometric temperature of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic and extragalactic emission at six frequencies from 3 to 90 GHz. ARCADE 2 utilizes a double-nulled design where emission from the sky is compared to that from an external cryogenic full-aperture blackbody calibrator by cryogenic switching radiometers containing internal blackbody reference loads. In order to further minimize sources of systematic error, ARCADE 2 features a cold fully open aperture with all radiometrically active components maintained at near 2.7 K without windows or other warm objects, achieved through a novel thermal design. We discuss the design and performance of the ARCADE 2 instrument in its 2005 and 2006 flights.

  18. Portable instrumentation for environmental field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Low-power, portable instruments have been developed for measuring gas exchange on individual plant leaves, the aggregate carbon uptake and release of vast jungle and forest areas, and methane concentrations in and around the dense fog resulting from a liquefied-natural-gas (LNG) spill. The group includes a battery powered carbon dioxide sensor and three specialized instruments that incorporate it in various ways: a minicuvette gas-exchange monitor, a rapid-response carbon-dioxide-flux sensor with a high-speed, cooled IR detector, a response time of 10 ms and a sensitivity of about 0.03 ppm CO2, and a methane monitor with the optical path shortened to 5 cm and with a quadrupled IR output.

  19. An ice lithography instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  20. Impact dynamics instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormck, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    One of the tasks specified in the NASA Langley controlled impact demonstration (CID) work package was to furnish dynamic instrumentation sensors. The types of instrumentation sensors required were accelerometers for aircraft structural loads measurements, seat belt load cells to measure anthropomorphic dummy responses to the aircraft impact, and strain gage bending bridges to measure the aircraft fuselage and wing bending during impact. The objective in the selection of dynamic instrumentation for the CID was to provide 352 of the highest quality transducers and remain within budget allocation. The transducers that were selected for the CID evaluation process were each subjected to rigorous laboratory acceptance tests and to aircraft fuselage section drop tests at the LaRC Impact Dynamics Research Facility. Data compiled from this series of tests showed the selected transducers to be best suited for the CID mission requirement. The transducers installation technique on the airframe proved successful. The transducer quality assurance was guaranteed through rigorous acceptance testing. Data acquired was 97.0%.

  1. Mandolin Family Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David J.; Rossing, Thomas D.

    The mandolin family of instruments consists of plucked chordophones, each having eight strings in four double courses. With the exception of the mandobass, the courses are tuned in intervals of fifths, as are the strings in violin family instruments. The soprano member of the family is the mandolin, tuned G3-D4-A4-E5. The alto member of the family is the mandola, tuned C3-G3-D4-A4. The mandola is usually referred to simply as the mandola in the USA, but is called the tenor mandola in Europe. The tenor member of the family is the octave mandolin, tuned G2-D3-A3-E4. It is referred to as the octave mandolin in the USA, and as the octave mandola in Europe. The baritone member of the family is the mandocello, or mandoloncello, tuned C2-G2-D3-A3. A variant of the mandocello not common in the USA is the five-course liuto moderno, or simply liuto, designed for solo repertoire. Its courses are tuned C2-G2-D3-A3-E4. A mandobass was also made by more than one manufacturer during the early twentieth century, though none are manufactured today. They were fretted instruments with single string courses tuned E1-A1-D2-G2. There are currently a few luthiers making piccolo mandolins, tuned C4-G4-D5-A5.

  2. Instrumentation and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-12-01

    This Technology Status Report describes research and accomplishments for the Instrumentation and Diagnostics (I D) Projects within the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Process understanding and control can be improved through the development of advanced instrumentation and diagnostics. The thrust of the I D Projects is to further develop existing measurement and control techniques for application to advanced coal-based technologies. Project highlights are: an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) instrument has been developed to analyze trace elements in gasification and combustion process streams. An in situ two-color Mie scattering technique with LSS can simultaneously measure the size, velocity, and elemental composition of coal particles during combustion. A high-temperature, fluorescence thermometry technique has accurately measured gas temperatures during field testing in combustion and gasification environments. Expert systems have been developed to improve the control of advanced coal-based processes. Capacitance flowmeters were developed to determine the mass flowrate, solid volume fraction, and particle velocities of coal slurries. 32 refs., 9 figs.

  3. An ice lithography instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  4. An ice lithography instrument.

    PubMed

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J A

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  5. An ice lithography instrument

    PubMed Central

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  6. Borehole survey instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, H.E.; Lin, J.W. III; Macha, E.S.; Smither, M.A.

    1984-12-04

    A borehole survey instrument is provided having a meniscus type floating compass member with indicia thereon for indicating azimuth and inclination. A light source is disposed below the indicia for illuminating the indicia upward through the liquid through which the meniscus type floating compass member floats. A lens system is provided for focusing the image of the illuminated compass member upon a film disposed below the compass member. This arrangement permits the centering post for the compass member to be of minimum diameter consistent with rigidity requirements and permits a high angle compass member to indicate angles of inclination approaching ninety degrees. A multiple light bulb light source is utilized and each light bulb is mounted in a manner which permits a single light bulb to illuminate the entire compass member. A hand-held programming and diagnostic unit is provided which may be momentarily electrically mated with the borehole survey tool to input a programmed timed delay and diagnostically test both the condition of the light bulbs utilized as the illumination source and the state of the batteries within the instrument. This hand-held programmable unit eliminates all the mechanical programming switches and permits the instrument to be completely sealed from the pressure, fluids and contaminants normally found in a well bore.

  7. SABER instrument design update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, Roy W.; Zollinger, Lorin; Batty, J. Clair; Folkman, Steve; Roosta, Mehrdad; Tansock, Joseph J.; Jensen, Mark; Stauder, John; Miller, Jim; Vanek, Michael; Robinson, Don

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the design of a 10-channel infrared (1.27 to 16.9 micrometers ) radiometer instrument known as SABER (sounding of the atmosphere using broadband emission radiometry) that will measure earth-limb emissions from the TIMED (thermosphere- ionosphere-mesosphere energetics and dynamics) satellite. The instrument telescope, designed to reject stray light from the earth and the atmosphere, is an on-axis Cassegrain design with a clam shell reimager and a one-axis scan mirror. The telescope is cooled below 210 K by a dedicated radiator. The focal plane assembly (consisting of a filter array, a detector array, a Lyot stop, and a window) is cooled to 75 K by a miniature cryogenic refrigerator. The conductive heat load on the refrigerator is minimized by a Kevlar support system that thermally isolates the focal plane assembly from the telescope. Kevlar is also used to thermally isolate the telescope from the spacecraft. Instrument responsivity drifts due to changes in telescope and focal plane temperatures as well as other causes are neutralized by an in-flight calibration system. The detector array consists of discrete HgCdTe, InSb, and InGaAs detectors. Two InGaAs detectors are a new long wavelength type, made by EG&G, that have a long wavelength cutoff of 2.33 micrometers at 77 K.

  8. Simulation visualization through dynamic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.

    1998-09-01

    The goal of the instrument composition system is to allow a simulation user to dynamically create instruments as a simulation executes. Instruments can include graphical displays, data collectors, and debugging aides. Instruments are made up of small building blocks which can be easily combined into larger, more complex instruments. Through the sue of an Attribute Server (a distributed publication/subscription mechanism), the actors and instruments in a simulation can interact without direct knowledge of each other. Instead, each actor publishes the attributes which it has available. An instrument subscribes to the attributes in which it is interested, and is notified whenever the value of one of these attribute changes. An instrument can also publish attributes for use by other instruments. Since the Attribute Server is distributed, the publisher of an attribute need not execute on the same machine as the subscriber. This allows CPU intensive data visualization to execute on separate machines from the simulation, minimizing the impact on the simulation.

  9. Low-Dimensional Feature Representation for Instrument Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Mizuki; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Ikeda, Kazushi; Ishii, Shin

    For monophonic music instrument identification, various feature extraction and selection methods have been proposed. One of the issues toward instrument identification is that the same spectrum is not always observed even in the same instrument due to the difference of the recording condition. Therefore, it is important to find non-redundant instrument-specific features that maintain information essential for high-quality instrument identification to apply them to various instrumental music analyses. For such a dimensionality reduction method, the authors propose the utilization of linear projection methods: local Fisher discriminant analysis (LFDA) and LFDA combined with principal component analysis (PCA). After experimentally clarifying that raw power spectra are actually good for instrument classification, the authors reduced the feature dimensionality by LFDA or by PCA followed by LFDA (PCA-LFDA). The reduced features achieved reasonably high identification performance that was comparable or higher than those by the power spectra and those achieved by other existing studies. These results demonstrated that our LFDA and PCA-LFDA can successfully extract low-dimensional instrument features that maintain the characteristic information of the instruments.

  10. Reading Instruments: Objects, Texts and Museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Katharine; Frappier, Mélanie; Neswald, Elizabeth; Trim, Henry

    2013-05-01

    Science educators, historians of science and their students often share a curiosity about historical instruments as a tangible link between past and present practices in the sciences. We less often integrate instruments into our research and pedagogy, considering artefact study as the domain of museum specialists. We argue here that scholars and teachers new to material culture can readily use artefacts to reveal rich and complex networks of narratives. We illustrate this point by describing our own lay encounter with an artefact turned over for our analysis during a week-long workshop at the Canada Science and Technology Museum. The text explains how elements as disparate as the military appearance of the instrument, the crest stamped on its body, the manipulation of its telescopes, or a luggage tag revealed the object's scientific and political significance in different national contexts. In this way, the presence of the instrument in the classroom vividly conveyed the nature of geophysics as a field practice and an international science, and illuminated relationships between pure and applied science for early twentieth century geologists. We conclude that artefact study can be an unexpectedly powerful and accessible tool in the study of science, making visible the connections between past and present, laboratory and field, texts and instruments.

  11. Development of airblast and soil strength instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, P. L.; Groethe, M. A.

    1980-02-01

    The development and testing of airblast and soil strength gauges are presented. The airblast sensors include an accelerometer instrumented drag sphere to measure dynamic pressure and bar gauge probes to measure static, stagnation and reflected pressures at levels to 10 to the 8th power Pa (1 kilobar). The soil strength gauge is a shock hardened dynamic cone penetrator. An analysis of a slug type heat flux sensor is given.

  12. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  13. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation, Cl. Thermoluminescence: Part II. Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Presents part two on the use of the detection of thermoluminescence as an analytical tool for the chemistry laboratory and allied science. This part discusses instrumentation used and investigates recent developments in instrumentation for thermoluminescence. (HM)

  14. CARMENES instrument overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Caballero, J. A.; Mundt, R.; Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Seifert, W.; Abril, M.; Aceituno, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Ammler-von Eiff, M.; Antona Jiménez, R.; Anwand-Heerwart, H.; Azzaro, M.; Bauer, F.; Barrado, D.; Becerril, S.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Benítez, D.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Casal, E.; Claret, A.; Colomé, J.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Czesla, S.; Doellinger, M.; Dreizler, S.; Feiz, C.; Fernández, M.; Galadí, D.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; García-Piquer, A.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Garrido, R.; Gesa, L.; Gómez Galera, V.; González Álvarez, E.; González Hernández, J. I.; Grözinger, U.; Guàrdia, J.; Guenther, E. W.; de Guindos, E.; Gutiérrez-Soto, J.; Hagen, H.-J.; Hatzes, A. P.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Helmling, J.; Henning, T.; Hermann, D.; Hernández Castaño, L.; Herrero, E.; Hidalgo, D.; Holgado, G.; Huber, A.; Huber, K. F.; Jeffers, S.; Joergens, V.; de Juan, E.; Kehr, M.; Klein, R.; Kürster, M.; Lamert, A.; Lalitha, S.; Laun, W.; Lemke, U.; Lenzen, R.; López del Fresno, Mauro; López Martí, B.; López-Santiago, J.; Mall, U.; Mandel, H.; Martín, E. L.; Martín-Ruiz, S.; Martínez-Rodríguez, H.; Marvin, C. J.; Mathar, R. J.; Mirabet, E.; Montes, D.; Morales Muñoz, R.; Moya, A.; Naranjo, V.; Ofir, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pallé, E.; Panduro, J.; Passegger, V.-M.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; Pérez Medialdea, D.; Perger, M.; Pluto, M.; Ramón, A.; Rebolo, R.; Redondo, P.; Reffert, S.; Reinhardt, S.; Rhode, P.; Rix, H.-W.; Rodler, F.; Rodríguez, E.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Rodríguez-Pérez, E.; Rohloff, R.-R.; Rosich, A.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Schäfer, S.; Schiller, J.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Solano, E.; Stahl, O.; Storz, C.; Stürmer, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Ulbrich, R. G.; Veredas, G.; Wagner, K.; Winkler, J.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Zechmeister, M.; Abellán de Paco, F. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; del Burgo, C.; Klutsch, A.; Lizon, J. L.; López-Morales, M.; Morales, J. C.; Perryman, M. A. C.; Tulloch, S. M.; Xu, W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the CARMENES instrument and of the survey that will be carried out with it during the first years of operation. CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs) is a next-generation radial-velocity instrument under construction for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. The scientific goal of the project is conducting a 600-night exoplanet survey targeting ~ 300 M dwarfs with the completed instrument. The CARMENES instrument consists of two separate echelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7 μm at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. The spectrographs are housed in vacuum tanks providing the temperature-stabilized environments necessary to enable a 1 m/s radial velocity precision employing a simultaneous calibration with an emission-line lamp or with a Fabry-Perot etalon. For mid-M to late-M spectral types, the wavelength range around 1.0 μm (Y band) is the most important wavelength region for radial velocity work. Therefore, the efficiency of CARMENES has been optimized in this range. The CARMENES instrument consists of two spectrographs, one equipped with a 4k x 4k pixel CCD for the range 0.55 - 1.05 μm, and one with two 2k x 2k pixel HgCdTe detectors for the range from 0.95 - 1.7μm. Each spectrograph will be coupled to the 3.5m telescope with two optical fibers, one for the target, and one for calibration light. The front end contains a dichroic beam splitter and an atmospheric dispersion corrector, to feed the light into the fibers leading to the spectrographs. Guiding is performed with a separate camera; on-axis as well as off-axis guiding modes are implemented. Fibers with octagonal cross-section are employed to ensure good stability of the output in the presence of residual guiding errors. The

  15. Using XML and Java Technologies for Astronomical Instrument Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Case, Lynne; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, instrument command and control systems have been highly specialized, consisting mostly of custom code that is difficult to develop, maintain, and extend. Such solutions are initially very costly and are inflexible to subsequent engineering change requests, increasing software maintenance costs. Instrument description is too tightly coupled with details of implementation. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, under the Instrument Remote Control (IRC) project, is developing a general and highly extensible framework that applies to any kind of instrument that can be controlled by a computer. The software architecture combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML), a human readable and machine understandable way to describe structured data. A key aspect of the object-oriented architecture is that the software is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML), a dialect of XML. IML is used to describe the command sets and command formats of the instrument, communication mechanisms, format of the data coming from the instrument, and characteristics of the graphical user interface to control and monitor the instrument. The IRC framework allows the users to define a data analysis pipeline which converts data coming out of the instrument. The data can be used in visualizations in order for the user to assess the data in real-time, if necessary. The data analysis pipeline algorithms can be supplied by the user in a variety of forms or programming languages. Although the current integration effort is targeted for the High-resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE), first-light instruments of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the framework is designed to be generic and extensible so that it can be applied to any instrument. Plans are underway to test the framework

  16. Instrumentation: Software-Driven Instrumentation: The New Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salit, M. L.; Parsons, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Software-driven instrumentation makes measurements that demand a computer as an integral part of either control, data acquisition, or data reduction. The structure of such instrumentation, hardware requirements, and software requirements are discussed. Examples of software-driven instrumentation (such as wavelength-modulated continuum source…

  17. CALIPSO Instrument OFF

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-12-05

    ... which requires the computer to be powered down.   Recovery planning has begun and will be dependent on proton levels and the ... maneuver.   The CALIPSO Payload was returned to Data Acquisition and regular nightly science data downlinks following the ...

  18. Control and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E.W.

    1982-05-01

    The control room design review is part of a broad program being undertaken by the nuclear industry and the government to ensure consideration of human factors in nuclear power-plant design and operation. The objectives of this review are to identify and correct deficiencies in existing or committed control room equipment and physical arrangements and to improve the ability of nuclear power-plant control room operators to prevent or cope with accidents by improving the information provided to those operators.

  19. "The Instruments used in Conducting the Tests at the Tule ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "The Instruments used in Conducting the Tests at the Tule River Power House." San Joaquin Light and Power Magazine, Vol. II, No. 3, March 1914, p. 119 - Tule River Hydroelectric Complex, CA Highway 190 at North Fork of Middle Fork of Tule River, Springville, Tulare County, CA

  20. 95. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770). BATTERY RACK FOR BACKUP BOOSTER POWER ON LEFT; BATTERY RACK FOR BACKUP AEROSPACE GROUND EQUIPMENT (AGE) POWER ON RIGHT. BATTERY CHARGER IS RIGHT OF BATTERY RACKS. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. 117. VIEW OF CABINETS ON EAST SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. VIEW OF CABINETS ON EAST SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (206), LSB (BLDG. 751). FEATURES LEFT TO RIGHT: ALTERNATING CURRENT POWER DISTRIBUTION RELAY BOX, AIRBORNE BEACON ELECTRONIC TEST SYSTEM (ABETS), AUTOPILOT CHECKOUT CONTROLS, POWER DISTRIBUTION UNITS. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. ZBLAN Viscosity Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William

    2001-01-01

    The past year's contribution from Dr. Kaukler's experimental effort consists of these 5 parts: a) Construction and proof-of-concept testing of a novel shearing plate viscometer designed to produce small shear rates and operate at elevated temperatures; b) Preparing nonlinear polymeric materials to serve as standards of nonlinear Theological behavior; c) Measurements and evaluation of above materials for nonlinear rheometric behavior at room temperature using commercial spinning cone and plate viscometers available in the lab; d) Preparing specimens from various forms of pitch for quantitative comparative testing in a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer, Thermal Mechanical Analyzer; and Archeological Analyzer; e) Arranging to have sets of pitch specimens tested using the various instruments listed above, from different manufacturers, to form a baseline of the viscosity variation with temperature using the different test modes offered by these instruments by compiling the data collected from the various test results. Our focus in this project is the shear thinning behavior of ZBLAN glass over a wide range of temperature. Experimentally, there are no standard techniques to perform such measurements on glasses, particularly at elevated temperatures. Literature reviews to date have shown that shear thinning in certain glasses appears to occur, but no data is available for ZBLAN glass. The best techniques to find shear thinning behavior require the application of very low rates of shear. In addition, because the onset of the thinning behavior occurs at an unknown elevated temperature, the instruments used in this study must provide controlled low rates of shear and do so for temperatures approaching 600 C. In this regard, a novel shearing parallel plate viscometer was designed and a prototype built and tested.

  3. LBL's Pollution Instrumentation Comparability Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, R. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Contained are condensed excerpts from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Survey of Instrumentation for Environmental Monitoring. The survey describes instrumentation used to analyze air and water quality, radiation emissions, and biomedical impacts. (BB)

  4. Instruments for Water Quality Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballinger, Dwight G.

    1972-01-01

    Presents information regarding available instruments for industries and agencies who must monitor numerous aquatic parameters. Charts denote examples of parameters sampled, testing methods, range and accuracy of test methods, cost analysis, and reliability of instruments. (BL)

  5. Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Explains the job of precision instrument and equipment repairers, who work on cameras, medical equipment, musical instruments, watches and clocks, and industrial measuring devices. Discusses duties, working conditions, employment and earnings, job outlook, and skills and training. (JOW)

  6. Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2004-01-01

    The topics addressed in this viewgraph presentation include information on 1) Historic instruments at Goddard; 2) Integrated Design Capability at Goddard; 3) The Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL).

  7. Instrumental musicians' hazards.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, R A

    2001-01-01

    In the last two decades, injuries to instrumental musicians have been well documented. Major categories of performance-related injuries include musculoskeletal overuse, nerve entrapment/thoracic outlet syndrome, and focal dystonia. Other areas of concern to instrumentalists include hypermobility, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, and hearing loss. This chapter reviews the epidemiology, risk factors, physical exam, treatment, and prevention of common problems of instrumentalists. Emphasis is placed on the team approach of treatment and prevention and the need for close collaboration of the various health professionals, music educators, and performers. Additional resources are presented for those interested in pursuing performing arts medicine in greater detail. PMID:11567922

  8. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  9. Diaphragms for Aeronautic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, M D

    1924-01-01

    This investigation was carried out at the request of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and comprises an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles, together with a discussion of expedients for making the most effective use of existing diaphragms actuated by the hydrostatic pressure form an essential element of a great variety instruments for aeronautic and other technical purposes. The various physical data needed as a foundation for rational methods of diaphragm design have not, however, been available hitherto except in the most fragmentary form.

  10. Biomagnetic instrumentation and measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iufer, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The instruments and techniques of biomagnetic measurement have progressed greatly in the past 15 years and are now of a quality appropriate to clinical applications. The paper reports on recent developments in the design and application of SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) magnetometers to biomagnetic measurement. The discussion covers biomagnetic field levels, magnetocardiography, magnetic susceptibility plethysmography, ambient noise and sensor types, principles of operation of a SQUID magnetometer, and laboratory techniques. Of the many promising applications of noninvasive biomagnetic measurement, magnetocardiography is the most advanced and the most likely to find clinical application in the near future.

  11. Instrument Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Jayakody, Chatura; Hull-Ryde, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    Well-defined quality control (QC) processes are used to determine whether a certain procedure or action conforms to a widely accepted standard and/or set of guidelines, and are important components of any laboratory quality assurance program (Popa-Burke et al., J Biomol Screen 14: 1017-1030, 2009). In this chapter, we describe QC procedures useful for monitoring the accuracy and precision of laboratory instrumentation, most notably automated liquid dispensers. Two techniques, gravimetric QC and photometric QC, are highlighted in this chapter. When used together, these simple techniques provide a robust process for evaluating liquid handler accuracy and precision, and critically underpin high-quality research programs. PMID:27316990

  12. Keyboard Emulation For Computerized Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, P. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Keyboard emulator has interface at same level as manual keyboard entry. Since communication and control take place at high intelligence level in instrument, all instrument circuitry fully utilized. Little knowledge of instrument circuitry necessary, since only task interface performs is key closure. All existing logic and error checking still performed by instrument, minimizing workload of laboratory microcomputer. Timing constraints for interface operation minimal at keyboard entry level.

  13. Surface composition mapping radiometer instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and fabrication of a three-channel scanning radiometer are discussed. The instrument was flown on Nimbus 5 satellite and measured infrared energy in the 8.3 to 9.3, 10.2 to 11.2, and 0.8 to 1.1 micron spectral regions. The instrument parameters are presented. Theoretical discussions of the instrument subassemblies are provided. Operational details of the mechanical and electrical portions of the instrument are included.

  14. A new innovative instrument for space plasma instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, Roy B.

    1993-01-01

    The Faraday Ring Ammeter was the subject of this grant for a new innovative instrument for space plasma instrumentation. This report summarizes our progress in this work. Briefly, we have conducted an intensive series of experiments and trials over three years, testing some five configurations of the instrument to measure currents, resulting in two Ph.D. theses, supported by this grant, and two flight configurations of the instrument. The first flight would have been on a NASA-Air Force collaborative sounding rocket, but was not flown because of instrumental difficulties. The second has been successfully integrated on the NASA Auroral Turbulence payload which is to be launched in February, 1994.

  15. Spacecraft instrument calibration and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Feldman, P.; Hudson, R.; Lean, J.; Madden, R.; Mcmaster, L.; Mount, G.; Rottman, G.; Simon, P. C.

    1989-01-01

    The following topics are covered: instrument degradation; the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) Experiment; the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS); the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 1 (SAGE-1) and SAGE-2 instruments; the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) UV ozone and near infrared airglow instruments; and the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS).

  16. Instruments for Water Quality Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Sidney L.; Mack, Dick A.

    1975-01-01

    This discussion gives a general picture of the instrumentation available or being developed for measuring the four major categories of water pollutants: metals, nutrients, pesticides and oxygen demand. The instruments are classified as follows: manually operated laboratory analyzers, automated laboratory instrumentation, manual field monitors, and…

  17. The QUIET Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, T.; Kangaslahti, P.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leitch, E. M.; Wollack, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ( approx 1 deg.) . Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4 m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 micro Ks(exp 1/2)) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0.1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 micro Ks(exp 1/2) at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0.01 (QUIET Collaboration 2012) The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range l approximately equals 25-975 . These are the largest HEMT-ba.sed arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument,

  18. Instrumentation for Submillimeter Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovan, M.; Novak, G.

    1984-01-01

    During the last two years three instruments were built and operated for detection of polarization in the submillimeter to millimeter wavelength bands. In principle, simply rotating a polarizing grid in front of the detector would be sufficient to determine the state of linear polarization. In practice severe systematic problems are found with this approach. Everything in the light path has potential for inducing polarization. The telescope, apertures in the lightpath, and the Winston light collectors all introduce systematic errors. (The polarization/depolarization induced by these devices is due to diffraction and the finite conductivity of the metals used). Two of the polarimeters are for use on the KAO; the third is for the IRTF on Mauna Kea. The airplane polarimeters, M1 and M2, were specifically designed to minimize the systematic errors. The ground based polarimeter uses our f/35 photometer with an external polarizing grid as the analyzer. With all three instruments the key to success is the data collector and analysis scheme.

  19. An Instrumental Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Think of guitars and you think of rock and country music, or the vigorous rhythms of the gypsy flamenco, or perhaps the classical strumming of a Segovia. About the last thing you would associate with guitars is aerospace technology. Yet there is a connection. A whole family of quality guitars is an outgrowth of helicopter rotor research conducted for the military services and NASA by an aerospace contractor. These musical spinoffs, commercially available and rapidly gaining in popularity, are the Ovation guitar line, manufactured by Ovation Instruments, Inc., Bloomfield, Connecticut. Ovation Instruments is a subsidiary of Kaman Corporation, a diversified company originally formed to develop and build helicopters. A helicopter's rotor system, with thousands of moving parts, is highly susceptible to vibration. For rotor efficiency, vibration must be "dampened," or reduced. Like other helicopter builders, Kaman Corporation spent years of research toward that end. The technology thus developed, together with the availability of staff experts in vibration engineering, sparked an idea in the mind of the company's president and founder, Charles H. Karnan. A guitarist of professional caliber, Kaman reasoned that vibration-dampening technology could be turned around to enhance vibration and thereby produce a guitar with superior sound.

  20. The QUIET Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, C.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to measure polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background, targeting the imprint of inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales ({approx}1{sup o}). Between 2008 October and 2010 December, two independent receiver arrays were deployed sequentially on a 1.4m side-fed Dragonian telescope. The polarimeters which form the focal planes use a highly compact design based on High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) that provides simultaneous measurements of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and I in a single module. The 17-element Q-band polarimeter array, with a central frequency of 43.1 GHz, has the best sensitivity (69 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2}) and the lowest instrumental systematic errors ever achieved in this band, contributing to the tensor-to-scalar ratio at r < 0:1. The 84-element W-band polarimeter array has a sensitivity of 87 {mu}Ks{sup 1/2} at a central frequency of 94.5 GHz. It has the lowest systematic errors to date, contributing at r < 0:01. The two arrays together cover multipoles in the range {ell} {approx} 25 -- 975. These are the largest HEMT-based arrays deployed to date. This article describes the design, calibration, performance of, and sources of systematic error for the instrument.

  1. XEUS mission and instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavdaz, Marcos; Peacock, Anthony J.; Parmar, Arvind N.; Beijersbergen, Marco W.

    2002-01-01

    The X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy mission (XEUS) is an ambitious project under study by the European Space Agency (ESA), which aims to probe the distant hot universe with comparable sensitivity to NGST and ALMA. The effective optical area and angular resolution required to perform this task is 30 m2 effective area and <5 inch angular resolution respectively at 1 keV. The single Wolter-I X-ray telescope having these characteristics will be equipped with large area semiconductor detectors and high-resolution cryogenic imaging spectrometers with 2 eV resolution at 1 keV. A novel approach to mission design has been developed, placing the detector instruments on one dedicated spacecraft and the optics on another. The International Space Station (ISS) with the best ever-available infrastructure in space will be used to expand the mirror diameter from 4.5 m to 10 m, by using the European Robotic Arm on the ISS. The detector spacecraft (DSC) uses solar-electric propulsion to maintain its position while flying in formation with the mirror spacecraft. The detector instruments are protected from straylight and contamination by sophisticated baffles and filters, and employing the Earth as a shield to make the most sensitive low energy X-ray observations of the heavily red-shifted universe. After completion of an initial observation phase lasting 5 years, the mirror spacecraft will be upgraded (basically expanded to a full 10 m diameter mirror) at the ISS, while the DSC is replaced by a new spacecraft with a new suite of detector instruments optimised to the full area XEUS mirror. An industrial feasibility study was successfully completed and identified no major problem area. Current activities focus on a full system level study and the necessary technology developments. XEUS is likely to become a truly global mission, involving many of the partners that have teamed up to build the ISS. Japan is already a major partner int the study of XEUS, with ISAS having its main

  2. Robotic servicing of EOS instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaghi, Andrea I.; Juberts, Maris

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses robotic servicing of the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) instruments. The goals of implementing a robotic servicing system on EOS would be to maintain the instruments throughout the required mission life and minimize life-cycle costs. To address robot servicing, an initial design concept has been developed which will be applied to a representative EOS instrument. This instrument will be used as a model for determining the most practical level of servicing of its parts, and how to design these parts for robot servicing. Using this representative EOS instrument as a model, a generic design scheme will be developed that can be applied to all EOS instruments. The first task is to determine how to identify which parts must be designed for robot servicing. Next, the requirements imposed on the instruments and the servicing robot when designing for robot serviceability must be examined.

  3. 115. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (206), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (206), LSB (BLDG. 751). BATTERY RACK ON LEFT FOR BACKUP BOOSTER POWER; BATTERY RACK ON RIGHT FOR BACKUP AEROSPACE GROUND EQUIPMENT (AGE) POWER. RECTIFIER SUPPLYING PRIMARY POWER ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PHOTO; BATTERY CHARGER BETWEEN RECTIFIER AND BATTERY RACKS. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  5. Sentinel-1 Instrument Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Torres, Ramon; Geudtner, Dirk; Brown, Michael; Deghaye, Patrick; Navas-Traver, Ignacio; Ostergaard, Allan; Rommen, Bjorn; Floury, Nicolas; Davidson, Malcolm

    2013-03-01

    The forthcoming European Space Agency (ESA) Sentinel-1 (S-1) C-band SAR constellation will provide continuous all-weather day/night global coverage, with six days exact repetition time (near daily coverage over Europe and Canada) and with radar data delivery within 3 to 24 hours. These features open new possibilities for operational maritime services. The Sentinel-1 space segment has been designed and is being built by an industrial consortium with Thales Alenia Space Italia as prime contractor and EADS Astrium GmbH as C-SAR instrument responsible. It is expected that Sentinel-1A be launched in 2013. This paper will provide an overview of the Sentinel-1 system, the status and characteristics of the technical implementation. The key elements of the system supporting the maritime user community will be highlighted.

  6. Instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical validation.

    PubMed

    Zigler, S S

    2009-08-01

    Although the promise of new positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents is great, the process of bringing these agents to commercialization remains in its infancy. There are no PET products today that have gone through the full clinical and chemistry development process required to gain marketing approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The purpose of this paper was to review validation from the perspective of the chemistry, manufacturing and controls (CMC) section of an FDA filing, as well as the validation requirements described in FDA good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations, guidance documents and general chapters of the US Pharmacopeia (USP). The review includes discussion of validation from development to commercial production of PET radiopharmaceuticals with a special emphasis on equipment and instrumentation used in production and testing. The goal is to stimulate a dialog that leads to the standardization of industry practices and regulatory requirements for validation practices in PET. PMID:19834450

  7. Well surveying instrument sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Poquette, R.S.

    1981-01-20

    A surveying instrument sensor which includes a gimbal supported for rotation within a casing, a torquer coupled to rotate the gimbal with a first two-axis flexure suspended gyro supported on the gimbal with its spin axis perpendicular to the axis of the gimbal and one of its sensitive axes aligned with the axis of the gimbal, a second two-axis flexure suspended gyro disposed on the gimbal with its spin axis alinged with the axis of the gimbal and having two sensitive axes outputs orthogonal thereto. The output of the first gyro is coupled to the torquer to form a gimbal stabilized loop and the outputs and torquing inputs of the second gimbal coupled into rate capture loops with output signals obtained from the rate captured loops permitting fast and accurate surveying of a well pipe.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  9. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  10. LANDSAT instruments characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Work performed for the LANDSAT instrument characterization task in the areas of absolute radiometry, coherent noise analysis, and between-date smoothing is reported. Absolute radiometric calibration for LANDSAT-5 TM under ambient conditions was performed. The TM Radiometric Algorithms and Performance Program (TRAPP) was modified to create optional midscan data files and to match the TM Image Processing System (TIPS) algorithm for pulse determination. Several data reduction programs were developed, including a linear regression and its plotted result. A fast Fourier transformation study was conducted on the resequenced TM data. Subscenes of homogeneous water within scenes over Pensacola, Florida were used for testing the FFT on the resequenced data. Finally, a gain and pulse height stability study of LANDSAT 5 TM spectral bands was performed.

  11. Instrumented Architectural Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delagi, B. A.; Saraiya, N.; Nishimura, S.; Byrd, G.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation of systems at an architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs executing significant code bodies, not just toy problems or small application fragements, (2) the details of the simulation include the critical details of the design, (3) the view of the design presented by the simulator instrumentation leads to useful insights on the problems with the design, and (4) there is enough flexibility in the simulation system so that the asking of unplanned questions is not suppressed by the weight of the mechanics involved in making changes either in the design or its measurement. A simulation system with these goals is described together with the approach to its implementation. Its application to the study of a particular class of multiprocessor hardware system architectures is illustrated.

  12. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  13. Ideology as instrument.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Michael; Karno, Donna

    2007-12-01

    Comments on the article by J. T. Jost, which argued that the end-of-ideology claims that emerged in the aftermath of World War II were both incorrect and detrimental to the field of political psychology. M. Glassman and D. Karno make three critical points. First, Jost objectified ideology as a grand strategy implemented at the individual level, rather than as an instrument used for a specific purpose in activity. In doing so, he set ideology up as an "object" that guides human behavior rather than as a rational part of human experience. Second, they take issue with the idea that, because somebody acts in a manner that can be categorized as ideological, there actually is such a thing as ideology separate from that event and/or political experience and that psychologists ought to understand the meaning of ideology in order to understand future human activities as outside observers. Third, Jost seems to see this objective ideology as a unidirectional, causal mechanism for activity, a mechanism that assumes individuals act according to ideology, which eclipses the possibility that immediate ideological positions are the residue of purposeful activity. Glassman and Karno suggest that it may be better to take a pluralistic view of ideology in human action. Where ideology does exist, it is as a purposeful instrument--part of a logically based action to meet some ends-in-view--a mixture of immediate goals tied to secondary belief systems (which have been integrated to serve the material purposes of the purveyors of these ideologies). So if we are to understand ideology, we can only understand it through its use in human activity. PMID:18085858

  14. Instrumentation for optical ocean remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    Instruments used in ocean color remote sensing algorithm development, validation, and data acquisition which have the potential for further commercial development and marketing are discussed. The Ocean Data Acquisition System (ODAS) is an aircraft-borne radiometer system suitable for light aircraft, which has applications for rapid measurement of chlorophyll pigment concentrations along the flight line. The instrument package includes a three channel radiometer system for upwelling radiance, an infrared temperature sensor, a three-channel downwelling irradiance sensor, and Loran-C navigation. Data are stored on a PC and processed to transects or interpolated 'images' on the ground. The instrument has been in operational use for two and one half years. The accuracy of pigment concentrations from the instrument is quite good, even in complex Chesapeake Bay waters. To help meet the requirement for validation of future satellite missions, a prototype air-deployable drifting buoy for measurement of near-surface upwelled radiance in multiple channnels is undergoing test deployment. The optical drifter burst samples radiance, stores and processes the data, and uses the Argos system as a data link. Studies are underway to explore the limits to useful lifetime with respect to power and fouling.

  15. Instrument design and optimization using genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzel, Robert; Bentley, Phillip M.; Fouquet, Peter

    2006-10-15

    This article describes the design of highly complex physical instruments by using a canonical genetic algorithm (GA). The procedure can be applied to all instrument designs where performance goals can be quantified. It is particularly suited to the optimization of instrument design where local optima in the performance figure of merit are prevalent. Here, a GA is used to evolve the design of the neutron spin-echo spectrometer WASP which is presently being constructed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France. A comparison is made between this artificial intelligence approach and the traditional manual design methods. We demonstrate that the search of parameter space is more efficient when applying the genetic algorithm, and the GA produces a significantly better instrument design. Furthermore, it is found that the GA increases flexibility, by facilitating the reoptimization of the design after changes in boundary conditions during the design phase. The GA also allows the exploration of 'nonstandard' magnet coil geometries. We conclude that this technique constitutes a powerful complementary tool for the design and optimization of complex scientific apparatus, without replacing the careful thought processes employed in traditional design methods.

  16. Instrumentation and control systems, equipment location; instrumentation and control building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Instrumentation and control systems, equipment location; instrumentation and control building, instrumentation room, bays and console plan. Specifications No. Eng-04-353-55-72; drawing no. 60-09-12; sheet 110 of 148; file no. 1321/61. Stamped: Record drawing - as constructed. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Virtual Instrument Simulator for CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    1997-01-01

    A benchtop virtual instrument simulator for CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) has been built at NASA, Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. The CERES instruments will fly on several earth orbiting platforms notably NASDA's Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites. CERES measures top of the atmosphere radiative fluxes using microprocessor controlled scanning radiometers. The CERES Virtual Instrument Simulator consists of electronic circuitry identical to the flight unit's twin microprocessors and telemetry interface to the supporting spacecraft electronics and two personal computers (PC) connected to the I/O ports that control azimuth and elevation gimbals. Software consists of the unmodified TRW developed Flight Code and Ground Support Software which serves as the instrument monitor and NASA/TRW developed engineering models of the scanners. The CERES Instrument Simulator will serve as a testbed for testing of custom instrument commands intended to solve in-flight anomalies of the instruments which could arise during the CERES mission. One of the supporting computers supports the telemetry display which monitors the simulator microprocessors during the development and testing of custom instrument commands. The CERES engineering development software models have been modified to provide a virtual instrument running on a second supporting computer linked in real time to the instrument flight microprocessor control ports. The CERES Instrument Simulator will be used to verify memory uploads by the CERES Flight Operations TEAM at NASA. Plots of the virtual scanner models match the actual instrument scan plots. A high speed logic analyzer has been used to track the performance of the flight microprocessor. The concept of using an identical but non-flight qualified microprocessor and electronics ensemble linked to a virtual instrument with identical system software affords a relatively inexpensive

  18. Virtual instrument simulator for CERES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, John J.

    1997-12-01

    A benchtop virtual instrument simulator for CERES (clouds and the Earth's radiant energy system) has been built at NASA, Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The CERES instruments will fly on several earth orbiting platforms notably NASDA's tropical rainfall measurement mission (TRMM) and NASA's Earth observing system (EOS) satellites. CERES measures top of the atmosphere radiative fluxes using microprocessor controlled scanning radiometers. The CERES virtual instrument simulator consists of electronic circuitry identical to the flight unit's twin microprocessors and telemetry interface to the supporting spacecraft electronics and two personal computers (PC) connected to the I/O ports that control azimuth and elevation gimbals. Software consists of the unmodified TRW developed flight code and ground support software which serves as the instrument monitor and NASA/TRW developed engineering models of the scanners. The CERES instrument simulator will serve as a testbed for testing of custom instrument commands intended to solve in-flight anomalies of the instruments which could arise during the CERES mission. One of the supporting computers supports the telemetry display which monitors the simulator microprocessors during the development and testing of custom instrument commands. The CERES engineering development software models have been modified to provide a virtual instrument running on a second supporting computer linked in real time to the instrument flight microprocessor control ports. The CERES instrument simulator will be used to verify memory uploads by the CERES flight operations TEAM at NASA. Plots of the virtual scanner models match the actual instrument scan plots. A high speed logic analyzer has been used to track the performance of the flight microprocessor. The concept of using an identical but non-flight qualified microprocessor and electronics ensemble linked to a virtual instrument with identical system software affords a relatively

  19. Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument: Development of a new instrument

    PubMed Central

    Bova, Carol; Barton, Bruce; Hartigan, Celia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this project was to develop the first disease-specific instrument for the evaluation of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. Methods: Focus groups and interview sessions were conducted, with chronic pancreatitis patients, to identify items felt to impact quality of life which were subsequently formatted into a paper-and-pencil instrument. This instrument was used to conduct an online survey by an expert panel of pancreatologists to evaluate its content validity. Finally, the modified instrument was presented to patients during precognitive testing interviews to evaluate its clarity and appropriateness. Results: In total, 10 patients were enrolled in the focus groups and interview sessions where they identified 50 items. Once redundant items were removed, the 40 remaining items were made into a paper-and-pencil instrument referred to as the Pancreatitis Quality of Life Instrument. Through the processes of content validation and precognitive testing, the number of items in the instrument was reduced to 24. Conclusions: This marks the development of the first disease-specific instrument to evaluate quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. It includes unique features not found in generic instruments (economic factors, stigma, and spiritual factors). Although this marks a giant step forward, psychometric evaluation is still needed prior to its clinical use. PMID:26770703

  20. μDirac: an autonomous instrument for halocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostlow, B.; Robinson, A. D.; Harris, N. R. P.; O'Brien, L. M.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G. P.; Newton, H. M.; Pyle, J. A.

    2009-09-01

    We describe a new instrument (μDirac) capable of measuring halocarbons in the atmosphere. Portability, power efficiency and autonomy were critical requirements in the design, and the resulting instrument can be readily deployed unattended on a range of platforms: long duration balloon, aircraft, ship and ground based stations. The instrument is a temperature programmed gas chromatograph with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). The design requirements led to μDirac being built in-house with several novel features. It currently measures a range of halocarbons (CFCs and shorter-lived halocarbons having biogenic and anthropogenic sources) with measurement precisions ranging from ∼1% sd (CCl4) to ∼9% sd (CH3I). Since the prototype instrument was first tested in 2005 the instrument has been proved in the field on technically challenging aircraft and ground based campaigns. Results from one aircraft and two ground-based deployments are described.

  1. μDirac: an autonomous instrument for halocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostlow, B.; Robinson, A. D.; Harris, N. R. P.; O'Brien, L. M.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G. P.; Newton, H. M.; Yong, S. E.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    We describe a new instrument (μDirac) capable of measuring halocarbons in the atmosphere. Portability, power efficiency and autonomy were critical design requirements and the resulting instrument can be readily deployed unattended on a range of platforms: long duration balloon, aircraft, ship and ground-based stations. The instrument is a temperature programmed gas chromatograph with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). The design requirements led to μDirac being built in-house with several novel features. It currently measures a range of halocarbons (including short-lived tracers having biogenic and anthropogenic sources) with measurement precision relative standard deviations ranging from ± 1% (CCl4) to ± 9% (CH3I). The prototype instrument was first tested in 2005 and the instrument has been proved in the field on technically challenging aircraft and ground-based campaigns. Results from an aircraft and a ground-based deployment are described.

  2. Development of Real-Time Coal Monitoring Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan Gurjar, Ph.D.

    2010-06-17

    Relying on coal for energy requires optimizing the extraction of heat content from various blends of coal fuel and reducing harmful constituents and byproducts. Having a real-time measurement instrument provides relevant information about toxic constituents released in the atmosphere from burning coal and optimizes the performance of a power plant. A few commercial instruments exist and have been in operation for more than a decade. However, most of these instruments are based on radioactive sources and are bulky, expensive and time-consuming. The proposed instrument is based on the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The advantage of LIBS is that it is a standoff instrument, does not require sample preparation and provides precise information about sample constituents.

  3. Advanced CO2 removal process control and monitor instrumentation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Dalhausen, M. J.; Klimes, R.

    1982-01-01

    A progam to evaluate, design and demonstrate major advances in control and monitor instrumentation was undertaken. A carbon dioxide removal process, one whose maturity level makes it a prime candidate for early flight demonstration was investigated. The instrumentation design incorporates features which are compatible with anticipated flight requirements. Current electronics technology and projected advances are included. In addition, the program established commonality of components for all advanced life support subsystems. It was concluded from the studies and design activities conducted under this program that the next generation of instrumentation will be greatly smaller than the prior one. Not only physical size but weight, power and heat rejection requirements were reduced in the range of 80 to 85% from the former level of research and development instrumentation. Using a microprocessor based computer, a standard computer bus structure and nonvolatile memory, improved fabrication techniques and aerospace packaging this instrumentation will greatly enhance overall reliability and total system availability.

  4. An experimental VLT cryo-cooler instrumentation vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Gerd; Lizon, Jean-Louis

    2012-09-01

    Cryo-coolers are widely used to provide the required temperature levels of ESO's VLT instrumentation suite, mainly for infrared instruments and their detectors. Nevertheless, mechanical vibrations induced by these refrigerator systems became a serious issue over the last years. Especially for the extremely sensitive VLT-Interferometer even micro vibration levels can be critical. As a consequence ESO started some time ago a comprehensive vibration reduction program. Major tasks involved are the quantification of typical cryo-cooler instrument vibration levels and their impact on the VLT / VLT-I optical stability. This paper describes the design, construction and calibration of a dedicated VLT dummy instrument comprising six powerful state-of-the-art 2-stage cold heads and the subsequent comprehensive vibration measurement test campaign. As a result trendsetting cryo-cooler instrument design and operation recommendations are presented.

  5. Flexible Rover Architecture for Science Instrument Integration and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bualat, Maria G.; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Susan Y.; Park, Eric

    2006-01-01

    At NASA Ames Research Center, the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) fields the K9 and K10 class rovers. Both use a mobile robot hardware architecture designed for extensibility and reconfigurability that allows for rapid changes in instrumentation and provides a high degree of modularity. Over the past ssveral years, we have worked with instrument developers at NASA centers, universities, and national laboratories to integrate or partially integrate their instruments onboard the K9 and K10 rovers. Early efforts required considerable interaction to work through integration issues such as power, data protocol and mechanical mounting. These interactions informed the design of our current avionics architecture, and have simplified more recent integration projects. In this paper, we will describe the IRG extensible avionics and software architecture and the effect it has had on our recent instrument integration efforts, including integration of four Mars Instrument Development Program devices.

  6. Solar Activity-driven Variability of Instrumental Data Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martayan, C.; Smette, A.; Hanuschik, R.; van Der Heyden, P.; Mieske, S.

    2016-06-01

    The unexplained variability of the data quality from Very Large Telescope instruments and the frequency of power cuts have been investigated. Origins for the variability in ambient temperature variations, software, data reduction pipelines and internal to hardware could be discarded. The most probable cause appears to be correlated with the evolution of the cosmic ray rate, and also with solar and terrestrial geomagnetic activity. We report on the consequences of such variability and describe how the observatory infrastructure, instruments and data are affected.

  7. 9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view to the south. The water purification system is visible in the right foreground of the photograph and the instrument air receiver tank is visible in the right background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  8. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  9. 98. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770). POWER DISTRIBUTION UNITS AND CABLE DISTRIBUTION UNITS IN EAST ROW OF CABINETS; LOGIC CONTROL AND MONITOR UNITS FOR BOOSTER AND FUEL SYSTEMS, AND SIGNAL CONDITIONERS IN WEST ROW OF CABINETS. CABLE TRAY TUNNEL ENTRANCE TO LSB (BLDG. 770) AT THE SOUTH END OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106). - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. 97. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770). EAST ROW OF CABINETS INCLUDES, LEFT TO RIGHT: CABLE DISTRIBUTION UNITS, AUTOPILOT CHECKOUT CONTROLS, AND POWER DISTRIBUTION UNITS. NOTE OVERHEAD DUCTS FOR INSTRUMENT AIR CONDITIONING AND CABLE TRAYS ON EAST, WEST, AND SOUTH WALLS. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Trace cable, locate faults with one instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, A. )

    1994-12-01

    One of the problems with cable-tracing instruments that use radio-frequency (RF) signals is that they tend to radiate to nontarget conductors belonging to other utilities, such as telecommunications, gas, and cable TV. False readings generated by these RF units put repair crews at risk of locating the wrong lines, marking them, digging them up and so damaging another company's facilities. Crews at Florida Power Light Co (FP L) now are using a microprocessor-controlled transmitter that energizes the target cable at about 7776 Hz. This tracing frequency energizes only the secondary cable, even when nontarget conductors are nearby. An above-ground receiver detects this signal and guides the operator along the cable path. The instrument, known as the SFL-2000, is sold by AVO International, Blue Bell, Pa. 3 figs.

  12. Portable calibration instrument of hemodialysis unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Liang-bing; Li, Dong-sheng; Chen, Ai-jun

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of meeting the rapid development of blood purification in China, improve the level of blood purification treatment, and get rid of the plight of the foreign technology monopolization to promise patients' medical safety, a parameter-calibrator for the hemodialysis unit, which can detect simultaneously multi-parameter, is designed. The instrument includes a loop, which connects to the hemodialysis unit. Sensors are in the loop in series, so that the dialysis can flow through this loop and the sensors can acquisitive data of various parameters. In order to facilitate detection and carrying, the integrated circuit part modularly based on the ultralow-power microcontrollers,TI MSP430 is designed. High-performance and small-packaged components are used to establish a modular, high-precision, multi-functional, portable system. The functions and the key technical indexes of the instrument have reached the level of products abroad.

  13. Ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, M.J.; Hsu, D.K.; Thompson, D.O.; Wormley, S.J.

    1993-04-06

    An ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument uses active switches and a timing and drive circuitry to control electrical energy to a transducer, the discharging of the transducer, and the opening of an electrical pathway to the receiving circuitry for the returning echoes. The active switches utilize MOSFET devices along with decoupling circuitry to insure the preservation of the unipolar nature of the pulses, insure fast transition times, and maintain broad band width and time resolution. A housing contains the various circuitry and switches and allows connection to a power supply and a movable ultrasonic transducer. The circuitry maintains low impedance input to the transducer during transmitting cycles, and high impedance between the transducer and the receiving circuit during receive cycles to maintain the unipolar pulse shape. A unipolar pulse is valuable for nondestructive evaluation, a prime use for the present instrument.

  14. Ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Michael S.; Hsu, David K.; Thompson, Donald O.; Wormley, Samuel J.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument uses active switches and a timing and drive circuitry to control electrical energy to a transducer, the discharging of the transducer, and the opening of an electrical pathway to the receiving circuitry for the returning echoes. The active switches utilize MOSFET devices along with decoupling circuitry to insure the preservation of the unipolar nature of the pulses, insure fast transition times, and maintain broad band width and time resolution. A housing contains the various circuitry and switches and allows connection to a power supply and a movable ultrasonic transducer. The circuitry maintains low impedance input to the transducer during transmitting cycles, and high impedance between the transducer and the receiving circuit during receive cycles to maintain the unipolar pulse shape. A unipolar pulse is valuable for nondestructive evaluation, a prime use for the present instrument.

  15. The PREMOS/PICARD instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutz, Werner; Fehlmann, André; Hülsen, Gregor; Meindl, Peter; Winkler, Rainer; Thuillier, Gérard; Blattner, Peter; Buisson, François; Egorova, Tatiana; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Fox, Nigel; Gröbner, Julian; Hochedez, Jean-François; Koller, Silvio; Meftah, Mustapha; Meisonnier, Mireille; Nyeki, Stephan; Pfiffner, Daniel; Roth, Hansjörg; Rozanov, Eugene; Spescha, Marcel; Wehrli, Christoph; Werner, Lutz; Wyss, Jules U.

    2009-08-01

    PREMOS is a space experiment scheduled to fly on the French solar mission PICARD. The experiment comprises filter radiometers and absolute radiometers to measure the spectral and total solar irradiance. The aim of PREMOS is to contribute to the long term monitoring of the total solar irradiance, to use irradiance observations for 'nowcasting' the state of the terrestrial middle atmosphere and to provide long term sensitivity calibration for the solar imaging instrument SODISM on PICARD. In this paper we describe the calibration of the instruments. The filter radiometer channels in the visible and near IR were characterized at PMOD/WRC and the UV channels were calibrated at PTB Berlin. The absolute radiometers were compared with the World Radiometric Reference at PMOD/WRC and a power calibration relative to a primary cryogenic radiometer standard was performed in vacuum and air at NPL.

  16. Building Bigger, Better Instruments with Dry Cryostats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Voellmer, George

    2010-01-01

    The cylindrical instrument volume allowable n SOFIA is large, comprising perhaps 400 liters at 4K. However, the cryogen accommodation to enable this environment consumes roughly 20% of the volume, and worsens rues, airworthiness/safety, and handling/operation, Present-day pulse tube coolers have negligible cold volumes, provide adequate cooling powers, and reach colder temperatures than stored cryogen. In addition, they permit safer, more reliable, lower maintenance instrument operation. While the advantages of dry cryostats are well-known and commonly used in labs and ground-based astronomical facilities, SOFIA would require some charges in accommodations to permit a pulse tube cooler to operate on board, Whil e these changes are not negligible, we present our investigation into the feasibility and desirability of making SOFIA a dry cryostat-capable observatory

  17. Evaluation of Instrumentation and Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, A.

    2013-01-31

    In 2010, a project was initiated through a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to evaluate EPRI's rating technology and instrumentation that can be used to monitor the thermal states of transmission lines and provide the required real-time data for real-time rating calculations. The project included the installation and maintenance of various instruments at three 230 kV line sites in northern New York. The instruments were monitored, and data collection and rating calculations were performed for about a three year period.

  18. The Eastern Space and Missile Center - Jonathan Dickinson Instrumentation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, H. E.; Clark, S. R.; Bonner, J. R.; Thomas, C. G.

    The Jonathan Dickinson Instrumentation Facility (JDIF) is an instrumentation station at the Eastern Test Range designed to provide space diversity tracking of all launches from the Eastern Space and Missile Center or Kennedy Space Center. The JDIF includes tracking radar, telemetry, command/control systems, timing, and communication systems and the Navy's Flight Test Support System in one integrated building. Since virtually all of the instrumentation at JDIF is critical to the success of launches, a concept was established to make it possible to run the Eastern Test Range site during mission support from a bank of diesel generators, and to use commercial power for normal day-to-day operations.

  19. Two Radiative/Thermochemical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.; Janoff, Dwight D.; Shelley, Richard M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of absorption and emission complement thermal measurements. Two laboratory instruments for research in combustion and pyrolysis equipped for radiative as well as thermal measurements. One instrument essentially differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) modified to detect radiation emitted by flames. Provides means to evaluate limits of flammability of materials exhibiting exothermic reactions in DSC's. Other instrument used to determine pyrolysis properties of specimens exposed to various gases by measurement of infrared absorption spectra of pyrolysis products.

  20. Instrumentation in Frontal Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Adappa, Nithin D

    2016-08-01

    Frontal recess dissection proposes many challenges to the surgeon. These challenges stem from its highly variable nature, small caliber, difficult visualization, and proximity to vital structures such as the skull base and orbit. As such, delicate mucosal-sparing dissection of the frontal recess with proper instrumentation is paramount to minimize scar formation and ensure patency. Here, the article explores key instrumentation in frontal recess surgery with an emphasis on hand instruments and adjunctive technologies. PMID:27329980

  1. Experimenting with string musical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2012-03-01

    What follows are several investigations involving string musical instruments developed for and used in a Science of Sound & Light course. The experiments make use of a guitar, orchestral string instruments and data collection and graphing software. They are designed to provide students with concrete examples of how mathematical formulae, when used in physics, represent reality that can actually be observed, in this case, the operation of string musical instruments.

  2. Detectors for Tomorrow's Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Cryogenically cooled superconducting detectors have become essential tools for a wide range of measurement applications, ranging from quantum limited heterodyne detection in the millimeter range to direct searches for dark matter with superconducting phonon detectors operating at 20 mK. Superconducting detectors have several fundamental and practical advantages which have resulted in their rapid adoption by experimenters. Their excellent performance arises in part from reductions in noise resulting from their low operating temperatures, but unique superconducting properties provide a wide range of mechanisms for detection. For example, the steep dependence of resistance with temperature on the superconductor/normal transition provides a sensitive thermometer for calorimetric and bolometric applications. Parametric changes in the properties of superconducting resonators provides a mechanism for high sensitivity detection of submillimeter photons. From a practical point of view, the use of superconducting detectors has grown rapidly because many of these devices couple well to SQUID amplifiers, which are easily integrated with the detectors. These SQUID-based amplifiers and multiplexers have matured with the detectors; they are convenient to use, and have excellent noise performance. The first generation of fully integrated large scale superconducting detection systems are now being deployed. I will discuss the prospects for a new generation of instruments designed to take full advantage of the revolution in detector technology.

  3. Radiological instrument. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1985-10-10

    This patent application discloses a radiological measuring instrument including an angularly variable radiation-sensitive structure comprised of two blocks of material having a different index of refraction with one of the materials comprising a radiochromic substance whose refractive index changes through anomolous dispersion as a result of being exposed to radiation. The ratio of the two indices of refraction is selected to be close to unity, with the radiation-sensitive structure being pivotally adjusted so that light is directed into one end of the block comprising the material having the greater index of refraction. This element, moreover, is selected to be clear and transparent with the incident angle being close to the critical angle where total reflection of all incident light occurs. A portion of the incident light is furthermore projected through the clear transparent block without reflection, with the two beams emerging from the other end of the block, where they are detected. Exposure to radiation changes the index of refraction of the radiochromic block and accordingly the reflected energy emerging therefrom. Calibrated readjustment of the angle of incidence provides a measure of the sensed radiation.

  4. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  5. Halo vest instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Dryver R.; Krag, Martin

    1996-05-01

    The halo vest is a head and neck immobilization system that is often used on patients that are recovering from cervical trauma or surgery. The halo vest system consists of a rigid halo that is firmly attached to the skull, an upright support structure for stabilization and immobilization, and a torso-enveloping vest. The main purpose of this study was to measure the forces that are carried by the halo-vest structure as the subject undergoes various activities of daily living and external loading for different vest designs. A tethered strain gage load cell based instrumentation system was used to take these load measurements on ten different subjects. Three different halo-vest systems were evaluated. The primary difference between the vests was the amount of torso coverage and the use of shoulder straps. The loads were measured, analyzed and used to compare the vests and to create a model of halo-vest-neck mechanics. Future applications of this technology to standalone data logging, pin-load measuring and biofeedback applications are discussed.

  6. The tissue diagnostic instrument

    PubMed Central

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M. Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection. PMID:19485522

  7. Optical distance measuring instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An optical instrument, such as a stability monitor or a target range finder, uses an unstabilized laser to project a composite optical signal of coherent light having two naturally occurring longitudinal mode components. A beamsplitter divides the signal into a reference beam which is directed toward one photodetector and a transmitted beam which illuminates and is reflected from a distant target onto a second photodetector optically isolated from the first photodetector. Both photodetectors are operated on the square law principle to provide electrical signals modulated at a frequency equal to the separation between the frequencies of the two longitudinal mode components of the optical signal projected by the laser. Slight movement of the target may be detected and measured by electrically monitoring the phase difference between the two signals provided by the photodetectors and the range of the target measured with the aid of a microprocessor by changing the separation between the longitudinal modes by shifting the length of the resonator cavity in an iterative series of increments.

  8. The tissue diagnostic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M. Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection.

  9. Ultrasonics and space instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design topic selected was an outgrowth of the experimental design work done in the Fluid Behavior in Space experiment, which relies on the measurement of minute changes of the pressure and temperature to obtain reasonably accurate volume determinations. An alternative method of volume determination is the use of ultrasonic imaging. An ultrasonic wave system is generated by wall mounted transducer arrays. The interior liquid configuration causes reflection and refraction of the pattern so that analysis of the received wave system provides a description of the configuration and hence volume. Both continuous and chirp probe beams were used in a laboratory experiment simulating a surface wetting propellant. The hardware included a simulated tank with gaseous voids, transmitting and receiving transducers, transmitters, receivers, computer interface, and computer. Analysis software was developed for image generation and interpretation of results. Space instrumentation was pursued in support of a number of experiments under development for GAS flights. The program included thirty undergraduate students pursuing major qualifying project work under the guidance of eight faculty supported by a teaching assistant. Both mechanical and electrical engineering students designed and built several microprocessor systems to measure parameters such as temperature, acceleration, pressure, velocity, and circulation in order to determine combustion products, vortex formation, gas entrainment, EMR emissions from thunderstorms, and milli-g-accelerations due to crew motions.

  10. Guideline implementation: surgical instrument cleaning.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-05-01

    Cleaning, decontaminating, and handling instructions for instruments vary widely based on the type of instrument and the manufacturer. Processing instruments in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions can help prevent damage and keep devices in good working order. Most importantly, proper cleaning and disinfection may prevent transmission of pathogenic organisms from a contaminated device to a patient or health care worker. The updated AORN "Guideline for cleaning and care of surgical instruments" provides guidance on cleaning, decontaminating, transporting, inspecting, and storing instruments. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel implement appropriate instrument care protocols in their practice settings. The key points address timely cleaning and decontamination of instruments after use; appropriate heating, ventilation, and air conditioning parameters for the decontamination area; processing of ophthalmic instruments and laryngoscopes; and precautions to take with instruments used in cases of suspected prion disease. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:25946180

  11. Instrumentation advances for transonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, Percy J.

    1989-01-01

    New and improved instrumentation, like new and improved wind tunnels, provide capabilities which stimulate innovative research and discovery. During the past few years there have been a number of instrumentation developments which have aided and abetted the acquisition of more accurate aerodynamic data and have led to new physical insights as well. Some of these advances are reviewed, particularly in the area of thin film gages, hot wire anemometry, and laser instrumentation. A description is given of the instruments and/or techniques and some sample results are shown.

  12. Electronic load for testing power generating devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. B.; Stepfer, G.

    1968-01-01

    Instrument tests various electric power generating devices by connecting the devices to the input of the load and comparing their outputs with a reference voltage. The load automatically adjusts until voltage output of the power generating device matches the reference.

  13. Instrumentation and new missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, Fabrizio; Cash, W.; Bautz, M.; Elvis, M.

    2012-09-01

    A Soft X-Ray Grating Mission: Missing Baryons, AGN Outflows, Cosmic Feedback, Coronae Doppler Tomography, and much more | I will review the parameters of the new generation of high efficiency high resolution X-ray grating spectrometers, and present possible mission configurations, which would allow soft X-ray spectrometry to be performed on a large variety of astrophysical sources, with high diagnostic power. Resolving powers of R~4000 at 0.5 keV correspond to velocity accuracies of only few tens of km per second, sufficient to separate physical and dynamical phases of the low red shift photo-ionized and shock-heated inter-galactic medium (IGM), investigate mechanical and metal-feedback from galaxies to their surrounding circum- galactic medium (CGM) and IGM, study the physics and kinematics of AGN outflows, probing the dynamics of hot X-ray gas in clusters from their center to their virial radius and beyond, Doppler-mapping X-ray coronae of active stars.

  14. Interstellar Dust Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Drake, K.; Collette, A.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Krueger, H.; Auer, S.

    2010-10-01

    Interstellar grains traversing the inner planetary system have been identified by the Ulysses dust detector. Space dust detectors on other missions confirmed this finding. Analysis of the Stardust collectors is under way to search for and analyze such exotic grains. Interstellar dust particles can be detected and analyzed in the near-Earth space environment. New instrumentation has been developed to determine the origin of dust particles and their elemental composition. A Dust Telescope is a combination of a Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501, 2008) together with a high mass resolution mass analyzer for the chemical composition of dust particles in space. Dust particles' trajectories are determined by the measurement of induced electric signals when a charged grain flies through a position sensitive electrode system. A modern DTS can measure dust particles as small as 0.2 micron in radius and dust speeds up to 100 km/s. Large area chemical analyzers of 0.1 m2 sensitive area have been tested at a dust accelerator and it was demonstrated that they have sufficient mass resolution to resolve ions with atomic mass number up to >100 (Earth, Moon and Planets, DOI: 10.1007/s11038-005-9040-z, 2005; Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 014501, 2007). The advanced Dust Telescope is capable of identifying interstellar and interplanetary grains, and measuring their mass, velocity vector, charge, elemental and isotopic compositions. An Active Dust Collector combines a DTS with an aerogel or other dust collector materials, e.g. like the ones used on the Stardust mission. The combination of a DTS with a dust collector provides not only individual trajectories of the collected particles but also their impact time and position on the collector which proves essential in finding collected sub-micron sized grains on the collector.

  15. St. Lucie nuclear plant's instrument setpoint control program

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, B.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In the past several years, instrument setpoint control has become an issue of significant utility focus and concern. Various nuclear industry initiatives have contributed to shaping the current environment. Florida Power and Light Company's St. Lucie nuclear plant maintains a proactive approach to implementing an instrument setpoint control program. St. Lucie's timely response to prevailing setpoint issues ensures that an effective setpoint program is the end result. Florida Power and Light (FP and L) initiated a setpoint control program at St. Lucie, a two-unit Combustion Engineering plant, in 1985. The plan's development was the result of obsolete equipment modifications, setpoint changes, and regulatory inquiries.

  16. Using XML and Java for Astronomical Instrumentation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Koons, Lisa; Sall, Ken; Warsaw, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, instrument command and control systems have been highly specialized, consisting mostly of custom code that is difficult to develop, maintain, and extend. Such solutions are initially very costly and are inflexible to subsequent engineering change requests, increasing software maintenance costs. Instrument description is too tightly coupled with details of implementation. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing a general and highly extensible framework that applies to any kind of instrument that can be controlled by a computer. The software architecture combines the platform independent processing capabilities of Java with the power of the Extensible Markup Language (XML), a human readable and machine understandable way to describe structured data. A key aspect of the object-oriented architecture is software that is driven by an instrument description, written using the Instrument Markup Language (IML). ]ML is used to describe graphical user interfaces to control and monitor the instrument, command sets and command formats, data streams, and communication mechanisms. Although the current effort is targeted for the High-resolution Airborne Wideband Camera, a first-light instrument of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, the framework is designed to be generic and extensible so that it can be applied to any instrument.

  17. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Molodtsov, S. L.

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  18. Plans for Advanced LIGO Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    The proposed Advanced LIGO detector will have an increase in sensitivity over initial LIGO by a factor of ten, with an increased bandwidth in the region of highest sensitivity and the ability to tune for specific astrophysical sources. Advanced LIGO will achieve the equivalent of the one-year integrated observation time of initial LIGO in just several hours, allowing observation of astrophysical gravitational waves on a regular basis. The Advanced LIGO detector will replace the existing detector at the LIGO Observatories while retaining the existing building and vacuum system infrastructure. The new instruments build on the initial LIGO Fabry-Perot Michelson Interferometer layout and take advantage of significant advances in technology since the design of initial LIGO in the 1990's. Signal strength/sensitivity will be improved by increasing the laser power, lowering optical absorption, and adding signal recycling to the Fabry-Perot arm cavities. Stray forces on the test masses will be controlled by reducing thermal noise sources in the suspensions and optics and using a multi-staged seismic isolation system with inertial sensing and feedback control. The LIGO laboratory, the LIGO Science Collaboration, and international partners have undertaken a structured program of research and development, including testing of full-scale prototypes in context. Significant progress has been made on several of the detector subsystems. The Advanced LIGO project has been through National Science Foundation peer review and the National Science Board has recommended it for funding. Based on a proposed funding start in 2007, detector installation will begin in 2010, with observations at an advanced level of commissioning in 2013.

  19. Zach's instruments and their characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    The astronomically interested Duke Ernst II von Sachsen-Gotha-Altenburg (1745-1804) hired Baron Franz Xaver von Zach (1754-1832) as court astronomer in 1786. Immediatedly Zach started to make plans for instrumentation for a new observatory. But first they travelled with their instruments (a 2-foot Ramsden transit instrument, the Sisson quadrant, three Hadley sextants, two achromatic refractors and chronometers) to southern France. In Hyàres a tower of the wall around the town was converted into an observatory in 1787. For the building of the new observatory Zach had chosen a place outside of Gotha on the top of the Seeberg. The three main instruments were an 8-foot transit instrument made by Ramsden, a northern and southern mural quadrant made by Sisson and a zenith sector made by Cary, in addition an 8-foot circle made by Ramsden. By analysing the whole instrumentation of Gotha observatory, we can see a change around 1800 in the kind of instruments, from quadrants and sextants to the full circles and from the transit instrument to the meridian circle. The decline of the Gotha observatory started with the early death of the Duke in 1804 and the subsequent departure of Zach in 1806.

  20. Introduction to Instrumentation. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, A. O., III

    This module contains instructional materials on instrumentation to help teachers train students in the job skills they will need as beginning instrumentation technicians. The module addresses the nature of accessing, measuring, and controlling phenomena such as level, flow, pressure, and temperature. Students are introduced to the devices and…

  1. Rating Scale Instruments and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Robert F.; Romanoski, Joseph T.

    2006-01-01

    The article examines theoretical issues associated with measurement in the human sciences and ensuring data from rating scale instruments are measures. An argument is made that using raw scores from rating scale instruments for subsequent arithmetic operations and applying linear statistics is less preferable than using measures. These theoretical…

  2. Associations in Human Instrumental Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, A. Matias; Rosas, Juan M.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to study the contents of human instrumental conditioning. Experiment 1 found positive transfer between a discriminative stimulus (S[superscript D] and an instrumental response (R) that shared the outcome (O) with the response that was originally trained with the S[superscript D], showing the formation of an…

  3. Experimenting with String Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    What follows are several investigations involving string musical instruments developed for and used in a "Science of Sound & Light" course. The experiments make use of a guitar, orchestral string instruments and data collection and graphing software. They are designed to provide students with concrete examples of how mathematical formulae, when…

  4. Technician Program Uses Advanced Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    Describes various aspects of a newly-developed computer-assisted drafting/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) facility in the chemical engineering technology department at Broome Community College, Binghamton, New York. Stresses the use of new instruments such as microcomputers and microprocessor-equipped instruments. (CS)

  5. PRISM project optical instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    The scientific goal of the Passively-cooled Reconnaissance of the InterStellar Medium (PRISM) project is to map the emission of molecular hydrogen at 17.035 micrometers and 28.221 micrometers. Since the atmosphere is opaque at these infrared wavelengths, an orbiting telescope is being studied. The availability of infrared focal plane arrays enables infrared imaging spectroscopy at the molecular hydrogen wavelengths. The array proposed for PRISM is 128 pixels square, with a pixel size of 75 micrometers. In order to map the sky in a period of six months, and to resolve the nearer molecular clouds, each pixel must cover 0.5 arcminutes. This sets the focal length at 51.6 cm. In order for the pixel size to be half the diameter of the central diffraction peak at 28 micrometers would require a telescope aperture of 24 cm; an aperture of 60 cm has been selected for the PRISM study for greater light gathering power.

  6. Miniaturized Environmental Monitoring Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Freidhoff

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the Mass Spectrograph on a Chip (MSOC) program is the development of a miniature, multi-species gas sensor fabricated using silicon micromachining technology which will be orders of magnitude smaller and lower power consumption than a conventional mass spectrometer. The sensing and discrimination of this gas sensor are based on an ionic mass spectrograph, using magnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The fields cause a spatial separation of the ions according to their respective mass-to-charge ratio. The fabrication of this device involves the combination of microelectronics with micromechanically built sensors and, ultimately, vacuum pumps. The prototype of a chemical sensor would revolutionize the method of performing environmental monitoring for both commercial and government applications. The portable unit decided upon was the miniaturized gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector, referred to as a GC/MS in the analytical marketplace.

  7. Cervical Spine Instrumentation in Children.

    PubMed

    Hedequist, Daniel J; Emans, John B

    2016-06-01

    Instrumentation of the cervical spine enhances stability and improves arthrodesis rates in children undergoing surgery for deformity or instability. Various morphologic and clinical studies have been conducted in children, confirming the feasibility of anterior or posterior instrumentation of the cervical spine with modern implants. Knowledge of the relevant spine anatomy and preoperative imaging studies can aid the clinician in understanding the pitfalls of instrumentation for each patient. Preoperative planning, intraoperative positioning, and adherence to strict surgical techniques are required given the small size of children. Instrumentation options include anterior plating, occipital plating, and a variety of posterior screw techniques. Complications related to screw malposition include injury to the vertebral artery, neurologic injury, and instrumentation failure. PMID:27097300

  8. Instrument Remote Control Application Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Hostetter, Carl F.

    2006-01-01

    The Instrument Remote Control (IRC) architecture is a flexible, platform-independent application framework that is well suited for the control and monitoring of remote devices and sensors. IRC enables significant savings in development costs by utilizing extensible Markup Language (XML) descriptions to configure the framework for a specific application. The Instrument Markup Language (IML) is used to describe the commands used by an instrument, the data streams produced, the rules for formatting commands and parsing the data, and the method of communication. Often no custom code is needed to communicate with a new instrument or device. An IRC instance can advertise and publish a description about a device or subscribe to another device's description on a network. This simple capability of dynamically publishing and subscribing to interfaces enables a very flexible, self-adapting architecture for monitoring and control of complex instruments in diverse environments.

  9. Instrument Concept for the Proposed DESDynI SAR instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkovic-Martin, Dragana; Hoffman, James P.; Veilleux, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The proposed DESDynI (Solid Earth Deformation, Ecosystems Structure and Dynamics of Ice) SAR (synthetic aperture radar) Instrument would expand the trade-space of radar instrument concepts and push the boundaries of high-level integration of digital and RF subsystems in order to achieve very precise assessments of system's behavior; DESDynI mission concept would provide continuous science measurements that would greatly enhance understanding of geophysical and anthropological effects in three science disciplines; Trades in instrument architecture implementations and partnership discussions are producing a set of options for science community and NASA to evaluate and consider implementing late in the decade.

  10. Instrumental variables and Mendelian randomization with invalid instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyunseung

    Instrumental variables (IV) methods have been widely used to determine the causal effect of a treatment, exposure, policy, or an intervention on an outcome of interest. The IV method relies on having a valid instrument, a variable that is (A1) associated with the exposure, (A2) has no direct effect on the outcome, and (A3) is unrelated to the unmeasured confounders associated with the exposure and the outcome. However, in practice, finding a valid instrument, especially those that satisfy (A2) and (A3), can be challenging. For example, in Mendelian randomization studies where genetic markers are used as instruments, complete knowledge about instruments' validity is equivalent to complete knowledge about the involved genes' functions. The dissertation explores the theory, methods, and application of IV methods when invalid instruments are present. First, when we have multiple candidate instruments, we establish a theoretical bound whereby causal effects are only identified as long as less than 50% of instruments are invalid, without knowing which of the instruments are invalid. We also propose a fast penalized method, called sisVIVE, to estimate the causal effect. We find that sisVIVE outperforms traditional IV methods when invalid instruments are present both in simulation studies as well as in real data analysis. Second, we propose a robust confidence interval under the multiple invalid IV setting. This work is an extension of our work on sisVIVE. However, unlike sisVIVE which is robust to violations of (A2) and (A3), our confidence interval procedure provides honest coverage even if all three assumptions, (A1)-(A3), are violated. Third, we study the single IV setting where the one IV we have may actually be invalid. We propose a nonparametric IV estimation method based on full matching, a technique popular in causal inference for observational data, that leverages observed covariates to make the instrument more valid. We propose an estimator along with

  11. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  12. Dynamics and control of instrumented harmonic drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazerooni, H.; Ellis, S. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Since torque in harmonic drives is transmitted by a pure couple, harmonic drives do not generate radial forces and therefore can be instrumented with torque sensors without interference from radial forces. The installation of torque sensors on the stationary component of harmonic drives (the Flexipline cup in this research work) produce backdrivability needed for robotic and telerobotic compliant maneuvers. Backdrivability of a harmonic drive, when used as torque increaser, means that the output shaft can be rotated via finite amount of torque. A high ratio harmonic drive is non-backdrivable because its output shaft cannot be turned by applying a torque on it. This article first develops the dynamic behavior of a harmonic drive, in particular the non-backdrivability, in terms of a sensitivity transfer function. The instrumentation of the harmonic drive with torque sensor is then described. This leads to a description of the control architecture which allows modulation of the sensitivity transfer function within the limits established by the closed-loop stability. A set of experiments on an active hand controller, powered by a DC motor coupled to an instrumented harmonic drive, is given to exhibit this method's limitations.

  13. GEOS Instrument of Opportunity (IoO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NOAA's three-axis stabilized series of GOES satellites have a place reserved on the Earth-facing side for an Instrument of Opportunity (IoO). The IoO slot is a location for new technologies that provide space-time-spectral resolution of the environment not possible with the preconceived Imager and Sounder. For example, candidate IoO's have usually proposed to use large-format staring arrays of detectors. The size, weight, power, data rate, and interface allocations for the IoO are modest in comparison to the Imager and Sounder, but the resources are large enough to allow for the collection of useful real time data. Because, the geosynchronous location is ideal for monitoring rapidly changing unpredictable events, IoO's have been suggested to detect lightning, volcanism, ozone and sulfur dioxide, ocean color, vegetation, special weather events, and even broadcast color TV. To become an IoO on GOES, the proposed instrument must: 1) have potential benefit to NOAA, 2) fit within the allocation constraints, 3) be independently funded, including pre-launch test equipment and the spacecraft accommodation costs, 4) be delivered two years before launch for integration and testing, and 5) not interfere with the existing launch schedule or the operational instruments.

  14. Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    This report details the interim progress for contract NASW-4818, Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID), a robotic system for deploying science instruments and acquiring samples for analysis. The system is a conventional four degree of freedom manipulator 2 meters in length. A baseline design has been achieved through analysis and trade studies. The design considers environmental operating conditions on the surface of Mars, as well as volume constraints on proposed Mars landers. Control issues have also been studied, and simulations of joint and tip movements have been performed. A passively braked shape memory actuator with the ability to measure load has been developed. The wrist also contains a mechanism which locks the lid output to the bucket so that objects can be grasped and released for instrument deployment. The wrist actuator has been tested for operational power and mechanical functionality at Mars environmental conditions. The torque which the actuator can produce has been measured. Also, testing in Mars analogous soils has been performed.

  15. Workshop on advanced technologies for planetary instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, J. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    NASA's robotic solar system exploration program requires a new generation of science instruments. Design concepts are now judged against stringent mass, power, and size constraints--yet future instruments must be highly capable, reliable, and, in some applications, they must operate for many years. The most important single constraint, however, is cost: new instruments must be developed in a tightly controlled design-to-cost environment. Technical innovation is the key to success and will enable the sophisticated measurements needed for future scientific exploration. As a fundamental benefit, the incorporation of breakthrough technologies in planetary flight hardware will contribute to U.S. industrial competitiveness and will strengthen the U.S. technology base. The Workshop on Advanced Technologies for Planetary Instruments was conceived to address these challenges, to provide an open forum in which the NASA and DoD space communities could become better acquainted at the working level, and to assess future collaborative efforts. Over 300 space scientists and engineers participated in the two-and-a-half-day meeting held April 28-30, 1993, in Fairfax, Virginia. It was jointly sponsored by NASA's Solar System Exploration Division (SSED), within the Office of Space Science (OSS); NASA's Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology (OACT); DoD's Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO), now called the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO); and the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI). The meeting included invited oral and contributed poster presentations, working group sessions in four sub-disciplines, and a wrap-up panel discussion. On the first day, the planetary science community described instrumentation needed for missions that may go into development during the next 5 to 10 years. Most of the second day was set aside for the DoD community to inform their counterparts in planetary science about their interests and capabilities, and to describe the

  16. Modularized Parallel Neutron Instrument Simulation on the TeraGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Meili; Cobb, John W; Hagen, Mark E; Miller, Stephen D; Lynch, Vickie E

    2007-01-01

    In order to build a bridge between the TeraGrid (TG), a national scale cyberinfrastructure resource, and neutron science, the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG) is focused on introducing productive HPC usage to the neutron science community, primarily the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Monte Carlo simulations are used as a powerful tool for instrument design and optimization at SNS. One of the successful efforts of a collaboration team composed of NSTG HPC experts and SNS instrument scientists is the development of a software facility named PSoNI, Parallelizing Simulations of Neutron Instruments. Parallelizing the traditional serial instrument simulation on TeraGrid resources, PSoNI quickly computes full instrument simulation at sufficient statistical levels in instrument de-sign. Upon SNS successful commissioning, to the end of 2007, three out of five commissioned instruments in SNS target station will be available for initial users. Advanced instrument study, proposal feasibility evalua-tion, and experiment planning are on the immediate schedule of SNS, which pose further requirements such as flexibility and high runtime efficiency on fast instrument simulation. PSoNI has been redesigned to meet the new challenges and a preliminary version is developed on TeraGrid. This paper explores the motivation and goals of the new design, and the improved software structure. Further, it describes the realized new fea-tures seen from MPI parallelized McStas running high resolution design simulations of the SEQUOIA and BSS instruments at SNS. A discussion regarding future work, which is targeted to do fast simulation for automated experiment adjustment and comparing models to data in analysis, is also presented.

  17. Validating GOES Instrument Thermal Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harter, Peter; Ghaffarian, Benny; Ng, Ray; Pugh, Brett; Wilkin, Paul; Sayal, Chetan; Chu, Don

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) instrument thermal model predictions with on-orbit data shows that the models capture the observed temperature and misalignment trends. Lack of precise knowledge as to spacecraft pointing precludes such comparison with instrument pointing predictions. Based on the models, thermally induced instrument attitude variation will dominate GOES N-Q Image Motion Compensation (IMC). Errors due to day-to-day changes in the attitude profiles are predicted to be under 10 microradians except for rapid scans where disturbances may reach 30 microradians.

  18. Adjustable extender for instrument module

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, J.B.; Stein, A.D.

    1975-11-01

    A blank extender module used to mount an instrument module in front of its console for repair or test purposes has been equipped with a rotatable mount and means for locking the mount at various angles of rotation for easy accessibility. The rotatable mount includes a horizontal conduit supported by bearings within the blank module. The conduit is spring-biased in a retracted position within the blank module and in this position a small gear mounted on the conduit periphery is locked by a fixed pawl. The conduit and instrument mount can be pulled into an extended position with the gear clearing the pawl to permit rotation and adjustment of the instrument.

  19. Commissioning Instrument for the GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, S.; Sánchez, B.; Bringas, V.; Espejo, C.; Flores, R.; Chapa, O.; Lara, G.; Chavolla, A.; Anguiano, G.; Arciniega, S.; Dorantes, A.; González, J. L.; Montoya, J. M.; Toral, R.; Hernández, H.; Nava, R.; Devaney, N.; Castro, J.; Cavaller-Marqués, L.

    2005-12-01

    During the GTC integration phase, the Commissioning Instrument (CI) will be a diagnostic tool for performance verification. The CI features four operation modes: imaging, pupil imaging, Curvature WFS, and high resolution Shack-Hartmann WFS. This instrument was built by the Instituto de Astronomía UNAM and the Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI) under GRANTECAN contract after a public bid. In this paper we made a general instrument overview and we show some of the performance final results obtained when the Factory Acceptance tests previous to its transport to La Palma.

  20. Foundations of measurement and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, Isidore

    1990-01-01

    The user of instrumentation has provided an understanding of the factors that influence instrument performance, selection, and application, and of the methods of interpreting and presenting the results of measurements. Such understanding is prerequisite to the successful attainment of the best compromise among reliability, accuracy, speed, cost, and importance of the measurement operation in achieving the ultimate goal of a project. Some subjects covered are dimensions; units; sources of measurement error; methods of describing and estimating accuracy; deduction and presentation of results through empirical equations, including the method of least squares; experimental and analytical methods of determining the static and dynamic behavior of instrumentation systems, including the use of analogs.

  1. Genetic markers as instrumental variables

    PubMed Central

    von Hinke, Stephanie; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Propper, Carol; Windmeijer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The use of genetic markers as instrumental variables (IV) is receiving increasing attention from economists, statisticians, epidemiologists and social scientists. Although IV is commonly used in economics, the appropriate conditions for the use of genetic variants as instruments have not been well defined. The increasing availability of biomedical data, however, makes understanding of these conditions crucial to the successful use of genotypes as instruments. We combine the econometric IV literature with that from genetic epidemiology, and discuss the biological conditions and IV assumptions within the statistical potential outcomes framework. We review this in the context of two illustrative applications. PMID:26614692

  2. Lightweight Regulated Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Power-supply circuit regulates output voltage by adjusting frequency of chopper circuit according to variations. Currently installed in battery charger for electric wheelchair, circuit is well suited to other uses in which light weight is important - for example, in portable computers, radios, and test instruments.

  3. Initial Results of Instrument-Flying Trials Conducted In A Single-Rotor Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crim, Almer D; Reeder, John P; Whitten, James B

    1953-01-01

    Instrument-flying trials have been conducted in a single-rotor helicopter, the maneuver stability of which could be changed from satisfactory to unsatisfactory. The results indicated that existing longitudinal flying-qualities requirements based on contact flight were adequate for instrument flight at speeds above that for minimum power. However, lateral-directional problems were encountered at low speeds and during precision maneuvers. The adequacy, for helicopter use, of standard airplane instruments was also investigated, and the conclusion was reached that special instruments would be desirable under all conditions, and necessary for sustained low-speed instrument flight.

  4. A DMA Instrument with Versatile Capabilities For Rubber Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perier, Laurent; Favier, Arnaud

    2010-06-01

    Following a development of 40 years, 01dB-Metravib is proposing a set of powerful instruments, including innovative and unique capabilities. The different instruments are covering a unique frequency range from static up to 10,000Hz. Additionnaly to standard DMA tests, thanks to high force capabilities (up to +/-450N), it is possible to understand strain dependence of the material up to very high dynamic strain (+/-300% and higher) and also to propose on the same instrument, complementary tests such as: fatigue, heat build up, crack growth, excitation waveform control, automated glass transition detection and optimization of measurement, …. This presentation illustrates some of the capability of the DMA+ range of instrument applied to different kind of rubbers and elastomers material.

  5. Science with Constellation-X, Choice of Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornscheimeier, Ann; White, Nicholas; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Cottam, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation X-ray Observatory is one of the two Beyond Einstein Great Observatories and will provide a 100-fold increase in collecting area in high spectral resolving power X-ray instruments over the Chandra and XMM-Newton gratings instruments. The mission has four main science objectives which drive the requirements for the mission. This contribution to the Garmire celebration conference describes these four science areas: Black Holes, Dark Energy, Missing Baryons, and the Neutron Star Equation of State as well as the requirements flow-down that give rise to the choice of instrumentation and implementation for Constellation-X. As we show, each of these science areas place complementary constraints on mission performance parameters such as collecting area, spectral resolving power, timing resolution, and field of view. The mission's capabilities will enable a great breadth of science, and its resources will be open to the community through its General Observer program.

  6. Trace Gas Retrievals from the GeoTASO Aircraft Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlan, C. R.; Liu, X.; Leitch, J. W.; Liu, C.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Chance, K.; Cole, J.; Delker, T.; Good, W. S.; Murcray, F.; Ruppert, L.; Soo, D.; Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Janz, S. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Pickering, K. E.; Zoogman, P.; Al-Saadi, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) instrument is a passive remote sensing instrument capable of making 2-D measurements of trace gases and aerosols from aircraft. The instrument measures backscattered UV and visible radiation, allowing the retrieval of trace gas amounts below the aircraft at horizontal resolutions on the order of 250 m x 250 m. GeoTASO was originally developed under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program as a test-bed instrument for the Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) decadal survey mission, and is now also part of risk reduction for the upcoming Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) geostationary satellite missions. We present spatially resolved observations of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide over urban areas and power plants from flights during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaigns in Texas and Colorado, as well as comparisons with observations made by ground-based Pandora spectrometers, in situ monitoring instruments and other aircraft instruments deployed during these campaigns. These measurements at various times of day are providing a very useful data set for testing and improving TEMPO and GEMS retrieval algorithms, as well as demonstrating prototype validation strategies.

  7. TSI Instrument Validations on the TSI Radiometer Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Harber, D.; Heuerman, K.

    2011-12-01

    Offsets between total solar irradiance (TSI) instruments have perplexed the solar and climate communities particularly since the launch of the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) on NASA's SORCE mission. The recent creation of the TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) under NASA's Glory program has helped resolve these differences by determining the instrumental causes of measurement offsets. The TRF is the world's first laboratory reference capable of validating TSI instruments to needed accuracy levels as they are operated in space, that is in vacuum and illuminated by a uniform incident beam at full solar power levels to enable irradiance calibrations. Diagnostic tests on the TRF with several TSI instruments indicate that unaccounted for internal instrument scatter causes erroneously high readings in traditional TSI instrument designs. These tests favor the lower TSI value of 1361 W/m2, as reported by the SORCE/TIM. I will present an overview of the TRF capabilities and the results of instrument comparisons on this facility with representative SORCE and Glory TIMs, the PICARD/PREMOS, the SoHO/VIRGO, and the ACRIMSat/ACRIM3.

  8. ISIS Support for Dawn Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J. A.; Barrett, J. M.; Sides, S. C.; Titus, T. N.

    2012-03-01

    The USGS ISIS system now includes support for the Dawn FC and VIR instruments with ingestion and camera/sensor model software. This provides the scientific community with the means to process Dawn image data into geologic maps.

  9. Instrumentation for Air Pollution Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollowell, Craig D.; McLaughlin, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the techniques which form the basis of current commercial instrumentation for monitoring five major gaseous atmospheric pollutants (sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxidants, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons). (JR)

  10. Self-playing musical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Karen

    2001-05-01

    This do-ahead Physics Olympics competition is a musical challenge based on one designed by Dan Calder for a past New Hampshire Physics Olympics. The objective is to build a musical instrument that is self-playing.

  11. Life support subsystem monitoring instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Kostell, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    The recognition of the need for instrumentation in manned spacecraft life-support subsystems has increased significantly over the past several years. Of the required control and monitoring instrumentation, this paper will focus on the monitoring instrumentation as applied to life-support subsystems. The initial approach used independent sensors, independent sensor signal conditioning circuitry, and independent logic circuitry to provide shutdown protection only. This monitoring system was replaced with a coordinated series of printed circuit cards, each of which contains all the electronics to service one sensor and provide performance trend information, fault detection and isolation information, and shutdown protection. Finally, a review of sensor and instrumentation problems is presented, and the requirement for sensors with built-in signal conditioning and provisions for in situ calibration is discussed.

  12. Ames Scientists Develop MSL Instrument

    NASA Video Gallery

    David Blake, a research scientist at NASA Ames, led the development of CheMin, one of ten scientific instruments onboard Curiosity, the Mars Scientific Laboratory. The Powder X-Ray Diffraction tool...

  13. Course on Instruments Updates Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Describes a course in chemical instrumentation for high school chemistry teachers, paid for by Union Carbide. Teachers used spectrophotometer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, atomic absorption spectrograph, gas chromatograph, liquid chromatograph and infrared spectrophotometer. Also describes other teacher education seminars. (JM)

  14. Instruments and attachments for electronystagmography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mironenko, Y. T.; Vilenskiy, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    A portable set of instruments and devices was developed which makes it possible to record spontaneous nystagmus with open and closed eyes. Rotational, caloric, position, and pressure nystagmus under any conditions may also be recorded.

  15. Tailoring Instrumentation to the Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abplanalp, Glen H.; Menzenhauer, Fred C.

    1978-01-01

    This article provides guidelines in selecting appropriate instrumentation for water treatment facilities. Major areas of concern include: technical operating requirements of the process; equipment design and quality; installations; and mechanical aptitude of personnel. (CS)

  16. Modular Approach to Instrumental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, Richard L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    To remedy certain deficiencies, an instrument analysis course was reorganized into six one-unit modules: optical spectroscopy, magnetic resonance, separations, electrochemistry, radiochemistry, and computers and interfacing. Selected aspects of the course are discussed. (SK)

  17. Islamic Astronomical Instruments and Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, Tofigh

    This chapter is a brief survey of astronomical instruments being used and developed in Islamic territories from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries as well as a concise account of major observatories and observational programs in this period.

  18. Interfacing Microcomputers with Laboratory Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joseph W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes development of microcomputer-controlled gamma scintillation spectrometer and chromatographic data analyzer, including design and construction of interface electronics and production of software. Includes diagrams of electric circuits and project evaluation indicating that both instruments functioned as intended. (JN)

  19. Instrument detects bacterial life forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plakas, C.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument assays enzymatic bioluminescent reaction that occurs when adenosine triphosphate /ATP/ combines with lucifrase and luciferin. Module assembly minimizes need for hardware associated with reaction fluid and waste transfer. System is applicable in marine biology and aerospace and medical fields.

  20. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... paragraph (d) of this section, no person may take off an aircraft with inoperative instruments or equipment... airplane, glider, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered parachute, or weight-shift-control aircraft, for which... small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has...

  1. 18 CFR 367.1750 - Account 175, Derivative instrument assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... instrument assets. 367.1750 Section 367.1750 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Assets § 367.1750 Account 175,...

  2. 18 CFR 367.2440 - Account 244, Derivative instrument liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... instrument liabilities. 367.2440 Section 367.2440 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Liabilities § 367.2440 Account...

  3. 18 CFR 367.1750 - Account 175, Derivative instrument assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... instrument assets. 367.1750 Section 367.1750 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Assets § 367.1750 Account 175,...

  4. 18 CFR 367.2440 - Account 244, Derivative instrument liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... instrument liabilities. 367.2440 Section 367.2440 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Liabilities § 367.2440 Account...

  5. 18 CFR 367.1750 - Account 175, Derivative instrument assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... instrument assets. 367.1750 Section 367.1750 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Assets § 367.1750 Account 175,...

  6. 18 CFR 367.2440 - Account 244, Derivative instrument liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... instrument liabilities. 367.2440 Section 367.2440 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Liabilities § 367.2440 Account...

  7. 18 CFR 367.1750 - Account 175, Derivative instrument assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... instrument assets. 367.1750 Section 367.1750 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Assets § 367.1750 Account 175,...

  8. 21 CFR 886.4150 - Vitreous aspiration and cutting instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitreous aspiration and cutting instrument. 886.4150 Section 886.4150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... powered device, which may use ultrasound, intended to remove vitreous matter from the vitreous cavity...

  9. 21 CFR 886.4150 - Vitreous aspiration and cutting instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vitreous aspiration and cutting instrument. 886.4150 Section 886.4150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... powered device, which may use ultrasound, intended to remove vitreous matter from the vitreous cavity...

  10. 21 CFR 886.4150 - Vitreous aspiration and cutting instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vitreous aspiration and cutting instrument. 886.4150 Section 886.4150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... powered device, which may use ultrasound, intended to remove vitreous matter from the vitreous cavity...

  11. 103. LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770): LOGIC CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770): LOGIC CONTROL AND MONITOR UNIT FOR BOOSTER AND FUEL SYSTEMS, INCLUDING MISSILE GROUND POWER, HYDRAULICS, PURGE, AND COMMIT - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. 116. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (206), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. VIEW OF NORTH SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (206), LSB (BLDG. 751), WITH CABINETS ON EAST SIDE OF ROOM FACING WEST. THE ROW OF CABINETS ON EAST SIDE OF ROOM INCLUDES LEFT TO RIGHT: CABLE DISTRIBUTION UNITS, AUTOPILOT CONTROLS, AND POWER DISTRIBUTION UNITS. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. 95. VIEW OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM FROM NORTHEAST CORNER SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. VIEW OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM FROM NORTHEAST CORNER SHOWING PART OF EACH OF TWO ROWS OF CABINETS CONTAINING ESTERLINE ANGUS CHART RECORDERS. West end of back row of cabinets, containing power distribution units, not accessible for photography. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Toward a Critical Instructional Technology: Instrumental Rationality, Objectification, and Psychologism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gur, Bekir S.

    2007-01-01

    Using a multiple-paper format, this dissertation includes three papers. By providing critiques of instrumental rationality, objectification, and psychologism in instructional technology," this study aims to provide a tentative formulation of a "critical instructional technology that is sensitive to power and ethics. The first article starts by…

  15. Instrumentation for Reflectance Spectroscopy and Microspectroscopy with Application to Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    We present instrument concepts for in-situ reflectance spectroscopy over a spatial resolution range from several meters to tens of micrometers. These have been adapted to the low mass and power requirements of rover or similar platforms. Described are a miniaturized imaging spectrometer for rover mast, a combined mast and arm point spectrometer, and an imaging microspectrometer for the rover arm.

  16. The Spatial Power Motivation Scale: a semi-implicit measure of situational power motivation.

    PubMed

    Schoel, Christiane; Zimmer, Katharina; Stahlberg, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new nonverbal and unobtrusive measure to assess power motive activation, the Spatial Power Motivation Scale (SPMS). The unique features of this instrument are that it is (a) very simple and economical, (b) reliable and valid, and (c) sensitive to situational changes. Study 1 demonstrates the instrument's convergent and discriminant validity with explicit measures. Study 2 demonstrates the instrument's responsiveness to situational power motive salience: anticipating and winning competition versus losing competition and watching television. Studies 3 and 4 demonstrate that thoughts of competition result in higher power motivation specifically for individuals with a high dispositional power motive. PMID:24815377

  17. Advanced Instrumentation for Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M; Kisner, Roger; Fugate, David L

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is pursuing embedded instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology for next generation nuclear power generation applications. Embedded systems encompass a wide range of configurations and technologies; we define embedding in this instance as the integration of the sensors and the control system design into the component design using a systems engineering process. Embedded I&C systems are often an essential part of developing new capabilities, improving reliability, enhancing performance, and reducing operational costs. The new intrinsically safe, more efficient, and cost effective reactor technologies (Next Generation Nuclear Plant and Small Modular Reactors) require the development and application of new I&C technologies. These new designs raise extreme environmental challenges such as high temperatures (over 700 C) and material compatibility (e.g., molten salts). The desired reliability and functionality requires measurements in these extreme conditions including high radiation environments which were not previously monitored in real time. The DOE/NE Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program currently has several projects investigating I&C technologies necessary to make these reactor designs realizable. The project described in this paper has the specific goal of investigating embedded I&C with the following objectives: 1.Explore and quantify the potential gains from embedded I&C improved reliability, increased performance, and reduced cost 2.Identify practical control, sensing, and measurement techniques for the extreme environments found in high-temperature reactors 3.Design and fabricate a functional prototype high-temperature cooling pump for molten salts represents target demonstration of improved performance, reliability, and widespread usage There are many engineering challenges in the design of a high-temperature liquid salt cooling pump. The pump and motor are in direct contact with

  18. The SETI instrument development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The architecture of the instrument system for the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) program is briefly described and the development approach used to implement the operational instruments is discussed. The two versions of the instrument system include a target survey instrument to observe at a very high sensitivity a selected set of interesting stars that have particular a priori promise, and a sky survey instrument to observe the entire celestial sphere at a lower sensitivity. The targeted survey utilizes the 305 meter antenna at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, a 64 meter DSN antenna, and other large radio telescopes. The Arecibo instrument provides the highest sensitivity by virtue of the antenna gain. The antenna line feeds cover an instantaneous frequency range of 50 MHz (tunable over 100 MHz), while the multichannel spectrum analyzer/signal detector is capable of analyzing a frequency segment 16 MHz wide with a maximum resolution of 1 Hz. The sky survey employs a listen-only, 34 meter antenna. The SETI breadboard development is also described.

  19. Instrument Modelling in Observational Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, P.; Rosa, M. R.

    2004-07-01

    By constructing instrument models which incorporate as full as possible a knowledge of optical and detector physics, the calibration of astronomical data can be placed on a firmer footing than is currently the norm. A number of developments make it more practical today to efficiently use optical models in the whole observational process: At first, the proposer can prepare observations using model based exposure time estimators and data simulators. Second, the observatory controls the instrumental configuration, tests data analysis procedures and provides calibration solutions with the help of instrument and environment models. We show in particular how such models can be used to ease very significantly the calibration and operation of complex instruments from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope and provide a high level of homogeneity and integrity in the post-operational archives. We review the role of instrument models for observatory operations, observing, pipeline processing and data interpretation and describe the current usage of instrument modelling at the ST-ECF and ESO.

  20. CARMENES. IV: instrument control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guàrdia, Josep; Colomé, Josep; Ribas, Ignasi; Hagen, Hans-Jürgen; Morales, Rafael; Abril, Miguel; Galadí-Enríquez, David; Seifert, Walter; Sánchez Carrasco, Miguel A.; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Amado, Pedro J.; Caballero, Jose A.; Mandel, Holger

    2012-09-01

    The overall purpose of the CARMENES instrument is to perform high-precision measurements of radial velocities of late-type stars with long-term stability. CARMENES will be installed in 2014 at the 3.5 m telescope in the German- Spanish Astronomical Center at Calar Alto observatory (CAHA, Spain) and will be equipped with two spectrographs in the near-infrared and visible windows. The technology involved in such instrument represents a challenge at all levels. The instrument coordination and management is handled by the Instrument Control System (ICS), which is responsible of carrying out the operations of the different subsystems and providing a tool to operate the instrument from low to high user interaction level. The main goal of the ICS and the CARMENES control layer architecture is to maximize the instrument efficiency by reducing time overheads and by operating it in an integrated manner. The ICS implements the CARMENES operational design. A description of the ICS architecture and the application programming interfaces for low- and high-level communication is given. Internet Communications Engine is the technology selected to implement most of the interface protocols.

  1. 18 CFR 367.1760 - Account 176, Derivative instrument assets-Hedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Account 176, Derivative instrument assets-Hedges. 367.1760 Section 367.1760 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND...

  2. High Data Rate Instrument Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schober, Wayne; Lansing, Faiza; Wilson, Keith; Webb, Evan

    1999-01-01

    The High Data Rate Instrument Study was a joint effort between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The objectives were to assess the characteristics of future high data rate Earth observing science instruments and then to assess the feasibility of developing data processing systems and communications systems required to meet those data rates. Instruments and technology were assessed for technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006. The highest data rate instruments are hyperspectral and synthetic aperture radar instruments which are capable of generating 3.2 Gigabits per second (Gbps) and 1.3 Gbps, respectively, with a technology readiness date of 2003. These instruments would require storage of 16.2 Terebits (Tb) of information (RF communications case of two orbits of data) or 40.5 Tb of information (optical communications case of five orbits of data) with a technology readiness date of 2003. Onboard storage capability in 2003 is estimated at 4 Tb; therefore, all the data created cannot be stored without processing or compression. Of the 4 Tb of stored data, RF communications can only send about one third of the data to the ground, while optical communications is estimated at 6.4 Tb across all three technology readiness dates of 2000, 2003, and 2006 which were used in the study. The study includes analysis of the onboard processing and communications technologies at these three dates and potential systems to meet the high data rate requirements. In the 2003 case, 7.8% of the data can be stored and downlinked by RF communications while 10% of the data can be stored and downlinked with optical communications. The study conclusion is that only 1 to 10% of the data generated by high data rate instruments will be sent to the ground from now through 2006 unless revolutionary changes in spacecraft design and operations such as intelligent data extraction are developed.

  3. 14 CFR 25.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or more physically separate units or components connected together (such as a remote indicating gyroscopic direction indicator that includes a magnetic sensing element, a gyroscopic unit, an amplifier...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or more physically separate units or components connected together (such as a remote indicating gyroscopic direction indicator that includes a magnetic sensing element, a gyroscopic unit, an amplifier...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1331 - Instruments using a power supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... or more physically separate units or components connected together (such as a remote indicating gyroscopic direction indicator that includes a magnetic sensing element, a gyroscopic unit, an amplifier...

  6. Analytical techniques and instrumentation: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technical information on developments in instrumentation is arranged into four sections: (1) instrumentation for analysis; (2) analysis of matter; (3) analysis of electrical and mechanical phenomena; and (4) structural analysis. Patent information for two of the instruments described is presented.

  7. 14 CFR 33.29 - Instrument connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... must make provision for the installation of instrumentation necessary to ensure operation in compliance... other requirement, dependence is placed on instrumentation that is not otherwise mandatory in the assumed aircraft installation, then the applicant must specify this instrumentation in the...

  8. Accuracies of Incoming Radiation: Calibrations of Total Solar Irradiance Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Harber, D.; Heuerman, K.

    2009-04-01

    All of the energy tracked by the GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment and the driving energy for Earth climate is incident at the top of the Earth's atmosphere as solar radiation. The total solar irradiance (TSI) has been monitored continually for over 30 years from space. Continuity of these measurements has enabled the creation of composite time series from which the radiative forcing inputs to climate models are derived and solar forcing sensitivities are determined. None of the ten spaceborne TSI instruments contributing to the solar climate data record have been calibrated or validated end-to-end for irradiance accuracy under flight-like conditions, and calibration inaccuracies contribute to seemingly large offsets between the TSI values reported by each instrument. The newest of the flight TSI instruments, the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), measures lower solar irradiance than prior instruments. I will review the accuracies of flight TSI instruments, discuss possible causes for the offsets between them, and describe a recently built calibration facility to improve the accuracies of future TSI instruments. The TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) enables end-to-end comparisons of TSI instruments to a NIST-calibrated cryogenic radiometer. For the first time, TSI instruments can be validated directly against a cryogenic radiometer under flight-like conditions for measuring irradiance (rather than merely optical power) at solar power levels while under vacuum. The TRF not only validates TSI instrument accuracy, but also can help diagnose the causes of offsets between different instruments. This facility recently validated the accuracy of the TIM to be launched this year on NASA's Glory mission, establishing a baseline that can link the Glory/TIM to future TSI instruments via this ground-based comparison. Similar tests on the TRF with a ground-based SORCE/TIM support the lower TSI values measured by the SORCE flight unit. These

  9. AIRS-Light instrument concept and critical technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschhoff, Kevin R.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding Earth's climate, atmospheric transport mechanisms, and the hydrologic cycle requires a precise knowledge of global atmospheric circulation, temperature profiles, and water vapor distribution. The accuracy of advanced sounders such as AIRS/AMSU/HSB on NASA's Aqua spacecraft can match radiosonde accuracy. It is essential to fold those capabilities fully into the NPOESS, enabling soundings of radiosonde accuracy every 6 hours around the globe on an operational basis. However, the size, mass, power demands, and thermal characteristics of the Aqua sounding instrument suite cannot be accommodated on the NPOESS spacecraft. AIRS-Light is an instrument concept, developed under the Instrument Incubator Program, which provides IR sounding performance identical to the AIRS instrument but uses advances in HgCdTe FPA technology and pulse tube cooler technology, as well as design changes, to dramatically reduce the size, mass, and power demand, allowing AIRS-Light to meet all NPOESS spacecraft interface requirements. The AIRS-Light Instrument Incubator program fostered the development of photovoltaic-mode HgCdTe detector array technology for the 13.5-15.4 μm band covered by photoconductive-mode HgCdTe arrays in AIRS, achieved state of the art results in this band, and substantially reduced the development risk for this last new technology needed for AIRS-Light implementation.

  10. Readiness Issues for Emergency Response Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Riland; D.R. Bowman; R.J. Tighe

    1999-03-01

    Issues in maintaining readiness of instruments for deployment and use in emergency response situation often differ from those in maintaining instruments for normal operations. Confunding circumstances include use of non-availability of check sources, ensuring instruments are always in calibration and operable, possible use of instruments in different climates, packaging of instrumentation for deployment, transport of instrumentation and check sources, and ensuring users are familiar with instruments. Methods and procedures for addressing these issues are presented. Instrumentation used for survey, in situ measurements, electronic dosimetry, and air conditioning are discussed.

  11. An improved instrument mounting arm.

    PubMed

    Gendeh, B S; Khalid, B A; Alberti, P W

    2001-02-01

    Although some form of commercial instrument mounting arm is available, a paucity of information in the literature may cause problems in selecting the most appropriate model for an ENT department wishing to trial their invention for use in the clinic or operating theatre. The instrument mounting arm described here is based on existing designs used by hobbyists and model makers for many years but the main benefit of this innovation is its multi-purpose use in the operating theatre and cost effectiveness since it is made of aluminum alloy. It is compact, stable and easily adjustable and can incorporate an endoscope holder or an operating end piece to mount various ENT instruments that offers considerable advantages to the unassisted operator. PMID:11320829

  12. Wide Field Instrument Adjutant Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, David

    As Wide Field Instrument Adjutant Scientist, my goal will be to maximize the science capability of the mission in a cost-contained environment. I hope to work with the HQ, project and the FSWG to assure mission success. I plan to play a leadership role in communicating the WFIRST science capabilities to the astronomy community , obtain input from both science teams and the broader community that help derive performance requirements and calibration metrics. I plan to focus on developing the observing program for the deep fields and focus on using them to calibrate instrument performance and capabilities. I plan to organize workshops that will bring together WFIRST team members with astronomers working on LSST, Euclid, JWST, and the ELTs to maximize combined science return. I am also eager to explore the astrometric and stellar seismology capabilities of the instrument with a goal of maximizing science return without affecting science requirements.

  13. Autoclaving of lubricated dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Hegna, I K; Kardel, K; Kardel, M

    1978-03-01

    Test organisms forced mechanically into lubricated, rotating dental instruments (handpieces) were all killed during autoclaving at 134 degrees C for 8 min, even when protected by serum and oil. The test organisms were: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus. Also when testing the sterility of autoclaved simulated instrument surfaces (brass cylinders and pieces of a cotton fabric) which had been inoculated with bacteria and dried before they were sprayed with oil, there was no growth of the test organisms. In addition to the other test organisms, spores of Bacillus subtilis and Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria isolated from used handpieces that had been exposed to several autoclavings were used. Some of the handpieces that had been left to dry after use in the dentist's office before they were autoclaved, were shown not to be sterile. Therefore, the authors suggest that autoclaving of the instruments should take place shortly after use and prescribed cleaning. PMID:274800

  14. ac-resistance-measuring instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.J.

    1981-04-22

    An auto-ranging ac resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an ac excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance.

  15. Safeguards instrumentation: past, present, future

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Instruments are essential for accounting, for surveillance and for protection of nuclear materials. The development and application of such instrumentation is reviewed, with special attention to international safeguards applications. Active and passive nondestructive assay techniques are some 25 years of age. The important advances have been in learning how to use them effectively for specific applications, accompanied by major advances in radiation detectors, electronics, and, more recently, in mini-computers. The progress in seals has been disappointingly slow. Surveillance cameras have been widely used for many applications other than safeguards. The revolution in TV technology will have important implications. More sophisticated containment/surveillance equipment is being developed but has yet to be exploited. On the basis of this history, some expectations for instrumentation in the near future are presented.

  16. Advanced Light Source instrumentation overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.; Hinkson, J.

    1992-10-01

    The accelerator instrumentation played a vital role in commissioning the ALS injector accelerator. It helped us to see whether electron dynamics agreed with our theoretical predictions and important beam parameters met the design specifications. It helped us to see where beam losses occurred and why. In this paper we will start with a brief description of the ALS accelerator complex and the expected performance of it. Then we will describe each diagnostics instrument by its construction, operational principle, requirements, and our experiences with it. We will describe the wall current monitor, the scintillator, the Faraday cup, the beam collimator, the beam position monitor, the direct-current current transformer (DCCT), the traveling wave electrodes the Sabersky finger, and other special instruments. Finally, we will go into some detail on how we measured the beam emittances, the closed orbit, and the betatron tunes.

  17. Multifunction Imaging and Spectroscopic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would perform several different spectroscopic and imaging functions that, heretofore, have been performed by separate instruments. The functions would be reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies; variable-color confocal imaging at two different resolutions; and wide-field color imaging. The instrument was conceived for use in examination of minerals on remote planets. It could also be used on Earth to characterize material specimens. The conceptual design of the instrument emphasizes compactness and economy, to be achieved largely through sharing of components among subsystems that perform different imaging and spectrometric functions. The input optics for the various functions would be mounted in a single optical head. With the exception of a targeting lens, the input optics would all be aimed at the same spot on a specimen, thereby both (1) eliminating the need to reposition the specimen to perform different imaging and/or spectroscopic observations and (2) ensuring that data from such observations can be correlated with respect to known positions on the specimen. The figure schematically depicts the principal components and subsystems of the instrument. The targeting lens would collect light into a multimode optical fiber, which would guide the light through a fiber-selection switch to a reflection/ fluorescence spectrometer. The switch would have four positions, enabling selection of spectrometer input from the targeting lens, from either of one or two multimode optical fibers coming from a reflectance/fluorescence- microspectrometer optical head, or from a dark calibration position (no fiber). The switch would be the only moving part within the instrument.

  18. Aerostat-lofted instrument and sampling method for determination of emissions from open area sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    An aerostat-borne instrument and sampling method was developed to characterize air samples from area sources, such as emissions from open burning. The 10 kg battery-powered instrument system, termed "the Flyer," is lofted with a helium-filled aerostat of 4 m nominal diameter and ...

  19. 77 FR 58419 - Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Licensing Applications for Instrumentation and Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Upgrades for Non-Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft NUREG; request for... public comment on Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control Systems, augmenting NUREG-1537, Part 1... Content,'' for instrumentation and control upgrades and NUREG-1537, Part 2, ``Guidelines for Preparing...

  20. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 29 - Airworthiness Criteria for Helicopter Instrument Flight

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... power to all systems necessary for flight under IFR must be included in the evaluation. (c) Thunderstorm lights. In addition to the instrument lights required by § 29.1381(a), thunderstorm lights which provide high intensity white flood lighting to the basic flight instruments must be provided. The...

  1. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 29 - Airworthiness Criteria for Helicopter Instrument Flight

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... power to all systems necessary for flight under IFR must be included in the evaluation. (c) Thunderstorm lights. In addition to the instrument lights required by § 29.1381(a), thunderstorm lights which provide high intensity white flood lighting to the basic flight instruments must be provided. The...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 29 - Airworthiness Criteria for Helicopter Instrument Flight

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... power to all systems necessary for flight under IFR must be included in the evaluation. (c) Thunderstorm lights. In addition to the instrument lights required by § 29.1381(a), thunderstorm lights which provide high intensity white flood lighting to the basic flight instruments must be provided. The...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 29 - Airworthiness Criteria for Helicopter Instrument Flight

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... power to all systems necessary for flight under IFR must be included in the evaluation. (c) Thunderstorm lights. In addition to the instrument lights required by § 29.1381(a), thunderstorm lights which provide high intensity white flood lighting to the basic flight instruments must be provided. The...

  4. Small instrument to volcanic seismic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, Normandino; Gomariz, Spartacus; Manuel, Antoni

    2014-05-01

    Currently, the presence of volcanoes represents a threat to their local populations, and for this reason, scientific communities invest resources to monitor seismic activity of an area, and to obtain information to identify risk situations. To perform such monitoring, it can use different general purpose acquisition systems commercially available, but these devices do not meet to the specifications of reduced dimensions, low weight, low power consumption and low cost. These features allow the system works in autonomous mode for a long period of time, and it makes easy to be carried and to be installed. In the line of designing a volcanic acquisition system with the previously mentioned specifications, exists the Volcanology Department of CSIC, developers of a system with some of these specifications. The objective of this work is to improve the energy consumption requirements of the previous system, providing three channels of data acquisition and with the possibility to transmit data acquisition via radio frequency to a base station, allowing operation it in remote mode. The developed acquisition system consists of three very low-power acquisition modules of Texas Instruments (ADS1246), and this is designed to capture information of the three coordinate axes. A microprocessor also of Texas Instruments (MSP430F5438) is used to work in low-power, due to it is ready to run this consumption and also takes advantage the power save mode in certain moments when system is not working. This system is configurable by serial port, and it has a SD memory to storage data. Contrast to the previous system, it has a RF communication module incorporated specially to work in remote mode of Lynx (YLX-TRM8053-025-05), and boasts also with a GPS module which keeps the time reference synchronized with module of SANAV (GM-1315LA). Thanks to this last selection of components, it is designed a small system about 106 x 106 mm. Assuming that the power supply system is working during all the

  5. Differential scanning calorimetric studies of nickel titanium rotary endodontic instruments.

    PubMed

    Brantley, W A; Svec, T A; Iijima, M; Powers, J M; Grentzer, T H

    2002-08-01

    Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analyses were performed between -130 degrees and 100 degrees C on specimens prepared from nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary endodontic instruments: ProFile (n = 5), Lightspeed (n = 4), and Quantec (n = 3). The ProFile and Lightspeed instruments were in the as-received condition, whereas the Quantec instruments were randomly selected from a dental clinic and had unknown history. The DSC plots showed that the ProFile and Lightspeed instruments analyzed had the superelastic NiTi property, with an austenite-finish (Af) temperature of approximately 25 degrees C. Differences in DSC plots for the ProFile instruments and the starting wire blanks (n = 2) were attributed to the manufacturing process. The phase transformation behavior when the specimens were heated and cooled between -130 degrees and 100 degrees C, the temperature ranges for the phase transformations, and the resulting enthalpy changes were similar to those previously reported for nickel-titanium orthodontic wires having superelastic characteristics or shape memory behavior in the oral environment. The experiments demonstrated that DSC is a powerful tool for materials characterization of these rotary instruments, providing direct information not readily available from other analytical techniques about the NiTi phases present, which are fundamentally responsible for their clinical behavior. PMID:12184415

  6. Multiple regression analyses in the prediction of aerospace instrument costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Linh

    The aerospace industry has been investing for decades in ways to improve its efficiency in estimating the project life cycle cost (LCC). One of the major focuses in the LCC is the cost/prediction of aerospace instruments done during the early conceptual design phase of the project. The accuracy of early cost predictions affects the project scheduling and funding, and it is often the major cause for project cost overruns. The prediction of instruments' cost is based on the statistical analysis of these independent variables: Mass (kg), Power (watts), Instrument Type, Technology Readiness Level (TRL), Destination: earth orbiting or planetary, Data rates (kbps), Number of bands, Number of channels, Design life (months), and Development duration (months). This author is proposing a cost prediction approach of aerospace instruments based on these statistical analyses: Clustering Analysis, Principle Components Analysis (PCA), Bootstrap, and multiple regressions (both linear and non-linear). In the proposed approach, the Cost Estimating Relationship (CER) will be developed for the dependent variable Instrument Cost by using a combination of multiple independent variables. "The Full Model" will be developed and executed to estimate the full set of nine variables. The SAS program, Excel, Automatic Cost Estimating Integrate Tool (ACEIT) and Minitab are the tools to aid the analysis. Through the analysis, the cost drivers will be identified which will help develop an ultimate cost estimating software tool for the Instrument Cost prediction and optimization of future missions.

  7. A novel microcontroller-based digital instrument for measurement of electrical quantities under non-sinusoidal condition

    SciTech Connect

    Anaya, O.; Moreno, G.E.L.; Madrigal, M.M.

    1999-11-01

    In the last years, several definitions of power have been proposed for more accurate measurement of electrical quantities in presence of harmonics pollution on power lines. Nevertheless, only few instruments have been constructed considering these definitions. This paper describes a new microcontroller-based digital instrument, which include definitions based on Harley Transform. The algorithms are fully processed using Fast Hartley Transform (FHT) and 16 bit-microcontroller platform. The constructed prototype was compared with commercial harmonics analyzer instrument.

  8. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Yvon

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  9. Instruments Sniff Organic Surface Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler-Golden, Steven; Matthew, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    Portable instruments detecting both nonvolatile and volatile organic surface contaminants in real time developed. Instruments easy to use: operate under ordinary ambient atmospheric conditions, without need to use messy liquid solvents or install and remove witness plates, and without need to cut specimens from surfaces to be inspected. Principle of detection involves sweeping pure, activated gas across surface spot inspected, then monitoring light emitted at wavelengths characteristic of excited molecules formed by chemical reactions between activated gas and contaminants. Gas activated by dc discharge, radio-frequency induction, microwave radiation, laser beam, hot filaments, or any other suitable means that excites some of gas molecules.

  10. New generation of GOME instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Albinana, Abelardo; Munro, Rosemary; Corpaccioli, Enrico; Eisinger, Michael; Callies, Joerg; Lefebvre, Alain; Hahne, Achim R.

    2002-02-01

    Following the successful mission of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) on-board the European Space Agency (ESA) ERS-2 satellite, the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) and ESA have decided to embark on-board the Metop satellites an improved version of the GOME spectrometer. The new generation of GOME instruments will provide data for the ozone product chain of the EUMETSAT Polar System, in charge not only of the daily production of ozone data but also of the long term ozone monitoring. This imposes strong accuracy and stability requirements to the instrument, the calibration activities and the ground processing.

  11. Sample acquisition and instrument deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing the Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID) system, a robotic system for deploying science instruments and acquiring samples for analysis. The system is a conventional four degree of freedom manipulator 2 meters in length. A baseline design has been achieved through analysis and trade studies. The design considers environmental operating conditions on the surface of Mars, as well as volume constraints on proposed Mars landers. Control issues have also been studied, and simulations of joint and tip movements have been performed. The systems have been fabricated and tested in environmental chambers, as well as soil testing and robotic control testing.

  12. Instrumentation in Diffuse Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging is highly versatile and has a very broad range of applications in biology and medicine. It covers diffuse optical tomography, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, bioluminescence, and a number of other new imaging methods. These methods of diffuse optical imaging have diversified instrument configurations but share the same core physical principle – light propagation in highly diffusive media, i.e., the biological tissue. In this review, the author summarizes the latest development in instrumentation and methodology available to diffuse optical imaging in terms of system architecture, light source, photo-detection, spectral separation, signal modulation, and lastly imaging contrast. PMID:24860804

  13. SPERTI, Instrument Cell Building (PER606). East facade. Camera facing southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I, Instrument Cell Building (PER-606). East facade. Camera facing southwest. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-3-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. SPERTI, Instrument Cell Building (PER606). North facade. Date: August 2003. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I, Instrument Cell Building (PER-606). North facade. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-3-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. SPERTI, Instrument Cell Building (PER606). West facade. Camera facing northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I, Instrument Cell Building (PER-606). West facade. Camera facing northeast. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-3-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. LACHESIS -- An instrumentation system for obtaining containment and environmental data

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, R.G.; Oblad, F.R.

    1995-09-01

    The instrumentation system developed to obtain containment and environmental data in the LYNER complex is presented. The primary purpose of this report is to familiarize potential operators of the system with the details of its use. The instrumentation system has three major hardware modules: (1) the sensor power source, amplifier, and signal conditioner module, (2) the digitizers, and (3) the computer controller. Each of these is described with emphasis on the steps required to make that component perform effectively. In addition the roles of activities of other people besides the Los Alamos shot engineer who are required to ensure the success of the system are outlined.

  17. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  18. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  19. Kinetic type indicating and recording instruments for determining specific gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, H.E.

    1984-04-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive presentation of the kinetic type gas gravitometer, including: Simple explanation of operating principle; Equipment set-up and operation in field; and Trouble-shooting, repair and adjustment. The kinetic type gas gravitometer is manufactured as a portable indicating type instrument illustrated in Figure 1 and as a stationary recording type instrument illustrated in Figure 2. The basic operating mechanism is identical for both types, but the case, motive power and linkage are modified to adapt them to either portable use or permanent mounting.

  20. PORÍS: practical-oriented representation for instrument systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz-Cedillo, Jacinto Javier

    2010-07-01

    This article presents a toolkit for defining simple but powerful systems. PORIS toolkit is an open and extensible source collaborative project that allows describing system graph-based systems and their behavior in a snapshot. It provides a web editor for a domain visual specific language (DSL) and transformation tools to generate software prototypes, system configurations, specific user interfaces and documentation. Different kind of instruments, like the astronomical ones, can be described and represented using PORIS specifications and models. A significant advantage of using PORIS toolkit is that it makes easy and lighter providing instant feedback to domain experts in the dynamic process of defining new instruments.