Science.gov

Sample records for pure magnetite crystals

  1. Thermal Decomposition of an Impure (Roxbury) Siderite: Relevance to the Presence of Chemically Pure Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K.; Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; Wentworth, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the origin of nanophase magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been widely debated for nearly a decade. Golden et al. have reported producing nearly chemically pure magnetite from thermal decomposition of chemically impure siderite [(Fe, Mg, Mn)CO3]. This claim is significant for three reasons: first, it has been argued that chemically pure magnetite present in the carbonate disks in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could have formed by the thermal decomposition of the impure carbonate matrix in which they are embedded; second, the chemical purity of magnetite has been previously used to identify biogenic magnetite; and, third, previous studies of thermal decomposition of impure (Mg,Ca,Mn)-siderites, which have been investigated under a wide variety of conditions by numerous researchers, invariably yields a mixed metal oxide phase as the product and not chemically pure magnetite. The explanation for this observation is that these siderites all possess the same crystallographic structure (Calcite; R3c) so solid solutions between these carbonates are readily formed and can be viewed on an atomic scale as two chemically different but structurally similar lattices.

  2. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbonates Implications for the Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Trieman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite and sulfides in the black rims of carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al. that they are biogenic in origin. However, exclusively inorganic (abiotic) processes are able to account for the occurrence of carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblages in the meteorite. We have previously precipitated chemically zoned and sulfide-bearing carbonate globules analogous to those in ALH84001 (at less than or equal to 150 C) from multiple fluxes of variable-composition Ca-Mg-Fe-CO2-S-H2O solutions. Brief heating of precipitated globules to approx. 470 C produced magnetite and pyrrhotite within the globules by thermal decomposition of siderite and pyrite, respectively. We have also shown that morphology of magnetite formed by inorganic thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate is similar to the morphology of so-called biogenic magnetite in the carbonate globules of ALH84001. Magnetite crystals in the rims of carbonate globules in ALH84001 are chemically pure [Note: "Chemically pure" is defined here as magnetite with Mg at levels comparable or lower than Mg detected by [8] in ALH84001 magnetite]. A debate continues on whether or not chemically pure magnetite can form by the thermal decomposition of mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates that have formed under abiotic conditions. Thomas-Keprta et al. argue that it is not possible to form Mg-free magnetite from Mg-Fe-carbonate based on thermodynamic data. We previously suggested that chemically pure magnetite could form by the thermal decomposition of relatively pure siderite in the outer rims of the globules. Mg-Fe-carbonates may also thermally decompose under conditions conducive for formation of chemically pure magnetite. In this paper we show through laboratory experiments that chemically pure magnetite can form by an inorganic process from mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of magnetite crystals: From sheet to pseudo-octahedron

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ming; Ji, Rui-Ping; Jiang, Ji-Sen

    2010-12-15

    In this paper, we developed a hydrothermal method to fabricate sheet-like and pseudo-octahedral magnetite crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the products were pure spinel-structured magnetite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the morphology of the obtained crystals. By carefully regulating the initial NaOH concentrations, the morphology of the products could be changed from sheet-like crystals to pseudo-octahedral crystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated the sheet-like crystals were the oriented aggregation of nanoparticles. Pseudo-octahedral magnetite crystals were single crystalline, and were obtained by dissolution-recrystallization of the sheet-like crystals. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM)) suggested the magnetic properties of the products were strongly related to the morphology. The coercivity of the sheet-like magnetite crystals was 100 Oe, larger than 30 Oe of the pseudo-octahedral crystals, but the saturation magnetization of the sheet-like magnetite crystals was 40 emu/g, smaller than 85 emu/g of the pseudo-octahedral crystals.

  4. Studies of Inorganic Crystals in Biological Tissue: Magnetite in Human

    E-print Network

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Studies of Inorganic Crystals in Biological Tissue: Magnetite in Human Tumor Atsuko Kobayashi Metallurgy 44 (1997 ), 294 #12;294 Studies of Inorganic Crystals in Biological Tissue: Magnetite in Human Tumor Atsuko Kobayashi*', Naoichi Yamamoto*l and Joseph Kirschvink*2 *1 Graduate School of Human

  5. Process for Making Single-Domain Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Lofgren, Gary E.; McKay, Gordan A.; Schwandt, Craig S.; Lauer, Howard V., Jr.; Socki, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    A process for making chemically pure, single-domain magnetite crystals substantially free of structural defects has been invented as a byproduct of research into the origin of globules in a meteorite found in Antarctica and believed to have originated on Mars. The globules in the meteorite comprise layers of mixed (Mg, Fe, and Ca) carbonates, magnetite, and iron sulfides. Since the discovery of the meteorite was announced in August 1996, scientists have debated whether the globules are of biological origin or were formed from inorganic materials by processes that could have taken place on Mars. While the research that led to the present invention has not provided a definitive conclusion concerning the origin of the globules, it has shown that globules of a different but related chemically layered structure can be grown from inorganic ingredients in a multistep precipitation process. As described in more detail below, the present invention comprises the multistep precipitation process plus a subsequent heat treatment. The multistep precipitation process was demonstrated in a laboratory experiment on the growth of submicron ankerite crystals, overgrown by submicron siderite and pyrite crystals, overgrown by submicron magnesite crystals, overgrown by submicron siderite and pyrite. In each step, chloride salts of appropriate cations (Ca, Fe, and Mg) were dissolved in deoxygenated, CO2- saturated water. NaHCO3 was added as a pH buffer while CO2 was passed continuously through the solution. A 15-mL aliquot of the resulting solution was transferred into each of several 20 mL, poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-lined hydrothermal pressure vessels. The vessels were closed in a CO2 atmosphere, then transferred into an oven at a temperature of 150 C. After a predetermined time, the hydrothermal vessels were removed from the oven and quenched in a freezer. Supernatant solutions were decanted, and carbonate precipitates were washed free of soluble salts by repeated decantations with deionized water.

  6. ADVANCED TEM TECHNIQUES FOR ASSESSING THE POSSIBLE BIOGENIC ORIGIN OF METEORITIC MAGNETITE CRYSTALS. M. Weyland

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    ADVANCED TEM TECHNIQUES FOR ASSESSING THE POSSIBLE BIOGENIC ORIGIN OF METEORITIC MAGNETITE CRYSTALS of extraterrestrial life is provided by a small subset of magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals found in meteorite ALH84001 from bacteria [1, 2]. The conclusion that the meteoritic crystals are `physically and chemi- cally identical

  7. Magnetotransport properties of a percolating network of magnetite crystals embedded in a glass-ceramic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allia, Paolo; Bretcanu, Oana; Vernè, Enrica; Celegato, Federica; Coisson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola; Vinai, Franco; Spizzo, Federico; Tamisari, Melissa

    2009-04-01

    Electrical resistance, magnetization, and magnetoresistance have been measured as functions of temperature from 50 to 300 K on three ferromagnetic glass ceramics containing different magnetite crystals by preparing conditions and crystal morphology. Magnetite crystals form a percolating network for electrons with weak links at crystal-crystal contact points. All samples exhibit a broadened Verwey transition, peaked at temperatures lower than measured in bulk stoichiometric magnetite. The negative magnetoresistance ratio increases in absolute value with sample cooling from RT down to the Verwey temperature and decreases on further cooling. This behavior indicates that electron transfer between magnetite crystals is achieved through spin-dependent and spin-independent channels acting in parallel. Magnetic correlation states for spins at contact points between magnetite crystals are studied by plotting the magnetoresistance as a function of reduced magnetization. The transition from activated hopping to variable range hopping affects the magnetoresistance versus magnetization curves.

  8. Ferromagnetic resonance of intact cells and isolated crystals from cultured and uncultured magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abraçado, Leida G; Wajnberg, Eliane; Esquivel, Darci M S; Keim, Carolina N; Silva, Karen T; Moreira, Emílio T S; Lins, Ulysses; Farina, Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Most magnetotactic bacteria (MB) produce stable, single-domain magnetite nanocrystals with species-specific size, shape and chain arrangement. In addition, most crystals are elongated along the [111] direction, which is the easy axis of magnetization in magnetite, chemically pure and structurally perfect. These special characteristics allow magnetite crystal chains from MB to be recognized in environmental samples including old sedimentary rocks. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) has been proposed as a powerful and practical tool for screening large numbers of samples possibly containing magnetofossils. Indeed, several studies were recently published on FMR of cultured MB, mainly Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. In this work, we examined both uncultured magnetotactic cocci and the cultured MB M. gryphiswaldense using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and FMR from 10 K to room temperature (RT). The TEM data supported the FMR spectral characteristics of our samples. The FMR spectra of both bacteria showed the intrinsic characteristics of magnetite produced by MB, such as extended absorption at the low field region of the spectra and a Verwey transition around 100 K. As previously observed, the spectra of M. gryphiswaldense isolated crystals were more symmetrical than the spectra obtained from whole cells, reflecting the loss of chain arrangement due to the small size and symmetrical shape of the crystals. However, the FMR spectra of magnetic crystals isolated from magnetotactic cocci were very similar to the FMR spectra of whole cells, because the chain arrangement was maintained due to the large size and prismatic shape of the crystals. Our data support the use of FMR spectra to detect magnetotactic bacteria and magnetofossils in samples of present and past environments. Furthermore, the spectra suggest the use of the temperature transition of spectral peak-to-peak intensity to obtain the Verwey temperature for these systems. PMID:24828297

  9. Analysis of magnetite crystals and inclusion bodies inside magnetotactic bacteria from different environmental locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreicher, Z.; Lower, B.; Lower, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Biomineralization occurs throughout the living world; a few common examples include iron oxide in chiton teeth, calcium carbonate in mollusk shells, calcium phosphate in animal bones and teeth, silica in diatom shells, and magnetite crystals inside the cells of magnetotactic bacteria. Biologically controlled mineralization is characterized by biominerals that have species-specific properties such as: preferential crystallographic orientation, consistent particle size, highly ordered spatial locations, and well-defined composition and structure. It is well known that magnetotactic bacteria synthesize crystals of magnetite inside of their cells, but how they mineralize the magnetite is poorly understood. Magnetosomes have a species-specific morphology that is due to specific proteins involved in the mineralization process. In addition to magnetite crystals, magnetotactic bacteria also produce inclusion bodies or granules that contain different elements, such as phosphorus, calcium, and sulfur. In this study we used the transmission electron microscope to analyze the structure of magnetite crystals and inclusion bodies from different species of magnetotactic bacteria in order to determine the composition of the inclusion bodies and to ascertain whether or not the magnetite crystals contain elements other than iron and oxygen. Using energy dispersive spectroscopy we found that different bacteria from different environments possess inclusion bodies that contain different elements such as phosphorus, calcium, barium, magnesium, and sulfur. These differences may reflect the conditions of the environment in which the bacteria inhabit.

  10. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  11. Crystal growth of bullet-shaped magnetite in magnetotactic bacteria of the Nitrospirae phylum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Menguy, Nicolas; Gatel, Christophe; Boureau, Victor; Snoeck, Etienne; Patriarche, Gilles; Leroy, Eric; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-02-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are known to produce single-domain magnetite or greigite crystals within intracellular membrane organelles and to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field lines. MTB have been suggested as being one of the most ancient biomineralizing metabolisms on the Earth and they represent a fundamental model of intracellular biomineralization. Moreover, the determination of their specific crystallographic signature (e.g. structure and morphology) is essential for palaeoenvironmental and ancient-life studies. Yet, the mechanisms of MTB biomineralization remain poorly understood, although this process has been extensively studied in several cultured MTB strains in the Proteobacteria phylum. Here, we show a comprehensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of magnetic and structural properties down to atomic scales on bullet-shaped magnetites produced by the uncultured strain MYR-1 belonging to the Nitrospirae phylum, a deeply branching phylogenetic MTB group. We observed a multiple-step crystal growth of MYR-1 magnetite: initial isotropic growth forming cubo-octahedral particles (less than approx. 40 nm), subsequent anisotropic growth and a systematic final elongation along [001] direction. During the crystal growth, one major {111} face is well developed and preserved at the larger basal end of the crystal. The basal {111} face appears to be terminated by a tetrahedral-octahedral-mixed iron surface, suggesting dimensional advantages for binding protein(s), which may template the crystallization of magnetite. This study offers new insights for understanding magnetite biomineralization within the Nitrospirae phylum. PMID:25566884

  12. Microstructural characterization of metamorphic magnetite crystals with implications for oxygen isotope distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sitzman, S.D.; Banfield, J.F.; Valley, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    The microstructures of magnetite crystals in three samples from a single outcrop of granulite-facies marble were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine how exsolution history can affect physical properties and mineral reactivity during retrograde metamorphism. The microstructure of sample 90LP9 consists of dislocation, dislocation arrays (with dislocation spacings of 100 to 500 nm), and linear channels filled with layer silicates. Acid etching and ion milling of polished 90LP9 magnetite grains show dislocation arrays clustered near grain boundaries with rheologically hard magnetite, diopside, and monticellite, but rarely near grain boundaries with softer calcite. Samples LP204-1 magnetite grains contain coherent {l{underscore}brace}100{r{underscore}brace} Al-Mn-Fe-spinel precipitates ({approximately}40 nm diameter, {approximately}1--3 nm thick, {approximately}10{sup 4} platelets/{micro}m{sup 3}) and very few dislocations. Larger, more widely spaced spinel precipitates are present in a third sample, 94AK3. Extremely low dislocation densities in powders of LP204-1 and intermediate dislocation densities in powders of 94AK3, compared with extremely high dislocation densities in powders of 90LP9, are related to strong dislocation pinning effects by precipitates. The different exsolution behavior of the three magnetite samples is attributed to small, but important, differences in Al content. Because dislocations can provide fast pathways for exchange that enhance diffusion, especially in very slowly cooled rocks, these microstructural results may explain previously reported subgrain-scale oxygen isotopic heterogeneity in 90LP9 magnetite compared with relative isotopic homogeneity in LP204-1 magnetite.

  13. Hysteresis of Magnetite, Hematite and Pyrrhotite Crystals at High and Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Alternating gradient force magnetometers and sensitive vibrating-sample magnetometers operating above, at, and below room temperature have enabled rapid reliable measurements of hysteresis and remanence curves. The hysteresis parameters Ms, Mrs, Hc, plus the remanence coercivity Hcr, are routinely determined, at room temperature at least, and reported in the form of a Day plot as an indication of domain state and inferred grain size. Yet our knowledge of the hysteresis and remanence properties of individual crystals or sized crystal aggregates of magnetite, titanomagnetite, hematite, pyrrhotite and other important magnetic minerals has scarcely advanced beyond what was known at the end of the 1980's. Applications have indeed outstripped fundamental studies. This presentation will focus on new hysteresis measurements for well-sized magnetites of a variety of origins; magnetite inclusions in plagioclase, pyroxene, amphiboles and biotite; hematite; and pyrrhotite. Measurements were made at 20oC intervals from 25oC to the Curie point for all magnetites and hematites and at 10oC intervals for pyrrhotite. For one set of sized magnetites (0.6, 3, 6, 9, 14 and 110 micrometers), hysteresis and back-field remanence curves were also measured below room temperature (every 10 K from 10 K to 70 K, every 5 K from 80 K to 140 K, and every 10 K from 150 K to 300 K). These data give a wealth of information about the individual mineral crystals and trends linking crystals of common origin but different sizes. From Ms(T) we obtain precise Curie points and transition temperatures. Mrs(T)/Ms(T) tracks sometimes subtle changes in domain structure with changing temperature. Hc(T) gives an indication of the mechanism(s) of anisotropy, important for understanding TRM acquisition in crystals above single-domain size. Mrs(T) and Hc(T) often show substantial irreversible changes in the first heating- cooling cycle, particularly but not exclusively for synthetic crystals, stabilizing in subsequent cycles. Finally, Mrs(T)/Ms(T) vs. Hcr(T)/Hc(T) data trace curves on a Day plot showing unmistakable differences in domain structure between monoclinic and cubic magnetite, as well as more subtle changes away from the Verwey transition.

  14. Magnetite 3D colloidal crystals formed in the early solar system 4.6 billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Jun; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; van Enckevort, Willem; Nakamura, Tomoki; Kimura, Yuki; Miura, Hitoshi; Satoh, Hisao; Nagashima, Ken; Konoto, Makoto

    2011-06-15

    Three-dimensional colloidal crystals made of ferromagnetic particles, such as magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), cannot be synthesized in principle because of the strong attractive magnetic interaction. However, we discovered colloidal crystals composed of polyhedral magnetite nanocrystallites of uniform size in the range of a few hundred nanometers in the Tagish Lake meteorite. Those colloidal crystals were formed 4.6 billion years ago and thus are much older than natural colloidal crystals on earth, such as opals, which formed about 100 million years ago. We found that the size of each individual magnetite particle determines its morphology, which in turn plays an important role in deciding the packing structure of the colloidal crystals. We also hypothesize that each particle has a flux-closed magnetic domain structure, which reduces the interparticle magnetic force significantly. PMID:21563777

  15. Sub-Micrometer-Scale Mapping of Magnetite Crystals and Sulfur Globules in Magnetotactic Bacteria Using Confocal Raman Micro-Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stephan H. K.; Gigler, Alexander M.; Hanzlik, Marianne; Winklhofer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35–120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (<0.25 mW) to prevent laser induced damage of magnetite, we can identify and map magnetite by its characteristic Raman spectrum (303, 535, 665 ) against a large autofluorescence background in our natural magnetotactic bacteria samples. While greigite (cubic ; Raman lines of 253 and 351 ) is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae), we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (: 151, 219, 467 ), using green (532 nm), red (638 nm) and near-infrared excitation (785 nm). The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state. PMID:25233081

  16. Intrinsic response of crystals to pure dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinghan; Yip, S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Phillpot, S.; Wolf, D. )

    1991-01-01

    The response of an f.c.c. lattice with Lennard-Jones interaction under symmetric lattice extension has been studied by Monte Carlo simulation at several temperatures. The critical strain at which the crystal undergoes a structural change is found to be well predicted by the mechanical stability limit expressed in terms of either the elastic constants or the bulk modulus. At low temperature (reduced temperature T = 0.125), lattice decohesion is observed in the form of cleavage fracture, whereas at higher temperature (T = 0.3) the strained system deforms by cavitation with some degree of local plasticity. At still higher temperature (T = 0.5) the lattice undergoes homogeneous disordering with all the attendant characteristics of melting.

  17. Intrinsic response of crystals to pure dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinghan; Yip, S.; Phillpot, S.; Wolf, D.

    1991-12-31

    The response of an f.c.c. lattice with Lennard-Jones interaction under symmetric lattice extension has been studied by Monte Carlo simulation at several temperatures. The critical strain at which the crystal undergoes a structural change is found to be well predicted by the mechanical stability limit expressed in terms of either the elastic constants or the bulk modulus. At low temperature (reduced temperature T = 0.125), lattice decohesion is observed in the form of cleavage fracture, whereas at higher temperature (T = 0.3) the strained system deforms by cavitation with some degree of local plasticity. At still higher temperature (T = 0.5) the lattice undergoes homogeneous disordering with all the attendant characteristics of melting.

  18. Molarity (Aromic Density) of the Elements as Pure Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the atomic density of the elements as pure crystals. Atomic density is defined as the reciprocal of the atomic volume. Includes atomic-density diagrams which were prepared using the atomic-volume values given by Singman, supplemented by additional values for some allotropes. (JN)

  19. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose ori gins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated: that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  20. Degeneration of Biogenic Superparamagnetic Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Yi-Liang; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Dyar, Dr. M Darby; Vali, Dr. Hojatolah; Konhauser, Dr, Kurt; Cole, David R; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Magnetite crystals precipitated as a consequence of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella algae BrY after 265 hours incubation and 5-year storage were investigated with transmission electron microscopy, M ssbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetite crystals were typically superparamagnetic with an approximate size of 13 nm. The lattice constants of the 265 hour and 5-year crystals are 8.4164 and 8.3774 , respectively. The M ssbauer spectra indicated that the 265 hour magnetite had excess Fe(II) in its crystal-chemistry (Fe3+1.9901Fe2+ 1.0149O4) but the 5-year magnetite was Fe(II)-deficient in stoichiometry (Fe3+2.3875Fe2+0.4188O4). Such crystal-hemical changes may be indicative of the degeneration of superparamagnetic magnetite through the aqueous oxidization of Fe(II) anaerobically, and the concomitant oxidation of the organic phases(fatty acid methyl esters) that were present during the initial formation of the magnetite. The observation of a corona structure on the aged magnetite corroborates the oxidation of Fe(II) on the outer layers of magnetite crystals. These results suggest that there may be a possible link between the enzymatic activity of the bacteria and the stability of Fe(II)-excess magnetite, which may help explain why stable nano-magnetite grains are seldom preserved in natural environments.

  1. Origin of Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from our thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  2. New insights into the origin of magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approximately 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  3. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Characterization and phylogenetic identification of a species of spherical multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes that produces both magnetite and greigite crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Yi-Ran; Du, Hai-Jian; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Pan, Hong-Miao; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of Gram-negative bacteria synthesizing magnetic crystals that allow them aligning along magnetic field lines. They have diverse morphologies including cocci, rods, vibrio, spirilla, and multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs). MMPs are composed of 10-57 cells with peritrichous flagella on their outer surfaces and swim as an entire unit. Here, we describe a species of spherical MMPs isolated from intertidal sediments of Lake Yuehu (Yellow Sea, China). They were mainly found in the subsurface layer of gray-black sediments. Microscopy revealed that these spherical MMPs were 5.6 ± 0.9 ?m in diameter and composed of approximately 16-32 ovoid cells with a helical arrangement and peritrichous flagellation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the MMPs contained both bullet-shaped magnetite and irregular greigite magnetosomes that were arranged in chains or clusters. These MMPs displayed typical escape motility and negative phototaxis. The 16S rRNA genes of micromanipulation-purified spherical MMPs were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MMP species was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and displayed >2.8% sequence divergence with respect to previously reported MMPs. This is the first phylogenetic identification of a spherical MMP that produces both magnetite and greigite magnetosomes. PMID:25086260

  5. Influence of growth conditions on magnetite nanoparticles electro-crystallized in the presence of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Mosivand, Saba; Monzon, Lorena M A; Kazeminezhad, Iraj; Coey, J Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by electrocrystallization in the presence of thiourea or sodium butanoate as an organic stabilizer. The synthesis was performed in a thermostatic electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes with an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate as electrolyte. The effects of organic concentration, applied potential and growth temperature on particle size, morphology, structure and magnetic properties were investigated. The magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, magnetometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. When the synthesis is performed in the presence of sodium butanoate at 60 °C, a paramagnetic ferric salt is obtained as a second phase; it is possible to avoid formation of this phase, increase the specific magnetization and improve the structure of the oxide particles by tuning the growth conditions. Room-temperature magnetization values range from 45 to 90 Am2kg-1, depending on the particle size, type of surfactant and synthesis conditions. Mössbauer spectra, which were recorded at 290 K for all the samples, are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe3-?O4, with a small excess of Fe3+, 0.05 ? ? ? 0.15. PMID:23685871

  6. Morphological Evidence for an Exclusively Inorganic Origin for Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.; McKay, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of magnetite crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 is the focus of a debate about the possibility of past (and present) life on Mars. McKay et al. originally suggested that some of the magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 are biogenic in ori-gin, because they are single magnetic domain, free of crystalline defects, chemically pure, and coexist with other metastable phases in apparent disequilibrium. Thomas-Keprta et al. reported that a subpopulation of magnetite crystals (approx. 25%) associated with carbonate globules in ALH84001 and magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 have similar morphologies with crystal elongation along the [111] crystallographic axis that they describe as "truncated hexa-octahedral" ([111-THO]) magnetite. Along with several other properties, the [111]-THO morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes), so that the presence of [111]-THO magnetite in ALH84001 may be evidence for past life on Mars.

  7. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite ? Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite ? calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite ? calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation. PMID:26348458

  8. Signatures in magnetites formed by (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 thermal decomposition: Terrestrial and extraterrestrial implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lauer, Howard V.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2012-06-01

    It has never been demonstrated whether magnetite synthesized through the heat-dependent decomposition of carbonate precursors retains the chemical and structural features of the carbonates. In this study, synthetic (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 was thermally decomposed by heating from 25 to 700 °C under 1 atm CO2, and by in situ exposure under vacuum to the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope. In both cases, the decomposition of the carbonate was topotactic and resulted in porous pseudomorphs composed of oriented aggregates of magnetite nanocrystals. Both calcium and magnesium were incorporated into nanophase magnetite, forming (Ca,Mg)-magnetites and (Ca,Mg)-ferrites when these elements were present in the parent material, thus preserving the chemical signature of the precursor. These results show that magnetites synthesized in this way acquire a chemical and structural inheritance from their carbonate precursor that indicates how they were produced. These results are not only important in the determination of the origin of chemically-impure, oriented nanophase magnetite crystals in general, but they also provide important insights into the origin of the large, euhedral, chemically-pure, [111]-elongated magnetites found within Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Based on our experimental results, the chemically-pure magnetites within ALH84001 cannot be genetically related to the Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonate matrix within which they are embedded, and an alternative explanation for their occurrence is warranted.

  9. Cooling crystallization of aluminum sulfate in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxue; Sun, Yuzhu; Yu, Jianguo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the cooling crystallization of aluminum sulfate to explore the basic data for the recovery of aluminum resources from coal spoil. First, the metastable zone width (MSZW) of aluminum sulfate was reported. A parallel synthesis platform (CrystalSCAN) was used to determine the solubility from 10 °C to 70 °C, and an automatic lab reactor (LabMax) equipped with focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was adopted to determine the supersolubility. The effects of operating variables on MSZW were experimentally explored. Results show that the MSZW of aluminum sulfate decreases with increasing stirring speed, while it increases with increasing cooling rate. Second, the continuous crystallization kinetics of aluminum sulfate was investigated in a laboratory-scale mixed-suspension mixed-product removal (MSMPR) crystallizer at a steady state. Growth kinetics presented size-dependent growth rate, which was well fitted with the MJ3 model. Both the growth rate (G) and the total nucleation rate (BTOT) were correlated in the power law kinetic expressions with good correlation coefficients. Third, aluminum sulfate products were modified by sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS). Crystals with large sizes and regular hexagonal plate morphologies were obtained. These crystals reveal that SDBS can inhibit crystal nucleation and promote crystal growth.

  10. Isolation of isoelectrically pure cholera toxin for crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, B.D.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    We have determined that the failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well results from its isoelectric heterogeneity, which is probably due to a post-translational process such as deamidation of its B subunit. Every sample of cholera toxin we have examined from commercial or academic suppliers has been heterogeneous; heterogeneous cholera toxin does not crystallize satisfactorily. We have overcome this problem by using ion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) to obtain an isoelectrically homogeneous species of cholera toxin. Homogeneous cholera toxin crystallizes readily, forming single, nonmosaic crystals suitable for x-ray diffraction studies. For this process, protein was applied to a MonoQ ion-exchange column, then eluted with an isocratic low salt buffer followed by a linear salt gradient (0-100 mM NaCl). Column fractions were analyzed on isoelectric focusing gels, and those fractions containing the desired homogeneous species were pooled and concentrated. Crystals formed within 24 to 48 hours in a MOPS/PEG buffer, which made use of slow isoelectric precipitation to induce crystallization. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Isotopically pure ZnSe crystals grown from the vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauck, R.; Schönherr, E.

    1999-02-01

    For the study of isotope effects in ZnSe, 64Zn and 68Zn isotopes have been combined with 76Se and 80Se isotopes. Synthesis, purification and crystal growth were carried out via the vapor phase in the same sealed ampoule. The <1 1 1> directed growth was favored by repeated formation of twins. Rod-shaped crystals up to 8 mm in length were obtained from small quantities of source materials. The physical vapor transport in an argon atmosphere with a Zn reservoir has been studied quantitatively.

  12. Submicron magnetite grains and carbon compounds in Martian meteorite ALH84001: inorganic, abiotic formation by shock and thermal metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Allan H

    2003-01-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe(3)O(4), reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered). PMID:14577885

  13. Photorefractive nonlinearity in pure and doped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kan

    Detailed theoretical analysis and experimental investigation of the photorefractive (PR) effect in liquid crystals (LC) are presented. The photorefractive nonlinearity arises from the formation of spatially modulated space charge field. Two main mechanisms contribute space charge field in liquid crystals. One comes from the formation and the subsequent dissociation of charge transfer complexes between the liquid crystal and the dopant, which produces mobile charge carriers. The generation and redistribution of charge carriers, induced by external dc voltage and inhomogeneous illumination, form the space charge field. Second source comes from the so-called Carr-Helfrich effect, which states that transverse space charge field can be induced by liquid crystal dielectric and conductivity anisotropy under external applied field. Assisted by the space charge field, large optical nonlinearity can be obtained in liquid crystals. Liquid crystal molecular reorientation occurs under the combined action of internal space charge field and external dc field. The subsequent birefringent grating accounts for photorefractive diffraction and beam coupling. Its orientational feature is investigated and evidenced by facts, such as, polarization anisotropy observed in probe diffraction, external threshold behavior, asymmetric two beam coupling, and geometrical dependence of diffraction efficiency. In parallel with the effort to understand basic mechanisms governing photorefractive effect in liquid crystals, we've also attempted to enhance PR performance, mainly by chemical doping. The doping effect, both organic (C60, single walled nanotubes (SWNT)), and inorganic doping (e.g., CdSe nanorodes), is studied. Substantial improvement of photorefractive response can be observed in our doping samples, in terms of larger diffraction efficiency and higher beam coupling gain. Although the underline mechanism is still intricate in molecular level, we believe the enhanced photo-charge generation and transport, and/or the enlarged conductivity anisotropy, may be the possible explanations for the better PR performance in doped LC system. While there is compelling evidence that liquid crystal reorientation under space charge field is responsible for photorefractive grating formation, much less understood, however, are the mechanisms involved in the formation of space charge fields that drive the orientation. The photorefractive effect in undoped LC samples is revisited, with our focus on the study of space charge field origin. Theoretical models were derived to identify the photorefractive threshold voltage. The PR threshold voltage can be substantially lowered with the increase of incident light intensity, which is mainly due to inhomogeneous interface ions distribution induced surface torque. The thickness dependence of threshold voltage lowing effect was also measured, which allows us to estimate the modulation depth of surface charge. Our result shows both bulk and surface optically induced charges and field modulation are responsible for the build up of space charge field. Based on our work, several potential further researches are proposed, which are all related to photorefractive effect, yet fall into three categories. First is to further study doping effect: increase SWNT doping concentration using functionalized nanotubes and try other novel doping materials such as nanometals. Second is to continue the investigation of surface effect in doped LC samples. We anticipate more interesting surface effect exists in doping system. The last one is to study PR effect in new LC composites, such as PSLC (polymer stablilized liquid crystal) and PDLC (polymer dispersed liquid crystal).

  14. Trace elements in magnetite as petrogenetic indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, Sarah A. S.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Beaudoin, Georges; Méric, Julien; Boutroy, Emilie; Potvin-Doucet, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    We have characterized the distribution of 25 trace elements in magnetite (Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Sn, Hf, Ta, W, and Pb), using laser ablation ICP-MS and electron microprobe, from a variety of magmatic and hydrothermal ore-forming environments and compared them with data from the literature. We propose a new multielement diagram, normalized to bulk continental crust, designed to emphasize the partitioning behavior of trace elements between magnetite, the melt/fluid, and co-crystallizing phases. The normalized pattern of magnetite reflects the composition of the melt/fluid, which in both magmatic and hydrothermal systems varies with temperature. Thus, it is possible to distinguish magnetite formed at different degrees of crystal fractionation in both silicate and sulfide melts. The crystallization of ilmenite or sulfide before magnetite is recorded as a marked depletion in Ti or Cu, respectively. The chemical signature of hydrothermal magnetite is distinct being depleted in elements that are relatively immobile during alteration and commonly enriched in elements that are highly incompatible into magnetite (e.g., Si and Ca). Magnetite formed from low-temperature fluids has the lowest overall abundance of trace elements due to their lower solubility. Chemical zonation of magnetite is rare but occurs in some hydrothermal deposits where laser mapping reveals oscillatory zoning, which records the changing conditions and composition of the fluid during magnetite growth. This new way of plotting all 25 trace elements on 1 diagram, normalized to bulk continental crust and elements in order of compatibility into magnetite, provides a tool to help understand the processes that control partitioning of a full suit of trace elements in magnetite and aid discrimination of magnetite formed in different environments. It has applications in both petrogenetic and provenance studies, such as in the exploration of ore deposits and in sedimentology.

  15. Characterization and applications of a pure phase reflective liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Joaquín O.; Ambs, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    We present the characterization of a pure phase reflective liquid crystal spatial light modulator. This modulator is electrically addressed and is based on nematic liquid crystal. Its performance in terms of frame rate, phase modulation versus gray level and wavefront distortion is experimentally evaluated. It is shown that after adding phase compensation and applying an appropriate Look-Up-Table, this spatial light modulator is an excellent candidate for applications such as dynamic diffractive optical elements, wavefront generation and dynamic zoom lens.

  16. Radiation damage in pure and RE-doped LiBaF{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gektin, A.V.; Shiran, N.V.; Voronova, V.V.

    1996-12-31

    Absorption, emission, excitation and thermoluminescence were investigated for pure, Eu- and Ce-doped LiBaF{sub 3} crystals, both as grown and irradiated. It is shown that the purity of initial crystal is a prerequisite to reduce the afterglow and decrease the radiation damage level. Doping by Ce or Eu ions is a way to vary the spectral and kinetic characteristic. The exciton luminescence and blue afterglow are suppressed in Eu- or Ce-doped crystals. Radiation induced absorption spectrum is complicated and includes more than six overlapped bands. Emission of these color centers appears in the luminescence spectrum.

  17. Interactions of collinear acoustic waves propagating along pure mode directions of crystals

    E-print Network

    Cao, Wenwu

    by using ultrasonic second harmonic generation technique.8,9 Anisotropic nonlinear elastic properties devoted to waves propagating along pure modes directions of cubic crystals. In this paper, we show the nonlinear interactions are defined here. The effective third order elastic constants involved

  18. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-09-14

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. As a result, this article highlights recent advances in the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization.

  19. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. This article highlights recent advances in the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization. PMID:26382301

  20. Magnetism in nanometer-thick magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Matteo; Santos, Benito; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Rodríguez de La Fuente, Oscar; Niño, Miguel Angel; Mente?, Tevfik Onur; Locatelli, Andrea; McCarty, Kevin F.; Marco, José F.; de La Figuera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The oldest known magnetic material, magnetite, is of current interest for use in spintronics as a thin film. An open question is how thin can magnetite films be and still retain the robust ferrimagnetism required for many applications. We have grown 1-nm-thick magnetite crystals and characterized them in situ by electron and photoelectron microscopies including selected-area x-ray circular dichroism. Well-defined magnetic patterns are observed in individual nanocrystals up to at least 520 K, establishing the retention of ferrimagnetism in magnetite two unit cells thick.

  1. Self-organized single crystal mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite films grown by infrared pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Figuera, Juan; Quesada, Adrián; Martín-García, Laura; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Prieto, Pilar; Muñoz-Martín, Ángel; Aballe, Lucía; Marco, José F.

    2015-12-01

    We have grown mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite epitaxial films on SrTiO3 by infrared pulsed-laser deposition. Diffraction experiments indicate epitaxial growth with a relaxed lattice spacing. The films are flat with two distinct island types: nanometric rectangular mounds in two perpendicular orientations, and larger square islands, attributed to the two main components of the film as determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The origin of the segregation is suggested to be the oxygen-deficiency during growth.

  2. Growth and characterization of pure and doped KHP NLO single crystals.

    PubMed

    Thilagavathy, S R; Rajesh, P; Ramasamy, P; Ambujam, K

    2014-06-01

    Single crystals of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate doped with amino acid l-lysine were grown successfully by slow evaporation method. The concentration of dopant in the mother solution was 0.5mol%, 1mol% and 2mol%. There is a drastic change in the morphology due to variation in doping rates which is also reflected in the X-ray diffraction data. The Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy study confirms the incorporation of l-lysine into Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate crystal. The thermal study indicates the dissociating nature of the crystal. The nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal has been confirmed by Kurtz-powder second harmonic generation test. The dopant of 0.5mol% and 1mol% shows higher second harmonic generation result than pure Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate. Results are discussed. PMID:24632232

  3. Growth and characterization of pure and doped KHP NLO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilagavathy, S. R.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.; Ambujam, K.

    2014-06-01

    Single crystals of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate doped with amino acid L-lysine were grown successfully by slow evaporation method. The concentration of dopant in the mother solution was 0.5 mol%, 1 mol% and 2 mol%. There is a drastic change in the morphology due to variation in doping rates which is also reflected in the X-ray diffraction data. The Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy study confirms the incorporation of L-lysine into Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate crystal. The thermal study indicates the dissociating nature of the crystal. The nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal has been confirmed by Kurtz-powder second harmonic generation test. The dopant of 0.5 mol% and 1 mol% shows higher second harmonic generation result than pure Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate. Results are discussed.

  4. Statistical Analyses Comparing Prismatic Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Globules with those from the Terrestrial Magnetotactic Bacteria Strain MV-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we use rigorous mathematical modeling to compare ALH84001 prismatic magnetites with those produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria, MV-1. We find that this subset of the Martian magnetites appears to be statistically indistinguishable from those of MV-1.

  5. Spectral analysis of TL emission from pure and Eu-doped NaCl crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, A. T.; Kozakiewicz, A. G.; Derry, T. E.; Comins, J. D.; Suszynska, M.; Valberg, L.; Townsend, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have measured emission spectra during thermoluminescence of pure and europium-doped NaCl crystals following irradiation at ambient temperature with X- and -rays. Factors investigated include the effect of pre-irradiation annealing of crystals and the post-irradiation fading of colour centres. Results for other dopants such as chromium, strontium and nickel are considered. Glow curves show some degree of uniformity having common glow peaks for the impurities investigated. A low temperature glow peak near 60 °C emits predominantly high energy photons. A high temperature glow peak near 200 °C shows less consistency, varying both in temperature and in the energy of emitted photons. Samples doped with chromium and nickel impurities inhibit emission at certain wavelengths. Pre-annealing crystals before irradiation produce changes in emission wavelengths.

  6. Floating zone crystal growth of pure and Si- or Zn-substituted copper germanate CuGeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Dhalenne, G.; Revcolevschi, A.; Rouchaud, J.C.; Fedoroff, M.

    1997-07-01

    Crystal growth of pure and Si- or Zn-substituted copper germanate CuGeO{sub 3} was carried out by the floating zone technique associated with an image furnace and has led to high crystalline quality centimeter-sized crystals. Segregation of Zn and Si in the resulting solid solution crystals has been studied using ICP/AES chemical analysis and has allowed determination of the partition coefficients of these elements in CuGeO{sub 3}.

  7. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-09-14

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. As a result, this article highlights recent advances inmore »the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization.« less

  8. Magnetite and its production

    SciTech Connect

    Koebbe, E.R.

    1993-12-31

    The supply of high quality magnetite for the cleaning of coal using dense medium cyclones and vessels is of concern to all coal preparation operations. This paper describes the production of high purity magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) from a domestic underground mining operation in Missouri, Pea Ridge Iron Ore Company. Emphasis will be placed on the mining and processing of the magnetite ore into the various magnetite products required by coal preparation plants.

  9. Growth and Characterization of Pure and Cd-Doped Zinc Tris-Thiourea Sulfate (ZTS) Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muley, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    Single crystals of pure and Cd-doped zinc tris-thiourea sulfate (ZTS) were grown for frequency conversion applications by a low temperature solution growth method, allowing slow evaporation of the water solvent at a constant temperature. The solubility of ZTS was found to increase with the concentration of Cd in the aqueous solution. The optical transparency was found to increase in the Cd-doped crystals as compared to that in the undoped crystals. The doping of Cd was confirmed quantitatively by the atomic absorption spectroscopy and qualitatively by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From the powder x-ray diffraction study, it was found that the lattice constants (a, b and c) decrease with the concentration of Cd in ZTS, but the change in the crystal symmetry and space group has not been reported. A?change in growth habit of Cd-doped crystals has been observed. Thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis was employed to learn the thermal stability of the grown crystals, and 2 mol% Cd-doped ZTS crystal was found to thermally stable up to 230 °C. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurement reveals improvement in the SHG efficiency, as 4 mol% Cd-doped ZTS crystal has 1.36 times more SHG efficiency as compared to the pure ZTS crystal.

  10. Energetics of free pure metallic nanoclusters with different motifs by equivalent crystal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, F. R.; Soares, E. A.; de Carvalho, V. E.

    2007-11-01

    The energy of metallic (Ni, Cu, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au) nanoparticles up to 5000 atoms are studied by equivalent crystal theory (ECT), a quantum approximate method (QAM) that describes the ground state structure and the surface properties of metals and semiconductors at zero temperature. ECT relies on the universal binding energy relation to predict with precision and speed the energy of a crystal in a specific configuration. For each pure metallic nanoparticle of each chosen motif (icosahedron, octahedron, and decahedron), the energy variation with the number of atoms Nat is studied. Crossover and minimum energy values are calculated and/or estimated and compared with the results obtained by molecular dynamics (MD). Our results confirm the qualitative behavior (i.e., icosahedron shapes are less energetic for small sizes, decahedron for medium sizes, and octahedron for bigger sizes) predicted by MD, but the calculated crossover and minimum energy values are, in general, larger for all metals and geometries examined. Also, we studied the trends in relaxation between layers and the behavior of the average radius Rav of each relaxed nanoparticle as Nat was increased. For each motif, the most stable structures (i.e., with the best truncation) follow a simple law of Rav in terms of Nat . This simple law is unchanged for the four different motifs and can be extended for all six metals after a simple parametrization is performed.

  11. Growth, mechanical, thermal and dielectric properties of pure and doped KHP single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Lakshmipriya.; Babu, D. Rajan; Vizhi, R. Ezhil

    2015-06-01

    L-Arginine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate and L-Histidine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The grown crystal crystallizes in orthorhombic system which is confirmed by single crystal XRD analysis. The grown crystals are subjected to thermal, mechanical and dielectric analysis.

  12. Experimental low-grade alteration of biogenic magnetite indicates microbial involvement in generation of banded iron formations

    E-print Network

    Konhauser, Kurt

    product being ferrous iron-containing minerals including magnetite. Although earlier studies have hypothesis lacks an explanation as to why modern biogenic magnetite crystals are generally a few hundred nm or smaller in size, yet the magnetite crystals in BIF are mostly tens of micrometers or larger in size

  13. Thermoluminescence in pure LiF crystals: Glow peaks and their connection with color centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchini, G.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Kalinov, V. S.; Voitovich, A. P.; Davidson, A. T.; Kozakiewicz, A. G.

    2008-09-01

    Nominally pure LiF crystals were irradiated with the same dose (0.85 106 R) of gamma rays at ambient and low temperatures (-60 °C) and the resulting thermoluminescence (TL) is reported. Various optical and thermal treatments were applied in order to change the concentration of color centers (CCs). The effect of such treatments on the glow curves is observed. Knowing the coloration from optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements made on the same samples, we attribute many of the glow peaks (GPs) to the annealing of F center aggregates. For the present conditions of irradiation and dose, TL processes begin with decay of F3+ centers that display a GP at 164 °C. F3(R) centers follow and are responsible for GPs at 193 and 228 °C. A GP at 263 °C is ascribed to F2 centers. Several peaks at temperatures in the range of 280-380 °C are associated with impurity perturbed F centers. A GP at 410 °C is associated with a complex of aggregated F and H centers. These attributions are accomplished by means of TL spectra, optical transmission spectra, and annealing procedures, and are critically discussed. The experimental data confirm the general trend of thermal stability of CCs, which decreases by moving from simple F centers to more complex ones, and the existence of exchange dynamics among CCs.

  14. Thermoluminescence in pure LiF crystals: Glow peaks and their connection with color centers

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, G.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Kalinov, V. S.; Voitovich, A. P.; Davidson, A. T.; Kozakiewicz, A. G.

    2008-09-15

    Nominally pure LiF crystals were irradiated with the same dose (0.85 10{sup 6} R) of gamma rays at ambient and low temperatures (-60 deg. C) and the resulting thermoluminescence (TL) is reported. Various optical and thermal treatments were applied in order to change the concentration of color centers (CCs). The effect of such treatments on the glow curves is observed. Knowing the coloration from optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements made on the same samples, we attribute many of the glow peaks (GPs) to the annealing of F center aggregates. For the present conditions of irradiation and dose, TL processes begin with decay of F{sub 3}{sup +} centers that display a GP at 164 deg. C. F{sub 3}(R) centers follow and are responsible for GPs at 193 and 228 deg. C. A GP at 263 deg. C is ascribed to F{sub 2} centers. Several peaks at temperatures in the range of 280-380 deg. C are associated with impurity perturbed F centers. A GP at 410 deg. C is associated with a complex of aggregated F and H centers. These attributions are accomplished by means of TL spectra, optical transmission spectra, and annealing procedures, and are critically discussed. The experimental data confirm the general trend of thermal stability of CCs, which decreases by moving from simple F centers to more complex ones, and the existence of exchange dynamics among CCs.

  15. Growth aspects and characteristic properties of pure and Li-doped L-arginine acetate (LAA) single crystals: A promising nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, V.; Arivanandhan, M.; Sankaranarayanan, K.; Ramasamy, P.

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of pure and lithium (Li)-doped L-arginine acetate (LAA) were grown by the slow evaporation technique. The effect of Li-doping on the growth, structural and optical properties of LAA crystal has been investigated. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirm the crystal structure of the grown pure and Li-doped LAA single crystals. Various types of functional groups of the grown pure and Li-doped LAA single crystals were identified by the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. The presence of Li in the grown crystal was confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis. Electrical properties of the Li-doped LAA crystal were analyzed by AC impedance studies. The optical transmission study shows that the Li-doped LAA crystal has good optical transparency in the UV and visible regions.

  16. InxGa1-xAs nanowires with uniform composition, pure wurtzite crystal phase and taper-free morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameruddin, Amira S.; Aruni Fonseka, H.; Caroff, Philippe; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; het Veld, Roy LM Op; Boland, Jessica L.; Johnston, Michael B.; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-05-01

    Obtaining compositional homogeneity without compromising morphological or structural quality is one of the biggest challenges in growing ternary alloy compound semiconductor nanowires. Here we report growth of Au-seeded InxGa1-xAs nanowires via metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy with uniform composition, morphology and pure wurtzite (WZ) crystal phase by carefully optimizing growth temperature and V/III ratio. We find that high growth temperatures allow the InxGa1-xAs composition to be more uniform by suppressing the formation of typically observed spontaneous In-rich shells. A low V/III ratio results in the growth of pure WZ phase InxGa1-xAs nanowires with uniform composition and morphology while a high V/III ratio allows pure zinc-blende (ZB) phase to form. Ga incorporation is found to be dependent on the crystal phase favouring higher Ga concentration in ZB phase compared to the WZ phase. Tapering is also found to be more prominent in defective nanowires hence it is critical to maintain the highest crystal structure purity in order to minimize tapering and inhomogeneity. The InP capped pure WZ In0.65Ga0.35As core-shell nanowire heterostructures show 1.54 ?m photoluminescence, close to the technologically important optical fibre telecommunication wavelength, which is promising for application in photodetectors and nanoscale lasers.

  17. Trace elements in magnetite from massive iron oxide-apatite deposits indicate a combined formation by igneous and magmatic-hydrothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipping, Jaayke L.; Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur P.; W?lle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Holtz, François; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits are an important source of iron and other elements (e.g., REE, P, U, Ag and Co) vital to modern society. However, their formation, including the namesake Kiruna-type IOA deposit (Sweden), remains controversial. Working hypotheses include a purely magmatic origin involving separation of an Fe-, P-rich, volatile-rich oxide melt from a Si-rich silicate melt, and precipitation of magnetite from an aqueous ore fluid, which is either of magmatic-hydrothermal or non-magmatic surface or metamorphic origin. In this study, we focus on the geochemistry of magnetite from the Cretaceous Kiruna-type Los Colorados IOA deposit (?350 Mt Fe) located in the northern Chilean Iron Belt. Los Colorados has experienced minimal hydrothermal alteration that commonly obscures primary features in IOA deposits. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) transects and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectrometry mapping demonstrate distinct chemical zoning in magnetite grains, wherein cores are enriched in Ti, Al, Mn and Mg. The concentrations of these trace elements in magnetite cores are consistent with igneous magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt, whereas magnetite rims show a pronounced depletion in these elements, consistent with magnetite grown from an Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. Further, magnetite grains contain polycrystalline inclusions that re-homogenize at magmatic temperatures (>850 °C). Smaller inclusions (<5 ?m) contain halite crystals indicating a saline environment during magnetite growth. The combination of these observations are consistent with a formation model for IOA deposits in northern Chile that involves crystallization of magnetite microlites from a silicate melt, nucleation of aqueous fluid bubbles on magnetite surfaces, and formation and ascent of buoyant fluid bubble-magnetite aggregates. Decompression of the fluid-magnetite aggregate during ascent along regional-scale transcurrent faults promotes continued growth of the magmatic magnetite microlites from the Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal fluid, which manifests in magnetite rims that have trace element abundances consistent with growth from a magmatic-hydrothermal fluid. Mass balance calculations indicate that this process can leach and transport sufficient Fe from a magmatic source to form large IOA deposits such as Los Colorados. Furthermore, published experimental data demonstrate that a saline magmatic-hydrothermal ore fluid will scavenge significant quantities of metals such as Cu and Au from a silicate melt, and when combined with solubility data for Fe, Cu and Au, it is plausible that the magmatic-hydrothermal ore fluid that continues to ascend from the IOA depositional environment can retain sufficient concentrations of these metals to form iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG) deposits at lateral and/or stratigraphically higher levels in the crust. Notably, this study provides a new discrimination diagram to identify magnetite from Kiruna-type deposits and to distinguish them from IOCG, porphyry and Fe-Ti-V/P deposits, based on low Cr (<100 ppm) and high V (>500 ppm) concentrations.

  18. Crystallography of magnetite plaquettes and their significance as asymmetric catalysts for the synthesis of chiral organics in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials [1]. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  19. Crystallography of Magnetite Plaquettes and their Significance as Asymmetric Catalysts for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  20. Structure and superparamagnetic behaviour of magnetite nanoparticles in cellulose beads

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Jose R.; Bordallo, Eduardo; Canetti, Dora; Leon, Vivian; Otero-Diaz, Luis C.; Electron Microscopy Center, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid 28040 ; Negro, Carlos; Gomez, Adrian; Saez-Puche, Regino

    2010-08-15

    Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles were obtained starting from a mixture of iron(II) and iron(III) solutions in a preset total iron concentration from 0.04 to 0.8 mol l{sup -1} with ammonia at 25 and 70 {sup o}C. The regeneration of cellulose from viscose produces micrometrical spherical cellulose beads in which synthetic magnetite were embedded. The characterization of cellulose-magnetite beads by X-ray diffraction, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy and magnetic measurement is reported. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the higher is the total iron concentration and temperature the higher is the crystal size of the magnetite obtained. Transmission Electron Microscopy studies of cellulose-magnetite beads revealed the distribution of magnetite nanoparticles inside pores of hundred nanometers. Magnetite as well as the cellulose-magnetite composites exhibit superparamagnetic characteristics. Field cooling and zero field cooling magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the superparamagnetic behaviour and the blocking temperature for the magnetite with a mean size of 12.5 nm, which is 200 K.

  1. Scaffold of Asymmetric Organic Compounds - Magnetite Plaquettes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Martinez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Life on Earth shows preference towards the set of organics with particular spatial configurations, this 'selectivity' is a crucial criterion for life. With only rare exceptions, life prefers the left- (L-) form over the right- (D-) form of amino acids, resulting in an L-enantiomeric excess (L-ee). Recent studies have shown Lee for alpha-methyl amino acids in some chondrites. Since these amino acids have limited terrestrial occurrence, the origin of their stereoselectivity is nonbiological, and it seems appropriate to conclude that chiral asymmetry, the molecular characteristic that is common to all terrestrial life form, has an abiotic origin. A possible abiotic mechanism that can produce chiral asymmetry in meteoritic amino acids is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts, as mineral crystallization can produce spatially asymmetric structures. Magnetite is shown to be an effective catalyst for the formation of amino acids that are commonly found in chondrites. Magnetite 'plaquettes' (or 'platelets'), first described by Jedwab, show an interesting morphology of barrel-shaped stacks of magnetite disks with an apparent dislocation-induced spiral growth that seem to be connected at the center. A recent study by Singh et al. has shown that magnetites can self-assemble into helical superstructures. Such molecular asymmetry could be inherited by adsorbed organic molecules. In order to understand the distribution of 'spiral' magnetites in different meteorite classes, as well as to investigate their apparent spiral configurations and possible correlation to molecular asymmetry, we observed polished sections of carbonaceous chondrites (CC) using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. The sections were also studied by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in order to reconstruct the crystal orientation along the stack of magnetite disks.

  2. Thermophiles as Candidate Iron-Reducing Bacteria For the Putative Biogenetic Magnetite in Banded Iron Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Phelps, T. J.; Cole, D. R.; Vali, H.; Konhauser, K.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature of the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic ocean was likely consistent with physiological requirements of thermophilic species being present. In this study, we compared the crystallochemistry and lattice constants of magnetite crystals produced by Thermoanaerobacter sp. TOR39, Geobacter and Shewanella and the slightly altered magnetite from BIF of Hamersley, Western Australia. The lattice constants of TOR39-magnetite and the BIF-magnetite were similar, being 8.3901 and 8.3869 Å respectively. The lattice constant of magnetite produced by Geobacter is more close to perfect stoichiometry (8.4038 Å), however, the magnetite produced by Shewanella experienced oxidization has a much smaller value (8.3522 Å). The stoichiometries of TOR39-magnetite was Fe3+[Fe3+1.1217Fe2+0.8175--0.0608]O4 and that of BIF-magnetite was quite similar being Fe3+[Fe3+0.9963Fe2+1.0056]O4. The stoichiometry, lattice constant and crystal size collectively indicated that TOR39-magnetite was similar to BIF-magnetite. The Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated the existence of a Fe(III)-salt, possibly Fe3+OH(CH3COO)2 in the magnetite lamina of BIF which was widely detected in the magnetite-assemblages of iron-reducing bacterial cultures that contained acetate. This is evidence that supports a potential role for thermophiles such as Thermoanaerobacter in the biogenesis of magnetite in BIF. The magnetite crystals produced by cultures of Shewanella, Geobacter, magnetotactic bacteria and those synthesized from green rust appeared less similar to BIF-magnetite by either their crystallochemistry or their optimized growth temperatures.

  3. Growth of pure and RE 3+-doped Y 2O 3 single crystals by LHPG technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutaudier, C.; Ermeneux, F. S.; Cohen-Adad, M. T.; Moncorge, R.

    2000-03-01

    High-quality and crack-free Y 2O 3 single crystals containing low concentrations of Tm 3+, Tb 3+ and Yb 3+ were obtained. The crystals were grown in the form of monocrystalline fibers by using a floating zone method with laser heating (laser-heated pedestal growth).

  4. Growth of large, defect-free pure C60 single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, R. L.; Ramirez, D.; Jiang, X.; Chow, P. C.; Diaz, C.; Matsuishi, K.; Moss, S. C.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Millimeter-sized single crystals of C60 were grown by sublimation of C60 powder in a vacuum for 6-24 h. The crystals had excellent facets, were free of C70 or solvent, and showed face-centered cubic symmetry with a very small mosaic spread down to 0.01 deg.

  5. A comparative study on pure, L-arginine and glycine doped ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate single crystals grown by slow solvent evaporation and temperature-gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaboonmee, N.; Ramasamy, P.; Yimnirun, R.; Manyum, P.

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of pure, L-arginine and glycine doped ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate (ADP) were grown by both the slow solvent evaporation method and the temperature-gradient method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR). The metastable zone width for different saturation temperatures of pure glycine and L-arginine added solutions were carried out. The grown crystals were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical transmission, dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and Vickers microhardness. The DSC and TG curves of the grown crystals indicated that they were stable up to 200 °C. The XRD study confirmed the structure of the grown crystal. The optical transmission analysis revealed that the pure and doped ADP crystals had very high percentage of transmission in the entire visible region. The important optical parameters such as reflectance and extinction coefficients of the grown crystals were calculated. L-arginine and glycine were used as dopants to reduce dielectric constant of ADP. The a.c. resistivity and a.c. conductivity were calculated. Dielectric loss of the doped ADP crystals grown by the SR method is lower than the doped ADP crystals grown by the conventional method. Larger hardness value for the SR method grown crystals confirmed greater crystalline perfection.

  6. Growth and characterization of pure, and doped crystals of potassium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durugkar, P. D.; Katpatal, A. G.

    1996-05-01

    Four compositions of potassium niobate single crystals with 0 wt% Sm (KN), 1 wt% Sm (KND-1), 2 wt% Sm (KND-2) and 1 wt% Sm + 1 wt% Sn (KND-3) were grown by controlled colling of the melt. In powder X-ray diffraction investigations, it is shown that doping has decreased lattice parameter b0 values except for KND-1 retaining an orthorhombic nature and has increased tetragonality in the crystals. SEM study revealed that with increasing percentage doping, the grain size had increased. Growth habits are significantly influenced and modified due to doping. The layered growth of KN shows a needle-shaped growth habit with a rectangular cross section in KND-1. This change is more predominant in KND-3 and is insignificant in KND-2. It appears that impurities influence the kinetics of nucleation and growth.

  7. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1982-01-01

    The undercooling behavior of large spheroids of Pd40Ni40P40 was investigated. By surface etching, supporting the specimens on a fused silica substrate, and successive heating and cooling, crystallization can be eliminated, presumable due to the removal of surface heterogeneities. By this method samples up to 3.2g with a 0.53 mm minor diameter, were made entirely glassy, except for some superficial crystals comprising less than 0.5% of the volume. These experiments show that a cooling rate of approximately 1 K/sec is adequate to avoid copious homogeneous nucleation in the alloy, and that by eliminating or reducing the effectiveness of heterogeneous nucleation sites, it is possible to form bulk samples of this metallic glass with virtually unlimited dimensions.

  8. Pure and Hybrid Evolutionary Computing in Global Optimization of Chemical Structures: from Atoms and Molecules to Clusters and Crystals

    E-print Network

    Sarkar, Kanchan

    2015-01-01

    The growth of evolutionary computing (EC) methods in the exploration of complex potential energy landscapes of atomic and molecular clusters, as well as crystals over the last decade or so is reviewed. The trend of growth indicates that pure as well as hybrid evolutionary computing techniques in conjunction of DFT has been emerging as a powerful tool, although work on molecular clusters has been rather limited so far. Some attempts to solve the atomic/molecular Schrodinger Equation (SE) directly by genetic algorithms (GA) are available in literature. At the Born-Oppenheimer level of approximation GA-density methods appear to be a viable tool which could be more extensively explored in the coming years, specially in the context of designing molecules and materials with targeted properties.

  9. Atomic frequency comb memory in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+:Y7LiF4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R. A.; Gushchin, L. A.; Kalachev, A. A.; Korableva, S. L.; Sobgayda, D. A.; Zelensky, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    We implemented the atomic frequency comb protocol for optical quantum memory in an isotopically pure crystal of Y7LiF4 doped by 143Nd3+?ions. Echo signals were observed on the 4I9/2(1)–4F3/2(1) transition, which had inhomogeneous broadening much smaller than the hyperfine splitting of the ground and excited states. We performed hole-burning spectroscopy measurements on several transitions, obtaining information about the hyperfine state lifetimes. An intrinsic hole structure was found on some of the transitions, which allowed us to prepare a comb structure with two clearly defined periods and to observe echo pulses with different time delays.

  10. Synthesis, magnetic and ethanol gas sensing properties of semiconducting magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Al-Hazmi, Faten; Al-Tuwirqi, R. M.; Alnowaiser, F.; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.; El-Tantawy, Farid; Yakuphanoglu, F.

    2013-05-01

    The superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with an average size of 7 nm were synthesized using a rapid and facile microwave hydrothermal technique. The structure of the magnetite nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction (X-ray), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The prepared Fe3O4 was shown to have a cubic phase of pure magnetite. Magnetization hysteresis loop shows that the synthesized magnetite exhibits no hysteretic features with a superparamagnetic behavior. The ethanol gas sensing properties of the synthesized magnetite were investigated, and it was found that the responsibility time is less than 10 s with good reproducibility for ethanol sensor. Accordingly, it is evaluated that the magnetite nanoparticles can be effectively used as a solid state ethanol sensor in industrial commercial product applications.

  11. Nanophase Magnetite and Pyrrhotite in ALH84001 Martian Meteorite: Evidence for an Abiotic Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr. III; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2006-01-01

    The nanophase magnetite crystals in the black rims of pancake-shaped carbonate globules of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al.that they are biogenic in origin. A subpopulation of these magnetite crystals are reported to conform to a unique elongated shape called "truncated hexa-octahedral" or "THO" by Thomas-Keprta et al. They claim these THO magnetite crystals can only be produced by living bacteria thus forming a biomarker in the meteorite. In contrast, thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate has been suggested as an alternate hypothesis for the elongated magnetite formation in ALH84001 carbonates. The experimental and observational evidence for the inorganic formation of nanophase magnetite and pyrrhotite in ALH84001 by decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate in the presence of pyrite are provided.

  12. Magnetite: What it reveals about the origin of the banded iron formations. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4 is produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, magnetite is a late magmatic mineral and forms as a consequence of the cooling of iron rich magma. Biotically, magnetite is produced by several organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria. Hematite, Fe2O3, is also produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, hematite rarely occurs as a primary mineral in igneous rocks, but is common as an alteration product, fumarole deposit, and in some metamorphosed Fe-rich rocks. Biotically, hematite is produced by several types of microorganisms. Biologically-produced magnetite and hematite are formed under the control of the host organism, and consequently, have characteristics not found in abiotically produced magnetite and hematite crystals. To determine if the magnetite and hematite in the Banded Iron Formation was biologically or abiotically produced, the characteristics of biologically-produced magnetite and hematite (concentrated from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum) and abiotically-produced magnetite and hematite obtained from Wards Scientific Supply Company, were compared with characteristics of magnetite and hematite concentrated from the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation (Ontario, Canada) using thermal and crystallographic analytical techniques. Whole rock analysis of the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed the presence of quartz, hematite, siderite and dolomite as the major minerals, and magnetite, greenalite, pyrite, pyrrhotite and apatite as the minor minerals. Analysis of a crude magnetic fraction of the Gunflint showed the minerals quartz, hematite, siderite, dolomite, and magnetite. Analysis of the crude magnetic fraction from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum revealed organic compounds plus hematite and magnetite. The mineral identification and particle size distribution data obtained from the DTA along with XRD data indicate that the magnetite and hematite from the Gunflint BIF share some similarities with biologically formed magnetite and hematite.

  13. Effect of cation trapping on thermal stability of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pati, S S; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the effect of sodium trapping on thermal stability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The pure magnetite nanoparticles incubated in sodium hydroxide solutions and subsequently washed with water to remove the excess sodium. The amount of sodium in magnetite is measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The size distribution obtained from Small angle X-ray scattering measurements show that particles are fairly monodisperse. The FTIR spectra of nanoparticles show transmission bands at 441 and 611 cm(-1) are due to the symmetric stretching vibrations (v) of Fe-O in octahedral and tetrahedral sites respectively. With 500 ppm of sodium ions (Na+) in magnetite, the cubic ferrite structure of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) to hexagonal hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) phase transition is enhanced by -150 degrees C in air. The Rietveld analysis of sodium doped magnetite nanoparticles show that above 99% of metastable gamma-Fe2O3 is converted to a thermodynamically stable alpha-Fe2O3 after air annealing at 700 degrees C. A decrease in enthalpy observed in doped magnetite unambiguously confirms that the activation energy for maghemite to hematite transition is increased due to the presence of trapped sodium ions. These results suggest that the trapped cations in ferrite nanoparticles can stabilize them by increasing the activation energy. PMID:24738360

  14. Exsolution of Iron-Titanium Oxides in Magnetite in Miller Range (MIL) 03346 Nakhlite: Evidence for Post Crystallization Reduction in the Nakhlite Cumulate Pile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Christoffersen, R.

    2012-01-01

    MIL 03346 is one of the most mesostasis-rich nakhlites [1] and thought to have equilibrated at oxygen fugacities near the fayalite-magnetite-quartz oxygen (FMQ) buffer ([2,3]). Studies of FeTi oxides in nakhlites have led to additional constraints on their equilibration temperatures and fO2s [4,5,6,7]. Comparison of these results to fO2s calculated for shergottites indicates that nakhlites are among the most oxidized samples from the martian meteorite suite [2]. The mesostasis of MIL 03346 contains skeletal titanomagnetite. Several scientists noticed several years ago (e.g. [8]) that this titanomagnetite contains very fine oxidation-driven exsolution lamellae (Figure 1). However, the lamellae are so small that they cannot be characterized by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). Here we select several areas for focused ion beam (FIB) extraction, prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) foils, and identify and analyze the lamellae using TEM at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The resulting analyses are combined with previous work on nakhlites to interpret the thermal and oxidation history of this meteorite group.

  15. Controllable one-step synthesis of magnetite/carbon nanotubes composite and its electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. P.; Yu, J.; Shi, D.; Wang, D. S.; Liu, Y. F.; Liu, F.; Zhang, X. B.; Li, J. G.

    2012-03-01

    Magnetite nanocrystals are deposited on carbon nanotubes by a reflux method in diethylene glycol. The morphological characterization proves that magnetite nanocrystals are decorated on the external surfaces of carbon nanotubes. The crystal size of magnetite nanocrystals can be readily tuned by adjusting the content of sodium acetate, but the content of sodium acetate has little effect on the amount of magnetite. The magnetite/carbon nanotubes composites exhibit an initial capacity as high as 840 mAh g-1 and an excellent cycling performance for lithium storage. The reversible capacity, as high as 390 mAh g-1, can be maintained after 75 charge/discharge cycles. The research has potential implications for the application of magnetite/carbon nanotubes composites as anode materials of lithium ion batteries.

  16. Plagioclase-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions From the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.; Wenk, H.

    2004-12-01

    Gabbros from the Main Zone of the 2.064 Ga Bushveld Complex have long been known to possess unusually stable magnetizations due to the presence of high coercivity, exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic pole for these rocks has been used to anchor apparent polar wander paths for the Kaapval craton during the Early-Mid Proterozoic. To better understand the rock magnetic properties of silicate-hosted magnetite inclusions, oriented paleomagnetic samples of gabbro were collected from quarries near Belfast and Rustenberg, South Africa, sampling the eastern and western limbs of the Complex, respectively. Plagioclase composition at both sites ranges from An55 (rims) to An65 (cores) based on optical and electron microprobe data. Four kinds of inclusions are present within the plagioclase: elongate magnetite needles, nanometer-scale magnetite particles (responsible for the "cloudy" appearance of some crystals), translucent brown hematite/ilmenite platelets, and colorless euhedral inclusions of pyroxene and/or feldspar. Magnetite inclusions are most abundant at the cores of the plagioclase crystals. Orientations of the needles and the platelets are crystallographically controlled by the silicate host. Although the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusions can occur in any of five possible orientations, only two or three of these directions dominates each plagioclase crystal. Alternating field demagnetization of bulk samples (NRM = 1.5 x 101 A m-1) shows univectorial remanence with average median destructive fields (MDF) of 115 mT (Belfast) and 90 mT (Rustenberg). AF demagnetization of single plagioclase crystals (NRM = 100 A m-1) also shows single component remanence with average MDFs >150 mT. The NRM coercivity spectra of single plagioclase crystals are indistinguishable from that of the bulk samples. When normalized to their abundance in bulk samples the magnetite-bearing plagioclase fully accounts for the NRM of Bushveld gabbros at both sites. Close examination of the inclusions' interiors using magnetic force microscopy shows no ulvöspinel exsolution as observed in other silicate exsolved titanomagnetites with comparably high coercivities. Consequently, we interpret the high coercivities of the inclusions to be a product of their small size and extreme shape anisotropy. Single crystals of plagioclase demonstrate a strong anisotropy of IRM acquisition (see Scott, et al. this conference). Additionally, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) orientation indexing shows a strongly preferred orientation for plagioclase and pyroxene (with (010)plag and (100)pyr parallel to subhorizontal layering) consistent with gravitational settling within a magma chamber. Thus, there are two anisotropies (silicate preferred orientation and magnetite inclusion remanence) to consider when describing the ancient magnetic field present during the emplacement of the Bushveld.

  17. Origin of supposedly biogenic magnetite in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    PubMed Central

    Barber, David J.; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2002-01-01

    Crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) and periclase (MgO) in Fe-Mg-Ca carbonate in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 were studied by using transmission electron microscopy to understand their origin and evaluate claims that the magnetites were made by Martian microorganisms. In magnesian carbonate, periclase occurs as aggregates of crystals (grain size ?3 nm) that are preferentially oriented with respect to the carbonate lattice. Larger periclase crystals ?50 nm in size are commonly associated with voids of similar size. Periclase clearly formed by precipitation from carbonate as a result of partial decomposition and loss of CO2. Magnetite occurs in more ferroan carbonate, and, like periclase, it is associated with voids and microfractures and the two oxides may be intermixed. Magnetite nanocrystals that are commonly euhedral and entirely embedded in carbonate are topotactically oriented with respect to the carbonate lattice, showing that they formed as solid-state precipitates. Magnetites in Fe-rich carbonate rims are not well oriented. These magnetites are generally more irregular in shape and diverse in size than the euhedral variety. All occurrences of magnetite and periclase are entirely consistent with in situ growth by solid-state diffusion as a result of carbonate decomposition during impact heating. Biogenic sources should not be invoked for any magnetites. PMID:12011420

  18. Magnetic response of microbially synthesized transition metal- and lanthanide-substituted nano-sized magnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ji-Won; Yeary, Lucas W.; Rondinone, Adam J.; Rawn, Claudia J.; Kirkham, Melanie J.; Roh, Yul; Love, Lonnie J.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2007-06-01

    The magnetic susceptibility ( ?RT) and saturation magnetization ( MS) of microbially synthesized magnetites were systematically examined. Transition metal (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Zn)- and lanthanide (Nd, Gd, Tb, Ho and Er)-substituted magnetites were microbially synthesized by the incubation of transition metal (TM)- and lanthanide (L)-mixed magnetite precursors with either thermophilic (TOR-39) or psychrotolerant (PV-4) metal-reducing bacteria (MRB). Zinc incorporated congruently into both the precursor and substituted magnetite, while Ni and Er predominantly did not. Microbially synthesized Mn- and Zn-substituted magnetites had higher ?RT than pure biomagnetite depending on bacterial species and they exhibited a maximum ?RT at 0.2 cationic mole fraction (CMF). Other TMs' substitution linearly decreased the ?RT with increasing substitution amount. Based on the MS values of TM- and L-substituted magnetite at 0.1 and 0.02 CMF, respectively, Zn (90.7 emu/g for TOR-39 and 93.2 emu/g for PV-4)- and Mn (88.3 emu/g by PV-4)-substituted magnetite exhibited higher MS than standard chemical magnetite (84.7 emu/g) or pure biomagnetite without metal substitution (76.6 emu/g for TOR-39 and 80.3 emu/g for PV-4). Lanthanides tended to decrease MS, with Gd- and Ho-substituted magnetites having the highest magnetization. The higher magnetization of microbially synthesized TM-substituted magnetites by the psychrotroph, PV-4 may be explained by the magnetite formation taking place at low temperatures slowing mechanics, which may alter the magnetic properties compared to the thermophile, through suppression of the random distribution of substituted cations.

  19. Evidence for exclusively inorganic formation of magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetite crystals produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacterium MV-1 are elongated on a [111] crystallographic axis, in a so-called truncated hexa-Octahedral shape. This morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes). A subpopulation of magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 is reported to have this morphology, and the observation has been taken as evidence for biological activity on Mars. In this study, we present evidence for the exclusively inorganic origin of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals in ALH84001. We report three-dimensional(3-D) morphologies for approx.1000 magnetite crystals extracted from: (1) thermal decomposition products of Fe-rich carbonate produced by inorganic hydrothermal precipitation in laboratory experiments; (2) carbonate globules in Martian meteoriteeALH84001; and (3) cells of magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1. The 3-D morphologies were derived by fitting 3-D shape models to two-dimensional bright-field transmission-electron microscope (TEAM) images obtained at a series of viewing angles. The view down the {110} axes closest to the [111] elongation axis of magnetite crystals ([111]x{110) not equal to 0) provides a 2-D projection that uniquely discriminates among the three [111]-elongated magnetite morphologies found in these samples: [111]-elongated truncated hexaoctahedron ([111]-THO), [111]-elongated cubo-octahedron ([111]-ECO), and [111]-elongated simple octahedron ([111]-ESO). All [111] -elongated morphologies are present in the three types of sample, but in different proportions. In the ALH84001 Martian meteorite and in our inorganic laboratory products, the most common [111]-elongated magnetite crystal morphology is [111]-ECO. In contrast, the most common morphology for magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 is [111]-THO. These results show that: (1) the morphology of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals associated with the carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 is replicated by an inorganic process; and (2) the most common crystal morphology for biogenic (MV-1) magnetite is distinctly different from that in both ALH84001 and our inorganic laboratory products. Therefore, [111]-elongated magnetite crystals in ALH84001 do not constitute, as previously claimed, a robust biosignature and, in fact, an exclusively inorganic origin for the magnetite is fully consistent with our results. Furthermore, the inorganic synthesis method, i.e., the thermal decomposition of hydrothermally precipitated Fe-rich carbonate, is a process analogue for formation of the magnetite on Mars. Namely, precipitation of carbonate globules from carbonate-rich hydrothermal solutions followed at some later time by a thermal pulse, perhaps in association with meteoritic impact or volcanic processes on the Martian surface.

  20. Natural Magnetite: an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminant

    PubMed Central

    HE, Hongping; ZHONG, Yuanhong; LIANG, Xiaoliang; TAN, Wei; ZHU, Jianxi; Yan WANG, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous earth materials that have high adsorption capacities for toxic elements and degradation ability towards organic contaminants. Many studies have investigated the reactivity of synthetic magnetite, while little is known about natural magnetite. Here, we first report the reactivity of natural magnetites with a variety of elemental impurities for catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) and the consequent degradation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP). We observed that these natural magnetites show higher catalytic performance than that of the synthetic pure magnetite. The catalytic ability of natural magnetite with high phase purity depends on the surface site density while that for the magnetites with exsolutions relies on the mineralogical nature of the exsolved phases. The pleonaste exsolution can promote the generation of •OH and the consequent degradation of p-NP; the ilmenite exsolution has little effect on the decomposition of H2O2, but can increase the adsorption of p-NP on magnetite. Our results imply that natural magnetite is an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants in nature. PMID:25958854

  1. Magnetite morphology and life on Mars Peter R. Buseck*

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    terrestrial bacteria has been used in support of the biological origin of the extraterrestrial minerals scanning electron microscope images of lines of small, bright objects in ALH84001 as magnetite crystals are ``indistinguishable'' from those produced by a particular strain of terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria. Both

  2. Magnetite morphology and life on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Buseck, Peter R.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Devouard, Bertrand; Frankel, Richard B.; McCartney, Martha R.; Midgley, Paul A.; Pósfai, Mihály; Weyland, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) in a meteorite from Mars provide the strongest, albeit controversial, evidence for the former presence of extraterrestrial life. The morphological and size resemblance of the crystals from meteorite ALH84001 to crystals formed by certain terrestrial bacteria has been used in support of the biological origin of the extraterrestrial minerals. By using tomographic and holographic methods in a transmission electron microscope, we show that the three-dimensional shapes of such nanocrystals can be defined, that the detailed morphologies of individual crystals from three bacterial strains differ, and that none uniquely match those reported from the Martian meteorite. In contrast to previous accounts, we argue that the existing crystallographic and morphological evidence is inadequate to support the inference of former life on Mars. PMID:11717421

  3. Iron isotopic fractionation factor between magnetite and hydrous silicic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2006-12-01

    A "thermal migration" experiment was conducted in the piston cylinder to investigate the changes in composition of a wet andesitic bulk composition in a temperature gradient at 0.5 GPa. A homogeneous andesite powder (AGV-1 containing 4 wt.% H2O was sealed in a AuPd double capsule with the hot end at 950°C and the bottom end 350°C for 66 days. The charge changes from 100% melt at the top to the progressively more crystalline with the sequential appearance of apatite, magnetite, amphibole, biotite, plagioclase, quartz, and K-feldspar. We microdrilled 5 samples along the temperature gradient and analyzed these for Fe isotope ratios by double spike MC-ICP-MS at UIUC. Results show that the 100% melt area is depleted in heavy Fe isotopes relative to all more crystalline portions of the experiment (4 samples) with the offset in {?}^{56/54}FeIRMM of about 1.7‰. This does not appear to reflect Fe loss in the experiment as the Fe content and isotopes mass balance and no detectable Fe was found in the capsule after the experiment. Instead the offset is interpreted to reflect the combination of diffusive fractionation of Fe moving by diffusion and possible equilibrium fractionations between melt and magnetite that occurs throughout the crystalline portion of the experiment. However, both the isotopic fractionation factor between magnetite and melt and the effect of diffusion on Fe isotopes remains unknown. We are currently investigating Fe isotopic fractionation factor between magnetite and melt and effects of melt diffusion on Fe isotopes. To assess diffusion, we will microdrill and analyze melt-melt diffusion couples from Lundstrom(G-Cubed, 2003). To assess magnetite-melt fractionation, we have begun piston cylinder experiments at 0.5 GPa and 800°C using a starting material synthesized based on the melt composition within the thermal migration experiment. Initial experiments produce a layer of 100% melt on top of a 2-phase mush of magnetite-melt. This will allow analysis of pure melt and the magnetite-melt mush with knowledge of the modes providing the ability to back out the fractionation factor. If we can prove attainment of equilibrium, this technique will bypass the difficulty of making pure separates of magnetite and melt. Fe isotopic composition of the melt and melt-magnetite layers will be measured by MC-ICP-MS.

  4. In(x)Ga(1-x)As nanowires with uniform composition, pure wurtzite crystal phase and taper-free morphology.

    PubMed

    Ameruddin, Amira S; Fonseka, H Aruni; Caroff, Philippe; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Op het Veld, Roy L M; Boland, Jessica L; Johnston, Michael B; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-05-22

    Obtaining compositional homogeneity without compromising morphological or structural quality is one of the biggest challenges in growing ternary alloy compound semiconductor nanowires. Here we report growth of Au-seeded InxGa1-xAs nanowires via metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy with uniform composition, morphology and pure wurtzite (WZ) crystal phase by carefully optimizing growth temperature and V/III ratio. We find that high growth temperatures allow the InxGa1-xAs composition to be more uniform by suppressing the formation of typically observed spontaneous In-rich shells. A low V/III ratio results in the growth of pure WZ phase InxGa1-xAs nanowires with uniform composition and morphology while a high V/III ratio allows pure zinc-blende (ZB) phase to form. Ga incorporation is found to be dependent on the crystal phase favouring higher Ga concentration in ZB phase compared to the WZ phase. Tapering is also found to be more prominent in defective nanowires hence it is critical to maintain the highest crystal structure purity in order to minimize tapering and inhomogeneity. The InP capped pure WZ In0.65Ga0.35As core-shell nanowire heterostructures show 1.54 ?m photoluminescence, close to the technologically important optical fibre telecommunication wavelength, which is promising for application in photodetectors and nanoscale lasers. PMID:25927420

  5. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial activity of pure, Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped organic NLO l-arginine trifluoroacetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanyaa, T.; Haris, M.; Jayaramakrishnan, V.; Amgalan, M.; Mathivanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    Optically transparent Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped l-arginine trifluoroacetate (LATF) single crystals were grown from its aqueous solution using the slow solvent evaporation technique. The grown crystals were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction to confirm the monoclinic crystal structure. The percentage of transmittance measured using the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrophotometer was found to be more than 80% for doped crystals. The functional group analysis of the grown crystals has been made by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis was performed for the grown crystals. An atomic absorption study was carried out to determine the presence of Cu2+ and Cd2+. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show a significant variation in the hardness value between the pure and doped LATF crystals. The second harmonic generation measurements show that Cu2+ doped LATF is 2.8 times greater and Cd2+ doped is 2.6 times greater than KDP. The anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities of the title compound were performed using the disc diffusion method against standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus.

  6. Hydrothermal Preparation of Apatite Composite with Magnetite or Anatase

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Setsuaki; Ishida, Emile H.; Ioku, Koji

    2006-05-15

    Microstructure designed porous hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) composites with magnetite (Fe3O4) particles or anatase (TiO2) dispersion were prepared by hydrothermal treatment. These composites had micro-pores of about 0.1-0.5 {mu}m in size. Magnetite / Hydroxyapatite composites should be suitable for medical treatment of cancer, especially in bones, because HA can bond to bones directly and magnetite can generate heat. They must be used for hyperthermia therapies of cancer in bones. Meanwhile, anatase / Hydroxyapatite composite should be suitable for environmental purification, because HA rod-shape particles expose the specific crystal face, which adsorbs organic contaminants and so on.

  7. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D.; Kopp, Robert E.; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Sears, S. Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M.; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 ?m long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 ?m long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability—a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming—drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes. PMID:18936486

  8. Growth of phase-pure, crack-free single crystals and large-grained polycrystals of molybdenum disilicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossetti, M.

    1970-01-01

    High purity molybdenum disilicide crystals are prepared by zone melting sintered compacts. This method yields single crystals or polycrystals free from macrocracks which allow better measurement and evaluation of mechanical properties.

  9. The discovery of biogenic magnetite in the radula teeth of chitons (Lowenstam, 1962) and in bacteria (Blakemore, 1975)

    E-print Network

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    in magnetoreception. Involvement of these crystals became more likely when magnetite was also found in animal species JEB4431 To test the hypothesis that single domain magnetite is involved in magnetoreception, we the magnetization of single domain particles. This pulse was administered in the presence of a 1mT biasing field

  10. Incorporation and retention of 99-Tc(IV) in magnetite under high pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Timothy A; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Bots, Pieter; Parry, Stephen A; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-10-21

    Technetium incorporation into magnetite and its behavior during subsequent oxidation has been investigated at high pH to determine the technetium retention mechanism(s) on formation and oxidative perturbation of magnetite in systems relevant to radioactive waste disposal. Ferrihydrite was exposed to Tc(VII)(aq) containing cement leachates (pH 10.5-13.1), and crystallization of magnetite was induced via addition of Fe(II)aq. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical extraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques provided direct evidence that Tc(VII) was reduced and incorporated into the magnetite structure. Subsequent air oxidation of the magnetite particles for up to 152 days resulted in only limited remobilization of the incorporated Tc(IV). Analysis of both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data indicated that the Tc(IV) was predominantly incorporated into the magnetite octahedral site in all systems studied. On reoxidation in air, the incorporated Tc(IV) was recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution with less than 40% remobilization to solution despite significant oxidation of the magnetite to maghemite/goethite: All solid associated Tc remained as Tc(IV). The results of this study provide the first direct evidence for significant Tc(IV) incorporation into the magnetite structure and confirm that magnetite incorporated Tc(IV) is recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution. Immobilization of Tc(VII) by reduction and incorporation into magnetite at high pH and with significant stability upon reoxidation has clear and important implications for limiting technetium migration under conditions where magnetite is formed including in geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:25236360

  11. Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy of magnetite (110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, K.; Verre, R.; Mauit, O.; Sofin, R. G. S.; Farrell, L.; Byrne, C.; Smith, C. M.; McGilp, J. F.; Shvets, I. V.

    2014-05-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) has been used to measure the optical anisotropies of bulk and thin-film Fe3O4(110) surfaces. The spectra indicate that small shifts in energy of the optical transitions, associated with anisotropic strain or electric field gradients caused by the (110) surface termination or a native oxide layer, are responsible for the strong signal observed. The RAS response was then measured as a function of temperature. A distinct change in the RAS line-shape amplitude was observed in the spectral range from 0.8 to 1.6 eV for temperatures below the Verwey transition of the crystal. Finally, thin-film magnetite was grown by molecular beam epitaxy on MgO(110) substrates. Changes in the RAS spectra were found for different film thickness, suggesting that RAS can be used to monitor the growth of magnetite (110) films in situ. The thickness dependence of the RAS is discussed in terms of various models for the origin of the RAS signal.

  12. Laser heated pedestal growth of pure and Nd 3+-doped potassium lithium niobate single-crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriol, M.; Foulon, G.; Brenier, A.; Cohen-Adad, M. T.; Boulon, G.

    1997-03-01

    Due to their incongruent melting, potassium lithium niobate K 3Li 2- xNb 5+ xO 15+2 x (KLN, 0.15 < x < 0.5) crystals are difficult to grow by conventional methods such as Czochralski or TSSG. Using the laser heated pedestal growth technique, compositionally homogeneous a-axis oriented KLN single-crystal fibers free of macro-defects were successfully grown. The crystal length was between 10 and 40 mm for a diameter of about 500 ?m. After etching, the fibers appeared to be mostly single domain, allowing blue laser light by second harmonic generation from an infrared laser emission.

  13. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-11-03

    Iron oxide films were deposited onto Si substrates using ion-beam-assisted deposition. The films were ~300 nm thick polycrystalline magnetite with an average crystallite size of ~6 nm. Additionally, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction both indicate that the films are single-phase magnetite. Since no direct evidence of a second phase could be found, exchange bias likely arises due to defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples have such small grains, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field. The high energy deposition process results in an oxygen-rich, argon-containing magnetite film with low temperature exchange bias due to defects at the high concentration of grain boundaries.

  14. Some Properties of Magnetite Nanoparticles Produced Under Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Umar Saeed; Khattak, Nazir Shah; Manan, Abdul; Rahman, Aminur; Khan, Faridullah; Rahim, Abdur

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, stirring rate, stirring time, reaction pH, and concentration of precursors during synthesis were found to be crucial in determining the size of the magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) obtained. The relationship between synthetic conditions and the crystal structure, particle size, and size distribution of the NPs was studied. Surface coating of iron oxide NPs was performed in two steps. Magnetite NPs were prepared by coprecipitation then coated with silica by use of a sol-gel process. Saturation magnetization of the magnetite NPs increased from 47.23 to 49.12 emu/g when their size was increased from 8.89 to 9.39 nm. Magnetite NPs in the size range 11-12 nm, coated with silica, are monodispersed and their corresponding saturation magnetization is 40.67 emu/g (11 nm) and 34.65 emu/g (12 nm). The decrease in the saturation magnetization of the coated samples is attributed to the increase in the amount of tetraethyl orthosilicate.

  15. Synthesis of Magnetite Nano-Particles by Reverse CO-PRECIPITATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh, Hamid; Ataie, Abolghasem; Rashchi, Fereshteh

    Magnetite nano-particles have been synthesized by reverse co-precipitation method using iron salts in alkaline medium in the presence of diethylene glycol (DEG). Effect of DEG on the nano-particle characteristics was investigated by XRD, FE-SEM, FTIR and VSM techniques. From XRD results it was concluded that in the presence of DEG the composition of magnetite did not change, however the mean crystallite size reduced from 10 to 5 nm. SEM micrograph showed that DEG decreased the size of spherical magnetite nano-particles from 50 to 20 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) indicated that the DEG molecules chemisorbed on the magnetite nano-particles. Under the given experimental conditions, the rate of crystallization and growth reduced, which is probably due to the capping of DEG to the magnetite nano-particles. The agglomeration was also decreased which is attributed to the coating of magnetite nano-particles by DEG which prevents the formation of hydrogen bonding between magnetite and water molecules.

  16. Near-surface Structural Change in Magnetite: An EPR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, H.; Luster, J.; Gehring, A. U.

    2006-12-01

    Magnetite as a lithogenic mineral is widespread in soils. Its bulk magnetic properties have been studied in detail and the grain size distribution has been used as proxy to reconstruct weathering environments. During weathering, oxidation can lead to the formation of ferric oxides at the magnetite surface. Such changes are difficult to detect by classical rock magnetic analysis, because the magnetic data are generally dominated by the bulk properties. In this research we test the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to get an insight into near-surface properties of magnetite in a soil. The experiments were carried out on untreated and chemically treated soil samples. Chemical treatments included oxalate extraction which dissolves poorly crystallized ferric oxides, as well as citrate-bicarbonate- dithionite (CBD) treatment, which removes ferric oxides (e.g. maghemite, hematite) but also SD magnetite by reductive dissolution. Under the SEM, the magnetite particles showed a particle size of generally more than 10 microns. A minor Ti for Fe substitution was found by EDX analysis. Hysteresis loops of the untreated (KA), oxalate treated (K_ox), and CBD treated (KA_dith) samples at room temperature showed a coercive force (Hc) of 10 ±1 mT and a hysteresis closure between 250-300 mT which is indicative of magnetite. The FORC diagrams of KA, KA_ox and KA_dith were similar and revealed two features : an Hc distribution with maximum at 10 mT and a vertical spread (bias field) with Hc around 2mT. These data suggest that the different chemical treatments had no significant effect on the magnetite in the soil samples. Since CBD treatment is known to dissolve SD magnetite, an assemblage of MD and PSD magnetite particles can be inferred. The EPR spectroscopic parameters (g-value and linewidth ?B) showed different values for the untreated and chemically treated magnetite. For KA, g = 2.12 and ?B = 120 mT were measured. Similar values (g = 2.14 and ?B =120 mT ) were found for Ka_ox. With CBD treatment, both parameters increased to 2.27 and 160 mT, respectively. The significant broadening of the lineshape after CBD treatment is due to an increase of inhomogeneity (e.g. defect structures) caused by the reductive dissolution of Fe^{(III)}. The simultaneous decrease of the resonant field, indicated by higher g-values, points to an enhancement of the internal field. This can be explained by an increase of the magnetic moments due to incongruent dissolution of Fe^{(III)} probably in the vicinity of Ti^{(IV)} sites in the near-surface region of the magnetite grains. In conclusion, EPR spectroscopy is a powerful tool to detect near-surface structural defects and can, therefore, be used to complement classical rock magnetic methods.

  17. Magnetite-Based Magnetoreceptor Cells in the Olfactory Organ of Rainbow Trout and Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Cadiou, H.; Dixson, A. D.; Eder, S.; Kobayashi, A.; McNaughton, P. A.; Muhamad, A. N.; Raub, T. D.; Walker, M. M.; Winklhofer, M.; Yuen, B. B.

    2011-12-01

    Many vertebrate and invertebrate animals have a geomagnetic sensory system, but the biophysics and anatomy of how magnetic stimuli are transduced to the nervous system is a challenging problem. Previous work in our laboratories identified single-domain magnetite chains in olfactory epithelium in cells proximal to the ros V nerve, which, in rainbow trout, responds to magnetic fields. Our objectives are to characterize these magnetite-containing cells and determine whether they form part of the mechanism of magnetic field transduction in teleost fishes, as a model for other Vertebrates. Using a combination of reflection mode confocal microscopy and a Prussian Blue technique modified to stain specifically for magnetite, our Auckland group estimated that both juvenile rainbow trout (ca. 7 cm total length) olfactory rosettes have ~200 magnetite-containing cells. The magnetite present in two types of cells within the olfactory epithelium appears to be arranged in intracellular chains. All of our groups (Munich, Auckland, Cambridge and Caltech) have obtained different types of structural evidence that magnetite chains closely associate with the plasma membrane in the cells, even in disaggregated tissues. In addition, our Cambridge group used Ca2+ imaging to demonstrate a clear response by individual magnetite-containing cells to a step change in the intensity of the external magnetic field and a slow change in Ca2+ activity when the external magnetic field was cancelled. In the teleost, zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small (~4 cm adult length in captivity) genetic and developmental biology model organism, our Caltech group detected ferromagnetic material throughout the body, but concentrated in the rostral trunk, using NRM and IRM scans of whole adults. Our analysis suggests greater than one million, 80-100 nm crystals, with Lowrie-Fuller curves strongly consistent with single-domain magnetite in 100-100,000 magnetocytes. Ferromagentic resonance (FMR) spectra show crystals with narrow particle size distribution concentrated in the trunk, similar to biogenic magnetofossils. In SQUID microscopy images numerous dipole spots are widely distributed throughout the flank, not correlated with skin pigments or the spinal cord and neural arches. We interpret this to indicate a lateral line location for trunk magnetite in zebrafish. In contrast to trout in which rock magnetic experiments and TEM suggest highly interacting bundled ropes of crystals, similar to those in the large magnetotactic bacterium, M. bavaricum, zebrafish magnetic aggregates apparently arrange in clumps or mixed chains and clumps. We report trout olfactory epithelium containing magnetite magnetoreceptors that transduce the external magnetic field, then encode and transmit it to the brain, while zebrafish contain magnetite in the lateral line region.

  18. Biophysics of Magnetic Orientation: Radical Pairs, Biogenic Magnetite, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joe

    2011-03-01

    Two major biophysical mechanisms for magnetoreception in terrestrial animals, one based on biogenic magnetite and another on radical-pair biochemical reactions, have been the subject of experiment and debate for the past 30 years. The magnetite hypothesis has stood the test of time: biogenic magnetite is synthesized biochemically in Bacteria, Protists, and numerous Animal phyla, as well as in some plants. Chains of single-domain crystals have been detected by clean-lab based SQUID magnetometry in animal tissues in all major phyla, followed by high-resolution TEM in selected model organisms, as well as by electrophysiological studies demonstrating the role of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in the magnetoreceptive process. Pulse-remagnetization - configured to uniquely flip the polarity of single-domain ferromagnets - has dramatic effects on the behavior of many birds, honeybees, mole rats, turtles, and bats, to cite a growing list. Magnetite-containing cells in the vicinity of these neurons in fish are now the subject of intense study by our consortium. The existence of a specialized class of magnetite-containing magnetoreceptor cells in animal tissues is no longer controversial. In contrast, less success has been achieved in gaining experimental support across a range of taxa for the radical-pair hypothesis. Although this mechanism was proposed to explain an early observation that birds would not respond to complete inversion of the magnetic vector, many organisms (even some birds) do indeed respond to the field polarity. We also note that few, if any, of these critical experiments have been done using fully double-blind methods. This is joint work with: M. M. Walker (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and M. Winklhofer (LMU Munich, Germany).

  19. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostka, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis.

  20. Formation of Magnetite Nanoparticles at Low Temperature: From Superparamagnetic to Stable Single Domain Particles

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Jens; Bertinetti, Luca; Widdrat, Marc; Hirt, Ann M.; Faivre, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The room temperature co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric iron under alkaline conditions typically yields superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles below a size of 20 nm. We show that at pH ?=? 9 this method can be tuned to grow larger particles with single stable domain magnetic (> 20–30 nm) or even multi-domain behavior (> 80 nm). The crystal growth kinetics resembles surprisingly observations of magnetite crystal formation in magnetotactic bacteria. The physicochemical parameters required for mineralization in these organisms are unknown, therefore this study provides insight into which conditions could possibly prevail in the biomineralizing vesicle compartments (magnetosomes) of these bacteria. PMID:23520462

  1. Thermal treatment of magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wykowska, Urszula; Satula, Dariusz; Nordblad, Per

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper presents the results of a thermal treatment process for magnetite nanoparticles in the temperature range of 50–500 °C. The tested magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using three different methods that resulted in nanoparticles with different surface characteristics and crystallinity, which in turn, was reflected in their thermal durability. The particles were obtained by coprecipitation from Fe chlorides and decomposition of an Fe(acac)3 complex with and without a core–shell structure. Three types of ferrite nanoparticles were produced and their thermal stability properties were compared. In this study, two sets of unmodified magnetite nanoparticles were used where crystallinity was as determinant of the series. For the third type of particles, a Ag shell was added. By comparing the coated and uncoated particles, the influence of the metallic layer on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles was tested. Before and after heat treatment, the nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was observed that the fabrication methods determine, to some extent, the sensitivity of the nanoparticles to external factors. PMID:26199842

  2. Magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles with diluted magnet-like behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza-Navarro, Marco; Torres-Castro, Alejandro; González, Virgilio; Ortiz, Ubaldo; De la Rosa, Elder

    2010-01-01

    In the present work is reported the use of the biopolymer chitosan as template for the preparation of magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems, following a two step procedure of magnetite nanoparticles in situ precipitation and subsequent silver ions reduction. The crystalline and morphological characteristics of both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nanobeam diffraction patterns (NBD). The results of these studies corroborate the core/shell morphology and the crystalline structure of the magnetite core and the silver shell. Moreover, magnetization temperature dependent, M( T), measurements show an unusual diluted magnetic behavior attributed to the dilution of the magnetic ordering in the magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems.

  3. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    SciTech Connect

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-10-15

    The syntheses of nanosize magnetite particles by wet-chemical oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} have been extensively investigated. In the present investigation the nanosize magnetite particles were synthesised without using the Fe(II) precursor. This was achieved by {gamma}-irradiation of water-in-oil microemulsion containing only the Fe(III) precursor. The corresponding phase transformations were monitored. Microemulsions (pH {approx} 12.5) were {gamma}-irradiated at a relatively high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h. Upon 1 h of {gamma}-irradiation the XRD pattern of the precipitate showed goethite and unidentified low-intensity peaks. Upon 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, reductive conditions were achieved and substoichiometric magnetite ({approx}Fe{sub 2.71}O{sub 4}) particles with insignificant amount of goethite particles found in the precipitate. Hydrated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup -}), organic radicals and hydrogen gas as radiolytic products were responsible for the reductive dissolution of iron oxide in the microemulsion and the reduction Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+}. Upon 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the precipitate exhibited dual behaviour, it was a more oxidised product than the precipitate obtained after 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, but it contained magnetite particles in a more reduced form ({approx}Fe{sub 2.93}O{sub 4}). It was presumed that the reduction and oxidation processes existed as concurrent competitive processes in the microemulsion. After 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the pH of the medium shifted from the alkaline to the acidic range. The high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h was directly responsible for this shift to the acidic range. At a slightly acidic pH a further reduction of Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+} resulted in the formation of more stoichiometric magnetite particles, whereas the oxidation conditions in the acidic medium permitted the oxidation Fe{sup 2+} {yields} Fe{sup 3+}. The Fe{sup 3+} was much less soluble in the acidic medium and it hydrolysed and recrystallised as goethite. The {gamma}-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure substoichiometric nanosize magnetite particles of about 25 nm in size and with the stoichiometry of Fe{sub 2.83}O{sub 4}.

  4. Composition of coarse-grained magnetite from pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Overstreet, William C.; Mousa, Hassan; Matzko, John J.

    1985-01-01

    Crystals of magnetite as large as 30 mm long and 7 mm thick are locally present in quartz-rich zones of interior and exterior pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area. Niobium, tin, and yttrium are strongly enriched in six specimens of magnetite from interior pegmatite dikes in a small pluton where these elements form geochemical anomalies in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrates from wadi sediment. Less abundant anomalous elements in the magnetite are molybdenum, lead, and zirconium, which also tend to be present in anomalous amounts in the nonmagnetic concentrates from the niobium-bearing pluton. The most anomalous trace element in the magnetite is zinc, which is at least 10 times as abundant as it is in the quartz monzonite plutons or in the nonmagnetic concentrates. The capacity of magnetite to scavenge molybdenum, zinc, niobium, lead, tin, yttrium, and zirconium suggests the possible utility of magnetite as a geochemical sample medium.

  5. Vortex magnetic structure in framboidal magnetite reveals existence of water droplets in an ancient asteroid.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Nozawa, Jun; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The majority of water has vanished from modern meteorites, yet there remain signatures of water on ancient asteroids. How and when water disappeared from the asteroids is important, because the final fluid-concentrated chemical species played critical roles in the early evolution of organics and in the final minerals in meteorites. Here we show evidence of vestigial traces of water based on a nanometre-scale palaeomagnetic method, applying electron holography to the framboids in the Tagish Lake meteorite. The framboids are colloidal crystals composed of three-dimensionally ordered magnetite nanoparticles and therefore are only able to form against the repulsive force induced by the surface charge of the magnetite as a water droplet parches in microgravity. We demonstrate that the magnetites have a flux closure vortex structure, a unique magnetic configuration in nature that permits the formation of colloidal crystals just before exhaustion of water from a local system within a hydrous asteroid. PMID:24149376

  6. Vortex magnetic structure in framboidal magnetite reveals existence of water droplets in an ancient asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Nozawa, Jun; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    The majority of water has vanished from modern meteorites, yet there remain signatures of water on ancient asteroids. How and when water disappeared from the asteroids is important, because the final fluid-concentrated chemical species played critical roles in the early evolution of organics and in the final minerals in meteorites. Here we show evidence of vestigial traces of water based on a nanometre-scale palaeomagnetic method, applying electron holography to the framboids in the Tagish Lake meteorite. The framboids are colloidal crystals composed of three-dimensionally ordered magnetite nanoparticles and therefore are only able to form against the repulsive force induced by the surface charge of the magnetite as a water droplet parches in microgravity. We demonstrate that the magnetites have a flux closure vortex structure, a unique magnetic configuration in nature that permits the formation of colloidal crystals just before exhaustion of water from a local system within a hydrous asteroid.

  7. Novel environmentally friendly synthesis of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles using mechanochemical effect

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Kosaka, Kazunori; Watano, Satoru; Yanagida, Takeshi; Kawai, Tomoji

    2010-04-15

    A novel method for synthesizing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles in water system via coprecipitation under an environmentally friendly condition has been developed. In this method, an almost neutral suspension containing ferrous hydroxide and goethite is used as the starting suspension and subjected to a ball-milling treatment. The product was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The mechanochemical effect generated by the ball-milling treatment promoted the reaction between ferrous hydroxide and goethite even at room temperature, resulting in the formation of homogeneous magnetite nanoparticles. Simultaneously, it also contributed to crystallize the formed magnetite nanoparticles while inhibiting the particle growth. This resulted in the formation of ultrafine magnetite nanoparticles of about 10 nm having a single crystal structure. This method could provide ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with superparamagnetism under the moderate condition without neither heating nor any additives such as surfactant and organic solvent.

  8. Metal-doped magnetite thin films.

    PubMed

    Abe, Seishi; Ping, De Hai; Nakamura, Shintaro; Ohnuma, Masato; Ohnuma, Shigehiro

    2012-06-01

    This paper investigates magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film containing a small amount of a metal element. The films are prepared by rf sputtering with a composite target of ceramic iron oxide with metal chips. Low-temperature magnetization of magnetite containing 5.3%Ge reveals that the film contains some magnetically weak coupling grains. The metal element Mg reduces both hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) and magnetite, resulting in single-phase wüstite (Fe1-xO). In contrast, adding Ge selectively reduces hematite, while magnetite remains unreactive. According to the free energy of reaction, the element Ge is able to reduce hematite only, whereas the element Mg is capable of reducing both hematite and magnetite. This property is in good agreement with the experiment results. PMID:22905582

  9. MAGNETIC AND STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BIOGENIC MAGNETITE M.R. McCartney* and R. E. Dunin-Borkowski**

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Science, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK Magnetic crystals below 100 nm in size occur in organisms are intracellular, ferrimagnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The magnetosomes are usually is thought to increase the efficiency with which such bacteria find their optimal oxygen concentrations

  10. Three-Dimensional Morphological Analysis of ALH84001 Magnetite Using Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Shimmin, Joel; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2003-01-01

    We report here the crystal morphologies of MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites as calculated by back-projection using electron tomography. In the present study, we used a 300 keV TEM with a field emission gun (Tecnai F-30 from FEI Inc.), equipped with a 2048 x 2048 pixel CCD camera from Gatan Inc. to image magnetite crystals over tilt ranges of approx. +/- 72 deg in 2 deg tilt intervals. The images were aligned for back-projection, either manually, or through the use of fiducial 5 nm Au spheres affixed to the specimen prior to microscopy. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were computed using weighted back-projection of the tilted views. The tomograms were viewed and analyzed as a series of slices 1.0 nm thick, taken parallel to the specimen-supporting grid, using the IMOD software package. The shape of each magnetite crystal was determined by defining the external contour of a given magnetite in each slice and assembling a stack of these contours in 3-D. To aid in visualization, the stacked contour array was reduced to an optimal mesh by Delaunay triangulation. The surface normal to each of the triangles in the mesh was calculated and the triangle faces colored according to the orientation of that surface normal relative to the principal crystallographic axis of magnetite. Green surfaces correspond to {111} orientations, blue surfaces to {100} orientations, and red surfaces to {110} orientations. Triangles whose surface normal did not correspond to one of the principal axes were colored gray. Within the experimental and numerical uncertainties of the deconvolution, the tomographic reconstruction of both MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites are equivalent and correspond to a truncated hexa-octahedral morphology.

  11. Magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles with diluted magnet-like behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Garza-Navarro, Marco; Gonzalez, Virgilio; Ortiz, Ubaldo; De la Rosa, Elder

    2010-01-15

    In the present work is reported the use of the biopolymer chitosan as template for the preparation of magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems, following a two step procedure of magnetite nanoparticles in situ precipitation and subsequent silver ions reduction. The crystalline and morphological characteristics of both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nanobeam diffraction patterns (NBD). The results of these studies corroborate the core/shell morphology and the crystalline structure of the magnetite core and the silver shell. Moreover, magnetization temperature dependent, M(T), measurements show an unusual diluted magnetic behavior attributed to the dilution of the magnetic ordering in the magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems. - Graphical abstract: Biopolymer chitosan was used as stabilization media to synthesize both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles. Results of HRTEM and NBD patterns confirm core/shell morphology of the obtained nanoparticles. It was found that the composites show diluted magnet-like behavior.

  12. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-01-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments. PMID:21776027

  13. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-02-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments. PMID:21776027

  14. Circumstellar Magnetite from the LAP 031117 CO3.0 Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Haenecour, Pierre; Floss, Christine; Stroud, Rhonda M.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first microstructural confirmation of circumstellar magnetite, identified in a petrographic thin section of the LaPaz Icefield 031117 CO3.0 chondrite. The O-isotopic composition of the grain indicates an origin in a low-mass (˜2.2 M?), approximately solar metallicity red/asymptotic giant branch (RGB/AGB) star undergoing first dredge-up. The magnetite is a single crystal measuring 750 × 670 nm, is free of defects, and is stoichiometric Fe3O4. We hypothesize that the magnetite formed via oxidation of previously condensed Fe dust within the circumstellar envelope of its progenitor star. Using an empirically derived rate constant for this reaction, we calculate that such oxidation could have occurred over timescales ranging from approximately ˜9000-500,000 years. This timescale is within the lifetime of estimates for dust condensation within RGB/AGB stars.

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of nanosized magnetite obtained by glass recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Sandu, V; Nicolescu, M S; Kuncser, V; Popa, S; Pasuk, I; Ghica, C; Sandu, E

    2012-06-01

    We present the preparation, structural and magnetic properties of nanosized magnetite obtained by the crystallization of a series of Fe-containing borosilicate glasses. Several compositions with the ratio Fe2O3/SiO2 spanning from 0.37 to 0.67 were investigated as a function of two nucleators Cr2O3 and P2O5, respectively, and modifiers and intermediates (Al2O3 and MgO). Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed the degree, the type and the location of disorder induced by a specific composition and nucleators. In addition to magnetite, it was also revealed the presence of large amounts of Fe-rich paramagnetic phases. The magnetic response is analysed in relation with the amount of Fe ions which remain dispersed in the glassy matrix as noninteracting (paramagnetic) ions. We discuss the role of the nucleators on the disorder in both tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the magnetite. PMID:22905574

  16. Is magnetite a universal memory molecule?

    PubMed

    Størmer, Fredrik C

    2014-11-01

    Human stem cells possess memory, and consequently all living human cells must have a memory system. How memory is stored in cells and organisms is an open question. Magnetite is perhaps the best candidate to be a universal memory molecule. Magnetite may give us a clue, because it is the Earth's most distributed and important magnetic material. It is found in living organisms with no known functions except for involvement in navigation in some organisms. In humans magnetite is found in the brain, heart, liver and spleen. Humans suffer from memory dysfunctions in many cases when iron is out of balance. Anomalous concentrations of magnetite is known to be associated with a neurodegenerative disorder like Alzheimer's disease. Due to the rapid speed and accuracy of our brain, memory and its functions must be governed by quantum mechanics. PMID:25236401

  17. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (?-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase biomineralization that is not specific of Fe bio-reduction, but can also result from Fe bio-oxidation.

  18. Mineralogical and microfabric characteristics of magnetite in the Wuyang Precambrian BIFs, southern North China Craton: Implications for genesis and depositional processes of the associated BIFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Yang, Zhijun; Kapsiotis, Argyrios; Zhou, Yongzhang; He, Junguo; Wang, Changle; Liang, Jin

    2014-11-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are widely distributed in the North China Craton (NCC). Among them, the Wuyang BIFs located in the southern margin of NCC occur in the Late Archaean Tieshanmiao Formation and can be subdivided in two different sub-types: (i) quartz-magnetite BIFs (QMB), consisting of magnetite, fine-microcrystalline quartz and minor calcite and (ii) pyroxene-magnetite BIFs (PMB), composed of pyroxene, fine-microcrystalline quartz and subordinate feldspars. Both sub-types display apparent discrepancies in terms of petrography and mineral composition. As shown in Electron BackScattered Diffraction (EBSD) images and micrographs, magnetite grains from the QMB range in size from tens up to hundreds of ?m, whereas magnetite crystals from the PMB can be up to a few tens of ?m across. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) structural data indicate that magnetite from both BIF sub-types is equiaxed (cubic) and was generated by sedimentary metamorphic processes. The cell parameters of magnetite in the QMB are a = b = c = 8.396 Å and Z = 8, which deviate slightly from these of magnetite in the PMB: a = b = c = 8.394 Å and Z = 8. The analytical results of Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed micro-structural signatures of both magnetite (Raman shifts near 552 cm-1 and 673 cm-1) and hematite (Raman shifts near 227 cm-1, 295 cm-1 and 413 cm-1). In magnetite from both QMB and PMB, the crystallinity degree is similar for magnetite micro-structures but varies significantly for hematite micro-structures. Oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions fluctuated during the recrystallization of magnetite in the QMB, whereas no evident variation of fO2 occurred during the formation of magnetite in the PMB. Analytical results of laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) show that the Si, Al and Mg abundances are higher in magnetite from the QMB, whereas the Ti and Mn contents are more elevated in magnetite from the PMB. Magnetite composition also denotes that both BIF sub-types are sedimentary-metamorphic origin, whereas the deposition of PMB was also affected by volcanic activities. Overall data indicate that the differences in the depositional environment of each BIF sub-type are due to the involvement of volcanic eruption processes in the genesis of the PMB. Thus, this paper indicated that the QMB was deposited by chemical deposition at the long-term interval of volcanic eruptions, and the PMB were the product of chemical deposition affected by the volcanic eruption.

  19. Thermal Analysis of Acicular Shaped Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Golden, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a database on the thermal properties of well-characterized Martian analog materials in support of future Mars surface missions. The database contains the thermal behaviors of these analog materials under reduced and Earth ambient pressures. Magnetite in planetary materials has received considerable attention in recent years since the identification of fine grain single-domain magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 and their possible link to past life on Mars (i.e., possible biominerals of magnetotactic bacteria). Because of its possible importance to Mars science, we report here the thermal properties of magnetite particles with acicular morphology, i.e., needle-shaped magnetite. Acicular shaped magnetite can be commercially produced from goethite (FeOOH) as the starting material via a H2 reduction process. However, instead of using this process or procedure, we report here on the thermal characterization of acicular magnetite formed under reducing conditions from well-characterized needle-shaped goethite at low temperature in controlled CO-CO2 1-bar atmosphere gas mixing furnaces.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and applications of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanmukhla, Vikram Kumar

    In the past few years, the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has received considerable attention due to their potential use in clinical applications. Since the properties of these nanoparticles depend strongly on their size, shape and crystallinity, there is a need for a general method to produce these particles with a controlled size, shape and crystal type. Of the many magnetic materials (Co, Ni, and Fe), the magnetite (Fe3O 4) is least toxic and hence most promising for applications in medical diagnostics. Microemulsion-based synthesis utilizes the local aqueous environment within a reverse micelle as a nano-scale reactor and allows synthesizing nanoparticles with a hydrophilic surface for subsequent functionalization. By controlling the water-to-surfactant ratio, the type of surfactants, and the ionic strength of the aqueous core, one can control the size and shape of the resulting particles. We developed such a system that allows the multi-step synthesis of surface-functionalized, magnetic nanoparticles in a one-pot synthesis reaction. By altering the system chemistry, we were further able to produce either spheres or cylinders of controlled dimension in the size range of 5 nm to 30 nm. Using standard bio-conjugation techniques, we successfully immobilized an enzyme onto the nanoparticles. We also developed a theoretical model for the separation and fractionation of nanoparticles based on their size and magnetic properties. Using the multiphysics and finite element modeling capabilities of FEMLAB(TM), we solved the coupled system of PDEs describing the interaction of magnetic particles within a magnetic field for either static (cylindrical beaker) or convective flow (capillary) conditions. A net retention time as high as 310 s is achieved for 200 nm particles at field strength of 1250 kA/m. The model allows the design of a magnetic, field-flow fractionation (MFFF) system to separate nanoparticles by size.

  1. The chemistry of hydrothermal magnetite: a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, Patrick; Angerer, Thomas; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; French, David; Walshe, John

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a well-recognized petrogenetic indicator and is a common accessory mineral in many ore deposits and their host rocks. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of hydrothermal magnetite for provenance studies and as a pathfinder for mineral exploration. A number of studies have investigated how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of the respective magnetite. Two fundamental questions underlie these efforts — (i) How can the composition of igneous and, more importantly, hydrothermal magnetite be used to discriminate mineralized areas from barren host rocks, and (ii) how can this assist exploration geologists to target ore deposits at greater and greater distances from the main mineralization? Similar to igneous magnetite, the most important factors that govern compositional variations in hydrothermal magnetite are (A) temperature, (B) fluid composition — element availability, (C) oxygen and sulfur fugacity, (D) silicate and sulfide activity, (E) host rock buffering, (F) re-equilibration processes, and (G) intrinsic crystallographic controls such as ionic radius and charge balance. We discuss how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of magnetite and review studies that investigate the chemistry of hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from various mineral deposits and their host rocks. Furthermore, we discuss the redox-related alteration of magnetite (martitization and mushketovitization) and mineral inclusions in magnetite and their effect on chemical analyses. Our database includes published and previously unpublished magnetite minor and trace element data for magnetite from (1) banded iron formations (BIF) and related high-grade iron ore deposits in Western Australia, India, and Brazil, (2) Ag–Pb–Zn veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, United States, (3) porphyry Cu–(Au)–(Mo) deposits and associated (4) calcic and magnesian skarn deposits in the southwestern United States and Indonesia, and (5) plutonic igneous rocks from the Henderson Climax-type Mo deposit, United States, and the un-mineralized Inner Zone Batholith granodiorite, Japan. These five settings represent a diverse suite of geological settings and cover a wide range of formation conditions. The main discriminator elements for magnetite are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, and Ga. These elements are commonly present at detectable levels (10 to > 1000 ppm) and display systematic variations. We propose a combination of Ni/(Cr + Mn) vs. Ti + V, Al + Mn vs. Ti + V, Ti/V and Sn/Ga discriminant plots and upper threshold concentrations to discriminate hydrothermal from igneous magnetite and to fingerprint different hydrothermal ore deposits. The overall trends in upper threshold values for the different settings can be summarized as follows: (I) BIF (hydrothermal) — low Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn, Ga and Sn; (II) Ag–Pb–Zn veins (hydrothermal) — high Mn and low Ga and Sn; (III) Mg-skarn (hydrothermal) — high Mg and Mn and low Al, Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Ga; (IV) skarn (hydrothermal) — high Mg, Al, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Zn and low Sn; (V) porphyry (hydrothermal) — high Ti and V and low Sn; (VI) porphyry (igneous) — high Ti, V and Cr and low Mg; and (VII) Climax-Mo (igneous) — high Al, Ga and Sn and low Mg and Cr.

  2. Geochemistry of magnetite from Proterozoic Fe-Cu deposits in the Kangdian metallogenic province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei Terry; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Gao, Jian-Feng; Hu, Ruizhong

    2015-10-01

    Fe-Cu deposits in the Kangdian Fe-Cu metallogenic province, SW China, are hosted in Paleoproterozoic meta-volcanic-sedimentary sequences and are spatially associated with coeval mafic intrusions. Several well-known examples are the giant Lala, Dahongshan, and Yinachang deposits. They have a common paragenetic sequence of an early Fe-oxide stage associated with sodic alteration and a late Cu-sulfide stage associated with potassic-carbonate alteration. Magnetite dominates the Fe-oxide stage of these deposits but is also present in the Cu-sulfide stage of the Lala deposit. This study uses trace element compositions of magnetite to examine the nature and origin of the ore-forming fluids. The magnetite has variable concentrations of Ti, Al, Mg, Mn, Si, V, Cr, Ca, Co, Ni, Sc, Zn, Cu, Mo, Sn, and Ga, which are thought to have been controlled mainly by fluid compositions and/or intensive parameters (e.g., temperature and oxygen fugacity ( fO2)). Fluid-rock interaction and coprecipitating mineral phases appear to be less important in controlling the magnetite compositions. Magnetite grains in the Fe-oxide stage of the Lala and Dahongshan deposits have comparable trace element compositions and were likely precipitated from chemically similar fluids. High Ni contents of magnetite in both deposits, coupled with previous isotopic data and the fact that the two deposits are spatially associated with coeval mafic intrusions, strongly suggest that the ore-forming fluids were genetically related to the mafic magmas that formed the intrusions. Magnetite grains in the Fe-oxide stage of the Yinachang deposit have much lower V and Ni but higher Sn and Mo contents than those of the Lala and Dahongshan deposits and are thus thought to have precipitated from more oxidized and Mo-Sn-rich fluids that may have evolved from relatively felsic magmas. Magnetite grains from the Cu-sulfide and Fe-oxide stages of the Lala deposit are broadly similar in composition, but those in the Cu-sulfide stage have slightly higher Cu, Zn, and Mn and are thought to have crystallized from relatively low-temperature and Cu-Zn-Mn-rich fluids evolved from the fluids of the early Fe-oxide stage. Our results show that magnetite from the Fe-Cu deposits in the Kangdian Province, banded iron formation, Fe skarn deposits, diabase-hosted hydrothermal Fe deposits, and magmatic deposits has significantly different compositions. We propose that covariations of Co-Ni, Zn-Sn, and Co/Ni-Mn can be used to effectively discriminate different deposit types.

  3. Pond sediment magnetite grains show a distinctive microbial community.

    PubMed

    Song, H-K; Sonkaria, S; Khare, V; Dong, K; Lee, H-T; Ahn, S-H; Kim, H-K; Kang, H-J; Lee, S-H; Jung, S P; Adams, J M

    2015-07-01

    Formation of magnetite in anaerobic sediments is thought to be enhanced by the activities of iron-reducing bacteria. Geobacter has been implicated as playing a major role, as in culture its cells are often associated with extracellular magnetite grains. We studied the bacterial community associated with magnetite grains in sediment of a freshwater pond in South Korea. Magnetite was isolated from the sediment using a magnet. The magnetite-depleted fraction of sediment was also taken for comparison. DNA was extracted from each set of samples, followed by PCR for 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and HiSeq sequencing. The bacterial communities of the magnetite-enriched and magnetite-depleted fractions were significantly different. The enrichment of three abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) suggests that they may either be dependent upon the magnetite grain environment or may be playing a role in magnetite formation. The most abundant OTU in magnetite-enriched fractions was Geobacter, bolstering the case that this genus is important in magnetite formation in natural systems. Other major OTUs strongly associated with the magnetite-enriched fraction, rather than the magnetite-depleted fraction, include a Sulfuricella and a novel member of the Betaproteobacteria. The existence of distinct bacterial communities associated with particular mineral grain types may also be an example of niche separation and coexistence in sediments and soils, which cannot usually be detected due to difficulties in separating and concentrating minerals. PMID:25592636

  4. Oxidation of pyrite in coal to magnetite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Alexander, C.C.; Dulong, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    When bituminous coal is heated in an inert atmosphere (He) containing small amounts of oxygen at 393-455 ??C, pyrite (FeS2) in coal is partially converted to magnetite (Fe304). The maximum amount of Fe304 formed during the time of heating corresponds to 5-20% of the total pyrite present, depending on the coal sample. The magnetite forms as an outer crust on the pyrite grains. The fact that the magnetic properties of the pyrite grains are substantially increased by the magnetite crust suggests that pyrite can be separated from coal by use of a low magnetic field. In a laboratory test, 75% removal is obtained by means of a 500 Oe magnet on three samples, and 60% on a fourth sample. ?? 1984.

  5. Spin state of iron in Fe3O4 magnetite and h-Fe3O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtson, Amelia; Morgan, Dane; Becker, Udo

    2013-04-01

    The high-pressure behavior of magnetite has been widely debated in the literature. Experimental measurements have found conflicting high-pressure transitions: a charge reordering in magnetite from inverse-spinel to normal-spinel [Pasternak , J. Phys. Chem. Solids0022-369710.1016/j.jpcs.2003.12.013 65, 1531 (2004); Rozenberg , Phys. Rev. B10.1103/PhysRevB.75.020102 75, 020102 (2007)], iron high-spin to intermediate-spin transition in magnetite [Ding , Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.045508 100, 045508 (2008)], electron delocalization in magnetite [Baudelet , Phys. Rev. B1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.82.140412 82, 140412 (2010); Glazyrin , Am. Mineral.0003-004X10.2138/am.2011.3862 97, 128 (2012)], and a structural phase transition from magnetite to h-Fe3O4 [Dubrovinsky , J. Phys.: Condens. Matter0953-898410.1088/0953-8984/15/45/009 15, 7697 (2003); Fei , Am. Mineral. 84, 203 (1999); Haavik , Am. Mineral. 85, 514 (2000)]. We present ab initio calculations of iron's spin state in magnetite and h-Fe3O4, which help resolve the high-pressure debate. The results of the calculations find that iron remains high spin in both magnetite and h-Fe3O4; intermediate-spin iron is not stable. In addition, magnetite remains inverse-spinel but undergoes a phase transition to h-Fe3O4 near 10 GPa. Magnetite has a complex magnetic ordering, multiple valence states (Fe2+ and Fe3+), charge ordering, and different local Fe site environments, all of which were accounted for in the calculations. The lack of intermediate-spin iron in magnetite helps resolve the spin state of iron in perovskite, the major mineral in the lower mantle. In both magnetite and perovskite, x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements in the literature show a drop in satellite peak intensity by approximately half, which is interpreted as intermediate-spin iron. In both minerals, calculations give no indication of intermediate-spin iron and predict high-spin iron to be stable for defect-free crystals. The results question the interpretation of a nonzero drop in XES satellite peak intensities as intermediate-spin iron.

  6. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t < 300°C), and amphibolite facies metamorphism ( t > 500°C).

  7. Short-Range Correlations in Magnetite above the Verwey Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Alexey; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Hoesch, Moritz; Piekarz, Przemys?aw; Le Tacon, Mathieu; Krisch, Michael; Koz?owski, Andrzej; Ole?, Andrzej M.; Parlinski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4, is the first magnetic material discovered and utilized by mankind in Ancient Greece, yet it still attracts attention due to its puzzling properties. This is largely due to the quest for a full and coherent understanding of the Verwey transition that occurs at TV=124 K and is associated with a drop of electric conductivity and a complex structural phase transition. A recent detailed analysis of the structure, based on single crystal diffraction, suggests that the electron localization pattern contains linear three-Fe-site units, the so-called trimerons. Here, we show that whatever the electron localization pattern is, it partially survives up to room temperature as short-range correlations in the high-temperature cubic phase, easily discernible by diffuse scattering. Additionally, ab initio electronic structure calculations reveal that characteristic features in these diffuse scattering patterns can be correlated with the Fermi surface topology.

  8. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Schwartz, Cindy; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2004-01-01

    Dated at approximately 3.9 billion years of age, carbonate disks, found within fractures of the host rock of Martian meteorite ALH84001, have been interpreted as secondary minerals that formed at low temperature in an aqueous medium. Heterogeneously distributed within these disks are magnetite nanocrystals that are of Martian origin. Approximately one quarter of these magnetites have morphological and chemical similarities to magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, which are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats on Earth. Moreover, these types of magnetite particles are not known or expected to be produced by abiotic means either through geological processes or synthetically in the laboratory. The remaining three quarters of the ALH84001 magnetites are likely products of multiple processes including, but not limited to, precipitation from a hydrothermal fluid, thermal decomposition of the carbonate matrix in which they are embedded, and extracellular formation by dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria. We have proposed that the origins of magnetites in ALH84001 can be best explained as the products of multiple processes, one of which is biological. Recently the three-dimensional (3-D) external morphology of the purported biogenic fraction of the ALH84001 magnetites has been the subject of considerable debate. We report here the 3-D geometry of biogenic magnetite crystals extracted from MV-1 and of those extracted from ALH84001 carbonate disks using a combination of high resolution classical and tomographic transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We focus on answering the following questions: (1) which technique provides adequate information to deduce the 3-D external crystal morphology?; and, (2) what is the precise 3-D geometry of the ALH84001 and MV-1 magnetites?

  9. Magnetite Biomineralization: Fifty years of progress, from beach-combing to the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Dixson, A. D.; Raub, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetite biomineralization was first discovered 50 years ago as a hardening agent in the teeth of the Polyplacophoran molluscs (chitons) by the late Prof. Heinz A. Lowenstam of Caltech, when he noticed unusual erosional effects produced by their grazing in the intertidal zones of Palau (Lowenstam, 1962). Since then, biogenic magnetite has been detected in a broad range of organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria, protists, insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans. In many species, the role of ferromagnetic material as a neurophysiological transducer is demonstrated clearly through the effects of pulse-remagnetization on behavior. A brief (1 uS), properly configured magnetic discharge from a rectified LC circuit, tailored to exceed the coercivity of the magnetite, will often abolish a magnetic behavioral response, or in some cases make the organism go the wrong way. This is a unique ferromagnetic effect. The genes controlling magnetite biomineralization are well characterized in several species of bacteria, and the ability of some of these bacterial genes to initiate magnetite precipitation in mammalian cell lines argues for a common descent, probably via a magnetotactic mitochondrial ancestor. Previous studies in fish reported the presence of single-domain magnetite crystals in cells near projections of the trigeminal nerve, co-located in the olfactory epithelium. Although the cells are rare, the recent development of a spinning magnetic field technique allows easy identification and isolation of these cells for individual study (Eder et al., 2012). The cells are surprisingly magnetic, with moments hundreds of times larger than typical magnetotactic bacteria. Subsequent efforts to identify the anatomical seat of magnetoreceptors have focused on the same locations in new organisms, excluding other areas. Using SQUID moment magnetometry and SQUID scanning microscopy, we report here the unexpected presence of biogenic magnetite in the lateral line region of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. We suspect that the magnetic field receptor cells of the trigeminal system in animals may be co-located within a variety of other sensory tissues (olfaction, lateral line, vision, hearing, taste, etc.) as a means of spatially dispersing cells with large magnetic moments to prevent magnetostatic interactions between them. References: Eder et al., Magnetic characterization of isolated candidate vertebrate magnetoreceptor cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2012; 109:12022-12027. Lowenstam, H.A., 1962. Magnetite in denticle capping in recent chitons (Polyplacophora). Bulletin of the Geological Society of America 73, 435-438.

  10. Quantification of Biogenic Magnetite by Synchrotron X-ray Microscopy During the PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Kent, D. V.; Chen-Wiegart, Y. C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals, including spearhead-like and spindle-like ones up to 4 microns, have been reported in clay-rich sediments recording the ~56 Ma Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and carbon isotope excursion (CIE) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ and along with magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) chains, were suggested [Schumann et al. 2008 PNAS; Kopp et al. 2009 Paleoceanography] to account for the distinctive single domain (SD) rock magnetic properties of these sediments [Lanci et al. 2002 JGR]. However, because uncalibrated magnetic extraction techniques were used to provide material for TEM imaging of the biogenic magnetite, it is difficult to quantitatively analyze their concentration in the bulk clay. In this study, we use a synchrotron transmission X-ray microscope to image bulk CIE clay. We first take mosaic images of sub-millimeter-sized bulk clay samples, in which we can identify many of the various types of giant biogenic magnetite crystals, as well as several other types of iron minerals, such as pyrite framboids, siderite, and detrital magnetite. However, limited by the instrument resolution (~50 nm), we are not able to identify MTB chains let alone isolated magnetic nanoparticles that may be abundant the clay. To quantitatively estimate the concentration of the giant biogenic magnetite, we re-deposited the bulk clay sample in an alcohol solution on a silicon nitride membrane for 2D X-ray scans. After scanning a total area of 0.55 mm2 with average clay thickness of 4 ?m, we identified ~40 spearheads, ~5 spindles and a few elongated rods and estimated their total magnetization as SD particles to be less than about 10% of the mass normalized clay for the scanned area. This result suggests that the giant biogenic magnetite is not a major source of the SD signal for the clay and is in good agreement with rock magnetic analyses using high-resolution first-order reversal curves and thermal fluctuation tomography on bulk CIE clay showing that most of the magnetite occurs as isolated, near-equant SD particles [Wang et al. 2013 PNAS]. This would also exclude a significant contribution from MTB chains and points to a non-biogenic origin, such as a comet impact plume condensate, for the magnetic nanoparticles [Kent et al. 2003 EPSL] in the very rapidly deposited CIE clays [Wright & Schaller 2014 PNAS].

  11. Partial oxidation as a rational approach to kinetic control in bioinspired magnetite synthesis.

    PubMed

    Altan, Cem L; Lenders, Jos J M; Bomans, Paul H H; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner; Bucak, Seyda; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-04-13

    Biological systems show impressive control over the shape, size and organization of mineral structures, which often leads to advanced physical properties that are tuned to the function of these materials. Such control is also found in magnetotactic bacteria, which produce-in aqueous medium and at room temperature-magnetite nanoparticles with precisely controlled morphologies and sizes that are generally only accessible in synthetic systems with the use of organic solvents and/or the use of high-temperature methods. The synthesis of magnetite under biomimetic conditions, that is, in water and at room temperature and using polymeric additives as control agents, is of interest as a green production method for magnetic nanoparticles. Inspired by the process of magnetite biomineralization, a rational approach is taken by the use of a solid precursor for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. The conversion of a ferrous hydroxide precursor, which we demonstrate with cryo-TEM and low-dose electron diffraction, is used to achieve control over the solution supersaturation such that crystal growth can be regulated through the interaction with poly-(?,?)-dl-aspartic acid, a soluble, negatively charged polymer. In this way, stable suspensions of nanocrystals are achieved that show remanence and coercivity at the size limit of superparamagnetism, and which are able to align their magnetic moments forming strings in solution as is demonstrated by cryo-electron tomography. PMID:25740708

  12. Influence of magnetite stoichiometry on U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Boyanov, Maxim I; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Kemner, Kenneth M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-01-17

    Hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) can be reduced enzymatically by various microbes and abiotically by Fe(2+)-bearing minerals, including magnetite, of interest because of its formation from Fe(3+) (oxy)hydroxides via dissimilatory iron reduction. Magnetite is also a corrosion product of iron metal in suboxic and anoxic conditions and is likely to form during corrosion of steel waste containers holding uranium-containing spent nuclear fuel. Previous work indicated discrepancies in the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Here, we demonstrate that the stoichiometry (the bulk Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio, x) of magnetite can, in part, explain the observed discrepancies. In our studies, magnetite stoichiometry significantly influenced the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Stoichiometric and partially oxidized magnetites with x ? 0.38 reduced U(VI) to U(IV) in UO(2) (uraninite) nanoparticles, whereas with more oxidized magnetites (x < 0.38) and maghemite (x = 0), sorbed U(VI) was the dominant phase observed. Furthermore, as with our chemically synthesized magnetites (x ? 0.38), nanoparticulate UO(2) was formed from reduction of U(VI) in a heat-killed suspension of biogenic magnetite (x = 0.43). X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy results indicate that reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is coupled to oxidation of Fe(2+) in magnetite. The addition of aqueous Fe(2+) to suspensions of oxidized magnetite resulted in reduction of U(VI) to UO(2), consistent with our previous finding that Fe(2+) taken up from solution increased the magnetite stoichiometry. Our results suggest that magnetite stoichiometry and the ability of aqueous Fe(2+) to recharge magnetite are important factors in reduction of U(VI) in the subsurface. PMID:22148359

  13. Magnetite in Black Sea Turtles (Chelonia agassizi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Garduño, V.; Sanchez, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have reported experimental evidence for magnetoreception in marine turtles. In order to increase our knowledge about magnetoreception and biogenic mineralization, we have isolated magnetite particles from the brain of specimens of black sea turtles Chelonia agassizi. Our samples come from natural deceased organisms collected the reserve area of Colola Maruata in southern Mexico. The occurrence of magnetite particles in brain tissue of black sea turtles offers the opportunity for further studies to investigate possible function of ferrimagnetic material, its mineralogical composition, grain size, texture and its location and structural arrangement within the host tissue. After sample preparation and microscopic examination, we localized and identified the ultrafine unidimensional particles of magnetite by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Particles present grain sizes between 10.0 to 40.0Mm. Our study provides, for the first time, evidence for biogenic formation of this material in the black sea turtles. The ultrafine particles are apparently superparamagnetic. Preliminary results from rock magnetic measurements are also reported and correlated to the SEM observations. The black turtle story on the Michoacan coast is an example of formerly abundant resource which was utilized as a subsistence level by Nahuatl indigenous group for centuries, but which is collapsing because of intensive illegal commercial exploitation. The most important nesting and breeding grounds for the black sea turtle on any mainland shore are the eastern Pacific coastal areas of Maruata and Colola, in Michoacan. These beaches are characterized by important amounts of magnetic mineral (magnetites and titanomagnetites) mixed in their sediments.

  14. Bisphosphonate release profiles from magnetite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Shirosaki, Yuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsubara, Takao; Matsumine, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthermia has been suggested as a novel, minimally invasive cancer treatment method. After implantation of magnetic nano- or microparticles around a tumour through blood vessels, irradiation with alternating magnetic fields facilitates the efficient in situ hyperthermia even for deep-seated tumours. On the basis of this idea, if the microspheres are capable of delivering drugs, they could be promising multifunctional biomaterials effective for chemotherapy as well as hyperthermia. In the present study, magnetite microspheres were prepared by aggregation of the iron oxide colloid in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The release behaviour of alendronate, a typical bisphosphonate, from the microspheres was examined in vitro as a model of the bone tumour prevention and treatment system. The alendronate was successfully incorporated onto the porous magnetite microspheres in vacuum conditions. The drug-loaded microspheres maintained their original spherical shapes even after shaking in ultrapure water for 3 days, suggesting that they have sufficient mechanical integrity for clinical use. It was attributed to high aggregation capability of the magnetite nanoparticles through van der Waals and weak magnetic attractions. The microspheres showed slow release of the alendronate in vitro, resulting from tight covalent or ionic interaction between the magnetite and the alendronate. The release rate was diffusion-controlled type and well controlled by the alendronate concentration in drug incorporation to the microspheres. PMID:24854985

  15. Lanthanide-Substituted Magnetite Nanoparticles Using a New Mixed Precursor Method by Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, J.; Roh, Y.; Yeary, L. W.; Lauf, R. J.; Phelps, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    A metal reducing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus successfully converted the precursor of L (lanthanide)-mixed akaganeite (LxFe1-xOOH) phase to L-substituted magnetite (LyFe3-yO4) while avoiding the potentially toxic effects of soluble L-ions. Antibiotic elements, lanthanide (Nd, Gd, Tb, Ho, and Er)-substituted magnetites were produced by microbial fermentation using LxFe1-xOOH, where x was up to 0.02 which is equivalent to 0.72 mM. Combining lanthanides into the akaganeite precursor phase mitigated some of the toxicity when compared to the traditional method by using pure akaganeite and the dissolved L-salt form. This new technique showed that an upper limit of L-concentrations between 0.02 and 0.1 mM might suppress bacterial activity. At the equivalent L-cation mole fraction, the traditional method increased the concentration of soluble toxic L ions in the final media. The precursor method enabled production of microbially synthesized L- substituted magnetite with an L-concentration 36-fold greater than could be obtained when the lanthanides were added as soluble salts. These results were confirmed by protein assay. The increase of L-concentration in the magnetite evidently manipulates its physical properties such as decreasing Curie temperature and decreasing saturation magnetism of L-substituted magnetite. This mixed precursor method can therefore be used to extend the application for nanofermentation and other bacterial synthesis fields where there is a need for economically low-energy consumable microbial production of nanoscale materials that should involve toxic or inhibitory elements to bacterial growth.

  16. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; McCloy, John S.

    2014-11-01

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ˜6 nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  17. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; McCloy, John S.

    2014-11-07

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ?6?nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  18. Occurrence of gigantic biogenic magnetite during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, D.; Raub, T. D.; Kopp, R. E.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Wu, T. D.; Rouiller, I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Sears, S. K.; Lücken, U.; Tikoo, S. M.; Hesse, R.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Vali, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is one of the most severe climatic events of the Cenozoic Era. A massive injection of light carbon into the oceans and atmosphere over a few thousand of years triggered drastic perturbation of Earth's climate resulting in abrupt global warming of ~5-9oC [Sluijs et al., 2007] that persisted for ~180,000 years. This episode is marked by the diversification and radiation of terrestrial plants and mammals while in the marine realm numerous deep-sea benthic foraminifera species disappeared and new forms evolved. Sediments deposited during the PETM are clay-rich and contain distinct evidence of these climatic changes. Kopp et al., (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) report an extraordinary magnetofossil ‘Lagerstätte' in lowermost Eocene kaolinite-rich clay sediments deposited at subtropical paleolatitude in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of New Jersey, USA. Magnetofossils are magnetic particles produced most abundantly by magnetotactic bacteria. Kopp et al. (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) used ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy, other rock magnetic methods, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of magnetic separates to characterize sediments from boreholes at Ancora (ODP Leg 174AX) and Wilson Lake, NJ, respectively. These sediments contain abundant ~40- to 300-nm cuboidal, elongate-prismatic and bullet-shaped magnetofossils, sometimes arranged in short chains, resembling crystals in living magnetotactic bacteria. Despite the scarcity of intact magnetofossil chains, the asymmetry ratios of the FMR spectra reflects a profusion of elongate single domain (SD) crystals and/or chains. Here we address both conundrums by reporting the discovery from these same sediments of exceptionally large and novel biogenic magnetite crystals unlike any previously reported from living organisms or from sediments. Aside from abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite crystals up to 4 ?m long (eight times larger than magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria) and elongated hexaoctahedra up to 1.4 ?m long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition and lattice perfection consistent with a biogenic origin. The oxygen isotopic composition of indiviual particles supports a low temperature aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite the large crystal size. In a few cases, we observed apparently intact, tip-outward spherical assemblages of spearhead-like particles that possibly represent the preserved original biological arrangement of these crystals in a hitherto unknown magnetite producing organism. The discovery of these exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals that possibly represent the remains of a new microorganism that appeared and disappeared with the PETM sheds some light upon the ecological response to biogeochemical changes that occurred during this warming event. The abundance of fossil magnetotactic bacteria on the Atlantic Coastal Plain during the PETM could be explained by enhanced production, enhanced preservation, or both. The presence of novel magnetofossils, however, argues that changes in growth conditions are a major part of the explanation. Considering that other bacterial magnetofossils are present (although less abundant) and well-preserved in sediments below and above the PETM clay, as well as in a sand lens within the PETM clay [Kopp et al., 2007], suggests that the new magnetofossils are unlikely to be a preservation artefact. We conclude, therefore, that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability - a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming - resulted in diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes. In this study we extended the search for these new magnetofossils [Schumann et al. 2008] to other PETM locations of the Atlantic margin and to a possible modern

  19. The magnetosome membrane protein, MmsF, is a major regulator of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Murat, Dorothée; Falahati, Veesta; Bertinetti, Luca; Csencsits, Roseann; Körnig, André; Downing, Kenneth; Faivre, Damien; Komeili, Arash

    2012-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use magnetosomes, membrane-bound crystals of magnetite or greigite, for navigation along geomagnetic fields. In Magnetospirillum magneticum sp. AMB-1, and other MTB, a magnetosome gene island (MAI) is essential for every step of magnetosome formation. An 8-gene region of the MAI encodes several factors implicated in control of crystal size and morphology in previous genetic and proteomic studies. We show that these factors play a minor role in magnetite biomineralization in vivo. In contrast, MmsF, a previously uncharacterized magnetosome membrane protein encoded within the same region plays a dominant role in defining crystal size and morphology and is sufficient for restoring magnetite synthesis in the absence of the other major biomineralization candidates. In addition, we show that the 18 genes of the mamAB gene cluster of the MAI are sufficient for the formation of an immature magnetosome organelle. Addition of MmsF to these 18 genes leads to a significant enhancement of magnetite biomineralization and an increase in the cellular magnetic response. These results define a new biomineralization protein and lay down the foundation for the design of autonomous gene cassettes for the transfer of the magnetic phenotype in other bacteria. PMID:22716969

  20. The magnetosome membrane protein, MmsF, is a major regulator of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Dorothée; Falahati, Veesta; Bertinetti, Luca; Csencsits, Roseann; Körnig, André; Downing, Kenneth; Faivre, Damien; Komeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use magnetosomes, membrane bound crystals of magnetite or greigite, for navigation along geomagnetic fields. In Magnetospirillum magneticum sp. AMB-1, and other MTB, a magnetosome gene island (MAI) is essential for every step of magnetosome formation. An 8-gene region of the MAI encodes several factors implicated in control of crystal size and morphology in previous genetic and proteomic studies. We show that these factors play a minor role in magnetite biomineralization in vivo. In contrast, MmsF, a previously uncharacterized magnetosome membrane protein encoded within the same region plays a dominant role in defining crystal size and morphology and is sufficient for restoring magnetite synthesis in the absence of the other major biomineralization candidates. In addition, we show that the 18 genes of the mamAB gene cluster of the MAI are sufficient for the formation of an immature magnetosome organelle. Addition of MmsF to these 18 genes leads to a significant enhancement of magnetite biomineralization and an increase in the cellular magnetic response. These results define a new biomineralization protein and lay down the foundation for the design of autonomous gene cassettes for the transfer of the magnetic phenotype in other bacteria. PMID:22716969

  1. The oxidation state and microstructural environment of transition metals (V, Co, and Ni) in magnetite: an XAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoliang; He, Zisen; Tan, Wei; Liu, Peng; Zhu, Jianxi; Zhang, Jing; He, Hongping

    2015-05-01

    Transition metal-substituted magnetite minerals have attracted increasing attention for their wide application in industry and environmental protection. In this study, the valence and atomic environment of some substituting metals in magnetites (Fe3- x M x O4, M = V, Co, and Ni) were investigated using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The results deduced from X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy indicated that the valences of V, Co, and Ni in Fe3- x M x O4 were +3, +2, and +2, respectively. The valences did not change as the substitution extent increased. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy suggested that the substituting cations occupied octahedral sites in the magnetite structure. The M-O and M-M/Fe distances were consistent with the Feoct-O and Feoct-Fe distances, respectively, in the magnetite (Fe3O4) structure. The occupancy of the substituting cations was assessed by crystal-field theory. We also considered the relationship between the chemical environment of substituting cations and their effects on the physicochemical properties of magnetite, including thermal stability, surface properties, and catalytic reactivity.

  2. Comparison of the inhibitory capacity of two groups of pure natural extract on the crystallization of two types of material compound urinary stones in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghalia, Mohamed; Ghalem, Said; Allali, Hocine

    2015-10-01

    Urolithiasis is defined as the result of an abnormal precipitation within the urinary tract. This precipitation is most often from the normal constituents of the urine. This is a fairly common condition in the population. She is happy and recurrent etiology is often unknown if hypothetical. In Algeria, as in many countries, a large number of patients use herbal medicines in the treatment of their diseases including urolithiasis. Thus the aim of this study is the most widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extracts of medicinal plants, in the treatment of calcium urolithiasis oxalo-and magnesium-amoniaco in vitro. The study also examines the effect of these extracts on the states of crystallization (nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation), followed by photography on polarized light microscope.In this regard, we are devoted to studying the crystallization steps from oxalo-calcium and phospho-calcic prepared as artificial urine and supersaturated aqueous solutions, maintained at 37 °C to remain close to biological conditions. Extracts of the first group of herbs: Ammodaucus leucotrichus, Ajuga iva, Globularia alypum, Atriplex halimus are studied on the crystallization calcium oxalate, we cite the Ammodaucus leucotrichus which acts on the stages of nucleation, growth and the aggregation with a total inhibition. The second group of extracts plants tested on calcium phosphate crystallization : Acacia raddiana, Citrullus colocynthis, Rhus tripartita, Pistacia lentiscu, Warionia saharae, are able to significantly reduce phosphate crystallization in vitro. It is easily proved by FTIR and optical microscope. In conclusion the results of our work allows us to confirm the use of these plants as an aqueous decoction, in the field of urolithiasis. These activities may help to strengthen the body in depressed situations.

  3. Initial Test Determination of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, H.; Caffee, M. W.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides, such as 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl, are produced by cosmic rays in surficial materials on Earth, and used for determinations of cosmic-ray exposure ages and erosion rates. Quartz and limestone are routinely used as the target minerals for these geomorphological studies. Magnetite also contains target elements that produce abundant cosmogenic nuclides when exposed to the cosmic rays. Magnetite has several notable merits that enable the measurement of cosmogenic nuclides: (1) the target elements for production of cosmogenic nuclides in magnetite comprise the dominant mineral form of magnetite, Fe3O4; (2) magnetite can be easily isolated, using a magnet, after rock milling; (3) multiple cosmogenic nuclides are produced by exposure of magnetite to cosmic-ray secondaries; and (4) cosmogenic nuclides produced in the rock containing the magnetite, but not within the magnetite itself, can be separated using nitric acid and sodium hydroxide leaches. As part of this initial study, magnetite was separated from a basaltic sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chili (2,995 m). Then Be, Al, Cl, Ca, and Mn were separated from ~2 g of the purified magnetite. We measured cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl concentrations in the magnetite by accelerator mass spectrometry at PRIME Lab, Purdue University. Cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations of aliquot of the magnetite were measured by mass spectrometry at the University of Tokyo. We also measured the nuclide concentrations from magnetite collected from a mine at Ishpeming, Michigan as a blank. The 10Be and 36Cl concentrations as well as 3He concentration produce concordant cosmic ray exposure ages of ~0.4 Myr for the Atacama basalt. However, observed high 26Al and 21Ne concentrations attribute to those nuclides incorporation from silicate impurity.

  4. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  5. Hybrid DFT calculation of Fe57 NMR resonances and orbital order in magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, C. H.

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structure and charge and orbital order of magnetite below the Verwey temperature are calculated using a first-principles hybrid density functional theory (DFT) method. The initial atomic positions in the crystal-structure calculation are those recently refined from x-ray diffraction data for the Cc space-group unit cell [Senn, Wright, and Attfield, Nature (London) 481, 173 (2012), 10.1038/nature10704]. Fermi contact and magnetic dipolar contributions to hyperfine fields at Fe57 nuclei obtained from hybrid DFT calculations are used to obtain NMR resonance frequencies for magnetite for a range of external magnetic field directions in a relatively weak field. NMR frequencies from hybrid density functional theory calculations are compared to NMR data [M. Mizoguchi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 70, 2333 (2001), 10.1143/JPSJ.70.2333] for a range of applied magnetic field directions. NMR resonance frequencies of B-site Fe ions show large relative variations with applied field direction owing to anisotropic hyperfine fields from charge and orbital ordered Fe 3d minority-spin electrons at those sites. Good agreement between computed and measured NMR resonance frequencies confirms the pattern of charge and orbital order obtained from calculations. The charge and orbital order of magne-tite in its low-temperature phase obtained from hybrid DFT calculations is analyzed in terms of one-electron bonds between Fe ions. The Verwey transition in magnetite therefore resembles Mott-Peierls transitions in vanadium oxides which undergo symmetry-breaking transitions owing to electron-pair bond formation.

  6. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO{sub 3} crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  7. Pure low-frequency flexural mode of [011]c poled relaxor-PbTiO3 single crystals excited by k32 mode

    E-print Network

    Cao, Wenwu

    of piezoelectric vibrators is the flexure mode. The flexural vibration of a bar (or a plate) can be generated when crystals poled along [011]c exhibits superior lateral extensional piezoelectric response, which enables of the pseudo-cubic direction. Recently, it was found that the shear piezoelectric coefficients d36 could excess

  8. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O. N. C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J. M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-03-01

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy modulation of magnetite in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/BaTiO{sub 3}(100) epitaxial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Hoffman, J.; Posadas, A.-B.; Ahn, C. H.

    2009-01-12

    Temperature dependent magnetometry and transport measurements on epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films grown on BaTiO{sub 3}(100) single crystals by molecular beam epitaxy show a series of discontinuities, due to changes in the magnetic anisotropy induced by strain from the different crystal phases of BaTiO{sub 3}. The magnetite film is under tensile strain at room temperature, which is ascribed to the lattice expansion of BaTiO{sub 3} at the cubic to tetragonal transition, indicating that the magnetite film is relaxed at the growth temperature. From the magnetization versus temperature curves, the variation in the magnetic anisotropy is determined and compared with the magnetoelastic anisotropies. These results demonstrate the possibility of using the piezoelectric response of BaTiO{sub 3} to modulate the magnetic anisotropy of magnetite films.

  10. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We are undertaking a complementation strategy to demonstrate the necessity of these novel genes in BCMM as well as characterizing the phenotypes of the mutants. 1. S. B. R. Chang, J. F. Stolz, J. L. Kirschvink, S. M. Awramik, Precambrian Res. 43, 305-315 (1989). 2. K. Grünberg, C. Wawer, B. M. Tebo, D. Schüler, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67, 4573-4582 (2001). 3. A. T. Wahyudi, H. Takeyama, T. Matsunaga, Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 91-3, 147-154 (2001). 4. T. Matsunaga, C. Nakamura, J. G. Burgess, K. Sode, J. Bacteriol. 174, 2748-2753 (1992).

  11. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-03-15

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications. -- Graphical abstract: A large amount of Lewis acid sites were found in the highly dispersed magnetite which is supported on the SWCNT outer surface. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} The obtained materials were completely characterized with XRD, Raman and SEM-TEM. {yields} DRIFT, TGA and adsorption of the composites allowed understand the material formation. {yields} This is the first report of a study of Lewis sites by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  12. crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Fen; Wang, Qingpu; Tao, Xutang; Li, Ping; Zhang, Xingyu; Liu, Zhaojun; Shen, Hongbin; Lan, Weixia; Gao, Liang; Gao, Zeliang; Zhang, Junjie; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2014-08-01

    An eye-safe Raman laser is realized with BaTeMo2O9 (BTM) nonlinear crystal for the first time. By using a diode-end-pumped acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser as the pumping source, the BTM crystal converts the fundamental laser at 1,342 nm to first-Stokes laser at 1,531 nm successfully. With an incident power of 10.8 W and a pulse repetition rate of 25 kHz, the average output power at 1,531 nm is obtained to be 0.83 W, corresponding to a diode-to-Stokes conversion efficiency of 7.7 %. The pulse width is 11 ns, and the peak power is 3.0 kW.

  13. Silicon dioxide nanoporous structure with liquid crystal for optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushynskyi, Orest; Vistak, Maria; Gotra, Zenon; Fechan, Andriy; Mikityuk, Zinoviy

    2013-05-01

    It has been studied the spectral characteristics of the porous silicon dioxide and cholesteric liquid crystal. It has been shown that doping of the EE1 cholesteric liquid crystal with Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles doesn't shift significantly the position of the transmittance minimum of the material. It has been found that the deformation of chiral pitch of cholesteric liquid crystal with magnetite is observed in case of doping of porous nanocomposite host with following shifting of minimum of transmittance into short wavelength direction. It has been shown that influence of carbon monoxide on optical characteristics of the cholesteric liquid crystal with magnetite can be explained by the interaction of CARBON MONOXIDE molecules with magnetite nanodopants.

  14. Magnetite as Possible Template for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the Japanese Aerospace Ex-ploration Agency (JAXA) Hayabusa-2 mission is to visit and return to Earth samples of a C-type asteroid (162173) 1999 JU3 in order to understand the origin and nature of organic materials in the Solar System. Life on Earth shows preference towards the set of organics with particular spatial arrangements, this 'selectivity' is a crucial criterion for life. With only rare exceptions, life 'determines' to use the left- (L-) form over the right- (D-) form of amino acids, resulting in a L-enantiomeric excess (ee). Recent studies have shown that L-ee is found within the alpha-methyl amino acids in meteorites [1, 2], which are amino acids with rare terrestrial occurrence, and thus point towards a plausible abiotic origin for ee. One of the proposed origins of chiral asymmetry of amino acids in meteorites is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts [3]. The catalytic mineral grains acted as a surface at which nebular gases (CO, H2 and NH3) were allowed to condense and react through Fisher Tropsch type (FTT) syntheses to form the organics observed in meteorites [4]. Magnetite is shown to be an effective catalyst of the synthesis of amino acids that are commonly found in meteorites [5]. It has also taken the form as spiral magnetites (a.k.a. 'plaquettes'), which were found in various carbonaceous chondrites (CCs), including C2s Tagish Lake and Esseibi, CI Orgueil, and CR chondrites [e.g., 6, 7, 8]. In addition, L-ee for amino acids are common in the aqueously altered CCs, as opposed to the unaltered CCs [1]. It seems possible that the synthesis of amino acids with chiral preferences is correlated to the alteration process experienced by the asteroid parent body, and related to the configuration of spiral magnetite catalysts. Since C-type asteroids are considered to be enriched in organic matter, and the spectral data of 1999 JU3 indicates a certain de-gree of aqueous alteration [9], the Hayabusa-2 mission serves as a perfect chance to attest this argument. In order to understand the distribution of spiral magnetites among different meteorite classes, as well as to investigate their spiral configurations and correlation to molecular asymmetry, we observed polished thin sections of CCs using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Individual magnetite grains were picked, embedded in epoxy, thin-sectioned using an ultra-microtome, and studied with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in order to reconstruct the crystal orientation along the stack of magnetite disks.

  15. Polyaspartate coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurich, Konstanze; Schwalbe, Manuela; Clement, Joachim H.; Weitschies, Werner; Buske, Norbert

    2007-04-01

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) in biomedical applications is subject to specific conditions. Special demands such as non-toxic core material and a biocompatible shell are prerequisites. These are fulfilled with magnetite cores and amino acid shell material, which provide different functional groups for coupling biomolecules as presented here. In this study the biocompatibility was tested by using breast cancer cell lines and leukocytes from peripheral blood. Functionalization with antibodies and the binding experiments detected by magneto-optical relaxation measurements confirm the bonding capacity and demonstrate the application of the presented MNP in magnetic immunoassays or magnetic drug targeting.

  16. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2006-12-26

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  17. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.; Padilla, Dennis D.; Wingo, Robert M.; Worl, Laura A.; Johnson, Michael D.

    2003-07-22

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  18. Solvothermal reduction synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles{

    E-print Network

    Gao, Song

    of magnetism, photoelectric plot,2 biomedicine and high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS).3 A suspension-acceptor type surfactants on the magnetic properties of the nanoscale materials have been investigated of magnetite nanoparticles is a classical magnetic fluid in oscillation damping. Moreover magnetite nanoparti

  19. MAGNETITE RECOVERY IN COAL WASHING BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a demonstration of the successful recovery of magnetite from mixtures of magnetite and coal, like those found in a coal-washing circuit, by High Gradient Magnetic Separation. The demonstration was part of a research program at Francis Bitter National Magnet L...

  20. Lymphatic mapping and sentinel node location with magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chu W.; Rogers, James M.; Groman, Ernest V.

    1999-04-01

    Subcutaneously administered magnetite nanoparticles were used to locate sentinel lymph nodes in normal rats. Nanoparticles sequestered in brachial and axillary lymph nodes produced magnetic susceptibility artifacts in gradient recall echo magnetic resonance images. The artifact sizes enabled the determination of nanoparticle nodal uptake rates and lymphatic drainage patterns. These studies were confirmed by use of 59Fe labeled magnetite nanoparticles.

  1. No evidence for intracellular magnetite in putative vertebrate magnetoreceptors identified by magnetic screening.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Nathaniel B; Fritz, Tanja; Nimpf, Simon; Pichler, Paul; Lauwers, Mattias; Hickman, Robert W; Papadaki-Anastasopoulou, Artemis; Ushakova, Lyubov; Heuser, Thomas; Resch, Guenter P; Saunders, Martin; Shaw, Jeremy A; Keays, David A

    2015-01-01

    The cellular basis of the magnetic sense remains an unsolved scientific mystery. One theory that aims to explain how animals detect the magnetic field is the magnetite hypothesis. It argues that intracellular crystals of the iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4) are coupled to mechanosensitive channels that elicit neuronal activity in specialized sensory cells. Attempts to find these primary sensors have largely relied on the Prussian Blue stain that labels cells rich in ferric iron. This method has proved problematic as it has led investigators to conflate iron-rich macrophages with magnetoreceptors. An alternative approach developed by Eder et al. [Eder SH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(30):12022-12027] is to identify candidate magnetoreceptive cells based on their magnetic moment. Here, we explore the utility of this method by undertaking a screen for magnetic cells in the pigeon. We report the identification of a small number of cells (1 in 476,000) with large magnetic moments (8-106 fAm(2)) from various tissues. The development of single-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) permitted subcellular analysis of magnetic cells. This revealed the presence of extracellular structures composed of iron, titanium, and chromium accounting for the magnetic properties of these cells. Application of single-cell CLEM to magnetic cells from the trout failed to identify any intracellular structures consistent with biogenically derived magnetite. Our work illustrates the need for new methods to test the magnetite hypothesis of magnetosensation. PMID:25535350

  2. No evidence for intracellular magnetite in putative vertebrate magnetoreceptors identified by magnetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Nathaniel B.; Fritz, Tanja; Nimpf, Simon; Pichler, Paul; Lauwers, Mattias; Hickman, Robert W.; Papadaki-Anastasopoulou, Artemis; Ushakova, Lyubov; Heuser, Thomas; Resch, Guenter P.; Saunders, Martin; Shaw, Jeremy A.; Keays, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular basis of the magnetic sense remains an unsolved scientific mystery. One theory that aims to explain how animals detect the magnetic field is the magnetite hypothesis. It argues that intracellular crystals of the iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4) are coupled to mechanosensitive channels that elicit neuronal activity in specialized sensory cells. Attempts to find these primary sensors have largely relied on the Prussian Blue stain that labels cells rich in ferric iron. This method has proved problematic as it has led investigators to conflate iron-rich macrophages with magnetoreceptors. An alternative approach developed by Eder et al. [Eder SH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(30):12022–12027] is to identify candidate magnetoreceptive cells based on their magnetic moment. Here, we explore the utility of this method by undertaking a screen for magnetic cells in the pigeon. We report the identification of a small number of cells (1 in 476,000) with large magnetic moments (8–106 fAm2) from various tissues. The development of single-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) permitted subcellular analysis of magnetic cells. This revealed the presence of extracellular structures composed of iron, titanium, and chromium accounting for the magnetic properties of these cells. Application of single-cell CLEM to magnetic cells from the trout failed to identify any intracellular structures consistent with biogenically derived magnetite. Our work illustrates the need for new methods to test the magnetite hypothesis of magnetosensation. PMID:25535350

  3. Electrical and magnetic properties of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Aarti S.; Krishna Bhat, D.; Santosh, M. S.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetite powders in nanometer size have been synthesized by the hydrothermal process. Various magnetic films of chitosan and the synthesized magnetite nanopowders containing different concentrations of the latter were prepared by ultrasonication route. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the synthesized magnetite particles had 80 nm dimensions. The band gap of the composites was evaluated using the UV-visible Spectroscopy. The influence of magnetite content on the magnetic properties of the composite showed a decrease in the saturation magnetization with the decrease in the magnetic content. The effect of magnetite content on the dielectric properties of the polymer film at different frequencies from 0.01 to 105 Hz was studied using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The possible mechanism for the observed electrical properties of the composite films was discussed.

  4. Hexagonal platelet-like magnetite as a biosignature of thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria and its applications to the exploration of the modern deep, hot biosphere and the emergence of iron-reducing bacteria in early precambrian oceans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Liang

    2012-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine magnetite crystals characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic magnetite. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into magnetite with a size up to 120?nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like magnetite of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic magnetite with such large crystal sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these crystals allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic magnetite in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life. PMID:23145573

  5. Coating agents affected toward magnetite nanoparticles properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcharoen, Karat; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2012-02-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles --MNPs-- are innovative materials used in biological and medical applications. They respond to magnetic field through the superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. In this study, the MNPs were synthesized via the chemical co-precipitation method using various coating agents. Fatty acids, found naturally in the animal fats, can be used as a coating agent. Oleic acid and hexanoic acid were chosen as the surface modification agents to study the improvement in the suspension of MNPs in water and the magnetite properties. Suspension stability, particle size, and electrical conductivity of MNPs are critically affected by the modification process. The well-dispersed MNPs in water can be improved by the surface modification and the oleic acid coated MNPs possess excellent suspension stability over 1 week. The particle size of MNPs increases up to 40 nm using oleic acid coated MNPs. The electrical conductivity of the smallest particle size is 1.3x10-3 S/cm, which is 5 times higher than that of the largest particle, suggesting potential applications as a biomedical material under both of the electrical and magnetic fields.

  6. Electronic phase transitions in ultrathin magnetite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Villamil, I.; Gallego, S.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) shows singular electronic and magnetic properties, resulting from complex electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions that involve the interplay of charge, orbital and spin degrees of freedom. The Verwey transition is a manifestation of these interactions, with a puzzling connection between the low temperature charge ordered state and the dynamic charge fluctuations still present above the transition temperature. Here we explore how these rich physical phenomena are affected by thin film geometries, particularly focusing on the ultimate size limit defined by thicknesses below the minimum bulk unit cell. On one hand, we address the influence of extended defects, such as surfaces or antiphase domains, on the novel features exhibited by thin films. On the other, we try to isolate the effect of the reduced thickness on the electronic and magnetic properties. We will show that a distinct phase diagram and novel charge distributions emerge under reduced dimensions, while holding the local high magnetic moments. Altogether, thin film geometries offer unique possibilities to understand the complex interplay of short- and long-range orders in the Verwey transition. Furthermore, they arise as interesting candidates for the exploitation of the rich physics of magnetite in devices that demand nanoscale geometries, additionally offering novel functionalities based on their distinct properties with respect to the bulk form.

  7. Did the massive magnetite "lava flows" of El Laco (Chile) form by magmatic or hydrothermal processes? New constraints from magnetite composition by LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, Sarah A. S.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-06-01

    The El Laco magnetite deposits consist of more than 98 % magnetite but show field textures remarkably similar to mafic lava flows. Therefore, it has long been suggested that they represent a rare example of an effusive Fe oxide liquid. Field and petrographic evidence, however, suggest that the magnetite deposits represent replacement of andesite flows and that the textures are pseudomorphs. We determined the trace element content of magnetite by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) from various settings at El Laco and compared them with magnetite from both igneous and hydrothermal environments. This new technique allows us to place constraints on the conditions under which magnetite in these supposed magnetite "lava flows" formed. The trace element content of magnetite from the massive magnetite samples is different to any known magmatic magnetite, including primary magnetite phenocrysts from the unaltered andesite host rocks at El Laco. Instead, the El Laco magnetite is most similar in composition to hydrothermal magnetite from high-temperature environments (>500 °C), such as iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) and porphyry-Cu deposits. The magnetite trace elements from massive magnetite are characterised by (1) depletion in elements considered relatively immobile in hydrothermal fluids (e.g. Ti, Al, Cr, Zr, Hf and Sc); (2) enrichment in elements that are highly incompatible with magmatic magnetite (rare earth elements (REE), Si, Ca, Na and P) and normally present in very low abundance in magmatic magnetite; (3) high Ni/Cr ratios which are typical of magnetite from hydrothermal environments; and (4) oscillatory zoning of Si, Ca, Mg, REE and most high field strength elements, and zoning truncations indicating dissolution, similar to that formed in hydrothermal Fe skarn deposits. In addition, secondary magnetite in altered, brecciated host rock, forming disseminations and veins, has the same composition as magnetite from the massive lenses. Euhedral magnetite lining both open-spaced veins in the brecciated host rock and along the walls of large, hollow chimneys in the massive magnetite lenses also displays oscillatory zoning and most likely formed by fluctuating composition and/or physio-chemical conditions of the fluid. Thus, the chemical fingerprint of magnetite from the supposed El Laco magnetite lava flows supports the hydrothermal model of metasomatic replacement of andesite lava flows, by dissolution and precipitation of magnetite from high-temperature fluids, rather than a magmatic origin from an effusive Fe oxide liquid.

  8. LA-ICP-MS of magnetite: Methods and reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, P.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a common accessory mineral in many geologic settings. Its variable geochemistry makes it a powerful petrogenetic indicator. Electron microprobe (EMPA) analyses are commonly used to examine major and minor element contents in magnetite. Laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is applicable to trace element analyses of magnetite but has not been widely employed to examine compositional variations. We tested the applicability of the NIST SRM 610, the USGS GSE-1G, and the NIST SRM 2782 reference materials (RMs) as external standards and developed a reliable method for LA-ICP-MS analysis of magnetite. LA-ICP-MS analyses were carried out on well characterized magnetite samples with a 193 nm, Excimer, ArF LA system. Although matrix-matched RMs are sometimes important for calibration and normalization of LA-ICP-MS data, we demonstrate that glass RMs can produce accurate results for LA-ICP-MS analyses of magnetite. Cross-comparison between the NIST SRM 610 and USGS GSE-1G indicates good agreement for magnetite minor and trace element data calibrated with either of these RMs. Many elements show a sufficiently good match between the LA-ICP-MS and the EMPA data; for example, Ti and V show a close to linear relationship with correlation coefficients, R2 of 0.79 and 0.85 respectively. ?? 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Bats Use Magnetite to Detect the Earth's Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Richard A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Doak, Thomas G.; Wikelski, Martin

    2008-01-01

    While the role of magnetic cues for compass orientation has been confirmed in numerous animals, the mechanism of detection is still debated. Two hypotheses have been proposed, one based on a light dependent mechanism, apparently used by birds and another based on a “compass organelle” containing the iron oxide particles magnetite (Fe3O4). Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method by which they detect the Earth's magnetic field remains unknown. Here we use the classic “Kalmijn-Blakemore” pulse re-magnetization experiment, whereby the polarity of cellular magnetite is reversed. The results demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain magnetite to detect the Earths magnetic field and the response indicates a polarity based receptor. Polarity detection is a prerequisite for the use of magnetite as a compass and suggests that big brown bats use magnetite to detect the magnetic field as a compass. Our results indicate the possibility that sensory cells in bats contain freely rotating magnetite particles, which appears not to be the case in birds. It is crucial that the ultrastructure of the magnetite containing magnetoreceptors is described for our understanding of magnetoreception in animals. PMID:18301753

  10. Hexagonal plate-like magnetite nanocrystals produced in komatiite-H2O-CO2 reaction system at 450°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xi-Luo; Li, Yi-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Batch experiments of komatiite-H2O-CO2 system with temperatures from 200 to 450°C were performed to simulate the interactions between the newly formed ultramafic crust and the proto-atmosphere on Earth before the formation of its earliest ocean. Particularly, magnetite nanocrystals were observed in the experiment carried out at 450°C that are characterized by their hexagonal platelet-like morphology and porous structure. Exactly the same set of lattice fringes on the two opposite sides of one pore suggests post-crystallization erosion. The results demonstrate that magnetite could be produced by the direct interactions between the ultramafic rocky crust and the atmosphere before the formation of the ocean on the Hadean Earth. These magnetite nanoparticles could serve as a catalyst in the synthesis of simple organic molecules during the organochemical evolution towards life.

  11. Magnetite Plaquettes Provide an Extraterrestrial Source of Asymmetric Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Martinez, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular selectivity is a crucial criterion for life. A possible abiotic mechanism that can produce chiral asymmetry in meteoritic amino acids is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts. Magnetite (Fe3O4), a common mineral in some carbonaceous chondrites (CCs), has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the formation of amino acids that are commonly found in these meteorites. Magnetite sometimes takes the form of plaquettes that consist of barrel-shaped stacks of magnetite disks that resemble a spiral. However, a widely accepted description of the internal morphology of this particular magnetite form is still lacking, which is necessary in order to confirm or disprove the spiral configuration.

  12. Electrophoretic mobility of magnetite particles in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Vidojkovic, Sonja; Rodriguez-Santiago, V; Fedkin, Mark V.; Wesolowski, David J; Lvov, Serguei N.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite(Fe3O4) isoneofthemostcommonoxidesformingdepositsandparticulatephasesin industrialhightemperaturewatercircuits.Itscolloidalcharacteristicsplayaprincipalroleinthe mechanismofdepositformationandcanbeusedascontrollingfactorstopreventorminimizedeposit formationanddamageofindustrialpipelinesduetounder-depositcorrosion.Inthisstudy,ahigh temperatureparticleelectrophoresistechniquewasemployedtomeasurethezetapotentialatthe magnetite/waterinterface the parameterthatcontrolscolloidalstabilityofparticles,theiraggrega- tion, anddeposition.Themeasurementsweremadeattemperaturesupto200 1C overawiderangeofpH. The isoelectricpointsofmagnetite,atwhichthedepositionofparticlesisincreased,weredeterminedatpH 6.35, 6.00,5.25,and5.05fortemperatures25,100,150,and200 1C, respectively.Theobserved temperaturedependenceofzetapotentialandtheisoelectricpHpointofmagnetitecanhelptoexplain the extentofinteractionsbetweenthecolloidalparticlesandthesteelwallsurfacesunderhydro- thermalconditions,andindicatemethodsforcontrollingandmitigatingoxidedepositioninhigh temperaturewatercycles.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Olena; Lewandowski, Miko?aj; Pepli?ska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Wiesner, Maciej; Za??ski, Karol; Babutina, Tetyana; Warowicka, Alicja; Jurga, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The article is devoted to preparation and characterization of magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy. Magnetite nanopowder was produced by thermochemical technique; silver was deposited on the magnetite nanoparticles in the form of silver clusters. Magnetite/silver nanocomposite was investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM, AFM, XPS, EDX techniques. Adsorptivity of magnetite/silver nanocomposite towards seven antibiotics from five different groups was investigated. It was shown that rifampicin, doxycycline, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and doxycycline may be attached by physical adsorption to magnetite/silver nanocomposite. Electrostatic surfaces of antibiotics were modeled and possible mechanism of antibiotic attachment is considered in this article. Raman spectra of magnetite, magnetite/silver and magnetite/silver/antibiotic were collected. It was found that it is difficult to detect the bands related to antibiotics in the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposite spectra due to their overlap by the broad carbon bands of magnetite nanopowder. Magnetic measurements revealed that magnetic saturation of the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites decreased on 6-19 % in comparison with initial magnetite nanopowder. Pilot study of antimicrobial properties of the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites were performed towards Bacillus pumilus. PMID:26117765

  14. Production of substantially pure fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, H.J.; Gallian, J.J.; Leeper, S.A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production of a substantially pure product containing greater than 60% fructose. It comprises: combining a sucrose-containing substrate with effective amounts of a levansucrase enzyme preparation to form levan and glucose; purifying the levan by at least one of the following purification methods: ultrafiltration, diafiltration, hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, liquid--liquid partition, solvent extraction, chromatography, and precipitation; hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose substantially free of glucose and sucrose; and recovering the fructose by at least one of the following recovery methods: hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, evaporation, drying, crystallization, and chromatography.

  15. Variations of trace element concentration of magnetite and ilmenite from the Taihe layered intrusion, Emeishan large igneous province, SW China: Implications for magmatic fractionation and origin of Fe-Ti-V oxide ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Yu-Wei; Song, Xie-Yan; Yu, Song-Yue; He, Hai-Long

    2015-12-01

    In situ LA-ICP-MS trace elemental analysis has been applied to magnetite and ilmenite of the Taihe layered intrusion, Emeishan large igneous province, SW China, in order to understand better fractionation processes of magma and origin of Fe-Ti-V oxide ore deposits. The periodic reversals in Mg, Ti, Mn in magnetite and Mg, Sc in ilmenite are found in the Middle Zone of the intrusion and agree with fractionation trends as recorded by olivine (Fo), plagioclase (An) and clinopyroxene (Mg#) compositions. These suggest the Taihe intrusion formed from open magma chamber processes in a magma conduit with multiple replenishments of more primitive magmas. The V and Cr of magnetite are well correlated with V and Cr of clinopyroxene indicating that they became liquidus phases almost simultaneously at an early stage of magma evolution. Ilmenite from the Middle and Upper Zones shows variable Cr, Ni, V, Mg, Nb, Ta and Sc contents indicating that ilmenite at some stratigraphic levels crystallized slightly earlier than magnetite and clinopyroxene. The early crystallization of magnetite and ilmenite is the result of the high FeOt and TiO2 contents in the parental magma. The ilmenite crystallization before magnetite in the Middle and Upper Zones can be attributed to higher TiO2 content of the magma due to the remelting of pre-existing ilmenite in a middle-level magma chamber. Compared to the coeval high-Ti basalts, the relatively low Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta contents in both magnetite and ilmenite throughout the Taihe intrusion indicate that they crystallized from Fe-Ti-(P)-rich silicate magmas. Positive correlations of Ti with Mg, Mn, Sc and Zr of magnetite, and Zr with Sc, Hf and Nb of ilmenite also suggest that magnetite and ilmenite crystallized continuously from the homogeneous silicate magma rather than an immiscible Fe-rich melt. Therefore, frequent replenishments of Fe-Ti-(P)-rich silicate magma and gravitational sorting and settling are crucial for the formation the massive and apatite-rich disseminated ores in the Lower and Middle Zones of the Taihe intrusion.

  16. Origins of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Mckay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of mag- netite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compo- sitional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the car- bonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.

  17. Low Temperature Cycling of Partially Oxidized Submicron Magnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, O.

    2009-05-01

    In nature, the oxidation of magnetite to maghemite is the most common oxide mineral alteration. Small deviations from stoichiometry, such as surface oxidation in magnetite, have a considerable effect on the Verwey transition. The present work studies the effect of partial oxidation on the Verwey transition temperature Tv of submicron magnetites with mean particle sizes of 40 nm to 210 nm. Samples were heated in air at 100, 150 and 200 C. Saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) given to the oxidized nanoparticles by a 2.5 T field at 10 K decreased steadily during zero-field warming to 300 K, with little or no indication of the Verwey transition. After completing the thermal cycle by cooling in zero field to 10 K the stoichiometric magnetites, which had lost 70-90 percent of their SIRM in warming through Tv, recovered very little of their initial remanence. However, the partially oxidized magnetites, which had lost 30-60 percent of their SIRM in the warming half-cycle, recovered 50-90 percent of the initial remanence after cooling to 10 K. A complete set of zero-field cooling-warming cycles of SIRM produced at 300 K was also carried out. These curves have more structure in both cooling and warming and are more diagnostic of degree of oxidation than the usually measured warming curve of SIRM produced below Tv. The 300 K SIRM of stoichiometric magnetites decreases steadily with cooling to the isotropic point, with variable amounts of recovery in cooling through Tv. The oxidized magnetites behave quite differently: the SIRM at first increases in zero-field cooling from 300 K, then decreases as Tv is approached. The hump-like form of the zero-field warming curve above Tv is even more pronounced. With complete oxidation to maghemite and the disappearance of the Verwey transition, the 300 K SIRM increases monotonically throughout zero-field cooling from 300 to 10 K.

  18. Microbial Synthesis and Characterization of Superparamagnetic Zn-Substituted Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yumi; Roh, Yul

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to examine microbial synthesis of magnetite and Zn-substituted magnetite nanoparticles by iron-reducing bacteria (Clostridium sp.) enriched from intertidal flat sediments. The magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by the bacteria under anaerobic conditions at room temperature using akaganeite (?-FeOOH) or Zn-substituted akaganeite (?-ZnxFe1-xOOH) as a magnetite precursor during glucose fermentation. This research indicates that fermentation processes can establish the microbial synthesis of magnetite and Zn-substituted magnetite when conditions are at room temperature, ambient pressure, and pH values near neutral to slightly basic (pH < 8). PMID:26369212

  19. Electrochemistry and dissolution kinetics of magnetite and ilmenite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Hochella, M.F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Natural samples of magnetite and ilmenite were experimentally weathered in pH 1-7 anoxic solutions at temperatures of 2-65 ??C. Reaction of magnetite is described as [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 2H+ ??? ??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + H2O. Dynamic polarization experiments using magnetite electrodes confirmed that this reaction is controlled by two electrochemical half cells, 3[Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) ??? 4??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2e- and [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 8 H+ + 2e- ??? 3Fe2+ + 4H2O, which result in solid state Fe3+ reduction, formation of an oxidized layer and release of Fe(II) to solution. XPS data revealed that iron is present in the ferric state in the surfaces of reacted magnetite and ilmenite and that the Ti Fe ratio increased with reaction pH for ilmenite. Short-term (<36 h) release rates of Fe(II) were linear with time. Between pH 1 and 7, rates varied between 0.3 and 13 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for magnetite and 0.05 and 12.3 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for ilmenite. These rates are two orders of magnitude slower than electrochemical rates determined by Tafel and polarization resistance measurements. Discrepancies are due to both differences in geometric and BET surface area estimates and in the oxidation state of the mineral surface. In long-term closed-system experiments (<120 days), Fe(II) release slowed with time due to the passivation of the surfaces by increasing thicknesses of oxide surface layers. A shrinking core model, coupling surface reaction and diffusion transport, predicted that at neutral pH, the mean residence time for sand-size grains of magnetite and ilmenite will exceed 107 years. This agrees with long-term stability of these oxides in the geologic record. ?? 1994.

  20. Functionalization of Magnetite Nanoparticles as Oil Spill Collector

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Ayman M.; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.; Al-Hussain, Sami A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a new magnetic powder based on magnetite can be used as a petroleum crude oil collector. Amidoximes based on rosin as a natural product can be prepared from a reaction between hydroxylamine and rosin/acrylonitrile adducts. The produced rosin amidoximes were used as capping agents for magnetite nanoparticles to prepare hydrophobic coated magnetic powders. A new class of monodisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The structure and morphology of magnetite capped with rosin amidoxime were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic properties were determined from vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses. These prepared magnetite nanoparticles were tested as bioactive nanosystems and their antimicrobial effects were investigated. The prepared nanomaterials were examined as a crude oil collector using magnetic fields. The results show promising data for the separation of the petroleum crude oil from aqueous solution in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:25822876

  1. Abnormal Elastic and Vibrational Behaviors of Magnetite at High Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H.; Leu, Bogdan M.; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of magnetite at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric magnetite using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20?GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5?GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8?GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe2+-Fe3+-Fe2+ ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of magnetite in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8?GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916

  2. Abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H; Leu, Bogdan M; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of magnetite at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric magnetite using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe(2+)-Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of magnetite in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916

  3. Magnetic Separations with Magnetite: Theory, Operation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    G. B. Cotten

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a magnetite-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. Magnetite-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the magnetite-based bed. Magnetite-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a magnetite-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable.

  4. Fabrication of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip for chromium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2015-03-01

    Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The magnetite nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.

  5. Functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles as oil spill collector.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a new magnetic powder based on magnetite can be used as a petroleum crude oil collector. Amidoximes based on rosin as a natural product can be prepared from a reaction between hydroxylamine and rosin/acrylonitrile adducts. The produced rosin amidoximes were used as capping agents for magnetite nanoparticles to prepare hydrophobic coated magnetic powders. A new class of monodisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The structure and morphology of magnetite capped with rosin amidoxime were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic properties were determined from vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses. These prepared magnetite nanoparticles were tested as bioactive nanosystems and their antimicrobial effects were investigated. The prepared nanomaterials were examined as a crude oil collector using magnetic fields. The results show promising data for the separation of the petroleum crude oil from aqueous solution in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:25822876

  6. The Verwey transition in nanostructured magnetite produced by a combination of chimie douce and spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudisson, T.; Nowak, S.; Ammar, S.; Vázquez-Victorio, G.; Valenzuela, R.; Bañobre-López, M.; Rivas, J.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2014-05-07

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 10?nm sized were synthesized by the polyol method. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC)-FC measurements showed a blocking temperature ?170?K and the absence of the Verwey transition. They were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering at 750?°C for 15?min, leading to a high density (92% of the theoretical density), solid body, with grains in the 150?nm range. X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a spinel single phase with cell parameters corresponding to the magnetite structure. Magnetic measurements showed a decrease of coercivity from 685?Oe (54.5?kA/m) at 118?K to 90?Oe (7.2?kA/m) at 139?K. ZFC measurements at 25?Oe presented a three-fold magnetization increase as temperature increased; a small transition between 116 and 117.5?K, followed by a larger one from 117.6 to 124?K. The first transition can be associated with a complex crystallographic transition and delocalization of Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 3+}, while the second one can be attributed to spin reorientation due to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}) change of sign as previously observed only in magnetite single crystals.

  7. Simple and Rapid Synthesis of Magnetite/Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hyperthermia Treatments via a Mechanochemical Route

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Ryo; Murase, Kenya; Takata, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for the rapid synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite particles. In this method, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are first synthesized by coprecipitation using ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. Immediately following the synthesis, carbonate-substituted (B-type) hydroxyapatite particles are mechanochemically synthesized by wet milling dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium carbonate in a dispersed suspension of magnetite nanoparticles, during which the magnetite nanoparticles are incorporated into the hydroxyapatite matrix. We observed that the resultant magnetite/hydroxyapatite composites possessed a homogeneous dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles, characterized by an absence of large aggregates. When this material was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, the heat generated increased with increasing magnetite concentration. For a magnetite concentration of 30 mass%, a temperature increase greater than 20 K was achieved in less than 50 s. These results suggest that our composites exhibit good hyperthermia properties and are promising candidates for hyperthermia treatments. PMID:23629669

  8. Insight into the formation of magnetite mesocrystals from ferrous precursors in ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiaqi; Tang, Jing; Zhang, Chongyu; Yuan, Ruiting; Chen, Kezheng

    2015-11-14

    Uniform magnetite mesocrystals were fabricated by solvothermal treatment of ferrous chloride in ethylene glycol in the presence of sodium hydroxide. The formation mechanism of magnetite mesocrystals in ethylene glycol was deduced by a time-dependent experiment. PMID:26255597

  9. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Jaime; Melendres, Julio; Almada, Mario; Burboa, María G.; Taboada, Pablo; Juárez, Josué; Valdez, Miguel A.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new hybrid nanoparticles system performed by magnetite nanoparticles, loaded in a PLGA matrix, and stabilized by different concentrations of chitosan. Magnetite nanoparticles were hydrophobized with oleic acid and entrapped in a PLGA matrix by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, after that, magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles were obtained by adding dropwise magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles in chitosan solutions. Magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles produced with different molar ratios did not show significant differences in size and the 3:1 molar ratio showed best spherical shapes as well as uniform particle size. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies demonstrated that the first stage of PLGA-chitosan interaction is mostly regulated by electrostatic forces. Based on a single set of identical sites model, we obtained for the average number of binding sites a value of 3.4, which can be considered as the number of chitosan chains per nanoparticle. This value was confirmed by using a model based on the DLVO theory and fitting zeta potential measurements of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles. From the adjusted parameters, we found that an average number of chitosan molecules of 3.6 per nanoparticle are attached onto the surface of the PLGA matrix. Finally, we evaluated the effect of surface charge of nanoparticles on a membrane model of endothelial cells performed by a mixture of three phospholipids at the air-water interface. Different isotherms and adsorption curves show that cationic surface of charged nanoparticles strongly interact with the phospholipids mixture and these results can be the basis of future experiments to understand the nanoparticles- cell membrane interaction.

  10. Bats Use Magnetite to Detect the Earth's Magnetic Field Richard A. Holland1,2

    E-print Network

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Bats Use Magnetite to Detect the Earth's Magnetic Field Richard A. Holland1,2 *, Joseph L magnetite (Fe3O4). Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain magnetite to detect the Earths magnetic

  11. Synthesis, characterization and adsorption properties of magnetite/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tingting; Huang, Chenchen; Yan, Shan; Li, Xiu-Juan; Pan, Si-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Three kinds of magnetite/reduced graphene oxide (MRGO) nanocomposites were prepared by solvothermal, hydrothermal and co-precipitation methods. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized and compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential. The results showed that MRGO made by different methods differed in surface functional groups, crystal structure, particle sizes, surface morphology and surface charge. Due to their unlike features, these nanocomposites displayed dissimilar performances when they were used to adsorb drugs, dyes and metal ions. The MRGO prepared by the co-precipitation method showed special adsorption ability to negative ions, but those synthesized by the solvothermal method obtained the best extraction ability and reusability to the others and showed a good prospective in magnetic solid-phase extraction. Therefore, it is highly recommended to use the right preparation method before application in order to attain the best extraction performance. PMID:26452936

  12. Low-temperature oxidation of magnetite - a humidity sensitive process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Erwin; Fang, Xiaomin; Herb, Christian; Hu, Shouyun

    2015-04-01

    Extensive multi-parameter palaeoclimate records were obtained from two long-term lacustrine archives at the Tibetan Plateau: the Qaidam basin (2.69-0.08 Ma) and Heqing basin (0.90-0.03 Ma). At present the region of the Qaidam site has an arid climate (<100 mm mean annual precipitation) while the Heqing site is located in the sub-tropical region with monsoonal rainfall. Magnetic properties play a prominent role for palaeoclimate interpretation in both records. Several parameters show a 100 kyr eccentricity cyclicity; in the Qaidam record also the Mid-Pleistocene Transition is seen. Both magnetic records are controlled by different absolute and relative contributions of magnetite and its altered (maghemitized) phases as well as hematite. Weathering conditions likely cause a systematic variation of magnetic mineralogy due to low-temperature oxidation (LTO). Maghemitization is well recognized as an alteration process in submarine basalts but about its relevance for climate-induced weathering in continental environments little is known. Various factors i.e., humidity, temperature, seasonality, duration of specific weathering conditions, and bacterial activity could be responsible for maghemitization (LTO) and transformation to hematite (or goethite) when a critical degree of LTO is reached. These factors may lead to a complex interplay, but one has to note that water acts as an electrolyte for Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidation at the crystal surface and due to maghemitization-induced lattice shrinking a larger internal particle surface area becomes exposed to oxidation. We suggest that humidity is the most crucial driver for the two studied archives - for the following reasons: (1) The overall parameter variations and catchment conditions are well in agreement with an LTO scenario. (2) In the Qaidam record we observe a direct relationship of a humidity sensitive pollen Ratio with magnetic susceptibility (reflecting the degree of alteration by LTO). (3) In the Heqing record carbonate erosion that reflects higher precipitation matches with stronger maghemitization. In the arid Qaidam region we interpret the humidity variation by regional water recycling related to glacial-interglacial periods. In the sub-tropical Heqing region humidity fluctuations may be caused by a changing relative influence of the Indian summer monsoon.

  13. Cytochrome cd1 Nitrite Reductase NirS Is Involved in Anaerobic Magnetite Biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and Requires NirN for Proper d1 Heme Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingjie; Bali, Shilpa; Borg, Sarah; Katzmann, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense synthesizes magnetosomes, which are membrane-enveloped crystals of magnetite. Here we show that nitrite reduction is involved in redox control during anaerobic biomineralization of the mixed-valence iron oxide magnetite. The cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase NirS shares conspicuous sequence similarity with NirN, which is also encoded within a larger nir cluster. Deletion of any one of these two nir genes resulted in impaired growth and smaller, fewer, and aberrantly shaped magnetite crystals during nitrate reduction. However, whereas nitrite reduction was completely abolished in the ?nirS mutant, attenuated but significant nitrite reduction occurred in the ?nirN mutant, indicating that only NirS is a nitrite reductase in M. gryphiswaldense. However, the ?nirN mutant produced a different form of periplasmic d1 heme that was not noncovalently bound to NirS, indicating that NirN is required for full reductase activity by maintaining a proper form of d1 heme for holo-cytochrome cd1 assembly. In conclusion, we assign for the first time a physiological function to NirN and demonstrate that effective nitrite reduction is required for biomineralization of wild-type crystals, probably by contributing to oxidation of ferrous iron under oxygen-limited conditions. PMID:23893106

  14. Intensified magneto-resistance by rapid thermal annealing in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film on SiO2 glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobori, H.; Morii, K.; Yamasaki, A.; Sugimura, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Horie, T.; Naitoh, Y.; Shimizu, T.

    2012-12-01

    We have observed large magneto-resistance (MR) intensified by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film (MTF) on SiO2 glass (a-SiO2) substrate. The MTF was produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method by using a magnetite target. The electrical resistivity (ER) of as-grown MTF (AG-MTF) showed the Mott's variable range hopping behavior, which implies that the AG-MTF is amorphous-like. Although the magneto-resistance (MR) ratio of bulk single crystal is very small except around the Verwey transition temperature (VTT), that of the AG-MTF showed moderately large below room temperature. Due to RTA of the AG-MTF by use of an IR image furnace, the MR ratio of MTFs was intensified, and especially by the annealing around the Curie temperature (585°C) of magnetite. Furthermore the ER of the rapid thermally annealed MTF (RTA-MTF) showed a slight kink at around the VTT, which indicates that the crystallinity of the RTA-MTF is higher than that of the AG-MTF The MTF produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method are composed of magnetite fine particles (MFPs). We consider that the directions of magnetic moments of MFPs in the MTF were spatially randomized by the RTA and the strong spin scattering of itinerant electrons transferring between adjacent MFPs caused the intensification of the MR ratio.

  15. Aqueous Ferrofluid of Magnetite Nanoparticles: Fluorescence Labeling and Magnetophoretic Control

    E-print Network

    Swihart, Mark T.

    of nanometers making them smaller than or comparable in size to important biological entities such as cells (10Aqueous Ferrofluid of Magnetite Nanoparticles: Fluorescence Labeling and Magnetophoretic Control, and Paras N. Prasad*, Department of Chemistry, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute

  16. Benefaction studies on the Hasan Celebi magnetite deposit, Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pressler, Jean W.; Akar, Ali

    1972-01-01

    Bench-scale and semicontinuous tests were performed on surface, trench, and diamond drill core samples from the Hasan Celebi low-grade magnetite deposit to determine the optimum benefication procedures utilizing wet magnetic separation techniques. Composite core samples typically contain about 27 percent recoverable magnetite and require crushing and grinding through 1 mm in size to insure satisfactory separation of the gangue from the magnetite. Regrinding and cleaning the magnetite concentrate to 80 percent minus 150-mesh is necessary to obtain an optimum of 66 percent iron. Semicontinuous pilot-plant testing with the wet magnetic drum using the recycled middling technique indicates that as much as 83 percent of the acid-soluble iron can be recovered into a concentrate containing 66 percent iron, with minimum deleterious elements. This represents 27 weight percent of the original ore. Further tests will continue when the Maden Tetkik ve Arama Enstitusu (MTA) receives 24 tons of bulk sample from an exploratory drift and cross-cut now being driven through a section of the major reserve area.

  17. Magnetite and Carbonate Textures in ALH84001: Experimental Insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2001-01-01

    Synthetic siderite and synthetic siderite-magnesite carbonates were equilibrated with hematite, magnetite, and CO2 at elevated pressure and temperature. Comparisons are made to textures seen in the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Avian magnetite-based magnetoreception: a physiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Cadiou, Hervé; McNaughton, Peter A

    2010-04-01

    It is now well established that animals use the Earth's magnetic field to perform long-distance migration and other navigational tasks. However, the transduction mechanisms that allow the conversion of magnetic field variations into an electric signal by specialized sensory cells remain largely unknown. Among the species that have been shown to sense Earth-strength magnetic fields, birds have been a model of choice since behavioural tests show that their direction-finding abilities are strongly influenced by magnetic fields. Magnetite, a ferromagnetic mineral, has been found in a wide range of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates. In birds, both superparamagnetic (SPM) and single-domain magnetite have been found to be associated with the trigeminal nerve. Electrophysiological recordings from cells in the trigeminal ganglion have shown an increase in action potential firing in response to magnetic field changes. More recently, histological evidence has demonstrated the presence of SPM magnetite in the subcutis of the pigeon's upper beak. The aims of the present review are to review the evidence for a magnetite-based mechanism in birds and to introduce physiological concepts in order to refine the proposed models. PMID:20106875

  19. Avian magnetite-based magnetoreception: a physiologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cadiou, Hervé; McNaughton, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that animals use the Earth's magnetic field to perform long-distance migration and other navigational tasks. However, the transduction mechanisms that allow the conversion of magnetic field variations into an electric signal by specialized sensory cells remain largely unknown. Among the species that have been shown to sense Earth-strength magnetic fields, birds have been a model of choice since behavioural tests show that their direction-finding abilities are strongly influenced by magnetic fields. Magnetite, a ferromagnetic mineral, has been found in a wide range of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates. In birds, both superparamagnetic (SPM) and single-domain magnetite have been found to be associated with the trigeminal nerve. Electrophysiological recordings from cells in the trigeminal ganglion have shown an increase in action potential firing in response to magnetic field changes. More recently, histological evidence has demonstrated the presence of SPM magnetite in the subcutis of the pigeon's upper beak. The aims of the present review are to review the evidence for a magnetite-based mechanism in birds and to introduce physiological concepts in order to refine the proposed models. PMID:20106875

  20. Mechanochemically enhanced degradation of pyrene and phenanthrene loaded on magnetite.

    PubMed

    Joseph-Ezra, Hadas; Nasser, Ahmed; Ben-Ari, Julius; Mingelgrin, Uri

    2014-05-20

    The enhancement of the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), exemplified by pyrene and phenanthrene, using mild grinding in the presence of common minerals was investigated. Magnetite, birnessite, and Na- and Cu-montmorillonite samples were loaded with pyrene or phenanthrene and ground manually or in a ball mill for short periods of time. The ground samples were analyzed for PAHs and for their metabolites, using high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. No degradation of pyrene occurred when it was in contact with Na-montmorillonite or birnessite. Sorption of pyrene on Cu-montmorillonite enhanced its degradation, but grinding of the loaded clay actually inhibited pyrene's degradation. Phenanthrene hardly degraded on Cu-montmorillonite. Grinding magnetite loaded with either PAH resulted in a significant degradation of both (?50% after grinding for 5 min), while in the nonground samples, negligible degradation was detected. The extent of degradation increased with the duration of grinding. The degradation of either PAH loaded on magnetite yielded oxidized products. In soil samples contaminated with PAHs and mixed with magnetite, a similar grinding-induced degradation pattern was observed, but with a lower rate. A liquid phase was required to initiate degradation in the soil. The liquid phase apparently served as the medium through which the pollutants reached the surface of the degradation-enhancing mineral. PMID:24730613

  1. Electrokinetic characterization of magnetite nanoparticles functionalized with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Viota, J L; Arroyo, F J; Delgado, A V; Horno, J

    2010-04-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a magnetite core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (L-arginine, L-lysine, glycine, and L-glutamine) is described in this paper. For all the amino acids it is found that adsorption increases with concentration in solution in the range 0.5-10 mg/mL. The adsorption, however, differs substantially from one amino acid to another, depending on the length of the hydrocarbon chain and the polarity and charge of the side group. Thus, for given concentration and pH, adsorption is found to increase in the order L-arginine < L-lysine < L-glutamine < glycine. This order corresponds roughly to amino acids with decreasing chain length; in addition, the presence of the less polarizable guanidine group in the arginine molecule may explain why this amino acid is slightly less adsorbed than lysine. The pH dependence of the adsorption of each amino acid is reasonably explained considering the surface charge of magnetite and the charge of the amino acid molecules for different pHs, indicating a significant role of electrostatics in adsorption. This is further checked by means of determinations of the electrophoretic mobility of amino acid-coated magnetite as a function of pH: the results indicate a shift of the isoelectric point of the raw magnetite toward more basic pHs, an indication of adsorption of positive species, as confirmed by the tendency of the mobility of amino acid-coated magnetite toward more positive values below neutral pH. The electrophoretic mobility of coated particles was also measured as a function of the concentration of amino acid, and it was found that for low concentrations the four amino acids provoke charge inversion and overcharging of the magnetite surface at pH 6. Finally, the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility on the ionic strength indicated that from an electrophoretic point of view, the functionalized magnetite-amino acid particles do not behave as soft particles, and that the amino acid coating should be very compact. PMID:20096847

  2. Magnetite Nanoparticles Stabilized Under Physiological Conditions for Biomedical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdãº, A.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bica, D.; Vékás, L.

    The biomedical application of water based magnetic fluids (MFs) is of great practical importance. Their colloidal stability under physiological conditions (blood pH ˜ 7.2-7.4 and salt concentration ˜0.15 M) and more in high magnetic field gradient is crucial. Magnetite or maghemite nanoparticles are used in general. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles were stabilized with different compounds (citric acid (CA) and phosphate) and sodium oleate (NaO) as the most used surfactant in the stabilization of MFs. The adsorption and overcharging effect were quantified, and the enhancement in salt tolerance of stabilized systems was studied. Adsorption, electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements were performed. The electrolyte tolerance was tested in coagulation kinetic measurements. Above the adsorption saturation, the nanoparticles are stabilized in a way of combined steric and electrostatic effects. The aim was to research these two important effects and demonstrate that none of them alone is enough. The phosphate was not able to stabilize the ferrofluid in spite of our expectation, but the other two additives proved to be effective stabilizing agents. The magnetite was well stabilized by the surface complexation of CA above pH ˜ 5, however, the salt tolerance of citrate stabilized MFs remained much below the concentration of physiological salt solution, and more the dissolution of magnetite nanocrystals was enhanced due to Fe-CA complexation in aqueous medium, which may cause problems in vivo. The oleate double layers were able to stabilize magnetite nanoparticles perfectly at pH ˜ 6 preventing particle aggregation effectively even in physiological salt solution.

  3. Toward pure electronic spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Petrovi?, Vladimir, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis is summarized the progress toward completing our understanding of the Rydberg system of CaF and developing Pure Electronic Spectroscopy. The Rydberg system of CaF possesses a paradigmatic character due to ...

  4. Magnetite Formation from Thermal Decomposition of Siderite: Implications for Inorganic Magnetite Formation in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, RIchard V.

    2002-01-01

    A biogenic mechanism for formation of a subpopulation magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been suggested [McKay et al., 1996; Thomas-Keprta, et al., 2000]. We are developing experimental evidence for an alternating working hypothesis, that the subpopulation was produced inorganically by the thermal decomposition of siderite [Golden et al., 2000].

  5. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  6. Magnetite-based Magnetoreception in Animals: 25+ Years of Theory & Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Walker, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Living organisms ranging from bacteria through higher vertebrates rely on orientation, navigation, and homing to survive. Any sensory cue that enhances these behaviors will be subject to intense natural selection over geological time. Reproducible behavioral responses to earth-strength magnetic fields(1) have been documented in Bacteria, Protoctists, and in nearly every major group of animals, and are possibly also present in the Archaea. Several groups of animals, including birds and cetaceans, respond behaviorally to magnetic anomalies below 100 nT in magnitude, implying that their magnetoreception ability approaches the thermal noise limit. This approach to thermal noise is commonly observed in other sensory systems, including hearing, olfaction, and electroreception. The hypothesis of magnetite-based magnetoreception(2) is the only theory proposed so far that is capable of explaining all of the magnetic behavioral data. Tiny crystals of single-domain magnetite (or in some bacteria, greigite) rotate the cells of microorganisms passively like a simple compass needle. The initial detection of biogenic magnetite with rock magnetic techniques in birds and bees over 25 years ago has led progressively to the identification of a group of specialized cells in fish and birds which contain organized magnetite-containing structures. In these animals (and presumably all vertebrates) magnetic signals are transmitted to the brain via the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve(3, 4). Experiments with pulse-remagnetization, like those that convert North-seeking bacteria into South-seekers, have dramatic effects on animal behavior, confirming the role of magnetite in the sensory system. This is therefore a general mechanism for a highly sensitive magnetic sense, the origin of which probably dates to the ancestral metazoan, and perhaps earlier. The largest debate presently occurring in the field concerns the interpretation of magnetic compass responses that vary with intensity and color of light. Some biologists interpret the tendency of birds and amphibians to orient randomly under red lights, but not under shorter wavelengths, as evidence for the existence of a separate compass receptor involving light. However, even some magnetotactic bacteria change their behavior in red light,(5) and all such effects reported to date in animals can be explained simply as a visual influence on an animal's choice of behavior. Although the light-dependent mechanism might be physically plausible for a compass (but not for a high-resolution magnetic), natural selection cannot develop it without a separation from the visual system (exaptation), for which there is no evidence. 1. R. Wiltschko, W. Wiltschko, Magnetic orientation in animals, Zoophysiology (Springer, Berlin, 1995), pp. 297. 2. J. L. Kirschvink, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University (1979). 3. J. L. Kirschvink, M. M. Walker, C. Deibel, Current Opinion in Neurobiology 11, 462 (2001). 4. M. M. Walker, T. E. Dennis, J. L. Kirschvink, Current Opinion in Neurobiology 12, 735 (Dec, 2002). 5. R. B. Frankel, D. A. Bazylinski, M. S. Johnson, B. L. Taylor, Biophysical Journal 73, 994 (1997).

  7. Geochemistry of magnetite from porphyry Cu and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadoll, Patrick; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Leveille, Richard A.; Koenig, Alan E.

    2015-04-01

    A combination of petrographic observations, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and statistical data exploration was used in this study to determine compositional variations in hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from five porphyry Cu-Mo and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States, and igneous magnetite from the unmineralized, granodioritic Inner Zone Batholith, Japan. The most important overall discriminators for the minor and trace element chemistry of magnetite from the investigated porphyry and skarn deposits are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and Ga—of these the elements with the highest variance for (I) igneous magnetite are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, for (II) hydrothermal porphyry magnetite are Mg, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and for (III) hydrothermal skarn magnetite are Mg, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Ga. Nickel could only be detected at levels above the limit of reporting (LOR) in two igneous magnetites. Equally, Cr could only be detected in one igneous occurrence. Copper, As, Mo, Ag, Au, and Pb have been reported in magnetite by other authors but could not be detected at levels greater than their respective LORs in our samples. Comparison with the chemical signature of igneous magnetite from the barren Inner Zone Batholith, Japan, suggests that V, Mn, Co, and Ga concentrations are relatively depleted in magnetite from the porphyry and skarn deposits. Higher formation conditions in combination with distinct differences between melt and hydrothermal fluid compositions are reflected in Al, Ti, V, and Ga concentrations that are, on average, higher in igneous magnetite than in hydrothermal magnetite (including porphyry and skarn magnetite). Low Ti and V concentrations in combination with high Mn concentrations are characteristic features of magnetite from skarn deposits. High Mg concentrations (<1,000 ppm) are characteristic for magnetite from magnesian skarn and likely reflect extensive fluid/rock interaction. In porphyry deposits, hydrothermal magnetite from different vein types can be distinguished by varying Ti, V, Mn, and Zn contents. Titanium and V concentrations are highly variable among hydrothermal and igneous magnetites, but Ti concentrations above 3,560 ppm could only be detected in igneous magnetite, and V concentrations are on average lower in hydrothermal magnetite. The highest Ti concentrations are present in igneous magnetite from gabbro and monzonite. The lowest Ti concentrations were recorded in igneous magnetite from granodiorite and granodiorite breccia and largely overlap with Ti concentrations found in hydrothermal porphyry magnetite. Magnesium and Mn concentrations vary between magnetite from different skarn deposits but are generally greater than in hydrothermal magnetite from the porphyry deposits. High Mg, and low Ti and V concentrations characterize hydrothermal magnetite from magnesian skarn deposits and follow a trend that indicates that magnetite from skarn (calcic and magnesian) commonly has low Ti and V concentrations.

  8. Geochemistry of magnetite from porphyry Cu and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, Patrick; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; LeVeille, Richard A.; Koenig, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of petrographic observations, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and statistical data exploration was used in this study to determine compositional variations in hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from five porphyry Cu–Mo and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States, and igneous magnetite from the unmineralized, granodioritic Inner Zone Batholith, Japan. The most important overall discriminators for the minor and trace element chemistry of magnetite from the investigated porphyry and skarn deposits are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and Ga—of these the elements with the highest variance for (I) igneous magnetite are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, for (II) hydrothermal porphyry magnetite are Mg, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and for (III) hydrothermal skarn magnetite are Mg, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Ga. Nickel could only be detected at levels above the limit of reporting (LOR) in two igneous magnetites. Equally, Cr could only be detected in one igneous occurrence. Copper, As, Mo, Ag, Au, and Pb have been reported in magnetite by other authors but could not be detected at levels greater than their respective LORs in our samples. Comparison with the chemical signature of igneous magnetite from the barren Inner Zone Batholith, Japan, suggests that V, Mn, Co, and Ga concentrations are relatively depleted in magnetite from the porphyry and skarn deposits. Higher formation conditions in combination with distinct differences between melt and hydrothermal fluid compositions are reflected in Al, Ti, V, and Ga concentrations that are, on average, higher in igneous magnetite than in hydrothermal magnetite (including porphyry and skarn magnetite). Low Ti and V concentrations in combination with high Mn concentrations are characteristic features of magnetite from skarn deposits. High Mg concentrations (<1,000 ppm) are characteristic for magnetite from magnesian skarn and likely reflect extensive fluid/rock interaction. In porphyry deposits, hydrothermal magnetite from different vein types can be distinguished by varying Ti, V, Mn, and Zn contents. Titanium and V concentrations are highly variable among hydrothermal and igneous magnetites, but Ti concentrations above 3,560 ppm could only be detected in igneous magnetite, and V concentrations are on average lower in hydrothermal magnetite. The highest Ti concentrations are present in igneous magnetite from gabbro and monzonite. The lowest Ti concentrations were recorded in igneous magnetite from granodiorite and granodiorite breccia and largely overlap with Ti concentrations found in hydrothermal porphyry magnetite. Magnesium and Mn concentrations vary between magnetite from different skarn deposits but are generally greater than in hydrothermal magnetite from the porphyry deposits. High Mg, and low Ti and V concentrations characterize hydrothermal magnetite from magnesian skarn deposits and follow a trend that indicates that magnetite from skarn (calcic and magnesian) commonly has low Ti and V concentrations.

  9. Low-temperature viscous magnetization of multidomain magnetite: evidence for disaccommodation contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muxworthy, A. R.; Williams, W.

    2005-12-01

    There are large gaps in our understanding of multidomain (MD) viscous behavior and MD remanence theory in general. For example, Dunlop and Ozdemir (2000) have demonstrated that multidomain (MD) viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) acquired at 200 C in crushed and sized natural crystals of magnetite persists on thermal demagnetization up to the Curie temperature, that is, there is a MD VRM component which is metastable. This goes against the classic MD theory of Noel which predicts that domain walls which move at low-temperatures in the earth's field, are easily re-organized by small increases in temperatures. That is, theory predicts that any VRM acquired by domain walls at 200 C will not persist to the Curie temperature. Recent viscosity experiments at temperatures above room-temperature have revealed that MD viscosity has a complex dependency on the magnetization state, dislocation density, disaccommodation, stoichiometry and thermal history. In particular the contribution of disaccommodation to viscosity has been difficult to isolate. Below room-temperature, disaccommodation displays a large increase, therefore by measuring viscosity below room temperature, then its contribution can be more readily assessed. Low-temperature viscous acquisition and decay measurements above and below the Verwey transition have been measured for a selection of natural and synthetic multidomain magnetite samples. A strong correlation between the viscosity spectra and published disaccommodation spectra was found, where disaccommodation reflects electron mobility. Assuming the viscosity is controlled by identical mechanisms as disaccommodation, the reduction in electron mobility below the Verwey transition is found to significantly increase viscous acquisition and decay rates over the time scales measured (1-3000 seconds). Although strongly affecting the viscosity, disaccommodation processes do not appear to control the rate of change of viscosity with time, i.e., the viscosity curvature. It is suggested that the curvature is controlled by the shape of relaxation-time distributions, which is approximately the same for all the magnetite samples studied. In addition, the acquisition and decay curvature parameters mirror each other when plotted as a function of temperature, inferring that at any given temperature the acquisition and decay processes are identical.

  10. Charge localization in the Verwey structure of magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Mark S.; Wright, Jon P.; Cumby, James; Attfield, J. Paul

    2015-07-01

    The thermal evolution of electronic order in the complex Verwey ground state of magnetite (F e3O4) has been determined through 22 high-accuracy synchrotron x-ray structure refinements using three 10 -40 ? m grains of stoichiometric magnetite. A robust fitting function is introduced to extract values of order parameterlike quantities at zero temperature and at the upper limit of the Verwey phase Tu=123.4 K . The low-temperature structural distortion is found to be almost frozen below the Verwey transition but small changes in lattice and local mode amplitudes and Fe-Fe distances reveal an increase in electron localization on cooling. These distortions confirm that electron localization within trimerons is the driving force behind the Verwey transition. Electron localization is also revealed by anomalous decreases in the largest principal thermal displacement factors of Fe cations as electron-phonon decoupling occurs on cooling.

  11. Hematite Versus Magnetite as the Signature for Planetary Magnetic Anomalies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetshka, Gunther; Taylor, Patrick T.; Wasilewski, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic anomalies due to remanent magnetization, while the Earth has some anomalies where remanence can be shown to be important. This picture, however, is less clear because of the nature and the magnitude of the geomagnetic field which is responsible for superimposed induced magnetization. Induced magnetization assumes a magnetite source, because of its much greater magnetic susceptibility when compared with other magnetic minerals. We investigated the TRM (thermoremanent magnetization) acquisition of hematite, in weak magnetic fields up to 1 mT, to determine if the remanent and induced magnetization of hematite could compete with magnetite. TRM acquisition curves of magnetite and hematite show that multi-domain hematite reaches TRM saturation (0.3 - 0.4 A sq m/kg) in fields as low as 100 microT. However, multi-domain magnetite reaches only a few percent of its TRM saturation in a field of 100 microT (0.02 - 0.06 A sq m/kg). These results suggest that a mineral such as hematite and, perhaps, other minerals with significant remanence and minor induced magnetization may play an important role in providing requisite magnetization contrast. Perhaps, and especially for the Mars case, we should reevaluate where hematite and other minerals, with efficient remanence acquisition, exist in significant concentration, allowing a more comprehensive explanation of Martian anomalies and better insight into the role of remanent magnetization in terrestrial crustal magnetic anomalies.

  12. Biologically controlled synthesis and assembly of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Mathieu; Bertinetti, Luca; Neely, Robert K; Schertel, Andreas; Körnig, André; Flors, Cristina; Müller, Frank D; Schüler, Dirk; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles have size- and shape-dependent magnetic properties. In addition, assemblies of magnetite nanoparticles forming one-dimensional nanostructures have magnetic properties distinct from zero-dimensional or non-organized materials due to strong uniaxial shape anisotropy. However, assemblies of free-standing magnetic nanoparticles tend to collapse and form closed-ring structures rather than chains in order to minimize their energy. Magnetotactic bacteria, ubiquitous microorganisms, have the capability to mineralize magnetite nanoparticles, the so-called magnetosomes, and to direct their assembly in stable chains via biological macromolecules. In this contribution, the synthesis and assembly of biological magnetite to obtain functional magnetic dipoles in magnetotactic bacteria are presented, with a focus on the assembly. We present tomographic reconstructions based on cryo-FIB sectioning and SEM imaging of a magnetotactic bacterium to exemplify that the magnetosome chain is indeed a paradigm of a 1D magnetic nanostructure, based on the assembly of several individual particles. We show that the biological forces are a major player in the formation of the magnetosome chain. Finally, we demonstrate by super resolution fluorescence microscopy that MamK, a protein of the actin family necessary to form the chain backbone in the bacteria, forms a bundle of filaments that are not only found in the vicinity of the magnetosome chain but are widespread within the cytoplasm, illustrating the dynamic localization of the protein within the cells. These very simple microorganisms have thus much to teach us with regards to controlling the design of functional 1D magnetic nanoassembly. PMID:25932467

  13. Lanthanide sorbent based on magnetite nanoparticles functionalized with organophosphorus extractants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basualto, Carlos; Gaete, José; Molina, Lorena; Valenzuela, Fernando; Yañez, Claudia; Marco, Jose F.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, an adsorbent was prepared based on the attachment of organophosphorus acid extractants, namely, D2EHPA, CYANEX 272, and CYANEX 301, to the surface of superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with oleic acid, first by a chemisorption mechanism and later by the respective extractant via physical adsorption. The obtained core-shell functionalized magnetite nanoparticle composites were characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, infrared absorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. All the prepared nanoparticles exhibited a high saturation magnetization capacity that varied between 72 and 46 emu g-1 and decreased as the magnetite nanoparticle was coated with oleic acid and functionalized. The scope of this study also included adsorption tests for lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium and the corresponding analysis of their results. Sorption tests indicated that the functionalized nanoparticles were able to extract the four studied lanthanide metal ions, although the best extraction performance was observed when the sorbent was functionalized with CYANEX 272, which resulted in a loading capacity of approximately 12-14 mgLa/gMNP. The magnetization of the synthesized nanoparticles was verified during the separation of the lanthanide-loaded sorbent from the raffinate by using a conventional magnet.

  14. Stable ferrofluids of magnetite nanoparticles in hydrophobic ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestrom, Luuk; Lenders, Jos J. M.; de Groot, Rick; Hooghoudt, Tonnis; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Vilaplana Artigas, Marcel

    2015-07-01

    Ferrofluids (FFs) of metal oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquids (ILs) are a potentially useful class of magnetic materials for many applications because of their properties related to temperature/pressure stability, hydrophobicity, viscosity and recyclability. In this work, the screening of several designer surfactants for their stabilizing capabilities has resulted in the synthesis of stable FFs of superparamagnetic 7 ± 2 nm magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the hydrophobic IL 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([CRMIM][NTf2]). The designed and synthesized 1-butyl-3-(10-carboxydecyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bromide (ILC10-COOH) surfactant that combines the same imidazole moiety as the IL with a long alkyl chain ensured compatibility with the IL and increased the steric repulsion between the magnetite nanoparticles sufficiently such that stable dispersions of up to 50 wt% magnetite were obtained according to stability tests in the presence of a magnetic field (0.5-1 Tesla). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) of the IL-based FFs allowed direct visualization of the surfactant-stabilized nanoparticles in the ILs and the native, hardly aggregated state of their dispersion.

  15. Synthesis of pure RDX

    SciTech Connect

    Pagoria, P.F.

    1994-03-25

    For the bioremediation of explosives, there is the need for RDX uncontaminated by HMX. (In the Bachmann process, RDX always has residual HMX.) There are two methods for synthesizing pure RDX: one involving oxidation of R-salt, the other nitration of hexamine. Absence of HMX in the RDX samples was confirmed by NMR and melting points.

  16. Production of nano zinc, zinc sulphide and nanocomplex of magnetite zinc oxide by Brevundimonas diminuta and Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Mirhendi, Mansoureh; Emtiazi, Giti; Roghanian, Rasoul

    2013-12-01

    ZnO (Zincite) nanoparticle has many industrial applications and is mostly produced by chemical reactions, usually prepared by decomposition of zinc acetate or hot-injection and heating-up method. Synthesis of semi-conductor nanoparticles such as ZnS (Sphalerite) by ultrasonic was previously reported. In this work, high-zinc tolerant bacteria were isolated and used for nano zinc production. Among all isolated microorganisms, a gram negative bacterium which was identified as Brevundimonas diminuta could construct nano magnetite zinc oxide on bacterial surface with 22 nm in size and nano zinc with 48.29 nm in size. A piece of zinc metal was immersed in medium containing of pure culture of B. diminuta. Subsequently, a yellow-white biofilm was formed which was collected from the surface of zinc. It was dried at room temperature. The isolated biofilm was analysed by X-ray diffractometer. Interestingly, the yield of these particles was higher in the light, with pH 7 at 23°C. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the first report about the production of nano zinc metal and nano zinc oxide that are stable and have anti-bacterial activities with magnetite property. Also ZnS (sized 12 nm) produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri, was studied by photoluminescence and fluorescent microscope. PMID:24206770

  17. Bench-Scale Testing of the Micronized Magnetite Process

    SciTech Connect

    Edward R. Torak; Peter J. Suardini

    1997-11-01

    A recent emphasis of the Department of Energy's (DOE's), Coal Preparation Program has been the development of high-efficiency technologies that offer near-term, low-cost improvements in the ability of coal preparation plants to address problems associated with coal fines. In 1992, three cost-shared contracts were awarded to industry, under the first High-Efficiency Preparation (HEP I) solicitation. All three projects involved bench-scale testing of various emerging technologies, at the Federal Energy Technology Center*s (FETC*s), Process Research Facility (PRF). The first HEP I project, completed in mid-1993, was conducted by Process Technology, Inc., with the objective of developing a computerized, on-line system for monitoring and controlling the operation of a column flotation circuit. The second HEP I project, completed in mid-1994, was conducted by a team led by Virginia Polytechnic Institute to test the Mozely Multi-Gravity Separator in combination with the Microcel Flotation Column, for improved removal of mineral matter and pyritic sulfur from fine coal. The last HEP I project, of which the findings are contained in this report, was conducted by Custom Coals Corporation to evaluate and advance a micronized-magnetite-based, fine-coal cycloning technology. The micronized-magnetite coal cleaning technology, also know as the Micro-Mag process, is based on widely used conventional dense-medium cyclone applications, in that it utilizes a finely ground magnetite/water suspension as a separating medium for cleaning fine coal, by density, in a cyclone. However, the micronized-magnetite cleaning technology differs from conventional systems in several ways: ! It utilizes significantly finer magnetite (about 5 to 10 micron mean particle size), as compared to normal mean particle sizes of 20 microns. ! It can effectively beneficiate coal particles down to 500M in size, as compared to the most advanced, existing conventional systems that are limited to a particle bottom size of about 28M - 100 M. ! Smaller diameter cyclones, 4 to 10 inches, are used to provide the higher G-force required to separate the finer feed coal. ! Cyclone feed pressures up to 10 times greater than those used in conventional cleaning systems are employed to enhance the separating forces.

  18. Force interactions between magnetite, silica, and bentonite studied with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobryden, I.; Potapova, E.; Holmgren, A.; Weber, H.; Hedlund, J.; Almqvist, N.

    2015-04-01

    Iron ore pellets consist of variety of mineral particles and are an important refined product used in steel manufacturing. Production of high-quality pellets requires good understanding of interactions between different constituents, such as magnetite, gangue residues, bentonite, and additives. Much research has been reported on magnetite, silica, and bentonite surface properties and their effect on pellet strength but more scant with a focus on a fundamental particle-particle interaction. To probe such particle interaction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using colloidal probe technique has proven to be a suitable tool. In this work, the measurements were performed between magnetite-magnetite, bentonite-magnetite, silica-bentonite, and silica-magnetite particles in 1 mM CaCl2 solution at various pH values. The interaction character, i.e., repulsion or attraction, was determined by measuring and analyzing AFM force curves. The observed quantitative changes in interaction forces were in good agreement with the measured zeta-potentials for the particles at the same experimental conditions. Particle aggregation was studied by measuring the adhesion force. Absolute values of adhesion forces for different systems could not be compared due to the difference in particle size and contact geometry. Therefore, the relative change of adhesion force between pH 6 and 10 was used for comparison. The adhesion force decreased for the magnetite-magnetite and bentonite-silica systems and slightly increased for the magnetite-bentonite system at pH 10 as compared to pH 6, whereas a pronounced decrease in adhesion force was observed in the magnetite-silica system. Thus, the presence of silica particles on the magnetite surface could have a negative impact on the interaction between magnetite and bentonite in balling due to the reduction of the adhesion force.

  19. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite and the Origin of Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary Sue

    2007-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments to determine whether magnetite could be produced by the decomposition of iron-carbonate were initiated. Naturally occurring siderite was first characterized by electron microprobe (EMP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements to be sure that the starting material did not contain detectable magnetite. Samples were shocked in tungsten-alloy holders (W=90%, Ni=6%, Cu=4%) to further insure that any iron phases in the shock products were contributed by the siderite rather than the sample holder. Each sample was shocked to a specific pressure between 30 to 49 GPa. Previously reported results of TEM analyses on 49 GPa experiments indicated the presence of nano-phase spinel-structured iron oxide. Transformation of siderite to magnetite as characterized by TEM was found in the 49 GPa shock experiment. Compositions of most magnetites are greater than 50% Fe sup(+2) in the octahedral site of the inverse spinel structure. Magnetites produced in shock experiments display the same range of single-domain, superparamagnetic sizes (approx. 50 100 nm), compositions (100% magnetite to 80% magnetite-20% magnesioferrite), and morphologies (equant, elongated, euhedral to subhedral) as magnetites synthesized by Golden et al. (2001) or magnetites grown naturally by MV1 magnetotactic bacteria, and as the magnetites in Martian meteorite ALH84001. Fritz et al. (2005) previously concluded that ALH84001 experienced approx. 32 GPa pressure and a resultant thermal pulse of approx. 100 - 110 C. However, ALH84001 contains evidence of local temperature excursions high enough to 1 melt feldspar, pyroxene, and a silica-rich phase. This 49 GPa experiment demonstrates that magnetite can be produced by the shock decomposition of siderite as a result of local heating to greater than 470 C. Therefore, magnetite in the rims of carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could be a product of shock devolatilization of siderite as well.

  20. Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure of Oxidized and Partially Oxidized Magnetite Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Yin, Yadong; Falcone, Roger; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2010-10-24

    The crystal structure of magnetite nanoparticles may be transformed to maghemite by complete oxidation, but under many relevant conditions the oxidation is partial, creating a mixed-valence material with structural and electronic properties that are poorly characterized. We used X-ray diffraction, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy to characterize the products of oxidizing uncoated and oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles in air. The oxidization of uncoated magnetite nanoparticles creates a material that is structurally and electronically indistinguishable from maghemite. By contrast, while oxidized oleic acid-coated nanoparticles are also structurally indistinguishable from maghemite, Fe L-edge spectroscopy revealed the presence of interior reduced iron sites even after a 2-year period. We used X-ray emission spectroscopy at the O K-edge to study the valence bands (VB) of the iron oxide nanoparticles, using resonant excitation to remove the contributions from oxygen atoms in the ligands and from low-energy excitations that obscured the VB edge. The bonding in all nanoparticles was typical of maghemite, with no detectable VB states introduced by the long-lived, reduced-iron sites in the oleic acid-coated sample. However, O K-edge absorption spectroscopy observed a 0.2 eV shift in the position of the lowest unoccupied states in the coated sample, indicating an increase in the semiconductor band gap relative to bulk stoichiometric maghemite that was also observed by optical absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the ferrous iron sites within ferric iron oxide nanoparticles coated by an organic ligand can persist under ambient conditions with no evidence of a distinct interior phase and can exert an effect on the global electronic and optical properties of the material. This phenomenon resembles the band gap enlargement caused by electron accumulation in the conduction band of TiO2.

  1. Reaction of U-VI with titanium-substituted magnetite: Influence of Ti on U-IV speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Latta, Drew; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2013-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent uranium (UVI) to less soluble tetravalent uranium (UIV) through enzymatic or abiotic redox reactions has the potential to alter U mobility in subsurface environments. As a ubiquitous natural mineral, magnetite (Fe3O4) is of interest because of its ability to act as a rechargeable reductant for UVI. Natural magnetites are often impure with titanium, and structural Fe3+ replacement by TiIV yields a proportional increase in the relative Fe2+ content in the metal sublattice to maintain bulk charge neutrality. In the absence of oxidation, the Ti content sets the initial bulk Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio (R). Here, we demonstrate that Ti-doped magnetites (Fe3 xTixO4) reduce UVI to UIV. The UVI-Fe2+ redox reactivity was found to be controlled directly by R, but was otherwise independent of Ti content (xTi). However, in contrast to previous studies with pure magnetite where UVI was reduced to nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2), the presence of structural Ti (xTi = 0.25 0.53) results in the formation of UIV species that lack the bidentate U-O2-U bridges of uraninite. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis indicated that the titanomagnetite-bound UIV phase has a novel UIV-Ti binding geometry, different from the coordination of UIV in the mineral brannerite (UIVTi2O6). The observed UIV-Ti coordination at a distance of 3.43 Å suggests a binuclear corner-sharing adsorption/incorporation UIV complex with the solid phase. Furthermore, we explored the effect of oxidation (decreasing R) and solids-to-solution ratio on the reduced UIV phase. The formation of the non-uraninite UIV-Ti phase appears to be controlled by availability of surface Ti sites, rather than R. Our work highlights a previously unrecognized role of Ti in the environmental chemistry of UIV and suggests that further work to characterize the long-term stability of UIV phases formed in the presence of Ti is warranted.

  2. Pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    E-print Network

    Xián O. Camanho; Naresh Dadhich; Alfred Molina

    2015-05-25

    We study pure Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single $N$th order Lovelock term in the action in $d=2N+1,\\,2N+2$ dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. Pure Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, $d=2N+1$, is kinematic; i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for $d=2N+1$, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five and six dimensional pure Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We also comment on a closely related family of exponential solutions and on the possibility of solutions with complex Kasner exponents. We show that the latter imply the existence of closed timelike curves in the geometry.

  3. Pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    E-print Network

    Camanho, Xián O; Molina, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We study pure Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single $N$th order Lovelock term in the action in $d=2N+1,\\,2N+2$ dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. Pure Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, $d=2N+1$, is kinematic; i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for $d=2N+1$, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five and six dimensional pure Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We al...

  4. Pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanho, Xián O.; Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred

    2015-09-01

    We study pure Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single Nth order Lovelock term in the action in d=2N+1,2N+2 dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. Pure Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, d=2N+1, is kinematic, i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for d=2N+1, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five- and six dimensional pure Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We also comment on a closely related family of exponential solutions and on the possibility of solutions with complex Kasner exponents. We show that the latter imply the existence of closed timelike curves in the geometry.

  5. Magnetic Microstructure of Closely-Spaced Ferrimagnetic Crystals in Magnetotactic Bacteria

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Magnetic Microstructure of Closely-Spaced Ferrimagnetic Crystals in Magnetotactic Bacteria R. E of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, United Kingdom Magnetotactic bacteria migrate along of magnetite and greigite crystals in air-dried cells of magnetotactic bacteria, with sub-10-nm spatial

  6. Role of the substrate on the magnetic anisotropy of magnetite thin films grown by ion-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Pilar; Prieto, José Emilio; Gargallo-Caballero, Raquel; Marco, José Francisco; de la Figuera, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) thin films were deposited on MgO (0 0 1), SrTiO3 (0 0 1), LaAlO3 (0 0 1) single crystal substrates as well on as silicon and amorphous glass in order to study the effect of the substrate on their magnetic properties, mainly the magnetic anisotropy. We have performed a structural, morphological and compositional characterization by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering ion channeling in oxygen resonance mode. The magnetic anisotropy has been investigated by vectorial magneto-optical Kerr effect. The results indicate that the magnetic anisotropy is especially influenced by the substrate-induced microstructure. In-plane isotropy and uniaxial anisotropy behavior have been observed on silicon and glass substrates, respectively. The transition between both behaviors depends on grain size. For LaAlO3 substrates, in which the lattice mismatch between the Fe3O4 films and the substrate is significant, a weak in-plane fourfold magnetic anisotropy is induced. However when magnetite is deposited on MgO (0 0 1) and SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrates, a well-defined fourfold in-plane magnetic anisotropy is observed with easy axes along [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] directions. The magnetic properties on these two latter substrates are similar in terms of magnetic anisotropy and coercive fields.

  7. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  8. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  9. Magnetorheological behavior of magnetite covered clay particles in aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Gonzalez, C.; Lopez-Lopez, M. T.; Duran, J. D. G.

    2012-08-01

    Montmorillonite clay particles coated with magnetite nanoparticles suspended in aqueous media behave as magnetorheological fluids with enhanced stability as compared to conventional ones. In this work, the study of the magnetorheological behavior of these suspensions of magnetite-clay composite particles has been carried out. For this purpose, both steady and dynamic rheological measurements were carried out in the absence and in the presence of external magnetic fields. In the first kind of experiments, the rheograms of the suspensions (shear stress versus shear rate plot) are analyzed as a function of the strength of the magnetic field applied. In the second one, oscillatory stresses are applied to the system, and the storage modulus is studied as a function of the external magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic field, the suspensions develop a weak yield stress due to the aggregation of the magnetite covered clay particles. In the presence of magnetic field, the yield stress is strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength inside the samples, demonstrating that the suspensions experience a magnetorheological effect, moderate when the magnetic field strength is weak and stronger for values of magnetic field higher than 150-200 kA/m. Actually, the most intriguing result is the change of the trend in the dependence of the yield stress with the field. This dependence is approximately linear with the field for strength values smaller than 150-200 kA/m. On the other hand, for higher values, the yield stress increases with magnetic field following a power law with exponent 4.5.The results are interpreted by means of a model that relates the structure of the particles in the suspensions to the magnetic field applied and using the interaction energy between particles calculated by the extended DLVO theory to include magnetic interaction.

  10. Trace-element fingerprints of chromite, magnetite and sulfides from the 3.1 Ga ultramafic-mafic rocks of the Nuggihalli greenstone belt, Western Dharwar craton (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ria; Mondal, Sisir K.; González-Jiménez, José M.; Griffin, William L.; Pearson, Norman J.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.

    2015-06-01

    The 3.1 Ga Nuggihalli greenstone belt in the Western Dharwar craton is comprised of chromitite-bearing sill-like ultramafic-mafic rocks that are surrounded by metavolcanic schists (compositionally komatiitic to komatiitic basalts) and a suite of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite gneissic rocks. The sill-like plutonic unit consists of a succession of serpentinite (after dunite)-peridotite-pyroxenite and gabbro with bands of titaniferous magnetite ore. The chromitite ore-bodies (length ?30-500 m; width ?2-15 m) are hosted by the serpentinite-peridotite unit. Unaltered chromites from massive chromitites (>80 % modal chromite) of the Byrapur and Bhaktarhalli chromite mines in the greenstone belt are characterized by high Cr# (100Cr/(Cr + Al)) of 78-86 and moderate Mg# (100 Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)) of 45-55. In situ trace-element analysis (LA-ICPMS) of unaltered chromites indicates that the parental magma of the chromitite ore-bodies was a komatiite lacking nickel-sulfide mineralization. In the Ga/Fe3+# versus Ti/Fe3+# diagram, the Byrapur chromites plot in the field of suprasubduction zone (SSZ) chromites while those from Bhaktarhalli lie in the MOR field. The above results corroborate our previous results based on major-element characteristics of the chromites, where the calculated parental melt of the Byrapur chromites was komatiitic to komatiitic basalt, and the Bhaktarhalli chromite was derived from Archean high-Mg basalt. The major-element chromite data hinted at the possibility of a SSZ environment existing in the Archean. Altered and compositionally zoned chromite grains in our study show a decrease in Ga, V, Co, Zn, Mn and enrichments of Ni and Ti in the ferritchromit rims. Trace-element heterogeneity in the altered chromites is attributed to serpentinization. The trace-element patterns of magnetite from the massive magnetite bands in the greenstone belt are similar to those from magmatic Fe-Ti-V-rich magnetite bands in layered intrusions, and magnetites from andesitic melts, suggesting that magnetite crystallized from an evolved gabbroic melt. Enrichments of Ni, Co, Te, As and Bi in disseminated millerite and niccolite occurring within chromitites, and in disseminated bravoite within magnetites, reflect element mobility during serpentinization. Monosulfide solid solution inclusions within pyroxenes (altered to actinolite) in pyroxenite, and interstitial pyrites and chalcopyrites in magnetite, retain primary characteristics except for Fe-enrichment in chalcopyrite, probably due to sub-solidus re-equilibration with magnetite. Disseminated sulfides are depleted in platinum-group elements (PGE) due to late sulfide saturation and the PGE-depleted nature of the mantle source of the sill-like ultramafic-mafic plutonic rocks in the Nuggihalli greenstone belt.

  11. Pure de Sitter supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Kallosh, Renata; Van Proeyen, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    Using superconformal methods we derive an explicit de Sitter supergravity action invariant under spontaneously broken local N =1 supersymmetry. The supergravity multiplet interacts with a nilpotent Goldstino multiplet. We present a complete locally supersymmetric action including the graviton and the fermionic fields, gravitino and Goldstino, no scalars. In the global limit when the supergravity multiplet decouples, our action reproduces the Volkov-Akulov theory. In the unitary gauge where the Goldstino vanishes we recover pure supergravity with the positive cosmological constant. The classical equations of motion, with all fermions vanishing, have a maximally symmetric solution: de Sitter space.

  12. Monodispersed magnetite nanoparticles optimized for magnetic fluid hyperthermia: Implications in biological systems

    E-print Network

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Monodispersed magnetite nanoparticles optimized for magnetic fluid hyperthermia: Implications 2011) Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) are suitable materials for Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3556948] I. INTRODUCTION Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising approach

  13. Formation of tabular single-domain magnetite induced by Geobacter metallireducens GS-15

    E-print Network

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Formation of tabular single-domain magnetite induced by Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 Hojatollah.g., an anisotropic medium) has been reported (1, 2). Although magnetite forms predominantly diamond-shape octahedrons is produced intracellularly by a variety of magnetic bacteria in diverse environments (4­6). The formation

  14. Accessible and green manufacturing of magnetite (ferrous ferric oxide) nanocrystals and their use in magnetic separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Cafer Tayyar

    This work describes the first size dependent magnetic separation in nanoscale. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystals of high quality and uniform size were synthesized with monodispersity below 10%. Magnetite nanocrystals of 4 nm to 33 nm (average diameter) were produced. Batch synthesis was shown to go up to 20 grams which is more than 10 times of a standard nanocrystal synthesis, without loosing the quality and monodispersity. Reactor design for mass (1 gram per hour) production of magnetite nanocrystals is reported for the first time. The cost of a kg of lab purity magnetite nanocrystals was shown to be 2600. A green synthesis that utilizes rust and edible oils was developed. The cost of a kg was brought down to 22. Size dependency of magnetism was shown in nanoscale for the first time. Reversible aggregation theory was developed to explain the low field magnetic separation and solution behavior of magnetite nanocrystals. Arsenic was removed from drinking water with magnetite nanocrystals 200 times better than commercial adsorbents. Silica coating was successfully applied to enable the known silica related biotechnologies. Magnetite-silica nanoshells were functionalized with amino groups. For the first time, silver was coated on the magnetite-silica nanoshells to produce triple multishells. Anti-microbial activity of multishells is anticipated.

  15. Achieving Persistent Room Temperature Phosphorescence and Remarkable Mechanochromism from Pure Organic Luminogens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yongyang; Chen, Gan; Peng, Qian; Yuan, Wang Zhang; Xie, Yujun; Li, Shuhong; Zhang, Yongming; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Persistent room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) from pure organic luminogens can be rationally realized based on the crystallization-induced phosphorescence phenomenon and severe crystallization. A perfect crystal with dense molecular packing and effective inter-molecular interactions isolates the triplet excitons from quenching sites and significantly blocks the high-energy vibrational dissipation, thus yielding long-lasting RTP. PMID:26456393

  16. Avian orientation: the pulse effect is mediated by the magnetite receptors in the upper beak

    PubMed Central

    Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2009-01-01

    Migratory silvereyes treated with a strong magnetic pulse shift their headings by approximately 90°, indicating an involvement of magnetite-based receptors in the orientation process. Structures containing superparamagnetic magnetite have been described in the inner skin at the edges of the upper beak of birds, while single-domain magnetite particles are indicated in the nasal cavity. To test which of these structures mediate the pulse effect, we subjected migratory silvereyes, Zosterops l. lateralis, to a strong pulse, and then tested their orientation, while the skin of their upper beak was anaesthetized with a local anaesthetic to temporarily deactivate the magnetite-containing structures there. After the pulse, birds without anaesthesia showed the typical shift, whereas when their beak was anaesthetized, they maintained their original headings. This indicates that the superparamagnetic magnetite-containing structures in the skin of the upper beak are most likely the magnetoreceptors that cause the change in headings observed after pulse treatment. PMID:19324756

  17. Speed limit of the insulator-metal transition in magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, S.; Kukreja, R.; Trabant, C.; Pontius, N.; Chang, C. F.; Kachel, T.; Beye, M.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Back, C. H.; Bräuer, B.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Krupin, O.; Doehler, M.; Zhu, D.; Hossain, M. A.; Scherz, A. O.; Fausti, D.; Novelli, F.; Esposito, M.; Lee, W. S.; Chuang, Y. D.; Lu, D. H.; Moore, R. G.; Yi, M.; Trigo, M.; Kirchmann, P.; Pathey, L.; Golden, M. S.; Buchholz, M.; Metcalf, P.; Parmigiani, F.; Wurth, W.; Föhlisch, A.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Dürr, H. A.

    2013-10-01

    As the oldest known magnetic material, magnetite (Fe3O4) has fascinated mankind for millennia. As the first oxide in which a relationship between electrical conductivity and fluctuating/localized electronic order was shown, magnetite represents a model system for understanding correlated oxides in general. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism of the insulator-metal, or Verwey, transition has long remained inaccessible. Recently, three-Fe-site lattice distortions called trimerons were identified as the characteristic building blocks of the low-temperature insulating electronically ordered phase. Here we investigate the Verwey transition with pump-probe X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity techniques, and show how trimerons become mobile across the insulator-metal transition. We find this to be a two-step process. After an initial 300?fs destruction of individual trimerons, phase separation occurs on a 1.5±0.2?ps timescale to yield residual insulating and metallic regions. This work establishes the speed limit for switching in future oxide electronics.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles coated with lauric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mamani, J.B.; Costa-Filho, A.J.; Cornejo, D.R.; Vieira, E.D.; Gamarra, L.F.

    2013-07-15

    Understanding the process of synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is important for its implementation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In this work we report the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles made from ferrous oxide through coprecipitation chemical process. The nanostructured material was coated with lauric acid and dispersed in aqueous medium containing surfactant that yielded a stable colloidal suspension. The characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with distinct physico-chemical configurations is fundamental for biomedical applications. Therefore magnetic nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphology by means of TEM and DLS, which showed a polydispersed set of spherical nanoparticles (average diameter of ca. 9 nm) as a result of the protocol. The structural properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD pattern showed the presence of peaks corresponding to the spinel phase of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The relaxivities r{sub 2} and r{sub 2}* values were determined from the transverse relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* at 3 T. Magnetic characterization was performed using SQUID and FMR, which evidenced the superparamagnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Thermal characterization using DSC showed exothermic events associated with the oxidation of magnetite to maghemite. - Highlights: • Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles coated with lauric acid • Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles • Morphological, structural, magnetic, calorimetric and relaxometric characterization.

  19. Low temperature oxidation mechanisms of nanocrystalline magnetite thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, F.; Gergaud, P.; Feuillet, G.; Renevier, H.; Leclere, C.

    2013-01-07

    A detailed investigation of the mechanisms related to the low temperature oxidation of nanocrystalline magnetite thin films into maghemite is presented. Despite strong differences in the functional properties of these two phases, structural similarities make it difficult to distinguish between them, and to quantify the oxidation process, particularly in the case of nanostructured polycrystalline layers. Contrary to the case of bulk materials or monocrystalline films and particles, the oxidation processes in nanocrystalline thin film have only scarcely been studied. In this work, structural and optical techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), EXAFS/X-ray absorption near edge structure, FTIR, and Raman scattering, have been used to estimate the oxidation rate of magnetite. The overall oxidation reaction rates are discussed in the framework of two limiting cases corresponding to intra grain diffusion and to grain boundary diffusion. SIMS profiling and electrical measurements were also carried out to better assess the oxidation quantification in order to conclude on the predominant oxidation mechanisms in this heterogeneous material. We propose a qualitative model for the structure, in terms of insulating zone distribution, for partially oxidized films.

  20. Characterization of Modified Magnetite Nanoparticles for Albumin Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, A. K.; Rastegari, A. A.; Amiri, R.; Ranjbakhsh, E.; Abbasi, M.; Khosropour, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by chemical coprecipitation method. Silica-coated magnetite NPs were prepared by sol-gel reaction, subsequently coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) via silanization reaction, and then were activated with 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine (TCT) and covalently immobilized with bovine serum albumin (BSA). The size and structure of the particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The immobilization was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). XRD analysis showed that the binding process has not done any phase change to Fe3O4. The immobilization time for this process was 4?h and the amount of immobilized BSA for the initial value of 1.05?mg BSA was about 120?mg/gr nanoparticles. Also, the influences of three different buffer solutions and ionic strength on covalent immobilization were evaluated. PMID:24963410

  1. Biomimetic Control of Magnetite Shape and Morphology using Polyaminoacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altan, Cem Levent; Bucak, Seyda; Sommerdijk, Nico

    2012-02-01

    Inspired by nature, this work explores the use of randomly sequenced poly(aminoacids)s to control the size, morphology and magnetic properties of magnetite via synthetic methods in a controlled manner as in the case of magnetotactic bacteria. Aqueous partial oxidation and chemical precipitation methods are employed for the synthesis of 7 - 50 nm iron oxide nanoparticles at room temperature. X -- ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) revealed formation of iron oxide nanoparticles both in the presence and absence of poly(amino acids). In the presence of random poly(amino acid)s with different compositions consisting of E, K and A amino acids the mean particle size for the chemical precipitation method is decreased regardless of amino acid composition. For partial oxidation method, mean particle size is also decreased and nanoparticle strings are observed while synthesized in the presence of poly(aspartic acid). Magnetic properties of particles obtained via different routes are also investigated. This provides a bio-inspired route for control over size, morphology and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles.

  2. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles for bio- and nanotechnology: genetic engineering and biomimetics of bacterial magnetosomes.

    PubMed

    Lang, Claus; Schüler, Dirk; Faivre, Damien

    2007-02-12

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) have the ability to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field. This so-called magnetotaxis is a result of the presence of magnetosomes, organelles which comprise nanometer-sized intracellular crystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) enveloped by a membrane. Because of their unique characteristics, magnetosomes have a high potential for nano- and biotechnological applications, which require a specifically designed particle surface. The functionalization of magnetosomes is possible either by chemical modification of purified particles or by genetic engineering of magnetosome membrane proteins. The second approach is potentially superior to chemical approaches as a large variety of biological functions such as protein tags, fluorophores, and enzymes may be directly incorporated in a site-specific manner during magnetosome biomineralization. An alternative to the bacterial production of magnetosomes are biomimetic approaches, which aim to mimic the bacterial biomineralization pathway in vitro. In MTB a number of magnetosome proteins with putative functions in the biomineralization of the nanoparticles have been identified by genetic and biochemical approaches. The initial results obtained by several groups indicate that some of these proteins have an impact on nanomagnetite properties in vitro. In this article the key features of magnetosomes are discussed, an overview of their potential applications are given, and different strategies are proposed for the functionalization of magnetosome particles and for the biomimetism of their biomineralization pathway. PMID:17295401

  3. Carbon nanotubes/magnetite hybrids prepared by a facile synthesis process and their magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Ni, Qing-Qing; Natsuki, Toshiaki; Fu, Yaqin

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a facile synthesis process is proposed to prepare multiwalled carbon nanotubes/magnetite (MWCNTs/Fe 3O 4) hybrids. The process involves two steps: (1) water-soluble CNTs are synthesized by one-pot modification using potassium persulfate (KPS) as oxidant. (2) Fe 3O 4 is assembled along the treated CNTs by employing a facile hydrothermal process with the presence of hydrazine hydrate as the mineralizer. The treated CNTs can be easily dispersed in aqueous solvent. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis reveals that several functional groups such as potassium carboxylate (-COOK), carbonyl (-C dbnd O) and hydroxyl (-C-OH) groups are formed on the nanotube surfaces. The MWCNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids are characterized with respect to crystal structure, morphology, element composition and magnetic property by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), XPS and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. XRD and TEM results show that the Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles with diameter in the range of 20-60 nm were firmly assembled on the nanotube surface. The magnetic property investigation indicated that the CNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior and possess a saturation magnetization of 32.2 emu/g. Further investigation indicates that the size of assembled Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles can be turned by varying experiment factors. Moreover, a probable growth mechanism for the preparation of CNTs/Fe 3O 4 hybrids was discussed.

  4. Synthesis and investigating the magnetic properties of magnetite nanocrystallites for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansar, Muhammad Zaka; Atiq, Shahid; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Ramay, Shahid M.; Mahmood, Asif

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, use of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications has increased tremendously. In particular, magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles being highly biocompatible are rated very high due to their potential applications in biomedicines, for instance in anticancer drug delivery. In this work, the Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been synthesized using a novel sol-gel based autocombustion technique. The crystal structure of the Fe3O4 phase was confirmed by the data obtained from X-ray diffraction. Scherrer’s formula was employed to estimate the crystallite size of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The structural morphology, investigated by using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), revealed well-dispersed and uniform sized grains in the sample prepared using enhanced fuel concentration. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was employed to investigate the magnetic characteristics of the samples which confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of the Fe3O4 samples, essentially required for cancer treatment. These nanoparticles could further be modified and functionalized by suitable polymers to achieve better biocompatibility before being injected into the diseased cells.

  5. Synthesis of magnetite particles by pulsed alexandrite laser processing of metallic glass precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorescu, M.; Schafer, S.A.; Knobbe, E.T.

    1996-12-31

    Samples of Fe{sub 78}B{sub 13}Si{sub 9} and Fe{sub 81}B{sub 13.5}Si{sub 3.5}C{sub 2} metallic glasses were irradiated with a pulsed alexandrite laser ({lambda} = 750 nm, {tau} = 60 {micro}s) using different laser fluences. Kinetics of laser-induced phase transformations and fluence dependence of magnetic properties were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Low laser fluences were found to induce changes in magnetic texture and onset of crystallization. High laser fluences, however, correlated with additional oxidation effects and the formation of stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles in the irradiated alloy system. An activation energy of 11.9 eV was estimated for the laser-driven synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. Pulsed alexandrite laser processing is an intriguing alternative technique for the controlled synthesis of iron oxide phases from ferromagnetic glass precursors.

  6. The KANT Perspective: A Critique of Pure Transfer (and Pure Interlingua, Pure Statistics, . . . )

    E-print Network

    Carbonell, Jaime

    The KANT Perspective: A Critique of Pure Transfer (and Pure Interlingua, Pure Statistics, . . . ) Jaime G. Carbonell Teruko Mitamura Eric H. Nyberg, 3rd Center for Machine Translation Carnegie Mellon from the interlingua, statistical, and transfer-based MT paradigms to produce accurate, high

  7. Identification of Simultaneous U(VI) Sorption Complexes and U(IV) Nanoprecipitates on the Magnetite (111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2012-05-10

    Sequestration of uranium (U) by magnetite is a potentially important sink for U in natural and contaminated environments. However, molecular-scale controls that favor U(VI) uptake including both adsorption of U(VI) and reduction to U(IV) by magnetite remain poorly understood, in particular, the role of U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca complexes in inhibiting U(VI) reduction. To investigate U uptake pathways on magnetite as a function of U(VI) aqueous speciation, we performed batch sorption experiments on (111) surfaces of natural single crystals under a range of solution conditions (pH 5 and 10; 0.1 mM U(VI); 1 mM NaNO{sub 3}; and with or without 0.5 mM CO{sub 3} and 0.1 mM Ca) and characterized surface-associated U using grazing incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-EXAFS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the absence of both carbonate ([CO{sub 3}]T, denoted here as CO{sub 3}) and calcium (Ca), or in the presence of CO{sub 3} only, coexisting adsorption of U(VI) surface species and reduction to U(IV) occurs at both pH 5 and 10. In the presence of both Ca and CO{sub 3}, only U(VI) adsorption (VI) occurs. When U reduction occurs, nanoparticulate UO{sub 2} forms only within and adjacent to surface microtopographic features such as crystal boundaries and cracks. This result suggests that U reduction is limited to defect-rich surface regions. Further, at both pH 5 and 10 in the presence of both CO{sub 3} and Ca, U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca ternary surface species develop and U reduction is inhibited. These findings extend the range of conditions under which U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction.

  8. Impact of high energy ball milling on the nanostructure of magnetite–graphite and magnetite–graphite–molybdenum disulphide blends

    SciTech Connect

    Österle, W.; Orts-Gil, G.; Gross, T.; Deutsch, C.; Hinrichs, R.; Vasconcellos, M.A.Z.; Zoz, H.; Yigit, D.; Sun, X.

    2013-12-15

    Different, partly complementary and partly redundant characterization methods were applied to study the transition of magnetite, graphite and MoS{sub 2} powders to mechanically alloyed nanostructures. The applied methods were: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), Raman spectroscopy (RS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The main objective was to prepare a model material providing the essential features of a typical tribofilm forming during automotive braking, and to assess the impact of different constituents on sliding behaviour and friction level. Irrespective of the initial grain size, the raw materials were transferred to a nanocrystalline structure and mixed on a nanoscopic scale during high energy ball milling. Whereas magnetite remained almost unchanged, graphite and molybdenum disulphide were transformed to a nanocrystalline and highly disordered structure. The observed increase of the coefficient of friction was attributed to a loss of lubricity of the latter ingredient due to this transformation and subsequent oxidation. - Highlights: • Characterization of microstructural changes induced by high energy ball milling • Assessment of the potential of different characterization methods • Impact of mechanical alloying on tribological performance revealed by tests • Preparation of an artificial third body resembling the one formed during braking.

  9. Crystal structures of carbonates up to Mbar pressures determined by single crystal synchrotron radiation diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlini, M.

    2013-12-01

    The recent improvements at synchrotron beamlines, currently allow single crystal diffraction experiments at extreme pressures and temperatures [1,2] on very small single crystal domains. We successfully applied such technique to determine the crystal structure adopted by carbonates at mantle pressures. The knowledge of carbon-bearing phases is in fact fundamental for any quantitative modelling of global carbon cycle. The major technical difficulty arises after first order transitions or decomposition reactions, since original crystal (apx. 10x10x5 ?m3) is transformed in much smaller crystalline domains often with random orientation. The use of 3D reciprocal space visualization software and the improved resolution of new generation flat panel detectors, however, allow both identification and integration of each single crystal domain, with suitable accuracy for ab-initio structure solution, performed with direct and charge-flipping methods and successive structure refinements. The results obtained on carbonates, indicate two major crystal-chemistry trends established at high pressures. The CO32- units, planar and parallel in ambient pressure calcite and dolomite structures, becomes non parallel in calcite- and dolomite-II and III phases, allowing more flexibility in the structures with possibility to accommodate strain arising from different cation sizes (Ca and Mg in particular). Dolomite-III is therefore also observed to be thermodynamically stable at lower mantle pressures and temperatures, differently from dolomite, which undergoes decomposition into pure end-members in upper mantle. At higher pressure, towards Mbar (lowermost mantle and D'' region) in agreement with theoretical calculations [3,4] and other experimental results [5], carbon coordination transform into 4-fold CO4 units, with different polymerisation in the structure depending on carbonate composition. The second important crystal chemistry feature detected is related to Fe2+ in Fe-bearing magnesite, which spontaneously oxidises at HP/HT, forming Fe3+ carbonates, Fe3+ oxides and reduced carbon (diamonds). Single crystal diffraction approach allowed full structure determination of these phases, yielding to the discovery of few unpredicted structures, such as Mg2Fe2C4O13 and Fe13O19, which can be well reproduced in different experiments. Mg2Fe2C4O13 carbonate present truncated chain C4O13 groups, and Fe13O19 oxide, whose stoichiometry is intermediate between magnetite and hematite, is a one-layer structure, with features encountered in superconducting materials. The results fully support the ideas of unexpected complexities in the mineralogy of the lowermost mantle, and single crystal technique, once properly optimized in ad-hoc synchrotron beamlines, is fundamental for extracting accurate structural information, otherwise rarely accessible with other experimental techniques. References: [1] Merlini M., Hanfland M. (2013). Single crystal diffraction at Mbar conditions by synchrotron radiation. High Pressure Research, in press. [2] Dubrovinsky et al., (2010). High Pressure Research, 30, 620-633. [3] Arapan et al. (1997). Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 268501. [4] Oganov et al. (2008) EPSL, 273, 38-47. [5] Boulard et al. (2011) PNAS, 108, 5184-5187.

  10. Single crystal electron spin resonance of bis(tetraphenylphosphonium) bis(quinoxaline-2,3-dithiolato)oxovanadate(IV) as a pure compound and diluted in the isomorphous molybdenum(IV) compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabbs, Frank E.; Temperley, John

    1989-01-01

    Single crystal e.s.r. spectra at room temperature and Q-band frequencies on [PPh 4] 2 [(Mo/V)O(qdt= 2] (qdt = quinoxaline-2,3-dithiolate) containing ca 3% vanadium gave the spin-Hamiltonian parameters g1 = 1.977 ± 0.001, g2 = 1.985 ± 0.001, g3 = 1.987 ± 0.001, A1 = (-38.5 ± 0.3) × 10 -4, A2 = (-45.1 ± 0.3) × 10 -4, A3 = (-133.2 ± 0.3) × 10 -4 cm -1, and Q' = -(0.15±0.05) × 10 -4 cm -1. The g and A tensor axes are not coincident. The principal values of the g and A tensors have been analysed via an angular overlap treatment. Proton spin-flip transitions were observed in the spectra at X-band frequencies. Single crystal e.s.r. spectra of undiluted [PPh 4] 2 [VO(qdt) 2] at both X- and Q-band frequencies are interpreted in terms of a two-dimensional weak exchange model with J0 = -48 ± 2 G (ferromagnetic).

  11. Crystal modification of dipyridamole using different solvents and crystallization conditions.

    PubMed

    Adhiyaman, R; Basu, Sanat Kumar

    2006-09-14

    Dipyridamole crystals having different types of habits, improved dissolution rate were prepared by recrystallization from selected solvents, such as acetonitrile, benzene and methanol (Method I); crystals have also been made by solvent change using methanolic solution of dipyridamole in the presence of 2% solutions of Tween-80, Povidone K30 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 (Method II). Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffractometry, IR spectrometry and differential scanning calorimetry were used to investigate the physicochemical characteristics of the crystals. The comparative dissolution behavior of the newly developed crystals and that of the untreated dipyridamole were also studied. It was found that the newly developed crystals were different from each other with respect to physical properties but are chemically identical. The crystals, obtained (Method I) from benzene and acetonitrile, produced needle shaped crystals and that obtained from methanol produced rectangular shaped crystals. But the crystals obtained (Method II) with the methanolic solution of the drug in the presence of Tween-80, Povidone K30 and PEG-4000 produced smooth needle shaped crystals. X-ray diffraction spectra and differential scanning calorimetry study of the newly developed crystals, clearly indicate that dipyridamole exist in different crystal modification. The dissolution rate of newly developed crystals was found to be greater than the pure drug dipyridamole. Stability studies at 40 degrees C (75% RH) for 1 month for the modified crystals as well as the pure drug did show some changes in the XRD and DSC but not in IR studies. PMID:16842943

  12. Lysozyme crystallization by vapor diffusion: characterization and modeling in the absence and presence of exogenous minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, W. L.; Rousseau, R. W.; Sambanis, A.

    1995-01-01

    A model accounting for water evaporation and crystal growth was synthesized to simulate protein concentration profiles in the crystallization wells of a vapor-diffusion apparatus. The model calculations were compared with experimental results obtained with chicken egg white lysozyme crystallized in the absence and presence of exogenous mineral particles. The model predicted the increase in protein concentration during water evaporation and the decrease during crystal growth. The effects of magnetite, galena and chalcopyrite on the time profile of dissolved lysozyme concentration appeared minimal, except for the occurrence of earlier nucleation in the presence of magnetite. Few of the lysozyme crystals formed were physically associated with these minerals. More protein crystals were associated with topaz, lepidolite and apophyllite, which exhibit a close match of their crystalline lattice to that of lysozyme.

  13. Microreactor and electron spectroscopy studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, H.J.; Bonzel, H.P.; Schwarting, W.; Gafner, G.

    1981-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H/sub 2/ (1:3 mixture) at 1 bar total pressure and 570 K has been studied in a differential microreactor system on reduced and unreduced Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ (magnetite). The catalytic reactivity data were complemented by surface analytical measurements using Auger electron and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, ESCA). XPS measurements showed evidence of carbon deposition, mostly in the form of graphite on all samples. The rate of methanation on reduced magnetite was characterized by a maximum and subsequent decrease. Both features were dependent on the reduction history of the sample. All samples gave rise to the production of higher-molecular-weight species. The selectivity of reduced magnetite tended towards the formation of saturated hydrocarbons while that of the unreduced magnetite favoured the formation of alkenes. It was concluded that the reduction of magnetite led to a considerable increase in surface area and porosity and that secondary reactions of the alkenes caused the primary product spectrum to shift from alkenes to alkanes. Accordingly the polymerisation probability increased from 0.3 for unreduced magnetite (also for clean foil) to greater than or equal to 0.42 for reduced magnetite.

  14. Characterization and cytotoxicity studies on liposome-hydrophobic magnetite hybrid colloids.

    PubMed

    Floris, Alice; Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria; Lai, Francesco; Marongiu, Francesca; Scano, Alessandra; Pilloni, Martina; Angius, Fabrizio; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; Ennas, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to highlight the main features of magnetoliposomes prepared by TLE, using hydrophobic magnetite, and stabilized with oleic acid, instead of using the usual hydrophilic magnetite surrounded by sodium citrate. These biocompatible magnetoliposomes (MLs) were prepared with the purpose of producing a magnetic carrier capable of loading either hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs. The effect of different liposome/magnetite weight ratios on the stability of magnetoliposomes was evaluated by monitoring the mean diameter of the particles, their polydispersity index, and zeta potential over time. The prepared magnetoliposomes showed a high liposome-magnetite association, with magnetoliposomes containing PEG (polyethylene glycol) showing the best magnetite loading values. To verify the position of magnetite nanoparticles in the vesicular structures, the morphological characteristics of the structures were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM studies showed a strong affinity between hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles, the surrounding oleic acid molecules, and phospholipids. Furthermore, the concentration above which one would expect to find a cytotoxic effect on cells as well as morphological cell-nanoparticle interactions was studied in situ by using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, and the Prussian Blue modified staining method. PMID:24776672

  15. Anaerobic production of magnetite by a dissimilatory iron-reducing microorganism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Stolz, J.F.; Nord, G.L., Jr.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The potential contribution of microbial metabolism to the magnetization of sediments has only recently been recognized. In the presence of oxygen, magnetotactic bacteria can form intracellular chains of magnetite while using oxygen or nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor for metabolism1. The production of ultrafine-grained magnetite by magnetotactic bacteria in surficial aerobic sediments may contribute significantly to the natural remanent magnetism of sediments2-4. However, recent studies on iron reduction in anaerobic sediments suggested that bacteria can also generate magnetite in the absence of oxygen5. We report here on a sediment organism, designated GS-15, which produces copious quantities of ultrafine-grained magnetite under anaerobic conditions. GS-15 is not magnetotactic, but reduces amorphic ferric oxide to extracellular magnetite during the reduction of ferric iron as the terminal electron acceptor for organic matter oxidation. This novel metabolism may be the mechanism for the formation of ultrafine-grained magnetite in anaerobic sediments, and couldaccount for the accumulation of magnetite in ancient iron formations and hydrocarbon deposits. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. Synthesis and magnetic characterization of magnetite obtained by monowavelength visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yulong; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039; School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050017 ; Wei, Yu; Sun, Yuhan; Wang, Jing

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetite was synthesized under monowavelength LED irradiation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different wavelength irradiations led to distinctive characteristics of magnetite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particle sizes of magnetite were controlled by different irradiation wavelengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wavelength affects the magnetic characteristics of magnetite. -- Abstract: Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by aerial oxidation Fe{sup II}EDTA solution under different monowavelength light-emitting diode (LED) lamps irradiation at room temperature. The results of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra show the formation of magnetite nanoparticle further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and the difference in crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles are nearly spherical in shape based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Average crystallite sizes of magnetite can be controlled by different irradiation light wavelengths from XRD and TEM: 50.1, 41.2, and 20.3 nm for red, green, and blue light irradiation, respectively. The magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples were investigated. Saturation magnetization values of magnetic nanoparticles were 70.1 (sample M-625), 65.3 (sample M-525), and 58.2 (sample M-460) emu/g, respectively.

  17. Arsenic sorption by nanocrystalline magnetite: an example of environmentally promising interface with geosphere.

    PubMed

    Buj?áková, Z; Baláž, P; Zorkovská, A; Sayagués, M J; Ková?, J; Timko, M

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, the sorption of arsenic onto nanocrystalline magnetite mineral Fe3O4 was studied in a model system. Nanocrystalline magnetite was produced by mechanical activation in a planetary ball mill from natural microcrystalline magnetite. As a consequence of milling, the specific surface area increased from 0.1m(2)/g to 11.9 m(2)/g and the surface site concentration enhanced from 2.2 sites/nm(2) to 8.4 sites/nm(2). These changes in surface properties of magnetite lead to the enhancement of arsenic removal from model system. The best sorption ability was achieved with magnetite sample activated for 90 min. In this case the sample was able to absorb around 4 mg/g. The structural changes of magnetite were also observed and the new hematite phase was detected after 120 min of milling. A good correlation between the decreasing particle size, increasing specific surface area and reduction of saturation magnetization was found. In desorption study, KOH and NaOH were found as the best eluents where more than 70% of arsenic was released back into the solution. The principal novelty of the paper is that mineral magnetite, truly one nature's gift can be used after "smart" milling (mechanical activation) as an effective arsenic sorbent. PMID:23531452

  18. Oxygen isotope ratios in authigenic magnetites from the Belden Formation, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripperdan, Robert L.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Elmore, R. Douglas; Banerjee, Sanjay; Engel, M. H.

    1998-09-01

    Authigenic magnetites from the Belden Formation at Bassam Park, Colorado, were analyzed for their 18O/16O composition using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The ?18O values of magnetite-rimmed pyrite (MagPy) grains averaged -8.5‰ (versus VSMOW). Small (25-50 ?m) iron oxide grains had a range of ?18O values from -9.7‰ to -5.5‰, consistent with a variably hematized magnetite population having a ?18O value of around -9‰ for magnetite. The ?18O results suggest that the magnetite rims and grains formed in contact with a water having ?18O of near 0‰ or less, implying a meteoric or connate source rather than a highly evolved orogenic or basinal fluid. This supports paleomagnetic results that suggest the formation of authigenic magnetites under Mesozoic burial conditions at some Belden Formation localities, rather than in response to orogenic fluid migration driven by Early Tertiary tectonic uplift. The ?18O results also support the observation that chemical remanent magnetizations related to authigenic magnetite formation cannot be universally applied to the dating of fluid migration events associated with orogenic deformation.

  19. Influence of Magnetite Nanoparticles on Human Leukocyte Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džarová, Anežka; Dubni?ková, Martina; Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Kop?anský, Peter; Gojzewski, Hubert; Timko, Milan

    2010-12-01

    Chemically synthesized magnetite particles coated by sodium oleate and PEG (MNP), and magnetosomes (MS) influence the process of phagocytosis and the metabolic activity (lysozyme and peroxidase activity) in leukocytes. Lysozyme activity is oxygen-independent liquidation mechanisms of engulfed microorganism, peroxidase activity is an oxygen-dependent mechanism. Both tested types of nanoparticles lysed leukocyte cells during incubation. MNP at concentrations of 10 and 20 ?g/mL lysed almost all leukocytes and their cell viability was in the 14±0.05% range. On the other hand MS begin to influence leukocytes activity at the concentration of 1 ?g/ml and this influence grows with increasing concentration up to 20 ?g/ml. MS are more suitable for biological applications than MNP which are more aggressive material than MS. MS should not be used above 10 ?g/mL.

  20. Hydrocolloid-Stabilized Magnetite for Efficient Removal of Radioactive Phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Vellora Thekkae Padil, Vinod; Rouha, Michael; ?erník, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste is a common by-product when using radioactive isotopes in research and medicine. Efficient remediation of such liquid waste is crucial for increasing safety during the necessary storage of the material. Herein, we present a novel Gum Karaya stabilized magnetite for the efficient removal of radioactive phosphorus 32P from liquid radioactive waste. This environmentally friendly material is well suited to be used as a nanohydrogel for the removal of liquid waste, which can then be stored in a smaller space and without the risk of the spills inherent to the initial liquid material. The maximum adsorption capacity of the GK/M in this study was found to be 15.68?GBq/g. We present a thorough morphological characterization of the synthesised GK/M, as well as a discussion of the possible phosphorus adsorption mechanisms. PMID:24696854

  1. Improving biohydrogen production using Clostridium beijerinckii immobilized with magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seelert, Trevor; Ghosh, Dipankar; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    In order to supplement the need for alternative energy resources within the near future, enhancing the production of biohydrogen with immobilized Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB8052 was investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were functionalized, with chitosan and alginic acid polyelectrolytes using a layer-by-layer method, to promote bacterial attachment. Cultivating C. beijerinckii with these nanoparticles resulted in a shorter lag growth phase and increased total biohydrogen production within 100-ml, 250-ml and 3.6-L reactors compared with freely suspended organisms. The greatest hydrogen yield was obtained in the 250-ml reactor with a value of 2.1?±?0.7 mol H2/mol glucose, corresponding to substrate conversion and energy conversion efficiencies of 52?±?18 and 10?±?3 %, respectively. The hydrogen yields obtained using the immobilized bacteria are comparable to values found in literature. However, to make this process viable, further improvements are required to increase the substrate and energy conversion efficiencies. PMID:25728446

  2. Biocompatible hydrodispersible magnetite nanoparticles used as antibiotic drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Bolocan, Alexandra; Mihaiescu, Dan Eduard; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Voicu, Georgeta; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Ficai, Anton; Vasile, Bogdan ?tefan; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Pop, Corina Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a newly synthesized vectorizing nanosystem, based on hydrodispersible magnetite nanoparticles (HMNPs) with an average size less than 10 nm, obtained by precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in basic solution of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis coupled with thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA) and bioevaluated for cytotoxicity and antibiotic delivery in active forms. The obtained data demonstrate that HMNPs can be used as an efficient drug delivery system, for clinically relevant antimicrobial drugs. HMNPs antimicrobial activity depended on the loaded drug structure and the tested microbial strain, being more efficient against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, comparing with the Escherichia coli strain. The novel HMNPs demonstrated an acceptable biocompatibility level, being thus a very good candidate for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery or targeting. PMID:26193200

  3. Zener Double Exchange from Local Valence Fluctuations in Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    McQueeney, Robert John; Yethiraj, M.; Chang, S.; Montfrooij, W.; Perring, T. G.; Honig, J. M.; Metcalf, P.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a mixed valent system where electronic conductivity occurs on the B site (octahedral) iron sublattice of the spinel structure. Below Tv = 123 K, a metal-insulator transition occurs which is argued to arise from the charge ordering of 2+ and 3+ iron valences on the B sites (Verwey transition). Inelastic neutron scattering measurements show that optical spin waves propagating on the B site sublattice (~80 meV) are shifted upwards in energy above TV due to the occurrence of B-B ferromagnetic double exchange in the mixed valent phase. The double exchange interaction affects only spin waves of 5 symmetry, not all modes, indicating that valence fluctuations are slow and the double exchange is constrained by short-range electron correlations above Tv.

  4. Biofunctionalized magnetic hydrogel nanospheres of magnetite and ?-carrageenan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel-da-Silva, Ana L.; Fateixa, Sara; Guiomar, António J.; Costa, Benilde F. O.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Trindade, Tito; Goodfellow, Brian J.; Gil, Ana M.

    2009-09-01

    Magnetic hydrogel ?-carrageenan nanospheres were successfully prepared via water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions combined with thermally induced gelation of the polysaccharide. The size of the nanospheres (an average diameter (?) of about 50 and 75 nm) was modulated by varying the concentration of surfactant. The nanospheres contained superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (?8 nm), previously prepared by co-precipitation within the biopolymer. Carboxyl groups, at a concentration of about 4 mmol g-1, were successfully grafted at the surface of these magnetic nanospheres via carboxymethylation of the ?-carrageenan. The carboxylated nanospheres were shown to be thermo-sensitive in the 37-45 °C temperature range, indicating their potential as thermally controlled delivery systems for drugs and/or magnetic particles at physiological temperatures. Finally, preliminary results have been obtained for IgG antibody conjugation of the carboxylated nanospheres and the potential of these systems for bio-applications is discussed.

  5. Cooling rate dependence of synthetic SD,PSD,MD magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, S.; Ferk, A.; Hess, K.; Leonhardt, R.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of the cooling rate on the thermoremanent magnetization is investigated experimentally. Several remelted volcanic glass samples as well as six samples of synthetic magnetite with grain sizes ranging from below 1 ?m (single domain) to 12.1 ?m (multidomain) are treated. The aim of this study is to investigate the theoretical log-linear relationship of magnetization acquisition with cooling rate and its domain state dependency. Earlier investigations suggest that an assemblage of non interacting SD particles acquires a larger TRM during slower cooling. Negative and/or MD particles, however, lead to a lower TRM after slower cooling rates. To avoid chemical alteration the synthetic samples are sealed in evacuated quartz glass tubes and stabilized thermally. Additionally, a natural phonolitic glass from Tenerife was investigated which was tempered for 10h. The dominating magnetic remanence carriers of the remelted volcanic glass are low titanium titanomagnetites. All samples are heated and cooled in the Earth magnetic field (approx. 48.000 nT) using 5 different cooling rates between 1 K/min and 15 K/m in the unblocking spectrum. The acquired TRM of all samples is measured after the controlled heating/cooling process using a cryogenic magnetometer of type 3G. Additional rock magnetic measurements like hysteresis loops are conducted for the remelted glasses to obtain an independent measure of domain state. Remelted glass samples show single domain characteristics in all rock magnetic measurements. As expected they acquire larger TRMs during slower cooling. Synthetic magnetite samples are currently measured. Unfortunately, due to problems with the cryogenic magnetometer, results were not available by the time of abstract submission.

  6. Growth of magnetite nanorods along its easy-magnetization axis of [1 1 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Peng, Zhenmeng; Huang, Yujie; Chen, Qianwang

    2004-03-01

    Magnetite nanorods were successfully synthesized from ferric chloride (FeCl3) and diamine hydrate (H4N2·H2O) reagents via a simple, mild reduction-oxidization hydrothermal process in the presence of polyethylene glycol. The magnetite nanorods were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetization measurements. The nanorods exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior with a high saturation magnetization (90.5 emu/g), a little lower than that of the corresponding bulk material (92 emu/g). The mechanism for the improved magnetic properties of the magnetite nanorods is discussed based on the oriented growth of particles.

  7. Pure optical photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L Jay; Carson, Paul L; Wang, Xueding

    2011-05-01

    The concept of pure optical photoacoustic microscopy(POPAM) was proposed based on optical rastering of a focused excitation beam and optically sensing the photoacoustic signal using a microring resonator fabricated by a nanoimprinting technique. After the refinements of the microring's working wavelength and in the resonator structure and mold fabrication, an ultrahigh Q factor of 3.0×10(5) was achieved which provided high sensitivity with a noise equivalent detectable pressure(NEDP) value of 29 Pa. This NEDP is much lower than the hundreds of Pascals achieved with existing optical resonant structures such as etalons, fiber gratings and dielectric multilayer interference filters available for acoustic measurement. The featured high sensitivity allowed the microring resonator to detect the weak photoacoustic signals from micro- or submicroscale objects. The inherent superbroad bandwidth of the optical microring resonator combined with an optically focused scanning beam provided POPAM with high resolution in the axial as well as both lateral directions while the axial resolution of conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) suffers from the limited bandwidth of PZT detectors. Furthermore, the broadband microring resonator showed similar sensitivity to that of our most sensitive PZT detector. The current POPAM system provides a lateral resolution of 5 ?m and an axial resolution of 8 ?m, comparable to that achieved by optical microscopy while presenting the unique contrast of optical absorption and functional information complementing other optical modalities. The 3D structure of microvasculature, including capillary networks, and even individual red blood cells have been discerned successfully in the proof-of-concept experiments on mouse bladders ex vivo and mouse ears in vivo. The potential of approximately GHz bandwidth of the microring resonator also might allow much higher resolution than shown here in microscopy of optical absorption and acoustic propagation properties at depths in unfrozen tissue specimens or thicker tissue sections, which is not now imageable with current optical or acoustic microscopes of comparable resolution. PMID:21643156

  8. Effect of Shock Waves on Magnetic Susceptibility and Microstructure of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, B.; Kontny, A.; Fritz, J.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of laboratory shock waves on the magnetic susceptibility and structural behavior of magnetite, and its usage for shock pressure barometry in terrestrial rocks and meteorites.

  9. Characterization of interfacial reactions in magnetite tunnel junctions with transmission electron microscopy

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, David E.

    transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy to investigate the interfacial fully understood. Since high resolution transmission electron microscopy HRTEM has the abilityCharacterization of interfacial reactions in magnetite tunnel junctions with transmission electron

  10. Magnetite-bubble aggregates at mixing interfaces in andesite magma bodies

    E-print Network

    Edmonds, M.; Brett, A.; Herd, R. A.; Humphreys, M. C. S.; Woods, A.

    2014-08-14

    -magnetite aggregates in magmas carries with it interesting implications for the fluid mechanics of magma bodies and for the magma mixing process responsible for the formation of andesites. We use image analysis and statistical methods to illustrate a spatial...

  11. Magnetite-supported sulfonic acid: a retrievable nanocatalyst for the Ritter reaction and multicomponent reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetite-sulfonic acid (NanocatFe-OSO3H), prepared by wet-impregnation method, serves as a magnetically retrievable sustainable catalyst for the Ritter reaction which can be used in several reaction cycles without any loss of activity.

  12. Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole magnetite core-shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-11-13

    In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. Magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of magnetite was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.

  13. Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole magnetite core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. Magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of magnetite was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.

  14. Magnetite Nucleation in Mantle Xenoliths During Quasi-Adiabatic Ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, K. B., Jr.; Filiberto, J.; Friedman, S. A.; Knafelc, J.; Conder, J. A.; Ferre, E. C.; Khakhalova, E.; Feinberg, J. M.; Neal, C. R.; Ionov, D. A.; Hernandez, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    Can magnetite be a stable phase in the lithospheric mantle? Equilibrium-based thermodynamic calculations and petrologic models predict that it should not be stable. Studies of mantle xenoliths during the 1980s concluded that even though there were rare exceptions, mantle rocks do not host sufficient concentrations of ferromagnetic minerals and are too hot to allow any magnetic remanence. Thus, conventional wisdom dictates that the Moho constitutes a fundamental magnetic boundary. Yet, growing evidence from a more complete global mantle xenolith survey indicates the presence of ferromagnetic minerals in mantle materials. Examination of mantle xenoliths devoid of serpentinization and meteoric alteration show the presence of ferromagnetic minerals within primary silicate mineral phases, including olivine, pyroxene, and spinel. Nucleation of these magnetic minerals could occur at three different stages: in-situ in the mantle, upon ascent, and at the surface. This study reports the results of laboratory-based quasi-adiabatic decompression experiments that aim to simulate the ascent of mantle xenoliths through the lithosphere and test if magnetite growth is promoted during the process. The starting material for these experiments is San Carlos olivine, which holds a magnetic remanence of less than ~10-10 A/m2-1kg2 (the detection limit of the vibrating sample magnetometer). This low starting remanence will allow us to identify whether new magnetic minerals are formed during the decompression experiments using either vibrating sample magnetometry or SQUID-based rock magnetometers. All olivine grains in these experiments were hand-picked under a light microscope in an effort to avoid the inclusion of grains with spurious magnetic minerals. Olivine powders from these carefully selected grains will be used to represent average mantle olivine compositions (Fo90-Fo92). Experiments will start at 1 GPa and be decompressed to 0.3 GPa over 60 hrs at constant temperature (1200° C). These experiments will provide an assessment of the stability of magnetic mineral assemblages within the mantle, unfettered by the effects of serpentinization and surficial oxidation, which in turn will better inform our understanding of long wavelength magnetic anomalies in the Earth.

  15. Preparation of ferrimagnetic magnetite microspheres for in situ hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, Masakazu; Tanaka, Masashi; Kokubo, Tadashi; Inoue, Yoshiaki; Yao, Takeshi; Hamada, Sunao; Shinjo, Teruya

    2005-05-01

    Ferrimagnetic microspheres 20-30 microm in diameter are useful as thermoseeds for inducing hyperthermia in cancers, especially for tumors located deep inside the body. The microspheres are entrapped in the capillary bed of the tumors when they are implanted through blood vessels and heat cancers locally by their hysteresis loss when placed under an alternating magnetic field. In the present study, preparation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) microspheres 20-30 microm in diameter was attempted by melting powders in high-frequency induction thermal plasma, and by precipitation from aqueous solution. The microspheres prepared by melting powders in high-frequency induction thermal plasma were composed of a large amount of Fe(3)O(4) and a small amount of wustite (FeO), and those subsequently heat treated at 600 degrees C for 1 h under 5.1 x 10(3) Pa were fully composed of Fe(3)O(4) 1 microm in size. The saturation magnetization and coercive force of the heat-treated microspheres were 92 emu g(-1) and 50 Oe, respectively. The heat generation of the heat-treated microspheres was estimated to be 10 Wg(-1), under 300 Oe and 100 kHz. The microspheres prepared by precipitation from aqueous solution consisted of beta-FeOOH, and those subsequently heat treated at 400 degrees C for 1 h in a 70% CO(2) + 30% H(2) atmosphere consisted of Fe(3)O(4) crystals 50 nm in size. The saturation magnetization and coercive force of the heat-treated microspheres were 53 emu g(-1) and 156 Oe, respectively. The heat generation of the heat-treated microspheres was estimated to be 41 Wg(-1), under 300 Oe and 100 kHz. The latter microspheres are believed to be promising thermoseeds for hyperthermic treatment of cancer. PMID:15585224

  16. Magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules in CK carbonaceous chondrites - Implications for the timing of CK oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites contain rare (about 0.1 vol pct) magnetite-sulfide chondrules that range from about 240 to 500 microns in apparent diameter and have ellipsoidal to spheroidal morphologies, granular textures, and concentric layering. They resemble the magnetite-sulfide nodules occurring inside mafic silicate chondrules in CK chondrites. It seems likely that the magnetite-sulfide chondrules constitute the subset of magnetite-sulfide nodules that escaped as immiscible droplets from their molten silicate chondrule hosts during chondrule formation. The intactness of the magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules implies that oxidation of CK metal occurred before agglomeration. Hence, the pervasive silicate darkening of CK chondrites was caused by the shock mobilization of magnetite and sulfide, not metallic Fe-Ni and sulfide as in shock-darkened ordinary chondrites.

  17. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-14

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689?°C as compared to 580?°C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF MAGNETITE IN B-TYPE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Bin; Jewitt, David E-mail: jewitt@ucla.ed

    2010-09-15

    Spectrally blue (B-type) asteroids are rare, with the second discovered asteroid, Pallas, being the largest and most famous example. We conducted a focused, infrared spectroscopic survey of B-type asteroids to search for water-related features in these objects. Our results show that the negative optical spectral slope of some B-type asteroids is due to the presence of a broad absorption band centered near 1.0 {mu}m. The 1 {mu}m band can be matched in position and shape using magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), which is an important indicator of past aqueous alteration in the parent body. Furthermore, our observations of B-type asteroid (335) Roberta in the 3 {mu}m region reveal an absorption feature centered at 2.9 {mu}m, which is consistent with the absorption due to phyllosilicates (another hydration product) observed in CI chondrites. The new observations suggest that at least some B-type asteroids are likely to have incorporated significant amounts of water ice and to have experienced intensive aqueous alteration.

  19. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Geiss, Roy H.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, ?, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with ? = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  20. Lipolytic biocatalyst based on recyclable magnetite-polysiloxane nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdureanu-Angheluta, Anamaria; Ignat, Maurusa-Elena; Maier, Stelian Sergiu; Pricop, Lucia; Coroaba, Adina; Fifere, Adrian; Pinteala, Mariana; Chiriac, Anca

    2014-02-01

    This work presents a novel hydrophobic magnetizable nanosupport able to load and valorize the lipase derived from Candida cylindracea (CCL). Nude magnetite nanoparticles (MP) were coated by covalent binding with an ester-polysiloxane (PS). The chemical composition, dimensions, morphology and magnetic properties of the resulted core-shell nanoparticles (MP-PS-CCL) are analyzed. The amount of immobilized lipase increase when loaded from aqueous solutions of up to 12.8 mg/mL CCL, when a lipolytic activity of 74.76 U/g is achieved. For higher concentrations of the loading solution, the activity of immobilized lipase decreases, probably due to the enzyme steric hindrance. MP-PS-CCL exhibits a good lipolytic activity against 4-nitrophenyl laurate (4-NPL), which allows the kinetic study of lipolysis reaction by measuring the amount of released 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), when working at room temperature, in TRIS buffer (pH 8.2). Even after three months of storage, the product is able to sustain up to 4 reusing cycles.

  1. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic magnetite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Ren, Wei E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yuepeng; Chen, Xing; Ye, Zuo-Guang E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-05-07

    One of the key challenges in realizing superparamagnetism in magnetic thin films lies in finding a low-energy growth way to create sufficiently small grains and magnetic domains which allow the magnetization to randomly and rapidly reverse. In this work, well-defined superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films are successfully prepared using atomic layer deposition technique by finely controlling the growth condition and post-annealing process. As-grown Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films exhibit a conformal surface and poly-crystalline nature with an average grain size of 7?nm, resulting in a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 210?K. After post-annealing in H{sub 2}/Ar at 400?°C, the as-grown ??Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample is reduced to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, exhibiting a ferrimagnetic ordering and distinct magnetic shape anisotropy. Atomic layer deposition of magnetite thin films with well-controlled morphology and magnetic properties provides great opportunities for integrating with other order parameters to realize magnetic nano-devices with potential applications in spintronics, electronics, and bio-applications.

  3. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E. Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5?nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50?K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, ?, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with ??=?0.024?±?0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  4. Evaluation of magnetic heating of asymmetric magnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin; Sabyrov, Kairat; Klein, Todd; Lee Penn, R.; Wiedmann, Timothy S.

    2015-05-01

    Characterization and theoretical description of relatively large (>100 nm), asymmetric magnetic particles remain of interest particularly for applications to the mechanical damage of cells. In this work, we have examined the properties of three types of magnetite, Fe3O4, particles that were prepared by hydrogen reduction of hematite, ?-Fe2O3. Transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the size and aspect ratio (AR), which were 1.8, 3.4 and 6.6, and all displayed magnetic hysteresis with corresponding saturation magnetization values of 65, 47, and 26 emu/g, respectively. With application of an alternating magnetic field to low concentrations, the temperature increased linearly with time, and the specific loss power (SLP) increased with increasing aspect ratio with values of 11.8, 24, and 26.8 W/g. The SLP increased linearly with the square of the applied magnetic field at low concentrations, but deviations were noted for high concentrations of the 2.4 and 6.6 AR particles. SLP was also dependent on frequency, but the functional relationship was not reliably determined. In consideration of the possible heating mechanisms, none provided a satisfactorily explanation for all types of particles. While these particles are not satisfactory for magnetic hyperthermia, they may have promise for causing cell death by magnetically inducing the particles to physically rotate or vibrate.

  5. Bi-functional gold-coated magnetite composites with improved biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Arsianti, Maria; Lim, May; Lou, Shi Nee; Goon, Ian Y; Marquis, Christopher P; Amal, Rose

    2011-02-15

    The effect of gold attachment on the physical characteristics, cellular uptake, gene expression efficiency, and biocompatibility of magnetic iron oxide (MNP) vector was investigated in vitro in BHK21 cells. The surface modification of magnetite with gold was shown to alter the morphology and surface charge of the vector. Nonetheless, despite the differences in the surface charge with and without gold attachment, the surface charge of all vectors were positive when conjugated with PEI/DNA complex, and switched from positive to negative when suspended in cell media containing serum, indicating the adsorption of serum components onto the composite. The cellular uptake of all MNP vectors under the influence of a magnetic field increased when the composite loadings increased, and was higher for the MNP vector that was modified with gold. Both bare magnetite and gold-coated magnetite vectors gave similar optimal gene expression efficiency, however, the gold-coated magnetite vector required a 25-fold higher overall loading to achieve a comparable efficiency as the attachment of gold increased the particle size, thus reducing the surface area for PEI/DNA complex conjugation. The MNP vector without gold showed optimal gene expression efficiency at a specific magnetite loading, however further increases beyond the optimum loading decreased the efficiency of gene expression. The drop in efficiency at high magnetite loadings was attributed to the significant reduction in cellular viability, indicating the bare magnetite became toxic at high intracellular levels. The gene expression efficiency of the gold-modified vector, on the other hand, did not diminish with increasing magnetite loadings. Intracellular examination of both bare magnetite and gold-coated magnetite vectors at 48h post-magnetofection using transmission electron microscopy provided evidence of the localization of both vectors in the cell nucleus for gene expression and elucidated the nuclear uptake mechanism of both vectors. The results of this work demonstrate the efficacy of gold-modified vectors to be used in cellular therapy research that can function both as a magnetically-driven gene delivery vehicle and an intracellular imaging agent with negligible impact on cell viability. PMID:21131002

  6. The synthesis and characterization of poly(?-glutamic acid)-coated magnetite nanoparticles and their effects on antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbaraj, B. Stephen; Kao, T. H.; Tsai, T. Y.; Chiu, C. P.; Kumar, R.; Chen, B. H.

    2011-02-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) modified with sodium and calcium salts of poly(?-glutamic acid) (NaPGA and CaPGA) were synthesized by the coprecipitation method, followed by characterization and evaluation of their antibacterial and cytotoxic effects. Superparamagnetic MNPs are particularly attractive for magnetic driving as well as bacterial biofilm and cell targeting in in vivo applications. Characterization of synthesized MNPs by the Fourier transform infrared spectra and magnetization curves confirmed the PGA coating on MNPs. The mean diameter of NaPGA- and CaPGA-coated MNPs as determined by transmission electron microscopy was 11.8 and 14 nm, respectively, while the x-ray diffraction pattern revealed the as-synthesized MNPs to be pure magnetite. Based on agar dilution assay, both NaPGA- and CaPGA-coated MNPs showed a lower minimum inhibitory concentration in Salmonella enteritidis SE 01 than the commercial antibiotics linezolid and cefaclor, but the former was effective against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 10832, whereas the latter was effective against Escherichia coli O157:H7 TWC 01. An in vitro cytotoxicity study in human skin fibroblast cells as measured by MTT assay implied the as-synthesized MNPs to be nontoxic. This outcome demonstrated that both ?-PGA-modified MNPs are cytocompatible and possess antibacterial activity in vitro, and thereby should be useful in in vivo studies for biomedical applications.

  7. Spontaneous Symmetry-Breaking Vortex Lattice Transitions in Pure Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, M.; Forgan, E.M.; Brown, S.P.; Bowell, C.; Ramos, S.; Lycett, R.J.; Charalambous, D.; Fort, D.; Christen, D.K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Dewhurst, C.D.; Cubitt, R.

    2006-04-28

    We report an extensive investigation of magnetic vortex lattice (VL) structures in single crystals of pure niobium with the magnetic field applied parallel to a fourfold symmetry axis, so as to induce frustration between the cubic crystal symmetry and hexagonal VL coordination expected in an isotropic situation. We observe new VL structures and phase transitions; all the VL phases observed (including those with an exactly square unit cell) spontaneously break some crystal symmetry. One phase even has the lowest possible symmetry of a two-dimensional Bravais lattice. This is quite unlike the situation in high-T{sub c} or borocarbide superconductors, where VL structures orient along particular directions of high crystal symmetry. The causes of this behavior are discussed.

  8. Low-temperature formation of pyrrhotite from magnetite sup + pyrite: Evidence from low-grade metamorphism and implications for magnetite preservation during deep burial

    SciTech Connect

    Gillett, S.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Early magnetite in sedimentary rocks must be preserved to retain a paleomagnetic signature; however, reactions such as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + 3 FeS{sub 2} + CH{sub 4}' = (organic matter) = 6 FeS' (pyrr.) + CO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O tend to the right for temperatures less than {approximately}200C. Such low temperatures strongly imply that magnetite can be destroyed merely by deep burial. Such pyrrhotite formation is illustrated by very low-grade metamorphism in a contact aureole surrounding the Jurassic Notch Peak stock in the central House Range of western Utah. The stock invades a Cambrian sedimentary sequence containing miogeoclinal limestones with intercalated siltstones. Limestones in the aureole yield a scattered, two-polarity remagnetization, residing in pyrrhotite, which extends into rocks that appear unmetamorphosed (temperatures {approximately}250C). The pyrrhotite could not have been precipitated from externally derived fluids because oxygen isotopic data from the limestones show no influence of magmatic or phreatic water; hence, it must have formed in situ, as in the above equation. Outside the aureole, a characteristic magnetization is preserved that apparently reflects late Paleozoic remagnetization and that probably resides in authigenic magnetite. Hence, it appears that this relatively late magnetite was in turn destroyed by modest reheating from the pluton. In general, thermal remagnetization of sedimentary rocks is probably rare: chemical changes probably have a much more profound effect on the paleomagnetic signatures.

  9. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ? 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (?) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ? = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05-0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  10. Optimizing magnetite nanoparticles for mass sensitivity in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Minard, Kevin R.; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI), using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) as tracer material, shows great promise as a platform for fast tomographic imaging. To date, the magnetic properties of MNPs used in imaging have not been optimized. As nanoparticle magnetism shows strong size dependence, the authors explore how varying MNP size impacts imaging performance in order to determine optimal MNP characteristics for MPI at any driving field frequency f0. Methods: Monodisperse MNPs of varying size were synthesized and their magnetic properties characterized. Their MPI response was measured experimentally using a custom-built MPI transceiver designed to detect the third harmonic of MNP magnetization. The driving field amplitude H0=6 mT ?0?1 and frequency f0=250 kHz were chosen to be suitable for imaging small animals. Experimental results were interpreted using a model of dynamic MNP magnetization that is based on the Langevin theory of superparamagnetism and accounts for sample size distribution and size-dependent magnetic relaxation. Results: The experimental results show a clear variation in the MPI signal intensity as a function of MNP diameter that is in agreement with simulated results. A maximum in the plot of MPI signal vs MNP size indicates there is a particular size that is optimal for the chosen f0. Conclusions: The authors observed that MNPs 15 nm in diameter generate maximum signal amplitude in MPI experiments at 250 kHz. The authors expect the physical basis for this result, the change in magnetic relaxation with MNP size, will impact MPI under other experimental conditions. PMID:21520874

  11. Size dependent heat generation of magnetite nanoparticles under AC magnetic field for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Jun; Hakata, Toshiyuki; Kato, Ryuji; Yamashita, Noriyuki; Morino, Tomio; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Background We have developed magnetic cationic liposomes (MCLs) that contained magnetic nanoparticles as heating mediator for applying them to local hyperthermia. The heating performance of the MCLs is significantly affected by the property of the incorporated magnetite nanoparticles. We estimated heating capacity of magnetite nanoparticles by measuring its specific absorption rate (SAR) against irradiation of the alternating magnetic field (AMF). Method Magnetite nanoparticles which have various specific-surface-area (SSA) are dispersed in the sample tubes, subjected to various AMF and studied SAR. Result Heat generation of magnetite particles under variable AMF conditions was summarized by the SSA. There were two maximum SAR values locally between 12 m2/g to 190 m2/g of the SSA in all ranges of applied AMF frequency and those values increased followed by the intensity of AMF power. One of the maximum values was observed at approximately 90 m2/g of the SSA particles and the other was observed at approximately 120 m2/g of the SSA particles. A boundary value of the SAR for heat generation was observed around 110 m2/g of SSA particles and the effects of the AMF power were different on both hand. Smaller SSA particles showed strong correlation of the SAR value to the intensity of the AMF power though larger SSA particles showed weaker correlation. Conclusion Those results suggest that two maximum SAR value stand for the heating mechanism of magnetite nanoparticles represented by hysteresis loss and relaxation loss. PMID:18928573

  12. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Laan, G. van der; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-08-02

    The bioproduction of nano-scale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens, by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles has been investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicates the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimised biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently in the less harmful trivalent form.

  13. Facile one-step fabrication of magnetite particles under mild hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthana, D. Shanthini; Namratha, K.; Byrappa, K.; Yathirajan, H. S.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrophilic magnetite particles for biological applications were synthesized by hydrothermal method in the presence of D-Glucose as both reducing and capping agent in a facile, one-step, low energy and environmentally friendly route. The role of D-Glucose as a reducing agent in the formation of magnetite particles under mild hydrothermal conditions has been investigated. The absence of D-Glucose results in the formation of hematite. The magnetite particles synthesized were characterized using powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HR-SEM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometery (VSM). The influence of the quantity of D-Glucose used and the reaction duration on the formation of magnetite were studied. DLS and HR-SEM results show that the size of the particles was in nano- to micron range. The antioxidant potency of the particles was confirmed using DPPH assay, where 2,2- Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl was used as a source of free radicals. Hence the magnetite particles obtained could be considered for the use in various biological applications.

  14. Kinetics of cadmium(II) uptake by mixed maghemite-magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saidur Rahman; Yanful, Ernest K

    2013-11-15

    In the present study, batch adsorption experiments involving the adsorption of Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions have been carried out using mixed maghemite-magnetite as adsorbent. The uptake capacity of Cd(II) ions by mixed maghemite-magnetite increased with an increase in the pH of the adsorbate solution. An increase in adsorbent dosage increased Cd(II) removal but decreased adsorption capacity and it was found to follow the pseudo-second-order model. Cd removal from a solution containing 1.5 mg/L initial concentration of Cd(II) decreased from 1.9 to 1.3 mg/g upon increasing the temperature from 10 to 50 °C. Cadmium adsorption may be partly diffusion controlled and partly due to electrostatic effect along with specific adsorption involving the adsorption of Cd(++) and CdOH(+) on mixed maghemite-magnetite nanoparticles in the alkaline pH range. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surveys confirmed that Cd(2+) ions may undergo oxidation-reduction reactions upon exposure to mixed maghemite-magnetite, or may be fixed by complexation to oxygen atoms in the oxyhydroxy groups at the surface of the iron oxide nanoparticles. After Cd(II) adsorption by the maghemite-magnetite mixture, the percent maghemite decreased from 74.8 to 68.5%. PMID:24041626

  15. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; van der Laan, G.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    The bioproduction of nanoscale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles have been investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicate the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimized biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently to the less harmful trivalent form.

  16. Magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense: time-resolved magnetic and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Fdez-Gubieda, M Luisa; Muela, Alicia; Alonso, Javier; García-Prieto, Ana; Olivi, Luca; Fernández-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Barandiarán, José Manuel

    2013-04-23

    Magnetotactic bacteria biosynthesize magnetite nanoparticles of high structural and chemical purity that allow them to orientate in the geomagnetic field. In this work we have followed the process of biomineralization of these magnetite nanoparticles. We have performed a time-resolved study on magnetotactic bacteria Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1. From the combination of magnetic and structural studies by means of Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy we have identified and quantified two phases of Fe (ferrihydrite and magnetite) involved in the biomineralization process, confirming the role of ferrihydrite as the source of Fe ions for magnetite biomineralization in M. gryphiswaldense. We have distinguished two steps in the biomineralization process: the first, in which Fe is accumulated in the form of ferrihydrite, and the second, in which the magnetite is rapidly biomineralized from ferrihydrite. Finally, the XANES analysis suggests that the origin of the ferrihydrite could be at bacterial ferritin cores, characterized by a poorly crystalline structure and high phosphorus content. PMID:23530668

  17. Heterogeneous electron transfer as a pathway in the dissolution of magnetite in oxalic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, E.; Blesa, M.A.; Marinovich, H.A.; Maroto, A.J.G.

    1983-08-03

    The dissolution of metal oxides is a process of importance in several fields such as hydrometallurgy, passivity of metals, and cleaning of boilers and metal surfaces in general. Oxalic acid is one of the most effective reagents for dissolution of magnetite under mild acid conditions. Magnetite is the oxide that confers passivity to steel surfaces. In the present communication, the more salient features of the mechanism of dissolution of magnetite by oxalic acid solutions are discussed with special focus on the role played by ferrous ions in the process. Oxalate plays an unique role among complexing carboxylic ligands in the dissolution of magnetite; it not only facilitates the electron-transfer reaction but also mediates in a relatively fast dissolution during the initial induction period (the induction period is much shorter than in the case of the dissolution of magnetite by ethylenediaminetetraacetic or nitrilotriacetic acid). This unique role has been used in the development of a very efficient scale removal formulation used in the decontamination of nuclear power plants.

  18. Biogenic magnetite, detrital hematite, and relative paleointensity in Quaternary sediments from the Southwest Iberian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Hodell, D. A.; Margari, V.; Skinner, L. C.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Kesler, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic properties of late Quaternary sediments on the SW Iberian Margin are dominated by bacterial magnetite, observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with contributions from detrital titanomagnetite and hematite. Reactive hematite, together with low organic matter concentrations and the lack of sulfate reduction, lead to dissimilatory iron reduction and availability of Fe(II) for abundant magnetotactic bacteria. Magnetite grain-size proxies (?ARM/? and ARM/IRM) and S-ratios (sensitive to hematite) vary on stadial/interstadial timescales, contain orbital power, and mimic planktic ?18O. The detrital/biogenic magnetite ratio and hematite concentration are greater during stadials and glacial isotopic stages, reflecting increased detrital (magnetite) input during times of lowered sea level, coinciding with atmospheric conditions favoring hematitic dust supply. Magnetic susceptibility, on the other hand, has a very different response being sensitive to coarse detrital multidomain (MD) magnetite associated with ice-rafted debris (IRD). High susceptibility and/or magnetic grain-size coarsening, mark Heinrich stadials (HS), particularly HS2, HS3, HS4, HS5, HS6 and HS7, as well as older Heinrich-like detrital layers, indicating the sensitivity of this region to fluctuations in the position of the polar front. Relative paleointensity (RPI) records have well-constrained age models based on planktic ?18O correlation to ice-core chronologies, however, they differ from reference records (e.g. PISO) particularly in the vicinity of glacial maxima, mainly due to inefficient normalization of RPI records in intervals of enhanced hematite input.

  19. Small magnetite antiretroviral therapeutic nanoparticle probes for MRI of drug biodistribution

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dongwei; Li, Tianyuzi; McMillan, JoEllyn; Sajja, Balasrinivasa R; Puligujja, Pavan; Boska, Michael D; Gendelman, Howard E; Liu, Xin-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Aim Drug toxicities, compliance and penetrance into viral reservoirs have diminished the efficacy of long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) for treatment of HIV infection. Cell-targeted nanoformulated ART was developed to improve disease outcomes. However, rapid noninvasive determination of drug biodistribution is unrealized. To this end, small magnetite ART (SMART) nanoparticles can provide assessments of ART biodistribution by MRI. Materials & methods Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine- and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(methoxy-PEG 2000)-encased particles were synthesized with atazanavir (ATV) and magnetite. Uptake and retention of ATV and magnetite administered at 3:1 ratios (weight/weight) were determined in human monocyte-derived macrophages and mice. Results SMART particles were taken up and retained in macrophages. In mice, following parenteral SMART injection, magnetite and drug biodistribution paralleled one another with MRI signal intensity greatest in the liver and spleen at 24 h. Significantly, ATV and magnetite levels correlated. Conclusion SMART can permit rapid assessment of drug tissue concentrations in viral reservoirs. PMID:23905578

  20. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ...731-TA-696 (Third Review)] Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis...of the antidumping duty order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to...4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  1. Synthesis of magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite and its application as a novel magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshayesh, Sara Dehghani, Hossein

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite (MPNC) as a novel magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations was synthesized. - Highlights: • Nanosized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of iron salt in alkaline media. • The synthesized magnetite and nanocomposite had soft ferromagnetic property. • Magnetic nanocomposite as a novel magnetic adsorbent for heavy cations was prepared. • Satisfactory separation from solutions in the order of Pb{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Hg{sup 2+} was obtained. - Abstract: Magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite (MPNC) was synthesized as a novel magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations. Firstly, we prepared nano-sized magnetite using a simple hydrothermal route. The synthesis of nanoscaled magnetite was carried out through reaction between iron source and various amines. In this paper, we studied effective parameters in controlling shape and size of nanoscaled magnetite. These parameters were presence of alkaline, reaction time, kind of amine and iron salt. Morphology, particle size and magnetic properties of the nanoscaled magnetite were obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Our study showed that the synthesized magnetite from reaction between FeSO{sub 4} and hydrazinum hydrate has spherical shape. The synthesized magnetite was a nanosized compound and used for preparation of magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite. The synthesized magnetite-porphyrin hybrid material had magnetic property and was used as magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations of water. Satisfactory separation from solutions in the order of Pb{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Hg{sup 2+} was obtained.

  2. In-Situ Study of Gaseous Reduction of Magnetite Doped with Alumina Using High-Temperature XRD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapelyushin, Yury; Sasaki, Yasushi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jeong, Sunkwang; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    The reduction of magnetite of technical grade and magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 was studied in situ using high-temperature XRD (HT-XRD) analysis. Magnetite was reduced by CO-CO2 gas (80 vol pct CO) at 1023 K (750 °C). Reduction of magnetite doped with alumina occurred from the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution which has a miscibility gap with critical temperature of 1133 K (860 °C). The degree of reduction of magnetite was derived using Rietveld refinement of the HT-XRD spectra; the compositions of the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution and the concentrations of carbon in ?-iron were determined from the lattice constants of the solutions. The reduction of magnetite progressed topochemically with the formation of a dense iron shell. The reduction of alumina-containing magnetite started along certain lattice planes with the formation of a network-like structure. Reduction of alumina-containing magnetite was faster than that of un-doped magnetite; this difference was attributed to the formation of the network-like structure. Hercynite content in the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution in the process of reduction of magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 increased from 5.11 to 20 mass pct, which is close to the miscibility gap at 1023 K (750 °C). The concentration of carbon in ?-Fe (0.76 mass pct) formed in the reduced sample of magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 was close to the equilibrium value with 80 vol pct CO to 20 vol pct CO2 gas used in the HT-XRD experiments.

  3. Preparation of hollow magnetite microspheres and their applications as drugs carriers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hollow magnetite microspheres have been synthesized by a simple process through a template-free hydrothermal approach. Hollow microspheres were surface modified by coating with a silica nanolayer. Pristine and modified hollow microparticles were characterized by field-emission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, and VSM magnetometry. The potential application of the modified hollow magnetite microspheres as a drug carrier was evaluated by using Rhodamine B and methotrexate as model drugs. The loading and release kinetics of both molecules showed a clear pH and temperature dependent profile. Graphical abstract Hollow magnetite microspheres have been synthesized. Load-release experiments with Rhodamine-B as a model drug and with Methotrexate (chemotherapy drug used in treating certain types of cancer) demonstrated the potential applications of these nanostructures in biomedical applications. PMID:22490731

  4. Large-scale exploratory tests of sodium/magnetite-concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-04-01

    Two large-scale tests examining the interaction between molten sodium at 825 K and magnetite concrete were performed. In the first test, bare magnetite concrete was exposed to the sodium and in the second test the concrete was partially protected by a flawed steel liner and a layer of dense silica firebrick. The results demonstrated that energetic chemical reactions can occur between sodium and magnetite concrete. In the first test, reaction zone temperatures exceeded 1150 K and the maximum heat generation rate was approx. 1.3 x 10/sup 5/ J/m/sup 2/-s. The maximum observed penetration rate was 2.5 mm/min. In the second test, the silica firebrick provided little protection for the underlying concrete. The reaction debris that formed between the steel liner and the concrete caused gross deformation of the liner as well as extensive cracking of the reinforced concrete.

  5. Magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool for As(V) removal from drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Arsenic (As) removal from contaminated groundwater is a key environmental concern worldwide. In this study, glass wool was coated with magnetite nanoparticles under argon gas flow and magnetite coated glass wool have been investigated for application as an adsorbent for As(V) removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and arsenic contaminated water treated with adsorbent was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results showed that 10 g/L of adsorbent removed 99.4% of As(V) within 5 hours at pH-7 and initial arsenic concentration of 360µg/L. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well in pseudo-first-order kinetics model with high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.995). As magnetite nanoparticles coated glass wool showed favorable adsorption behavior for As(V), it can be a promising tool for water purification.

  6. Four decades of paleomagnetic studies of magnetite in carbonate rocks: a history of remagnetizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Voo, R.

    2011-12-01

    With the advent of cryogenic magnetometers in the early 1970's, paleomagnetic studies of carbonate rocks became possible and it was quickly established that magnetite generally was the carrier of an ancient remanence in non-red limestones. For about a decade, this magnetite was thought to be detrital, implying that the magnetizations were primary, i.e., dating back to the time of deposition of the strata. Gray Devonian limestones from Ohio, Arizona's Grand Canyon, Arkansas, and New York revealed directions similar to those of Permian rocks in North America, resulting in APWP loops and erroneous large-scale tectonic conclusions about an "Acadia" displaced terrane and Europe-Laurentia reconstructions. However, when syn-folding magnetizations became documented, the prevailing interpretations quickly changed. Remagnetizations became the rule rather than the exception. The carrier was no longer thought to be detrital, and abundant magnetite in the form of spherules and framboids imaged in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) seemed to be the answer to the quest for a growth mechanism of this mineral. In some cases, magnetite could be seen as oxidation rims to Fe-sulfide cores. Also, at about this time, hysteresis parameters of remagnetized carbonates, plotted in Day diagrams, revealed unique patterns, which did not match the parameters measured on individual spherules. Growth of the magnetite from a superparamagnetic size to single- and pseudo-single-domain size is currently the favored mode of occurrence of the magnetite, and some SEM images support this. Important unresolved questions remain, however. Notably, it remains puzzling why the remagnetizations most often appear to have been acquired at the time the nearest orogeny occurred, and what role fluids played in this process.

  7. Arsenate and Arsenite Sorption on Magnetite: Relations to Groundwater Arsenic Treatment Using Zerovalent Iron and Natural Attenuation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a zerovalent iron corrosion product; it is also formed in natural soil and sediment. Sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) on magnetite is an important process of arsenic removal from groundwater using zerovalent iron-based permeable reactive ba...

  8. Domain wall pinning and dislocations: Investigating magnetite deformed under conditions analogous to nature using transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.; Harrison, R. J.; Loudon, J. C.; Newell, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we deformed samples cut from a single magnetite octahedron and used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements to experimentally verify earlier computational models of magnetic domain wall pinning by dislocations and to better understand the nature of dislocations in magnetite. Dislocations in magnetite have been of interest for many decades because they are often cited as a likely source of stable thermoremanent magnetizations in larger multidomain (MD) magnetite grains, so a better understanding of dislocation effects on coercivity in MD magnetite is crucial. TEM imaging shows, for the first time, domain walls sweeping through the magnetite sample and being pinned at dislocations. In agreement with theory, these findings demonstrate that domain walls are more strongly pinned at networks of dislocations than at single dislocations and that domain walls pinned at longer dislocations have higher microcoercivities than those pinned at shorter dislocations. This experimentally illustrates the ability of dislocations to increase the coercivity of larger multidomain magnetite grains. The observed values for microcoercivity and bulk coercivity are in reasonable agreement with theoretical calculations. Burgers vectors were determined for some dislocations to verify that they were in keeping with expected dislocation orientations. The dislocations were found to be primarily located on close-packed {111} planes within the magnetite. Deformation caused only a minor change in bulk coercivity, but first-order reversal curve diagrams show populations with increased coercivity not visible in hysteresis loops.

  9. Self-Assembly of Flux-Closure Polygons from Magnetite Nanocubes Megan W. Szyndler and Robert M. Corn*

    E-print Network

    Self-Assembly of Flux-Closure Polygons from Magnetite Nanocubes Megan W. Szyndler and Robert M fabricated on hydrophilic surfaces from the face-to-face self-assembly of magnetite nanocubes. Uniform,6-8 bio- medical therapeutics,9-11 and separations.12-14 One particularly useful nanoscale structure

  10. High stable suspension of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol by using sono-synthesized nanomagnetite in polyol medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bastami, Tahereh Rohani; Entezari, Mohammad H.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out in EG without any surfactant. • The nanoparticles with sizes ?24 nm were composed of small building blocks with sizes ?2 nm. • The hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles were stable in ethanol even after 8 months. • Ultrasonic intensity showed a crucial role on the obtained high stable magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol. - Abstract: The sonochemical synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles was carried out at relatively low temperature (80 °C) in ethylene glycol (EG) as a polyol solvent. The particle size was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 24 nm were composed of small building blocks with an average size of 2–3 nm and the particles exhibited nearly spherical shape. The surface characterization was investigated by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The stability of magnetite nanoparticles was studied in ethanol as a polar solvent. The nanoparticles showed an enhanced stability in ethanol which is due to the hydrophilic surface of the particles. The colloidal stability of magnetite nanoparticles in ethanol was monitored by UV–visible spectrophotometer. According to the results, the nanoparticles synthesized in 30 min of sonication with intensity of 35 W/cm{sup 2} (50%) led to a maximum stability in ethanol as a polar solvent with respect to the other applied intensities. The obtained magnetite nanoparticles were stable for more than12 months.

  11. Did the massive magnetite "lava flows" of El Laco (Chile) form by magmatic or hydrothermal processes? New constraints

    E-print Network

    that the magnetite deposits represent replacement of andesite flows and that the textures are pseudomorphs. We phenocrysts from the unaltered andesite host rocks at El Laco. Instead, the El Laco magnetite is most similar the hydrothermal model of metasomatic replacement of andesite lava flows, by dissolution and precip- itation

  12. Production of substantially pure fructose

    DOEpatents

    Hatcher, Herbert J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gallian, John J. (Twin Falls, ID); Leeper, Stephen A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of substantially pure fructose from sucrose-containing substrates. The process comprises converting the sucrose to levan and glucose, purifying the levan by membrane technology, hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose monomers, and recovering the fructose.

  13. Canonical phase measurement is pure

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Pellonpaeae, Juha-Pekka

    2009-10-15

    We show that the canonical phase measurement is pure in the sense that the corresponding positive operator valued measure (POVM) is extremal in the convex set of all POVMs. This means that the canonical phase measurement cannot be interpreted as a noisy measurement even if it is not a projection valued measure.

  14. Novel protocol for the solid-state synthesis of magnetite for medical practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, D. L.; Andrade, A. L.; Pereira, M. C.; Fabris, J. D.; Domingues, R. Z.; Alvarenga, M. E.

    2015-06-01

    It is reported a novel approach to prepare nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) by heating a mixture of synthetic commercial maghemite ( ?Fe2O3) with sucrose. This solid-state reaction leads to the chemical reduction of part of the Fe3+ of the precursor oxide to render Fe2+ and Fe3+ in octahedral and Fe3+ in tetrahedral sites of the Fe-O coordination framework. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns, FTIR and 298 K Mössbauer spectra confirm the conversion of maghemite into magnetite. Based on these results, the optimal sucrose:maghemite rate was found to be 4.

  15. Fabrication of magnetite-based core-shell coated nanoparticles with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, A M; Cristescu, R; Chifiriuc, M C; Dorcioman, G; Socol, G; Mihailescu, I N; Mihaiescu, D E; Ficai, A; Vasile, O R; Enculescu, M; Chrisey, D B

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of biofunctionalized magnetite core/sodium lauryl sulfate shell/antibiotic adsorption-shell nanoparticles assembled thin coatings by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation for antibacterial drug-targeted delivery. Magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized and subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The obtained thin coatings have been investigated by FTIR and scanning electron microscope, and tested by in vitro biological assays, for their influence on in vitro bacterial biofilm development and cytotoxicity on human epidermoid carcinoma (HEp2) cells. PMID:25797361

  16. Quenched magnetite in cretaceous-tertiary boundary microtekite-like spheroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, J.; Kyte, F. T.; Wasson, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetite containing spheres collected from a kt boundary localities in Italy were analyzed. It was found that these spheres contain relatively high concentrations of Ir. The spheres were analyzed for siderophile elements Ir, Pt, Au, Pd, Os, and Re. Elements Ir, Pt, Pd, and Au were found in high concentrations in magnetic spheres and their concentrations are similar to those in most meteorites. It is suggested that the magnetite spheres do not contain a meteorite component which may be a relic of the kt event.

  17. Magnetic and Mössbauer studies of fucan-coated magnetite nanoparticles for application on antitumoral activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, V. A. J.; Andrade, P. L.; Bustamante, Angel; de los Santos Valladares, L.; Mejia, M.; Souza, I. A.; Cavalcanti, K. P. S.; Silva, M. P. C.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-01-01

    Fucan-coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The sizes of the nanoparticles were 8-9 nm. Magnetization measurements and Mössbauer spectroscopy at 300 K revealed superparamagnetic behavior. The magnetic moment of the Fe3O4 is partly screened by the Fucan coating aggregation. When the magnetite nanoparticles are capped with oleic acid or fucan, reduced particle-particle interaction is observed by Mössbauer and TEM studies. The antitumoral activity of the fucan-coated nanoparticles were tested in Sarcoma 180, showing an effective reduction of the tumor size.

  18. Preparation of biocompatible magnetite-carboxymethyl cellulose nanocomposite: characterization of nanocomposite by FTIR, XRD, FESEM and TEM.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Neda

    2014-10-15

    The preparation and characterization of magnetite-carboxymethyl cellulose nano-composite (M-CMC) material is described. Magnetite nano-particles were synthesized by a modified co-precipitation method using ferrous chloride tetrahydrate and ferric chloride hexahydrate in ammonium hydroxide solution. The M-CMC nano-composite particles were synthesized by embedding the magnetite nanoparticles inside carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) using a freshly prepared mixture of Fe3O4 with CMC precursor. Morphology, particle size, and structural properties of magnetite-carboxymethyl cellulose nano-composite was accomplished using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis. As a result, magnetite nano-particles with an average size of 35nm were obtained. The biocompatible Fe3O4-carboxymethyl cellulose nano-composite particles obtained from the natural CMC polymers have a potential range of application in biomedical field. PMID:24820322

  19. Nonuniform Growth of Composite Layer-by-Layer Assembled Coatings via Three-Dimensional Expansion of Hydrophobic Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Denis V; Grigoriev, Dmitry; Möhwald, Helmuth; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Gorin, Dmitry A

    2015-12-30

    Nanocomposite coatings are promising for a range of practical applications, and layer-by-layer assembly (LbL) is a versatile tool for nanocomposite formation. However, conventional LbL is a quite laborious procedure taking a lot of time to reach a sufficient thickness of the coatings required for practical applications. Herein, we proposed a novel variant of the LbL approach based on the deposition of hydrophilic polyelectrolyte molecules from a polar solvent and hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) from a nonpolar dispersion medium with an intermediate washing in the same polar solvent. The composite multilayers formed in this way exhibit exponential growth of the thickness and mass. On the basis of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and surface profile measurements, we propose a model describing the driving force of multilayer formation and the factors leading to nonlinear growth of their mass and thickness. The results allow one to expand the understanding of the mechanism of the LbL assembly in order to form multifunctional nanocomposites in a more efficient way. PMID:26647922

  20. Crystallization Stages of the Bishop Tuff Magma Body Recorded in Crystal Textures in Pumice Clasts

    SciTech Connect

    Pamukcu, Ayla; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.; Anderson, Jr. , Alfred T.

    2012-07-25

    The Bishop Tuff is a giant silicic ignimbrite erupted at 0.76 Ma in eastern California, USA. Five pumice clasts from the late-erupted Bishop Tuff (Aeolian Buttes) were studied in an effort to better understand the pre- and syn-eruptive history of the Bishop magma body and place constraints on the timescales of its existence. This study complements and expands on a previous study that focused on early-erupted Bishop Tuff pumice clasts. Bulk densities of pumice clasts were measured using an immersion method, and phenocryst crystal contents were determined using a sieving and winnowing procedure. X-ray tomography was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative textural information, particularly crystal size distributions (CSDs). We have determined CSDs for crystals ranging in size from {approx}10 to {approx}1000 {micro}m for three groups of mineral phases: magnetite ({+-}ilmenite), pyroxene + biotite, quartz + feldspar. Similar to early-erupted pumice, late-erupted pumice bulk density and crystal contents are positively correlated, and comparison of crystal fraction vs size trends suggests that the proportion of large crystals is the primary control on crystallinity. Porosity is negatively correlated with crystal content, which is difficult to reconcile with closed-system crystallization. Magnetite and pyroxene + biotite size distributions are fractal in nature, often attributed to fragmentation; however, crystals are mostly whole and euhedral, such that an alternative mechanism is necessary to explain these distributions. Quartz + feldspar size distributions are kinked, with a shallow-sloped log-linear section describing large crystals (> 140 {micro}m) and a steep-sloped log-linear section describing small crystals (< 140 {micro}m). We interpret these two crystal populations as resulting from a shift in crystallization regime. We suggest that the shallow-sloped section describes a pre-eruptive quartz + feldspar growth-dominated regime, whereas the steep-sloped section represents a population that grew during a nucleation-dominated regime that began as a result of decompression at the onset of eruption. Timescales of quartz growth calculated from the slopes of these two segments of the size distributions indicate that the pre-eruptive crystal population grew on timescales on the order of millennia and may describe the timescale of crystallization of the Bishop magma body. The syn-eruptive population gives timescales of < 1-2 years (but possibly much less) and probably marks the onset of eruptive decompression.

  1. Crystallization Screens Crystallization Optimization

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    a local start-up company into an established business with a glo- bal distribution network. We deliver crystallization. High quality reagents and excellent customer service help the researcher to find tailor of tools for protein crystallization. High quality reagents and excellent customer service help

  2. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis. PMID:26559132

  3. Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1

    E-print Network

    Borchers, Brian

    Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1 , Jan M. H, paleoclimatology (Maher and Thompson, 1995), soil development (Singer et al., 1996; Van Dam et al., 2008 et al., 2011), the detection of unexploded ordnance (UXO) and land mines (Van Dam et al., 2005

  4. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Liu, S.; Roh, Y.; Cole, D.; Phelps, T.; Vali, H.; Kirschvink, J.L.; Onsttot, T.; McKay, D.

    1997-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 to 75 C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh ({minus}200 mV to {minus}415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl{sub 2} caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  5. Improvement of interaction between PVA and chitosan via magnetite nanoparticles for drug delivery application.

    PubMed

    Shagholani, Hamidreza; Ghoreishi, Sayed Mehdi; Mousazadeh, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation under ultrasonication followed by coating with chitosan. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is then combined with the chitosan that coated the magnetite nanoparticles. The combination occurs by hydrogen binding and ionic cross-linking of the amino and hydroxyl groups of chitosan and PVA respectively. The magnetite nanoparticles have an average size of 10.62 nm that was confirmed by TEM. The VSM measurements showed that nanoparticles were superparamagnetic. The coatings on the core nanoparticles were estimated by AAS and the attachments of coating to the nanoparticles were confirmed by FT-IR analysis. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were measured by DLS and zeta potential. Naked magnetite, chitosan and PVA coating have zeta potential of +36.4, +48.1 and -12.5 mV respectively. The unspecific adsorption and interaction between nanoparticles and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated systematically by UV-vis spectroscopy method. The nanoparticles that were modified by PVA present low protein adsorption, which makes them a practical choice for preventing opsonization in clinical application and drug delivery. PMID:25748852

  6. A Non-Biological Origin for the Nanophase Magnetite Grains in ALH84001: Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Andrea M.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2002-01-01

    We subjected siderite-magnesite carbonates to a short-lived thermal pulse. Individual magnetite grains that formed are 10 to 20 nm in size and randomly oriented. Shape and size distribution of these grains appear similar to those seen in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. The Terminal Oxidase cbb3 Functions in Redox Control of Magnetite Biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingjie; Raschdorf, Oliver; Silva, Karen T.

    2014-01-01

    The biomineralization of magnetosomes in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria occurs only under suboxic conditions. However, the mechanism of oxygen regulation and redox control of biosynthesis of the mixed-valence iron oxide magnetite [FeII(FeIII)2O4] is still unclear. Here, we set out to investigate the role of aerobic respiration in both energy metabolism and magnetite biomineralization of M. gryphiswaldense. Although three operons encoding putative terminal cbb3-type, aa3-type, and bd-type oxidases were identified in the genome assembly of M. gryphiswaldense, genetic and biochemical analyses revealed that only cbb3 and bd are required for oxygen respiration, whereas aa3 had no physiological significance under the tested conditions. While the loss of bd had no effects on growth and magnetosome synthesis, inactivation of cbb3 caused pleiotropic effects under microaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. In addition to their incapability of simultaneous nitrate and oxygen reduction, cbb3-deficient cells had complex magnetosome phenotypes and aberrant morphologies, probably by disturbing the redox balance required for proper growth and magnetite biomineralization. Altogether, besides being the primary terminal oxidase for aerobic respiration, cbb3 oxidase may serve as an oxygen sensor and have a further role in poising proper redox conditions required for magnetite biomineralization. PMID:24794567

  8. NOAA/NMFS Developments Magnetite Is Magnetic Material in Tuna Skulls

    E-print Network

    NOAA/NMFS Developments Magnetite Is Magnetic Material in Tuna Skulls National Marine Pollution Plan, reports that the magnetic material located within the ethmoid bone complex in the skulls of yellowfin tuna of 35 yellowfin tuna skulls were made and the tissue from within the ethmoid bones removed

  9. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

    2003-01-01

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  10. Solution Self-Assembly of Magnetic Light Modulators from Exfoliated Perovskite and Magnetite Nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Osterloh, Frank

    Solution Self-Assembly of Magnetic Light Modulators from Exfoliated Perovskite and Magnetite a layered perovskite) and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 spheres.4 Due to optical anisotropy of the sheets particles precipitate onto the perovskite sheets, and the product forms. After centrifugation and washing

  11. Synthesis of superparamagnetic silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjot; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2015-05-01

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with silica are widely researched for biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, tissue repair, cell separation, hyperthermia, drug delivery, etc. In this article synthesis of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and their coating with SiO2 is reported. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and it was coated with silica by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. XRD, FTIR, TEM and VSM techniques were used to characterize bare and coated nanoparticles. Results indicated that the average size of SPIONS was 8.4 nm. X-ray diffraction patterns of silica coated SPIONS were identical to that of SPIONS confirming the inner spinal structure of SPIONS. FTIR results confirmed the binding of silica with the magnetite and the formation of the silica shell around the magnetite core. Magnetic properties of SPIONS and silica coated SPIONS are determined by VSM. They are superparamagnetic. The major conclusion drawn from this study is that the synthesis route yields stable, non-aggregated magnetite-silica core-shell nanostructures with tailored morphology and excellent magnetic properties.

  12. Magnesium outdiffusion through magnetite films grown on magnesium oxide (001) (abstract)

    E-print Network

    Diebold, Ulrike

    Magnesium outdiffusion through magnetite films grown on magnesium oxide (001) (abstract) K. A. Shaw of magnesium in the uppermost layers of the film, and indicate a concentration gradient, with the highest concentrations of magnesium in the surface layer. X-ray fluorescence in scanning electron microscopy

  13. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis. PMID:26559132

  14. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams for pseudo-single-domain magnetites at high temperature

    E-print Network

    Dunlop, David J.

    of magnetostatic interactions, we measured FORC diagrams between room temperature and the Curie temperatureFirst-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams for pseudo-single-domain magnetites at high temperature. On heating the FORC distributions contract without changing shape until V500C. Above this temperature

  15. Synthesis of superparamagnetic silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Navjot Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2015-05-15

    Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) coated with silica are widely researched for biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, tissue repair, cell separation, hyperthermia, drug delivery, etc. In this article synthesis of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles and their coating with SiO{sub 2} is reported. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and it was coated with silica by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. XRD, FTIR, TEM and VSM techniques were used to characterize bare and coated nanoparticles. Results indicated that the average size of SPIONS was 8.4?nm. X-ray diffraction patterns of silica coated SPIONS were identical to that of SPIONS confirming the inner spinal structure of SPIONS. FTIR results confirmed the binding of silica with the magnetite and the formation of the silica shell around the magnetite core. Magnetic properties of SPIONS and silica coated SPIONS are determined by VSM. They are superparamagnetic. The major conclusion drawn from this study is that the synthesis route yields stable, non-aggregated magnetite-silica core-shell nanostructures with tailored morphology and excellent magnetic properties.

  16. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  17. Interactions between Magnetite Oxidation and Flux Calcination during Iron Ore Pellet Induration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firth, Andrew R.; Garden, John F.

    2008-08-01

    Many chemical reactions take place simultaneously during the induration of iron ore pellets produced from magnetite concentrates. Two of the most important are magnetite oxidation and calcination of carbonate fluxes. The first reaction consumes oxygen diffusing into the pellet, while the second reaction produces carbon dioxide that must diffuse out of the pellet. A mathematical model combining the two reactions and gaseous diffusion within the pellet has been developed to quantify the interaction between the two reactions. This combined mathematical model showed that current induration plant mathematical models for the mass and energy balance around a pellet furnace are inaccurate in treating magnetite oxidation and flux calcination as separate reactions. Assuming separate reactions can lead to an error of up to 20 pct conversion of magnetite at the end of the preheat stage. This combined mathematical model, confirmed by experiments with single pellets, also demonstrated that calcination of fluxes also tends to follow a “shrinking core” model rather than reacting simultaneously across the pellet, as existing whole plant models assume. Modifying induration plant mathematical models in accordance with the findings of this article could lead to further savings in energy costs for pellet plants.

  18. Microbial formation of lanthanide-substituted magnetites by Thermoanaerobacter sp. TOR-39

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul; Yeary, Lucas W; Lauf, Robert J; Rawn, Claudia J; Love, Lonnie J; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2007-01-01

    Lanthanide (Nd, Gd, Tb, Ho, and Er)-substituted magnetites, LyFe3-yO4 (L, lanthanide) were microbially synthesized using L-mixed precursors, LxFe1-xOOH, where x was between 0.01 and 0.2. By combining lanthanides (normally considered toxic to microorganisms) into the akaganeite precursor phase, we were able to mitigate some of the toxicity enabling the microorganisms to produce L-substituted magnetites. A metal reducing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus successfully converted the mixed akaganeite to L-substituted magnetite while avoiding the potentially toxic effects of soluble L-ions. At higher mixing levels (0.02 < x <0.05) the poor crystallinity of L-mixed precursors increased the concentration of soluble toxic L-ions in the media. Nevertheless, using L-mixed precursors enabled production of microbially synthesized L-substituted magnetite with considerably higher L-concentration than could be obtained when the lanthanides were added as soluble salts. This method can therefore be used to extend the application for nanofermentation to fields where there is a need for nanoscale materials that involve elements such as lanthanides that are toxic or inhibitory to bacterial growth.

  19. Structure of magnetite lodes at the Estyunino iron deposit in the central Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, V. F.; Aleshin, K. B.; Kuznetsov, A. Zh.; Ivanchenko, V. S.

    2013-11-01

    The structure of magnetite lodes is determined by iron and sulfur distribution, as well as texture and structure of ore. These features have been revealed by documentation of cores from ore intervals in exploration boreholes penetrating two main lodes 21 and 22 of the Estyunino iron deposit. The documentation of cores was accompanied by sampling for microscopic examination of texture and structure of ore and selection of Fe and S contents in ore. Then these data were summarized as sections of the lodes. It was established that the structure of magnetite lodes is characterized by conformable ore layers distinguished by texture, structure, and Fe and S contents. Banded and spotty ores containing less than 50% magnetite are predominant. Layers of homogeneous massive ore are infrequent. The textural pattern indicates a volcaniclastic nature of host rocks. The spotty texture is characteristic of hyaloclastites with vitreous shards. The banded texture with oriented distribution of fiamme is inherent to volcaniclastic rocks. In both cases, magnetite selectively replaces dark-colored vitreous fragments and is also dispersed in the salic matrix and lava fragments. No indications of crosscutting superposed relationships are observed. The available data can be satisfactorily explained by an impregnation-metasomatic mode of ore deposition.

  20. Low-temperature magnetic properties of pelagic carbonates: Oxidation of biogenic magnetite and identification

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    and magnetically interacting particles can complicate this test. Magnetic measurements through the Eocene section have a range of distinct properties, such as single domain (SD) magnetic behavior, narrow particle sizeLow-temperature magnetic properties of pelagic carbonates: Oxidation of biogenic magnetite

  1. Magnetically recyclable magnetite-palladium (Nanocat-Fe-Pd) nanocatalyst for the Buchwald-Hartwig reaction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The immobilization of Pd on magnetite surface afforded (Nanocat-Fe-Pd) using inexpensive precursors and its catalytic role in the Buchwald-Hartwig reaction for arylation of amines and amides was investigated; C-N bond formation was achieved in moderate to excellent yields and the...

  2. Cranberry magnetite deposits Avery County, N.C., and Carter County, Tenn.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kline, M.H.; Ballard, T.J.

    1948-01-01

    The Cranberry magnetite deposits occur in pre-Cambrian granite-gneiss in a belt extending from 3 miles southeast of Cranberry, N.C., to about 6 miles southwest of Magnetic City, Tenn. The belt forms a curve, elongated to the north, approximately 26 miles in length.

  3. Uranium (VI) recovery from aqueous medium using novel floating macroporous alginate-agarose-magnetite cryobeads.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Melo, Jose Savio; D'Souza, Stanislaus Francis

    2013-02-15

    This study presents a novel development of a floating polymeric-magnetite cryobead for the recovery of hexavalent uranium from the aqueous sub-surfaces. The alginate-agarose-magnetite cryobeads were synthesized by the process of cryotropic-gelation at subzero-temperature. The physico-chemical properties of cryobeads showed high surface area and high interconnected porosity (? 90%). Low density of these cryobeads explains their floating property in the aqueous medium. The rheological analysis of cryobeads showed its stability and increased stiffness after uranium adsorption. The presence of magnetite nanoparticles in the porous cryobeads facilitates the recovery of these beads by applying an external magnetic field. Maximum uranium adsorption (97 ± 2%) was observed in the pH range of 4.5-5.5. The thermodynamic parameters suggest passive endothermic adsorption behaviour. HCl was found to be an efficient eluent for the uranium desorption. Five repeated cycles for the desorption of uranium from biosorbent showed 69 ± 3% of uranium recovery. These results suggest stability of these novel floating magnetite-cryobeads under environmental conditions with potential for the recovery of uranium from contaminated aqueous subsurfaces. PMID:23280054

  4. A&M. Special shielding materials. Stockpile of magnetite, used for making ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Special shielding materials. Stockpile of magnetite, used for making high-density concrete, and loading conveyor near TAN-607 construction site. Date: September 25, 1953. INEEL negative no. 8710 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Methane production from hydrothermal transformation of siderite to magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratbayev, T.; Schroeder, C.; Kappler, A.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    Mumma et al. (2009) observed a methane (CH4) plume above the Nili Fossae region on Mars, a region rich in carbonate minerals. Morris et al. (2010) suggest this to be (Mg,Fe)-carbonate. McCollom (2003) demonstrated that the hydrothermal transformation of siderite (FeCO3), to magnetite (Fe3O4) produces CH4. This reaction may thus contribute to the formation of methane on Mars, but is also relevant in the context of such diverse topics as diagenesis of Precambrian banded iron formations, sources of prebiotic organic compounds on early Earth, oil and gas accumulations in Earth's crust, or geological sequestration and storage of CO2. However, neither the thermodynamics of this reaction nor the conditions of maximum CH4 yield have been investigated to date. In order to estimate how pressure and temperature influence CH4 yield we derived a thermodynamic model with a numerical solution implemented in MATLAB. We used the equation 12FeCO3 + 2H2O ? 4Fe3O4 + 11CO2 + CH4 (Frost et al. 2007) and thermodynamic calculations of the stability field of FeCO3 by Thoms-Keprta et al. (2009) as a template. At 1 bar pressure, the Gibbs energy turns negative (favorable reaction conditions) at a temperature of 200°C. Increasing pressure to 1000 bar changes that temperature to 250°C. An increase in temperature has a larger effect on shifting the Gibbs energy to more negative values. We therefore chose ambient pressure and temperatures of 300°C, 400°C, and 500°C as experimental conditions. We added 100 mg of either natural or synthetic FeCO3 and 25 ?L of MilliQ water into long tip Pasteur pipettes inside an anoxic glove box to avoid contamination by free oxygen. The Pasteur pipettes were sealed with butyl stoppers and then melted shut outside of the glove box. The glass capsules were heated for 48 hours in a muffle furnace at 300°C, 400 0C or 5000C. The composition of the gas phase and the formation of methane in particular were analyzed using gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. We used Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy with Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to investigate changes in the solid phase. Synthetic FeCO3 was completely transformed to Fe3O4 and sometimes the further oxidized phases maghemite (?-Fe2O3) and hematite (?-Fe2O3). Natural FeCO3 was not completely transformed, which can be explained by its larger particle size and therefore reduced reactivity. Methane yield was consequently higher from synthetic siderite. Our results show that hydrothermal activity invoked by either impact or volcanic activity could have transformed siderite and thereby released at least some of the CH4 observed on Mars. On Earth, long-term underground storage of CO2 as carbonate minerals has to avoid hydrothermal conditions. Otherwise not only CO2 will be released again, but some of it will potentially be transformed into the more potent greenhouse gas methane. References Frost et al., Contrib. Mineral. Pet. 153 (2006) 211; McCollom, Geochim. Cosmochim. Ac. 67 (2003) 311; Morris et al., Science 329 (2010), 421; Mumma et al., Science 323 (2009) 1041; Thomas-Keprta et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Ac. 73 (2009) 6631, EA-4

  6. Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of Pure Ferric Fayalite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (magnetite ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a pure ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.

  7. Synthesis of Environmentally Friendly Highly Dispersed Magnetite Nanoparticles Based on Rosin Cationic Surfactants as Thin Film Coatings of Steel

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Ayman M.; El-Mahdy, Gamal A.; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.; Al-Hussain, Sami A.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a new method to prepare monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles capping with new cationic surfactants based on rosin. Core/shell type magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using bis-N-(3-levopimaric maleic acid adduct-2-hydroxy) propyl-triethyl ammonium chloride (LPMQA) as capping agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was employed to characterize the nanoparticles chemical structure. Transmittance electron microscopies (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were used to examine the morphology of the modified magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite dispersed aqueous acid solution was evaluated as an effective anticorrosion behavior of a hydrophobic surface on steel. The inhibition effect of magnetite nanoparticles on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results obtained from both potentiodynamic polarisation and EIS measurements reveal that the magnetite nanoparticle is an effective inhibitor for the corrosion of steel in 1.0 M HCl solution. Polarization data show that magnetite nanoparticles behave as a mixed type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiencies obtained from potentiodynamic polarization and EIS methods are in good agreement. PMID:24758936

  8. Magnetite-Amyloid-? deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Teller, Sara; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Soriano, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-? peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-? in the deterioration of neuronal circuits, we investigated their capacity to alter spontaneous activity patterns in cultured neuronal networks. Using a versatile experimental platform that allows the parallel monitoring of several cultures, the activity in controls was compared with the one in cultures dosed with magnetite, amyloid-? and magnetite-amyloid-? complex. A prominent degradation in spontaneous activity was observed solely when amyloid-? and magnetite acted together. Our work suggests that magnetite nanoparticles have a more prominent role in AD than previously thought, and may bring new insights in the understanding of the damaging action of magnetite-amyloid-? complex. Our experimental system also offers new interesting perspectives to explore key biochemical players in neurological disorders through a controlled, model system manner. PMID:26608215

  9. Identification of magnetite in lunar regolith breccia 60016: Evidence for oxidized conditions at the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Katherine H.; Visscher, Channon; Zolensky, Michael E.; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Kring, David A.

    2015-07-01

    Lunar regolith breccias are temporal archives of magmatic and impact bombardment processes on the Moon. Apollo 16 sample 60016 is an "ancient" feldspathic regolith breccia that was converted from a soil to a rock at ~3.8 Ga. The breccia contains a small (70 × 50 ?m) rock fragment composed dominantly of an Fe-oxide phase with disseminated domains of troilite. Fragments of plagioclase (An95-97), pyroxene (En74-75, Fs21-22,Wo3-4), and olivine (Fo66-67) are distributed in and adjacent to the Fe-oxide. The silicate minerals have lunar compositions that are similar to anorthosites. Mineral chemistry, synchrotron X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies demonstrate that the oxide phase is magnetite with an estimated Fe3+/?Fe ratio of ~0.45. The presence of magnetite in 60016 indicates that oxygen fugacity during formation was equilibrated at, or above, the Fe-magnetite or wüstite-magnetite oxygen buffer. This discovery provides direct evidence for oxidized conditions on the Moon. Thermodynamic modeling shows that magnetite could have been formed from oxidization-driven mineral replacement of Fe-metal or desulphurisation from Fe-sulfides (troilite) at low temperatures (<570 °C) in equilibrium with H2O steam/liquid or CO2 gas. Oxidizing conditions may have arisen from vapor transport during degassing of a magmatic source region, or from a hybrid endogenic-exogenic process when gases were released during an impacting asteroid or comet impact.

  10. Effect of Alumina on the Gaseous Reduction of Magnetite in CO/CO2 Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapelyushin, Yury; Xing, Xing; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jeong, Sunkwang; Sasaki, Yasushi; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    Reduction of magnetite doped with alumina (3, 6 and 12 mass pct Al2O3) was studied using CO/CO2 gas mixture (80 vol pct CO) at 1023 K and 1123 K (750 °C and 850 °C). The reduction rate and degree of reduction were evaluated from the weight loss of a sample with time. The reduction behavior was analyzed using the results of XRD and SEM-EDS measurements and thermodynamic analysis. Effect of alumina on the magnetite reduction depended on the alumina content and temperature. Magnetite reduction at 1023 K (750 °C) was accelerated by the addition of 3 mass pct Al2O3, however, the rate of reduction significantly decreased with the further increase in the alumina content to 6 and 12 mass pct. Different effect of alumina was observed in reduction at 1123 K (850 °C); the rate of reduction of the Fe3O4-Al2O3 mixture with 6 mass pct Al2O3 was the fastest. Reduction of un-doped magnetite was developed topochemically with the formation of a dense iron shell. However, reduction of alumina-doped magnetite to wüstite started along certain lattice planes with the formation of network-like structure. In the course of reduction, Al3+ ions diffused from wüstite to the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution enriching hercynite content in the solution at the reaction interface. Further reduction of alumina-rich Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution resulted in the formation of micro-cracks which enhanced the rate of the reduction process.

  11. Reproducible Crystallite Size of Mono-Dispersed and Scalable Biologically Produced Metal-Substituted Nanometer-Sized Magnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, J.; Rawn, C.; Rondinone, A.; Love, L.; Roh, Y.; Lauf, R.; Phelps, T.

    2008-12-01

    Our previous research demonstrated that biosynthesized magnetite (biomagnetite) exhibited similar properties as chemically synthesized magnetite. To complement uses of the traditional chemically synthesized magnetite (chem-magnetite) biomagnetite must be exhibit highly reproducible sizes and be available in scalable qualities. Here we emphasize potentially advantageous properties of biomagnetite regarding size, reproducibility and scaling availability. Average crystallite size (ACS) of biomagnetites ranging from 10-100 nm was determined after varied 1) incubation times, 2) substitution of metal and lanthanide species, 3) degrees of congruent incorporation or retardation of substitution elements, 4) bacterial species with their varied ability to substitute elemental species, and 6) incubation temperature that can influence coalescence. The microbial production of biomagnetite has demonstrated capacity to make highly crystalline nanoscale particles of metal-substituted ferrites including compounds of Co, Ni, Cr, Mn, Zn and the rare earths in large quantity. Selected Zn-substituted magnetite (nominal composition of Zn0.6Fe2.4O4) has been recovered at over 1 kg (wet weight) in batches from 30 L fermentations. The massively produced extracellular magnetites were confirmed to exhibit good mono- dispersity via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM also validated highly reproducible ACS of 13.1±0.8 nm size as determined through X-ray diffraction (N=7) at a 99 % confidence level. Based on the scale-up experiments performed using the 35 L reactor, the reduction in ACS variability and shorted incubation times of several days may be attributed to increases of electron donor input, and availability of divalent ions of the substitution metal with less ferrous ions in the case of doped magnetite, or a combination of the above. While costs of commercial nanometer sized magnetite (25-50 nm) may vary from 500/kg to > 1,000/kg, microbial mass production is likely capable of producing 13-90 nm magnetite or doped magnetites at a fraction of the cost of traditional chemical synthesis. While there are numerous approaches for the synthesis of nanoparticles, bacterial fermentation of magnetite or metal-substituted magnetite may represent a disruptive manufacturing technology with respect to yield, reproducibility and scalability.

  12. Universality in Pure Gravity Mediation

    E-print Network

    Jason L. Evans; Masahiro Ibe; Keith A. Olive; Tsutomu T. Yanagida

    2014-05-30

    If low energy supersymmetry is realized in nature, the apparent discovery of a Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV points to a supersymmetric mass spectrum in the TeV or multi-TeV range. Multi-TeV scalar masses are a necessary component of supersymmetric models with pure gravity mediation or in any model with strong moduli stabilization. Here, we show that full scalar mass universality remains viable as long as the ratio of Higgs vevs, tan beta is relatively small (\\lesssim 2.5). We discuss in detail the low energy (observable) consequences of these models.

  13. Anomalous attenuation of longitudinal ultrasound in intermediate state of high pure type I superconductor

    E-print Network

    Shepelev, Anatoly G; Filimonov, Genady D

    2012-01-01

    The dependence of the ultrasonic attenuation on the direction of magnetic field in an intermediate state of the very pure Gallium single crystal, in the case, when the magnetic field H is perpendicular to the wave vector k at the temperature T = 0.5 K, is found to be anomalously different from the dependence, observed at the same temperature and the magnitude of magnetic field equal to the critical magnetic field H=Hc in a normal state of superconductor. This new phenomenon can be explained, considering the anisotropy of the Fermi surface in the very pure Gallium single crystal.

  14. Multiple pure tone noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Sharma, Anupam; Paliath, Umesh; Shieh, Chingwei

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a fully numerical method for predicting multiple pure tones, also known as “Buzzsaw” noise. It consists of three steps that account for noise source generation, nonlinear acoustic propagation with hard as well as lined walls inside the nacelle, and linear acoustic propagation outside the engine. Noise generation is modeled by steady, part-annulus computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. A linear superposition algorithm is used to construct full-annulus shock/pressure pattern just upstream of the fan from part-annulus CFD results. Nonlinear wave propagation is carried out inside the duct using a pseudo-two-dimensional solution of Burgers' equation. Scattering from nacelle lip as well as radiation to farfield is performed using the commercial solver ACTRAN/TM. The proposed prediction process is verified by comparing against full-annulus CFD simulations as well as against static engine test data for a typical high bypass ratio aircraft engine with hardwall as well as lined inlets. Comparisons are drawn against nacelle unsteady pressure transducer measurements at two axial locations as well as against near- and far-field microphone array measurements outside the duct. This is the first fully numerical approach (no experimental or empirical input is required) to predict multiple pure tone noise generation, in-duct propagation and far-field radiation. It uses measured blade coordinates to calculate MPT noise.

  15. [Pure doctrine and exact technic?].

    PubMed

    Caruso, I A

    1975-01-01

    There is a theoretical attitude in psychoanalysis that can be described as "pure teaching" (E. Wiesenhütter), and a practice that can be described as "exact technique". An important point, in which theory and practice seem to be in harmony is the rejection of agitating and the request of an anonymous neutrality concerning the psychoanalyst. The research serves the discussion about this coupled conception. Freud has imprinted theory and practice concerning this subject, but he himself was sovereign in the use of it. In the daily process of psychoanalysis, teaching and technique are always coming up with new questions in the concrete situation. They only asymptotically reach the point of absolute pureness and exactness. The author is selfcriticizing the psychoanalysis in the subjects mentioned above. He points out that flexibility in teaching and technique does not at all imply a revisionism of psychoanalysis; only when it is evident for psychoanalysis that a well-weighed theory is necessary as well as the relevant practice for the theory, there will be the greatest possible freedom for both of them. PMID:1231274

  16. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  17. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for: Navigation Home / Stories of Hope / Crystal meth Crystal meth Story Of Hope By giovanni January 3rd, ... about my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting ...

  18. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  19. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  20. Highly monodisperse low-magnetization magnetite nanocubes as simultaneous T1-T2 MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. K.; Alipour, A.; Soran-Erdem, Z.; Aykut, Z. G.; Demir, H. V.

    2015-06-01

    We report the first study of highly monodisperse and crystalline iron oxide nanocubes with sub-nm controlled size distribution (9.7 +/- 0.5 nm in size) that achieve simultaneous contrast enhancement in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we confirmed the magnetite structure of iron oxide nanocubes by X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, optical absorption and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra. These magnetite nanocubes exhibit superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior simultaneously by virtue of their finely controlled shape and size. The magnetic measurements reveal that the magnetic moment values are favorably much lower because of the small size and cubic shape of the nanoparticles, which results in an enhanced spin canting effect. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we showed their potential as dual contrast agents for both T1- and T2-weighted MRI via phantom studies, in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. Therefore, these low-magnetization magnetite nanocubes, while being non-toxic and bio-compatible, hold great promise as excellent dual-mode T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI.We report the first study of highly monodisperse and crystalline iron oxide nanocubes with sub-nm controlled size distribution (9.7 +/- 0.5 nm in size) that achieve simultaneous contrast enhancement in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we confirmed the magnetite structure of iron oxide nanocubes by X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, optical absorption and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra. These magnetite nanocubes exhibit superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior simultaneously by virtue of their finely controlled shape and size. The magnetic measurements reveal that the magnetic moment values are favorably much lower because of the small size and cubic shape of the nanoparticles, which results in an enhanced spin canting effect. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we showed their potential as dual contrast agents for both T1- and T2-weighted MRI via phantom studies, in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. Therefore, these low-magnetization magnetite nanocubes, while being non-toxic and bio-compatible, hold great promise as excellent dual-mode T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00752f

  1. Domain Wall Pinning and Dislocations: Investigating Magnetite Deformed Under Conditions Analogous to Nature Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.; Harrison, R. J.; Loudon, J. C.; Newell, A. J.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we deformed samples cut from a single magnetite octahedron and used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements to experimentally verify earlier computational models of magnetic domain wall pinning by dislocations...

  2. Method for solid state crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Nolas, George S.; Beekman, Matthew K.

    2013-04-09

    A novel method for high quality crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates is presented. The synthesis of high quality pure phase crystals has been complicated by the simultaneous formation of both clathrate type-I and clathrate type-II structures. It was found that selective, phase pure, single-crystal growth of type-I and type-II clathrates can be achieved by maintaining sufficient partial pressure of a chemical constituent during slow, controlled deprivation of the chemical constituent from the primary reactant. The chemical constituent is slowly removed from the primary reactant by the reaction of the chemical constituent vapor with a secondary reactant, spatially separated from the primary reactant, in a closed volume under uniaxial pressure and heat to form the single phase pure crystals.

  3. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are fabricated and characterized. A purely theoretical section of the thesis investigates advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method. In particular it is shown that an inner product can be used to filter out specific photonic crystal modes or photonic crystal waveguide modes (Bloch-modes). However it is also shown that the numerical accuracy of this inner product severely worsens for Bloch modes with very low group velocities.

  4. Carboxylic acid effects on the size and catalytic activity of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Monfared, Hassan; Parchegani, Fatemeh; Alavi, Sohaila

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs) were successfully synthesized in diethylene glycol in the presence of carboxylic acids. They were characterized using XRD, SEM and FTIR. Carboxylic acid plays a critical role in determining the morphology, particle size and size distribution of the resulting particles. The results show that as-prepared magnetite nanoparticles are monodisperse and highly crystalline. The nanoparticles can be easily dispersed in aqueous media and other polar solvents due to coated by a layer of hydrophilic polyol and carboxylic acid ligands in situ. Easily prepared Fe3O4-NPs have been shown to be an active, recyclable, and highly selective catalyst for the epoxidation of cyclic olefins with aqueous 30% H2O2. PMID:25302421

  5. MAPLE fabrication of thin films based on kanamycin functionalized magnetite nanoparticles with anti-pathogenic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumezescu, Valentina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Holban, Alina Maria; Mogoant?, Lauren?iu; Mogo?anu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; St?nculescu, Anca; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2015-05-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity of kanamycin functionalized 5 nm-magnetite (Fe3O4@KAN) nanoparticles thin films deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. A laser deposition regime was established in order to stoichiometrically transfer Fe3O4@KAN thin films on silicone and glass substrates. Morphological and physico-chemical properties of powders and coatings were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, AFM and IR microscopy (IRM). Our nanostructured thin films have proved efficiency in the prevention of microbial adhesion and mature biofilms development as a result of antibiotic release in its active form. Furthermore, kanamycin functionalized nanostructures exhibit a good biocompatibility, both in vivo and in vitro, demonstrating their potential for implants application. This is the first study reporting the assessment of the in vivo biocompatibility of a magnetite-antimicrobial thin films produced by MAPLE technique.

  6. Magnetite Nanoparticles Coated with Rifampicin and Chlortetracycline for Drug Delivery Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nadejde, Claudia; Ciurlica, Ecaterina Foca-nici; Creanga, Dorina; Carlescu, Aurelian; Badescu, Vasile

    2010-12-02

    Four types of biocompatible magnetic fluids based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores were functionalized with antibiotics (rifampicin or chlortetracycline) as potential candidates for in vivo biomedical applications, such as magnetically controlled drug delivery. The synthesis consisted in coprecipitation of iron oxide in basic, as well as in acid medium, followed by the dispersion of the resulted magnetite nanoparticles in aqueous solution containing the antibiotic. The chosen method to prepare the magnetite-core/drug-shell systems avoided intermediate organic coating of the magnetic nanoparticles. Comparative analysis of the rheological features of the aqueous magnetic fluid samples was performed. The structural features of the coated magnetic particles were investigated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM). Good crystallinity and adequate stability in time were evidenced. Drug delivery curves were spectrophotometrically provided.

  7. Preparation and application of crosslinked poly(sodium acrylate)--coated magnetite nanoparticles as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel alloy.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; El-Saeed, Ashraf M

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new method to prepare poly(sodium acrylate) magnetite composite nanoparticles. Core/shell type magnetite nanocomposites were synthesized using sodium acrylate as monomer and N,N-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as crosslinker. Microemulsion polymerization was used for constructing core/shell structures with magnetite nanoparticles as core and poly(sodium acrylate) as shell. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was employed to characterize the nanocomposite chemical structure. Transmittance electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the morphology of the modified poly(sodium acrylate) magnetite composite nanoparticles. These particle will be evaluated for effective anticorrosion behavior as a hydrophobic surface on stainless steel. The composite nanoparticles has been designed by dispersing nanocomposites which act as a corrosion inhibitor. The inhibition effect of AA-Na/magnetite composites on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Polarization measurements indicated that the studied inhibitor acts as mixed type corrosion inhibitor. EIS spectra exhibit one capacitive loop. The different techniques confirmed that the inhibition efficiency reaches 99% at 50 ppm concentration. This study has led to a better understanding of active anticorrosive magnetite nanoparticles with embedded nanocomposites and the factors influencing their anticorrosion performance. PMID:25594340

  8. Bubble-crystal aggregates promote magma chamber overturn in arc crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; Woods, A. W.; Humphreys, M.

    2014-12-01

    Bubble nucleation in melts occurs preferentially on the surfaces of crystals. Of all phases in oxidized melts, magnetite is most favorable for the heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles owing to the high wetting angles at the bubble-crystal-melt interface. Preservation of such relationships in erupted rocks however, is rare owing to overprinting by decompression-induced degassing, shear and bubble detachment during magma ascent. We present evidence from basaltic enclaves preserved in andesite lavas from Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, for a spatial association between magnetite and bubbles that we propose is a relict of the bubble nucleation process at depth. The existence of bubble-crystal aggregates means that magnetite crystals will tend to sink more slowly, and bubbles will rise less fast than for the case of single crystals and bubbles. The behavior of bubble-crystal aggregates will be dependent on their bulk density, which depends on the relative proportion by mass of the magnetite and the bubble and the pressure. In deeper chambers, the smaller mass of exsolved volatiles leads to the prediction that many of the bubble-crystal aggregates are dense and so fall to base of the chamber (and the bubbles are wholly or partially resorbed). In shallower chambers, however, the larger volume and mass of exsolved volatiles would tend to promote buoyant aggregate formation. The presence of the aggregates has implications for the mixing/mingling process when mafic magmas underplate crystal-rich evolved magma bodies in the arc crust. For shallow magma chambers the buoyancy of the aggregates in the underplating mafic magma will either cause vapor accumulation at the magma interface and the formation of mafic inclusions rich in magnetite; or the enhanced density of the aggregates may promote magma chamber overturn and mixing of mafic magmas into the andesites bodies. Both processes may be important over different spatial and time-scales. The overturn mechanism may explain the hybrid features of the andesite, including the presence of cryptic mafic components, reverse zoning of phenocrysts and how volatiles might be sourced from the mafic magmas and distributed within andesite bodies.

  9. 6.2. Pure death processes 6.2.1. Postulates of pure death processes.

    E-print Network

    Chen, Kani

    45 6.2. Pure death processes 6.2.1. Postulates of pure death processes. {X(t) : t [0, )} is called a pure death process with parameters µ0 = 0, µ1, ..., µN , and state space {0, 1, ..., N are equivalent, but Postulate 2 is incomplete and cannot be considered as a definition for pure death process. 6

  10. `Pure air, pure water and good light' Sanitary reform in the Dublin hospitals, 1858-1898

    E-print Network

    `Pure air, pure water and good light' Sanitary reform in the Dublin hospitals, 1858-1898 Irish hospitals, 1858-1898 Gerard Fealy, Martin McNamara, Ruth Geraghty 29 April 2010 Acknowledgements IRCHSS #12 and hospital sanitation `Pure air, pure water and good light' Sanitary reform in the Dublin hospitals, 1858

  11. Attenuated antiaggregation effects of magnetite nanoparticles in cerebrospinal fluid of people with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gažová, Zuzana; Antošová, Andrea; Krištofiková, Zdena; Bartoš, Aleš; Rí?ný, Jan; Cechová, Linda; Klaschka, Jan; Rípová, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that oligomeric/aggregated amyloid ? peptides are a key player in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and that different nanoparticles influence oligomerization/aggregation processes in experiments in vitro. Our previous results demonstrated antiaggregation effects of magnetite nanoparticles in the case of protein lysozyme, however, they have yet to be supported by biological samples containing peptides/proteins preaggregated in vivo. In the study, Thioflavin T based fluorescence was evaluated on cerebrospinal fluid samples from people with Alzheimer's disease/multiple sclerosis and corresponding age-related controls using magnetite nanoparticles incubated for 24 h. Our results are as follows: (i) fluorescence of samples without nanoparticles was significantly higher in both older groups (old controls and people with Alzheimer's disease) than in those of younger (young controls and people with multiple sclerosis), (ii) nanoparticles did not markedly influence a fluorescence intensity in young people but eliminated it in both old groups; nevertheless, the effects of nanoparticles were significantly lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease then in the age-matched controls, and finally (iii) significant positive correlation was observed between fluorescence of samples without nanoparticles and levels of phospho-tau. Our results support studies reporting enhanced aggregation of different peptides/proteins occurring during normal aging and demonstrate for the first time that peptides/proteins preaggregated in vivo during Alzheimer's disease are more resistant to the antiaggregation effects of magnetite nanoparticles than those of age-matched controls. A significant correlation with phospho-tau levels indicate that the in vitro test with magnetite nanoparticles and Thioflavin T dye on cerebrospinal fluid could be sensitive to changes mediated by early Alzheimer's disease stages. PMID:20721410

  12. Contamination of New Jersey beach sand with magnetite spherules from industrial air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Hassinan, W.T.; Puffer, J.H. . Geology Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Spherical particles composed of magnetite, typically 120 [mu]m to 2,450 [mu]m in diameter, are accumulating in the beach sands of New Jersey. Most magnetite spherule surfaces are highly polished but some are corroded or abraded. Their interiors are typically vesicular. Magnetite spherules from 213 New Jersey beach sand samples collected during May 1991 are chemically and morphologically the same as those filtered from industrial smokestacks and the air supplied of Newark, New Jersey and Philadelphia. The average concentration of spherules in New Jersey beach sand is 35 per kg throughout the northern 43 km of beach south of Newark (from Sandy Hook to Belmar Beach). They are rare to absent in the central 86 km stretch of beach but average 34 per kg of sand throughout the southern 91 km of beach east of Philadelphia (from Ventnor City to Villas Beach). The distribution of magnetite spherules in New Jersey beach sand is consistent with a transport pathway model that involves: (1) Prevailing wind dispersal from industrial sources, (2) erosion of spherules that have settled out of the air into the surface drainage system that flows toward the New Jersey coast and (3) longshore transport of spherule contaminated sand away from inlets identified as locations where most of the spherules enter the beach system. The spherules, therefore, are useful tracers indicating how industrial airborne fallout is transported to and along shorelines. The distribution pattern is consistent with generally northward longshore currents north of the Manasquan inlet and generally southward longshore currents south of the Abescon inlet.

  13. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    E-print Network

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  14. Biomineralization, crystallography and magnetic properties of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes in giant rod magnetotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Pan, Yongxin; Liu, Qingsong; Yu-Zhang, Kui; Menguy, Nicolas; Che, Renchao; Qin, Huafeng; Lin, Wei; Wu, Wenfang; Petersen, Nikolai; Yang, Xin'an

    2010-05-01

    Magnetosomes produced by magnetotactic bacteria are of great interest for understanding bacterial biomineralization along with sedimentary magnetism and environmental magnetism. One of the most intriguing species, Magnetobacterium bavaricum can synthesize hundreds of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes per cell, which contribute significantly to magnetic properties of sediments. However, the biomineralization mechanism and magnetic properties of such magnetosomes remain unknown. In this paper, we have conducted a comprehensive study of the crystallography and magnetic properties of bullet-shaped magnetosomes formed by uncultivated giant rod magnetotactic bacteria (referred to as MYR-1), recently discovered in Lake Miyun (Beijing, China). Transmission electron microscopy observations reveal that each MYR-1 cell contains hundreds of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes, which are arranged into 3 - 5 braid-like bundles of chains. The formation of the bullet-shaped magnetosomes can be divided into two stages: initial isotropic growth (up to ? 20 nm) followed by elongation along the [100] direction, which is unusual compared with the expected [111] magnetic easy axis. Although the [100] orientation is the hard axis of the face-centered cubic magnetite, the shape anisotropy of bullet-shaped magnetosomes and intra-bundle magnetostatic interactions confine the magnetization direction of the chain along the long axis of the cell/bundle. Due to each bundle of magnetosome chains effectively behaving as an elongated single domain particle, the MYR-1 cells show high coercivity, weak intra-bundle magnetostatic interaction, and high ?-ratio. These results provide new insights into the biomineralization process and magnetic properties of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes.

  15. Size control of magnetite nanoparticles in excess ligands as a function of reaction temperature and time.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Masafumi; Nishida, Ryo; Muramatsu, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The novel synthesis of monodisperse magnetite Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles of varying sizes using a solventless synthetic method was developed. Iron salt was treated in excess oleylamine and oleic acid as ligands. The effect of the reaction temperature and time on the particle size was investigated and the particle sizes were easily tuned from 5.3 to 20.4 nm by changing the reaction temperature and time. PMID:25093981

  16. Self-assembled MmsF proteinosomes control magnetite nanoparticle formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Andrea E.; Bramble, Jonathan P.; Walker, Robyn; Bain, Jennifer; Galloway, Johanna M.; Staniland, Sarah S.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize highly uniform intracellular magnetite nanoparticles through the action of several key biomineralization proteins. These proteins are present in a unique lipid-bound organelle (the magnetosome) that functions as a nanosized reactor in which the particle is formed. A master regulator protein of nanoparticle formation, magnetosome membrane specific F (MmsF), was recently discovered. This predicted integral membrane protein is essential for controlling the monodispersity of the nanoparticles in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. Two MmsF homologs sharing over 60% sequence identity, but showing no apparent impact on particle formation, were also identified in the same organism. We have cloned, expressed, and used these three purified proteins as additives in synthetic magnetite precipitation reactions. Remarkably, these predominantly ?-helical membrane spanning proteins are unusually highly stable and water-soluble because they self-assemble into spherical aggregates with an average diameter of 36 nm. The MmsF assembly appears to be responsible for a profound level of control over particle size and iron oxide (magnetite) homogeneity in chemical precipitation reactions, consistent with its indicated role in vivo. The assemblies of its two homologous proteins produce imprecise various iron oxide materials, which is a striking difference for proteins that are so similar to MmsF both in sequence and hierarchical structure. These findings show MmsF is a significant, previously undiscovered, protein additive for precision magnetite nanoparticle production. Furthermore, the self-assembly of these proteins into discrete, soluble, and functional “proteinosome” structures could lead to advances in fields ranging from membrane protein production to drug delivery applications. PMID:25349410

  17. Self-assembled MmsF proteinosomes control magnetite nanoparticle formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Andrea E; Bramble, Jonathan P; Walker, Robyn; Bain, Jennifer; Galloway, Johanna M; Staniland, Sarah S

    2014-11-11

    Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize highly uniform intracellular magnetite nanoparticles through the action of several key biomineralization proteins. These proteins are present in a unique lipid-bound organelle (the magnetosome) that functions as a nanosized reactor in which the particle is formed. A master regulator protein of nanoparticle formation, magnetosome membrane specific F (MmsF), was recently discovered. This predicted integral membrane protein is essential for controlling the monodispersity of the nanoparticles in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. Two MmsF homologs sharing over 60% sequence identity, but showing no apparent impact on particle formation, were also identified in the same organism. We have cloned, expressed, and used these three purified proteins as additives in synthetic magnetite precipitation reactions. Remarkably, these predominantly ?-helical membrane spanning proteins are unusually highly stable and water-soluble because they self-assemble into spherical aggregates with an average diameter of 36 nm. The MmsF assembly appears to be responsible for a profound level of control over particle size and iron oxide (magnetite) homogeneity in chemical precipitation reactions, consistent with its indicated role in vivo. The assemblies of its two homologous proteins produce imprecise various iron oxide materials, which is a striking difference for proteins that are so similar to MmsF both in sequence and hierarchical structure. These findings show MmsF is a significant, previously undiscovered, protein additive for precision magnetite nanoparticle production. Furthermore, the self-assembly of these proteins into discrete, soluble, and functional "proteinosome" structures could lead to advances in fields ranging from membrane protein production to drug delivery applications. PMID:25349410

  18. Magnetite in human tissues: A mechanism for the biological effects of weak ELF magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschvink, J.L.; Kobayashi-Kirschvink, A.; Diaz-Ricci, J.C.; Kirschvink, S.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Due to the apparent lack of a biophysical mechanism, the question of whether weak, low-frequency magnetic fields are able to influence living organisms has long been one of the most controversial subjects in any field of science. However, two developments during the past decade have changed this perception dramatically, the first being the discovery that many organisms, including humans, biochemically precipitate the ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite (Fe3O4). In the magnetotactic bacteria, the geomagnetic response is based on either biogenic magnetite or greigite (Fe3S4), and reasonably good evidence exists that this is also the case in higher animals such as the honey bee. Second, the development of simple behavioral conditioning experiments for training honey bees to discriminate magnetic fields demonstrates conclusively that at least one terrestrial animal is capable of detecting earth-strength magnetic fields through a sensory process. In turn, the existence of this ability implies the presence of specialized receptors which interact at the cellular level with weak magnetic fields in a fashion exceeding thermal noise. A simple calculation shows that magnetosomes moving in response to earth-strength ELF fields are capable of opening trans-membrane ion channels, in a fashion similar to those predicted by ionic resonance models. Hence, the presence of trace levels of biogenic magnetite in virtually all human tissues examined suggests that similar biophysical processes may explain a variety of weak field ELF bioeffects. 61 refs.

  19. Impact of surface coated magnetite used in magnetic drug delivery system on immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oaku, Yoshihiro; Tamada, Junya; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is a technique to effectively accumulate drugs, which are combined with ferromagnetic particles, into the affected area using magnetic force control. This study intends to apply MDDS for immunotherapy by enhancing immune responses by a surface treatment of a ferromagnetic particle. The objective of this study is to give the adjuvant effect to a ferromagnetic particle by the surface treatment with alum, which is known as one of the common adjuvants that activates inflammasome pathway. First, magnetite was prepared as a ferromagnetic particle and coated with alum. Alum-coated magnetite increased the expression of caspase-1, which is an activated indicator of inflammasome, in the culture of human monocyte cell (THP-1 cell). To evaluate the potential of the surface coated particles, the particles were subcutaneously injected to mice with a peptide vaccine. As a result, the antibody titer was increased by the surface coated particles as assessed by ELISA. Although a magnetic force has not yet applied in this study, the administration experiment to mice using magnetic force control is our next step. In conclusion, we modified the immune response to magnetite by coating the surface with alum. This can lead to a clinical application for vaccine therapy in future.

  20. In-situ precipitation of ultra-stable nano-magnetite slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramimoghadam, Donya; Bagheri, Samira; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution, we prepared water-based magnetic fluids of iron oxide nanoparticles using an in-situ precipitation method. The effect of dodecanoic acid addition as a surfactant on the physico-chemical and magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated as well. The quantity of the surfactant was varied between 3 and 5 g. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were utilized to confirm the presence of spinel phase magnetites (Fe3O4). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the resulting magnetic nanoparticles' size and morphology. The results showed polydispersed hexagonal nanoparticles (average diameter of ca. 70 nm) as a result of the protocol. Moreover, the pH-dependent stability of the samples confirms that magnetite nanofluids were highly stable in the wide range of pH, from 4-12. The optimal amount of dodecanoic acid to produce ultra-stable nano-magnetite slurry with the highest saturation magnetization of 8.6 emu g-1 was determined to be 4.5 g.

  1. Magnetite particles triggering a faster and more robust syntrophic pathway of methanogenic propionate degradation.

    PubMed

    Cruz Viggi, Carolina; Rossetti, Simona; Fazi, Stefano; Paiano, Paola; Majone, Mauro; Aulenta, Federico

    2014-07-01

    Interspecies electron transfer mechanisms between Bacteria and Archaea play a pivotal role during methanogenic degradation of organic matter in natural and engineered anaerobic ecosystems. Growing evidence suggests that in syntrophic communities electron transfer does not rely exclusively on the exchange of diffusible molecules and energy carriers such as hydrogen or formate, rather microorganisms have the capability to exchange metabolic electrons in a more direct manner. Here, we show that supplementation of micrometer-size magnetite (Fe3O4) particles to a methanogenic sludge enhanced (up to 33%) the methane production rate from propionate, a key intermediate in the anaerobic digestion of organic matter and a model substrate to study energy-limited syntrophic communities. The stimulatory effect most probably resulted from the establishment of a direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), based on magnetite particles serving as electron conduits between propionate-oxidizing acetogens and carbon dioxide-reducing methanogens. Theoretical calculations revealed that DIET allows electrons to be transferred among syntrophic partners at rates which are substantially higher than those attainable via interspecies H2 transfer. Besides the remarkable potential for improving anaerobic digestion, which is a proven biological strategy for renewable energy production, the herein described conduction-based DIET could also have a role in natural methane emissions from magnetite-rich soils and sediments. PMID:24901501

  2. Novel carboxylated PEG-coating on magnetite nanoparticles designed for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illés, Erzsébet; Tombácz, Etelka; Szekeres, Márta; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Szabó, Ákos; Iván, Béla

    2015-04-01

    Fabrication of PEG coating on magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) is one of the most favoured ways to ensure biocompatibility. Surface modification of magnetite by an own-prepared comb-like PEG-copolymer (PEGA-AA) was compared with two commercially available ones (carboxy-PEG (PEG-C) and phosphate-PEG (PEG-P)). ATR FT-IR data revealed that all polymers form complexes on the surface of MNPs. Electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed that both the type and quantity of the polymers' anchoring groups influence the aggregation of coated nanomagnets. PEG-C shell does not provide excess negative charges, so magnetite particles became aggregated. However PEG-P and PEGA-AA gradually modify the surface: neutralizing the originally positively charged MNPs below loading 0.5 mmol/g, while above it a polyanionic layer forms on nanomagnets dispersing them in salty media at pH ~6.5. The PEGA-AA comb-like copolymer is more efficient for MNPs PEGylation due to the uniform distribution of carboxylates and PEG chains along the carbon skeleton.

  3. Lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite exhibit diverse neurotoxic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy

    Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are one of the components of Lunar soil simulants. Neurotoxic potential of lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite was analyzed. The size of particles, their effects on membrane potential, acidification of synaptic vesicles, uptake and ambient level of glutamate, which is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, were studied in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) using photon correlation spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, radiolabeled assay, respectively. No significant effect of Lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite on acidification of synaptic vesicles were found in synaptosomes. Also, nanoparticles did not influence the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. Unspecific binding of L-[14C]glutamate to synaptosomes was not altered by nanoparticles of magnetite, whereas in the presence of Lunar soil simulant this parameter was changed. Thus, it was suggested that Lunar soil simulant might disturb glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS.

  4. Interaction of uranium with in situ anoxically generated magnetite on steel.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Miquel; El Aamrani, Souad; Duro, Lara; Giménez, Javier; de Pablo, Joan; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-08-25

    In the high level nuclear waste repository concept, spent nuclear fuel is designed to be encapsulated in steel canisters. Thus, it is necessary to study the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the behaviour of the radionuclides released from the fuel. In this sense, the main objective of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the uranium(VI) retention. To this aim, magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) has been generated by anaerobic steel corrosion in an autoclave reactor at an overpressure of 8atm of H(2)(g). After characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), the obtained corroded steel coupons were contacted, at two different H(2)(g) pressures (1atm and 7.6atm), with a U(VI) solution. The evolution of the uranium concentration in solution is determined and a study of the composition of the coupons at the end of the experiments is carried out. The main conclusion obtained from this work is that magnetite generated on a steel coupon is able not only to retain uranium via sorption, but also to reduce hexavalent to tetravalent uranium in a higher extent than commercial magnetite, thus, providing an effective retardation path to the migration of uranium (and, potentially, other actinides) out of the repository. PMID:17383093

  5. Magnetite/CdTe magnetic-fluorescent composite nanosystem for magnetic separation and bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Anup; Kale, Sonia; Yadav, Prasad; Gholap, Haribhau; Pasricha, Renu; Jog, J. P.; Lefez, Benoit; Hannoyer, Béatrice; Shastry, Padma; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2011-06-01

    A new synthesis protocol is described to obtain a CdTe decorated magnetite bifunctional nanosystem via dodecylamine (DDA) as cross linker. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and fluorescence microscopy are used to characterize the constitution, size, composition and physical properties of these superparamagnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles. These CdTe decorated magnetite nanoparticles were then functionalized with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody to specifically target cells expressing this receptor. The EGFR is a transmembrane glycoprotein and is expressed on tumor cells from different tissue origins including human leukemic cell line Molt-4 cells. The magnetite-CdTe composite nanosystem is shown to perform excellently for specific selection, magnetic separation and fluorescent detection of EGFR positive Molt-4 cells from a mixed population. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy results show that this composite nanosystem has great potential in antibody functionalized magnetic separation and imaging of cells using cell surface receptor antibody.

  6. Characterization of multiqubit pure-state entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zeqian; Xu Quanhua

    2006-03-15

    A necessary and sufficient entanglement criterion based on variances of Mermin-Klyshko's Bell operators is proved for multiqubit pure states. Contrary to Bell's inequalities, entangled pure states strictly satisfy a quadratic inequality but product ones can attain the equality under some local unitary transformations, which can be obtained by solving a quadratic maximum problem. This presents a characterization of multiqubit pure-state entanglement.

  7. Experiment MA-028 crystal growth. [low gravity manufacturing of single crystals from Apollo/Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A crystal growth experiment is reported on orbital space flights. The experiment was performed during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. The Crystal Growth Experiment assessed a novel process for growing single crystals of insoluble substances by allowing two or more reactant solutions to diffuse toward each other through a region of pure solvent in zero gravity. The experiment was entirely successful and yielded crystals of about the expected size, quality, and number.

  8. Pure single crystallographic form of TiO2 nanoparticles: Preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Piyush J.; Tomar, Laxmi J.; Desai, Rahul K.; Chakrabarty, Bishwajit S.

    2015-06-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles in three pure crystallographic forms (anatase, rutile and Brookite) have been prepared by hydrothermal and precipitation method. XRD analysis showed that the prepared nanoparticles using hydrothermal method for 2h and 24h were pure Brookite and pure anatase respectively. Pure rutile phase of TiO2 nanoparticles has been obtained by precipitation method. The average crystallite size for anatase, rutile and Brookite was found to be 14.71 nm, 12.88 nm and 5.27 nm respectively. This nano size of crystals has produced lattice strain in material, and this strain varies with size and structure. The UV-Visible absorption analysis showed that the energy gaps for anatase, rutile and Brookite are 3.32 eV, 2.45 eV and 2.60 eV respectively. Refractive index of all the samples has been changed compared to the bulk TiO2.

  9. Nano-doped weakly polar versus highly polar liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kamal Kumar; Misra, Abhishek Kumar; Manohar, Rajiv

    2015-03-01

    Nanoparticles doped liquid crystal show changed dielectric properties in comparison to pure liquid crystals. These changes are strongly dependent on the inherent properties of guest and host particles. In the present work we have done comparative dielectric study of highly polar nematic liquid crystals 5CB and weakly polar liquid crystal D6AOB and its 1 % wt/wt concentration with zinc oxide nanoparticles (1 % Cu) doped. The relaxation modes in pure and nano doped samples are explained properly. We have also analyzed the dielectric anisotropy and relaxation frequency for all the samples.

  10. Redox cycling of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in magnetite by Fe-metabolizing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, James; Klueglein, Nicole; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-03-26

    Despite the regular occurrence of both magnetite and iron-metabolizing bacteria in the same environments, it is currently unknown whether the iron(II) and iron(III) in magnetite can be cycled between different bacteria and whether or how magnetic properties are affected by this metabolic activity. We show through magnetic and spectroscopic measurements that the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizer Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 can oxidize solid-phase magnetite nanoparticles using light energy, leading to a decrease in the measured magnetic susceptibility (MS). This process likely occurs at the surface and is reversible in the dark by the Fe(III)-reducer Geobacter sulfurreducens resulting in an increase in MS. These results show that iron ions bound in highly crystalline mineral magnetite are bioavailable as electron stores and electron sinks under varying environmental conditions, making magnetite a potential “biogeobattery” during day/night cycles. These findings are relevant for environmental studies and reinforce the impact of microbial redox processes on the global iron cycle.

  11. Structural Modification and Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Magnetite Synthesised in the Presence of an Anionic Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S.; Hewitt, I. J.; Powell, A. K.

    2014-07-01

    The earliest reported medical use of magnetite powder for internal applications was in the 10th century A.D. by the Persian physician and philosopher Avicenna of Bokhara [1,2]. Today magnetic nanoparticles are used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are potential colloidal mediators for cancer magnetic hyperthermia [3]. Twenty years ago magnetite (Fe3O4) was found to be present in the human brain [4] and more recently it has been reported that nanoscale biogenic magnetite (origin and formation uncertain) is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and Alzheimer's [5]. Here we show that the synthesis of magnetite in the presence of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) gives rise to a variety of nanoscale morphologies, some of which look remarkably similar to magnetite found in organisms, suggesting that similar processes may be involved. Furthermore, these 1D materials with diameters of quantum confined size are of interest in the areas of biosensors [6] and biomedical imaging [7].

  12. GEOMETRIC PRESENTATIONS FOR THE PURE BRAID GROUP

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    GEOMETRIC PRESENTATIONS FOR THE PURE BRAID GROUP DAN MARGALIT AND JON MCCAMMOND Abstract. We give several new positive finite presentations for the pure braid group that are easy to remember and simple in form. All of our presentations involve a metric on the punctured disc so that the punctures

  13. Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Strathclyde, University of

    Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry Thomas Graham Building University of Strathclyde 295 Cathedral Duncan Graham, who will describe the exciting developments in nanometrology. In particular he.45--15.30 Functionalise Nanoparticles and Biomolecular Interactions Professor Duncan Graham Department of Pure and Applied

  14. Epitaxial Fe{sub 3-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 4} films from magnetite to ulvöspinel by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Droubay, T.C.; Pearce, C.I.; Ilton, E.S.; Engelhard, M.H.; Engelhard, M.H.; Heald, S.M.; Arenholz, E.; Rosso, K.M.

    2011-07-21

    Epitaxial films along the Fe{sub 3-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 4} (titanomagnetite) compositional series from pure end-members magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) to ulvöspinel (Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}) were successfully grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO(100) substrates. Spectroscopic characterization including high resolution x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism consistently shows that Ti(IV) substitutes for Fe(III) in the inverse spinel lattice with a proportional increase in lattice Fe(II) concentration. No evidence of Ti interstitials, spinodal decomposition, or secondary phases was found in the bulk of the grown films. At the uppermost few nanometers of the Ti-bearing film surfaces, evidence suggests that Fe(II) is susceptible to facile oxidation, and that an associated lower Fe/Ti ratio in this region is consistent with surface compositional incompleteness or alteration to a titanomaghemite-like composition and structure. The surface of these films nonetheless appear to remain highly ordered and commensurate with the underlying structure despite facile oxidation, a surface condition that is found to be reversible to some extent by heating in low oxygen environments.

  15. Virtual Crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  16. Crystal Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  17. Toward a new < 250 °C pyrrhotite-magnetite geothermometer for claystones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Charles; Pozzi, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effects of burial and moderate experimental heating on claystones from three regions with different degrees of maturation: immature (burial temperature ˜ 40 °C) of Bure Callovo-Oxfordian claystones in the Basin of Paris (France); early mature (burial temperature ˜ 85 °C) of Opalinus Lower Dogger claystones from the Mont Terri anticline in front of the Jura fold belt (Switzerland); and mature to overmature (burial temperature < 170 °C) of Chartreuse Callovian-Oxfordian claystones from Chartreuse Sub-Alpine chains. To have information about the nature of the magnetic assemblage, we perform low-temperature (10 K-300 K) investigation of an isothermal remanent magnetization. In a first set of laboratory heating experiments, we aim to impart a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) at 95 °C for several weeks in Bure and Opalinus claystones. Thermal demagnetization of the CRM reveals that magnetite is formed by heating the Opalinus claystones while an assemblage of magnetite and iron sulphide is formed in Bure claystones. Further, we document the appearance of a magnetic transition at ˜ 35 K in Bure claystones after heating. We name this transition the P-transition and we propose that it is related to the formation of fine-grained pyrrhotite (Fe 7S 8). The P-transition is also detected in early mature to mature Opalinus and Chartreuse claystones. We conduct additional experimental heating of natural Opalinus claystones. One set of experiments is referred to as short-term heating (1 h) from 100 °C to 200 °C. It is dedicated to an investigation of the effect of short-lived heating processes in geology. A second set of heating experiments is designed to approach burial conditions using a gold capsule. In burial-like experiments, we heated Opalinus claystones from 150 °C to 250 °C for several weeks under a pressure of 100 MPa. In both experiments, we observe a correlative diminution of the pyrrhotite signature at 35 K with increasing temperature. We interpret this trend as the appearance of magnetite. We derive a parameter PM from the warming curve of a saturated isothermal remanent magnetization acquired at 10 K (ZFC). We report on a consistent evolution of PM with temperature in the range of 40 °C to 250 °C, including natural samples, heated samples at 95 °C, and burial-like heated samples. PM first increases between ˜ 40 °C up to ˜ 85 °C, implying that pyrrhotite gradually dominates the magnetic assemblage at low temperature. For temperatures above 85 °C, PM decreases up to 250 °C, implying that the formation of magnetite gradually overshadows the magnetic input of pyrrhotite. PM values obtained from mature to overmature claystones from the Chartreuse are lower than the PM values obtained from the burial-like heated Opalinus claystones, suggesting that the formation of magnetite is driven by kinetics. The continuous trend of the PM parameter suggests that the magnetic properties of pyrrhotite-magnetite claystones can be used to infer paleo-temperatures and we propose to name this geothermometer MagEval.

  18. Producing high-grade nickel sulfate with solvent displacement crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldoveanu, Georgiana A.; Demopoulos, George P.

    2002-01-01

    Solvent displacement crystallization entails the addition of water-miscible organic solvents to aqueous metalliferous solutions to cause salt crystallization. In this work, isopropanol is used to produce well-grown and relatively pure nickel-sulfate hexahydrate crystals from industrial de-copperized electrolyte. By proper selection of the organic-to-aqueous ratio, the method of solvent addition and seeding/product recycling, nickel-sulfate crystals were produced with at least an order of magnitude higher purity than the ones conventionally produced by evaporative crystallization. The processing and product quality advantages of integrating solvent displacement crystallization with electrolyte purification in a copper refinery context are discussed.

  19. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  20. Magnetite solubility and phase stability in alkaline media at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1994-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, is the dominant oxide constituent of the indigenous corrosion layers that form on iron base alloys in high purity, high temperature water. The apparent simultaneous stability of two distinct oxidation states of iron in this metal oxide is responsible for its unique solubility behavior. The present work was undertaken to extend the experimental and theoretical bases for estimating solubilities of an iron corrosion product (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe(OH){sub 2}) over a broader temperature range and in the presence of complexing, pH-controlling reagents. These results indicate that a surface layer of ferrous hydroxide controls magnetite solubility behavior at low temperatures in much the same manner as a surface layer of nickel(II) hydroxide was previously reported to control the low temperature solubility behavior of NiO. The importance of Fe(III) ion complexes implies not only that most previously-derived thermodynamic properties of the Fe(OH){sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion are incorrect, but that magnetite phase stability probably shifts to favor a sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate compound in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures. The test methodology involved pumping alkaline solutions of known composition through a bed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} granules and analyzing the emerging solution for Fe. Two pH-controlling reagents were tested: sodium phosphate and ammonia. Equilibria for the following reactions were described in thermodynamic terms: (a) Fe(OH){sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} dissolution and transformation, (b) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion hydroxocomplex formation (hydrolysis), (c) Fe(II) ion amminocomplex formation, and (d) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion phosphatocomplex formation. 36 refs.

  1. Gold-magnetite nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates: Synthesis, properties and toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariti, Akshay

    This thesis study focuses on synthesizing and characterizing gold-magnetite optically active magnetic nanoparticle and its conjugation with biomolecules for biomedical applications, especially magnetic fluid hyperthermia treatment for cancerous tissue. Gold nanoparticles have already displayed their potential in the biomedical field. They exhibit excellent optical properties and possess strong surface chemistry which renders them suitable for various biomolecule attachments. Studies have showed gold nanoparticles to be a perfect biocompatible vector. However, clinical trials for gold mediated drug delivery and treatment studied in rat models identified some problems. Of these problems, the low retention time in bloodstream and inability to maneuver externally has been the consequential. To further enhance their potential applications and overcome the problems faced in using gold nanoparticles alone, many researchers have synthesized multifunctional magnetic materials with gold at one terminal. Magnetite, among the investigated magnetic materials is a promising and reliable candidate because of its high magnetic saturation moment and low toxicity. This thesis showcases a simple and facile one pot synthesis of gold-magnetite nanoparticles with an average particle size of 80 nm through hot injection method. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, TEM, Mossbauer spectroscopy, SQUID and MTS toxicity studies. The superparamagnetism of the as-synthesized nanoparticles has an interestingly high saturation magnetization moment and low toxicity than the literature values reported earlier. L-cysteine and (-)-EGCG (epigallacatechin-3-gallate) were attached to this multifunctional nanoparticles through the gold terminal and characterized to show the particles applicability through Raman, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  2. Upgrading Metals Via Direct Reduction from Poly-metallic Titaniferous Magnetite Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Saikat; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Dey, Rajib

    2015-02-01

    Pre-reduction is the thermo-chemical beneficiation process which is very useful technique for upgradation of metal values from complex low grade ore. The isothermal reduction behaviour of eastern Indian titaniferous magnetite lump ore without pre-treatment, pre-treated and ore-coke composite briquettes has been investigated in the present study. During pre-reduction of lump ore at 1473 K, magnetite and some part of ilmenite are transformed to metallic iron but most of the ilmenite has not reduced. Pre-treatment by multiple heating to high temperature (1373 K and 1473 K, respectively) and subsequently sudden cooling to room temperature by water successfully increase the porosity as well as many fissures in dense grain, which significantly enhance the degree of reduction. Ilmenite and magnetite phases are transformed to pseudobrookite and hematite during high temperature air soaking, and metallic iron is the dominant phase after reduction. Metallic iron and titanium dioxide are the major phases after reduction at 1373 K, but treatments above 1413 K lead to the formation of ferrous pseudobrookite (FeTi2O5). Finally, the different constitutes are separated by magnetic separation. The phases of reduced pre-treated and briquettes samples cannot be separated by magnetic separation, whereas reduced lump ore is separated successfully. The cause is perhaps due to association and interlocking of high intensity magnetic metallic iron with titanium oxide. Fe:TiO2 is upgraded about to 7.06:1 in the magnetic fraction of reduced lump ore which is formerly 2.14:1 in the case of raw ore. Vanadium is simultaneously distributed at a 3.81:1 ratio in magnetic and non-magnetic fraction.

  3. Viscosity of magnetite-toluene nanofluids: Dependence on temperature and nanoparticle concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rahul; Sanchez, Oswaldo; Ghosh, Suvojit; Kadimcherla, Naveen; Sen, Swarnendu; Balasubramanian, Ganesh

    2015-10-01

    We examine the dependence of the viscosity of nanofluids, comprised of magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in toluene, on particle concentration and temperature. The nanofluid viscosity increases monotonically with particle concentration. We show that although the nanoparticles aggregate to form clusters with increasing concentration, the cluster size is fairly monodisperse and hence the viscosity can be expressed as a function of only the particle concentration. The viscosity of the nanofluid is found to decrease with temperature, similarly to the characteristics of the carrier liquid. We describe these dependencies through an empirical correlation, since the observations are useful to employ such nanofluids in engineering applications.

  4. Iron site occupancies in magnetite-ulvospinel solid solution: A new approach using XMCD

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, C. I.; Henderson, C. M. B.; Telling, N. D.; Pattrick, R. A.D.; Vaughan, D. J.; Charnock, J. M.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Coker, V.S.; Laan, G. van der

    2009-06-22

    Ordering of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} between octahedral (Oh) and tetrahedral (Td) sites in synthetic members of the magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) - ulvoespinel (Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}) solid-solution series was determined using Fe L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) coupled with electron microprobe and chemical analysis, Ti L-edge spectroscopy, Fe K-edge EXAFS and XANES, Fe{sub 57} Moessbauer spectroscopy, and unit cell parameters. Microprobe analysis, cell edges and chemical FeO determinations showed that the bulk compositions of the samples were stoichiometric magnetite-ulvoespinel solid-solutions. Surface sensitive XMCD showed that the surfaces of these oxide minerals were more sensitive to redox conditions and some samples required re-equilibration with suitable solid-solid buffers. Detailed site-occupancy analysis of these samples gave XMCD-Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratios very close to stoichiometric values. L{sub 2,3}-edge spectroscopy showed that Ti{sup 4+} was restricted to Oh sites. XMCD results showed that significant Fe{sup 2+} only entered Td when the Ti content was > 0.40 apfu while Fe{sup 2+} in Oh increased from 1 a.p.f.u in magnetite to a maximum of {approx}1.4 apfu in USP45. As the Ti content increased from this point, the steady increase in Fe{sup 2+} in Td sites was clearly observable in the XMCD spectra, concurrent with a slow decrease in Fe{sup 2+} in Oh sites. Calculated magnetic moments showed a steady decrease from magnetite (4.06 {mu}{sub B}) to USP45 (1.5 {mu}{sub B}) and then a slower decrease towards the value for ulvoespinel (0 {mu}{sub B}). Two of the synthesized samples were also partially maghemitized by re-equilibrating with an oxidizing Ni-NiO buffer and XMCD showed that Fe{sup 2+} oxidation only occurred at Oh sites, with concomitant vacancy formation restricted to this site. This study shows the advantage of using XMCD as a direct measurement of Fe oxidation state in these complex magnetic spinels. These results can be used to rationalize the magnetic properties of titanomagnetites, and their oxidized titanomaghemitized analogues, in Earth's crustal rocks.

  5. Modifying the morphology and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles using swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Shubha; Lamba, Subhalakshmi; Kumari, Neha; Singh, Bhupendra; Avasthi, D. K.; Kulkarni, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanospheres of ˜8-11 nm diameter synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method were deposited as thin films on different substrates using spin coating. The thin films were irradiated with Ag ions at 100 MeV energy. Comparison of unirradiated, as synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticulate thin film and ion irradiated film shows that irradiation causes dramatic changes in the morphology, structure and magnetic properties. Monte Carlo simulations carried out on this system indicate that the origin of the changes in the magnetic properties lies in the enhanced magnetic anisotropy energy density and reorientation of magnetic easy axis.

  6. Dripping of a crystal.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, R; Graner, F; Rolley, E; Balibar, S; Eggers, J

    2007-04-01

    Dripping is usually associated with fluid motion, but here we describe the analogous phenomenon of a 3He crystal growing and melting under the influence of surface tension and gravity. The pinch-off of the crystal is described by a purely geometric equation of motion, viscous dissipation or inertia being negligible. In analogy to fluid pinch-off, the minimum neck radius R{n} goes to zero like a power law, but with a new scaling exponent of 12 . However, for a significant part of the neck's macroscopic evolution the scaling exponent is found to be much closer to 13 . This observation may be consistent with simulations and theoretical results showing a very slow approach to the asymptotic pinch solution, making the "critical region" very small, both in time and space. After pinch-off, we observe a similar 13 -scaling for the recoil of a crystal tip, both in simulation and experiment. For very early times our experiments are consistent with an approximate theory predicting an asymptotic regime with exponent 12 . Future experiments must show whether the transient 13 scaling is a universal feature of crystal melting, or perhaps an artifact of our experimental setup. PMID:17500906

  7. Letter report - parametric studies on the use of in situ formed magnetite for the removal of Sr and actinides from tank waste at the Savannah River site.

    SciTech Connect

    Arafat, H. A.; Aase, S. B.; Bakel, A. J.; Bowers, D. L.; Gelis, A. V.; Regalbuto, M. C.; Sedlet, J.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2003-04-14

    This report discusses the experimental program conducted at ANL to study the performance of in-situ-formed magnetite for the removal of Sr, Pu, Np, U, Am, and Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) tank waste. The boundaries for the experimental work were defined based on the operational envelope developed earlier in collaboration with SRS. In situ formed ''magnetite'' is actually a mixture of Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides and hydroxides, including magnetite. Decontamination factor (DF) values were measured for both magnetite and monosodium titanate (MST). Magnetite DF values were found to be superior to MST for all isotopes studied. DF values for Pu, Np, and Sr, achieved within 30 minutes of magnetite formation were orders of magnitude larger than the needed values. DF values for U and Am were less than the former three but still acceptable, and greater than MST. DF values for Cs were very low. Conditions were found under which magnetite filtered rapidly and faster than MST. Further tests are needed to make concrete conclusions on the magnetite performance relative to MST in a cross-flow filtration setup.

  8. Cluster models of doped ionic crystal scintillators. Quantum calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Berrondo, M.; Rivas-Silva, J.F.; Czirr, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have performed quantum electronic ab initio calculations of clusters of alkali halides, both pure and doped. In order to estimate the pure crystal energy gap and the dopant excitation, they have considered a central cation and four shells of ions surrounding it. They have studied KCl, NaI, NaCl and KI, both pure and with a Tl{sup +} ion replacing the central alkali cation. Encouraging results are presented for absorption and emission.

  9. Dissipation-induced pure Gaussian state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kei; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2012-02-01

    This paper provides some necessary and sufficient conditions for a general Markovian Gaussian master equation to have a unique pure steady state. The conditions are described by simple matrix equations; thus the so-called environment engineering problem for pure-Gaussian-state preparation can be straightforwardly dealt with in the linear algebraic framework. In fact, based on one of those conditions, for an arbitrary given pure Gaussian state, we obtain a complete parametrization of the Gaussian master equation having that state as a unique steady state; this leads to a systematic procedure for engineering a desired dissipative system. We demonstrate some examples including Gaussian cluster states.

  10. Inorganic chemistry: Direct syntheses from pure liquid SO3 and from trivalent and pentavalent nitrogen derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandorpe, B.; Heubel, J.

    1977-01-01

    From pure liquid SO3 direct synthesis reactions were carried out with N2O5, NO2Cl, NOCl which yielded N2O54SO3, 3SO3, 2SO3-NO2Cl2SO3-NOCl2SO3 and NOCl2SO3, the latter being obtained for the first time in the pure state. In all cases the crystallized product was obtained by separating the constituents of the mixture and then going through a single viscous liquid phase.

  11. Functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nanocomposite fibrous networks: Characterization by fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Neda

    2015-02-01

    The preparation and characterization of functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nano-composite fibrous material is described. Magnetite-cellulose nano-composite was prepared by a combination of the solution-based formation of magnetic nano-particles and subsequent coating with amino celluloses. Characterization was accomplished using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis. The peaks of Fe3O4 in the XRD pattern of nanocomposite confirm existence of the nanoparticles in the amino cellulose matrix. Magnetite-cellulose particles exhibit an average diameter of roughly 33 nm as demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles were irregular spheres dispersed in the cellulose matrix. The vibration corresponding to the Nsbnd CH3 functional group about 2850 cm-1 is assigned in the FTIR spectra. Functionalized magnetite-cellulose nano-composite polymers have a potential range of application as targeted drug delivery system in biomedical field.

  12. Applicability of post-ionization theory to laser-assisted field evaporation of magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Gordon, Lyle M.; Kruska, Karen

    2014-12-15

    Analysis of the mean Fe ion charge state from laser-assisted field evaporation of magnetite (Fe3O4) reveals unexpected trends as a function of laser pulse energy that break from conventional post-ionization theory for metals. For Fe ions evaporated from magnetite, the effects of post-ionization are partially offset by the increased prevalence of direct evaporation into higher charge states with increasing laser pulse energy. Therefore the final charge state is related to both the field strength and the laser pulse energy, despite those variables themselves being intertwined when analyzing at a constant detection rate. Comparison of data collected at different base temperatures also show that the increased prevalence of Fe2+ at higher laser energies is possibly not a direct thermal effect. Conversely, the ratio of 16O+:16O2+ is well-correlated with field strength and unaffected by laser pulse energy on its own, making it a better overall indicator of the field evaporation conditions than the mean Fe charge state. Plotting the normalized field strength versus laser pulse energy also elucidates a non-linear dependence, in agreement with previous observations on semiconductors, that suggests a field-dependent laser absorption efficiency. Together these observations demonstrate that the field evaporation process for laser-pulsed oxides exhibits fundamental differences from metallic specimens that cannot be completely explained by post-ionization theory. Further theoretical studies, combined with detailed analytical observations, are required to understand fully the field evaporation process of non-metallic samples.

  13. Magnetite nanoparticles for functionalized textile dressing to prevent fungal biofilms development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to improve the antibiofilm properties of textile dressing, tested in vitro against monospecific Candida albicans biofilms. Functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4/C18), with an average size not exceeding 20?nm, has been synthesized by precipitation of ferric and ferrous salts in aqueous solution of oleic acid (C18) and NaOH. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and differential thermal analysis coupled with thermo gravimetric analysis were used as characterization methods for the synthesized Fe3O4/C18. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the architecture of the fungal biofilm developed on the functionalized textile dressing samples and culture-based methods for the quantitative assay of the biofilm-embedded yeast cells. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to C. albicans colonization, as compared to the uncoated ones; these functionalized surfaces-based approaches are very useful in the prevention of wound microbial contamination and subsequent biofilm development on viable tissues or implanted devices. PMID:22950367

  14. Preparation and characterization of chondroitin-sulfate-A-coated magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Illés, Erzsébet; Szekeres, Márta; Tombácz, Etelka

    2015-04-01

    Polysaccharides are promising candidates for manufacturing biocompatible core-shell nanoparticles with potential in vivo use. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have prospective application in both diagnosis and therapy, and so developing a novel polysaccharide shell on MNP core is of great challenge. MNPs were prepared by co-precipitation, then the surface of purified MNPs was coated with chondroitin-sulfate-A (CSA) to obtain core-shell structured magnetite nanoparticles (CSA@MNP). The effect of the added amount of CSA on the surface charging and the aggregation state of MNPs at various pHs and 10 mM NaCl was measured by electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The amphoteric behavior of MNPs was fundamentally modified by adsorption of CSA polyanions. A very low CSA-loading induces the aggregation of MNPs, while four times more stabilizes the dispersions over the whole pH-range studied. The coagulation kinetics experiments measured at pH=6.3±0.3 showed that salt tolerance of CSA@MNPs rises up to ~150 mM NaCl.

  15. The effect of yttrium substitution on the magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, M.; Amighian, J.; Tavakoli, R.

    2015-04-01

    Superparamagnetic Y-substituted magnetite (YxFe3-xO4,with x=0.00, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.40) nanoparticles were synthesized via hydrothermal reduction route in the presence of citric acid. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and gradient field thermomagnetic measurement. The results showed that a minimum amount of citric acid is required to obtain single phase Y-substituted magnetite nanoparticles. Citric acid acts as a modulator and reducing agent in the formation of spinel structure and controls nanoparticle size and crystallinity. Mean crystallite sizes of the single-phase powders were estimated by Williamson-Hall method. Curie temperature measurement of the samples shows that as yttrium content increases, the Curie temperature decreases. Magnetic measurements show that the saturation magnetization of the samples decreases as x increases up to 0.15 and then increases to x=0.20 and finally decreases again for x=0.40.

  16. Addition of a magnetite layer onto a polysulfone water treatment membrane to enhance virus removal.

    PubMed

    Raciny, I; Zodrow, K R; Li, D; Li, Q; Alvarez, P J J

    2011-01-01

    The applicability of low-pressure membranes systems in distributed (point of use) water treatment is hindered by, among other things, their inability to remove potentially harmful viruses and ions via size exclusion. According to the USEPA and the Safe Drinking Water Act, drinking water treatment processes must be designed for 4-log virus removal. Batch experiments using magnetite nanoparticle (nano-Fe3O4) suspensions and water filtration experiments with polysulfone membranes coated with nano-Fe3O4 were conducted to assess the removal of a model virus (bacteriophage MS2). The membranes were coated via a simple filtration protocol. Unmodified membranes were a poor adsorbent for MS2 bacteriophage with less than 0.5-log removal, whereas membranes coated with magnetite nanoparticles exhibited a removal efficiency exceeding 99.99% (4-log). Thus, a cartridge of PSf membranes coated with nano-Fe3O4 particles could be used to remove viruses from water. Such membranes showed negligible iron leaching into the filtrate, thus obviating concern about coloured water. Further research is needed to reduce the loss of water flux caused by coating. PMID:21977659

  17. Biosynthesis and the conjugation of magnetite nanoparticles with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH).

    PubMed

    Obayemi, J D; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S; Danyuo, Y; Odusanya, O S; Anuku, N; Malatesta, K; Soboyejo, W O

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the biosynthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (BMNPs) with particle sizes between 10 nm and 60 nm. The biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are produced from Magnetospirillum magneticum (M.M.) bacteria that respond to magnetic fields. M.M. bacteria were cultured and used to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles. This was done in an enriched magnetic spirillum growth medium (EMSGM) at different pH levels. The nanoparticle concentrations were characterized with UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, while the particle shapes were elucidated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure of the particles was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions and polydispersity of the nanoparticles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Carbodiimide reduction was also used to functionalize the BMNPs with a molecular recognition unit (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, LHRH) that attaches specifically to receptors that are over-expressed on the surfaces of most breast cancer cell types. The resulting nanoparticles were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quantitative image analysis. The implications of the results are then discussed for the potential development of magnetic nanoparticles for the specific targeting and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25492013

  18. Methods of synthesizing carbon-magnetite nanocomposites from renewable resource materials and application of same

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-07-29

    A method of synthesizing carbon-magnetite nanocomposites. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of (a) dissolving a first amount of an alkali salt of lignosulfonate in water to form a first solution, (b) heating the first solution to a first temperature, (c) adding a second amount of iron sulfate (FeSO.sub.4) to the first solution to form a second solution, (d) heating the second solution at a second temperature for a first duration of time effective to form a third solution of iron lignosulfonate, (e) adding a third amount of 1N sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to the third solution of iron lignosulfonate to form a fourth solution with a first pH level, (f) heating the fourth solution at a third temperature for a second duration of time to form a first sample, and (g) subjecting the first sample to a microwave radiation for a third duration of time effective to form a second sample containing a plurality of carbon-magnetite nanocomposites.

  19. Self-organization of magnetite nanoparticles in providing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts with magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, S. V.; Yu, Gorobets O.; Demianenko, I. V.; Nikolaenko, R. N.

    2013-07-01

    The compared analyze of four methods of the magnetic nanoparticles clusters parameters estimation were developed and performed, such as, method, which takes into account two magneto-force scans of surface for calculation, geometry distance measurement between two centers of clusters in chains using the functions of NOVA-program, which is the standard computer equipment for scanning probe microscopy SOLVER PRO-M and the model, which takes into account the table meaning of magnetite magnetization and atomic-force microscopy. The magnetically-controllable biosorbent based on the culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as a model object for adequacy analyze of these models. As the result of the work we get the information about the depth of clusters penetration inside biomembrane, the typical sizes of clusters and the dispersion of magnetic clusters sizes. This analyze shows that all four methods can be used for single magnetic clusters, but for clusters, which lay in chains with small distance between their centers, the mode, which takes into account the table meaning of magnetite magnetization, cannot be used, because this model does not take into account the nearest neighbors contribution of interaction of magnetic fields dipole with magnetic probe.

  20. Magnetite nanoparticles for functionalized textile dressing to prevent fungal biofilms development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Ficai, Anton; Saviuc, Crina; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to improve the antibiofilm properties of textile dressing, tested in vitro against monospecific Candida albicans biofilms. Functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4/C18), with an average size not exceeding 20 nm, has been synthesized by precipitation of ferric and ferrous salts in aqueous solution of oleic acid (C18) and NaOH. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and differential thermal analysis coupled with thermo gravimetric analysis were used as characterization methods for the synthesized Fe3O4/C18. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the architecture of the fungal biofilm developed on the functionalized textile dressing samples and culture-based methods for the quantitative assay of the biofilm-embedded yeast cells. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to C. albicans colonization, as compared to the uncoated ones; these functionalized surfaces-based approaches are very useful in the prevention of wound microbial contamination and subsequent biofilm development on viable tissues or implanted devices.

  1. One-Step Synthesis of Highly Water-Soluble Magnetite ColloidalNanosrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, J.P.; Hu, Y.X.; Biasini, M.; Dong, C.L.; Guo, J.-H.; Beyermann, W.P.; Yin, Y.

    2007-03-05

    A high-temperature solution-phase hydrolysis approach has been developed for the synthesis of colloidal magnetite nanocrystals with well-controlled size and size distribution, high crystallinity, and high water solubility. The synthesis was accomplished by the hydrolysis and reduction of iron(III) cations in diethylene glycol with a rapidly injected solution of sodium hydroxide at an elevated temperature. The high reaction temperature allows for control over size and size distribution and yields highly crystalline products. The superior water solubility is achieved by using a polyelectrolyte, that is, poly(acrylic acid) as the capping agent, the carboxylate groups of which partially bind to the nanocrystal surface and partially extend into the surrounding water. The direct synthesis of water-soluble nanocrystals eliminates the need for additional surface modification steps which are usually required for treating hydrophobic nanocrystals produced in nonpolar solvents through the widely recognized pyrolysis route. The abundant carboxylate groups on the nanocrystal surface allow further modifications, such as bioconjugation, as demonstrated by linking cysteamine to the particle surface. The monodisperse, highly water-soluble, superparamagnetic, and biocompatible magnetite nanocrystals should find immediate important biomedical applications.

  2. Real-space imaging of the Verwey transition at the (100) surface of magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Figuera, Juan; Novotny, Zbynek; Setvin, Martin; Liu, Tijiang; Mao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Gong; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Schmid, Michael; Diebold, Ulrike; Schmid, Andreas K.; Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2013-10-01

    Effects of the Verwey transition on the (100) surface of magnetite were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy. On cooling through the transition temperature TV, the initially flat surface undergoes a rooflike distortion with a periodicity of ˜0.5 ?m due to ferroelastic twinning within monoclinic domains of the low-temperature monoclinic structure. The monoclinic c axis orients in the surface plane, along the [001]c directions. At the atomic scale, the charge-ordered (2×2)R45? reconstruction of the (100) surface is unperturbed by the bulk transition, and is continuous over the twin boundaries. Time resolved low-energy electron microscopy movies reveal the structural transition to be first order at the surface, indicating that the bulk transition is not an extension of the Verwey-like (2×2)R45? reconstruction. Although conceptually similar, the charge-ordered phases of the (100) surface and sub-TV bulk of magnetite are unrelated phenomena.

  3. Application of NMR relaxometry for determining the concentration of nanopowder magnetite in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, I. V.; Zhakov, S. V.; Revvo, A. V.; Byzov, I. V.; Bakhteeva, Yu. A.; Uimin, M. A.; Yermakov, A. E.; Mysik, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The use of the effect of a decrease in the transverse relaxation time T 2 of the NMR signal of water protons in the presence of magnetic particles has been suggested for the quantitative estimation of the concentration of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanopowder in water. A calibration dependence of the relaxivity T {2/-1} on the iron concentration has been obtained for model suspensions of magnetite nanoparticles with sizes of approximately 20 nm in the concentration range of 0.15-70 mg/L. For comparison, the concentration dependences of T {2/-1} for aqueous solutions of Fe(NO3)3 · 9H2O and FeSO4 · 7H2O and paramagnetic salts Ni(NO3)2 · 9H2O, Cr(NO3)3 · 9H2O, and CuSO4 · 5H2O have been studied to show that they correlate with their paramagnetic susceptibilities.

  4. Impact of magnetite nanoparticle incorporation on the eigenfrequencies of nanocomposite microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Modern researches showed that nanocomposite films with magnetite nanoparticle incorporation have good perspectives for applications in electronics to create antireflective coatings and also for biomedical applications to create coatings with remote control of physical properties using alternative magnetic field or microwave radiation, which is very important for fabrication of new generation substrates in tissue engineering and advanced drug delivery systems. In particular, the unique properties of advanced nanocomposite microcapsules allowed developing of the supramolecular system of targeted drug delivery. A study of the behavior of the nanocomposite shell of microcapsules, which consists of alternate layers of negatively charged iron oxide nanoparticles and cationic polyallylamine hydrochloride molecules, was carried out. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the number of nanoparticle layers on magnetic properties of polyelectrolyte/nanoparticles nanocomposite microcapsules prepared via layer-by-layer technique using iron oxide colloids. In result of numerical simulation using ANSYS Workbench software the behavior of the nanocomposite shell of microcapsules depending on the concentration of magnetite particles in it was investigated. Modal and harmonic analysis of behavior of the microcapsules shell was conducted in water at a temperature of 37°. As a result of numerical experiment the eigenfrequencies and mode shape were first time defined for any modifications of the nanocomposite microcapsules. It has been established that the magnetic permeability value depends on the number of iron oxide nanoparticle layers in a nanocomposite microcapsule.

  5. Size-dependent reactivity of magnetite nanoparticles: a field-laboratory comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swindle, Andrew L.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    Logistic challenges make direct comparisons between laboratory- and field-based investigations into the size-dependent reactivity of nanomaterials difficult. This investigation sought to compare the size-dependent reactivity of nanoparticles in a field setting to a laboratory analog using the specific example of magnetite dissolution. Synthetic magnetite nanoparticles of three size intervals, ?6 nm, ?44 nm, and ?90 nm were emplaced in the subsurface of the USGS research site at the Norman Landfill for up to 30 days using custom-made subsurface nanoparticle holders. Laboratory analog dissolution experiments were conducted using synthetic groundwater. Reaction products were analyzed via TEM and SEM and compared to initial particle characterizations. Field results indicated that an organic coating developed on the particle surfaces largely inhibiting reactivity. Limited dissolution occurred, with the amount of dissolution decreasing as particle size decreased. Conversely, the laboratory analogs without organics revealed greater dissolution of the smaller particles. These results showed that the presence of dissolved organics led to a nearly complete reversal in the size-dependent reactivity trends displayed between the field and laboratory experiments indicating that size-dependent trends observed in laboratory investigations may not be relevant in organic-rich natural systems.

  6. Scale-up of the production of highly reactive biogenic magnetite nanoparticles using Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Muhamadali, H.; Coker, V. S.; Cooper, J.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Although there are numerous examples of large-scale commercial microbial synthesis routes for organic bioproducts, few studies have addressed the obvious potential for microbial systems to produce inorganic functional biomaterials at scale. Here we address this by focusing on the production of nanoscale biomagnetite particles by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, which was scaled up successfully from laboratory- to pilot plant-scale production, while maintaining the surface reactivity and magnetic properties which make this material well suited to commercial exploitation. At the largest scale tested, the bacterium was grown in a 50 l bioreactor, harvested and then inoculated into a buffer solution containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide and an electron donor and mediator, which promoted the formation of magnetite in under 24 h. This procedure was capable of producing up to 120 g of biomagnetite. The particle size distribution was maintained between 10 and 15 nm during scale-up of this second step from 10 ml to 10 l, with conserved magnetic properties and surface reactivity; the latter demonstrated by the reduction of Cr(VI). The process presented provides an environmentally benign route to magnetite production and serves as an alternative to harsher synthetic techniques, with the clear potential to be used to produce kilogram to tonne quantities. PMID:25972437

  7. Separation, characterization and initial reaction studies of magnetite particles from Hanford sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, D. R.; Grosz, A. E.; Ilton, E. S.; Krupka, K. M.; Liu, J.; Penn, R. L.; Pepin, A.

    Magnetic and density separation methods have been applied to composite sediment samples from the Hanford formation from sediment recovered during drilling of an uncontaminated borehole located near the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This paper describes the results of using those separation methods and from the characterization and initial reactivity measurements on a highly magnetic fraction isolated from that sediment. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the highly magnetic sediment fraction indicates that this material contains predominantly magnetite (Fe 3O 4). Particle morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compositions determined energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are consistent with this identification. Analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that there is a thin coating on the particles that are likely a type of aluminosilicate. This highly magnetic fraction of material is not reactive with indigo carmine, an organic redox probe molecule that was shown to readily react with synthetic magnetite. Because of the limited amounts of material readily available, initial tests have been conducted that demonstrate the ability to complete U(VI) sorption on individual particles (nominally ?100 ?m in size) of the isolated sediment and to remove and mount these individual particles for analysis of the concentration and chemical state of the sorbed U species using small area XPS.

  8. A density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and spin moments of magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Junghyun; Osman, Osman I.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Winget, Paul; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations on magnetite, Fe3O4, which has been recently considered as electrode in the emerging field of organic spintronics. Given the nature of the potential applications, we evaluated the magnetite room-temperature cubic Fd\\bar{3}m phase in terms of structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. We considered GGA (PBE), GGA + U (PBE + U), and range-separated hybrid (HSE06 and HSE(15%)) functionals. Calculations using HSE06 and HSE(15%) functionals underline the impact that inclusion of exact exchange has on the electronic structure. While the modulation of the band gap with exact exchange has been seen in numerous situations, the dramatic change in the valence band nature and states near the Fermi level has major implications for even a qualitative interpretation of the DFT results. We find that HSE06 leads to highly localized states below the Fermi level while HSE(15%) and PBE + U result in delocalized states around the Fermi level. The significant differences in local magnetic moments and atomic charges indicate that describing room-temperature bulk materials, surfaces and interfaces may require different functionals than their low-temperature counterparts.

  9. Functionalized magnetite silica thin films fabricated by MAPLE with antibiofilm properties.

    PubMed

    Mihaiescu, D E; Cristescu, R; Dorcioman, G; Popescu, C E; Nita, C; Socol, G; Mihailescu, I N; Grumezescu, A M; Tamas, D; Enculescu, M; Negrea, R F; Ghica, C; Chifiriuc, C; Bleotu, C; Chrisey, D B

    2013-03-01

    We report on the fabrication of magnetite/salicylic acid/silica shell/antibiotics (Fe(3)O(4)/SA/SiO(2)/ATB) thin films by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) to inert substrates. Fe(3)O(4)-based powder have been synthesized and investigated by XRD and TEM. All thin films were studied by FTIR, SEM and in vitro biological assays using Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference strains, as well as eukaryotic HEp-2 cells. The influence of the obtained nanosystems on the microbial biofilm development as well as their biocompatibility has been assessed. For optimum deposition conditions, we obtained uniform adherent films with the composition identical with the raw materials. Fe(3)O(4)/SA/SiO(2)/ATB thin films had an inhibitory activity on the ability of microbial strains to initiate and develop mature biofilms, in a strain- and antibiotic-dependent manner. These magnetite silica thin films are promising candidates for the development of novel materials designed for the inhibition of medical biofilms formed by different pathogenic agents on common substrates, frequently implicated in the etiology of chronic and hard to treat infections. PMID:23254399

  10. Magnetite impregnation effects on the sorbent properties of activated carbons and biochars.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhantao; Sani, Badruddeen; Mrozik, Wojciech; Obst, Martin; Beckingham, Barbara; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Werner, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses the sorbent properties of magnetic activated carbons and biochars produced by wet impregnation with iron oxides. The sorbents had magnetic susceptibilities consistent with theoretical predictions for carbon-magnetite composites. The high BET surface areas of the activated carbons were preserved in the synthesis, and enhanced for one low surface area biochar by dissolving carbonates. Magnetization decreased the point of zero charge. Organic compound sorption correlated strongly with BET surface areas for the pristine and magnetized materials, while metal cation sorption did not show such a correlation. Strong sorption of the hydrophobic organic contaminant phenanthrene to the activated carbon or biochar surfaces was maintained following magnetite impregnation, while phenol sorption was diminished, probably due to enhanced carbon oxidation. Copper, zinc and lead sorption to the activated carbons and biochars was unchanged or slightly enhanced by the magnetization, and iron oxides also contributed to the composite metal sorption capacity. While a magnetic biochar with 219 ± 3.7 m(2)/g surface area nearly reached the very strong organic pollutant binding capacity of the two magnetic activated carbons, a magnetic biochar with 68 ± 2.8 m(2)/g surface area was the best metal sorbent. Magnetic biochars thus hold promise as more sustainable alternatives to coal-derived magnetic activated carbons. PMID:25555224

  11. Size-dependent reactivity of magnetite nanoparticles: a field-laboratory comparison.

    PubMed

    Swindle, Andrew L; Madden, Andrew S Elwood; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-10-01

    Logistic challenges make direct comparisons between laboratory- and field-based investigations into the size-dependent reactivity of nanomaterials difficult. This investigation sought to compare the size-dependent reactivity of nanoparticles in a field setting to a laboratory analog using the specific example of magnetite dissolution. Synthetic magnetite nanoparticles of three size intervals, ? 6 nm, ? 44 nm, and ? 90 nm were emplaced in the subsurface of the USGS research site at the Norman Landfill for up to 30 days using custom-made subsurface nanoparticle holders. Laboratory analog dissolution experiments were conducted using synthetic groundwater. Reaction products were analyzed via TEM and SEM and compared to initial particle characterizations. Field results indicated that an organic coating developed on the particle surfaces largely inhibiting reactivity. Limited dissolution occurred, with the amount of dissolution decreasing as particle size decreased. Conversely, the laboratory analogs without organics revealed greater dissolution of the smaller particles. These results showed that the presence of dissolved organics led to a nearly complete reversal in the size-dependent reactivity trends displayed between the field and laboratory experiments indicating that size-dependent trends observed in laboratory investigations may not be relevant in organic-rich natural systems. PMID:25203482

  12. Study of the magnetorheology of aqueous suspensions of extremely bimodal magnetite particles.

    PubMed

    Viota, J L; Durán, J D G; Delgado, A V

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we describe the magnetorheological behavior of aqueous suspensions consisting of magnetite particles of two size populations, in the micrometer and nanometer scale, respectively. Previous works on the magnetorheology of oil-based fluids demonstrated that the addition of nanoparticles has a very significant effect on the intensity of the magnetorheological effect. The present contribution confirms such results in the case of aqueous fluids, based on the dependence of the yield stress and the viscosity of the bimodal suspensions on both the composition of the mixtures and the magnetic field strength. It is demonstrated that for a given concentration of micrometer particles, increasing the amount of nanometer magnetite provokes a clear enhancement in the yield stress for all the magnetic fields applied. This is proposed to be due to the formation of heterogeneous aggregates that improve the stability of the suspensions and ease the building of well-arranged field-induced structures. The behavior of both the yield stress and the post-yield viscosity agrees better with the predictions of standard chain models when the relative proportion of both types of particles confers optimum stability to the bimodal dispersions. PMID:19430949

  13. Comparison of Non-Heating Paleointensity Methods Using Synthetic and Natural Magnetite-Bearing Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, G. A.; Piispa, E. J.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Data of the strength of Earth's magnetic field (paleointensity) in the geological past are crucial for understanding the geodynamo. Conventional paleointensity determination methods (e.g., the Thellier-Thellier method) require heating a sample to a high temperature in one or more steps. Consequently, many rocks are unsuitable for these methods due to a heating-induced experimental alteration. Alternative non-heating paleointensity methods are investigated to assess their effectiveness and reliability using synthetic magnetite-bearing samples of multiple grain sizes. Paleointensity was measured from synthetic magnetite-bearing samples using the Pseudo-Thellier, ARM, REM, REMc, REM', and FORC methods. Natural samples from Lemptégy Volcano, France were also analyzed. For the synthetic samples, the Pseudo-Thellier and ARM methods produced the most accurate results, while for the natural samples only the Pseudo-Thellier method was able to produce a reasonable paleointensity estimate consistent with previous paleointensity data. The Pseudo-Thellier method appears to be the best alternative to the heating-based paleointensity methods.

  14. Tracking of Magnetite Labeled Nanoparticles in the Rat Brain Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Vera, Naira P.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Langer, Klaus; Zlatev, Iavor; Wronski, Robert; Auer, Ewald; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; von Briesen, Hagen; Wagner, Sylvia; Stab, Julia; Deutsch, Motti; Pietrzik, Claus; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to explore the feasibility of tracing nanoparticles for drug transport in the healthy rat brain with a clinical MRI scanner. Phantom studies were performed to assess the R1 (?=? 1/T1) relaxivity of different magnetically labeled nanoparticle (MLNP) formulations that were based on biodegradable human serum albumin and that were labeled with magnetite of different size. In vivo MRI measurements in 26 rats were done at 3T to study the effect and dynamics of MLNP uptake in the rat brain and body. In the brain, MLNPs induced T1 changes were quantitatively assessed by T1 relaxation time mapping in vivo and compared to post-mortem results from fluorescence imaging. Following intravenous injection of MLNPs, a visible MLNP uptake was seen in the liver and spleen while no visual effect was seen in the brain. However a histogram analysis of T1 changes in the brain demonstrated global and diffuse presence of MLNPs. The magnitude of these T1 changes scaled with post-mortem fluorescence intensity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of tracking even small amounts of magnetite labeled NPs with a sensitive histogram technique in the brain of a living rodent. PMID:24633006

  15. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  16. Automatic Concept Formation in Pure Mathematics 

    E-print Network

    Colton, Simon; Bundy, Alan; Walsh, Toby

    1999-01-01

    The HR program forms concepts and makes conjectures in domains of pure mathematics and uses theorem prover OTTER and model generator MACE to prove or disprove the conjectures. HR measures properties of concepts and assesses ...

  17. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  18. Development of a pure methanol fuel car

    SciTech Connect

    Menrad, H.; Lee, W.; Bernhardt, W.

    1980-01-01

    Methanol as a fuel for spark ignition engines offers a lot of advantages in comparison to gasoline. Results of a prototype passenger car fueled with pure methanol show promising aspects of lower energy consumption, higher energy output and more favorable emission figures. Modifications on the engine are limited, the unfavorable cold start and warm up behavior of pure methanol can be eliminated by the use of suitable additives.

  19. The influence of anthropogenic pure iron on magnetic properties of indoor dust.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górka-Kostrubiec, Beata; Teisseyre-Jele?ska, Maria

    2015-04-01

    In our earlier work Górka-Kostrubiec et al., (2014) we presented the consistent study of magnetic properties of indoor dust involved about 200 apartments in various locations in Warsaw (Poland), which were affected by various sources of external pollution. Detailed measurements of magnetic properties of dust revealed linear relation between the magnetic susceptibility and the concentration of toxic metals and trace elements expressed by the Tomlinson Pollution Load Index (PLI). The data was divided into two sets which differ in the slope of each branch. Although them both showing linear relation of PLI(?). The aim of the present study is to find the differences in the magnetic mineralogy, structure and grain size between dust samples belonging to the 1st and 2nd sets revealing the relation of PLI versus ?. For this purpose, the dust samples representing the maximum, middle and low values of PLI on both branches were selected. For these samples the temperature-dependent magnetic parameter M(T) and the hysteresis loops were examined. The curves of M (T) showed two magnetic phases - magnetite and pure Fe in variable proportions. For samples belonging to the first branch the contribution of pure Fe to magnetic fraction calculated from the decrease of magnetization on the M (T) curves was in the range from 29% to 38%. The higher contribution, more than 74% was observed for the second branch. The heating up to 800oC caused the chemical changes in the magnetic mineralogy, which are demonstrated as an increase in magnetization at room temperature after cooling. The samples from the 1st branch showed higher changes than the samples for the 2nd one. This result indicates that different types of chemical reactions occur during heating in both groups. In order to observe changes in the structure of mineralogy and grain size the hysteresis loops for the samples before and after heating to 800° C were determined. Very narrow loops (with low values of Hc and Mrs) were observed for the samples containing high contribution of pure iron. After heating, the loops were wide and their parameters are characteristic for SD+MD grains of the magnetite. The results show that the small amount of soft-magnetic pure iron significantly affects the values of hysteresis parameters , i.e. shifts the ratios Bcr/Bc towards larger value and Mrs/Ms towards smaller values on the Day-Dunlop's diagram. The recognition of morphology and chemical composition of the magnetic fraction was confirmed by the scanning electron microscope observation and the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer measurement. Microscopic observations of dust samples revealed the presence of the elongated particles composed of pure iron. We found that magnetic susceptibility correlates with the concentration of following anthropogenic elements: Co, Cr, Fe, Ni but only Fe concentration influences high values of susceptibility observed in 2nd set of samples. Reference: B. Górka-Kostrubiec, M. Jele?ska and E. Król. (2014) Magnetic signature of indoor air pollution: household dust study. Acta Geophysica vol. 62, 1478-1503, DOI: 10.2478/s11600-014-0238-1.

  20. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  1. A purely flexible lightweight membrane-type acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Zhang, Weiquan; Zhang, Siwen

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a purely flexible lightweight membrane-type acoustic structure, wherein one kind of flexible lightweight rubber material takes the roles of mass and stiffness and another type of lightweight flexible EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer) or plastic material functions as the localized stiffness for each unit. Because both the scatterers and base are constituted by the same material, this type of structure breaks the limitation that the metamaterials and phononic crystals need different materials with relatively large density and elasticity modulus ratios to play the roles of the scatterers and base respectively. Based on the band structures with different units, mass block shapes and size parameters, it is suggested that the shapes of the mass block can significantly affect the band structure. In addition, this type of structure could not only open a full band gap in the low-frequency range below 500?Hz, but also obtain an ultra-low-frequency bending wave band gap in the range below 100?Hz. Finally, we take into account the semi-infinite medium as a component, and calculate the sound transmission loss (STL) to evaluate the interaction between the structure and air. An experimental validation employing the cylindrical mass structure was developed to directly support the simulation results. Since the structures proposed in this study have achieved a purely flexible lightweight design, there exists an important promotion effect to realize the engineering applications of the acoustic metamaterials in practice.

  2. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  3. Crystal Lake 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    APPLICATION OF FREEZE CRYSTALLIZATION ROBERT G. GORGOL, MARKETING MANAGER, HPD INCORPORATED, NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS ABSTRACT Industrial usc of frcezing for componcnt purification and separation is well understood, but commercial applications have becn... limitcd. Development of this process for commercial use has now bcen performed. The unique featurcs of frecze crystallization, low temperature operation, separation of organic and in-organic contaminants, can be put to use. Frccze crystallization can...

  4. Magnetoresistance characteristics in individual Fe3O4 single crystal nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. M.; Padture, Nitin P.; Punnoose, Alex; Hanna, Charles

    2015-05-01

    We report on the magnetoresistance (MR) and electron transport measurements observed on a single crystal magnetite nanowire prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method. High-resolution electron microscopy revealed the single crystal magnetite nanowires with 80-120 nm thickness and up to 8 ?m in length. Magnetic measurements showed the typical Verwey transition around 120 K with a 100 Oe room temperature coercivity and 45 emu/g saturation magnetization, which are comparable to bulk magnetite. Electrical resistance measurements in 5-300 K temperature range were performed by scanning gate voltage and varying applied magnetic field. Electrical resistivity of the nanowire was found to be around 5 × 10-4 ? m, slightly higher than the bulk and has activation energy of 0.07 eV. A negative MR of about 0.7% is observed for as-synthesized nanowires at 0.3 T applied field. MR scaled with increasing applied magnetic field representing the field-induced alignment of magnetic domain. These results are attributed to the spin-polarized electron transport across the antiphase boundaries, which implicate promising applications for nanowires in magnetoelectronics.

  5. Magnetoresistance characteristics in individual Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} single crystal nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. M. Punnoose, Alex; Hanna, Charles; Padture, Nitin P.

    2015-05-07

    We report on the magnetoresistance (MR) and electron transport measurements observed on a single crystal magnetite nanowire prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method. High-resolution electron microscopy revealed the single crystal magnetite nanowires with 80–120?nm thickness and up to 8 ?m in length. Magnetic measurements showed the typical Verwey transition around 120?K with a 100?Oe room temperature coercivity and 45?emu/g saturation magnetization, which are comparable to bulk magnetite. Electrical resistance measurements in 5–300?K temperature range were performed by scanning gate voltage and varying applied magnetic field. Electrical resistivity of the nanowire was found to be around 5 × 10{sup ?4} ? m, slightly higher than the bulk and has activation energy of 0.07?eV. A negative MR of about 0.7% is observed for as-synthesized nanowires at 0.3?T applied field. MR scaled with increasing applied magnetic field representing the field-induced alignment of magnetic domain. These results are attributed to the spin-polarized electron transport across the antiphase boundaries, which implicate promising applications for nanowires in magnetoelectronics.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of folic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles reflects tissue biodistribution of long-acting antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyuzi; Gendelman, Howard E; Zhang, Gang; Puligujja, Pavan; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Edagwa, Benson; Liu, Xin-Ming; Boska, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Regimen adherence, systemic toxicities, and limited drug penetrance to viral reservoirs are obstacles limiting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our laboratory’s development of the monocyte-macrophage-targeted long-acting nanoformulated ART (nanoART) carriage provides a novel opportunity to simplify drug-dosing regimens. Progress has nonetheless been slowed by cumbersome, but required, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution testing. To this end, we developed a small magnetite ART (SMART) nanoparticle platform to assess antiretroviral drug tissue biodistribution and PK using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Herein, we have taken this technique a significant step further by determining nanoART PK with folic acid (FA) decorated magnetite (ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide [USPIO]) particles and by using SMART particles. FA nanoparticles enhanced the entry and particle retention to the reticuloendothelial system over nondecorated polymers after systemic administration into mice. These data were seen by MRI testing and validated by comparison with SMART particles and direct evaluation of tissue drug levels after nanoART. The development of alendronate (ALN)-coated magnetite thus serves as a rapid initial screen for the ability of targeting ligands to enhance nanoparticle-antiretroviral drug biodistribution, underscoring the value of decorated magnetite particles as a theranostic tool for improved drug delivery. PMID:26082630

  7. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-11

    The major focus of the project, which is scheduled to occur through January 1996, will be to install and test a 500{number_sign}/hr. fine coal-cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The main accomplishments of Custom Coals and the project subcontractors, during this period, included: continued purchasing small equipment and supplies for the circuit; procured a 46-ton sample of Lower Kittanning ``B`` Seam coal; completed eight primary integrated tests (PIT {number_sign}1--{number_sign}8) using the Pittsburgh No. 8 seam and the Grade-K and Grade-L magnetites; completed classifying cyclone tests using the Pittsburgh No. 8 and Lower Kittanning seams using a larger (0.5 inch) apex; completed data analysis on the four Grade-K magnetite ``closed-loop`` heavy-media cyclone tests; obtained a finer third grade of magnetite (Grade-M) with a MVD of approximately 3 microns; presented paper on the Micro- Mag project at the Coal Preparation, Utilization and Environmental Control Contractors Conference and a Poster Board Paper on the Micro- Mag Project at the Pittsburgh Coal Conference; and developed a method to modify all 5 Micro-Mag magnetic separators to approximately one third of their present size to better approximate commercial operation.

  8. Removal of Aromatic Pollutant Surrogate from Water by Recyclable Magnetite-Activated Carbon Nanocomposite: An Experiment for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlan, Ping Y.; Melcer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment using readily available chemicals is described to introduce college students to an exciting class of nanocomposite materials. In a one-step room temperature synthetic process, magnetite nanoparticles are embedded onto activated carbon matrix. The resultant nanocomposite has been shown to combine the…

  9. Magnetically recyclable magnetite-ceria (Nanocat-Fe-Ce) nanocatalysts - applications in multicomponent reactions under benign conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel magnetite nanoparticle-supported ceria catalyst (Nanocat-Fe-Ce) has been successfully prepared by simple impregnation method and was well characterized by XRD, SIMS, FEG-SEM-EDS, and TEM. The exact nature of Nanocat-Fe-Ce was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of folic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles reflects tissue biodistribution of long-acting antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyuzi; Gendelman, Howard E; Zhang, Gang; Puligujja, Pavan; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Edagwa, Benson; Liu, Xin-Ming; Boska, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Regimen adherence, systemic toxicities, and limited drug penetrance to viral reservoirs are obstacles limiting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our laboratory's development of the monocyte-macrophage-targeted long-acting nanoformulated ART (nanoART) carriage provides a novel opportunity to simplify drug-dosing regimens. Progress has nonetheless been slowed by cumbersome, but required, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution testing. To this end, we developed a small magnetite ART (SMART) nanoparticle platform to assess antiretroviral drug tissue biodistribution and PK using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Herein, we have taken this technique a significant step further by determining nanoART PK with folic acid (FA) decorated magnetite (ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide [USPIO]) particles and by using SMART particles. FA nanoparticles enhanced the entry and particle retention to the reticuloendothelial system over nondecorated polymers after systemic administration into mice. These data were seen by MRI testing and validated by comparison with SMART particles and direct evaluation of tissue drug levels after nanoART. The development of alendronate (ALN)-coated magnetite thus serves as a rapid initial screen for the ability of targeting ligands to enhance nanoparticle-antiretroviral drug biodistribution, underscoring the value of decorated magnetite particles as a theranostic tool for improved drug delivery. PMID:26082630

  11. U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn

    2012-04-03

    Sorption of contaminants onto mineral surfaces is an important process that can restrict their transport in the environment. In the current study, uranium (U) uptake on magnetite (111) was measured as a function of time and solution composition (pH, [CO3]T, [Ca]) under continuous batch-flow conditions. We observed, in real-time and in situ, adsorption and reduction of U(VI) and subsequent growth of UO2 nanoprecipitates using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and newly developed batch-flow U LIII-edge grazing-incidence x-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge structure (GI-XANES) spectroscopy. U(VI) reduction occurred with and without CO3 present, and coincided with nucleation and growth of particles; maximum sorption loadings were 23 ?mol m-2 (pH 5) and 27 ?mol m-2 (pH 10). The U sorption loading was lower when Ca and CO3 were both present and during experiments in which no U(VI) reduction occurred; the maximum U sorption loading was 17 ?mol m-2 (pH 5 and 10). In situ batch-flow AFM data indicated that UO2 particles achieved a maximum height of 4-5 nm after about 8 hours of exposure, yet lateral growth as aggregates continued up to 300 nm. U uptake is therefore divided into three-stages; (1) initial adsorption of U(VI), (2) reduction of U(VI) to UO2 nanoprecipitates at surface-specific sites after 2-3 hours of exposure, and (3) completion of U(VI) reduction after 6-8 hours, with continuing slow adsorption of U(VI). U(VI) reduction also corresponded to detectable increases in Fe released to solution and surface topography changes, indicating that reduction is coupled to Fe(II) availability at or from the magnetite (111) surface. In addition to providing molecular-scale details about U sorption on magnetite, this work also presents novel advances for collecting surface sensitive molecular-scale information in real-time under batch-flow conditions.

  12. Deposition, Diagenetic, or Bacterial Origin of Magnetite in Sediment Drifts From the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulgar, S. E.; Brachfeld, S.; Ishman, S.; Ferré, E. C.

    2007-05-01

    A 607 meter sediment core from the western Antarctic Peninsula was collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 178 at Site 1096. An abrupt shift, first recognized during the construction of the geomagnetic reversal stratigraphy, is observed in the magnetic mineral assemblage in core 1096A at 18 meters below seafloor (mbsf). This magnetic shift led us to question the fidelity of the geomagnetic reversal record. We evaluated the magnetic mineral assemblage using rock magnetic and electron microscopy techniques. Magnetic susceptibility showed variable concentration of magnetic material with depth, but not an abrupt change in concentration at 18 mbsf. Hysteresis data reveal a grain size shift at 18 mbsf. Magnetic particle size measurements show that with increasing depth the magnetic grain size increases. One possible explanation for the grain size shift is the presence of bacterial magnetite above 18 mbsf. However, TEM analysis did not conclusively prove the presence of magnetosomes. TEM images show grains in the 20-60 nm size range, but these grains were not in chains and they do not have the typical morphologies associated with bacterial magnetite. It is possible that these ultra fine grains are authigenic. Dissolution of these ultra fine magnetic particles could cause the grain size shift, with the smaller grains dissolving below18 mbsf. Temperature dependent FORC analyses are in progress to further characterize the particle size distribution above and below 18 mbsf. Curie temperature analyses indicate that magnetite is present above and below 18 mbsf. A magnetic iron sulfide with a Curie temperature of 350° C is present above 18 mbsf. X-ray microanalysis results agree with Curie temperature analyses, and show the presence of both Ti-poor iron oxides and iron sulfides in the magnetic extract. The presence of magnetic iron sulfides above 18 mbsf suggests iron-sulfur diagenesis is occurring with pyrrhotite preserved above 18 mbsf, and non-magnetic pyrite present below 18 mbsf. This could explain why the bottom of the core has a weak-amplitude natural remnant magnetization and a noisy geomagnetic reversal record.

  13. Screening bacterial magnetites of the Holocene sediments in the Huguangyan Maar lake, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.; Zhu, R.; Deng, C.; Han, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Maar lakes are well known as ideal recorders of high-resolution paleo-environmental changes, because of high sedimentary rates and weak physical disturbance. The Huguangyan Maar Lake (21°9' N, 110°17' E) is a meromictic lake located at the tropical region in the Leizhou Peninsula, south China. It has a surface area of 2.3 km^2 and the maximum water depth of ~20 m. In this study surface sediments were collected at different water depth, and a 2 meter gravity core was taken at 13.8 m water depth, which spans the last ~2 kyr. For the 2-m core natural remanent magnetization (NRM), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and the isothermal remanent magnetizations (IRM) were performed using 2-G Enterprises pass-through high-resolution cryogenic magnetometers. Hysteresis loops, first-order reversal curves (FORCs), and low-temperature zero field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) curves were measured on representative samples. The Verwey transition temperature (Tv) was calculated from the FC curve at the maximum dM/dT while the delta ratio was calculated according to Moskowitz et al. (1993). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations were also conducted on magnetic extracted samples to examine biogenic magnetofossils. The relatively high values of the S-ratios (> 0.9) indicate that low coercivity magnetic particles (likely magnetite) are the dominant mineral in sediments. The selected samples have delta ratios between 1.1 and 1.3. On FORC diagrams samples showed a near close distribution along Bc axis with Bc peaked at ~15 mT and a narrow spread between × 20 mT along Bb axis, indicating of presence of single-domain magnetite with weak magnetic interaction. High-resolution FORC diagrams display a clear central-ridge pattern, indicating presence of magnetite magnetofossils (Egli et al., 2010). In the magnetic extracted samples with high ARM values, detrital titanomagnetite and biogenic elongated prismatic shaped and bullet-shaped magnetofossils (< 200 nm in size) were found. In the samples of low ARM values, there are large amount of diatom and shaped iron sulfur particles. We noted that the magnetic variation of the 2-m core is correlated well with the changes of total organic carbon and total nitrogen, implying that environmental changes may stimulate growth of magnetotactic bacteria in the lake.

  14. Study of the magnetorheological response of aqueous magnetite suspensions stabilized by acrylic acid polymers.

    PubMed

    Viota, J L; Delgado, A V; Arias, J L; Durán, J D G

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we describe the magnetorheological (MR) behavior of aqueous suspensions consisting of magnetite particles stabilized by poly(acrylic acid) polymers (PAA). A previous work on the colloidal stability of the same systems for different pH values and polymer concentrations demonstrated that the addition of PAA polymers has a very significant effect on the stability. In the present contribution, we study the MR effect of the suspensions stabilized by two different commercial polymers, as a function of pH, magnetic field strength and magnetite volume fraction. All the results are discussed in terms of the interfacial properties of the systems. It is demonstrated that for a given concentration of micrometer particles, the rheological response strongly depends on pH, on the volume fraction of magnetite particles, on the type of polymer added for increasing the stability and on the magnetic field strength. Changing the polymer used provokes clear rheological differences for the same sample conditions (field strength, volume fraction and pH). This is suggested to be due to the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of the polymer affecting the magnetic field ability to form magnetic structures by aggregation of the magnetized particles. The results are compared to the predictions of the so-called standard chain model, based on the assumption that the MR effect is the result of the balance between the magnetic interactions (tending to establish some degree of order in the suspension by formation of particle chains in the direction of the field) and hydrodynamic ones (tending to destroy the formed structures by viscous stress on the chains). It is found that the behavior of the yield stress does not agree well with the predictions of the model when the relative proportion of both particle and polymer confers optimum stability to the dispersions. This is likely due to the fact that the presence of the stabilizing polyelectrolyte provokes that the magnetic field is not as effective in structuring the suspension as deduced from the chain model. PMID:18533174

  15. Cupric oxide inclusions in cuprous oxide crystals grown by the floating zone method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frazer, Laszlo; Chang, Kelvin B.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-05-08

    Phase-pure cuprous oxide (Cu2O) crystals are difficult to grow since cupric oxide can form within the crystal as the crystal is cooled to ambient conditions. Vacancies are the solute which causes precipitation of macroscopic defects. Therefore, even when a mostly phase-pure single crystal is used as a feed rod, cupric oxide inclusions persist in the recrystallized solid. Control of the thermal profile during crystal growth, however, can improve phase-purity; a slow counter-rotation rate of the feed and seed rods results in fewer inclusions. Cupric oxide can be removed by annealing, which produces a factor of 540 ± 70 increase inmore »phase-purity.« less

  16. Cupric oxide inclusions in cuprous oxide crystals grown by the floating zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, Laszlo; Chang, Kelvin B.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Ketterson, John B.

    2015-06-01

    Phase-pure cuprous oxide (Cu2O) crystals are difficult to grow since cupric oxide can form within the crystal as the crystal is cooled to ambient conditions. Vacancies are the solute which causes precipitation of macroscopic defects. Therefore, even when a mostly phase-pure single crystal is used as a feed rod, cupric oxide inclusions persist in the recrystallized solid. Control of the thermal profile during crystal growth, however, can improve phase-purity; a slow counter-rotation rate of the feed and seed rods results in fewer inclusions. Cupric oxide can be removed by annealing, which produces a factor of 540 ± 70 increase in phase-purity.

  17. 77 FR 59979 - Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...731-TA-895 (Second Review)] Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China Determination...of the antidumping duty order on pure magnesium (granular) from China would be likely...4350 (September 2012), entitled Pure Magnesium (Granular) from China:...

  18. Electrochemical and Spectroscopic Evidence on the One-Electron Reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on Magnetite.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S; Antonio, Mark R; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces is often considered a one-step two-electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one-electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated reduction pathways of uranium by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4. Cyclic voltammetry confirms the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V). Formation of nanosize uranium precipitates on the magnetite surface at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials are observed by in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from -0.1 to -0.9 V (E(0)(U(VI)/U(V))= -0.135 V vs Ag/AgCl) show the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The sample with the highest U(V)/U(VI) ratio was prepared at -0.7 V, where the longest average U-O(axial) distance of 2.05 ± 0.01 Å was evident in the same sample revealed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of -0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) does not disproportionate but stabilizes on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(V)/U(VI) solids. PMID:25893535

  19. Crystal Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  20. Oxygen isotope and chemical compositions of magnetite and olivine in the anomalous CK3 Watson 002 and ungrouped Asuka-881595 carbonaceous chondrites: Effects of parent body metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jemma; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Hellebrand, Eric; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-08-01

    We report in situ O isotope and chemical compositions of magnetite and olivine in chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrites Watson-002 (anomalous CK3) and Asuka (A)-881595 (ungrouped C3). Magnetite in Watson-002 occurs as inclusion-free subhedral grains and rounded inclusion-bearing porous grains replacing Fe,Ni-metal. In A-881595, magnetite is almost entirely inclusion-free and coexists with Ni-rich sulfide and less abundant Ni-poor metal. Oxygen isotope compositions of chondrule olivine in both meteorites plot along carbonaceous chondrite anhydrous mineral (CCAM) line with a slope of approximately 1 and show a range of ?17O values (from approximately -3 to -6‰). One chondrule from each sample was found to contain O isotopically heterogeneous olivine, probably relict grains. Oxygen isotope compositions of magnetite in A-881595 plot along a mass-dependent fractionation line with a slope of 0.5 and show a range of ?17O values from -2.4‰ to -1.1‰. Oxygen isotope compositions of magnetite in Watson-002 cluster near the CCAM line and a ?17O value of -4.0‰ to -2.9‰. These observations indicate that magnetite and chondrule olivine are in O isotope disequilibrium, and, therefore, not cogenetic. We infer that magnetite in CK chondrites formed by the oxidation of pre-existing metal grains by an aqueous fluid during parent body alteration, in agreement with previous studies. The differences in ?17O values of magnetite between Watson-002 and A-881595 can be attributed to their different thermal histories: the former experienced a higher degree of thermal metamorphism that led to the O isotope exchange between magnetite and adjacent silicates.

  1. he shapes of crystals found in bio-mineral structures such as the

    E-print Network

    Dove, Patricia M.

    T he shapes of crystals found in bio- mineral structures such as the skeletons of marine organisms dif- fer dramatically from those of crystals grown in pure solution. The formation of these complex, often hierarchical structures is difficult to reconcile with the simple mechanistic model of crystal

  2. Hydrothermal growth of single crystals of the quantum magnets: Clinoatacamite, paratacamite, and herbertsmithite

    E-print Network

    Müller, Peter

    for growing millimeter-sized crystals of the quantum magnets with formula Cu4-xZnx OH 6Cl2: clinoatacamite x=0Hydrothermal growth of single crystals of the quantum magnets: Clinoatacamite, paratacamite , paratacamite 0.33 x 1 and herbertsmithite x=1 . These highly pure single crystals have been characterized by x

  3. Preparation of biodegradable magnetic microspheres with poly(lactic acid)-coated magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Saatchi, Katayoun; Häfeli, Urs O.

    2009-05-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles were made using uncapped PLA with free carboxylate groups. The physical properties of these particles were compared to those of oleate-coated or oleate/sulphonate bilayer (W40) coated magnetic particles. Magnetic microspheres (MMS) with the matrix material poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or PLA were then formed by the emulsion solvent extraction method with encapsulation efficiencies of 40%, 83% and 96% for oleate, PLA and oleate/sulfonate-coated magnetic particles, respectively. MMS made from PLA-coated magnetite were hemocompatible and produced no hemolysis, whereas the other MMS were hemolytic above 0.3 mg/mL of blood.

  4. Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report 3, July--September, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Anast, K.

    1993-10-29

    This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

  5. In vivo MRI of single-wall carbon nanohorns through magnetite nanoparticle attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Jin; Yudasaka, Masako; Imai, Hideto; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Isobe, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Eiichi; Iijima, Sumio

    2006-03-01

    Superparamagnetic magnetite (SPM) is used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thus, the SPM-attachment to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will enable to visualize motional behaviors of CNTs in the living body through MRI. We found that the strong attachment of the SPM nanoparticles (ca. 6 nm size) to one type of CNTs, single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs), could be achieved through a deposition of iron acetate clusters on SWNHs in ethanol at room temperature, followed by heat-treatment in Ar. In vivo MRI visualized that the SWNHs attached with the SPM nanoparticles accumulated in several organs of mice when injected into mice via tail veins. This simple method for the SPM-attaching on CNTs would facilitate the toxicity assessment of CNTs and the applications of CNTs in bioscience and biotechnology.

  6. Radiation effects in polyisobutylene succinic anhydride modified with silica and magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharescu, T.; Borbath, I.; Vékás, L.

    2014-12-01

    Polyisobutylene succinic anhydride (PIBSA) was modified with nanoparticles of magnetite and silica for the appraising the modification in the thermal stability of organic component after gamma irradiation. Pristine anhydride was loaded with different amounts of nanofiller (1, 2 and 5 wt% of each oxide). Gamma exposure was performed in air at several doses: 10, 20, 50 and 100 kGy. The stability determinations were carried out by nonisothermal chemiluminescence in stationary air atmosphere. The presence of these oxides induces an increase in the oxidation level corresponding to their chemical availability as the filler amounts and exposure doses are enhanced. The oxidation takes essentially place on quaternary carbon atoms and double bonds, which was demonstrated by the presence of two chemiluminescence intensity peaks. The comparative analysis on the radiation oxidation of PIBSA modified with Fe3O4 and SiO2 is presented.

  7. Photothermally driven fast responding photo-actuators fabricated with comb-type hydrogels and magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunsu; Kim, Dowan; Kim, Haneul; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2015-10-01

    To overcome the slow kinetics of the volume phase transition of stimuli-responsive hydrogels as platforms for soft actuators, thermally responsive comb-type hydrogels were prepared using synthesized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) macromonomers bearing graft chains. Fast responding light-responsive hydrogels were fabricated by combining a comb-type hydrogel matrix with photothermal magnetite nanoparticles (MNP). The MNPs dispersed in the matrix provide heat to stimulate the volume change of the hydrogel matrix by converting absorbed visible light to thermal energy. In this process, the comb-type hydrogel matrix exhibited a rapid response due to the free, mobile grafted chains. The comb-type hydrogel exhibited significantly enhanced light-induced volume shrinkage and rapid recovery. The comb-type hydrogels containing MNP were successfully used to fabricate a bilayer-type photo-actuator with fast bending motion.

  8. Synthesis of magnetite-silica core-shell nanoparticles via direct silicon oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxian; Tang, Jing; Zhao, Hongfu; Wan, Jiaqi; Chen, Kezheng

    2014-10-15

    Magnetite-silica core-shell nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs) were prepared from silicon powder by direct oxidation without using any expensive precursors (such as TEOS) and organic solvents. The as-prepared Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs were characterized by TEM, DLS, XRD, FT-IR, zeta potential and NMR Analyzer. The results show that the Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs are monodispersed core-shell nanostructures with single cores that were uniformly coated by silica shells. The relaxation property indicates that Fe3O4@SiO2 NPs have desirable characteristics for T2 MRI contrast agents. This facile and green method is promising for large-scale production, which would open new opportunities for preparing core-shell nanostructures for biomedical applications. PMID:25072518

  9. Characterization of magnetite nanoparticles for SQUID-relaxometry and magnetic needle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Adolphi, Natalie L.; Huber, Dale L.; Jaetao, Jason E.; Bryant, Howard C.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Fegan, Danielle L.; Venturini, Eugene L.; Monson, Todd C.; Tessier, Trace E.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Bergemann, Christian; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (Chemicell SiMAG-TCL) were characterized by SQUID-relaxometry, susceptometry, and TEM. The magnetization detected by SQUID-relaxometry was 0.33% of that detected by susceptometry, indicating that the sensitivity of SQUID-relaxometry could be significantly increased through improved control of nanoparticle size. The relaxometry data were analyzed by the moment superposition model (MSM) to determine the distribution of nanoparticle moments. Analysis of the binding of CD34-conjugated nanoparticles to U937 leukemia cells revealed 60,000 nanoparticles per cell, which were collected from whole blood using a prototype magnetic biopsy needle, with a capture efficiency of >65% from a 750 µl sample volume in 1 minute. PMID:20161153

  10. Molecularly imprinted polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles as an efficient mefenamic acid resonance light scattering nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mazaher; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas

    2014-12-10

    In this work, a mefenamic acid (MFA) nanosensor was synthesized by the aid of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) technique. MIP layer was coated on magnetite nanoparticles as magnetic nano-carriers. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using various measurements techniques. Light scattering properties of the synthesized nanoparticles in the presence or absence of MFA have been selected as the detection signal. In this regard, resonance light scattering has been used as the detection method. Various factors that can potentially affect light scattering efficiency (i.e., pH, ultrasonication time and nanoparticle dosage) were optimized using "one-at-a-time" method. A linear dynamic range was established from 100.0 to 2000.0 ng L(-1) of MFA and the limit of detection was found to be 50.0 ng L(-1) using the proposed method. PMID:25441905

  11. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate from magnetite nanoparticles at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Raghuraman, G K; Dhamodharan, R

    2006-07-01

    The synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) brush from the surface of magnetite nanoparticles (core-shell structure), from initiator moieties anchored covalently to the nanoparticles, via room temperature atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is described. The surface-initiated polymerization was carried out from a surface-confined initiator containing a 2-bromoisobutyrate moiety with Cu(I)Br/PMDETA catalytic system. The initiator moiety was covalently anchored to the nanoparticles via a two step modification reaction scheme. Controlled polymerization was observed if ethyl-2-bromoisobutyrate (2-EiBrB) was added as a free/sacrificial initiator. A linear increase of molecular weight and a narrow molecular weight distribution of the PMMA formed in solution, provide evidence for a controlled surface-initiated polymerization, leading to surface-attached polymer brushes under mild conditions. The grafted PMMA provides good stability and dispersibility for the nanoparticles in organic solvents. PMID:17025118

  12. The influence of colloidal parameters on the specific power absorption of PAA-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The suitability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to act as heat nano-sources by application of an alternating magnetic field has recently been studied due to their promising applications in biomedicine. The understanding of the magnetic relaxation mechanism in biocompatible nanoparticle systems is crucial in order to optimize the magnetic properties and maximize the specific absorption rate (SAR). With this aim, the SAR of magnetic dispersions containing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles bio-coated with polyacrylic acid of an average particle size of ?10 nm has been evaluated separately by changing colloidal parameters such as the MNP concentration and the viscosity of the solvent. A remarkable decrease of the SAR values with increasing particle concentration and solvent viscosity was found. These behaviours have been discussed on the basis of the magnetic relaxation mechanisms involved. PACS: 80; 87; 87.85jf PMID:21711915

  13. Regulating the thermal response of PNIPAM hydrogels by controlling the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionigi, Chiara; Piñeiro, Yolanda; Riminucci, Alberto; Bañobre, Manuel; Rivas, José; Dediu, Valentin

    2014-02-01

    Thermoswitchable magnetic hydrogels are being extensively investigated because of their great potential for medical applications. Indeed, they can behave as smart carriers able to transport drugs to a chosen part of the body and release them via magneto-thermal activation by an external alternating magnetic field. We report on the magnetization of the thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel through the adsorption of controlled amounts of magnetite nanoparticles. We show that the temperature at which the hydrogel contraction occurs (i.e. the lower critical solution temperature) can be controlled from 32 ?C to 52 ?C by varying the concentration of adsorbed nanoparticles. This is clearly shown by photon correlation spectroscopy. The results are an advance in the use of the magnetized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel as a flexible and adjustable nanomaterial and are of great interest in numerous applications which require drug release on demand.

  14. Relaxometry and Dephasing Imaging of Superparamagnetic Magnetite Nanoparticles Using a Single Qubit.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Lorch, Dominik; Häberle, Thomas; Reinhard, Friedemann; Zappe, Andrea; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Finkler, Amit; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-08-12

    To study the magnetic dynamics of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, we use scanning probe relaxometry and dephasing of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond, characterizing the spin noise of a single 10 nm magnetite particle. Additionally, we show the anisotropy of the NV sensitivity's dependence on the applied decoherence measurement method. By comparing the change in relaxation (T1) and dephasing (T2) time in the NV center when scanning a nanoparticle over it, we are able to extract the nanoparticle's diameter and distance from the NV center using an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model for the nanoparticle's fluctuations. This scanning probe technique can be used in the future to characterize different spin label substitutes for both medical applications and basic magnetic nanoparticle behavior. PMID:26218205

  15. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (?90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used. PMID:25038496

  16. Photothermally driven fast responding photo-actuators fabricated with comb-type hydrogels and magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsu; Kim, Dowan; Kim, Haneul; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the slow kinetics of the volume phase transition of stimuli-responsive hydrogels as platforms for soft actuators, thermally responsive comb-type hydrogels were prepared using synthesized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) macromonomers bearing graft chains. Fast responding light-responsive hydrogels were fabricated by combining a comb-type hydrogel matrix with photothermal magnetite nanoparticles (MNP). The MNPs dispersed in the matrix provide heat to stimulate the volume change of the hydrogel matrix by converting absorbed visible light to thermal energy. In this process, the comb-type hydrogel matrix exhibited a rapid response due to the free, mobile grafted chains. The comb-type hydrogel exhibited significantly enhanced light-induced volume shrinkage and rapid recovery. The comb-type hydrogels containing MNP were successfully used to fabricate a bilayer-type photo-actuator with fast bending motion. PMID:26459918

  17. Photo-Disintegration of the Iron Nucleus in Fractured Magnetite Rocks with Magnetostriction

    E-print Network

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2013-06-25

    There has been considerable interest in recent experiments on iron nuclear disintegrations observed when rocks containing such nuclei are crushed and fractured. The resulting nuclear transmutations are particularly strong for the case of magnetite rocks, i.e. loadstones. We argue that the fission of the iron nucleus is a consequence of photo-disintegration. The electro-strong coupling between electromagnetic fields and nuclear giant dipole resonances are central for producing observed nuclear reactions. The large electron energies produced during the fracture of piezomagnetic rocks are closely analogous to the previously discussed case of the fracture of piezoelectric rocks. In both cases electro-weak interactions can produce neutrons and neutrinos from energetic protons and electrons thus inducing nuclear transmutations. The electro-strong condensed matter coupling discussed herein represents new many body collective nuclear photo-disintegration effects.

  18. Anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in a ferrofluid with weakly interacting magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, J. M.; Odenbach, S.

    2015-05-01

    The anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect of a ferrofluid has been studied in a specially designed slit die viscometer, which allows three distinct orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the fluid flow. The corresponding Miesowicz viscosity coefficients were determined in dependence of the shear rate and the magnetic field intensity to gain a comprehensive magnetorheological characterization of the fluid. The particles in the fluid have a mean diameter of 13 nm corresponding to an interaction parameter of ? ? 1.3 for magnetite. Thus, the fluid can be expected to show a transition from non-interacting individual particles to microstructures with chain-like associated particles when the magnetic field intensity is increased and the shear rate is decreased. The observed field and shear dependent anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect is explained coherently in terms of these microstructural changes in the fluid.

  19. Anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in a ferrofluid with weakly interacting magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Linke, J M; Odenbach, S

    2015-05-01

    The anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect of a ferrofluid has been studied in a specially designed slit die viscometer, which allows three distinct orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the fluid flow. The corresponding Miesowicz viscosity coefficients were determined in dependence of the shear rate and the magnetic field intensity to gain a comprehensive magnetorheological characterization of the fluid. The particles in the fluid have a mean diameter of 13 nm corresponding to an interaction parameter of ? ? 1.3 for magnetite. Thus, the fluid can be expected to show a transition from non-interacting individual particles to microstructures with chain-like associated particles when the magnetic field intensity is increased and the shear rate is decreased. The observed field and shear dependent anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect is explained coherently in terms of these microstructural changes in the fluid. PMID:25837303

  20. Drive-field Frequency Dependent MPI Performance of Single-Core Magnetite Nanoparticle Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, C.; Khandhar, A. P.; Ferguson, R. M.; Kemp, S.; Wawrzik, T.; Schilling, M.; Krishnan, K. M.; Ludwig, F.

    2014-01-01

    The drive-field frequency of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) systems plays an important role for system design, safety requirements and tracer selection. Because the commonly utilized MPI drive-field frequency of 25 kHz might be increased in future system generations to avoid peripheral nerve stimulation, a performance evaluation of tracers at higher frequencies is desirable. We have studied single-core magnetite nanoparticles that were optimized for MPI applications, utilizing Magnetic Particle Spectrometers (MPS) with drive-field frequencies in the range from 1 kHz up to 100 kHz. The particles have core diameters of 25 nm and a hydrodynamic size of 77 nm. Measurements in the frequency range above 5 kHz were carried out with a newly designed MPS system. In addition, to exclude possible particle interaction, samples of different concentrations were characterized and compared. PMID:26052157

  1. The ilmenite/titano-magnetite assemblage - Kinetics of re-equilibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, P. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The petrogenesis of igneous and metamorphic rocks is a function of several parameters. Of these, temperature and pressure are of particular importance. Information concerning these two parameters is obtained through the use of mineral indicators. One such commonly used geothermometer/oxybarometer is that involving ilmenite/titano-magnetite. Anomalously low temperatures have been reported in cases in which the geothermometer/oxybarometer was employed. The studies suggest that low temperatures result from slow cooling rates which allows the Fe-Ti oxides to re-equilibrate. The current investigation is mainly concerned with the kinetics of the reduction of ilmenite-hematite solid solution, since this is the slower and, consequently, rate-controlling step in the re-equilibration process. The reaction rates determined for the reduction of ilmenites in the investigation are geologically rapid and must be considered when applying the considered geothermometer/oxybarometer.

  2. Microstructure and self-sharpening of the magnetite cap in chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Li, Q Y; Wang, S N; Qu, S X; Wang, X X

    2014-04-01

    The magnetite cap of chiton tooth (Acanthochiton rubrolineatus) was studied with SEM. Three microstructurally distinct regions were recognized: Region I, close to the anterior surface of the cusp and composed of thick rod microstructure units; Region III, close to the posterior surface and composed of fine fibers; and Region II, sandwiched between Regions I and II and composed of thin sheets. The microstructure units in the three regions constitute a continuous and integrated architecture component. The hardness of Regions I and II was measured to be Hv270 and Hv490, respectively. Based on these microstructure observation and hardness data, the abrasive behavior and microstructural mechanism of self-sharpening of the chiton tooth were discussed in the paper. The self-sharpening was attributed to the combined effect of the hardness and the texture orientation of the microstructure units in Regions I and II. PMID:24582215

  3. Surface vibrational spectroscopy of pure liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Du, Q.; Shen, Y.R.

    1991-03-01

    We report the use of infrared visible sum frequency generation (SFG) to obtain the surface vibrational spectra of pure liquid methanol and water. These are the first surface vibrational spectra ever obtained for pure liquids. We have also deduced from the SFG results the absolute orientations of molecules at the pure liquid/vapor interface. The surface methanol molecules appear to have their CH{sub 3} groups projecting out of the liquid in agreement with the theoretical prediction. For the orientation of surface water molecules, however, different calculations have yielded very different predictions. Our SFG measurement provides clear evidence that the molecules are oriented with an unbonded hydrogen projecting out of the liquid. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Alginate/magnetite hybrid beads for magnetically stimulated release of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Kondaveeti, Stalin; Cornejo, Daniel R; Petri, Denise Freitas Siqueira

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid beads composed of magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) and alginate (Alg) were synthesized and coded as Alg-MNP. They were incubated in dopamine (DOPA) solution (5g/L), at pH 7.4 and 8°C, during 12h, promoting the DOPA loaded magnetic beads, coded as Alg-MNP/DOPA. The release of DOPA was further evaluated in the absence and the presence of external magnetic field (EMF) of 0.4T. The products Alg-MNP and Alg-MNP/DOPA were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR), UV spectrophotometry, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analyses and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The magnetic and chemical properties of Alg-MNP beads were not affected by DOPA loading. The incorporation of DOPA into the beads depended on the pH and on the negative charge density. At pH 7.4 38% of DOPA were loaded into Alg-MNP beads, whereas at pH 2 or using neat Alg beads (lower charge density than Alg-MNP) the loading efficiency decreased to one third or less. In the absence of EMF, 24% of the loaded DOPA was released from Alg-MNP at pH 7.4 over a period of 26h. The released amount increased to 33% under the stimulus of EMF. A model was proposed to explain the loading efficiency of charged drugs, as DOPA, into hybrid beads and the role played by EMF on delivery systems, where drug and matrix are oppositely charged. The results suggest that the alginate combined with magnetite nanoparticles is a promising system for release of DOPA in the presence of EMF. PMID:26674837

  5. Magnetic field-enhanced sedimentation of nanopowder magnetite in water flow.

    PubMed

    Bakhteeva, Iu; Medvedeva, I; Byzov, I; Zhakov, S; Yermakov, A; Uimin, M; Shchegoleva, N

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation dynamics of magnetite (?-Fe3O4) nanopowder (10-20?nm) in water in a gradient magnetic field Bmax=0.3 T, (dB/dz)max=0.13?T/cm was studied for different water flow speeds and starting particle concentrations (0.1 and 1.0?g/l). The aggregates formation in water was monitored under the same conditions. In cyclical water flow, the velocity of particle sedimentation increases significantly in comparison to its rate in still water, which corresponds to the intensified aggregate formation. However, at a water flow speed more than 0.1?cm/s sedimentation velocity slows down, which might be connected to aggregate destruction in a faster water flow. Correlation between sedimentation time and the nanoparticle concentration in water does not follow the trend expected for spherical superparamagnetic particles. In our case sedimentation time is shorter for c=0.1?g/l in comparison with that for c=1?g/l. We submit that such a feature is caused by particle self-organization in water into complex structures of fractal type. This effect is unexplained in the framework of existing theoretical models of colloids systems, so far. Provisional recommendations are suggested for the design of a magnetic separator on the permanent magnets base. The main device parameters are magnetic field intensity B?0.1?T, magnetic field gradient (dB/dz)max?(0.1-0.2)?T/cm, and water flow speed V<0.15?cm/s. For particle concentration c=1 g/l, purification of water from magnetite down to ecological and hygienic standards is reached in 80?min, for c=0.1 g/l the time is reduced down to 50?min. PMID:25650300

  6. Crystal Growth and Characterization of Bil3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Julia; Chen, Kuo-Tong; Burger, Arnold

    1997-01-01

    Bismuth tri-iodide (BiI3) have been grown by physical vapor transport (PVT), and by the Bridgman (melt) method. These crystals along with pure and stoichiometric BiI3 powder have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC results show that pure BiI3 powder has no phase transition and melts around 408 C. While we found no evidence for the high temperature dissociation of BiI3, the DSC measurements show that crystals grown from melt method contain a significantly large amount of Bi-rich phases than crystals grown from PVT method, as indicated by phase transition detected at 270, 285, 298 and 336 C.

  7. Crystal Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A "melt recharging" technique which eliminates the cooldown and heating periods in a crystal "growing" crucible, resulted from a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)/Kayex Corporation program. Previously, the cost of growing the silicon solar cells had been very high. The JPL/Kayex system improved productivity by serially growing crystals from the same crucible using a melt recharger which made it possible to add raw silicon to an operating crucible. An isolation value, developed by Kayex, allowed the hopper to be lowered into the crucible without disturbing the inert gas atmosphere. The resulting product, a CG6000 crystal growing furnace, has become the company's major product.

  8. Pure states don't wear black

    E-print Network

    Robert C. Myers

    1997-05-23

    Recently, string theory has provided some remarkable new insights into the microphysics of black holes. I argue that a simple and important lesson is also provided with regards to the information loss paradox, namely, pure quantum states do not form black holes! Thus it seems black hole formation, as well as evaporation, must be understood within the framework of quantum decoherence.

  9. On the quantum theory of pure gravitation

    E-print Network

    B. Ram

    2002-08-19

    A quantum theory of the region of pure gravitation was given earlier in two papers [gr-qc/9908036 (Phys. Lett. A {\\bf {265}}, 1 (2000)); gr-qc/0101056]. In this paper I provide further insight into the physics of this region.

  10. RESCALED PURE GREEDY ALGORITHM FOR CONVEX OPTIMIZATION

    E-print Network

    Petrova, Guergana

    of these algorithms work only if the minimum of E is attained in the convex hull of D, since the approximant xm to the convex hull of D and has a rate of convergence O(m1-q). This algorithm is an appropriate modificationRESCALED PURE GREEDY ALGORITHM FOR CONVEX OPTIMIZATION ZHEMING GAO, GUERGANA PETROVA Abstract. We

  11. Investigations in Pure Mathematics: A Constructivist Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Keith; Shiu, Christine

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an investigative, constructivist approach in the context of undergraduate mathematics, with particular reference to pure mathematics, general aims and objectives, assessment strategies, and problems of supervision that affect tutors and lecturers using this approach. Gives students' views on their experiences in this mode of working. (19…

  12. Effect of impurities on crystal growth rate of ammonium pentaborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?ahin, Ö.; Özdemir, M.; Genli, N.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of sodium chloride, borax and boric acid of different concentrations on the growth rate of ammonium pentaborate octahydrate crystals (APBO) was measured and was found to depend on supersaturation in a fluidized bed crystallizer. The presence of impurities in APBO solution increases the growth rate compared with growth from pure solution. It was found that the presence of sodium chloride, borax and boric acid decreases the reaction rate constant kr, while it increases the mass-transfer coefficient, K, of APBO crystals. In pure aqueous solution, the crystal growth rate of APBO is mainly controlled by diffusion. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth rate of APBO crystals in the presence of sodium chloride, borax and boric acid. The mass-transfer coefficient, K, reaction rate constant, kr and reaction order, r were calculated from general mass-transfer equation by using genetic algorithm method making no assumption.

  13. Growth and properties of benzil doped benzimidazole (BMZ) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, R. Ramesh; Sukumar, M.; Vasudevan, V.; Crystal Growth and Crystallography Section, National Physical Laboratory, Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110 012 ; Shakir, Mohd.; Ramamurthi, K.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2010-09-15

    In the present work, we have made an attempt to study the effect of benzil doping on the properties of benzimidazole single crystals. For this purpose we have grown pure and benzil doped benzimidazole single crystals by vertical Bridgman technique. The grown crystals were characterized by various characterization techniques. The presence of dopants confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). Crystalline perfection of the grown crystals has been analysed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). The transmittance, electrical property and mechanical strength have been analysed using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopic, dielectric and Vicker's hardness studies. The relative second harmonic generation efficiency of pure and doped benzimidazole crystals measured using Kurtz powder test.

  14. Structural, spectral, optical and dielectric properties of copper and glycine doped LAHCl single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, K.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2011-09-01

    Cu 2+ and glycine doped L-arginine monohydrochloride monohydrate (LAHCl) single crystals were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique. The grown single crystals were confirmed by X-ray diffraction study and the interaction of dopants with LAHCl molecule was identified in Fourier transform infrared spectra. The crystalline perfection of pure and doped crystals was analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction studies. Vickers microhardness and UV-visible spectroscopy were carried out respectively to study the mechanical stability and optical transmittance of pure and doped LAHCl single crystals. He-Ne laser of wavelength 632.8 nm was used to measure refractive index and birefringence of grown crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency was also measured for pure and doped LAHCl single crystals using Nd:YAG laser.

  15. Monomial Crystals and Partition Crystals

    E-print Network

    Tingley, Peter William

    Recently Fayers introduced a large family of combinatorial realizations of the fundamental crystal B(?[subscript 0]) for [^ over sl][subscript n], where the vertices are indexed by certain partitions. He showed that special ...

  16. The origin of skarn beds, Ryllshyttan Zn-Pb-Ag + magnetite deposit, Bergslagen, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Nils F.; Allen, Rodney L.

    2011-11-01

    Thin- to medium-bedded, stratiform calc-silicate deposits (banded skarns) are a peculiar, but important, component of the supracrustal successions in the Palaeoproterozoic Bergslagen mining district of central Sweden. They are referred to as "skarn-banded leptites" in the literature and are common in areas and at stratigraphic levels that contain iron oxide and base metal sulphide deposits. The stratigraphic hanging wall of the stratabound Ryllshyttan Zn-Pb-Ag + magnetite deposit at Garpenberg, contains approximately 100-150 m of interbedded aluminous skarn beds and rhyolitic ash-siltstones. The skarn beds are mineralogically variable and dominantly composed of grandite, spessartine, epidote, actinolite, quartz, clinopyroxene, and locally magnetite. Integrated field-mapping, and whole-rock lithogeochemical, microscopic and mineral chemical analyses suggest that the stratiform skarn beds are the products of at least two discrete hydrothermal events and subsequent metamorphism. The first event comprised accumulation in a quiescent subaqueous environment, below wave base, of calcareous and ferruginous sediments rich in Fe, Mn, Ca, and Mg. These chemical sediments were deposited concurrently with rhyolitic ash-silt sedimentation, thus forming a (now metamorphosed) laminated calcareous Fe formation with both a detrital rhyolitic component and rhyolitic siltstone interbeds. Positive Eu-anomalies and negative Ce-anomalies for normalized rare earth element analyses of skarn beds suggest that the iron may have been derived from exhalation of hot and reduced hydrothermal fluids, which upon mixing with more oxidized seawater, precipitated Fe oxides and/or carbonates that settled from suspension to the seafloor. The size of the positive Eu-anomalies of the chemical sediments are modified by the content of rhyolitic volcaniclastic material, which has a negative Eu anomaly, such that positive Eu-anomalies are only observed in skarn beds that possess a minor volcaniclastic component. Subsequently, the calcareous Fe formations were subjected to post-depositional alteration by hydrothermal fluids, locally yielding more manganoan and magnesian assemblages. The Mn-alteration is manifested by lateral gradations from epidote-grandite-clinopyroxene±magnetite rocks into significantly more Mn-rich quartz-spessartine rocks and massive andradite rocks over distances of less than 10 cm within individual skarn beds. Magnesian alteration is manifested by the development of discordant zones of pargasite para-amphibolites and formation of stratiform pargasite rocks texturally similar to the interlaminated grandite-epidote-ferroan diopside rocks. The latter increase in abundance towards the Ryllshyttan deposit and are associated with pre-metamorphic/pre-tectonic K-Mg-Fe±Si alteration (now biotite-phlogopite-garnet-cordierite-pargasite rocks) that is related to base metal mineralization. The zone of Mn- and Mg-altered skarn beds extends beyond the zone of pervasive K-Mg-Fe±Si alteration around Ryllshyttan. This suggests that the skarn bed progenitors, or their sedimentary contacts against rhyolitic ash-siltstones, acted as conduits to outflowing hydrothermal fluids. The chemical and mineralogical imprint, imposed on affected beds by alteration, may serve as indicators of proximity to intense K-Mg-Fe±Si alteration envelopes around other base metal sulphide deposits in Bergslagen. The last recorded event comprised syn-tectonic veining of competent massive andradite skarn beds. The veins contain quartz-albite-epidote-ferroan diopside-actinolite assemblages.

  17. Three dimensional quantitative characterization of magnetite nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous silicon: local curvature, demagnetizing factors and magnetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Uusimäki, Toni; Margaris, Georgios; Trohidou, Kalliopi; Granitzer, Petra; Rumpf, Klemens; Sezen, Meltem; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2013-12-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles embedded within the pores of a mesoporous silicon template have been characterized using electron tomography. Linear least squares optimization was used to fit an arbitrary ellipsoid to each segmented particle from the three dimensional reconstruction. It was then possible to calculate the demagnetizing factors and the direction of the shape anisotropy easy axis for every particle. The demagnetizing factors, along with the knowledge of spatial and volume distribution of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles, were used as a model for magnetic Monte Carlo simulations, yielding zero field cooling/field cooling and magnetic hysteresis curves, which were compared to the measured ones. Additionally, the local curvature of the magnetite particles' docking site within the mesoporous silicon's surface was obtained in two different ways and a comparison will be given. A new iterative semi-automatic image alignment program was written and the importance of image segmentation for a truly objective analysis is also addressed. PMID:24132251

  18. A new route of emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization for the preparation of polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Quyen, D. H.; Hoang, T. K. N.

    2014-06-01

    A new route of emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization based on the homogenous mechanism was investigated to prepare magnetic nanoparticles coated by poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The experimental results confirm the formation of PMMA thin and unique layers covering magnetite cores. The polymer layer thickness, determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, increases from 4.3 nm to 6.8 nm with increasing mass ratio of MMA to magnetite from 3:1 to 11:1. The increase of the polymer thickness results in the decrease in magnetization saturation of polymeric coated magnetic particles. However, this reduction, no more than 13 emu g-1, is much lower compared to that in other studies with the presence of surfactants or emulsifiers. Besides, the dispersion stability of the prepared particles is significantly improved.

  19. Effect of microstructure of carbon steel on magnetite formation in simulated Hot Conditioning environment of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Prafful Kumar; Kiran Kumar, M.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2015-09-01

    The objective of present investigation is to establish the role of starting microstructure of carbon steel on the magnetite formation behaviour in Hot Conditioning simulated environment. Two grades of carbon steel (low and high carbon) were subjected to selective heat-treatments to generate different microstructures: martensite, tempered martensite and modified ferrite-pearlite. Oxidation was carried out in lithiated water of pH 10-10.2 in a static autoclave at 270 °C. The results of the investigation clearly establish that: (a) high carbon steel (0.63% C) showed a relatively higher rate of oxidation over the low carbon (0.08% C) grade at all the test durations and (b) the oxidation rates for both the grades were sensitive to microstructural differences at initial stages of oxidation while the differences narrowed down after 72 h of exposure. The oxide formed was established to be magnetite on all the specimens.

  20. ?-Cyclodextrin/thermosensitive containing polymer brushes grafted onto magnetite nano-particles for extraction and determination of venlafaxine in biological and pharmaceutical samples.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Panahi, Homayon; Alaei, Haniyeh Sadat

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, a novel nano-sorbent is fabricated by the surface grafting of poly[?-CD/allylamine-co-N-isopropylacrylamide] onto modified magnetite nano-particles by 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. The polymer grafted magnetite nano-particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The feasibility of employing this nano-sorbent for extraction of trace venlafaxine in pharmaceutical samples and human biological fluids are investigated. The effect of various parameters such as pH, reaction temperature, and contact time was evaluated. The result revealed that the best sorption of venlafaxine by the magnetite nano-sorbent occurred at 35 °C at an optimum pH of 5. The kinetics of the venlafaxine shows accessibility of active sites in the grafted polymer onto the drug. The equilibrium data of venlafaxine by grafted magnetite nano-sorbent are well represented by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption capacity of venlafaxine is found 142.8 mg g(-1) and indicated the homogeneous sites onto polymer grafted magnetite nano-sorbent surface. Nearly 80% of venlafaxine was released in simulated intestinal fluid, pH 7.4, in 30 h and 90% in simulated gastric fluid, pH 1.2, in 1 h. The venlafaxine loaded-polymer grafted magnetite nano-particles were successfully applied for the extraction in urine and pharmaceutical samples. PMID:25278039