Science.gov

Sample records for pumped laser systems

  1. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOEpatents

    Buchwald, Melvin I.; Jones, Claude R.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1982-01-01

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  2. Design of diode laser systems for solid state laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D.; Luethy, Willy A.; Weber, Heinz P.

    2003-11-01

    In contrast to flashlamps the emission of single stripe laser diodes is highly directional and can be focused rather easily to small spots, which gives access to very high pump intensities. Numerical arrangements are possible for transferring the pump radiation to the solid state laser media. In this paper the most important concepts of diode laser systems for pumping solid state lasers are summarized and described. Thereby the aim is to find the most efficient and powerful method for endpumping a Yb3+-double clad fiber.

  3. Diode-pumped laser with improved pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    2004-03-09

    A laser wherein pump radiation from laser diodes is delivered to a pump chamber and into the lasing medium by quasi-three-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator light channels. The light channels have reflective side walls with a curved surface and reflective end walls with a curved surface. A flow tube between the lasing medium and the light channel has a roughened surface.

  4. A modified pump laser system to pump the titanium sapphire laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petway, Larry B.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of the wide tunability of the titanium sapphire laser NASA has sited it to be used to perform differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of H2O vapor in the upper and lower troposphere. The titanium sapphire laser can provide a spectrally narrow (0.3 to 1.0 pm), high energy (0.5 to 1.0 J) output at 727, 762, and 940 nm which are needed in the DIAL experiments. This laser performance can be obtained by addressing the line-narrowing issues in a master oscillator and the high energy requirement in a fundamental mode oscillator. By injection seeding, the single frequency property of the master oscillator can produce a line narrow high energy power oscillator. A breadboard model of the titanium sapphire laser that will ultimately be used in NASA lidar atmospheric sensing experiment is being designed. The task was to identify and solve any problem that would arise in the actual laser system. One such problem was encountered in the pump laser system. The pump laser that is designed to pump both the master oscillator and power oscillator is a Nd:YLF laser. Nd:YLF exhibits a number of properties which renders this material an attractive option to be used in the laser system. The Nd:YLF crystal is effectively athermal; it produces essentially no thermal lensing and thermally induced birefringence is generally insignificant in comparison to the material birefringence resulting from the uniaxial crystal structure. However, in application repeated fracturing of these laser rods was experience. Because Nd:YLF rods are not commercially available at the sizes needed for this application a modified pump laser system to replace the Nd:YLF laser rod was designed to include the more durable Nd:YAG laser rods. In this design, compensation for the thermal lensing effect that is introduced because of the Nd:YAG laser rods is included.

  5. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  6. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J

    2013-10-01

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  7. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James

    2016-05-03

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  8. Diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser injection seeding system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.L.; Rahn, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    We have designed and tested a compact injection seeding system consisting of a diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator and a permanent-magnet Faraday isolator. With active resonator frequency stabilization, this system permits highly reliable single-axial-mode operation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser over a period of hours. The system is capable of injection seeding both stable and unstable resonator designs and is suitable for injection seeding commercial lasers with only minor modifications.

  9. Laser demonstration and performance characterization of optically pumped Alkali Laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulham, Clifford V.

    Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) offer a promising approach for high power lasers in military applications that will not suffer from the long logistical trails of chemical lasers or the thermal management issues of diode pumped solid state lasers. This research focuses on characterizing a DPAL-type system to gain a better understanding of using this type of laser as a directed energy weapon. A rubidium laser operating at 795 nm is optically pumped by a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the dynamics of DPALs at pump intensities between 1.3 and 45 kW/cm2. Linear scaling as high as 32 times threshold is observed, with no evidence of second order kinetics. Comparison of laser characteristics with a quasi-two level analytic model suggests performance near the ideal steady-state limit, disregarding the mode mis-match. Additionally, the peak power scales linearly as high as 1 kW, suggesting aperture scaling to a few cm2 is sufficient to achieve tactical level laser powers. The temporal dynamics of the 100 ns pump and rubidium laser pulses are presented, and the continually evolving laser efficiency provides insight into the bottlenecking of the rubidium atoms in the 2P3/2 state. Lastly, multiple excited states of rubidium and cesium were accessed through two photon absorption in the red, yielding a blue and an IR photon through amplified stimulated emission. Threshold is modest at 0.3 mJ/pulse, and slope efficiencies increase dramatically with alkali concentrations and peak at 0.4%, with considerable opportunity for improvement. This versatile system might find applications for IR countermeasures or underwater communications.

  10. Diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser injection seeding system.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R L; Rahn, L A

    1986-03-01

    We have designed and tested a compact injection seeding system consisting of a diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator and a permanent-magnet Faraday isolator. With active resonator frequency stabilization, this system permits highly reliable single-axial-mode operation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser over a period of hours. The system is capable of injection seeding both stable and unstable resonator designs and is suitable for injection seeding commercial lasers with only minor modifications. PMID:18231224

  11. Optically pumped planar waveguide lasers: Part II: Gain media, laser systems, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivas, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The field of optically pumped planar waveguide lasers has seen a rapid development over the last two decades driven by the requirements of a range of applications. This sustained research effort has led to the demonstration of a large variety of miniature highly efficient laser sources by combining different gain media and resonator geometries. One of the most attractive features of waveguide lasers is the broad range of regimes that they can operate, spanning from continuous wave and single frequency through to the generation of femtosecond pulses. Furthermore, their technology has experienced considerable advances to provide increased output power levels, deriving benefits from the relative immunity from the heat generated in the gain medium during laser operation and the use of cladding-pumped architectures. This second part of the review on optically pumped planar waveguide lasers provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art research in this field in terms of gain materials, laser system designs, and as well as a perspective on the status of their application as real devices in various research areas.

  12. Diode-pumped laser research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Bufton, J. L.; Chan, K.

    1988-01-01

    The Laboratory for Oceans is currently working on the development of compact laser diode array (LD) pumped Nd:YAG lasers for use in space-based altimetry and ranging. Laser diode-array pumping technology promises to increase the electrical to optical efficiency of solid state lasers by an order of magnitude with a lifetime increase of nearly three orders of magnitude relative to today's conventional flashlamp-pumped laser systems. The small size, efficiency, and ruggedness make LD-pumped solid state lasers ideal for space based applications. In an in-house RTOP effort, a novel multiple-pass LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser amplifier was designed and tested to increase the 100 microjoule output pulse energy of the Lightwave laser oscillator. Preliminary results have yielded a round trip amplifier gain of about 15 percent using 7 microjoule LD-pump energy. As a parallel activity, funding was recently obtained to investigate the possible use of custom made fiber optic arrays to obtain an efficient optical coupling mechanism between the emitting laser diode-arrays and the target solid state laser material. Fiber optic coupling arrays would allow for the easy manipulation of the spatial emitting pattern of the diode pump sources to match either an end or side pumping laser configuration.

  13. All solid-state picosecond flashlamp pumped oscillator-amplifier Nd:YAG laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Cech, Miroslav; Kubecek, Vaclav; Dombrovsky, Andrej; Diels, Jean-Claude M.; Stintz, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    Flashlamp pumped oscillator - three amplifiers Nd:YAG picosecond laser system mode-locked with multiple quantum well (MQW) saturable absorber was developed and investigated. 80 ps long pulses with the energy of 120 mJ were generated.

  14. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  15. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  16. Laser emission of Rhodamine 110--coumarin bifluorophoric systems under coaxial flashlamp pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Zhang, F.; Lian Yu, C.

    1987-07-01

    In this paper the experimental results of the laser emission of Rhodamine 110--coumarin bifluorophoric systems under coaxial flashlamp pumping have been reported. When coumarin 7 is used as a sensitizer, the laser output of Rhodamine 110 is increased by 130% over that without a sensitizer.

  17. SOLAR PUMPED LASER MICROTHRUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A M; Beach, R; Dawson, J; Siders, C W

    2010-02-05

    The development of microsatellites requires the development of engines to modify their orbit. It is natural to use solar energy to drive such engines. For an unlimited energy source the optimal thruster must use a minimal amount of expendable material to minimize launch costs. This requires the ejected material to have the maximal velocity and, hence, the ejected atoms must be as light as possible and be ejected by as high an energy density source as possible. Such a propulsion can be induced by pulses from an ultra-short laser. The ultra-short laser provides the high-energy concentration and high-ejected velocity. We suggest a microthruster system comprised of an inflatable solar concentrator, a solar panel, and a diode-pumped fiber laser. We will describe the system design and give weight estimates.

  18. DPSSL pumped 20-TW Ti:sapphire laser system for DD fusion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, T.; Hatano, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kawashima, T.

    2016-03-01

    A diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) pumped 20-TW output Ti:sapphire laser system has been developed. A diode-pumped Nd:glass laser with output energy of 12.7 J in 527 nm was used as a pump source for a 20-TW Ti:sapphire amplifier. A CeLiB6O10 nonlinear optical crystal was used as a frequency doubler of the Nd:glass DPSSL[1]. Figure 1 shows typical output pulse energy of the 20-TW amplifier as a function of pumping energy and a near field pattern. A 1.65 J pulse energy was obtained by 4.5 J pump energy. The amplified seed pulse is compressed to typically 60 fs as shown in Fig. 1 by a vacuumed pulse compressor with 80% of transmissivity. Encircled energy ratio, into a circled with 8 μm diameter area, of far field pattern focused by off-axis parabolic mirror with F# of 3 is numerically evaluated to 40% at TW class output condition. Then focal intensity would reach to 1018W/cm2. This all- DPSSL system contributes for stable and continual investigation of laser induced plasma experiment. We have succeeded continual and high efficient generation of DD fusion neutron from CD nano-particles by cluster fusion scheme using the 20-TW laser. A yield of ∼105 neutrons per shot was stably observed during continuous 100 shots with repetition rate of 0.1Hz.

  19. Pharyngeal pumping continues after laser killing of the pharyngeal nervous system of C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.; Horvitz, H.R. )

    1989-10-01

    Using a laser microbeam to kill specific subsets of the pharyngeal nervous system of C. elegans, we found that feeding was accomplished by two separately controlled muscle motions, isthmus peristalsis and pumping. The single neuron M4 was necessary and sufficient for isthmus peristalsis. The MC neurons were necessary for normal stimulation of pumping in response to food, but pumping continued and was functional in MC- worms. The remaining 12 neuron types were also unnecessary for functional pumping. No operation we did, including destruction of the entire pharyngeal nervous system, abolished pumping altogether. When we killed all pharyngeal neurons except M4, the worms were viable and fertile, although retarded and starved. Since feeding is one of the few known essential actions controlled by the nervous system, we suggest that most of the C. elegans nervous system is dispensable in hermaphrodites under laboratory conditions. This may explain the ease with which nervous system mutants are isolated and handled in C. elegans.

  20. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOEpatents

    Hamil, Roy A.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  1. 885-nm Pumped Ceramic Nd:YAG Master Oscillator Power Amplifier Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a traditional diode pumped solid-state laser that is typically pumped with 808-nm laser diode array (LDA) and crystalline Nd:YAG was improved by using 885-nm LDAs and ceramic Nd:YAG. The advantage is lower quantum defect, which will improve the thermal loading on laser gain medium, resulting in a higher-performance laser. The use of ceramic Nd:YAG allows a higher Nd dopant level that will make up the lower absorption at the 885-nm wavelength on Nd:YAG. When compared to traditional 808-nm pump, 885-nm diodes will have 30% less thermal load (or wasted heat) and will thus see a similar percentage improvement in the overall laser efficiency. In order to provide a more efficient laser system for future flight missions that require the use of low-repetition- rate (laser pulses, laser diodes such as the 885-nm LDA were used for pumping the Nd:YAG laser crystal. This pumping scheme has many potential advantages for improved reliability, efficiency, thermal management, contamination control, and mechanical flexibility. The advantages of using 885-nm pump diodes in Nd:YAG laser systems are numerous. The epitaxial structures of these 885-nm diodes are aluminum-free. There is a significant reduction in the thermal load generated from the Stokes shift or quantum defects. A Stokes shift is the energetic difference between the pump and laser photons. Pumping at a wavelength band closer to the lasing wavelength can reduce the thermal load by .30% compared to traditional pumping at 808 nm, and increase the optical- to-optical efficiency by the same factor. The slope efficiency is expected to increase with a reduction in the thermal load. The typical crystalline Nd:YAG can be difficult to produce with doping level >1% Nd. To make certain that the absorption at 885 nm is on the same par as the 808-nm diode, the Nd:YAG material needs to be doped with higher concentration of Nd. Ceramic Nd:YAG is the only material that can be tailored

  2. Solar pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Weaver, W. R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A solar pumped laser is described in which the lasant is a gas that will photodissociate and lase when subjected to sunrays. Sunrays are collected and directed onto the gas lasant to cause it to lase. Applications to laser propulsion and laser power transmission are discussed.

  3. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  4. Explosively pumped laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Piltch, M.S.; Michelott, R.A.

    1991-09-24

    This patent describes a single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  5. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  6. Off-axis coherently pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A coherently optically pumped laser system is described. A pump laser beam propagates through a laser medium contained in a degenerate cavity resonator in a controlled multiple round trip fashion in such a way that the unused pump beam emerges from an injection aperture at a different angle from which it enters the resonator. The pump beam is angularly injected off of the central axis of the resonator body whereupon the pump beam alternately undergoes spreading and focusing while pumping the laser medium by a process of resonant absorption. The emergent pump beam can also be used as a second pump beam source by being reinjected back into the cavity or it can be used for pumping another laser.

  7. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Osawa, Hitoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge2Sb2Te5 film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width (ΔE∕E ~ 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge2Sb2Te5 phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge2Sb2Te5 layers on laser power. PMID:23822352

  8. Lasant Materials for Blackbody-Pumped Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J. (Editor); Chen, K. Y. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Blackbody-pumped solar lasers are proposed to convert sunlight into laser power to provide future space power and propulsion needs. There are two classes of blackbody-pumped lasers. The direct cavity-pumped system in which the lasant molecule is vibrationally excited by the absorption of blackbody radiation and laser, all within the blackbody cavity. The other system is the transfer blackbody-pumped laser in which an absorbing molecule is first excited within the blackbody cavity, then transferred into a laser cavity when an appropriate lasant molecule is mixed. Collisional transfer of vibrational excitation from the absorbing to the lasing molecule results in laser emission. A workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate new lasant materials for both of these blackbody systems. Emphasis was placed on the physics of molecular systems which would be appropriate for blackbody-pumped lasers.

  9. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  10. /sup 3/He functions in tokamak-pumped laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.

    1986-10-01

    /sup 3/He placed in an annular cell around a tokamak fusion generator can convert moderated fusion neutrons to energetic ions by the /sup 3/He(n,p)T reaction, and thereby excite gaseous lasants mixed with the /sup 3/He while simultaneously breeding tritium. The total /sup 3/He inventory is about 4 kg for large tokamak devices. Special configurations of toroidal-field magnets, neutron moderators and beryllium reflectors are required to permit nearly uniform neutron current into the laser cell with minimal attenuation. The annular laser radiation can be combined into a single output beam at the top of the tokamak.

  11. Holmium laser pumped with a neodymium laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.R.; Rabinovich, W.S.

    1991-07-30

    This patent describes a solid-state laser device. It comprises a holmium laser having a first host material doped with an amount of holmium ions sufficient to produce an output laser emission at about 3 {mu}m when the holmium ions in the holmium laser are pumped by a pump beam at a wavelength of about 1.1 {mu}m; and neodymium laser pump source means for supplying a pump beam to pump the holmium ions in the holmium laser at a wavelength of about 1.1 {mu}m.

  12. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Kim, K. H.; Stock, L. V.

    1986-01-01

    In order to evaluate the feasibility of the solar pumped dye laser, the parametric study of a dye laser amplifier pumped by a solar simulator and flashlamp was carried out, and the amplifier gains were measured at various pump beam irradiances on the dye cell. Rhodamine 6G was considered as a candidate for the solar pumped laser because of its good utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. The measurement shows that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye. The work to construct a kinetic model algorithm which predicts the output parameter of laser was progressed. The kinetic model was improved such that there is good agreement between the theoretical model and experimental data for the systems defined previously as flashlamp pumped laser oscillator, and the long path length solar pumped laser.

  13. Nd:YAG laser side pumped by diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hua; Huang, Weiling; Zhou, Zhouyou; Wang, Hailin; Cao, Hongbing; Wang, Ying

    1999-09-01

    The major limitation of flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers is the low overall efficiency. Replacing flashlamps with high power laser diodes allows an increase of system efficiency by over an order of magnitude. Because of the thermally induced stress fracture of the laser materials, power-scaling possibilities of end-pumped configurations are limited. Therefore side pump geometry has to be used for high power laser. The theory and the design of high power diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser system is described. The Nd:YAG rod is side-pumped by diode laser arrays with wavelength at 808 nm. We analyze the result of our experiments and make some conclusions about the design of side-pumped laser.

  14. Laser Doppler velocimetry for continuous flow solar-pumped iodine laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabibi, Bagher M.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was employed to measure the flow velocity profile of iodide vapor inside laser tubes of 36 mm ID and 20 mm ID. The LDV, which was operated in the forward scatter mode used a low power (15 mW) He-Ne laser beam. Velocity ranges from 1 m/s was measured to within one percent accuracy. The flow velocity profile across the laser tube was measured and the intensity of turbulence was determined. The flow of iodide inside the laser tube demonstrated a mixture of both turbulence and laminar flow. The flowmeter used for the laser system previously was calibrated with the LDV and found to be in good agreement.

  15. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  16. Solar powered blackbody-pumped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Walter H.; Sirota, J. M.

    1991-02-01

    A concept for a solar-powered laser is presented which utilizes an intermediate blackbody cavity to provide a uniform optical pumping environment for the lasant, typically CO or CO2 or possibly a solid state laser medium. High power cw blackbody- pumped lasers with efficiencies on the order of 20 percent or more are feasible. The physical basis of this idea is reviewed. Small scale experiments using a high temperature oven as the optical pump have been carried out with gas laser mixtures. Detailed calculations showing a potential efficiency of 35 percent for blackbody pumped Nd:YAG system are discussed.

  17. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Kim, K. H.; Stock, L. V.

    1987-01-01

    The improvement on the collection system of the Tarmarack Solar Simulator beam was attemped. The basic study of evaluating the solid state laser materials for the solar pumping and also the work to construct a kinetic model algorithm for the flashlamp pumped iodine lasers were carried out. It was observed that the collector cone worked better than the lens assembly in order to collect the solar simulator beam and to focus it down to a strong power density. The study on the various laser materials and their lasing characteristics shows that the neodymium and chromium co-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nr:Cr:GSGG) may be a strong candidate for the high power solar pumped solid state laser crystal. On the other hand the improved kinetic modeling for the flashlamp pumped iodine laser provides a good agreement between the theoretical model and the experimental data on the laser power output, and predicts the output parameters of a solar pumped iodine laser.

  18. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Kim, K. H.; Stock, L. V.

    1987-02-01

    The improvement on the collection system of the Tarmarack Solar Simulator beam was attemped. The basic study of evaluating the solid state laser materials for the solar pumping and also the work to construct a kinetic model algorithm for the flashlamp pumped iodine lasers were carried out. It was observed that the collector cone worked better than the lens assembly in order to collect the solar simulator beam and to focus it down to a strong power density. The study on the various laser materials and their lasing characteristics shows that the neodymium and chromium co-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nr:Cr:GSGG) may be a strong candidate for the high power solar pumped solid state laser crystal. On the other hand the improved kinetic modeling for the flashlamp pumped iodine laser provides a good agreement between the theoretical model and the experimental data on the laser power output, and predicts the output parameters of a solar pumped iodine laser.

  19. Alexandrite laser pumped by semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Scheps, R.; Gately, B.M.; Myers, J.F. ); Krasinski, J.S. ); Heller, D.F. )

    1990-06-04

    We report the first operation of a direct diode-pumped tunable chromium-doped solid-state laser. A small alexandrite (Cr:BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) crystal was longitudinally pumped by two visible laser diodes. The threshold pump power was 12 mW using the {ital R}{sub 1} line at 680.4 nm for the pump transition, and the slope efficiency was 25%. The measured laser output bandwidth was 2.1 nm.

  20. Solar-pumped solid state Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Zapata, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solid state neodymium lasers are considered candidates for space-based polar-pumped laser for continuous power transmission. Laser performance for three different slab laser configurations has been computed to show the excellent power capability of such systems if heat problems can be solved. Ideas involving geometries and materials are offered as potential solutions to the heat problem.

  1. Laser beam control and diagnostic systems for the copper-pumped dye laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E.S.; Peterson, R.L.; Salmon, J.T.; Thomas, R.A.

    1992-11-01

    The laser system described in the previous paper is used for experiments in which success requires tight tolerances on beam position, direction, and wavefront. Indeed, the optimum performance of the laser itself depends on careful delivery of copper laser light to the dye amplifiers, precise propagation of dye laser beams through restricted amplifier apertures, and accurate monitoring of laser power at key locations. This paper describes the alignment systems, wavefront correction systems, and laser diagnostics systems which ensure that the control requirements of both the laser and associated experiments are met. Because laser isotope separation processes utilize more than one wavelength, these systems monitor and control multiple wavelengths simultaneously.

  2. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-15

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

  3. Activation of theMercury Laser System: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser Driver for Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Beach, R J; Bibeau, C; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Kanz, V K; Payne, S A; Schaffers, K I; Skulina, K M; Smith, L K; Tassano, J B

    2001-09-10

    Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated inertial fusion energy. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length. We report on the first Yb:S-FAP crystals grown to sufficient size for fabricating full size (4 x 6 cm) amplifier slabs. The first of four 160 kW (peak power) diode arrays and pump delivery systems were completed and tested with the following results: 5.5% power droop over a 0.75 ms pulse, 3.95 nm spectral linewidth, far field divergence of 14.0 mrad and 149.5 mrad in the microlensed and unmicrolensed directions respectively, and 83% optical-to-optical transfer efficiency through the pump delivery system.

  4. a Mathematical Model of the Dynamics of AN Optically Pumped Codoped Solid State Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangler, Thomas Gerard

    1990-01-01

    This is a study of a mathematical model for the dynamics of an optically pumped codoped solid state laser system. The model comprises five first order, nonlinear, coupled, ordinary differential equations which describe the temporal evolution of the dopant electron populations in the laser crystal as well as the photon density in the laser cavity. The analysis of the model is conducted in three parts. First, a detailed explanation of the modeling process is given and the full set of rate equations is obtained. The model is then simplified and certain qualitative properties of the solution are obtained. In the second part the equilibrium solutions are obtained and a local stability analysis is performed. The system of rate equations is solved numerically and the effects, on the solution, of varying physical parameters is discussed. Finally, the third part addresses the oscillatory behavior of the system by "tracking" the eigenvalues of the linearized system. A comparison is made between the frequency of oscillations in the linear and nonlinear system. Pertinent physical processes--back transfer, Q-switching, and up -conversion--are then examined. The laser system consists of thulium and holmium ions in a YAG crystal operated in a Fabrey-Perot cavity. All computer programs were written in FORTRAN and currently run on either an IBM-PC or a DEC VAX 11/750.

  5. A mathematical model of the dynamics of an optically pumped codoped solid-state laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    This is a study of a mathematical model for the dynamics of an optically pumped codoped solid state laser system. The model comprises five first order, nonlinear, coupled, ordinary differential equations which describe the temporal evolution of the dopant electron populations in the laser crystal as well as the photon density in the laser cavity. The analysis of the model is conducted in three parts. First, a detailed explanation of the modeling process is given and the full set of rate equations is obtained. The model is then simplified and certain qualitative properties of the solution are obtained. In the second part the equilibrium solutions are obtained and local stability analysis is performed. The system of rate equations is solved numerically and the effects, on the solution, of varying physical parameters is discussed. Finally, the third part addresses the oscillatory behavior of the system by tracking the eigenvalues of the linearized system. A comparison is made between the frequency of oscillations in the linear and nonlinear system. Pertinent physical processes - back transfer, Q-switching, and up-conversion - are then examined. The laser system consists of thulium and holmium ions in YAG crystal operated in a Fabrey-Perot cavity. All computer programs were written in FORTRAN and currently run on either an IBM-PC or a DEC VAX 11/750.

  6. Analysis of a 10 megawatt space-based solar-pumped neodymium laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurweg, U. H.

    1984-01-01

    A ten megawatt solar-pumped continuous liquid laser system for space applications is examined. It is found that a single inflatable mirror of 434 m diameter used in conjunction with a conical secondary concentrator is sufficient to side pump a liquid neodymium lasant in an annular tube of 6 m length and 1 m outer and 0.8 m inner diameter. About one fourth of intercepted radiation converging on the laser tube is absorbed and one fifth of this radiation is effective in populating the upper levels. The liquid lasant is flowed through the annular laser cavity at 1.9 m/s and is cooled via a heat exchanger and a large radiator surface comparable in size to the concentrating mirror. The power density of incident light within the lasant of approximately 68 watt/cu cm required for cw operation is exceeded in the present annular configuration. Total system weight corresponds to 20,500 kg and is thus capable of being transported to near Earth orbit by a single shuttle flight.

  7. A review of laser-pumped infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The lasing mechanisms are reviewed of molecules that have demonstrated laser action in the laboratories with laser emissions in the spectral range from 3 to 35 microns. A list of lasants and laser mechanisms are defined. The pumping sources for these lasers are mainly infrared lasers; however, the case in which excitation of bromine atoms at 2.71 microns by a flashlamp as energy input is also included in the review. A conceptual drawing of lasing mechanisms is shown. Three pumping mechanisms are shown, the first being the direct-pumped system in which the lasant molecule absorbs the infrared radiation from pump laser directly, and it is excited into the upper laser level from the ground state. The second system is the indirect-pumped system where the infrared-pump laser first excites an absorbing molecule which stores its vibrational energy. Through collision this energy is transferred to the lasant molecule, populating the upper laser level. In the third system, i.e., in a Br2-CO2 mixture, a flashlamp replaces the infrared laser as the pump source for the absorbing molecule.

  8. Initial conceptual design study of self-critical nuclear pumped laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical study of self-critical nuclear pumped laser system concepts was performed. Primary emphasis was placed on reactor concepts employing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) as the fissionable material. Relationships were developed between the key reactor design parameters including reactor power level, critical mass, neutron flux level, reactor size, operating pressure, and UF6 optical properties. The results were used to select a reference conceptual laser system configuration. In the reference configuration, the 3.2 m cubed lasing volume is surrounded by a graphite internal moderator and a region of heavy water. Results of neutronics calculations yield a critical mass of 4.9 U(235) in the form (235)UF6. The configuration appears capable of operating in a continuous steady-state mode. The average gas temperature in the core is 600 K and the UF6 partial pressure within the lasing volume is 0.34 atm.

  9. Detectable distance calculations for a visual navigation system using a scanning semiconductor laser with electronic pumping.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, G A; Shishkin, S A

    2011-07-10

    Results of detectable distance calculations for a visual navigation system based on a scanning semiconductor laser with electronic pumping (SSLEP) are presented. A semiconductor crystal in the laser is pumped with an electron beam, which is scanned across the crystal in the television-frame scan mode. The navigation system forms three orientation sectors with radiation wavelengths λ=0.52, 0.57, and 0.63 μm. Herein, calculations of energetic characteristics of output radiation are performed for the navigation system described above. The calculations were performed using the Range software package, which considers microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosol and observation path geometry for the case of coastal environment. Finally, comparison of results of the calculations with data obtained in marine and flight experiments is presented. It is demonstrated that minor discrepancies between calculated and measured values of detectable distance are observed in the coastal haze at lower values of meteorological visibility range S(m). As S(m) increases, the discrepancies become significant. PMID:21743551

  10. Femtosecond wavelength-tunable OPCPA system based on picosecond fiber laser seed and picosecond DPSS laser pump.

    PubMed

    Danilevičius, R; Zaukevičius, A; Budriūnas, R; Michailovas, A; Rusteika, N

    2016-07-25

    We present a compact and stable femtosecond wavelength-tunable optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) system. A novel OPCPA front-end was constructed using a multi-channel picosecond all-in-fiber source for seeding DPSS pump laser and white light supercontinuum generation. Broadband chirped pulses were parametrically amplified up to 1 mJ energy and compressed to less than 40 fs duration. Pulse wavelength tunability in the range from 680 nm to 930 nm was experimentally demonstrated. PMID:27464199

  11. Picosecond DPSS laser technology for OPCPA pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupel, Andreas; Bodnar, Nathan; Webb, Benjamin; Shah, Lawrence; Richardson, Martin

    2014-02-01

    We present the design and challenges of a diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) system to amplify picosecond pulses to high pulse energies and high average powers. We discuss our implemented solutions to mitigate thermal effects and present the obtained performance of the picosecond pulse amplification at the multi-10-MW level. Our here presented picosecond DPSS laser is well suited for pumping an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system. Several laser technologies have been employed to pump OPCPA systems and we show how our DPSS system compares in performance to the other approaches.

  12. Primary investigations on the potential of a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for middle ear surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Wurm, Holger; Hausladen, Florian

    2016-02-01

    Flashlamp pumped Er:YAG lasers are successfully used clinically for both precise soft and hard tissue ablation. Since several years a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system (Pantec Engineering AG) is available, with mean laser power up to 40 W and pulse repetition rate up to 1 kHz. The aim of the study was to investigate the suitability of the laser system specifically for stapedotomy. Firstly an experimental setup was realized with a beam focusing unit and a computer controlled translation stage to move the samples (slices of porcine bone) with a defined velocity while irradiation with various laser parameters. A microphone was positioned in a defined distance to the ablation point and the resulting acoustic signal of the ablation process was recorded. For comparison, measurements were also performed with a flash lamp pumped Er:YAG laser system. After irradiation the resulting ablation quality and efficacy were determined using light microscopy. Using a high speed camera and "Töpler-Schlierentechnik" the cavitation bubble in water after perforation of a bone slice was investigated. The results show efficient bone ablation using the diode pumped Er:YAG laser system. Also a decrease of the sound level and of the cavitation bubble volume was observed with decreasing pulse duration. Higher repetition rates lead to a slightly increase of thermal side effects but have no influence on the ablation efficiency. In conclusion, these first experiments demonstrate the high potential of the diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for use in middle ear surgery.

  13. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Stock, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from September 1, 1988 to February 28, 1989 under NASA grant NAG-1-441 entitled, Direct Solar-Pumped Iodine Laser Amplifier. During this period, the research effort was concentrated on the solar pumped master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system using n-C3F7I. In the experimental work, the amplification measurement was conducted to identify the optimum conditions for amplification of the center's Vortek solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. A modeling effort was also pursued to explain the experimental results in the theoretical work. The amplification measurement of the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier is the first amplification experiment on the continuously pumped amplifier. The small signal amplification of 5 was achieved for the triple pass geometry of the 15 cm long solar simulator pumped amplifier at the n-C3F7I pressure of 20 torr, at the flow velocity of 6 m/sec and at the pumping intensity of 1500 solar constants. The XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator, which was developed in the previous research, was employed as the master oscillator for the amplification measurement. In the theoretical work, the rate equations of the amplifier was established and the small signal amplification was calculated for the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. The amplification calculated from the kinetic equations with the previously measured rate coefficients reveals very large disagreement with experimental measurement. Moreover, the optimum condition predicted by the kinetic equation is quite discrepant with that measured by experiment. This fact indicates the necessity of study in the measurement of rate coefficients of the continuously pumped iodine laser system.

  14. Nuclear pumped gas laser research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear pumping of lasers by fission-fragments from nuclear chain reactions is discussed. Application of the newly developed lasers to spacecraft propulsion or onboard power, to lunar bases for industrial processing, and to earth for utilization of power without pollution and hazards is envisioned. Emphasis is placed on the process by which the fission-fragement kinetic energy is converted into laser light.

  15. Solar-pumped laser for free space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.

    1989-01-01

    Laser power transmission; laser systems; space-borne and available lasers; 2-D and 1 MW laser diode array systems; technical issues; iodine solar pumped laser system; and laser power transmission applications are presented. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  16. Investigations on the potential of a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Hausladen, Florian; Hibst, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    The successful clinical application of the Er:YAG-laser in dentistry is well known, documented by numerous published studies. These lasers are flash lamp pumped systems and emit pulses of typically some 100 μs duration with energies of up to 1 J. Pulse repetition rates can reach up to 100Hz, and mean powers are up to about 8W. As an alternative to these laser systems recently a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system (Pantec Engineering AG) became available. This laser can provide a pulse repetition rate up to 2kHz and a mean laser power up to 15W. The aim of the presented study is to investigate the effect of this laser system on dental hard and soft tissue at various irradiation parameters, particular at repetition rates more than 100 Hz. At first an appropriate experimental set-up was realized with a beam delivery and focusing unit, a computer controlled stepper unit with sample holder, and a shutter unit. The stepper unit allows to move the samples (dentin or enamel slides of extracted human teeth, chicken breast, pig bone) with a defined velocity during irradiation by various laser parameters. For rinsing the sample surface a water spray was also included. The laser produced grooves and cuts were analyzed by light microscopy and laser scanning microscopy regarding to the ablation quality, geometry, ablation efficacy, and thermal effects. The grooves in dentin and enamel show a rough surface, typical for Er:YAG laser ablation. The craters are slightly cone shaped with sharp edges on the surface. Water cooling is essential to prevent thermal injury. The ablation efficacy in dentin is comparable to literature values of the flash lamp pumped Er:YAG laser. The cutting of bone and soft tissue is excellent and appears superior to earlier results obtained with flash lamp pumped system. As a further advantage, the broad range of repetition rates allows to widely vary the thermal side effects. In conclusion, these first experiments with a diode pumped Er:YAG laser

  17. Solar-pumped laser on the Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Arashi, H.; Oka, Y.; Ishigame, M.

    1985-01-01

    A solid state solar pumped laser system to be used on the Space Station is described. The system is based on an experimental version of a solar pumped Nd:YAG laser which has achieved a maximum power in excess of 18 W in multi-mode. The laser is powered by a paraboloid solar radiation concentrator. A solar pumped gas laser system is recommended for applications requiring a higher output power. Applications of a laser on board the Space Station include optical communication; laser propulsion; energy conversion; and high speed laser processing. Detailed schematic drawings of the solid state and gas laser designs are provided.

  18. Investigations on the potential of a low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Wurm, Holger; Hausladen, Florian; Wagner, Sophia; Hibst, Raimund

    2015-02-01

    Flash lamp pumped Er:YAG-lasers are used in clinical practice for dental applications successfully. As an alternative, several diode pumped Er:YAG laser systems (Pantec Engineering AG) become available, with mean laser power of 2W, 15W, and 30W. The aim of the presented study is to investigate the potential of the 2W Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery. At first an appropriate experimental set-up was realized with a beam delivery and both, a focusing unit for non-contact tissue cutting and a fiber tip for tissue cutting in contact mode. In order to produce reproducible cuts, the samples (porcine gingiva) were moved by a computer controlled translation stage. On the fresh samples cutting depth and quality were determined by light microscopy. Afterwards histological sections were prepared and microscopically analyzed regarding cutting depth and thermal damage zone. The experiments show that low laser power ≤ 2W is sufficient to perform efficient oral soft tissue cutting with cut depth up to 2mm (sample movement 2mm/s). The width of the thermal damage zone can be controlled by the irradiation parameters within a range of about 50μm to 110μm. In general, thermal injury is more pronounced using fiber tips in contact mode compared to the focused laser beam. In conclusion the results reveal that even the low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser is an appropriate tool for oral surgery.

  19. Analysis of Nd3+:glass, solar-pumped, high-powr laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, L. E.; Williams, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The operating characteristics of Nd(3+):glass lasers energized by a solar concentrator were analyzed for the hosts YAG, silicate glass, and phosphate glass. The modeling is based on the slab zigzag laser geometry and assumes that chemical hardening methods for glass are successful in increasing glass hardness by a factor of 4. On this basis, it was found that a realistic 1-MW solar-pumped laser might be constructed from phosphate glass 4 sq m in area and 2 mm thick. If YAG were the host medium, a 1-MW solar-pumped laser need only be 0.5 sq m in area and 0.5 cm thick, which is already possible. In addition, Nd(3+) doped glass fibers were found to be excellent solar-pumped laser candidates. The small diameter of fibers eliminates thermal stress problems, and if their diameter is kept small (10 microns), they propagate a Gaussian single mode which can be expanded and transmitted long distances in space. Fiber lasers could then be used for communications in space or could be bundled and the individual beams summed or phase-matched for high-power operation.

  20. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Optically pumped molecular bromine laser. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    An optically pumped molecular bromine laser was studied to investigate the quenching kinetics state of Br2. This included characterization of the pressure dependence of the laser output power. The approach was to excite molecular bromine in a sealed cell with a Nd:YAG pumped dye laser. Unresolved side fluorescence and amplified stimulated emission (ASE) spectra were recorded. ASE offered the advantage of a simpler optical system with no externally induced wavelength dependencies. Stimulated emission as a signal monitor offered greater resolution than side fluorescence spectra and facilitated spectroscopic assignment. (JS)

  2. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the consequences for solid-state lasers of novel diode laser-pumping technology. Diode laser-pumped neodymium lasers have operated at an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 10 percent in a single spatial mode, with linewidths of less than 10 kHz, and with a spectral power brightness sufficiently great to allow frequency extension by harmonic generation in nonlinear crystals; this has yielded green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Q-switched operation with kW peak powers and mode-locked operation with 10-picosec pulse widths have also been demonstrated. All-solid-state lasers at prices comparable to those of current flash-lamp-pumped laser systems are foreseen, as are power levels exceeding 1 kW, for coherent radar, global satellite sensing, and micromachining.

  3. Bidirectional pumped high power Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Q; Yan, P; Li, D; Sun, J; Wang, X; Huang, Y; Gong, M

    2016-03-21

    This paper presents a 3.89 kW 1123 nm Raman all-fiber laser with an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 70.9%. The system consists of a single-wavelength (1070nm) seed and one-stage bidirectional 976 nm non-wavelength-stabilized laser diodes (LDs) pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier. The unique part of this system is the application of non-wavelength-stabilized LDs in high power bidirectional pumping configuration fiber amplifier via refractive index valley fiber combiners. This approach not only increases the pump power, but also shortens the length of fiber by avoiding the usage of multi-stage amplifier. Through both theoretical research and experiment, the bidirectional pumping configuration presented in this paper proves to be able to convert 976 nm pump laser to 1070 nm laser via Yb3+ transfer, which is then converted into 1123 nm Raman laser via the first-order Raman effect without the appearance of any higher-order Raman laser. PMID:27136862

  4. Nuclear-Pumped Lasers. [efficient conversion of energy liberated in nuclear reactions to coherent radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear pumped lasers is reviewed. Nuclear pumped laser modeling, nuclear volume and foil excitation of laser plasmas, proton beam simulations, nuclear flashlamp excitation, and reactor laser systems studies are covered.

  5. Development and application investigation of an ICSHG 532 nm diode-pumped solid-state laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhat Khoa Phan, Thanh; Tu, Trung Chan; Thuat Nguyen, Tran; Chien Nguyen, Thanh; Chien Dang, Mau

    2011-12-01

    A diode-pump solid-state laser system emitting a 532 nm beam has been developed. The pump source is an 808 nm diode laser, which has gained wide acceptance in research as well as in commercial production due to its effectiveness and reasonable price. The active medium was chosen to be Nd:YVO4 (neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate), a material with many advantages over traditional Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) such as a low lasing threshold and linearly polarized beam. However, the thermal conductivity of Nd:YVO4 is not as good as Nd:YAG, thus the thermal lens effect inside Nd:YVO4 under high pumping intensity becomes severe and detrimental to the laser performance. Our work showed that careful adjustments of Nd:YVO4 temperature as well as of the cavity's parameters played an important role in the performance of the laser. Potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), a nonlinear optics crystal, was used to convert the fundamental 1064 nm laser radiation from Nd:YVO4 into 532 nm. The 532 nm laser beam has been successfully proven to cut wood, plastic and aluminum.

  6. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  7. Performance assessment of a new laser system for efficient spin exchange optical pumping in a spin maser measurement of 129Xe EDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funayama, C.; Furukawa, T.; Sato, T.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ohtomo, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, S.; Suzuki, T.; Hirao, C.; Chikamori, M.; Hikota, E.; Tsuchiya, M.; Yoshimi, A.; Bidinosti, C. P.; Ino, T.; Ueno, H.; Matsuo, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Asahi, K.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate spin-exchange optical pumping of 129Xe atoms with our newly made laser system. The new laser system was prepared to provide higher laser power required for the stable operation of spin maser oscillations in the 129Xe EDM experiment. We studied the optimum cell temperature and pumping laser power to improve the degree of 129Xe spin polarization. The best performance was achieved at the cell temperature of 100 ∘C with the presently available laser power of 1 W. The results show that a more intense laser is required for further improvement of the spin polarization at higher cell temperatures in our experiment.

  8. Diode-pumped CW molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellegehausen, B.; Luhs, W.

    2016-05-01

    First continuous laser oscillation on many lines in the range of 533-635 nm on different transitions of Na2 and Te2 molecules has been obtained, optically pumped with common cw blue emitting InGaN diode lasers operating around 445 and 460 nm. Spectral narrowing of the diode laser is achieved with a beamsplitter and grating setup, allowing use of more than 50 % of the diode power. Operation conditions and properties of the laser systems are presented, and perspectives for the realization of compact low cost molecular lasers are discussed.

  9. Reactor-pumped laser experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.; Hays, G.N.

    1994-12-31

    Reactor pumped lasers have the potential to be scaled to multi-megawatt power levels with long run times. In proposed designs, the laser will be capable of output powers of several megawatts of power for run times of several hours. Such a laser would have many diverse applications such as material processing, space debris removal and power beaming to geosynchronous satellites or the moon. However, before such systems can be designed, fundamental laser parameters such as small signal gain, saturation intensity and efficiency must be determined over a wide operational parameter space. The authors have recently measured fundamental laser parameters for a selection of nuclear pumped visible and near IR laser transitions in atomic neon, argon and xenon. An overview of the results of this investigation will be presented.

  10. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  11. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  12. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth R.; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Alvin; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary L.

    2015-05-19

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  13. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Al; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary

    2013-07-09

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  14. Progress in discharge-pumped excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Charles T.

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes recent results achieved in the development of discharge pumped excimer lasers at the Textron Defense Systems organization (formerly the Avco Research Laboratory). Included is a description of a KrF laser with more than one Joule output at 2.4% efficiency, a 200 mJ XeCl laser operating with a 500 nsec wide pulse, and a several Joule, discharge pumped, KrCl laser operating at 222 nm. All of these devices are switched using thyratrons and are therefore capable of repetitive performance. The KrF and XeCl experiments were conducted with the same laser device operating with a conventional capacitor transfer excitation circuit for the KrF experiments but modified to operate with a pulser-sustainer discharge circuit using magnetic switching for the XeCl tests. The KrCl device is a 40 liter volume system built by Northrop and also operates with a magnetically switched discharge.

  15. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  16. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Kim, Khong Hon; Stock, Larry V.

    1988-01-01

    A XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator was developed which will be incorporated into the Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) system. The developed XeCl laser produces output energy of about 60 mJ per pulse. The pulse duration was about 10 nsec. The kinetic model for the solar-pumped laser was refined and the algorithm for the calculation of a set of rate equations was improved to increase the accuracy and the efficiency of the calculation. The improved algorithm was applied to explain the existing experimental data taken from a flashlamp pumped iodine laser for three kinds of lasants, i-C3F7I, n-C4F9I, and t-C4F9I. Various solid laser materials were evaluated for solar-pumping. The materials studied were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, and Cr:Nd:GSGG crystals. The slope efficiency of 0.17 percent was measured for the Nd:YLF near the threshold pump intensity which was 211 solar constants (29W/sq cm). The threshold pump intensity of the Nd:YAG was measured to be 236 solar constants (32W/sq cm) and the near-threshold slope efficiency was 0.12 percent. True CW laser operation of Cr:Nd:GSGG was possible only at pump intensities less than or equal to 1,500 solar constants (203 W/sq cm). This fact was attributed to the high thermal focusing effect of the Cr:Nd:GSGG rod.

  17. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  18. Sunlight-Pumped Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. R. J.; Lee, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Organic iodide gas is stimulated by portion of Sun's spectrum to emit laser light. Chopper forms pulses from beam of Xenon-Arc light. Chopper is only necessary to avoid buildup of laser-quenching species in sealed tube of present experiment. Perfluoropropyliodide lasing medium functions at temperatures of about 670 K, a fact that reduces cooling requirements in space.

  19. Compact and highly efficient laser pump cavity

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Bass, Isaac L.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1999-01-01

    A new, compact, side-pumped laser pump cavity design which uses non-conventional optics for injection of laser-diode light into a laser pump chamber includes a plurality of elongated light concentration channels. In one embodiment, the light concentration channels are compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) which have very small exit apertures so that light will not escape from the pumping chamber and will be multiply reflected through the laser rod. This new design effectively traps the pump radiation inside the pump chamber that encloses the laser rod. It enables more uniform laser pumping and highly effective recycle of pump radiation, leading to significantly improved laser performance. This new design also effectively widens the acceptable radiation wavelength of the diodes, resulting in a more reliable laser performance with lower cost.

  20. Algorithm for evaluation of temperature distribution of a vapor cell in a diode-pumped alkali laser system (part II).

    PubMed

    Han, Juhong; Wang, You; Cai, He; An, Guofei; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhou, Jie; Jiang, Zhigang; Gao, Ming

    2015-04-01

    With high efficiency and small thermally-induced effects in the near-infrared wavelength region, a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) is regarded as combining the major advantages of solid-state lasers and gas-state lasers and obviating their main disadvantages at the same time. Studying the temperature distribution in the cross-section of an alkali-vapor cell is critical to realize high-powered DPAL systems for both static and flowing states. In this report, a theoretical algorithm has been built to investigate the features of a flowing-gas DPAL system by uniting procedures in kinetics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamic together. The thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained for different gas velocities. The results have demonstrated the great potential of DPALs in the extremely high-powered laser operation. PMID:25968778

  1. All solid-state mode-locked flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser system with selectable pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubecek, Vaclav; Diels, Jean-Claude; Stintz, Andreas; Jelinkova, Helena; Dombrovsky, Andrej; Cech, Miroslav

    2005-04-01

    All solid state mode-locked flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser system with selectable pulse duration was developed based on the oscillator where a single semiconductor structure containing a multiple-quantum-well was used as a saturable absorber for mode-locking, and energy limiter for passive negative feedback. Single pulse selection from various parts of extended 200 ns long Q-switched pulse train enables the changing of pulse duration before entering into three stages of laser amplifiers. Using of additional acousto-optic mode-locker, stability enhancement of the output pulses was obtained and the amplitude fluctuations were reduced below 5%. The exploitation of the solid state saturable absorber and limiter integrated in the single element improved significantly the long term characteristics of the laser system which can be therefore used for various applications as a satellite laser ranging, spectroscopy, or medicine.

  2. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In H.; Stock, Larry V.

    1988-01-01

    A XeCl laser which was developed earlier for an iodine laser oscillator was modified in order to increase the output pulse energy of XeCl laser so that the iodine laser output energy could be increased. The electrical circuit of the XeCl laser was changed from a simple capacitor discharge circuit of the XeCl laser to a Marx system. Because of this improvement the output energy from the XeCl laser was increased from 60 mj to 80 mj. Subsequently, iodine laser output energy was increased from 100 mj to 3 mj. On the other hand, the energy storage capability and amplification characteristics of the Vortek solar simulator-pumped amplifier was calculated expecting the calculated amplification factor is about 2 and the energy extraction efficiency is 26 percent due to the very low input energy density to the amplifier. As a result of an improved kinetic modeling for the iodine solar simulator pumped power amplifier, it is found that the I-2 along the axis of the tube affects seriously the gain profile. For the gas i-C3F7I at the higher pressures, the gain will decrease due to the I-2 as the pumping intensity increases, and at these higher pressures an increase in flow velocity will increase the gain.

  3. Systems efficiency and specific mass estimates for direct and indirect solar-pumped closed-cycle high-energy lasers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Based on expected advances in technology, the maximum system efficiency and minimum specific mass have been calculated for closed-cycle CO and CO2 electric-discharge lasers (EDL's) and a direct solar-pumped laser in space. The efficiency calculations take into account losses from excitation gas heating, ducting frictional and turning losses, and the compressor efficiency. The mass calculations include the power source, radiator, compressor, fluids, ducting, laser channel, optics, and heat exchanger for all of the systems; and in addition the power conditioner for the EDL's and a focusing mirror for the solar-pumped laser. The results show the major component masses in each system, show which is the lightest system, and provide the necessary criteria for solar-pumped lasers to be lighter than the EDL's. Finally, the masses are compared with results from other studies for a closed-cycle CO2 gasdynamic laser (GDL) and the proposed microwave satellite solar power station (SSPS).

  4. Ultra-stable flashlamp-pumped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachmann, A.; Clendenin, J.; Galetto, T.; Maruyama, T.; Sodja, J.; Turner, J.; Woods, M.

    2003-07-01

    We present the design and experimental results for the flashlamp-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser system used at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This laser system is used in conjunction with the Polarized Electron Source to generate polarized electron beams for fixed target experiments (e.g. the E-158 experiment). The unique capabilities such as high pulse-to-pulse stability, long pulse length and high repetition rate is discussed. Emphasis is placed on recent modifications of the laser system, which allow ultra-stable operation with 0.5% rms intensity jitter.

  5. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  6. Scaling studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Chang, J.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of scaling studies of solar pumped lasers is presented. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser light has been demonstrated in this study. Parametric studies of the variation of laser mixture composition and laser gas temperature were carried out for CO2 and N2O gases. Theoretical analysis and modeling of the system have been performed. Reasonable agreement between predictions in the parameter variation and the experimental results have been obtained. Almost 200 mW of laser output at 10.6 micron was achieved by placing a small sapphire laser tube inside an oven at 1500 K the tube was filled with CO2 laser gas mixture and cooled by longitudinal nitrogen gas flow.

  7. Scaling studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Chang, J.

    1985-08-01

    A progress report of scaling studies of solar pumped lasers is presented. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser light has been demonstrated in this study. Parametric studies of the variation of laser mixture composition and laser gas temperature were carried out for CO2 and N2O gases. Theoretical analysis and modeling of the system have been performed. Reasonable agreement between predictions in the parameter variation and the experimental results have been obtained. Almost 200 mW of laser output at 10.6 micron was achieved by placing a small sapphire laser tube inside an oven at 1500 K the tube was filled with CO2 laser gas mixture and cooled by longitudinal nitrogen gas flow.

  8. Research of the quenched dye lasers pumped by excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shaolin; Lou Qihong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the quenched dye lasers pumped by XeCl and KrF excimer lasers were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Dye laser pulses with duration of 0.8 ns for XeCl laser pumping and 2 ns for KrF laser pumping were obtained. The dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in methyl was used as the active medium in the quenched dye laser. When the pump laser was KrF and the active medium was Coumarin 498 the quenched dye laser emitted pulse with duration of about 2 ns. The characteristics of the quenched dye laser was also investigated in detail.

  9. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Laser system based on a commercial microwave oscillator with time compression of a microwave pump pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteev, M. S.; Vaulin, V. A.; Slinko, V. N.; Chumerin, P. Yu; Yushkov, Yu G.

    1992-06-01

    An analysis is made of the possibility of using a commercial microsecond microwave oscillator, supplemented by a device for time compression of microwave pulses, in pumping of industrial lasers with a high efficiency of conversion of the pump source energy into laser radiation. The results are reported of preliminary experiments on the commissioning of an excimer XeCl laser.

  10. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  11. High efficiency CW green-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, J. W.; Brown, D. C.

    2006-02-01

    High power, CW and pulsed alexandrite lasers were produced by pumping the laser rod with a high quality diode pumped 532 nm laser sources. This pumping architecture provides stable performance with output power > 1.4 W at 767nm in the free running mode and 0.78W at 1000 Hz. An output of 80 mW at 375.5 nm was achieved at 500 Hz. This approach holds promise for the production of a scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  12. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from April 1, 1985 to Sept. 30, 1985 under NASA grant NAS1-441 entitled direct solar pumped iodine laser amplifier. During this period the parametric studies of the iodine laser oscillator pumped by a Vortek simulator was carried out before the amplifier studies. The amplifier studies are postponed to the extended period following completion of the parametric studies. In addition, the kinetic modeling of a solar pumped iodine laser amplifier, and the experimental work for a solar pumped dye laser amplifier are in progress. This report contains three parts: (1) the radiation characteristics of solar simulator and the parametric characteristics of photodissociation iodine laser continuously pumped by a Vortek solar simulator; (2) kinetic modeling of a solar pumped iodine laser amplifier; and (3) the study of the dye laser amplifier pumped by a Tamarack solar simulator.

  13. Prototype laser-diode-pumped solid state laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Monolithic, diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers can provide diffraction-limited, single-frequency, narrow-linewidth, tunable output which is adequate for use as a local oscillator in a coherent communication system. A laser was built which had a linewidth of about 2 kHz, a power of 5 milliwatts, and which was tunable over a range of 30 MHz in a few microseconds. This laser was phase-locked to a second, similar laser. This demonstrates that the powerful technique of heterodyne detection is possible with a diode-pumped laser used as the local oscillator. Laser diode pumping of monolithic Nd:YAG rings can lead to output powers of hundreds of milliwatts from a single laser. A laser was built with a single-mode output of 310 mW. Several lasers can be chained together to sum their power, while maintaining diffraction-limited, single frequency operation. This technique was demonstrated with two lasers, with a total output of 340 mW, and is expected to be practical for up to about ten lasers. Thus with lasers of 310 mW, output of up to 3 W is possible. The chaining technique, if properly engineered, results in redundancy. The technique of resonant external modulation and doubling is designed to efficiently convert the continuous wave, infrared output of our lasers into low duty-cycle pulsed green output. This technique was verified through both computer modeling and experimentation. Further work would be necessary to develop a deliverable system using this technique.

  14. Diode-pumped laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Isyanova, Y.

    1993-01-01

    TEM(sub 00)-mode output energies up to 22.5 mJ with 23 percent slope efficiencies were generated at 1.064 microns in a diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser using a transverse-pumping geometry. 1.32-micron performance was equally impressive at 10.2 mJ output energy with 15 percent slope efficiency. The same pumping geometry was successfully carried forward to several complex Q-switched laser resonator designs with no noticeable degradation of beam quality. Output beam profiles were consistently shown to have greater than 90 percent correlation with the ideal TEM(sub 00)-order Gaussian profile. A comparison study on pulse-reflection-mode (PRM), pulse-transmission-mode (PTM), and passive Q-switching techniques was undertaken. The PRM Q-switched laser generated 8.3 mJ pulses with durations as short as 10 ns. The PTM Q-switch laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 5 ns. The passively Q-switched laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 2.4 ns. Frequency doubling of both 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns with conversion efficiencies of 56 percent in lithium triborate and 10 percent in rubidium titanyl arsenate, respectively, was shown. Sum-frequency generation of the 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns radiations was demonstrated in KTP to generate 1.1 mJ of 0.589 micron output with 11.5 percent conversion efficiency.

  15. Photovoltaic pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klockgether, J.; Kiessling, K. P.

    1983-09-01

    Solar pump systems for the irrigation of fields and for water supply in regions with much sunshine are discussed. For surface water and sources with a hoisting depth of 12 m, a system with immersion pumps is used. For deep sources with larger hoisting depths, an underwater motor pump was developed. Both types of pump system meet the requirements of simple installation and manipulation, safe operation, maintenance free, and high efficiency reducing the number of solar cells needed.

  16. Possibilities of increasing the pumping efficiency of solid active medium laser generators by optimizing the pumping cavity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontu, O.; Ganatsios, S.; Alexandrescu, N.

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents some design elements concerning the optical pumping cavities of the laser generators with active solid medium, as well as the way of increasing their performance. We start from the fact that the laser cavity is a closed optical system, where the active laser medium and the pumping source are conjugated, in order to achieve a maximum concentration of the light flux of the pumping source towards the active medium. We discuss the simple elliptical section laser pumping cavities (with one pumping lamp) and triple elliptical (with three lamps), also presenting a series on calculus nomograms, very useful to those who design the laser generation optical pumping cavities.

  17. Femtosecond resolution timing jitter correction on a TW scale Ti:sapphire laser system for FEL pump-probe experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csatari Divall, Marta; Mutter, Patrick; Divall, Edwin J.; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-11-01

    Intense ultrashort pulse lasers are used for fs resolution pumpprobe experiments more and more at large scale facilities, such as free electron lasers (FEL). Measurement of the arrival time of the laser pulses and stabilization to the machine or other sub-systems on the target, is crucial for high time-resolution measurements. In this work we report on a single shot, spectrally resolved, non-collinear cross-correlator with sub-fs resolution. With a feedback applied we keep the output of the TW class Ti:sapphire amplifier chain in time with the seed oscillator to ~3 fs RMS level for several hours. This is well below the typical pulse duration used at FELs and supports fs resolution pump-probe experiments. Short term jitter and long term timing drift measurements are presented. Applicability to other wavelengths and integration into the timing infrastructure of the FEL are also covered to show the full potential of the device.

  18. Blackbody-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.

    1983-07-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10420

  19. Loop laser cavities with self-pumped phase-conjugate mirrors in low-gain active media for phase-locked multichannel laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Gavrilov, A V; Ershkov, M N; Smetanin, Sergei N; Fedin, Aleksandr V; Bel'kov, K A; Boreysho, A S; Lebedev, V F

    2011-03-31

    It is proved that lasers with different loop cavities with self-pumped phase-conjugate mirrors in low-gain active media can operate under injection of external laser radiation and can be used for the development of diode-pumped phase-locked multichannel neodymium laser systems operating both on the fundamental laser transition with the wavelength {lambda} = 1.06 {mu}m and on the transition with {lambda} = 1.34 {mu}m. The phase-conjugate oscillation thresholds in the case of injection of an external signal are determined for a multiloop cavity configuration and an increased number of active elements in the cavity. It is shown that phase-conjugate oscillation can occur even if the single-pass gain of the active element is as low as only {approx}2. Under high-power side diode pumping of a multiloop Nd:YAG laser, single-mode output radiation was achieved at {lambda} = 1.064 {mu}m with a pulse energy up to 0.75 J, a pulse repetition rate up to 25 Hz, an average power up to 18.3 W, and an efficiency up to 20%. In a multiloop Nd:YAG laser with three active elements in the cavity, single-mode radiation at {lambda} = 1.34 {mu}m was obtained with a pulse energy up to 0.96 J, a pulse repetition rate up to 10 Hz, and an average power up to 8.5 W. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  20. Direct nuclear-pumped laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    A (He-3)-Xe gas mixture, excited by the He-3(n,p)H-3 reaction, has been employed to amplify the output of a (He-3)Xe direct nuclear-pumped laser. Lasing occurred at the 2.63 micron line of XeI in the oscillator. The oscillator output was reflected through 180 deg and passed through the amplifier system. Power measurements of the oscillator output and the amplifier output show the laser power to be amplified by a factor of 3 for the (He-3)-Xe system. Amplification by a factor of 5 was obtained for a (He-3)-CO system.

  1. Theoretical studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, Wynford L.

    1990-01-01

    One concept for collecting solar energy is to use large solar collectors and then use lasers as energy converters whose output beams act as transmission lines to deliver the energy to a destination. The efficiency of the process would be improved if the conversion could be done directly using solar pumped lasers, and the possibility of making such lasers is studied. There are many applications for such lasers, and these are examined. By including the applications first, the requirements for the lasers will be more evident. They are especially applicable to the Space program, and include cases where no other methods of delivering power seem possible. Using the lasers for conveying information and surveillance is also discussed. Many difficulties confront the designer of an efficient system for power conversion. These involve the nature of the solar spectrum, the method of absorbing the energy, the transfer of power into laser beams, and finally, the far field patterns of the beams. The requirements of the lasers are discussed. Specific laser configurations are discussed. The thrust is into gas laser systems, because for space applications, the laser could be large, and also the medium would be uniform and not subject to thermal stresses. Dye and solid lasers are treated briefly. For gas lasers, a chart of the various possibilities is shown, and the various families of gas lasers divided according to the mechanisms of absorbing solar radiation and of lasing. Several specific models are analyzed and evaluated. Overall conclusions for the program are summarized, and the performances of the lasers related to the requirements of various applications.

  2. Key techniques for space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Xiong, Sheng-jun; Liu, Xiao-long; Han, Wei-hua

    2014-12-01

    In space, the absence of atmospheric turbulence, absorption, dispersion and aerosol factors on laser transmission. Therefore, space-based laser has important values in satellite communication, satellite attitude controlling, space debris clearing, and long distance energy transmission, etc. On the other hand, solar energy is a kind of clean and renewable resources, the average intensity of solar irradiation on the earth is 1353W/m2, and it is even higher in space. Therefore, the space-based solar pumped lasers has attracted much research in recent years, most research focuses on solar pumped solid state lasers and solar pumped fiber lasers. The two lasing principle is based on stimulated emission of the rare earth ions such as Nd, Yb, Cr. The rare earth ions absorb light only in narrow bands. This leads to inefficient absorption of the broad-band solar spectrum, and increases the system heating load, which make the system solar to laser power conversion efficiency very low. As a solar pumped semiconductor lasers could absorb all photons with energy greater than the bandgap. Thus, solar pumped semiconductor lasers could have considerably higher efficiencies than other solar pumped lasers. Besides, solar pumped semiconductor lasers has smaller volume chip, simpler structure and better heat dissipation, it can be mounted on a small satellite platform, can compose satellite array, which can greatly improve the output power of the system, and have flexible character. This paper summarizes the research progress of space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers, analyses of the key technologies based on several application areas, including the processing of semiconductor chip, the design of small and efficient solar condenser, and the cooling system of lasers, etc. We conclude that the solar pumped vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers will have a wide application prospects in the space.

  3. Recycle Rate in a Pulsed, Optically Pumped Rubidium Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Wooddy S.; Sulham, Clifford V.; Holtgrave, Jeremy C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A pulsed, optically pumped rubidium laser operating in analogy to the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) system at pump intensities as high as 750 kW/cm{sup 2} has been demonstrated with output energies of up to 13 {mu}J/pulse. Output energy is dramatically limited by spin-orbit relaxation rates under these high intensity pump conditions. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume, requiring a high number of cycles per atom during the 2-8 ns duration of the pump pulse. At 550 Torr of ethane, the spin-orbit relaxation rate is too slow to effectively utilize all the incident pump photons. Indeed, a linear dependence of output energy on pump pulse duration for fixed pump energy is demonstrated.

  4. High-efficiency side diode pumped breech mount laser ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Christopher R.; Guo, Baoping; Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.

    2007-09-01

    Breech Mounted Lasers (BMLs) have been successfully used to demonstrate laser ignition of howitzer propellant charges including bag, stick, and the Modular Artillery Charge System (MACS). BMLs have been integrated and tested on many artillery systems, including the US Army's M109A6 Paladin, M198, M777 Light Weight, Crusader, and Non-Line-of-Sight Cannon (NLOS-C). Until now, these lasers have been relatively large and inefficient systems based on a flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser design. Modern vehicle platforms will require smaller, more efficient lasers that can operate under increased shock and vibration loads. Kigre's new DPSS (Diode Pumped Solid State) lasers appear to meet these requirements. In this work we provide an evaluation of HESP (High Efficiency Side Pumped) DPSS laser design and performance with regard to its application as a practical artillery laser ignition system.

  5. Lasers from fission. [nuclear pumping feasibility experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.; Helmick, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of the nuclear pumping of lasers was demonstrated in three experiments conducted independently at three different laboratories. In this context nuclear pumping of lasers is understood to be the excitation of a laser by the kinetic energy of the fission fragments only. A description is given of research concerned with the use of nuclear energy for the excitation of gas lasers. Experimental work was supplemented by theoretical research. Attention is given to a nuclear pumped He-Xe laser, a nuclear pumped CO laser, and a neon-nitrogen laser pumped by alpha particles. Studies involving uranium hexafluoride admixture to laser media are discussed along with research on uranium hexafluoride-fueled reactors.

  6. Identification and properties of molecular systems of potential use in solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micha, D. A.; Oehrn, N. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The concepts and computational tools of theortical chemistry are used to investigate molecular properties needed in direct solar-pumped lasers. Compounds of the type RR'CXY, with R and R' organic groups, and X and Y halide atoms were identified as likely candidates because of their highly enhanced absorption coefficients over compounds with a single halide atom. The use of a combination of vibrational excitation followed by electronic excitation to enhance quantum yields at certain wavelengths is indicated. A self-consistent eikonal approximation to state-to-state transitions was tested for CH3I and is useful for other problems involving electronic energy and charge transfer. An approach to calculate potential energy surfaces and transition dipoles was developed which is based on the generation of eigenstates of the nonrelativisitc Hamiltonian followed by incorporation of the spin-orbit coupling by configuration interaction.

  7. Solar-pumped gas laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of gas properties through detailed kinetic models led to the identification of critical gas parameters for use in choosing appropriate gas combinations for solar pumped lasers. Broadband photoabsorption in the visible or near UV range is required to excite large volumes of gas and to insure good solar absorption efficiency. The photoexcitation density is independent of the absorption bandwidth. The state excited must be a metastable state which is not quenched by the parent gas. The emission bandwidth must be less than 10 A to insure lasing threshold over reasonable gain lengths. The system should show a high degree of chemical reversibility and an insensitivity to increasing temperature. Other properties such as good quantum efficiency and kinetic efficiency are also implied. Although photoexcitation of electronic vibrational transitions is considered as a possible system if the emission bands sufficiently narrow, it appears that photodissociation into atomic metastables is more likely to result in a successful solar pumped laser system.

  8. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    During this period the parametric studies of the iodine laser oscillator pumped by a Vortek simulator were carried out before amplifier studies. The amplifier studies are postponed to the extended period after completing the parametric studies. In addition, the kinetic modeling of a solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier, and the experimental work for a solar pumped dye laser amplifier are in progress. This report contains three parts: (1) a 10 W CW iodine laser pumped by a Vortek solar simulator; (2) kinetic modeling to predict the time to lasing threshold, lasing time, and energy output of solar-pumped iodine laser; and (3) the study of the dye laser amplifier pumped by a Tamarack solar simulator.

  9. Femtosecond resolution timing jitter correction on a TW scale Ti:sapphire laser system for FEL pump-probe experiments.

    PubMed

    Csatari Divall, Marta; Mutter, Patrick; Divall, Edwin J; Hauri, Christoph P

    2015-11-16

    Intense ultrashort pulse lasers are used for fs resolution pump-probe experiments more and more at large scale facilities, such as free electron lasers (FEL). Measurement of the arrival time of the laser pulses and stabilization to the machine or other sub-systems on the target, is crucial for high time-resolution measurements. In this work we report on a single shot, spectrally resolved, non-collinear cross-correlator with sub-fs resolution. With a feedback applied we keep the output of the TW class Ti:sapphire amplifier chain in time with the seed oscillator to ~3 fs RMS level for several hours. This is well below the typical pulse duration used at FELs and supports fs resolution pump-probe experiments. Short term jitter and long term timing drift measurements are presented. Applicability to other wavelengths and integration into the timing infrastructure of the FEL are also covered to show the full potential of the device. PMID:26698475

  10. Semiconductor Laser Diode Pumps for Inertial Fusion Energy Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R J

    2011-01-03

    Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at the Omega Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY. For power plant applications, these lasers must be pumped by semiconductor diode lasers to achieve the required laser system efficiency, repetition rate, and lifetime. Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require approximately 40-to-80 GW of peak pump power, and must operate efficiently and with high system availability for decades. These considerations lead to requirements on the efficiency, price, and production capacity of the semiconductor pump sources. This document provides a brief summary of these requirements, and how they can be met by a natural evolution of the current semiconductor laser industry. The detailed technical requirements described in this document flow down from a laser ampl9ifier design described elsewhere. In brief, laser amplifiers comprising multiple Nd:glass gain slabs are face-pumped by two planar diode arrays, each delivering 30 to 40 MW of peak power at 872 nm during a {approx} 200 {micro}s quasi-CW (QCW) pulse with a repetition rate in the range of 10 to 20 Hz. The baseline design of the diode array employs a 2D mosaic of submodules to facilitate manufacturing. As a baseline, they envision that each submodule is an array of vertically stacked, 1 cm wide, edge-emitting diode bars, an industry standard form factor. These stacks are mounted on a common backplane providing cooling and current drive. Stacks are conductively cooled to the backplane, to minimize both diode package cost and the number of fluid interconnects for improved reliability. While the baseline assessment in this document is based on edge-emitting devices, the amplifier design does not preclude future use of surface emitting diodes, which may offer appreciable future cost reductions and

  11. An investigation of a mathematical model of an optically pumped Ti(3+):Al2O3 laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lila F.

    1989-01-01

    During the last several years, solid state lasers were developed that have the potential for meeting rigorous performance requirements for space-based remote sensing of the atmosphere. In order to design a stable and efficient laser and to understand the effect on laser output of changes in the physical and design parameters, an understanding of the development of the dynamical processes of the laser is necessary. Typically, the dynamical processes in a laser system are investigated via rate equations describing the evolution of the occupancy in the electronic levels and of the photon density in the laser cavity. There are two approaches to this type of study. Most often, for the sake of simplicity, the spatial variations of the dynamic variables in the laser system are disregarded and the mathematical model consists of a system of first order nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODE). The second approach is to take into account both spatial and temporal variations in the dynamic variables in the laser cavity. The resulting model consists of a first order semilinear system of partial differential equations (PDE). The model which was studied was studied was generic in the sense that it was a four-level laser system, but the parameters used in the numerical study were specific to Titanium-doped sapphire. For simplicity, a constant, spatially uniform pumping scheme was considered. In addition, a simplification of the model was made so that it treats a single lasing wavelength with a narrow bandwidth. The purpose was to investigate both versions of the mathematical model and to determine whether the numerical solutions are similar both qualitatively and quantitatively. The systems of ordinary differential equations were solved numerically using a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg algorithm which was very efficient for typical values of the physical parameters. A numerical scheme, based on the Modified Euler method, for computing solutions to the system of partial differential

  12. Efficient pumping of inertial fusion energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessling, C.; Rübenach, O.; Hambücker, S.; Sinhoff, V.; Banerjeea, S.; Ertel, K.; Mason, P.

    2013-02-01

    Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for laser-plasma interaction and have presently been developed for various applications like inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [1], particle acceleration and intense X-ray generation [3]. Viable real world applications like power production at industrial scale will require high laser system efficiency, repetition rate and lifetime which are only possible with semiconductor diode pumping. The paper describes the work conducted with two 20 kW diode laser sources pumping an ytterbium:YAG laser amplifier. The set-up acts as a small scale prototype for the DiPOLE project [2]. This project aims to develop scalable gas cooled cryogenic multi-slab diode pumped solid state lasers capable of producing KJ pulse energy. A scale-down prototype is currently under development at the Central Laser Facility (CLF) designed to generate 10 J at 10 Hz. To secure an efficient pumping process the sources have to fulfill aside power requirement in the spectral and time domain, the claim for high homogenization and low divergence of the spatial and angular beam distribution as well as a minimization of losses within the optical path. The existing diode laser sources designed and built by INGENERIC deliver 20 kW pulsed power, concentrated on a plateau of FWHM dimension of 20 x 20 mm² with a homogeneity of more than 90 %. The center wavelength of 939.5 nm is controlled in a range of ± 0.1 nm. The time and area integrated spectrum of at least 76 % of the total energy is contained within a 6 nm wide wavelength band around the center wavelength. Repetition rates can be adjusted between 0.1 Hz up to 10 Hz with rise and fall times less than 50 μs and pulse durations from 0.2 ms to 1.2 ms. The paper describes the impact of different designs on the performance of pump sources and puts special emphasis on the influence of the optical components on efficiency and performance. In addition the influence of the measuring principle is

  13. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser with cryosorption vacuum pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John

    2000-05-01

    In a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL), chemically prepared, gaseous gain medium at 3-10 Torr pressure is drawn through the laser cavity by vacuum suction. Multiple-stage vacuum pumps such as Roots blowers or steam ejectors are typically used to receive and compress the gas flowing from the laser and exhaust it to the atmosphere. The size and weight of such vacuum pumps present a significant challenge to engineering and packaging a transportable COIL system.

  14. A direct nuclear-pumped He-3-CO laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.; Hohl, F.

    1981-01-01

    Direct nuclear pumping of a low-temperature (150 K) He-3-CO laser has been achieved using the volumetric He-3(n,p)H-3 nuclear reaction. Lasing occurred on the vibrational bands of CO at about 5 microns. Effects of N2 on the system were investigated, as well as scaling of laser output with CO concentration, thermal neutron flux, and total pressure. This is the first volume-pumped, nuclear powered CO laser.

  15. Compact 36 kJ electron beam system for laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1981-05-31

    An electron beam machine consisting of six modules is being constructed for the 'B' amplifier of the RAPIER KrF laser system. Each module consists of a diode, a 5 ..cap omega.. positive charged water dielectric Blumlein pulse-forming line, and a five stage Marx generator. Separate 25 cm x 41 cm electron beams are formed in magnetically isolated diodes which when arranged in groups of three produce two nearly continuous 25 cm x 125 cm beams that enter the laser cell from opposite sides. The pulse-forming lines operate at 450 keV and produce 150 ns long pulses. The lines employ electrically triggered annular SF/sub 6/ output switches. The two concentric transmission lines of each pulse-forming line are charged in 1 ..mu..s through symmetric circuits to reduce diode prepulse voltage. The six modules together with the laser cell will occupy less than 15 m/sup 2/ of floor space.

  16. Micro-machining workstation for a diode pumped Nd:YAG high-brightness laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleijhorst, R. A.; Offerhaus, H. L.; Bant, P.

    1998-05-01

    A Nd:YAG micro-machining workstation that allows cutting on a scale of a few microns has been developed and operated. The system incorporates a telescope viewing system that allows control during the work and a software interface to translate AutoCad files. Some examples of the performance are given. With this setup we demonstrate the possibility of machining within a few microns with a Nd:YAG laser.

  17. NDT of fiber-reinforced composites with a new fiber-optic pump-probe laser-ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Laser-ultrasonics is an attractive and powerful tool for the non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of composite materials. Current systems for non-contact detection of ultrasound have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact peizotransducers. They are also expensive, difficult to adjust, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Moreover, laser-ultrasound (LU) systems typically launch only about 50 firings per second, much slower than the kHz level pulse repetition rate of conventional systems. As demonstrated here, most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive, high repetition rate nanosecond fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe beam detector. In particular, a modified fiber-optic balanced Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of a LU pump-probe system for NDT&E of aircraft composites. The performance of the all-optical system is demonstrated for a number of composite samples with different types and locations of inclusions. PMID:25302156

  18. Ho:YLF pumped HBr laser.

    PubMed

    Botha, L R; Bollig, C; Esser, M J D; Campbell, R N; Jacobs, C; Preussler, D R

    2009-10-26

    A Ho:YLF laser pumped HBr molecular laser was developed that produced up to 2.5 mJ of energy in the 4 micron wavelength region. The Ho:YLF laser was fiber pumped using a commercial Tm:fibre laser. The Ho:YLF laser was operated in a single longitudinal mode via injection seeding with a narrow band diode laser which in turn was locked to one of the HBr transitions. The behavior of the HBr laser was described using a rate equation mathematical model and this was solved numerically. Good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively between the model and experimental results was obtained. PMID:19997290

  19. Design of multilamp nonimaging laser pump cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    A technique has been developed to design single laser rod, multiple flash lamp pump cavities that allow all of the energy generated by the lamp to pass through the laser rod before entering another lamp cavity. The effective lamp and rod perimeters are matched, guaranteeing maximal concentration and uniformity of pumping.

  20. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  1. Feasibility of solar-pumped dye lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Kim, Kyung C.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1987-01-01

    Dye laser gains were measured at various pump-beam irradiances on a dye cell in order to evaluate the feasibility of solar pumping. Rhodamine 6G dye was considered as a candidate for the solar-pumped laser because of its high utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. Measurements show that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye.

  2. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon

    1990-01-01

    The optimum conditions of a solar pumped iodine laser are found in this research for the case of a continuous wave operation and a pulsed operation. The optimum product of the pressure(p) inside the laser tube and the tube diameter(d) was pd=40 approx. 50 torr-cm on the contrary to the case of a high intensity flashlamp pumped iodine laser where the optimum value of the product is known to be pd=150 torr-cm. The pressure-diameter product is less than 1/3 of that of the high power iodine laser. During the research period, various laser materials were also studied for solar pumping. Among the laser materials, Nd:YAG is found to have the lowest laser threshold pumping intensity of about 200 solar constant. The Rhodamine 6G was also tested as the solar pumped laser material. The threshold pumping power was measured to be about 20,000 solar constant. The amplification experiment for a continuously pumped iodine laser amplifier was performed using Vortek solar simulator and the amplification factors were measured for single pass amplification and triple pass amplification of the 15 cm long amplifier tube. The amplification of 5 was obtained for the triple pass amplification.

  3. Solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weksler, M.; Shwartz, J.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented for direct solar pumping of a ND:YAG rod laser. Stable CW output of more than 60 W was obtained with a slope efficiency exceeding 2 percent. A compound parabolic concentrator, designed to increase the solar radiation coupled into the laser rod, was used in these experiments. The results are consistent with predictions based on a simple solar-pumped laser model, which is also presented. Using this model, it is shown that existing laser materials with broad-band absorption characteristics (e.g., alexandrite and Nd:Cr:GSGG) have a potential for better than 10 percent overall conversion efficiency when solar pumped.

  4. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  5. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  6. Instabilities in a three-level coherently pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1987-01-01

    A theory for a coherently pumped, homogeneously broadened laser is developed which predicts instability at excitations 1.6 times threshold. The system exhibits a period-doubling sequence, chaos, and a period-three window.

  7. GaAs laser diode pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conant, L. C.; Reno, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A 1.5-mm by 3-cm neodymium-ion doped YAG laser rod has been side pumped using a GaAs laser diode array tuned to the 8680-A absorption line, achieving a multimode average output power of 120 mW for a total input power of 20 W to the final-stage laser diode drivers. The pumped arrangement was designed to take advantage of the high brightness of a conventional GaAs array as a linear source by introducing the pump light through a slit into a close-wrapped gold coated pump cavity. This cavity forms an integrating chamber for the pump light.

  8. Assignment of the /Li-7/2 optically pumped laser transitions pumped by Ar/+/ and Kr/+/ laser lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, K. K.; Stwalley, W. C.; Zemke, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Welling and Wellegehausen (1977) have reported a list of Na2 and Li2 lines (belonging to B-X and A-X systems) which lase when vapors of these dimers are pumped with an Ar(+) or Kr(+) laser. A description is presented of a fluorescence study of the A-X system of the (Li-7)2 molecule excited by a Kr(+) laser (6471 A). The optically pumped laser lines are identified as P and R doublets in two different fluorescence series. The conditions which favor lasing action of these lines are pointed out. All but one of the known optically pumped laser lines of (Li-7)2 along with their assignments are presented in a table. For each pumping line, several additional wavelengths are listed which satisfy the condition for laser oscillations and which might well lase well under slightly improved conditions.

  9. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  10. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  11. Grazing Incidence Pumping for High Efficiency X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2005-10-03

    Over the last decade, most laser-driven collisional excitation x-ray lasers have relied on the absorption of the pump energy incident at normal incidence to a pre-formed plasma. The main advantage is that the inversion can be created at various plasma regions in space and time where the amplification and ray propagation processes are best served. The main disadvantage is that different plasma regions regardless of the contribution to the inversion have to be pumped simultaneously in order to make the laser work. This leads to a loss of efficiency. The new scheme of grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) addresses this issue. In essence, a chosen electron density region of a pre-formed plasma column, produced by a longer pulse at normal incidence onto a slab target, is selectively pumped by focusing a short pulse of 100 fs-10 ps duration laser at a determined grazing incidence angle to the target surface. The exact angle is dependent on the pump wavelength and relates to refraction of the drive beam in the plasma. The controlled use of refraction of the pumping laser in the plasma results in several benefits: The pump laser path length is longer and there is an increase in the laser absorption in the gain region for creating a collisional Ni-like ion x-ray laser. There is also an inherent traveling wave, close to c, that increases the overall pumping efficiency. This can lead to a 3-30 times reduction in the pump energy for mid-Z, sub-20 nm lasers. We report several examples of this new x-ray laser on two different laser systems. The first demonstrates a 10 Hz x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm pumped with a total of 150 mJ of 800 nm wavelength from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The second case is shown where the COMET laser is used both at 527 nm and 1054 nm wavelength to pump higher Z materials with the goal of extending the wavelength regime of tabletop x-ray lasers below 10 nm.

  12. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.

    1987-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from March 1, 1987 to September 30, 1987 under NASA grant NAG1-441 entitled 'Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier'. During this period Nd:YAG and Nd:Cr:GSGG crystals have been tested for the solar-simulator pumped cw laser, and loss mechanisms of the laser output power in a flashlamp-pumped iodine laser also have been identified theoretically. It was observed that the threshold pump-beam intensities for both Nd:YAG and Nd:Cr:GSGG crystals were about 1000 solar constants, and the cw laser operation of the Nd:Cr:GSGG crystal was more difficult than that of the Nd:YAG crystal under the solar-simulator pumping. The possibility of the Nd:Cr:GSGG laser operation with a fast continuously chopped pumping was also observed. In addition, good agreement between the theoretical calculations and the experimental data on the loss mechanisms of a flashlamp-pumped iodine laser at various fill pressures and various lasants was achieved.

  13. Theoretcial studies of solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Fong, Z. S.

    1984-01-01

    A method of pumping a COhZ laser by a hot cavity was demonstrated. The cavity, heated by solar radiation, should increase the efficiency of solar pumped lasers used for energy conversion. Kinetic modeling is used to examine the behavior of such a COhZ laser. The kinetic equations are solved numerically vs. time and, in addition, steady state solutions are obtained analytically. The effect of gas heating filling the lower laser level is included. The output power and laser efficiency are obtained as functions of black body temperature and gas ratios (COhZ-He-Ar) and pressures. The values are compared with experimental results.

  14. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Tso Yee; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, interest in diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers has increased due to their advantages over flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers. A historical overview is presented of semiconductor diode-pumped solid-state lasers beginning with work in the early 1960s and continuing through recent work on wavelength extension of these devices by laser operation on new transitions. Modeling of these devices by rate equations to obtain expressions for threshold, slope efficiency, and figures of merit is also given.

  15. Nuclear-pumped CO2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, M.

    1979-01-01

    The He-3 (n,p)T reaction was examined as an energy source for a CO2 laser. For this purpose He-3 was added to a functioning CO2 electrically excited laser. Initially the laser was run electrically with 12 torr total pressure. The gas mixture was 1:1:8, CO2:N2:He. At zero reactor power, the laser was tested in place next to the core of the Georgia Tech. Research Reactor. After verification of laser action He-3 was added to the system. The He-3 partial pressures of 10 torr, 50 torr, and 300 torr were added in three separate reactor runs. Reactor power ranged from zero to 5 million watts, which corresponds to a peak flux of 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. At reactor powers greater than 10 kW, gain of up to 30 percent was shown. However, indications are this may be due to gamma excitation rather than caused by the He-3 (n,p)T reaction. These results do agree with the data of past CO2 nuclear pumped laser experiments.

  16. Continuous wave Cs diode pumped alkali laser pumped by single emitter narrowband laser diode.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Venus, G; Smirnov, V; Glebov, L; Knize, R J

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents results of cooperative efforts on development of a continuous wave Cs diode pumped alkali laser with moderate output power, which can be considered as a prototype of the commercial device. The developed system operates at 895 nm with output power about 4 W and slope efficiency 28%. Measured turn on time of this system from the standby mode is about a minute. PMID:26329171

  17. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Ware, Kenneth D.; Jones, Claude R.

    1986-01-01

    Exploding conducting film laser optical pumping apparatus. The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-.mu.m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  18. Analysis of gain distribution in cladding-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser and optical feedback inhibition problem in fiber-bulk laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, En-Cai; Liu, Qiang; Hu, Zhen-Yue; Gong, Ma-Li

    2015-10-01

    The steady-state gain distribution in cladding pumped thulium-doped fiber laser (TDFL) is analytically and numerically solved based on the rate equations including loss coefficients and cross relaxation effect. With the gain curve, a problem, which is named optical feedback inhibition (OFI) and always occurs in tandem TDFL-Ho:YAG laser system, is analyzed quantitatively. The actual characteristics of output spectra and power basically prove the conclusion of theoretical analysis. Then a simple mirror-deflected L-shaped cavity is employed to restrain the external feedback and simplify the structure of fiber-bulk Ho:YAG laser. Finally, 25 W of 2097-nm laser power and 51.2% of optical-to-optical conversion efficiency are obtained, and the beam quality factor is less than 1.43 obtained by knife-edge method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275146), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110066), and the Special Program of the Co-construction with Beijing Municipal Government of China (Grant No. 20121000302).

  19. Direct pumping of ultrashort Ti:sapphire lasers by a frequency doubled diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole B.; Unterhuber, Angelika; Le, Tuan; Stingl, Andreas; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul M.

    2011-12-01

    A simple and robust diode laser system emitting 1.28 W of green light suitable for pumping an ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser is presented. To classify our results, the diode laser is compared to a standard, commercially available diode pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser system pumping the same oscillator. When using our diode laser system, the optical conversion efficiencies from green to near-infrared light reduces to 75 % of the values achieved with the commercial pump laser. Despite this reduction the overall efficiency of the Ti:sapphire laser is still increased by a factor > 2 due to the superior electro-optical efficiency of the diode laser. Autocorrelation measurements show that pulse widths of less than 20 fs can be expected with an average power of 52 mW when using our laser. These results indicate the high potential of direct diode laser pumped Ti:sapphire lasers to be used in applications like retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) or pumping of photonic crystal fibers for CARS (coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy) microscopy.

  20. Flashlamp-pumped submicrosecond dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Trusov, A.K.; Trusov, K.K.

    1985-02-01

    A laser flashlamp pumping system having an input energy of 330 J and a pulse duration of approx.230 nsec was developed experimentally and tests were made using a solution of rhodamine 6G under lasing conditions. The maximum lasing energy was 1.1 J, the efficiency was 0.33%, the angle of divergence of the beam at half-energy in a planar resonator was 1.2--1.3 mrad, and the illumination of an ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G halved the output energy when the intensity was 170 kJ/liter.

  1. Research on solar pumped liquid lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Kurzweg, U. H.; Cox, J. D.; Weinstein, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    A solar pumped liquid laser that can be scaled up to high power (10Mw CW) for space applications was developed. Liquid lasers have the inherent advantage over gases in that they provide much higher lasant densities and thus high power densities. Liquids also have inherent advantages over solids in that they have much higher damage thresholds and are much cheaper to produce for large scale applications. Among the liquid laser media that are potential candidates for solar pumping, the POC13:Nd(3+):ZrC14 liquid was chosen for its high intrinsic efficiency as well as its relatively good stability against decomposition due to protic contamination. The development and testing of the laser liquid and the development of a large solar concentrator to pump the laser was emphasized. The procedure to manufacture the laser liquid must include diagnostic tests of the solvent purity (from protic contamination) at various stages in the production process.

  2. High efficiency >26 W diode end-pumped Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Teppitaksak, Achaya; Minassian, Ara; Thomas, Gabrielle M; Damzen, Michael J

    2014-06-30

    We show for the first time that multi-ten Watt operation of an Alexandrite laser can be achieved with direct red diode-pumping and with high efficiency. An investigation of diode end-pumped Alexandrite rod lasers demonstrates continuous-wave output power in excess of 26W, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous diode end-pumping systems, and slope efficiency 49%, the highest reported for a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser. Wavelength tuning from 730 to 792nm is demonstrated using self-seeding feedback from an external grating. Q-switched laser operation based on polarization-switching to a lower gain axis of Alexandrite has produced ~mJ-pulse energy at 1kHz pulse rate in fundamental TEM(00) mode. PMID:24977887

  3. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  4. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  5. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Repetti, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technially or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming. 58 refs.

  6. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetti, T. E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technically or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming.

  7. Excited-state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occuring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelength resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed form the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  8. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliewer, Michael L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics in laser-pumped, rare-earth-doped, solid-state laser materials are investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It is found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited-state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process is an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  9. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occurring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Nd/sup 3+/ in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  10. Laser-induced quantum pumping in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    San-Jose, Pablo; Prada, Elsa; Kohler, Sigmund; Schomerus, Henning

    2012-10-08

    We investigate non-adiabatic electron pumping in graphene generated by laser irradiation with linear polarization parallel or perpendicular to the transport direction. Transport is dominated by the spatially asymmetric excitation of electrons from evanescent into propagating modes. For a laser with parallel polarization, the pumping response exhibits a subharmonic resonant enhancement which directly probes the Fermi energy; no such enhancement occurs for perpendicular polarization. The resonance mechanism relies on the chirality of charge carriers in graphene.

  11. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Ware, K.D.; Jones, C.R.

    1984-04-27

    The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-..mu..m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  12. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  13. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  14. A flashlamp pumped zig-zag slab dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearth, J. J.; Vaughn, V. V.; McGowan, R. B.; Ehrlich, J.; Conrad, R. W.

    In the experiments reported here, the zig-zag principle is extended from solid slab to liquid dye lasers. A zig-zag dye laser is constructed, and the laser beam quality is observed for both straight-through and zig-zag paths. The zig-zag dye cell and its associated flashlamp pumping system are described, and thermally induced effects in the system are discussed.

  15. Research on solar pumped liquid lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J. D.; Kurzweg, U. H.; Weinstein, N. H.; Schneider, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A solar pumped liquid laser that can be scaled up to high power (10 mW CW) for space applications was developed. Liquid lasers have the advantage over gases in that they provide much higher lasant densities and thus high-power densities. Liquids also have advantages over solids in that they have much higher damage thresholds and are much cheaper to produce for large scale applications. Among the liquid laser media that are potential candidates for solar pumping, the POC13: Nd sup 3+:ZrC14 liquid was chosen for its high intrinsic efficiency and its relatively good stability against decomposition due to protic contamination. The development of a manufacturing procedure and performance testing of the laser, liquid and the development of an inexpensive large solar concentrator to pump the laser are examined.

  16. Development of a lamp-pumped Cr:LiSAF laser operating at 20Hz for a terawatt CPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Ricardo E.; Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Baldochi, Sonia L.; Vieira, Nilson D., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    We report here the development, construction and characterization of a flashlamp pumped Cr:LiSAF rod pumping cavity designed to minimize the thermal load on the crystal. The cavity is a close coupled one with 2 Xe lamps and absorptive filters between the lamps and the Cr:LiSAF rod, and is refrigerated with cooled water. A compact and stable (g I×g II=0.57) resonator was designed for lasers tests and gain medium characterization, and we expected to obtain operation at 20 Hz repetition rate. Nevertheless, the thermal load minimizing design was so successful that allowed laser operation up to 30 Hz with an average power of 20 W. When operating with a 10% transmission output coupler this laser exhibited an overall laser efficiency of 0.6% under 100 J electrical pumping, and a slope efficiency of 0.8%. Under these conditions, a maximum gain per pass of 1.5 was obtained, suitable for regenerative amplifiers. To increase the gain, the intracavity filters were substituted by glass plates, resulting in a gain per pass of 3.6, adequate for multipass amplifiers. In this configuration, and operating as a laser resonator, it showed a maximum overall efficiency of 2.81% under 88 J electrical pumping with a 25% transmission output coupler, and maximum output power of 18 W at 8 Hz. A study of the thermal load on the crystal was conducted by observation of the upper laser level lifetime, and we concluded that there are no noticeable accumulated thermal effects on the Cr:LiSAF emission.

  17. An experimental investigation of 235 sub UF sub 6 fission produced plasmas. [gas handling system for use with nuclear pumped laser experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    A gas handling system capable of use with uranium fluoride was designed and constructed for use with nuclear pumped laser experiments using the TRIGA research reactor. By employing careful design and temperature controls, the UF6 can be first transported into the irradiation chamber, and then, at the conclusion of the experiment, returned to gas cylinders. The design of the system is described. Operating procedures for the UF6 and gas handling systems are included.

  18. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  19. Semiconductor disk laser-pumped subpicosecond holmium fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorovskiy, A Yu; Marakulin, A V; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, Andrei S; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-01-31

    The first passively mode-locked holmium fibre laser has been demonstrated, with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) as a mode locker. Semiconductor disk lasers have been used for the first time to pump holmium fibre lasers. We obtained 830-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 34 MHz with an average output power of 6.6 mW.

  20. Theoretical and experimental studies of optically pumped molecular gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanavis, Amarin

    Optically pumped molecular gas lasers based on vibrational-rotational transitions in the infrared spectral region were studied experimentally and theoretically. A model was developed to predict the performance of such lasers and explore their potentials for energy and power scaling. This rate equation model was applied to explore the performance of a second-overtone (pulsed) and a first-overtone (CW) pumped HBr laser. Experimental improvements concerning temperature spectral tuning and frequency stabilization of a Nd:YAG laser that pumped HBr were accomplished. Lasing at 4 microns was demonstrated from such a system. We identified acetylene and hydrogen cyanide as potential laser gases that can be pumped with lasers emitting in the attractive telecommunication C band region at about 1.5 microns. Estimations and fluorescence measurements suggest the possibility of lasing in the 3 micron region. Lasing was demonstrated for the first time with a 5 ns pump pulse from an optical parametric oscillator using traditional cavities. The first gas filled hollow fiber laser based on population inversion was demonstrated with C2H2 and emission in the 3 micron region was observed. An analytical model indicates the possibility of CW lasing with small Stokes shift in both C2H 2 and HCN.

  1. Pulsed differential pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, G.N.; Bagautdinov, F.A.; Rybalov, S.V.

    1985-06-01

    A pulsed differential pumping system is described for extracting an electron beam from a shaping region at a pressure of 10/sup -5/ torr into a volume with a pressure of 10-100 torr. A fast valve is used with appropriate geometrical parameters to reduce the length of the outlet channel considerable while increasing its diameter. Test results are given. The pumping system has two sections which communicate one with the other and with the volume at the elevated pressure which is produced by gasdynamic nozzles.

  2. LaRC results on nuclear pumped noble gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The recent experiment and theoretical results obtained for noble gas nuclear laser systems are presented. It is shown that the noble gas lasers are among the easiest systems to pump by nuclear excitation and as a result, all of the noble gases except He have lased under nuclear excitation. The noble gas systems are not ideal for high-power applications but they do give valuable insight into the operation and pumping mechanisms associated with nuclear lasers. At present, the Ar-Xe system is the best noble gas candidate for (U-235)F6 pumping. It appears that the quenching of Ar-Xe lasing is a result of the fluorine and not the uranium or fission fragments themselves. Thus, to achieve lasing with UF6, a fluorine compatible system must be found.

  3. Stable, red laser pumped, multi-kilohertz Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, Hamish; Withford, Michael J.; Piper, James A.

    2006-04-01

    Operation of a miniature Alexandrite laser pulse-pumped at 671 nm by a Q-switched, frequency-doubled, diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser is reported. Average power output ∼150 mW at 765 nm with optical-to-optical slope efficiencies of 28% has been demonstrated for gain-switched operation of the Alexandrite laser at 80 kHz. Q-switched pump-pulse stacking has been used to reduce output pulse width by a factor of 6 and increase peak power by a factor of 38 over gain-switched operation.

  4. Passively Q-switched side pumped monolithic ring laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Steven X. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a side-pumped passively Q-switched non-planar ring oscillator. The method introduces a laser into a cavity of a crystal, the cavity having a round-trip path formed by a reflection at a dielectrically coated front surface, a first internal reflection at a first side surface of the crystal at a non-orthogonal angle with the front, a second internal reflection at a top surface of the crystal, and a third internal reflection at a second side surface of the crystal at a non-orthogonal angle with the front. The method side pumps the laser at the top or bottom surface with a side pump diode array beam and generates an output laser emanating at a location on the front surface. The design can include additional internal reflections to increase interaction with the side pump. Waste heat may be removed by mounting the crystal to a heatsink.

  5. Investigation of the pump wavelength influence on pulsed laser pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, H.; Withford, M. J.; Mildren, R. P.; Piper, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    Recent theoretical modelling and experimental results have shown that excess lattice phonon energy created dur ing the non-radiative energy transfer from the 4T2 pump manifold to the 2E storage level in Alexandrite when pumped with wavelengths shorter than ˜645 nm causes chaotic lasing output. Shorter pump wavelengths have also been associated with increased non-radiative energy decay and reduced laser efficiency. We report studies of fluorescence emission spectra of Alexandrite illuminated at a range of wavelengths from green to red, which demonstrate reduced fluorescence yield for shorter pump wavelengths at elevated crystal temperatures. Investigations of pulsed laser pumping of Alexandrite over the same spectral range demonstrated reduced pump threshold energy for longer pump wavelengths. High repetition rate pulsed pumping of Alexandrite at 532, 578 and 671 nm showed stable and efficient laser performance was only achieved for red pumping at 671 nm. These results support the theoretical model and demonstrate the potential for scalable, red laser pumped, all-solid-state Alexandrite lasers.

  6. High average power diode pumped solid state lasers for CALIOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Halpin, J.; Moran, B.

    1994-07-01

    Diode pumping of solid state media offers the opportunity for very low maintenance, high efficiency, and compact laser systems. For remote sensing, such lasers may be used to pump tunable non-linear sources, or if tunable themselves, act directly or through harmonic crystals as the probe. The needs of long range remote sensing missions require laser performance in the several watts to kilowatts range. At these power performance levels, more advanced thermal management technologies are required for the diode pumps. The solid state laser design must now address a variety of issues arising from the thermal loads, including fracture limits, induced lensing and aberrations, induced birefringence, and laser cavity optical component performance degradation with average power loading. In order to highlight the design trade-offs involved in addressing the above issues, a variety of existing average power laser systems are briefly described. Included are two systems based on Spectra Diode Laboratory`s water impingement cooled diode packages: a two times diffraction limited, 200 watt average power, 200 Hz multi-rod laser/amplifier by Fibertek, and TRW`s 100 watt, 100 Hz, phase conjugated amplifier. The authors also present two laser systems built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) based on their more aggressive diode bar cooling package, which uses microchannel cooler technology capable of 100% duty factor operation. They then present the design of LLNL`s first generation OPO pump laser for remote sensing. This system is specified to run at 100 Hz, 20 nsec pulses each with 300 mJ, less than two times diffraction limited, and with a stable single longitudinal mode. The performance of the first testbed version will be presented. The authors conclude with directions their group is pursuing to advance average power lasers. This includes average power electro-optics, low heat load lasing media, and heat capacity lasers.

  7. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  8. Fiber laser pumped high energy cryogenically cooled Ho:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, Espen; Fonnum, Helge; Stenersen, Knut

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we report on a high energy, low repetition rate 2-micron-laser, with high conversion efficiency in terms of output energy per pump power. The laser consists of a Ho3+-doped LiYF4 (YLF) crystal cooled to cryogenic temperatures in an unstable resonator, pumped by a thulium fiber laser. The cooling to 77 K makes Ho:YLF a quasi four level laser system, which greatly enhances the extraction efficiency. We achieved 356 mJ in Q-switched operation at 1 Hz PRF when pumping the laser with 58 W for 36 ms. The high beam quality from the fiber laser and the use of an unstable resonator with a graded reflectivity mirror (GRM) resulted in a high quality laser beam with a M2-value of 1.3.

  9. Influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap on the performance of optically pumped cesium vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Tom; Lebiush, Eyal; Auslender, Ilya; Barmashenko, Boris D; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2016-06-27

    Experimental and theoretical study of the influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap, a crucial parameter for optimization of optically pumped alkali atom lasers, is reported for Ti:Sapphire pumped Cs laser. Maximum laser power > 370 mW with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 43% and slope efficiency ~55% was obtained. The dependence of the lasing power on the pump power was found for different pump beam radii at constant laser beam radius. Non monotonic dependence of the laser power (optimized over the temperature of the Cs cell) on the pump beam radius was observed with a maximum achieved at the ratio ~0.7 between the pump and laser beam radii. The optimal temperature decreased with increasing pump beam radius. A simple optical model of the laser, where Gaussian spatial shapes of the pump and laser intensities in any cross section of the beams were assumed, was compared to the experiments. Good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated dependence of the laser power on the pump power at different pump beam radii and also of the laser power, threshold pump power and optimal temperature on the pump beam radius. The model does not use empirical parameters such as mode overlap efficiency and can be applied to different Ti:Sapphire and diode pumped alkali lasers with arbitrary spatial distributions of the pump and laser beam widths. PMID:27410591

  10. LED pumped polymer laser sensor for explosives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Morawska, Paulina O; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Turnbull, Graham A; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2013-01-01

    A very compact explosive vapor sensor is demonstrated based on a distributed feedback polymer laser pumped by a commercial InGaN light-emitting diode. The laser shows a two-stage turn on of the laser emission, for pulsed drive currents above 15.7 A. The ‘double-threshold’ phenomenon is attributed to the slow rise of the ∼30 ns duration LED pump pulses. The laser emits a 533 nm pulsed output beam of ∼10 ns duration perpendicular to the polymer film. When exposed to nitroaromatic model explosive vapors at ∼8 ppb concentration, the laser shows a 46% change in the surface-emitted output under optimized LED excitation. PMID:25821526

  11. Optically pumped Na/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kanorskii, S.I.; Kaslin, V.M.; Yakushev, O.F.

    1980-10-01

    A pulsed copper vapor laser emitting the 578.2 nm line was used as the pump source in achieving stimulated emission as a result of the electronic A/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub u/ to X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/ transitions in the Na/sub 2/ molecule in the spectral range 0.765 to 0.804 ..mu... The average power of all the emission lines was 10 mW when the pulsed pump power was 150 W and the efficiency of conversion of the optical pump energy was about 3%. The pulse repetition frequency was 3.3 kHz. Violet diffuse radiation of the Na/sub 2/ molecules, generated by pumping with the copper vapor laser, was observed. The superradiance regime was found for some of the lines.

  12. Solar pumped lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja H.

    Since 1980, NASA has been pursuing high power solar lasers as part of the space power beaming program. Materials in liquid, solid, and gas phases have been evaluated against the requirements for solar pumping. Two basic characteristics of solar insolation, namely its diffuse irradiance and 5800 K blackbody-like spectrum, impose rather stringent requirements for laser excitation. However, meeting these requirements is not insurmountable as solar thermal energy technology has progressed today, and taking advantage of solar pumping lasers is becoming increasingly attractive. The high density photons of concentrated solar energy have been used for mainly electric power generation and thermal processing of materials by the DOE Solar Thermal Technologies Program. However, the photons can interact with materials through many other direct kinetic paths, and applications of the concentrated photons could be extended to processes requiring photolysis, photosynthesis, and photoexcitation. The use of solar pumped lasers on Earth seems constrained by economics and sociopolitics. Therefore, prospective applications may be limited to those that require use of quantum effects and coherency of the laser in order to generate extremely high value products and services when conventional and inexpensive means are ineffective or impossible. The new applications already proposed for concentrated solar photons, such as destruction of hazardous waste, production of renewable fuel, production of fertilizer, and air/water pollution controls, may benefit from the use of inexpensive solar pumped laser matched with the photochemical kinetics of these processes.

  13. Solar pumped continuous wave carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yesil, O.; Christiansen, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar pumped laser concept, gain has been measured in a CO2-He laser medium optically pumped by blackbody radiation. Various gas mixtures of CO2 and He have been pumped by blackbody radiation emitted from an electrically heated oven. Using a CO2 laser as a probe, an optical gain coefficient of 1.8 x 10 to the -3rd/cm has been measured at 10.6 microns for a 9:1 CO2-He mixture at an oven temperature of about 1500 K, a gas temperature of about 400 K and a pressure of about 1 torr. This corresponds to a small signal gain coefficient when allowance is made for saturation effects due to the probe beam, in reasonable agreement with a theoretical value.

  14. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin; Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian

    2014-03-01

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM00) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.

  15. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin; Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian

    2014-03-15

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM{sub 00}) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.

  16. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin; Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian

    2014-03-01

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM00) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde. PMID:24689563

  17. Power scaling of a wavelength-narrowed diode laser system for pumping alkali vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersman, F. W.; Distelbrink, J. H.; Ketel, J.; Wilson, J.; Watt, D. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report a method for locking the output wavelength and reducing the spectral linewidth of diode lasers by feeding back light to the emitters from a wavelength selective external optical cavity. Ten years ago our team developed a stepped-mirror that allowed a single external cavity to lock the wavelength of a stack of diode array bars by equalizing path lengths between each emitter and the grating. Here we report combining one such step-mirror external cavity with an array of power dividers, each sending a portion of this feedback power to a separate diode array bar stack.

  18. Threshold pump power of a solar-pumped dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Kim, Kyung C.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1988-01-01

    Threshold solar power for dye laser pumping has been determined by measuring the gain of a rhodamine 6G dye laser amplifier at various solar-simulated irradiances on an amplifier cell. The measured threshold was 20,000 solar constants (2.7 kW/sq cm) for the dye volume of 2 x 5 x 40 cu mm and the optimum dye concentration of 0.001 M. The threshold is about one-third of that achievable with a high-intensity solar concentrator.

  19. 980nm diode laser pump modules operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jenna; Semenic, Tadej; Leisher, Paul; Bhunia, Avijit; Mashanovitch, Milan; Renner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Existing thermal management technologies for diode laser pumps place a significant load on the size, weight and power consumption of High Power Solid State and Fiber Laser systems, thus making current laser systems very large, heavy, and inefficient in many important practical applications. This problem is being addressed by the team formed by Freedom Photonics and Teledyne Scientific through the development of novel high power laser chip array architectures that can operate with high efficiency when cooled with coolants at temperatures higher than 50 degrees Celsius and also the development of an advanced thermal management system for efficient heat extraction from the laser chip array. This paper will present experimental results for the optical, electrical and thermal characteristics of 980 nm diode laser pump modules operating effectively with liquid coolant at temperatures above 50 degrees Celsius, showing a very small change in performance as the operating temperature increases from 20 to 50 degrees Celsius. These pump modules can achieve output power of many Watts per array lasing element with an operating Wall-Plug-Efficiency (WPE) of >55% at elevated coolant temperatures. The paper will also discuss the technical approach that has enabled this high level of pump module performance and opportunities for further improvement.

  20. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  1. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  2. Lasing properties of chromium-aluminum-doped forsterite pumped with an alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, E.G.; Jani, M.G.; Powell, R.C. ); Verdun, H.R. ); Pinto, A. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on the lasing properties of chromium-aluminum-doped forsterite that were investigated using a tunable alexandrite laser as the pump source. Results of measurements of the lasing threshold, slope efficiency, spectral, and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, and the time delay between the alexandrite pump pulse and the laser emission are presented for pump wavelengths of 770, 746, and 730 nm and different pump beam energies. Laser rate equations are developed to model the lasing center as a four-level system and applied to the case of 746 nm pumping.

  3. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  4. Laser Wakefield acceleration with high relativistic pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W. B.; Darrow, C. B.

    1989-10-01

    Preliminary scaling laws are found for the laser wakefield accelerator in the very non-linear regime where the normalized laser pump strengh Voscc=eE0/mω0c≳1. Two important non-linear effects are an increase in the wake phase velocity (and hence the particle dephasing length) and an increase in the laser pulse length for optimal wake excitation. Application of the results to the proposed Livermore High-Brightness Lasers (HBL) is discussed here and in the accompanying paper by C. B. Darrow, et al. A preliminary 1-D PIC simulation is presented.

  5. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  6. High power tandem-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Yang, Jianlong; Huang, Chongyuan; Luo, Yongfeng; Wang, Shiwei; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-02-01

    We propose a cascaded tandem pumping technique and show its high power and high efficient operation in the 2-μm wavelength region, opening up a new way to scale the output power of the 2-μm fiber laser to new levels (e.g. 10 kW). Using a 1942 nm Tm(3+) fiber laser as the pump source with the co- (counter-) propagating configuration, the 2020 nm Tm(3+) fiber laser generates 34.68 W (35.15W) of output power with 84.4% (86.3%) optical-to-optical efficiency and 91.7% (92.4%) slope efficiency, with respect to launched pump power. It provides the highest slope efficiency reported for 2-μm Tm(3+)-doped fiber lasers, and the highest output power for all-fiber tandem-pumped 2-μm fiber oscillators. This system fulfills the complete structure of the proposed cascaded tandem pumping technique in the 2-μm wavelength region (~1900 nm → ~1940 nm → ~2020 nm). Numerical analysis is also carried out to show the power scaling capability and efficiency of the cascaded tandem pumping technique. PMID:25836159

  7. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  8. Solar pumped laser technology options for space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of long-range options for in-space laser power transmission is presented. The focus is on the new technology and research status of solar-pumped lasers and their solar concentration needs. The laser options include gas photodissociation lasers, optically-pumped solid-state lasers, and blackbody-pumped transfer lasers. The paper concludes with a summary of current research thrusts.

  9. Flashlamp-pumped iodine monobromide laser characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, L. E.; De Young, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a flashlamp-pumped IBr laser were investigated to evaluate its suitability for solar-pumped laser applications. A peak power of 350 W/sq cm at 2.7 microns was achieved at 12-torr IBr pressure. At 500-J flashlamp energy, the IBr output saturated; a gain of 0.17% per cm was measured for IBr. Neon was found to be effective for enhancing the recombination of the photodissociation products. With neon as a buffer gas, the laser pulse length was extended to 53 microsec. The termination of the laser pulse, within the flashlamp pulse, is thought to be due to the temperature rise in the gas. Increasing the IBr initial temperature decreased the lasing output. At 300 C, output dropped to approximately one-half the room temperature value. The dominant quencher is thought to be atomic iodine. IBr was found to couple better to the flashlamp energy than C3F7I.

  10. Development of Ho:YLF laser pumped by Tm:fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2014-11-01

    We are developing a 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by Tm:fiber laser. The oscillator has ring resonator of 3m length. The laser is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The oscillator and amplifier system showed outputs of about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser will be used for wind and CO2 concentration measurements.

  11. High-Beam-Quality All-Solid-State 355 nm Ultraviolet Pulsed Laser Based on a Master-Oscillator Power-Amplifier System Pumped at 888 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hailong; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Lei; Gong, Mali

    2012-09-01

    An efficient all-solid-state 355 nm ultraviolet laser based on an 888 nm pumped master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) system is presented. Due to the high beam quality of the fundamental wave being superior to 1.15 (M2) under all pump powers and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs), the UV laser has the advantage of being able to operate continuously from zero to maximum power. The maximum green and UV output powers were 45.9 W at 50 kHz and 24.3 W at 65 kHz with the corresponding conversion efficiencies from IR-to-green and IR-to-UV of 66.0% and 34.1%, respectively.

  12. Future directions in 980-nm pump lasers: submarine deployment to low-cost watt-class terrestrial pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulgazov, Vadim N.; Jackson, Gordon S.; Lascola, Kevin M.; Major, Jo S.; Parke, Ross; Richard, Tim; Rossin, Victor V.; Zhang, Kai

    1999-09-01

    The demands of global bandwidth and distribution are rising rapidly as Internet usage grows. This fundamentally means that more photons are flowing within optical cables. While transmitting sources launches some optical power, the majority of the optical power that is present within modern telecommunication systems originates from optical amplifiers. In addition, modern optical amplifiers offer flat optical gain over broad wavelength bands, thus making possible dense wavelength de-multiplexing (DWDM) systems. Optical amplifier performance, and by extension the performance of the laser pumps that drive them, is central to the future growth of both optical transmission and distribution systems. Erbium-doped amplifiers currently dominate optical amplifier usage. These amplifiers absorb pump light at 980 nm and/or 1480 nm, and achieve gain at wavelengths around 1550 nm. 980 nm pumps achieve better noise figures and are therefore used for the amplification of small signals. Due to the quantum defect, 1480 nm lasers deliver more signal photon per incident photon. In addition, 1480 nm lasers are less expensive than 980 nm lasers. Thus, 1480 nm pump lasers are used for amplification in situations where noise is not critical. The combination of these traits leads to the situation where many amplifiers contain 980 nm lasers to pump the input section of the Er- doped fiber with 1480 nm lasers being used to pump the latter section of Er fiber. This can be thought of as using 980 nm lasers to power an optical pre-amplifier with the power amplification function being pump with 1480 nm radiation. This paper will focus on 980 nm pump lasers and the impact that advances in 980 nm pump technology will have on optical amplification systems. Currently, 980 nm technology is rapidly advancing in two areas, power and reliability. Improving reliability is becoming increasingly important as amplifiers move towards employing more pump lasers and using these pump lasers without redundancy

  13. Relaxation oscillations in optically pumped molecular lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Koepf, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of relaxation oscillations in both the (C-13)H3F and (C-12)H3F optically pumped lasers is reported. Expressions are derived for the oscillation frequency and its temperature and pressure dependences using a four-level rate equation model. Excellent agreement between measured frequencies and the theory presented is observed. Models are considered for using this phenomenon to determine the rotational and vibrational relaxation mechanisms of the laser gases.

  14. Solar-pumped CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treanor, Charles E.

    This paper describes a method of converting thermal radiation directly into laser radiation at a wavelength of about 5 micrometers. The working fluid for the laser operation is a mixture of carbon monoxide and argon. The source of thermal radiation is assumed to be a solar oven or electrical oven operating in the range of 2000 to 2500 K. The use of carbon monoxide as the lasing material presents the advantage that the absorbing lines can be pressure broadened to permit efficient absorption of the thermal radiation without unacceptable increases in vibrational relaxation. Estimates of the efficiency, size, and power loading of such a laser are discussed.

  15. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  16. Optically pumped pulsed Li/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslin, V.; Yakushev, O.

    1982-02-01

    Pulsed lasing was obtained for the first time from Li/sub 2/ molecules by optical pumping with radiation from a pulsed copper vapor laser (578.2 nm, pulse repetition frequency 5 kHz). The laser transitions, with wavelengths in the range 867--907 nm, belong to the electronic A/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub u/--X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/ system. With a pump power of 190 mW, an average output power of 8 mW was achieved with an efficiency for the conversion of the optical pumping energy of 7%. A number of Li/sub 2/ laser emission lines were observed in the superradiant regime.

  17. High efficiency cw laser-pumped tunable alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Shand, M.L.

    1983-10-01

    High efficiency cw alexandrite laser operation has been achieved. With longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity, a 51% output power slope efficiency has been measured. Including the transmission at the input coupler mirror, a quantum yield of 85% has been attained above threshold. Tunability from 726 to 802 nm has also been demonstrated. The low loss and good thermal properties make alexandrite ideal for cw laser operation.

  18. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  19. Two-beam combined 3.36  J, 100  Hz diode-pumped high beam quality Nd:YAG laser system.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J S; Tang, X X; Fan, Z W; Wang, H C; Liu, H

    2016-07-20

    In this paper, we develop a diode-pumped all-solid-state high-energy and high beam quality Nd:YAG laser system. A master oscillator power amplifier structure is used to provide a high pulse energy laser output with a high repetition rate. In order to decrease the amplifier working current so as to reduce the impact of the thermal effect on the beam quality, a beam splitting-amplifying-combining scheme is adopted. The energy extraction efficiency of the laser system is 50.68%. We achieve 3.36 J pulse energy at a 100 Hz repetition rate with a pulse duration of 7.1 ns, a far-field beam spot 1.71 times the diffraction limit, and 1.07% energy stability (RMS). PMID:27463917

  20. Theoretical studies of solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Solar-pumped lasers were investigated by comparing experimental results from pulse experiments with steady state calculations. The time varying behavior of an IBr laser is studied. The analysis is only approximate, but indicates that conditions occurring in a pulsed experiment are quite different from those at steady state. The possibility of steady-state lasing in an IBr laser is determined. The effects of high temperatures on the quenching and recombination rates are examined. Although uncertainties in the values of the rate coefficients make it difficult to draw firm conclusions, it seems steady state running may be possible at high temperatures.

  1. Diode-Pumped Mode-Locked LiSAF Laser

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Under this contract we have developed Cr{sup 3+}:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (Cr:LiSAF, LiSAF) mode-locked lasers suitable for generation of polarized electrons for CEBAF. As 670 nm is an excellent wavelength for optical pumping of Cr:LiSAF, we have used a LIGHTWAVE developed 670 nm diode pump module that combines the output of ten diode lasers and yields approximately 2 Watts of optical power. By the use of a diffraction limited pump beam however, it is possible to maintain a small mode size through the length of the crystal and hence extract more power from Cr:LiSAF laser. For this purpose we have developed a 1 Watt, red 660nm laser (LIGHTWAVE model 240R) which serves as an ideal pump for Cr:LiSAF and is a potential replacement of costly and less robust krypton laser. This new system is to compliment LIGHTWAVE Series 240, and is currently being considered for commercialization. Partially developed under this contract is LIGHTWAVEs product model 240 which has already been in our production lines for a few months and is commercially available. This laser produces 2 Watts of output at 532 nm using some of the same technology developed for production of the 660nm red system. It is a potential replacement for argon ion lasers and has better current and cooling requirements and is an excellent pump source for Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Also, as a direct result of this contract we now have the capability of commercially developing a mode-locked 100MHz Cr:LiSAF system. Such a laser could be added to our 100 MHz LIGHTWAVE Series 131. The Series 131 lasers provide pico second pulses and were originally developed under another DOE SBIR. Both models of LIGHTWAVE Series 240 lasers, the fiber coupled pump module and the 100MHz LiSAF laser of Series 131 have been partially developed under this contract, and are commercially competitive products.

  2. Mode locking of diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers using semiconductor saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Andrej; Kubecek, Vaclav; Zvonicek, K.; Diels, Jean-Claude M.; Stintz, Andreas

    2003-07-01

    Operation of laser diode and flash lamp pumped Nd:YAG lasers mode locked with two different types of semiconductor saturable absorbers is reported. In the first type that is used mainly in diode pumped systems the absorber layers are integrated on highly reflective Bragg mirror. The second type is for use in transmission mode inside the resonator. Different design of semiconductor elements, pumping geometries and resonator configurations were investigated and characteristics of laser operation in mode-locked regime are presented.

  3. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  4. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, James M. R.; Causier, Sarah K.; Dalton, Andrew R.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-02-07

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  5. Dye laser pumped, continuous-wave KTP optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. E.; Scheidt, M.; Boller, K.-J.; Wallenstein, R.

    1998-06-01

    We report on dye-laser-pumped, continuous-wave (CW) KTiOPO4 (KTP) optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) with pump and idler resonant cavities. With a linear two-mirror cavity the pump power at threshold was 70 mW. The single-frequency signal and idler output wavelengths were tuned in the range of 1025 to 1040 nm and 1250 to 1380 nm by tuning the dye laser in the range of 565 to 588 nm. With a dual three-mirror cavity the threshold was 135 mW. Pumped by 500 mW of 578 nm radiation the 1040 nm single-frequency signal wave output power was 84 mW. Power and frequency stable operation with a spectral bandwidth of less than 9 MHz was obtained by piezo-electrically locking the length of the pump resonant cavity to the dye laser wavelength. Similar performance was achieved by placing the idler resonant OPO inside the resonator of the dye laser. With this system power stable and single-frequency operation was achieved with a spectral bandwidth of less than 11 MHz for the idler wave.

  6. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  7. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; McDonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-02-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  8. Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Stein, William E.; Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

  9. Efficient bone cutting with the novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system: in vitro investigation and optimization of the treatment parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Diebolder, Rolf; Hausladen, Florian; Hibst, Raimund

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that flashlamp pumped Er:YAG lasers allow efficient bone ablation due to strong absorption at 3μm by water. Preliminary experiments revealed also a newly developed diode pumped Er:YAG laser system (Pantec Engineering AG) to be an efficient tool for use for bone surgery. The aim of the present in vitro study is the investigation of a new power increased version of the laser system with higher pulse energy and optimization of the treatment set-up to get high cutting quality, efficiency, and ablation depth. Optical simulations were performed to achieve various focus diameters and homogeneous beam profile. An appropriate experimental set-up with two different focusing units, a computer controlled linear stage with sample holder, and a shutter unit was realized. By this we are able to move the sample (slices of pig bone) with a defined velocity during the irradiation. Cutting was performed under appropriate water spray by moving the sample back and forth. After each path the ablation depth was measured and the focal plane was tracked to the actual bottom of the groove. Finally, the cuts were analyzed by light microcopy regarding the ablation quality and geometry, and thermal effects. In summary, the results show that with carefully adapted irradiation parameters narrow and deep cuts (ablation depth > 6mm, aspect ratio approx. 20) are possible without carbonization. In conclusion, these in vitro investigations demonstrate that high efficient bone cutting is possible with the diode pumped Er:YAG laser system using appropriate treatment set-up and parameters.

  10. Vacuum system pump down analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrdanz, D.R.

    1990-08-01

    My assignment on the SP-100 Vacuum Vessel Vacuum System Team was to perform a transient pump down analysis for the vacuum vessel that will house the SP-100 reactor during testing. Pump down time was calculated for air and helium. For all cases the proposed vacuum system will be able to pump down the vessel within the required time. The use of a larger rotary piston pump (DUO250) improves the pump down time by 35 minutes and therefore should be considered. The 6-inch duct for the roughing line is optimal, however, because all cases are well below the 24 hour time frame, the 4-inch duct is sufficient. The use of the single turbomolecular pump during pump down is sufficient. A pump down with helium in the vessel and a helium inleakage delays the time to achieve the base pressure marginally and is acceptable.

  11. Photovoltaic converters for solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a mathematical parametric study of converters used to convert laser radiation to electricity for space-based laser power systems. Two different lasers, the 1.06-micron Nd laser and the 1.315-micron iodine laser, are used in the vertical junction converter. The calculated efficiency is 50 percent for a 100-junction Si photovoltaic converter when used with a Nd laser. The calculated efficiency for a 1000-junction Ga(0.53)In(0.47)As photovoltaic converter is 43 percent when used with an iodine laser.

  12. A portable lidar using a diode-pumped YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Okumura, H.; Sugita, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Yamaguchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    A Mie lidar system is technically established and is used for monitoring air pollution, stratospheric and boundary layer aerosol distribution, plume dispersion, visibility, and the study of atmospheric structure and cloud physics. However, a lidar system is not widely used because of its cumbersome handling and unwieldy portability. Although the author developed a laser diode lidar system based on RM-CW technique, it has a limit of measurement distance. Here we report the development of an all solid Mie lidar system using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a Si-APD detector. This was constructed as a prototype of a handy lidar system.

  13. Dynamics of photon-induced processes in adsorbate-surface systems studied by laser-synchrotron pump-probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Bernd J.; Gatzke, Johannes; Quast, T.; Will, Ingo; Wick, Manfred T.; Liero, A.; Pop, D.; Hertel, Ingolf V.

    1998-12-01

    We report on the MBI User Facility at BESSY II, presently under construction, which is dedicated to study the dynamics of photo-induced processes by combining laser and synchrotron pulses. In this paper we focus on the synchronization of a modelocked ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser to the Berlin electron storage ring for synchrotron radiation (BESSY). Two different techniques have been applied -- one based on a digital phase comparator and the other based on analog high-harmonic mixing. Both schemes may be easily adjusted to either single, multi- or hybrid-bunch operation of the synchrotron. Moreover, the temporal accuracy of the synchronization unit suitably matches the widths of the synchrotron pulses (some ten picoseconds) to be expected at BESSY II. Therefore, the currently performed test experiments at BESSY I provide the basis for time- resolved photon-induced experiments which combine laser and SR-undulator pulses in a pump-probe scheme at BESSY II. This facility will be available within the first half of 1999.

  14. Fuel pumping system and method

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, Scott F.; Wang, Lifeng ,

    2006-12-19

    A fuel pumping system that includes a pump drive is provided. A first pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a first flow of pressurized fuel. A second pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a second flow of pressurized fuel. A first solenoid is operatively connected to the first pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the first flow of pressurized fuel. A second solenoid is operatively connected to the second pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the second flow of pressurized fuel.

  15. Fuel Pumping System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, Scott F.; Wang, Lifeng

    2005-12-13

    A fuel pumping system that includes a pump drive is provided. A first pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a first flow of pressurized fuel. A second pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a second flow of pressurized fuel. A first solenoid is operatively connected to the first pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the first flow of pressurized fuel. A second solenoid is operatively connected to the second pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the second flow of pressurized fuel.

  16. Diode pumped solid-state laser oscillators for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Basu, S.; Fan, T. Y.; Kozlovsky, W. J.; Nabors, C. D.; Nilsson, A.; Huber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The rapid improvement in diode laser pump sources has led to the recent progress in diode laser pumped solid state lasers. To date, electrical efficiencies of greater than 10 percent were demonstrated. As diode laser costs decrease with increased production volume, diode laser and diode laser array pumped solid state lasers will replace the traditional flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser sources. The use of laser diode array pumping of slab geometry lasers will allow efficient, high peak and average power solid state laser sources to be developed. Perhaps the greatest impact of diode laser pumped solid state lasers will be in spectroscopic applications of miniature, monolithic devices. Single-stripe diode-pumped operation of a continuous-wave 946 nm Nd:YAG laser with less than 10 m/w threshold was demonstrated. A slope efficiency of 16 percent near threshold was shown with a projected slope efficiency well above a threshold of 34 percent based on results under Rhodamine 6G dye-laser pumping. Nonlinear crystals for second-harmonic generation of this source were evaluated. The KNbO3 and periodically poled LiNbO3 appear to be the most promising.

  17. Laser Wakefield acceleration with high relativistic pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W.B. ); Darrow, C.B. )

    1989-10-15

    Preliminary scaling laws are found for the laser wakefield accelerator in the very non-linear regime where the normalized laser pump strengh {ital V}{sub osc}{ital c}={ital eE}{sub 0}/{ital m}{omega}{sub 0}{ital c}{gt}1. Two important non-linear effects are an increase in the wake phase velocity (and hence the particle dephasing length) and an increase in the laser pulse length for optimal wake excitation. Application of the results to the proposed Livermore High-Brightness Lasers (HBL) is discussed here and in the accompanying paper by C. B. Darrow, {ital et} {ital al}. A preliminary 1-D PIC simulation is presented. {copyright} 1989 American Institute of Physics

  18. University of Florida nuclear pumped laser program. [excitation of laser gaseous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of excitation of laser gases by fast ions (triton, proton, or fission fragments) and especially any role UF6 might play in radiative deexcitation of these gases were investigated. Population densities of excited important for laser action were obtained. Nuclear pumped CW-laser systems, especially He-Ne and CO2, were studied using steady state reactors. It was demonstrated that He-Ne lases in a CW-mode with nuclear pumping at both the red and the infrared transition. The infrared transition was observed to be superradiant.

  19. Diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, William F.

    2008-05-01

    The concept of power-scalable, high beam-quality diode pumped alkali lasers was introduced in 2003 [Krupke, US Patent No. 6,643,311; Opt. Letters, 28, 2336 (2003)]. Since then several laboratory DPAL devices have been reported on, confirming many of the spectroscopic, kinetic, and laser characteristics projected from literature data. This talk will present an overview of the DPAL concept, summarize key relevant properties of the cesium, rubidium, and potassium alkali vapor gain media so-far examined, outline power scaling considerations, and highlight results of published DPAL laboratory experiments.

  20. Multi-lamp laser pumping cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1987-07-21

    An optically pumped laser comprises: A. a cylindrical laser rod having a longitudinal central rod axis; B. cylindrical lamps for optically pumping the laser rod. The lamps have longitudinal central lamp axes parallel to the rod axis. The lamps being so located with respect to each other and to the laser rod as to define in cross section a base line associated with each lamp and extending between the rod axis and the lamp axis of the associated lamp. The base lines being equal in length and equiangularly spaced; and C. a reflector wall consisting essentially of first and second wall sections associated with each lamp, the cross sections of the first and second wall sections associated with a given lamp essentially following first and second curves extending from a lamp cusp associated with the given lamp to second and first rod cusps, respectively, associated with the given lamp. The first and second curves consist of the loci of points to which the sums of the distances, exterior to the laser rod and the given lamp, from first and second rod starting points, respectively, associated with the given lamp and from first and second lamp starting points, respectively, on the given lamp equal a fixed quantity.

  1. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In H.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors consider the relation between the threshold pumping intensity, the material properties, the resonator parameters, and the ultimate slope efficiencies of various solid-state laser materials for solar pumping. They clarify the relation between the threshold pump intensity and the material parameters and the relation between the ultimate slope efficiency and the laser resonator parameters such that a design criterion for the solar-pumped solid-state laser can be established. Among the laser materials evaluated, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6 percent; however, it does not seem to be practical for a solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AM0) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12 percent when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  2. The pumping mechanism for the neon-nitrogen nuclear excited laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G. W.; Verdeyen, J. T.; Wells, W. E.; Miley, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    In order to determine the physical processes for pumping this laser, a detailed study of the afterglow system has been performed. The pumping mechanism has been found to be collisional-radiative electron-ion recombination. Microwave quenching of both the laser and spontaneous afterglow light have shown conclusively that a recombination process directly produces a nitrogen atom in either the upper laser level or, more likely, in a higher lying energy level which rapidly de-excites to the upper laser level.

  3. Design and development of a high-power LED-pumped Ce:Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Villars, Brenden; Steven Hill, E; Durfee, Charles G

    2015-07-01

    By studying quasi-continuous wave (QCW) operation of a Ce:Nd:YAG solid-state laser directly pumped by LED arrays, we demonstrate the feasibility of direct-LED pumping as an alternative to direct-diode or flashlamp pumping. LEDs emitting either at 460 or 810 nm were used to pump an uncooled Ce:Nd:YAG laser rod (at 30-Hz repetition rate for tens of seconds). Pumping at 460 nm was made possible by the Ce(3+) co-dopant that enables transfer of excitations near to Nd(3+) ions in the YAG lattice. Comparison of these two pumping schemes has allowed for a thorough analysis of the performance and efficiency of this laser system. QCW output energies as high as 18 mJ/pulse are reported, which to the best of our knowledge is the highest output pulse energy achieved by an LED-pumped solid-state laser to date. PMID:26125364

  4. Applications for reactor-pumped lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; McArthur, D.A.

    1994-10-01

    Nuclear reactor-pumped lasers (RPLs) have been developed in the US by the Department of Energy for over two decades, with the primary research occurring at Sandia National Laboratories and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The US program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at wavelengths of 585, 703, 725, 1,271, 1,733, 1,792, 2,032, 2,630, 2,650, and 3,370 nm with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. The major strengths of a reactor-pumped laser are continuous high-power operation, modular construction, self-contained power, compact size, and a variety of wavelengths (from visible to infrared). These characteristics suggest numerous applications not easily accessible to other laser types. The continuous high power of an RPL opens many potential manufacturing applications such as deep-penetration welding and cutting of thick structures, wide-area hardening of metal surfaces by heat treatment or cladding application, wide-area vapor deposition of ceramics onto metal surfaces, production of sub-micron sized particles for manufacturing of ceramics, and 3-D ceramic lithography. In addition, a ground-based RPL could beam its power to space for such activities as illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth`s shadow to extend their lives, beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, removing space debris, and providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night.

  5. Optically (solar) pumped oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, O. B.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies demonstrating the possibility of developing an oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with direct optical pumping of molecular oxygen involving inter-molecular interaction with charge transfer from donor molecule (buffer gas) to acceptor molecule (oxygen). This interaction lifts degeneracy of the lower energy states of molecular oxygen and increases its absorption cross section in the visible spectral region and the UV Herzberg band, where high quantum yield of singlet oxygen is achieved (QY ˜ 1 and QY ˜ 2, respectively) at the same time. A pulse-periodic optical pump sources with pulse energy of ˜50 kJ, pulse duration of ˜25 μs, and repetition rate of ˜10 Hz, which are synchronized with the mechanism of singlet oxygen generation, are developed. This allows implementation of a pulse-periodic oxygen-iodine laser with an efficiency of ˜25%, optical efficiency of ˜40%, and parameter L/ T ˜ 1/1.5, where T is the thermal energy released in the laser active medium upon generation of energy L. It is demonstrated that, under direct solar pumping of molecular oxygen, the efficiency parameter of the OIL can reach L/ T ˜ 1/0.8 in a wide range of scaling factors.

  6. Efficient flashlamp-pumped IBr laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, L. E.; De Young, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The operating characteristics and scaling parameters of a flashlamp-pumped, 4-m-long IBr laser were investigated to further evaluate its potential as a solar-pumped laser. A peak power of 3 kW/sq cm at 2.7 microns was achieved at 4-Torr IBr pressure. A gain of 0.07 per m was measured at a maximum capacitor discharge energy of 4 kJ. The threshold input power necessary for lasing was found to decrease by a factor of 4 and the laser pulse width increased fourfold as the active gain length was increased from 1 to 4 m. A maximum pulse width of 120 microseconds was achieved with 10-Torr argon diluent added to 4-Torr IBr. Quenching of the excited state by the parent molecule was shown to be unimportant for pressures less than 4-Torr IBr. An intrinsic efficiency in the range of 12 percent has been measured for flashlamp-pumped IBr.

  7. Grating THz laser with optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Jed; Haji-saeed, Bahareh; Woods, Charles; Kierstead, John

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a design for a widely tunable solid-state optically and electrically pumped THz laser based on the Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. In the free-electron laser, an energetic electron beam pumps a metallic grating to generate surface plasmons. Our solid-state optically pumped design consists of a thin layer of dielectic, such as SiNx, sandwiched between a corrugated structure and a thin metal or semiconductor layer. The lower layer is for current streaming, and replaces the electron beam in the original design. The upper layer consists of one micro-grating for coupling the electromagnetic field in, another for coupling out, and a nano-grating for coupling with the current in the lower layer for electromagnetic field generation. The surface plasmon waves generated from the upper layer by an external electromagnetic field, and the lower layer by the applied current, are coupled. Emission enhancement occurs when the plasmonic waves in both layers are resonantly coupled.

  8. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Frederico A.; Milne, Christopher J.; Amarasinghe, Dimali C. V.; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; Veen, Renske M. van der; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Mourik, Frank van; Chergui, Majed; Johnson, Steven L.; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; Abela, Rafael

    2011-06-15

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  9. A blackbody radiation-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.; Deyoung, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping.

  10. Progress in high-energy-class diode laser pump sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, P.; Frevert, C.; Bugge, F.; Knigge, S.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.; Pietrzak, A.; Hüslewede, R.; Zorn, M.; Sebastian, J.; Lotz, J.; Fassbender, W.; Neukum, J.; Körner, J.; Hein, J.; Töpfer, T.

    2015-03-01

    A new generation of diode-pumped high-energy-class solid-state laser facilities is in development that generate multijoule pulse energies at around 10 Hz. Currently deployed quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) diode lasers deliver average inpulse pump powers of around 300 W per bar. Increased power-per-bar helps to reduce the system size, complexity and cost per Joule and the increased pump brilliance also enables more efficient operation of the solid state laser itself. It has been shown in recent studies, that optimized QCW diode laser bars centered at 940…980 nm can operate with an average in-pulse power of > 1000 W per bar, triple that of commercial sources. When operated at pulsed condition of 1 ms, 10 Hz, this corresponds to > 1 J/bar. We review here the status of these high-energy-class pump sources, showing how the highest powers are enabled by using long resonators (4…6 mm) for improved cooling and robustly passivated output facets for high reliability. Results are presented for prototype passively-cooled single bar assemblies and monolithic stacked QCW arrays. We confirm that 1 J/bar is sustained for fast-axis collimated stacks with a bar pitch of 1.7 mm, with narrow lateral far field angle (< 12° with 95% power) and spectral width (< 12 nm with 95% power). Such stacks are anticipated to enable Joule/bar pump densities to be used near-term in commercial high power diode laser systems. Finally, we briefly summarize the latest status of research into bars with higher efficiencies, including studies into operation at sub-zero temperatures (-70°C), which also enables higher powers and narrower far field and spectra.

  11. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  12. Segment side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Fu, Chen; Hu, Zhenyue; Zhao, Qin; Gong, Mali

    2012-04-10

    In the design of conduction-cooled lasers, a side-pumped configuration is an attempt to solve the space conflict between pump and heat removal. The pump radiation always competes with the heat removal and mechanical support device for the lateral surface of a laser rod. This space conflict can be addressed by a segment side-pumped configuration in which circular laser diode arrays and heat-conducting rod holders alternate periodically along the length of the laser rod. This scheme permitted 11 Hz operation of a 190 mJ Q-switched laser at the wavelength of 1064 nm without the use of liquid cooling for both the laser rod and laser diode arrays and the corresponding optical-optical conversion efficiency of 23.1%. Thus, it has great potential to be used in compact and miniature laser systems. PMID:22505168

  13. High power tube solid-state laser with zigzag propagation of pump and laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savich, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A novel resonator and pumping design with zigzag propagation of pumping and laser beams permits to design an improved tube Solid State Laser (SSL), solving the problem of short absorption path to produce a high power laser beam (100 - 1000kW). The novel design provides an amplifier module and laser oscillator. The tube-shaped SSL includes a gain element fiber-optically coupled to a pumping source. The fiber optic coupling facilitates light entry at compound Brewster's angle of incidence into the laser gain element and uses internal reflection to follow a "zigzag" path in a generally spiral direction along the length of the tube. Optics are arranged for zigzag propagation of the laser beam, while the cryogenic cooling system is traditional. The novel method of lasing uses advantages of cylindrical geometry to reach the high volume of gain medium with compactness and structural rigidity, attain high pump density and uniformity, and reach a low threshold without excessive increase of the temperature of the crystal. The design minimizes thermal lensing and stress effects, and provides high gain amplification, high power extraction from lasing medium, high pumping and lasing efficiency and a high beam quality.

  14. Efficiency of Nd laser materials with laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Cross, Patricia L.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    For pulsed laser-diode-pumped lasers, where efficiency is the most important issue, the choice of the Nd laser material makes a significant difference. The absorption efficiency, storage efficiency, and extraction efficiency for Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:GSGG, Nd:BEL, Nd:YVO4, and Nd:glass are calculated. The materials are then compared under the assumption of equal quantum efficiency and damage threshold. Nd:YLF is found to be the best candidate for the application discussed here.

  15. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  16. Satellite Power System (SPS) laser studies. Volume 2: Meteorological effects on laser beam propagation and direct solar pumped lasers for the SPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1980-01-01

    The primary emphasis of this research activity was to investigate the effect of the environment on laser power transmission/reception from space to ground. Potential mitigation techniques to minimize the environment effect by a judicious choice of laser operating parameters was investigated. Using these techniques, the availability of power at selected sites was determined using statistical meteorological data for each site.

  17. Thulium fiber laser-pumped mid-IR OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Jiang, Min; Budni, Peter A.; Ketteridge, Peter A.; Setzler, Scott D.; Young, York E.; McCarthy, John C.; Schunemann, Peter G.; Pollak, Thomas M.; Tayebati, Parviz; Chicklis, Evan P.

    2008-04-01

    Fiber lasers are advancing rapidly due to their ability to generate stable, efficient, and diffraction-limited beams with significant peak and average powers. This is of particular interest as fibers provide an ideal pump source for driving parametric processes. Most nonlinear optical crystals which provide phase-matching to the mid-IR at commercially available fiber pump wavelengths suffer from high absorption above 4μm, resulting in low conversion efficiencies in the 4-5μm spectral region. The nonlinear optical crystals which combine low absorption in this same spectral region with high nonlinear gain require pumping at longer wavelengths (typically >1.9μm). In this paper, we report a novel mid-IR OPO pumped by a pulsed thulium-doped fiber laser operating at 2-microns. The eyesafe thulium-fiber pump laser generates >3W of average power at >30kHz repetition rate with 15-30ns pulses in a near diffraction-limited beam. The ZnGeP II (ZGP) OPO produces tunable mid-IR output power in the 3.4-3.99μm (signal) and the 4.0-4.7μm (idler) spectral regions in both singly resonant (SRO) and doubly resonant (DRO) formats. The highest mid-IR output power achieved from this system was 800mW with 20% conversion efficiency at 40kHz. In a separate experiment, the 3W of 2-micron light was further amplified to the 20W level. This amplified output was also used to pump a ZGP OPO, resulting in 2W of output power in the mid-IR. To our knowledge, these are the first demonstrations of a fiber-pumped ZGP OPO.

  18. Power scaling of semiconductor laser pumped Praseodymium-lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Heumann, E.; Huber, G.; Ostroumov, V.; Seelert, W.

    2007-04-01

    We report on efficient lasing of Pr-doped fluoride materials with cw output powers up to 600 mW in the visible spectral range. Praseodymium doped LiYF4 and LiLuF4 crystals were pumped either by an intracavity frequency doubled optically pumped semiconductor laser with output powers up to 1.6 W and nearly diffraction limited beam quality or by a multimode GaN-laser diode with an output power of about 370 mW. Furthermore, intracavity frequency doubling of the red Pr-laser radiation to 320 nm reaching output powers of more than 360 mW with a conversion efficiency of 61% and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 22% are presented.

  19. A Kinetic Plasma-Pumped Rare Gas Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsey, Guy; Güçlü, Yaman; Verboncoeur, John; Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Extending from diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPAL), Han and Heaven have shown that rare gas metastable states, np5 (n + 1) s[ 3 / 2 ] 2 , can operate as the base of a three-level laser with excition of the (n + 1) s --> (n + 1) p transitions. Though both the rare gas lasers (RGL) and DPALs can be excited with incoherent optical pumping, RGLs do not suffer from the highly reactive behavior of alkali metals. Since metastable populations are maintained via electric discharge, we propose using a tuned electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to modify RGL efficiencies and drive the population inversion. The EEDF is maintained by the discharge along with the introduction of electron sources. Using our kinetic global modeling framework (KGMf) and three gas systems (helium buffered argon and krypton along with pure argon), we first validate the intracavity intensity laser model and then generate gain and energy efficiency baselines for each system. Parameter scanning methods are then used to find optimized EEDFs and system parameters for metastable production, generation of a lasing population inversion, and increasing RGL operation efficiencies. Finally, we determine if an RGL can operate without optical pumping. Supported by AFOSR and a MSU Strategic Partnership Grant

  20. Amplified spontaneous emission in solar-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Yong S.; Hwang, In H.; Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1992-01-01

    The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from a long pulse, solar-simulating radiation pumped iodine laser amplifier is studied. The ASE threshold pump intensity is almost proportional to the inverse of the laser gain length when the gas pressure is constant in the laser tube.

  1. Flow tube used to cool solar-pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A flow tube has been designed and constructed to provide two major functions in the application of a laser beam for transmission of both sound and video. It maintains the YAG laser at the proper operating temperature of 300 degrees K under solar pumping conditions, and it serves as a pump cavity for the laser crystal.

  2. a Blackbody-Pumped Carbon Dioxide Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insuik, Robin Joy

    A proof of concept experiment has been carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using blackbody radiation to pump a gas laser. Building on earlier experiments in which optical gain was measured in a CO(,2) laser mixture exposed to blackbody radiation at a temperature of 1500(DEGREES)K, continuous wave oscillation of CO(,2) has been achieved, for the first time, using radiation from a blackbody cavity as the pump source. This was made possible by actively cooling the laser mixture as it was exposed to the radiation field of an electrically heated oven. Output power measurements are presented from a series of experiments using mixtures of CO(,2), He, and Ar. Maximum output power was obtained with a 20%CO(,2) - 15%He- 65%Ar mixture at pressures around 6-10 Torr. The output power was found to vary greatly with the gas temperature and the blackbody temperature. By varying these parameters output powers up to 8 mW have been achieved. The effects of the buffer gas are also shown to be important. Based on the experimental results, it is believed that the buffer gas is needed to inhibit diffusion of the excited species out of the laser mode volume. This diffusion leads to deactivation at the walls. Adding more CO(,2) results in a decrease in output power, indicating that the gas has a finite optical depth and the mode volume is not pumped if too much CO(,2) is present. A model which incorporates these effects is presented. The predicted small signal gains and powers based on this model adequately match the trends observed experimentally.

  3. Tunable mid-IR parametric conversion system pumped by a high-average-power picosecond Yb:YAG thin-disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Ondřej; Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Huynh, Jaroslav; Severová, Patricie; Endo, Akira; Mocek, TomáÅ.¡

    2014-05-01

    The mid-IR wavelength range has gained increased interest due to its applications in gas sensing, medicine, defense, and others. Optical parametric devices play an important role in the generation of radiation in the mid-IR. Low thermal load of nonlinear crystals promises high average power outputs if powerful pump laser is available. We have developed 75-W average power pump laser operating at 100 kHz repetition rate. The pulses of Yb-fiber laser oscillator at 1030-nm wavelength are stretched by a chirped volume Bragg grating from 5 ps to 180 ps and inserted into a cavity of regenerative amplifier with an Yb:YAG thin-disk. The amplified pulses are compressed by a chirped volume Bragg grating with an 88% efficiency. We have proposed a wavelength conversion system generating picosecond pulses tunable between 2 and 3 μm. The seed signal radiation is acquired by the optical parametric generation in the first nonlinear crystal. Signal pulse energy is increased in the subsequent optical parametric amplifiers. Each amplification stage consists of a crystal pair in the walkoff compensating arrangement. The wavelength of the signal beam is tunable between 1.6 and 2.1 μm. The 2.1 - 3 μm tunable source will be the idler beam taken from the last amplification stage. Calculations show the output power of ten watt can be achieved for 100 W pump. The results of preliminary experiments with seeded optical parametric generation and subsequent amplification are presented and discussed.

  4. Improving pumping system efficiency at coal plants

    SciTech Connect

    Livoti, W.C.; McCandless, S.; Poltorak, R.

    2009-03-15

    The industry must employ ultramodern technologies when building or upgrading power plant pumping systems thereby using fuels more efficiently. The article discusses the uses and efficiencies of positive displacement pumps, centrifugal pumps and multiple screw pumps. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  5. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  6. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2016-03-01

    Multi-photon microscopy is extensively used in research due to its superior possibilities when compared to other microscopy modalities. The technique also has the possibility to advance diagnostics in clinical applications, due to its capabilities complementing existing technology in a multimodal system. However, translation is hindered due to the high cost, high training demand and large footprint of a standard setup. We show in this article that minification of the setup, while also reducing cost and complexity, is indeed possible without compromising on image quality, by using a novel diode laser replacing the commonly used conventional solid state laser as the pump for the femtosecond system driving the imaging.

  7. Pump power stability range of single-mode solid-state lasers with rod thermal lensing

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; La Porta, P.; Magni, V.

    1987-11-01

    The pump power stability range of solid-state laser resonators operating in the TEM/sub 00/ mode has been thoroughly investigated. It has been shown that, for a very general resonator containing intracavity optical systems, rod thermal lensing engenders a pump power stability range which is a characteristic parameter of laser material and pump cavity, but is independent of resonator configuration. Stability ranges have been calculated and critically discussed for Nd:YAG, Nd:Glasses, Nd:Cr:GSGG, and alexandrite. The independence of the pump power stability range from the resonator configuration has been experimentally demonstrated for a CW Nd:YAG laser.

  8. A kilowatt level diode-side-pumped QCW Nd:YAG ceramic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Bo, Y.; Wang, B. S.; Tian, C. Y.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.; Liu, W. B.; Feng, X. Q.; Pan, Y. B.

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a kilowatt level Quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic laser at 1064 nm. The laser system adopts a master oscillator power amplifier scheme (MOPA). The master oscillator contains two diode-pumped laser modules. Under the pump power of 2000 W, an output power of 686 W was obtained. After amplified by an identical ceramic laser module, a maximum output power of 1020 W was obtained under a total incident pump power of 3433 W, corresponding to an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 29.7%. At the maximal output power, the repetition frequency was measured to be 1 kHz and the pulse width was 114 μs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to realize QCW side-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic laser system with output power above 1 kW.

  9. Design of diode-pumped solid-state laser applied in laser fuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, FangLin; Zhang, YiFei

    2005-04-01

    The function of laser fuzes which are parts of certain weapon systems is to control the blasting height of warheads. Commonly the battle environment these weapon systems are confronted with is very complicated and the tactical demand for them is very rigor, so laser fuzes equipped for them must fulfill some special technical requirements, such as high repetition rate, long ranging scope, etc. Lasers are one of key components which constitute fuze systems. Whether designed lasers are advanced and reasonable will determine whether laser fuzes can be applied in these weapon systems or not. So we adopt the novel technology of diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) to design lasers applied in fuzes. Nd:YVO4 crystal is accepted as gain material, which has wide absorption band and large absorption efficient for 808nm pumping laser. As warhead's temperature is usually very high, wider absorption band is beneficial to reduce the influence of temperature fluctuation. Passive Q-switching with Cr4+:YAG is used to reduce the power consumption farthest. Design the end-pumped microchip sandwich-architecture to decrease lasers' size and increase the reliability, further it's advantageous to produce short pulses and increase peak power of lasers. The designed DPSSL features small size and weight, high repetition rate and peak power, robustness, etc. The repetition rate is expected to reach 1 kHz; peak power will exceed 300 kW; pulse width is only 5 ns; and divergence angle of laser beams is less than 5 mrad. So DPSSL is suitable for laser fuzes as an emitter.

  10. Optical pumping of generalized laser active materials.

    PubMed

    Fry, F H

    1967-11-01

    Results are presented of a computer-based study on the rate of excitation in the active cores of two types of optically pumped lasers as a function of a number of parameters of the active core. The absorption bands of the active materials are generated by Lorentzian and Gaussian functions. The excitation rate of the active core is proportional to the width of the absorption band at all depths of penetration. The plots of excitation rate as a function of frequency show curves similar to line reversal spectra and emphasize the importance of excitation some distance from the center of the absorption band in the slab model. In the cylindrical model, this wing pumping is even more important due to focusing. The effect of refractive index on the excitation rate is also described. PMID:20062337