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Sample records for pure magnetite crystals

  1. Thermal Decomposition of an Impure (Roxbury) Siderite: Relevance to the Presence of Chemically Pure Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2009-03-01

    Thermal decomposition of Roxbury siderite resulted in the formation of impure (Mg,Mn)-ferrites. These findings, which are supported by kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium modeling studies, are in stark contrast to the chemically pure ALH 84001 magnetite.

  2. Thermal Decomposition of an Impure (Roxbury) Siderite: Relevance to the Presence of Chemically Pure Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K.; Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; Wentworth, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the origin of nanophase magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been widely debated for nearly a decade. Golden et al. have reported producing nearly chemically pure magnetite from thermal decomposition of chemically impure siderite [(Fe, Mg, Mn)CO3]. This claim is significant for three reasons: first, it has been argued that chemically pure magnetite present in the carbonate disks in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could have formed by the thermal decomposition of the impure carbonate matrix in which they are embedded; second, the chemical purity of magnetite has been previously used to identify biogenic magnetite; and, third, previous studies of thermal decomposition of impure (Mg,Ca,Mn)-siderites, which have been investigated under a wide variety of conditions by numerous researchers, invariably yields a mixed metal oxide phase as the product and not chemically pure magnetite. The explanation for this observation is that these siderites all possess the same crystallographic structure (Calcite; R3c) so solid solutions between these carbonates are readily formed and can be viewed on an atomic scale as two chemically different but structurally similar lattices.

  3. Manganese in biogenic magnetite crystals from magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Keim, Carolina N; Lins, Ulysses; Farina, Marcos

    2009-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce either magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) or greigite (Fe(3)S(4)) crystals in cytoplasmic organelles called magnetosomes. Whereas greigite magnetosomes can contain up to 10 atom% copper, magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria was considered chemically pure for a long time and this characteristic was used to distinguish between biogenic and abiogenic crystals. Recently, it was shown that magnetosomes containing cobalt could be produced by three strains of Magnetospirillum. Here we show that magnetite crystals produced by uncultured magnetotactic bacteria can incorporate manganese up to 2.8 atom% of the total metal content (Fe+Mn) when manganese chloride is added to microcosms. Thus, chemical purity can no longer be taken as a strict prerequisite to consider magnetite crystals to be of biogenic origin. PMID:19187208

  4. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbonates Implications for the Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Trieman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite and sulfides in the black rims of carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al. that they are biogenic in origin. However, exclusively inorganic (abiotic) processes are able to account for the occurrence of carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblages in the meteorite. We have previously precipitated chemically zoned and sulfide-bearing carbonate globules analogous to those in ALH84001 (at less than or equal to 150 C) from multiple fluxes of variable-composition Ca-Mg-Fe-CO2-S-H2O solutions. Brief heating of precipitated globules to approx. 470 C produced magnetite and pyrrhotite within the globules by thermal decomposition of siderite and pyrite, respectively. We have also shown that morphology of magnetite formed by inorganic thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate is similar to the morphology of so-called biogenic magnetite in the carbonate globules of ALH84001. Magnetite crystals in the rims of carbonate globules in ALH84001 are chemically pure [Note: "Chemically pure" is defined here as magnetite with Mg at levels comparable or lower than Mg detected by [8] in ALH84001 magnetite]. A debate continues on whether or not chemically pure magnetite can form by the thermal decomposition of mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates that have formed under abiotic conditions. Thomas-Keprta et al. argue that it is not possible to form Mg-free magnetite from Mg-Fe-carbonate based on thermodynamic data. We previously suggested that chemically pure magnetite could form by the thermal decomposition of relatively pure siderite in the outer rims of the globules. Mg-Fe-carbonates may also thermally decompose under conditions conducive for formation of chemically pure magnetite. In this paper we show through laboratory experiments that chemically pure magnetite can form by an inorganic process from mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  5. Non-chemically Pure Magnetites Produced from Thermal Decomposition of Ankerites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez López, C.; Romanek, C.; Rodríguez-Navarro, A.; Pérez-González, T.; Rodríguez Navarro, C.

    2008-12-01

    It has been claimed that chemically pure magnetites (Fe3O4) can be obtained from thermal decomposition of (Fe, Mg, Ca)CO3 (Golden et al., 2004). Such an observation is critical, since it opens the possibility of an inorganic way of formation of the magnetites found on Martian meteorite ALH84001. Such a chemical purity is one of the parameters used, so far, to recognize bacterial origin of natural magnetites (Thomas-Keptra et al., 2001), since it has been demonstrated that biologically-controlled magnetites are chemically pure (Bazylinski and Frankel, 2004) . However, while Golden et al. (2004) obtained pure magnetite from an almost pure precursor, the ankerite cores in ALH84001 in which magnetites are embedded are far from being chemically pure, since they contain considerable amounts of Ca and Mg (Kopp and Humayun, 2003). In this study we have performed several experiments to analyze the chemical purity of magnetites produced by thermal decomposition of four ankerite samples sinthetized in the laboratory, and containing different amounts of Ca, Fe and Mg. Such a thermal decomposition was achieved by two procedures: (1) by heating the samples at 470°C under CO2 pressure and (2) by decomposing the ankerite "in situ" under the TEM (Transmission electron Microscopy) electron beam. Magnetite produced by the first procedure was analyzed by XRD to determine whether or not the resulting solid was a mixture of oxides or rather a solid solution of (Ca, Fe and Mg)oxide. Magnetites formed by the two methods were studied by High Resolution TEM. The chemical composition of about 20 crystals of each experiment was analyzed by EDAX. Under our experimental conditions, ankerites decomposed in magnetite crystals of about 5 nanometers in size. Magentite crystals arranged to keep the morphology of the precursor. Our results confirm that any of these magnetites is chemically pure, but rather, each one of them is a solid solution of Ca and Mg. Therefore, chemically pure magnetites

  6. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; McKay, M. F.; Romanek, C. S.

    2001-01-01

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found.

  7. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: Presumptive biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, Hojatollah; Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, Mary Fae; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2001-01-01

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924–930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found. PMID:11226210

  8. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; Clemett, S J; Bazylinski, D A; Kirschvink, J L; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Vali, H; Gibson, E K; McKay, M F; Romanek, C S

    2001-02-27

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found. PMID:11226210

  9. Process for Making Single-Domain Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Lofgren, Gary E.; McKay, Gordan A.; Schwandt, Craig S.; Lauer, Howard V., Jr.; Socki, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    A process for making chemically pure, single-domain magnetite crystals substantially free of structural defects has been invented as a byproduct of research into the origin of globules in a meteorite found in Antarctica and believed to have originated on Mars. The globules in the meteorite comprise layers of mixed (Mg, Fe, and Ca) carbonates, magnetite, and iron sulfides. Since the discovery of the meteorite was announced in August 1996, scientists have debated whether the globules are of biological origin or were formed from inorganic materials by processes that could have taken place on Mars. While the research that led to the present invention has not provided a definitive conclusion concerning the origin of the globules, it has shown that globules of a different but related chemically layered structure can be grown from inorganic ingredients in a multistep precipitation process. As described in more detail below, the present invention comprises the multistep precipitation process plus a subsequent heat treatment. The multistep precipitation process was demonstrated in a laboratory experiment on the growth of submicron ankerite crystals, overgrown by submicron siderite and pyrite crystals, overgrown by submicron magnesite crystals, overgrown by submicron siderite and pyrite. In each step, chloride salts of appropriate cations (Ca, Fe, and Mg) were dissolved in deoxygenated, CO2- saturated water. NaHCO3 was added as a pH buffer while CO2 was passed continuously through the solution. A 15-mL aliquot of the resulting solution was transferred into each of several 20 mL, poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-lined hydrothermal pressure vessels. The vessels were closed in a CO2 atmosphere, then transferred into an oven at a temperature of 150 C. After a predetermined time, the hydrothermal vessels were removed from the oven and quenched in a freezer. Supernatant solutions were decanted, and carbonate precipitates were washed free of soluble salts by repeated decantations with

  10. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbontes: Implications for Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-03-01

    Pure (Mg-free) magnetite was synthesized by heating Mg-Fe-carbonate at 350°C in the presence of pyrite in an evacuated sealed glass tube. The Mg-free magnetite in the black rims of ALH84001 may have formed by a similar inorganic abiotic process from Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  11. Refractories Keep Silicon Crystals Pure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    Formation of carbon monoxide gas is prevented by a linear of refractory material free of elemental carbon. For pressures above about 4 torr, silicon carbide can be used as refractory liner. The problem of carbide contamination can arise in crystal growth of any material that forms a carbide more stable than carbon monoxide. Prevention in such cases is possible by using noncarbon refractories in place of graphite.

  12. Elongated prismatic magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate globules: potential Martian magnetofossils.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; Bazylinski, D A; Kirschvink, J L; Clemett, S J; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Vali, H; Gibson, E K; Romanek, C S

    2000-12-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we have analyzed magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals acid-extracted from carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We studied 594 magnetites from ALH84001 and grouped them into three populations on the basis of morphology: 389 were irregularly shaped, 164 were elongated prisms, and 41 were whisker-like. As a possible terrestrial analog for the ALH84001 elongated prisms, we compared these magnetites with those produced by the terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. By TEM again, we examined 206 magnetites recovered from strain MV-1 cells. Natural (Darwinian) selection in terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria appears to have resulted in the formation of intracellular magnetite crystals having the physical and chemical properties that optimize their magnetic moment. In this study, we describe six properties of magnetite produced by biologically controlled mechanisms (e.g., magnetotactic bacteria), properties that, collectively, are not observed in any known population of inorganic magnetites. These criteria can be used to distinguish one of the modes of origin for magnetites from samples with complex or unknown histories. Of the ALH84001 magnetites that we have examined, the elongated prismatic magnetite particles (similar to 27% of the total) are indistinguishable from the MV-1 magnetites in five of these six characteristics observed for biogenically controlled mineralization of magnetite crystals. PMID:11543573

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance of intact cells and isolated crystals from cultured and uncultured magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abraçado, Leida G; Wajnberg, Eliane; Esquivel, Darci M S; Keim, Carolina N; Silva, Karen T; Moreira, Emílio T S; Lins, Ulysses; Farina, Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Most magnetotactic bacteria (MB) produce stable, single-domain magnetite nanocrystals with species-specific size, shape and chain arrangement. In addition, most crystals are elongated along the [111] direction, which is the easy axis of magnetization in magnetite, chemically pure and structurally perfect. These special characteristics allow magnetite crystal chains from MB to be recognized in environmental samples including old sedimentary rocks. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) has been proposed as a powerful and practical tool for screening large numbers of samples possibly containing magnetofossils. Indeed, several studies were recently published on FMR of cultured MB, mainly Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. In this work, we examined both uncultured magnetotactic cocci and the cultured MB M. gryphiswaldense using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and FMR from 10 K to room temperature (RT). The TEM data supported the FMR spectral characteristics of our samples. The FMR spectra of both bacteria showed the intrinsic characteristics of magnetite produced by MB, such as extended absorption at the low field region of the spectra and a Verwey transition around 100 K. As previously observed, the spectra of M. gryphiswaldense isolated crystals were more symmetrical than the spectra obtained from whole cells, reflecting the loss of chain arrangement due to the small size and symmetrical shape of the crystals. However, the FMR spectra of magnetic crystals isolated from magnetotactic cocci were very similar to the FMR spectra of whole cells, because the chain arrangement was maintained due to the large size and prismatic shape of the crystals. Our data support the use of FMR spectra to detect magnetotactic bacteria and magnetofossils in samples of present and past environments. Furthermore, the spectra suggest the use of the temperature transition of spectral peak-to-peak intensity to obtain the Verwey temperature for these systems. PMID:24828297

  14. Fabrication of specimens of metamorphic magnetite crystals for field ion microscopy and atom probe microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, K R; Martens, R L; Kelly, T F; Evans, N D; Miller, M K

    2001-10-01

    Field ion specimens have been successfully fabricated from samples of metamorphic magnetite crystals (Fe3O4) extracted from a polymetamorphosed, granulite-facies marble with the use of a focused ion beam. These magnetite crystals contain nanometer-scale, disk-shaped inclusions making this magnetite particularly attractive for investigating the capabilities of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) for geological materials. Field ion microscope images of these magnetite crystals were obtained in which the observed size and morphology of the precipitates agree with previous results. Samples were analyzed in the energy compensated optical position-sensitive atom probe. Mass spectra were obtained in which peaks for singly ionized 16O, 56Fe and 56FeO and doubly ionized 54Fe, 56Fe and 57Fe peaks were fully resolved. Manganese and aluminum were observed in a limited analysis of a precipitate in an energy compensated position sensitive atom probe. PMID:11770743

  15. Properties of intracellular magnetite crystals produced by Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Arató, Balázs; Schüler, Dirk; Flies, Christine; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Frankel, Richard B.

    2006-09-01

    Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1 is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium. Cells form intracellular nanocrystals of magnetite but are only weakly magnetotactic. In order to understand the unusual magnetic response of this strain, we studied magnetite crystals within cells grown with fumarate and sulfate. Many cells grown under either condition did not form magnetic crystals while others contained only 1 to 18 small (˜ 40 nm) magnetite-containing magnetosomes. Bulk magnetic measurements of whole cells showed a superparamagnetic-like behavior, indicating that many of the magnetite crystals are too small to have a permanent magnetic moment at ambient temperature. The temperature of the Verwey transition is lower (˜ 86 K) than of magnetite from other magnetotactic strains, likely indicating partial oxidation of magnetite into maghemite. As a result of the small size and small number of magnetite magnetosomes, the magnetic moments of most cells grown anaerobically with fumarate or sulfate are insufficient for magnetotaxis. In addition to intracellular magnetite, in some cultures another iron oxide, hematite, formed on the surfaces of cells. The hematite grains are embedded in an extracellular polymeric material, indicating that the crystals likely resulted from a biologically-induced mineralization process. Although the hematite particles appear to consist of aggregations of many small (5 to 10 nm) grains, the grains have a consensus orientation and thus the whole particle diffracts as a single crystal. The aligned arrangement of nanoparticles within larger clusters may reflect either a templated nucleation of hematite crystallites in an extracellular organic matrix, or result from a self-assembling process during the crystallization of hematite from ferric gels or ferrihydrite.

  16. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  17. Did an Impact Make the Mysterious Microscopic Magnetite Crystals in ALH 84001?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2007-10-01

    Fervent debate swirls around microscopic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. Some investigators suggest that the crystals are evidence of past life on Mars, citing magnetite crystals of similar chemical compositions and sizes made by magnetotactic bacteria on Earth. Others cite assorted experiments and observations to argue that the important little crystals formed entirely by non-biological processes, hence say nothing about life on Mars. One of those processes is the decomposition of iron carbonate (the mineral siderite), which occurs in ALH 84001. Researchers argue that heating this mineral causes it to decompose into magnetite and CO2 gas. Experiments showing this were done by heating siderite and observing that it decomposed and formed magnetite, but nobody had shock-heated siderite to see if magnetite crystals formed. (Shock is a rapid, strong rise and fall in pressure. It happens under many circumstances, including meteorite impacts.) The lack of shock experiments has been solved by Mary Sue Bell (University of Houston and Jacobs Engineering). She experimentally shocked samples of siderite at the Experimental Impact Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center. She shows that magnetite crystals of the right size and composition formed when samples were shocked to 49 GPa (about 500,000 times the pressure at the Earth's surface). This is more evidence for a non-biological origin for the magnetite crystals in ALH 84001 and is consistent with what we know about the impact history of the rock. There seems to be growing evidence against a biological origin, but don't expect these results to completely settle the debate!

  18. Crystal growth of bullet-shaped magnetite in magnetotactic bacteria of the Nitrospirae phylum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Menguy, Nicolas; Gatel, Christophe; Boureau, Victor; Snoeck, Etienne; Patriarche, Gilles; Leroy, Eric; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-02-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are known to produce single-domain magnetite or greigite crystals within intracellular membrane organelles and to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field lines. MTB have been suggested as being one of the most ancient biomineralizing metabolisms on the Earth and they represent a fundamental model of intracellular biomineralization. Moreover, the determination of their specific crystallographic signature (e.g. structure and morphology) is essential for palaeoenvironmental and ancient-life studies. Yet, the mechanisms of MTB biomineralization remain poorly understood, although this process has been extensively studied in several cultured MTB strains in the Proteobacteria phylum. Here, we show a comprehensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of magnetic and structural properties down to atomic scales on bullet-shaped magnetites produced by the uncultured strain MYR-1 belonging to the Nitrospirae phylum, a deeply branching phylogenetic MTB group. We observed a multiple-step crystal growth of MYR-1 magnetite: initial isotropic growth forming cubo-octahedral particles (less than approx. 40 nm), subsequent anisotropic growth and a systematic final elongation along [001] direction. During the crystal growth, one major {111} face is well developed and preserved at the larger basal end of the crystal. The basal {111} face appears to be terminated by a tetrahedral-octahedral-mixed iron surface, suggesting dimensional advantages for binding protein(s), which may template the crystallization of magnetite. This study offers new insights for understanding magnetite biomineralization within the Nitrospirae phylum. PMID:25566884

  19. Crystal growth of bullet-shaped magnetite in magnetotactic bacteria of the Nitrospirae phylum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhua; Menguy, Nicolas; Gatel, Christophe; Boureau, Victor; Snoeck, Etienne; Patriarche, Gilles; Leroy, Eric; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are known to produce single-domain magnetite or greigite crystals within intracellular membrane organelles and to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field lines. MTB have been suggested as being one of the most ancient biomineralizing metabolisms on the Earth and they represent a fundamental model of intracellular biomineralization. Moreover, the determination of their specific crystallographic signature (e.g. structure and morphology) is essential for palaeoenvironmental and ancient-life studies. Yet, the mechanisms of MTB biomineralization remain poorly understood, although this process has been extensively studied in several cultured MTB strains in the Proteobacteria phylum. Here, we show a comprehensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of magnetic and structural properties down to atomic scales on bullet-shaped magnetites produced by the uncultured strain MYR-1 belonging to the Nitrospirae phylum, a deeply branching phylogenetic MTB group. We observed a multiple-step crystal growth of MYR-1 magnetite: initial isotropic growth forming cubo-octahedral particles (less than approx. 40 nm), subsequent anisotropic growth and a systematic final elongation along [001] direction. During the crystal growth, one major {111} face is well developed and preserved at the larger basal end of the crystal. The basal {111} face appears to be terminated by a tetrahedral–octahedral-mixed iron surface, suggesting dimensional advantages for binding protein(s), which may template the crystallization of magnetite. This study offers new insights for understanding magnetite biomineralization within the Nitrospirae phylum. PMID:25566884

  20. Chains of Magnetite Crystals in the Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biological Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, E. I.; Wierzchos, J.; Ascaso, C.; Winklhofer, M.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, missing evidence for their biological origin, as well as five morphological characteristics incompatible with a nonbiological origin are demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Microstructural characterization of metamorphic magnetite crystals with implications for oxygen isotope distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sitzman, S.D.; Banfield, J.F.; Valley, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    The microstructures of magnetite crystals in three samples from a single outcrop of granulite-facies marble were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine how exsolution history can affect physical properties and mineral reactivity during retrograde metamorphism. The microstructure of sample 90LP9 consists of dislocation, dislocation arrays (with dislocation spacings of 100 to 500 nm), and linear channels filled with layer silicates. Acid etching and ion milling of polished 90LP9 magnetite grains show dislocation arrays clustered near grain boundaries with rheologically hard magnetite, diopside, and monticellite, but rarely near grain boundaries with softer calcite. Samples LP204-1 magnetite grains contain coherent {l{underscore}brace}100{r{underscore}brace} Al-Mn-Fe-spinel precipitates ({approximately}40 nm diameter, {approximately}1--3 nm thick, {approximately}10{sup 4} platelets/{micro}m{sup 3}) and very few dislocations. Larger, more widely spaced spinel precipitates are present in a third sample, 94AK3. Extremely low dislocation densities in powders of LP204-1 and intermediate dislocation densities in powders of 94AK3, compared with extremely high dislocation densities in powders of 90LP9, are related to strong dislocation pinning effects by precipitates. The different exsolution behavior of the three magnetite samples is attributed to small, but important, differences in Al content. Because dislocations can provide fast pathways for exchange that enhance diffusion, especially in very slowly cooled rocks, these microstructural results may explain previously reported subgrain-scale oxygen isotopic heterogeneity in 90LP9 magnetite compared with relative isotopic homogeneity in LP204-1 magnetite.

  2. Magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles crystallized in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, M.; Tzankov, D.; Harizanova, R.; Avdeev, G.; Rüssel, C.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were crystallized from soda alumina borosilicate glasses with the composition (24- y)Na2O· yAl2O3·14B2O3·37SiO2·25Fe2O3, where y = 8, 12, 14, 16 mol%. All samples are phase separated into magnetite core, enriched in iron oxide, and a glass shell. The magnetic core phase consists of nanocrystallites with sizes ranging between 25 and 40 nm, depending on the respective glass composition. All samples show characteristic well-defined hysteresis loops at room temperature, indicating that the magnetite particles are ferrimagnetic. No evidence for the existence of superparamagnetic particles is found by measuring the ZFC and FC thermomagnetic curves.

  3. Polar properties of nominally pure polarized TGS crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnarev, P. I.; Maslovskaya, A. G.; Baryshnikov, S. V.

    2011-06-01

    Using the method of dynamic pyroeffect, polar properties of surface layers of nominally pure triglycinesulfate (TGS) crystals prepolarized in an electrostatic field are experimentally investigated. The results on the pyrocoefficient distribution over the crystal thickness modeled using the experimental dependences are reported. The model relies on the solution to the first-order integral Fredholm equation by the method of Tikhonov's regularization.

  4. Critical superparamagnetic/single-domain grain sizes in interacting magnetite particles: implications for magnetosome crystals

    PubMed Central

    Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Williams, Wyn

    2009-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain chains of magnetically interacting crystals (magnetosome crystals), which they use for navigation (magnetotaxis). To improve magnetotaxis efficiency, the magnetosome crystals (usually magnetite or greigite in composition) should be magnetically stable single-domain (SSD) particles. Smaller single-domain particles become magnetically unstable owing to thermal fluctuations and are termed superparamagnetic (SP). Previous calculations for the SSD/SP threshold size or blocking volume did not include the contribution of magnetic interactions. In this study, the blocking volume has been calculated as a function of grain elongation and separation for chains of identical magnetite grains. The inclusion of magnetic interactions was found to decrease the blocking volume, thereby increasing the range of SSD behaviour. Combining the results with previously published calculations for the SSD to multidomain threshold size in chains of magnetite reveals that interactions significantly increase the SSD range. We argue that chains of interacting magnetosome crystals found in magnetotactic bacteria have used this effect to improve magnetotaxis. PMID:19091684

  5. Critical superparamagnetic/single-domain grain sizes in interacting magnetite particles: implications for magnetosome crystals.

    PubMed

    Muxworthy, Adrian R; Williams, Wyn

    2009-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain chains of magnetically interacting crystals (magnetosome crystals), which they use for navigation (magnetotaxis). To improve magnetotaxis efficiency, the magnetosome crystals (usually magnetite or greigite in composition) should be magnetically stable single-domain (SSD) particles. Smaller single-domain particles become magnetically unstable owing to thermal fluctuations and are termed superparamagnetic (SP). Previous calculations for the SSD/SP threshold size or blocking volume did not include the contribution of magnetic interactions. In this study, the blocking volume has been calculated as a function of grain elongation and separation for chains of identical magnetite grains. The inclusion of magnetic interactions was found to decrease the blocking volume, thereby increasing the range of SSD behaviour. Combining the results with previously published calculations for the SSD to multidomain threshold size in chains of magnetite reveals that interactions significantly increase the SSD range. We argue that chains of interacting magnetosome crystals found in magnetotactic bacteria have used this effect to improve magnetotaxis. PMID:19091684

  6. Intrinsic response of crystals to pure dilatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinghan; Yip, S.; Phillpot, S.; Wolf, D.

    The response of an f.c.c. lattice with Lennard-Jones interaction under symmetric lattice extension has been studied by Monte Carlo simulation at several temperatures. The critical strain at which the crystal undergoes a structural change is found to be well predicted by the mechanical stability limit expressed in terms of either the elastic constants or the bulk modulus. At low temperature (reduced temperature T = 0.125), lattice decohesion is observed in the form of cleavage fracture, whereas at higher temperature (T = 0.3) the strained system deforms by cavitation with some degree of local plasticity. At still higher temperature (T = 0.5) the lattice undergoes homogeneous disordering with all the attendant characteristics of melting.

  7. Verwey transition of nano-sized magnetite crystals investigated by 57Fe NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sumin; Choi, Baek Soon; Lee, Soon Chil; Hong, Jaeyoung; Lee, Jisoo; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Taehun; Jeong, Jaehong; Park, Je-Geun

    It is well known that magnetite crystals undergo a metal-insulator transition at the Verwey transition temperature, TV = 123 K. In this work, we studied the Verwey transition of nano-sized crystals with 57Fe NMR. In the metallic state above Tv, the NMR spectrum shows a single sharp peak, which broadens below TV indicating the Verwey transition. We measured the spectra of the nano-crystals with radii of 16 nm, 25 nm, and 40 nm and compared with that of a bulk. The transition temperature obtained from the NMR spectra depends on both the crystal size and crystallinity. When the crystal size decreases from bulk to 16 nm, the transition temperature drops from 123 K to 100 K. The transition temperature of the samples kept dry air decrease due to aging.

  8. Magnetite Crystal Chains: Most Promising Evidence of Past Microbial Life on Mars, Also Useful on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, E.; Wierzchos, J.; Ascaso, C.; Giannuzzi, L. A.

    2005-12-01

    It is not easy to identify "biosignatures", suitable targets in the search for traces of microbial life on early Mars: They need to have withstood billions of years of extreme conditions and to provide unambiguous evidence. Organic molecules were probably destroyed by the highly oxidative environment, at least near the surface. Mineral structures offer hardly more than strong indication, not unambiguous evidence, and no direct information about the organisms that may have produced them. The reason is that soft-bodied bacteria do not leave behind good fossil traces. The only known exception seems to be magnetotactic bacteria, widespread on Earth in most aquatic environments, that produce inside their body chains of magnetite crystals. Single crystals showing properties observed in terrestrial bacteria (definite size range, morphology, chemical purity, rarity of crystallographic defects) may indicate biological origin, but provide no absolute evidence: It is impossible to prove that such crystals can not be produced by non-biological processes on Mars. However, magnetite crystal chains of bacteria have properties that are the direct consequence of being produced by organisms. In the living cell, they are surrounded by a biological membrane or organic matrix. Even in terrestrial fossils, crystals of a single chain show high level of uniformity in size and shape (because the matrix functions as a template), gaps between crystals (organic substance between crystals) and remarkable bends (due to the elasticity of the organic matter between crystals, a property absent in the mineral world). Magnetite chains of bacteria are complex structures whose formation requires the interaction of a series of chemical and physical processes and feedback loops, as well as genetically stored information, the ultimate proof of life. Non-biogenous chains produced in the laboratory do not show such characteristics. Bacterial magnetite chains in terrestrial magnetofossils can be observed in

  9. Size control of in vitro synthesized magnetite crystals by the MamC protein of Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Tercedor, C; Montalbán-López, M; Perez-Gonzalez, T; Sanchez-Quesada, M S; Prozorov, T; Pineda-Molina, E; Fernandez-Vivas, M A; Rodriguez-Navarro, A B; Trubitsyn, D; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Jimenez-Lopez, C

    2015-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes that share the unique ability of biomineralizing magnetosomes, which are intracellular, membrane-bounded crystals of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). Magnetosome biomineralization is mediated by a number of specific proteins, many of which are localized in the magnetosome membrane, and thus is under strict genetic control. Several studies have partially elucidated the effects of a number of these magnetosome-associated proteins in the control of the size of magnetosome magnetite crystals. However, the effect of MamC, one of the most abundant proteins in the magnetosome membrane, remains unclear. In this present study, magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized inorganically in free-drift experiments at 25 °C in the presence of different concentrations of the iron-binding recombinant proteins MamC and MamCnts (MamC without its first transmembrane segment) from the marine, magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1 and three commercial proteins [α-lactalbumin (α-Lac), myoglobin (Myo), and lysozyme (Lyz)]. While no effect was observed on the size of magnetite crystals formed in the presence of the commercial proteins, biomimetic synthesis in the presence of MamC and MamCnts at concentrations of 10-60 μg/mL resulted in the production of larger and more well-developed magnetite crystals (~30-40 nm) compared to those of the control (~20-30 nm; magnetite crystals grown protein-free). Our results demonstrate that MamC plays an important role in the control of the size of magnetite crystals and could be utilized in biomimetic synthesis of magnetite nanocrystals. PMID:25874532

  10. Molarity (Aromic Density) of the Elements as Pure Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the atomic density of the elements as pure crystals. Atomic density is defined as the reciprocal of the atomic volume. Includes atomic-density diagrams which were prepared using the atomic-volume values given by Singman, supplemented by additional values for some allotropes. (JN)

  11. Pure and doped triglycine sulfate crystals: growth and characterization.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, H V

    2009-04-01

    Triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystal is an important ferroelectric crystal used on a large spectrum of radiation detection. Crystals from this family are used as targeted vidicon materials. Pure, (L + D) and L- or D-alanine doped TGS crystals in the ferro- and paraelectric phase, 3-4 cm long, were grown by slow solvent evaporation or temperature reduction. The alanine segregation coefficient, being K approximately 0.01 dopant concentrations in the crystals, was less than 1%. The L- or D-alanine doped crystals presented mirror symmetry and unipolarity. Permittivity and losses were registered online as a function of temperature or at constant temperature versus time (1 kHz, HIOKI, RLC automatic bridge). Essential parameters permittivity, losses, positive and negative polarization components, coercive field components, and the bias field of the doped samples were measured versus temperature. Hysteresis loops and their derivatives were measured with a specially designed Sawyer-Tower device. Generally, doped crystals presented much smaller permittivity and losses and a higher pyroelectric coefficient. Pure TGS samples show nonreproducible permittivity values and its relaxation was studied at constant temperature in the ferroelectric phase. Dielectric parameters have been automatically recorded online every 10 s, during approximately 7 days. It was found that the relaxation time is not a real constant on such large time intervals. In a semi-log scale, permittivity shows three stages, probably related to several mechanisms of relaxation. PMID:19426332

  12. Plenty of Room at the Bottom: The Superparamagnetic Transition in Chains of Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, A.

    2009-05-01

    Among the few known fossil remnants of bacteria are chains of magnetite and greigite crystals left in sediments by magnetotactic bacteria. The information they provide about the abundance and nature of magnetotactic bacteria may provide useful information about environmental conditions back at least as far as the Cretaceous. Their usefulness depends on their readily identified features such as the size and shape of the crystals and their arrangement in chains. These features maximize the torque of the Earth's magnetic field on the bacteria by maximizing the magnetic remanence in the chains. The chains are in a single-domain (SD) state, with a uniform magnetization pointing along the chain axis. The single-domain state only occurs within a narrow range of crystal sizes. Smaller particles become superparamagnetic (SP), unable to hold any magnetic remanence, while larger particles are multidomain, having a smaller remanence per unit volume. Thus, one criterion for "magnetofossils" is that they fall within the single-domain size range. However, the SP size limit is only known for isolated crystals and many of the crystals in magnetotactic bacteria would be SP in isolation. They are SD only within chains, their magnetization stabilized by the magnetostatic interactions between crystals. The SP critical size is calculated for chains of magnetite crystals using a new algorithm that finds all the equilibrium magnetic states. From these the minima and saddle points in the energy surface are selected and energy gradients are followed from saddle points down to stable states. This network of connections determines the paths from positive to negative saturation and the decay rate for the magnetic moment of the chain. In turn, the decay rate determines the critical size. The transition paths depend on the ratio of the strength of the magnetostatic interactions to the internal magnetic anisotropy of the crystals. This ratio increases as the crystals get closer together or less

  13. Chains of magnetite crystals in the meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of biological origin

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, E. Imre; Wierzchos, Jacek; Ascaso, Carmen; Winklhofer, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, considered missing evidence for the biological origin of magnetite in ALH84001 [Thomas-Keprta, K. L., Bazylinski, D. A., Kirschvink, J. L., Clemett, S. J., McKay, D. S., Wentworth, S. J., Vali, H., Gibson, E. K., Jr., & Romanek, C. S. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049–4081], is demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Five characteristics of such chains (uniform crystal size and shape within chains, gaps between crystals, orientation of elongated crystals along the chain axis, flexibility of chains, and a halo that is a possible remnant of a membrane around chains), observed or inferred to be present in magnetotactic bacteria but incompatible with a nonbiological origin, are shown to be present. Although it is unlikely that magnetotactic bacteria were ever alive in ALH84001, decomposed remains of such organisms could have been deposited in cracks in the rock while it was still on the surface on Mars. PMID:11226212

  14. Chains of magnetite crystals in the meteorite ALH84001: evidence of biological origin.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, E I; Wierzchos, J; Ascaso, C; Winklhofer, M

    2001-02-27

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, considered missing evidence for the biological origin of magnetite in ALH84001 [Thomas-Keprta, K. L., Bazylinski, D. A., Kirschvink, J. L., Clemett, S. J., McKay, D. S., Wentworth, S. J., Vali, H., Gibson, E. K., Jr., & Romanek, C. S. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049-4081], is demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Five characteristics of such chains (uniform crystal size and shape within chains, gaps between crystals, orientation of elongated crystals along the chain axis, flexibility of chains, and a halo that is a possible remnant of a membrane around chains), observed or inferred to be present in magnetotactic bacteria but incompatible with a nonbiological origin, are shown to be present. Although it is unlikely that magnetotactic bacteria were ever alive in ALH84001, decomposed remains of such organisms could have been deposited in cracks in the rock while it was still on the surface on Mars. PMID:11226212

  15. Truncated Hexa-Octahedral Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biogenic Activity on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.; Clemett, S. J.; Schwartz, C.; McIntosh, J. R.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Vali, H.; Romanek, C. S.

    2004-01-01

    The landmark paper by McKay et al. [1] cited four lines of evidence associated with the Martian meteorite ALH84001 to support the hypothesis that life existed on Mars approximately 4 Ga ago. Now, more than five years later, attention has focused on the ALH84001 magnetite grains embedded within carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite. We have suggested that up to approx.25% of the ALH84001 magnetite crystals are products of biological activity [e.g., 2]. The remaining magnetites lack sufficient characteristics to constrain their origin. The papers of Thomas Keprta et al. were criticized arguing that the three dimensional structure of ALH84001 magnetite crystals can only be unambiguously determined using electron tomographic techniques. Clemett et al. [3] confirmed that magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-I display a truncated hexa-octahedral geometry using electron tomography and validated the use of the multi-tilt classical transmission microscopy technique used by [2]. Recently the geometry of the purported martian biogenic magnetites was shown be identical to that for MV-1 magnetites using electron tomography [6].

  16. A first test of the hypothesis of biogenic magnetite-based heterogeneous ice-crystal nucleation in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Golash, Harry N; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    An outstanding biophysical puzzle is focused on the apparent ability of weak, extremely low-frequency oscillating magnetic fields to enhance cryopreservation of many biological tissues. A recent theory holds that these weak magnetic fields could be inhibiting ice-crystal nucleation on the nanocrystals of biological magnetite (Fe3O4, an inverse cubic spinel) that are present in many plant and animal tissues by causing them to oscillate. In this theory, magnetically-induced mechanical oscillations disrupt the ability of water molecules to nucleate on the surface of the magnetite nanocrystals. However, the ability of the magnetite crystal lattice to serve as a template for heterogeneous ice crystal nucleation is as yet unknown, particularly for particles in the 10-100 nm size range. Here we report that the addition of trace-amounts of finely-dispersed magnetite into ultrapure water samples reduces strongly the incidence of supercooling, as measured in experiments conducted using a controlled freezing apparatus with multiple thermocouples. SQUID magnetometry was used to quantify nanogram levels of magnetite in the water samples. We also report a relationship between the volume change of ice, and the degree of supercooling, that may indicate lower degassing during the crystallization of supercooled water. In addition to supporting the role of ice-crystal nucleation by biogenic magnetite in many tissues, magnetite nanocrystals could provide inexpensive, non-toxic, and non-pathogenic ice nucleating agents needed in a variety of industrial processes, as well as influencing the dynamics of ice crystal nucleation in many natural environments. PMID:27087604

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  18. Structural and magnetic characterization of electro-crystallized magnetite nanoparticles under constant current

    SciTech Connect

    Mosivand, Saba; Kazeminezhad, Iraj

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Structural and magnetic properties of electro-crystallized magnetite nanoparticles under constant current were studied. All samples were characterized using XRD, SEM, VSM, and Mössbauer spectrometry. - Highlights: • The effect of applied current on morphology and properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is studied. • The particle size and morphology are controllable by adjusting the current. • The magnetization depends on particle size, type of surfactant and applied current. • The clear correlation between magnetization and the mean particle size is observed. - Abstract: The effect of applied current on the morphology, particle size, structure, and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles prepared by electro-crystallization method was studied. The synthesis was performed in an electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes and an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate, and either thiourea, sodium butanoate, or β-cyclodextrine as organic stabilizer. All the samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, VSM, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns, clearly confirmed that all products have the cubic spinel Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} crystal structure. Electron microscope images of the samples showed that their mean particle size is in the range 20–80 nm, and depends critically on the applied current and type of the organic additives. Specific magnetization of the samples at room temperature ranges from 60 to 90 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1}, depending on the growth conditions. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe{sub 3−δ}O{sub 4}, with a small excess of Fe{sup 3+}, 0.06 ≤ δ ≤ 0.17.

  19. Arsenic entrapment by nanocrystals of Al-magnetite: The role of Al in crystal growth and As retention.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Erico T F; Stroppa, Daniel G; Montoro, Luciano A; de Mello, Jaime W V; Gasparon, Massimo; Ciminelli, Virginia S T

    2016-09-01

    The nature of As-Al-Fe co-precipitates aged for 120 days are investigated in detail by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning TEM (STEM), electron diffraction, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM). The Al present in magnetite is shown to favour As incorporation (up to 1.10 wt%) relative to Al-free magnetite and Al-goethite, but As uptake by Al-magnetite decreases with increasing Al substitution (3.53-11.37 mol% Al). Arsenic-bearing magnetite and goethite mesocrystals (MCs) are formed by oriented aggregation (OA) of primary nanoparticles (NPs). Well-crystalline magnetite likely formed by Otswald ripening was predominant in the Al-free system. The As content in Al-goethite MCs (having approximately 13% substituted Al) was close to the EDS detection limit (0.1 wt% As), but was below detection in Al-goethites with 23.00-32.19 mol% Al. Our results show for the first time the capacity of Al-magnetite to incorporate more As than Al-free magnetite, and the role of Al in favouring OA-based crystal growth under the experimental conditions, and therefore As retention in the formed MCs. The proposed mechanism of As incorporation involves adsorption of As onto the newly formed NPs. Arsenic is then trapped in the MCs as they grow by self-assembly OA upon attachment of the NPs. We conclude that Al may diffuse to the crystal faces with high surface energy to reduce the total energy of the system during the attachment events, thus favouring the oriented aggregation. PMID:27258899

  20. A magnetosome-associated cytochrome MamP is critical for magnetite crystal growth during the exponential growth phase.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Azuma; Eguchi, Yukako; Mise, Shingo; Oestreicher, Zachery; Uno, Fumio; Fukumori, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria use a specific set of conserved proteins to biomineralize crystals of magnetite or greigite within their cells in organelles called magnetosomes. Using Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, we examined one of the magnetotactic bacteria-specific conserved proteins named MamP that was recently reported as a new type of cytochrome c that has iron oxidase activity. We found that MamP is a membrane-bound cytochrome, and the MamP content increases during the exponential growth phase compared to two other magnetosome-associated proteins on the same operon, MamA and MamK. To assess the function of MamP, we overproduced MamP from plasmids in wild-type (WT) AMB-1 and found that during the exponential phase of growth, these cells contained more magnetite crystals that were the same size as crystals in WT cells. Conversely, when the heme c-binding motifs within the mamP on the plasmid was mutated, the cells produced the same number of crystals, but smaller crystals than in WT cells during exponential growth. These results strongly suggest that during the exponential phase of growth, MamP is crucial to the normal growth of magnetite crystals during biomineralization. PMID:25048532

  1. Sub-Micrometer-Scale Mapping of Magnetite Crystals and Sulfur Globules in Magnetotactic Bacteria Using Confocal Raman Micro-Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stephan H. K.; Gigler, Alexander M.; Hanzlik, Marianne; Winklhofer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35–120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (<0.25 mW) to prevent laser induced damage of magnetite, we can identify and map magnetite by its characteristic Raman spectrum (303, 535, 665 ) against a large autofluorescence background in our natural magnetotactic bacteria samples. While greigite (cubic ; Raman lines of 253 and 351 ) is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae), we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (: 151, 219, 467 ), using green (532 nm), red (638 nm) and near-infrared excitation (785 nm). The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state. PMID:25233081

  2. Structural, optical, mechanical and dielectric studies of pure and doped L-Prolinium Trichloroacetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, N.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Vijayan, N.; Vasanthakumar, Geetha; Krishna, Anuj; Ramamurthi, K.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, pure and metal substituted L-Prolinium trichloroacetate (LPTCA) single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-Visible-NIR, hardness, photoluminescence and dielectric studies. The dopant concentration in the crystals was measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of the pure and metal substituted LPTCA revealed that the grown crystals belong to the trigonal system. Ni2+ and Co2+ doping slightly altered the lattice parameters of LPTCA without affecting the basic structure of the crystal. FTIR spectral analysis confirms the presence of various functional groups in the grown crystals. The mechanical behavior of pure and doped crystals was analyzed by Vickers's microhardness test. The optical transmittance, dielectric and photoluminescence properties of the pure and doped crystals were analyzed.

  3. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-01-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal. PMID:27477236

  4. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-08-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal.

  5. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-01-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal. PMID:27477236

  6. Comparison between pure and deuterated potassium acid phthalate (DKAP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Kumar, R.; Rajan Babu, D.; Murugakoothan, P.; Jayavel, R.

    2002-11-01

    Single crystals of pure and deuterated potassium acid phthalate (DKAP) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow cooling method. The effect of deuterium on morphology and crystal properties has been studied. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the structure and changes in lattice parameter values for the deuterated crystals. The presence of deuterium in the crystal lattice has been confirmed by FTIR analysis. The DKAP crystals possess relatively lower hardness values than the pure crystals. The transmittance of DKAP is found to be higher than KAP crystals.

  7. Crystallization Evolution of Cold-Sprayed Pure Ni Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cold spraying is a coating technology on the basis of aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. Spray particles (usually 1-50 μm in diameter) are accelerated to high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (preheated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval type nozzle. The coating forms through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on the substrate at temperatures well below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper, the main processing parameters affecting the crystallization behavior of pure Ni cold spray deposits on IN718 alloy are described. Various experimental conditions have been analyzed: gas temperature and pressure, nozzle to substrate distance. In particular, the study deals with those conditions leading to a strong grain refinement, with an acceptable level of the deposits mechanical properties. In precise spray conditions, a shift toward amorphous phases has been observed and studied. A systematic analysis of microstructural evolution, performed through TEM observations, as a function of processing parameters is presented.

  8. Crystallization Evolution of Cold-Sprayed Pure Ni Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-07-01

    Cold spraying is a coating technology on the basis of aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. Spray particles (usually 1-50 μm in diameter) are accelerated to high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (preheated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval type nozzle. The coating forms through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on the substrate at temperatures well below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper, the main processing parameters affecting the crystallization behavior of pure Ni cold spray deposits on IN718 alloy are described. Various experimental conditions have been analyzed: gas temperature and pressure, nozzle to substrate distance. In particular, the study deals with those conditions leading to a strong grain refinement, with an acceptable level of the deposits mechanical properties. In precise spray conditions, a shift toward amorphous phases has been observed and studied. A systematic analysis of microstructural evolution, performed through TEM observations, as a function of processing parameters is presented.

  9. Sub-micrometer-scale mapping of magnetite crystals and sulfur globules in magnetotactic bacteria using confocal Raman micro-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eder, Stephan H K; Gigler, Alexander M; Hanzlik, Marianne; Winklhofer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite Fe3O4 is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35-120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (<0.25 mW) to prevent laser induced damage of magnetite, we can identify and map magnetite by its characteristic Raman spectrum (303, 535, 665 cm(-1)) against a large autofluorescence background in our natural magnetotactic bacteria samples. While greigite (cubic Fe3S4; Raman lines of 253 and 351 cm(-1)) is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae), we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (S8: 151, 219, 467 cm(-1)), using green (532 nm), red (638 nm) and near-infrared excitation (785 nm). The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state. PMID:25233081

  10. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.

    2010-04-01

    Comparison of new TEM results with decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in ALH 84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  11. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose ori gins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated: that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  12. Growth and characterization of a pure and doped nonlinear optical L-histidine acetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen Kumar, P.; Manivannan, V.; Tamilselvan, S.; Senthil, S.; Antony Raj, Victor; Sagayaraj, P.; Madhavan, J.

    2008-05-01

    Single crystals of pure, Cu 2+and Mg 2+ doped L-histidine acetate (LHA) were grown successfully by slow evaporation technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out for the pure and doped grown crystals. Absorption of these grown crystals was analyzed using UV-vis-NIR studies, and it was found that these crystals possess minimum absorption from 200 nm to 1500 nm. The pure and doped crystals are characterized by Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman), thermal and photoconductivity studies. Vickers microhardness tests were carried out for the pure and doped crystals and the mechanical strengths were found. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss with frequency were also studied.

  13. Optical and electrical characteristics of pure and doped potassium hydrogen tartrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quasim, I.; Firdous, A.; Khosa, S. K.; Kotru, P. N.

    2009-08-01

    The optical and electrical characteristics of pure, sodium- and lithium-doped potassium hydrogen tartrate crystals grown by the gel technique are reported. An optical absorption study conducted in the UV-Vis range of 200-800 nm reveals the transparency of these crystals in the entire visible range but not in the ultraviolet range. The optical band gap of pure potassium hydrogen tartrate crystals is found to be dependent on doping by Na or Li ions. The non-linear optical behaviour of these crystals is reported and explained. The electrical properties of pure and doped potassium hydrogen tartrate crystals are studied by measuring electrical resistivity from 80 to 300 K. It is shown that while pure potassium hydrogen tartrate crystal is an insulator at room temperature (300 K), doping by Na or Li ions makes it a semiconductor. The results have been explained in terms of the variable range hopping model.

  14. The Verwey structure of a natural magnetite.

    PubMed

    Perversi, G; Cumby, J; Pachoud, E; Wright, J P; Attfield, J P

    2016-04-01

    A remarkably complex electronic order of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) charges, Fe(2+) orbital states, and weakly metal-metal bonded Fe3 units known as trimerons, was recently discovered in stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3O4) below the 125 K Verwey transition. Here, the low temperature crystal structure of a natural magnetite from a mineral sample has been determined using the same microcrystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction method. Structure refinement demonstrates that the natural sample has the same complex electronic order as pure synthetic magnetite, with only minor reductions of orbital and trimeron distortions. Chemical analysis shows that the natural sample contains dopants such as Al, Si, Mg and Mn at comparable concentrations to extraterrestrial magnetites, for example, as reported in the Tagish Lake meteorite. Much extraterrestrial magnetite exists at temperatures below the Verwey transition and hence our study demonstrates that the low temperature phase of magnetite represents the most complex long-range electronic order known to occur naturally. PMID:26908195

  15. Origin of magnetite crystals in Martian meteorite ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Clemett, Simon; McKay, David; Gibson, Everett; Wentworth, Susan

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. In-timately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate [1,2]. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate [3,4]. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterization of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our ob-servations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the carbonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates [5]. [1] McKay et al. (1996) Science 273, 924-930. [2] Thomas-Keprta et al. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98, 2164

  16. Cooling crystallization of aluminum sulfate in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxue; Sun, Yuzhu; Yu, Jianguo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the cooling crystallization of aluminum sulfate to explore the basic data for the recovery of aluminum resources from coal spoil. First, the metastable zone width (MSZW) of aluminum sulfate was reported. A parallel synthesis platform (CrystalSCAN) was used to determine the solubility from 10 °C to 70 °C, and an automatic lab reactor (LabMax) equipped with focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was adopted to determine the supersolubility. The effects of operating variables on MSZW were experimentally explored. Results show that the MSZW of aluminum sulfate decreases with increasing stirring speed, while it increases with increasing cooling rate. Second, the continuous crystallization kinetics of aluminum sulfate was investigated in a laboratory-scale mixed-suspension mixed-product removal (MSMPR) crystallizer at a steady state. Growth kinetics presented size-dependent growth rate, which was well fitted with the MJ3 model. Both the growth rate (G) and the total nucleation rate (BTOT) were correlated in the power law kinetic expressions with good correlation coefficients. Third, aluminum sulfate products were modified by sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS). Crystals with large sizes and regular hexagonal plate morphologies were obtained. These crystals reveal that SDBS can inhibit crystal nucleation and promote crystal growth.

  17. Origin of Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from our thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  18. New insights into the origin of magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approximately 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  19. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Growth and characterization of pure and glycine doped cadmium thiourea sulphate (GCTS) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, M.; Thomas Joseph Prakash, J.

    2012-06-01

    The pure and glycine doped cadmium thiourea sulphate (GCTS) single crystals were grown successfully by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The concentration of dopant in the mother solution was 1 mol%. There is a change in unit cell. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study confirms the incorporation of glycine into CTS crystal. The doped crystals are optically better and more transparent than the pure ones. The dopant increases the hardness value of the material. The grown crystals were also subjected to thermal and NLO studies.

  1. Study of radiation hardness of pure CsI crystals for Belle-II calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarintsev, A.; Boyarintseva, Y.; Gektin, A.; Shiran, N.; Shlyakhturov, V.; Taranyuk, V.; Timoshenko, N.; Bobrov, A.; Garmash, A.; Golkovski, M.; Kuzmin, A.; Matvienko, D.; Savrovski, P.; Shebalin, V.; Shwartz, B.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Zhilich, V.; Krumshtein, Z. V.; Nozdrin, A. A.; Olshevsky, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    A study of the radiation hardness of pure CsI crystals 30 cm long was performed with a uniformly absorbed dose of up to 14.3 krad. This study was initiated by the proposed upgrade of the end cap calorimeter of the Belle-II detector, using pure CsI crystals. A set of 14 crystals of truncated pyramid shape used in this study was produced at the Institute for Scintillation Materials NAS from 14 different ingots grown with variations of the growing technology. Interrelationship of crystal scintillation characteristics, radiation hardness and the growing technology was observed.

  2. Isolation of isoelectrically pure cholera toxin for crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Brenda D.; Westbrook, Edwin M.

    1991-03-01

    We have determined that the failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well results from its isoelectric heterogeneity, which is probably due to a post-translational process such as deamidation of its B subunit. Every sample of cholera toxin we have examined from commercial or academic suppliers has been heterogeneous; heterogeneous cholera toxin does not crystallize satisfactorily. We have overcome this problem by using ion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) to obtain an isoelectrically homogeneous species of cholera toxin. Homogeneous cholera toxin crystallizes readily, forming single, nonmosaic crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies. For this process, protein was applied to a MonoQ ion-exchange column, then eluted with an isocratic low salt buffer followed by a linear salt gradient (0-100 mM NaCl). Column fractions were analyzed on isoelectric focusing gels, and those fractions containing the desired homogeneous species were pooled and concentrated. Crystals formed within 24 to 48 h in a MOPS/PEG buffer, which made use of slow isoelectric precipitation to induce crystallization.

  3. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnbull, D.

    1979-01-01

    Crystal nucleation behavior in metallic alloys known to form glasses in melt quenching was characterized and from this characterization the possibility that massive amounts of certain alloys could be slow cooled to the glass state was assessed. Crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquid metals was examined experimentally, under containerless conditions, and theoretically.

  4. Thermodynamic Analysis Of Pure And Impurity Doped Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Crystals Grown At Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchimani, R; Zheng, W; Simon, S; Hope-Weeks, L; Burnham, A K; Weeks, B L

    2006-05-25

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) powders are used to initiate other explosives. During long-term storage, changes in powder properties can cause changes in the initiation performance. Changes in the morphology and surface area of aging powders are observed due to sublimation and growth of PETN crystals through coarsening mechanisms, (e.g. Ostwald ripening, sintering, etc.). In order to alleviate the sublimation of PETN crystals under service conditions, stabilization methods such as thermal cycling and doping with certain impurities during or after the crystallization of PETN have been proposed. In this report we present our work on the effect of impurities on the morphology and activation energy of the PETN crystals. The pure and impurity doped crystals of PETN were grown from supersaturated acetone solution by solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. The difference in the morphology of the impurity-doped PETN crystal compared to pure crystal was examined by optical microscopy. The changes in the activation energies and the evaporation rates are determined by thermogravimetric (TGA) analyses. Our activation energies of evaporation agree with earlier reported enthalpies of vaporization. The morphology and activation energy of PETN crystals doped with Ca, Na, and Fe cations are similar to that for pure PETN crystal, whereas the Zn-ion-doped PETN crystals have different morphology and decreased activation energy.

  5. Characterization and phylogenetic identification of a species of spherical multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes that produces both magnetite and greigite crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Yi-Ran; Du, Hai-Jian; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Pan, Hong-Miao; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of Gram-negative bacteria synthesizing magnetic crystals that allow them aligning along magnetic field lines. They have diverse morphologies including cocci, rods, vibrio, spirilla, and multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs). MMPs are composed of 10-57 cells with peritrichous flagella on their outer surfaces and swim as an entire unit. Here, we describe a species of spherical MMPs isolated from intertidal sediments of Lake Yuehu (Yellow Sea, China). They were mainly found in the subsurface layer of gray-black sediments. Microscopy revealed that these spherical MMPs were 5.6 ± 0.9 μm in diameter and composed of approximately 16-32 ovoid cells with a helical arrangement and peritrichous flagellation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the MMPs contained both bullet-shaped magnetite and irregular greigite magnetosomes that were arranged in chains or clusters. These MMPs displayed typical escape motility and negative phototaxis. The 16S rRNA genes of micromanipulation-purified spherical MMPs were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MMP species was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and displayed >2.8% sequence divergence with respect to previously reported MMPs. This is the first phylogenetic identification of a spherical MMP that produces both magnetite and greigite magnetosomes. PMID:25086260

  6. Single crystal growth and characterization of pure and sodium-modified copper tartrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quasim, I.; Firdous, A.; Want, B.; Khosa, S. K.; Kotru, P. N.

    2008-12-01

    Single crystal growth of pure and modified copper tartrate crystals bearing composition (Cu) x(Na) yC 4H 4O 6· nH 2O (where x=1, 0.77, 0.65; y=0, 0.23, 0.35) is achieved using gel technique. The optimum conditions required for the growth of these crystals are worked out. The morphological development of these crystals is studied using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The dominant habit faces of the grown copper tartrate crystals are (0 0 1) and (1 1 1). Calculation of the cell parameters using CRYSFIRE software suggests that the pure copper tartrate crystal belongs to orthorhombic system with space group P2 1/c whereas the modified copper tartrate falls under tetragonal system with the space group P4 2/nbc. The external morphological development is shown to remain unaffected in the modified copper tartrate. The stoichiometric composition of the crystals is established by EDAX analysis, CH analysis, FTIR spectroscopy and thermoanalytical techniques. Thermal analysis of the grown crystals suggests that pure copper tartrate is thermally stable up to 42.84 °C whereas the modified copper tartrate crystals are stable only up to 33.11 and 25.11 °C. Calculation of the percentage weight loss from the thermogram supplemented by EDAX/CH analysis and FTIR spectroscopy suggest that the chemical formula of pure copper tartrate crystal is CuC 4H 4O 6·3H 2O whereas the chemical formula for the modified copper tartrate crystals is (Cu) 0.77(Na) 0.23C 4H 4O 6·3H 2O and (Cu) 0.65(Na) 0.35 C 4H 4O 6·H 2O.

  7. Electrical resistance of single-crystal magnetite (Fe3O4) under quasi-hydrostatic pressures up to 100 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Takaki; Gasparov, Lev V.; Berger, Helmuth; Hemley, Russell J.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2016-04-01

    The pressure dependence of electrical resistance of single-crystal magnetite (Fe3O4) was measured under quasi-hydrostatic conditions to 100 GPa using low-temperature, megabar diamond-anvil cell techniques in order to gain insight into the anomalous behavior of this material that has been reported over the years in different high-pressure experiments. The measurements under nearly hydrostatic pressure conditions allowed us to detect the clear Verwey transition and the high-pressure structural phase. The appearance of a metallic ground state after the suppression of the Verwey transition around 20 GPa and the concomitant enhancement of the electrical resistance caused by the structural transformation to the high-pressure phase form reentrant semiconducting-metallic-semiconducting behavior, although the appearance of the metallic phase is highly sensitive to stress conditions and details of the measurement technique.

  8. Influence of Growth Conditions on Magnetite Nanoparticles Electro-Crystallized in the Presence of Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mosivand, Saba; Monzon, Lorena M. A.; Kazeminezhad, Iraj; Coey, J. Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by electrocrystallization in the presence of thiourea or sodium butanoate as an organic stabilizer. The synthesis was performed in a thermostatic electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes with an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate as electrolyte. The effects of organic concentration, applied potential and growth temperature on particle size, morphology, structure and magnetic properties were investigated. The magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, magnetometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. When the synthesis is performed in the presence of sodium butanoate at 60 °C, a paramagnetic ferric salt is obtained as a second phase; it is possible to avoid formation of this phase, increase the specific magnetization and improve the structure of the oxide particles by tuning the growth conditions. Room-temperature magnetization values range from 45 to 90 Am2kg−1, depending on the particle size, type of surfactant and synthesis conditions. Mössbauer spectra, which were recorded at 290 K for all the samples, are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe3−δO4, with a small excess of Fe3+, 0.05 ≤ δ ≤ 0.15. PMID:23685871

  9. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4)/Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardiyanti, Harlina; Suharyadi, Edi; Kato, Takeshi; Iwata, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Ribbon of magnetite (Fe3O4)/Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) nanoparticles have been successfully fabricated with various concentration of PVA synthesized by co-precipitation method. Particle size of nanoparticles Fe3O4 sample and ribbon Fe3O4/PVA 25% sample is about 9.34 nm and 11.29 nm, respectively. The result of Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) showed that saturation magnetization value decreased from 76.99 emu/g to 15.01 emu/g and coercivity increased from 49.30 Oe to 158.35 Oe as increasing concentration of PVA. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that encapsulated PVA given decreasing agglomeration, controlled shape of nanoparticles Fe3O4 more spherical and dispersed. Surface roughness decreased with increasing concentration of PVA.

  10. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, T.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2013-04-01

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV-visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated.

  11. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  12. Morphological Evidence for an Exclusively Inorganic Origin for Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.; McKay, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of magnetite crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 is the focus of a debate about the possibility of past (and present) life on Mars. McKay et al. originally suggested that some of the magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 are biogenic in ori-gin, because they are single magnetic domain, free of crystalline defects, chemically pure, and coexist with other metastable phases in apparent disequilibrium. Thomas-Keprta et al. reported that a subpopulation of magnetite crystals (approx. 25%) associated with carbonate globules in ALH84001 and magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 have similar morphologies with crystal elongation along the [111] crystallographic axis that they describe as "truncated hexa-octahedral" ([111-THO]) magnetite. Along with several other properties, the [111]-THO morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes), so that the presence of [111]-THO magnetite in ALH84001 may be evidence for past life on Mars.

  13. Longitudinal uniformity, time performances and irradiation test of pure CsI crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelucci, M.; Atanova, O.; Baccaro, S.; Cemmi, A.; Cordelli, M.; Donghia, R.; Giovannella, S.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    To study an alternative to BaF2, as the crystal choice for the Mu2e calorimeter, 13 pure CsI crystals from Opto Materials and ISMA producers have been characterized by determining their light yield (LY) and longitudinal response uniformity (LRU), when read with a UV extended PMT. The crystals show a LY of ~100 p.e./MeV (~150 p.e./MeV) when wrapped with Tyvek and coupled to the PMT without (with) optical grease. The LRU is well represented by a linear slope that is on average δ~ -0.6%/cm. The timing performances of the Opto Materials crystal, read with a UV extended MPPC, have been evaluated with minimum ionizing particles. A timing resolution of ~330 ps (~ 440 ps) is achieved when connecting the photosensor to the MPPC with (without) optical grease. The crystal radiation hardness to a ionization dose has also been studied for one pure CsI crystal from SICCAS. After exposing it to a dose of 900 Gy, a decrease of 33% in the LY is observed while the LRU remains unchanged.

  14. Growth and characterization studies of pure and tartaric acid doped benzilic acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilda, M. J. Jarald Brigit; Devarajan, Prem Anand

    2016-04-01

    The organic nonlinear optical crystals of pure benzilic acid (PBA) and tartaric acid doped benzilic acid (TADBA) single crystals were grown by using slow evaporation method utilizing dimethyl formamide (DMF) as a solvent. Transparent single crystals of PBA and TADBA of dimensions 9×4×1 mm3 and 7×5×2 mm3 were grown after thirty days. Lattice parameters and space groups of PBA and TADBA were evaluated using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Employing Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis, various functional groups in pure and doped crystals were ascertained. 1H and C13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis suggests the presence of hydrogen- and carbon-bonded network. Optical transparency of PBA and TADBA was investigated using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectral analysis whereas thermal properties of the grown crystals were studied by thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analyses. Second harmonic generation efficiency of PBA and TADBA was found to be 2.2 and 2.7 times higher than that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate.

  15. Growth and characterization of pure and doped KHP NLO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilagavathy, S. R.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.; Ambujam, K.

    2014-06-01

    Single crystals of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate doped with amino acid L-lysine were grown successfully by slow evaporation method. The concentration of dopant in the mother solution was 0.5 mol%, 1 mol% and 2 mol%. There is a drastic change in the morphology due to variation in doping rates which is also reflected in the X-ray diffraction data. The Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy study confirms the incorporation of L-lysine into Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate crystal. The thermal study indicates the dissociating nature of the crystal. The nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal has been confirmed by Kurtz-powder second harmonic generation test. The dopant of 0.5 mol% and 1 mol% shows higher second harmonic generation result than pure Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate. Results are discussed.

  16. Formation and Relaxation of Two-Dimensional Vortex Crystals in a Magnetized Pure-Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kiwamoto, Y.; Hashizume, N.; Soga, Y.; Aoki, J.; Kawai, Y.

    2007-09-14

    Systematic examinations are carried out experimentally about the contribution of background vorticity distributions (BGVD's) to the spontaneous formation and decay of ordered arrays (vortex crystals) composed of strong vortices (clumps) by using a pure-electron plasma. It is found that the BGVD level needs to be higher for an increasing number of clumps to form vortex crystals and that the number of the clumps constituting the crystal decreases in time as {proportional_to}{gamma}lnt in contrast to {proportional_to}t{sup -{xi}} with {xi}{approx_equal}1 as accepted well in turbulence models. The decay rate {gamma} increases with the BGVD level. The observed configurations of the clumps cover the theoretically predicted catalogue of vortex arrays in superfluid helium, suggesting a possible relaxation path of the crystal states.

  17. Infrared absorption spectra of pure and doped YAl3(BO3)4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, L.; Mazzera, M.; Beregi, E.; Capelletti, R.

    2009-02-01

    Several weak absorption bands have been observed in the optical absorption spectra of pure and rare-earth-doped YAl3(BO3)4 single crystals in the 3350- 3650 cm-1 wave number region. Two of them, peaking at about 3377 cm-1 and 3580 cm-1 in the 8 K spectra, appear in most of the samples. They are tentatively attributed to the stretching mode of OH- ions incorporated in the crystal during the growth. An additional absorption band at about 5250 cm-1 at 8 K has also been detected in almost all samples. The temperature and polarization dependences of these bands, and their possible origin, are discussed.

  18. Study on A.C. electrical properties of pure and L-serine doped ADP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, J. H.; Dixit, K. P.; Joshi, M. J.; Parikh, K. D.

    2016-05-01

    Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADP) crystals have a wide range of applications in integrated and nonlinear optics. Amino acids having significant properties like molecular chirality, zwitter ionic nature, etc. attracted many researchers to dope them in various NLO crystals. In the present study, pure and different weight percentage L-serine doped ADP crystals were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. The A.C. electrical study was carried out for palletized samples at room temperature. The Nyquist plot showed two semi circles for pure ADP indicated the effect of grain and grain boundary, whereas the doped ADP samples exhibited the single semi circle suggesting the effect of grain. The values resistance and capacitance for grain and grain boundary were calculated. The effect of doping was clearly seen in the grain capacitance and resistance values. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreased with increase in frequency for all samples. The Jonscher power law was applied for A.C. conductivity for pure and doped ADP samples. The imaginary part of modulus and impedance versus frequency were drawn and the value of stretch exponent (β) was calculated for all the samples.

  19. Signatures in magnetites formed by (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 thermal decomposition: Terrestrial and extraterrestrial implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lauer, Howard V.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2012-06-01

    It has never been demonstrated whether magnetite synthesized through the heat-dependent decomposition of carbonate precursors retains the chemical and structural features of the carbonates. In this study, synthetic (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 was thermally decomposed by heating from 25 to 700 °C under 1 atm CO2, and by in situ exposure under vacuum to the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope. In both cases, the decomposition of the carbonate was topotactic and resulted in porous pseudomorphs composed of oriented aggregates of magnetite nanocrystals. Both calcium and magnesium were incorporated into nanophase magnetite, forming (Ca,Mg)-magnetites and (Ca,Mg)-ferrites when these elements were present in the parent material, thus preserving the chemical signature of the precursor. These results show that magnetites synthesized in this way acquire a chemical and structural inheritance from their carbonate precursor that indicates how they were produced. These results are not only important in the determination of the origin of chemically-impure, oriented nanophase magnetite crystals in general, but they also provide important insights into the origin of the large, euhedral, chemically-pure, [111]-elongated magnetites found within Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Based on our experimental results, the chemically-pure magnetites within ALH84001 cannot be genetically related to the Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonate matrix within which they are embedded, and an alternative explanation for their occurrence is warranted.

  20. Single-step synthesis of well-crystallized and pure barium titanate nanoparticles in supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverón, Helen; Aymonier, Cyril; Loppinet-Serani, Anne; Elissalde, Catherine; Maglione, Mario; Cansell, François

    2005-08-01

    Single-step synthesis of ultra-fine barium titanate powder with a crystallinity as high as 90% and without barium carbonate contamination has been successfully performed under supercritical conditions using a continuous-flow reactor in the temperature range 150-380 °C at 16 MPa. To synthesize this bimetallic oxide, alkoxides, ethanol and water were used. The influence of the synthesis parameters on the BaTiO3 powder characteristics was investigated. The results show that the water to alkoxide precursor ratio, the reactor temperature and the Ba:Ti molar ratio of alkoxide precursor play a major role in the crystallization of pure and well-crystallized BaTiO3 nanoparticles. The continuous mode of operation without post-treatments for powder washing, drying or crystallization increase the industrial interest.

  1. Design of a broadband highly dispersive pure silica photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Subbaraman, Harish; Ling, Tao; Jiang, YongQiang; Chen, Maggie Y; Cao, Peiyan; Chen, Ray T

    2007-06-01

    A highly dispersive dual-concentric-core pure silica photonic crystal fiber is designed with a maximum chromatic dispersion value of about -9500 ps/(nm km) around the 1.56 microm wavelength region and a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 55 nm. The change in the dispersion-bandwidth product as a function of period is carefully studied by using the plane wave expansion method. The coupled mode theory matches well with the plane wave expansion method that was used to simulate the chromatic dispersion. This kind of a photonic crystal fiber structure is suitable for high-dispersion application in phased array antenna systems based on photonic crystal fiber arrays. PMID:17514284

  2. Comparison of optical properties of pure and doped lithium tetraborate single crystals and glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, G. D.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, S. G.; Tyagi, M.; Sen, S.; Tiwari, B.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2012-06-01

    High optical quality Li2B4O7 (LTB) single crystals and glassy phases of pure, doped (Cu, Ag) and co-doped with Cu+Ag have been grown by Czochralski crystal pulling and melt quenching techniques respectively. They were characterized through photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL), and UV-VIS-NIR transmission measurements. The PL of glass phase shows light yield comparable to that of single crystal. 80-85 % optical transmission in the range 350-800 nm revealed good optical quality of the glasses which is comparable to the single crystals though the glasses have higher cut off wavelength (lower energy). TL glow peaks of Cu doped LTB single crystal at 200 °C and for Cu+Ag co-doped LTB single crystals at around 170°C and 240°C are useful for the dosimetry applications and found to be linear in the range from 1mGy to 1kGy. However, in glasses no TL was observed in spite of a good PL yield.

  3. Release of gold-bearing fluids in convergent margin magmas prompted by magnetite crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weidong; Arculus, Richard J; Kamenetsky, Vadim S; Binns, Raymond A

    2004-10-21

    A relationship between convergent margin magmas and copper-gold ore mineralization has long been recognized. The nature of the genetic link is controversial, particularly whether the link is due to high-oxygen-fugacity (fO2) melts and fluids released from subducted slabs or to brine exsolution during magmatic evolution. For submarine, subduction-related volcanic glasses from the eastern Manus basin, Papua New Guinea, we here report abrupt decreases in gold and copper abundances, coupled with a switch in the behaviour of titanium and iron from concentration increases to decreases as SiO2 rises. We propose that the abrupt depletion in gold and copper results from concurrent sulphur reduction as a result of fO2 buffering, causing enhanced formation of copper-gold hydrosulphide complexes that become scavenged from crystallizing melts into cogenetic magmatic aqueous fluids. This process is particularly efficient in oxidized arc magmas with substantial sulphate. We infer that subsequent migration and cooling of exsolved aqueous fluids create links between copper-gold mineralization and arc magmatism in the Manus basin, and at convergent margins in general. PMID:15496920

  4. Rheology of Pure Glasses and Crystal Bearing Melts: from the Newtonian Field to the Brittle Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordonnier, B.; Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J. M.; Hess, K.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition remains a central question of modern geology. If rocks can be perceived as a granular flow on geological time-scale, their behavior is brittle in dynamic areas. Understanding rock failure conditions is the main parameter in mitigating geological risks, more specifically the eruptive style transitions from effusive to explosive. If numerical simulations are the only way to fully understanding the physical processes involved, we are in a strong need of an experimental validation of the proposed models. here we present results obtained under torsion and uni-axial compression on both pure glasses and crystal bearing melts. We characterized the brittle onset of two phases magmas from 0 to 65% crystals. The strain-rates span a 5 orders magnitude range, from the Newtonian flow to the Brittle field (10-5 - 100 s-1). We particularly emphasize the time dependency of the measured rheology. The materials tested are a borosilicate glass from the National Bureau of Standards, a natural sample from Mt Unzen volcano and a synthetic sample. The lattest is an HPG8 melt with 7% sodium mole excess. The particles are quasi-isometric corundum crystalschosen for their shape and integrity under the stress range investigated. The crystal fraction ranges from 0 to 0.65. Concerning pure magmas, we recently demonstrated that the material passes from a Newtonian to a non-Nemtonian behavior with increasing strain-rate. This onset can mostly be explained by viscous-heating effects. However, for even greater strain-rates, the material cracks and finally fail. The brittle onset is here explained with the visco-elastic theory and corresponds to a Deborah number greater than 10-2. Concerning crystal bearing melts the departure from the Newtonian state is characterized by two effects: a shear-thinning and a time weakening effect. The first one is instantaneous and loading-unloading cyclic tests suggest an elastic contribution of the crystal network. The second one

  5. Studies on gel-grown pure and strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, A.; Quasim, I.; Ahmad, M. M.; Kotru, P. N.

    2009-07-01

    Crystals of pure and strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate bearing composition (La) 1-x(Sr) xC 4H 4O 6· nH 2O (where x=0, 0.04, 0.10, 0.15; n=5,5,6,8) were obtained using gel method. The materials were studied using CH analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR, EDAX and thermoanalytical techniques. X-ray powder diffraction results analyzed by using suitable software suggest that while unmodified lanthanum tartrate has a monoclinic structure with the space group P 21, the entry of strontium into its lattice changes the system to orthorhombic with the space group P 2121. The unit cell volume is observed to decrease with increase in the concentration of strontium in lanthanum tartrate. Thermal analysis suggests that pure lanthanum tartrate starts decomposing at 41.31 °C whereas the strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate brings about better thermal stability which increases with an increase in strontium concentration. The percentage weight loss calculations from the thermogram supplemented by EDAX, CH analysis and FTIR spectroscopy suggest that both unmodified and strontium-modified lanthanum tartrate spherulitic crystals contain water of hydration; the amount of water of hydration being different for crystals with different content of strontium.

  6. Charge transport due to photoelectric interface activation in pure nematic liquid-crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliusi, P.; Cipparrone, G.

    2002-11-01

    We report a study of the crucial role of liquid-crystal-polymer interface on photoinduced transport and redistribution of charges in pure nematic liquid-crystal cells that exhibit a photorefractivelike effect. A stationary photocurrent that is 30% of the dark current has been measured for very low power illumination (few mW) and low applied dc electric field (about 0.1 V/mum). The experimental results indicate a clear dependence of the effect on the light wavelength. The absence of photocurrent in cells with only one component, liquid-crystal, or polymer, suggests that both are not intrinsically photoconductive, rules out light-induced charge injection by the electrodes, and indicates the polymer-liquid-crystal interface as the photoactive element in the effect. The photocurrent dynamics indicate the presence of various mechanisms. We suppose that the effect is due to photoinduced carriers injection through the liquid-crystal-polymer interface and recombination process with the counterions present on the opposite side. Different hypotheses are made and discussed.

  7. Magnetite as a prokaryotic biomarker: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Romanek, Christopher S.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2010-06-01

    Over the years, nanometer-sized magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals have been recovered from many modern and ancient environments including sediments and soils and even meteorites. In some cases these crystals have been used as "magnetofossils" for evidence of the past presence of specific microbes. Magnetite nanocrystals can be formed by a number of different biological and inorganic mechanisms resulting in crystals with different physical and magnetic characteristics. Prokaryotes (bacteria) biomineralize magnetite through two methods that differ mechanistically, including: biologically induced mineralization (BIM) and biologically controlled mineralization (BCM). Magnetite nanocrystals produced by BIM are known to be synthesized by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, are deposited external to the cell, and generally are physically indistinguishable from magnetite particles formed inorganically. BCM magnetites, in contrast, are synthesized by the magnetotactic bacteria and some higher organisms and are precipitated intracellularly as membrane-bounded structures called magnetosomes. These magnetites appear to have unique crystal morphologies and a narrow size range leading to their original use as magnetofossils. Because of the discovery of nanometer-sized crystals of magnetite in the Martian meteorite ALH84001, the use of these criteria for the determination of whether magnetite crystals could constitute a prokaryotic biomarker was questioned. Thus, there is currently great debate over what criteria to use in the determination of whether specific magnetite crystals are biogenic or not. In the last decade, additional criteria have been established (e.g., the Magnetite Assay for Biogenicity), and new tools and technologies have been developed to determine the origin of specific types of magnetite crystals.

  8. pH-responsive lyotropic liquid crystals for the preparation of pure cubic zirconia nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei Yan; Liu, Jin Rong; He, Zhang; Cao, Zhen Zhu; Li, Cai Hong; Gao, Yan Fang

    2016-07-01

    We present a lyotropic liquid crystal system consisting of SDS/Triton X-100/water at 25 °C. This system is respond to pH variations with a phase switch. When pH is altered from alkaline (pH 13) to acidic (pH 2) conditions, phase change occurs from a bicontinuous hexagonal phase to a partially hexagonal phase until it disappears. The hexagonal phase under alkaline conditions is stable. Thus, this system is an ideal candidate for the preparation of pure cubic ZrO2 nanoparticles. XRD results confirm that the as-synthesized powder is composed of pure cubic ZrO2. These nanoparticles also exhibit a thermal stability of up to 800 °C. The size and morphological characteristics of the nanoparticles are greatly affected by ZrOCl2 concentration. The mechanism of zirconia nanoparticle synthesis in a lyotropic hexagonal phase was proposed.

  9. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  10. Electrohydrodynamic Pattern Formation in Nematic Liquid Crystals by External Pure Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    Pure noise-induced electrohydrodynamic convections (EHCs) in nematic liquid crystals are presented in comparison with ac field-induced ones. There exists a characteristic cutoff frequency fc* of noise dividing EHC patterns qualitatively. Sufficiently colored noise with fc < fc* can induce a variety of well-ordered patterns such as Williams domains, fluctuating Williams domains, and grid patterns. The amplitude of the primary pattern (Williams domains) and its wavelength are investigated with varying intensity VN and/or cutoff frequency fc of noise. The present noise-induced EHCs are discussed on the basis of the conventional (ac-based) Carr-Helfrich mechanism.

  11. Swift Heavy Ion Beam Modified Behaviour of Pure and Doped TGS Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, P. K.

    2009-03-10

    Modifications due to swift heavy ion (SHI) beam irradiation on polar surfaces of pure and doped tri-glycine sulphate (TGS) crystals are investigated using dielectric, ferroelectric, optical and scanning force microcopy with varying ion beam fluence. The dielectric response becomes diffuse and the loss decreases, the optical band gap gets modified, the surface micro-relief's show pits and protrusions converting into regular hillocks of nano-dimensions. The results are interpreted considering that irradiation takes the crystal to a non-equilibrium state and generates thermal/charge flux leading to thermally generated internal field. The micro-relief is explained as a result of domain orientation; piezoelectric compression and stretching creating inhomogeneous force gradient at domain walls.

  12. Morphology evolution and pure red upconversion mechanism of β-NaLuF4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Li, Anming; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2016-06-01

    A series of β-NaLuF4 crystals were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. Hexagonal phase microdisks, microprisms, and microtubes were achieved by simply changing the amount of citric acid in the initial reaction solution. Pure red upconversion (UC) luminescence can be observed in β-NaLuF4:Yb3+, Tm3+, Er3+ and Li+ doped β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+. Based on the rate equations, we report the theoretical model about the pure red UC mechanism in Yb3+/Tm3+/Er3+ doped system. It is proposed that the pure red UC luminescence is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer UC from Tm3+:3F4 → 3H6 to Er3+:4I11/2 → 4F9/2 and the cross-relaxation (CR) effect [Er3+:4S3/2 + 4I15/2 → 4I9/2 + 4I13/2] rather than the long-accepted mechanism [CR process among Er3+:4F7/2 + 4I11/2 → 4F9/2 + 4F9/2]. In addition, compared to the Li+-free counterpart, the pure red UC luminescence in β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+ with 15 mol% Li+ doping is enhanced by 13.7 times. This study provides a general and effective approach to obtain intense pure red UC luminescence, which can be applied to other synthetic strategies.

  13. Morphology evolution and pure red upconversion mechanism of β-NaLuF4 crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Li, Anming; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2016-01-01

    A series of β-NaLuF4 crystals were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. Hexagonal phase microdisks, microprisms, and microtubes were achieved by simply changing the amount of citric acid in the initial reaction solution. Pure red upconversion (UC) luminescence can be observed in β-NaLuF4:Yb3+, Tm3+, Er3+ and Li+ doped β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+. Based on the rate equations, we report the theoretical model about the pure red UC mechanism in Yb3+/Tm3+/Er3+ doped system. It is proposed that the pure red UC luminescence is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer UC from Tm3+:3F4 → 3H6 to Er3+:4I11/2 → 4F9/2 and the cross-relaxation (CR) effect [Er3+:4S3/2 + 4I15/2 → 4I9/2 + 4I13/2] rather than the long-accepted mechanism [CR process among Er3+:4F7/2 + 4I11/2 → 4F9/2 + 4F9/2]. In addition, compared to the Li+-free counterpart, the pure red UC luminescence in β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+ with 15 mol% Li+ doping is enhanced by 13.7 times. This study provides a general and effective approach to obtain intense pure red UC luminescence, which can be applied to other synthetic strategies. PMID:27306720

  14. Morphology evolution and pure red upconversion mechanism of β-NaLuF4 crystals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Li, Anming; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2016-01-01

    A series of β-NaLuF4 crystals were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. Hexagonal phase microdisks, microprisms, and microtubes were achieved by simply changing the amount of citric acid in the initial reaction solution. Pure red upconversion (UC) luminescence can be observed in β-NaLuF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+), Er(3+) and Li(+) doped β-NaLuF4:20% Yb(3+), 1% Tm(3+), 20% Er(3+). Based on the rate equations, we report the theoretical model about the pure red UC mechanism in Yb(3+)/Tm(3+)/Er(3+) doped system. It is proposed that the pure red UC luminescence is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer UC from Tm(3+):(3)F4 → (3)H6 to Er(3+):(4)I11/2 → (4)F9/2 and the cross-relaxation (CR) effect [Er(3+):(4)S3/2 + (4)I15/2 → (4)I9/2 + (4)I13/2] rather than the long-accepted mechanism [CR process among Er(3+):(4)F7/2 + (4)I11/2 → (4)F9/2 + (4)F9/2]. In addition, compared to the Li(+)-free counterpart, the pure red UC luminescence in β-NaLuF4:20% Yb(3+), 1% Tm(3+), 20% Er(3+) with 15 mol% Li(+) doping is enhanced by 13.7 times. This study provides a general and effective approach to obtain intense pure red UC luminescence, which can be applied to other synthetic strategies. PMID:27306720

  15. Submicron Magnetite Grains and Carbon Compounds in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Inorganic, Abiotic Formation by Shock and Thermal Metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2003-06-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe3O4, reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered).

  16. Submicron magnetite grains and carbon compounds in Martian meteorite ALH84001: inorganic, abiotic formation by shock and thermal metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Allan H

    2003-01-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe(3)O(4), reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered). PMID:14577885

  17. Pure, single crystal Ge nanodots formed using a sandwich structure via pulsed UV excimer laser annealing.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ting-Wei; Chen, Hung-Ming; Shen, Kuan-Yuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2015-04-24

    In this paper, a sandwich structure comprising a SiO2 capping layer, amorphous Germanium (a-Ge) nanodots (NDs), and a pit-patterned Silicon (Si) substrate is developed, which is then annealed by utilizing a pulsed ultraviolet excimer laser in order to fabricate an array of pure, single crystal Ge NDs at room temperature. A wide bandgap SiO2 capping layer is used as a transparent thermally isolated layer to prevent thermal loss and Si-Ge intermixing. The two-dimensional pit-patterned Si substrate is designed to confine the absorbed laser energy, reduce the melting point, and block the surface migration of the Ge. After optimizing the laser radiation parameters such that the laser energy density is 200 mJ cm(-2), the laser annealing period is 10 s, and the number of laser shots is 10, pure, single crystal Ge NDs that have both a regular arrangement and a uniform size distribution are obtained in the pits of the Si substrates. The Raman spectrum shows a highly symmetric Ge transversal optical peak with a full width at half maximum of 4.2 cm(-1) at 300.7 cm(-1), which is close to that of the original Ge wafer. In addition, the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image for the Ge NDs and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction pattern shows a clear single crystalline structure without any impurities. PMID:25815515

  18. Pure, single crystal Ge nanodots formed using a sandwich structure via pulsed UV excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ting-Wei; Chen, Hung-Ming; Shen, Kuan-Yuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a sandwich structure comprising a SiO2 capping layer, amorphous Germanium (a-Ge) nanodots (NDs), and a pit-patterned Silicon (Si) substrate is developed, which is then annealed by utilizing a pulsed ultraviolet excimer laser in order to fabricate an array of pure, single crystal Ge NDs at room temperature. A wide bandgap SiO2 capping layer is used as a transparent thermally isolated layer to prevent thermal loss and Si-Ge intermixing. The two-dimensional pit-patterned Si substrate is designed to confine the absorbed laser energy, reduce the melting point, and block the surface migration of the Ge. After optimizing the laser radiation parameters such that the laser energy density is 200 mJ cm-2, the laser annealing period is 10 s, and the number of laser shots is 10, pure, single crystal Ge NDs that have both a regular arrangement and a uniform size distribution are obtained in the pits of the Si substrates. The Raman spectrum shows a highly symmetric Ge transversal optical peak with a full width at half maximum of 4.2 cm-1 at 300.7 cm-1, which is close to that of the original Ge wafer. In addition, the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image for the Ge NDs and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction pattern shows a clear single crystalline structure without any impurities.

  19. Crystal growth of pure substances: Phase-field simulations in comparison with analytical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Danilov, D.; Galenko, P.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model for non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent systems [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 64 (3) (2004) 775-799] consistent with the formalism of classic irreversible thermodynamics is used for numerical simulations of crystal growth in a pure material. The relation of this approach to the phase-field model by Bragard et al. [Interface Science 10 (2-3) (2002) 121-136] is discussed. 2D and 3D simulations of dendritic structures are compared with the analytical predictions of the Brener theory [Journal of Crystal Growth 99 (1990) 165-170] and with recent experimental measurements of solidification in pure nickel [Proceedings of the TMS Annual Meeting, March 14-18, 2004, pp. 277-288; European Physical Journal B, submitted for publication]. 3D morphology transitions are obtained for variations in surface energy and kinetic anisotropies at different undercoolings. In computations, we investigate the convergence behaviour of a standard phase-field model and of its thin interface extension at different undercoolings and at different ratios between the diffuse interface thickness and the atomistic capillary length. The influence of the grid anisotropy is accurately analyzed for a finite difference method and for an adaptive finite element method in comparison.

  20. Antimicrobial activity and second harmonic studies on organic non-centrosymmetric pure and doped ninhydrin single crystals.

    PubMed

    Prasanyaa, T; Jayaramakrishnan, V; Haris, M

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of pure, Cu(2+) ions and Cd(2+) ions doped on ninhydrin single crystals by slow solvent evaporation technique. The presence of Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) ions in the specimen of ninhydrin single crystal has been determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The powder X-ray diffraction analysis was done to calculate the lattice parameters of the pure and doped crystals. The percentage of transmittance of the crystal was recorded using the UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. Thermal behaviors of the grown crystals have been examined by the thermal gravimetric/differential thermal analysis. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show the minor variation in the hardness value for the pure and doped ninhydrin samples. The value of the work hardening coefficient n was found to be 2.0, 1.0 and 1.06 for pure, copper and cadmium doped ninhydrin crystals respectively. The second harmonic generation efficiency of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) doped ninhydrin is 8.3 and 6.3 times greater than well known nonlinear crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate respectively. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the title compound were performed by disk diffusion method against the standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillis niger and Aspergillus flavus. PMID:23266683

  1. Metamorphic Origin of Sub-Micron Magnetite Crystals in ALH 84001: Re-Evaluation of Equilibria, Thermochemistry, and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Essene, E. J.

    2010-04-01

    Treiman (1993) suggested that magnetite grains in ALH 84001 formed by decomposition of Fe-carbonate after a major impact event. Criticisms of this work (Thomas-Keprta et al.. 2009) lack merit, and demonstrate some pitfalls in the search for signs of extraterrestrial life.

  2. Metamorphic Origin of Sub-Micron Magnetite Crystals in ALH 84001: Reevaluation of Equilibria, Thermochemistry, and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Essene, E. J.

    2010-03-01

    Magnetite grains in ALH 84001, cited as evidence of martian life, could have formed abiotically by thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonates. Thomas-Keprta et al. (2009) criticize this abiotic hypothesis; their criticisms lack merit and do not disprove the hypothesis.

  3. Effect of non-hydrostatic conditions on the elastic behaviour of magnetite: an in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. Diego; Kantor, I.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Dubrovinsky, L.; McCammon, C.

    2007-11-01

    The high-pressure elastic behaviour and the pressure-induced structural evolution of synthetic magnetite were investigated up to 11.11(5) GPa by means of in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction with a diamond anvil cell, using the mix methanol:ethanol:water = 16:3:1 as pressure-transmitting medium and the ruby-fluorescence method for pressure-calibration. The evolution of the ruby R1-fluorescence line with P, with a drastic increase of the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the Lorentzian profile at P > 9 GPa, shows that the P-medium is not hydrostatic above 9 GPa. Such a condition is well reflected by the drastic increase (by 20-22%) of the FWHM of the diffraction peak profiles of magnetite, by the behaviour of the Eulerian finite strain versus normalized pressures plot ( f e - F e plot) and by the slight EoS-misfit. However, the diffraction data collected during decompression showed a reversible/complete restoration of the diffraction profiles and of the elastic behaviour in the f e - F e plot. The reflection conditions dictated by the Fdbar 3m space group confirm that symmetry of magnetite is maintained within the P-range investigated. The structural refinements performed at 0.0001, 4.99(3) and 9.21(8) GPa show that the evolution of the oxygen u-parameter is almost constant within the P-range investigated. A weighted linear regression through the data points gives only a slight negative slope and no discontinuity is observed within the P-range investigated. A similar continuous behaviour is also observed in the evolution of the T- and M-polyhedral volumes, bond distances and angles with P. On the basis of data reported in this study, it appears that the elastic behaviour and the structural evolution of magnetite is drastically influenced by the experimental conditions (i.e., hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic), and diffraction data of magnetite collected under non-hydrostatic conditions are unusable for a reliable description of the elastic behaviour and for the

  4. Trace elements in magnetite as petrogenetic indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, Sarah A. S.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Beaudoin, Georges; Méric, Julien; Boutroy, Emilie; Potvin-Doucet, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    We have characterized the distribution of 25 trace elements in magnetite (Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Sn, Hf, Ta, W, and Pb), using laser ablation ICP-MS and electron microprobe, from a variety of magmatic and hydrothermal ore-forming environments and compared them with data from the literature. We propose a new multielement diagram, normalized to bulk continental crust, designed to emphasize the partitioning behavior of trace elements between magnetite, the melt/fluid, and co-crystallizing phases. The normalized pattern of magnetite reflects the composition of the melt/fluid, which in both magmatic and hydrothermal systems varies with temperature. Thus, it is possible to distinguish magnetite formed at different degrees of crystal fractionation in both silicate and sulfide melts. The crystallization of ilmenite or sulfide before magnetite is recorded as a marked depletion in Ti or Cu, respectively. The chemical signature of hydrothermal magnetite is distinct being depleted in elements that are relatively immobile during alteration and commonly enriched in elements that are highly incompatible into magnetite (e.g., Si and Ca). Magnetite formed from low-temperature fluids has the lowest overall abundance of trace elements due to their lower solubility. Chemical zonation of magnetite is rare but occurs in some hydrothermal deposits where laser mapping reveals oscillatory zoning, which records the changing conditions and composition of the fluid during magnetite growth. This new way of plotting all 25 trace elements on 1 diagram, normalized to bulk continental crust and elements in order of compatibility into magnetite, provides a tool to help understand the processes that control partitioning of a full suit of trace elements in magnetite and aid discrimination of magnetite formed in different environments. It has applications in both petrogenetic and provenance studies, such as in the exploration of ore deposits and in

  5. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of pure and mixed gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, B.; Shah, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic moment and susceptibility measurements of single crystals of pure and mixed rare earth fumarates of gadolinium and terbium were carried out at room temperature. The experimental values of molar susceptibilities for Gd2 (C4H2O4)3·7H2O, Tb2(C4H2O4)3·7H2O and GdTb (C4H2O4)3·7H2O are 2.68×10-2, 3.89×10-2, and 3.18×10-2 (in emu mol-1 Oe-1), respectively. The calculated effective magnetic moments are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions on rare earth ions.

  6. Self-organized single crystal mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite films grown by infrared pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Figuera, Juan; Quesada, Adrián; Martín-García, Laura; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Prieto, Pilar; Muñoz-Martín, Ángel; Aballe, Lucía; Marco, José F.

    2015-12-01

    We have grown mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite epitaxial films on SrTiO3 by infrared pulsed-laser deposition. Diffraction experiments indicate epitaxial growth with a relaxed lattice spacing. The films are flat with two distinct island types: nanometric rectangular mounds in two perpendicular orientations, and larger square islands, attributed to the two main components of the film as determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The origin of the segregation is suggested to be the oxygen-deficiency during growth.

  7. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-09-14

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. As a result, this article highlights recent advances in the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization.

  8. Statistical Analyses Comparing Prismatic Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Globules with those from the Terrestrial Magnetotactic Bacteria Strain MV-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we use rigorous mathematical modeling to compare ALH84001 prismatic magnetites with those produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria, MV-1. We find that this subset of the Martian magnetites appears to be statistically indistinguishable from those of MV-1.

  9. Crystal Structure of Pure and Aluminous Calcium Silicate Perovskites at Mantle Related Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Shim, S. H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Meng, Y.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    CaSiO3-perovskite (CaPv) is believed to be the third most abundant mineral (5 wt%) in the Earth's lower mantle (LM). Subducted slabs contain 23 wt% CaPv at the LM related pressure (P) and temperature (T), where Al2O3 could be incorporated into the crystal structure of CaPv (AlCaPv). However, there remains important discrepancy between computations and experiments on the crystal structure of CaPv at high P and low T. Some computations have predicted a tetragonal I4/mcm structure with a pseudo-cubic axial ratio (cp/ap) greater than 1, while X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies have suggested a tetragonal P4/mmm structure with cp/ap ~ 0.995. Using Ne as a pressure medium, we conducted in-situ XRD of CaSiO3 and 5 wt% Al-bearing CaSiO3 in the laser heated diamond anvil cell at the GSECARS and HPCAT sectors of the Advanced Photon Source. Rietveld refinements are performed on the diffraction patterns of CaPv at 300 K and 20-60 GPa. Similar to previous studies, we observed splitting of the 200 and 211 peaks after T-quench in pure CaPv. However, unlike previous experiments, diffraction patterns were more consistent with a tetragonal I4/mcm structure with cp/ap ~ 1.005 than P4/mmm. All the previous diffraction patterns have been measured with an Ar or MgO medium, or even without a medium, while we used more hydrostatic Ne medium. Considering the small free energy differences among different perovskite structures, the crystal structure of CaPv may be very sensitive to non-hydrostatic stresses. In runs with AlCaPv, asymmetrical 200 peaks are found up to 60 GPa and 2200 K, showing that non-cubic could be still stable at mantle geotherm temperatures in AlCaPv. The extreme sensitivity of CaPv on deviatoric stresses may have important implications for the elastic properties of the mantle regions with strong deformations, because the elastic anisotropy can change with the crystal structure of CaPv.

  10. Study of a pure CsI crystal readout by APD for Belle II end cap ECL upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Aihara, H.; Borshchev, O. V.; Epifanov, D. A.; Ponomarenko, S. A.; Surin, N. M.

    2016-07-01

    A scintillation counter consisting of a pure CsI crystal and avalanche photodiodes (Hamamatsu APD S8664-55 and S8664-1010) has been studied for the upgrade of the end cap electromagnetic calorimeter of Belle II detector. An essential increase of the light output was achieved with wavelength shifters based on nanostructured organosilicon luminophores.

  11. Thermoluminescence in pure LiF crystals: Glow peaks and their connection with color centers

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, G.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Kalinov, V. S.; Voitovich, A. P.; Davidson, A. T.; Kozakiewicz, A. G.

    2008-09-15

    Nominally pure LiF crystals were irradiated with the same dose (0.85 10{sup 6} R) of gamma rays at ambient and low temperatures (-60 deg. C) and the resulting thermoluminescence (TL) is reported. Various optical and thermal treatments were applied in order to change the concentration of color centers (CCs). The effect of such treatments on the glow curves is observed. Knowing the coloration from optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements made on the same samples, we attribute many of the glow peaks (GPs) to the annealing of F center aggregates. For the present conditions of irradiation and dose, TL processes begin with decay of F{sub 3}{sup +} centers that display a GP at 164 deg. C. F{sub 3}(R) centers follow and are responsible for GPs at 193 and 228 deg. C. A GP at 263 deg. C is ascribed to F{sub 2} centers. Several peaks at temperatures in the range of 280-380 deg. C are associated with impurity perturbed F centers. A GP at 410 deg. C is associated with a complex of aggregated F and H centers. These attributions are accomplished by means of TL spectra, optical transmission spectra, and annealing procedures, and are critically discussed. The experimental data confirm the general trend of thermal stability of CCs, which decreases by moving from simple F centers to more complex ones, and the existence of exchange dynamics among CCs.

  12. Growth, mechanical, thermal and dielectric properties of pure and doped KHP single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Lakshmipriya.; Babu, D. Rajan; Vizhi, R. Ezhil

    2015-06-01

    L-Arginine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate and L-Histidine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The grown crystal crystallizes in orthorhombic system which is confirmed by single crystal XRD analysis. The grown crystals are subjected to thermal, mechanical and dielectric analysis.

  13. Highly crystalline porous magnetite and vacancy-ordered maghemite microcrystals of rhombohedral habit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercuta, Aurel; Chirita, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Porous crystals of magnetite and vacancy-ordered maghemite, rhombohedron-shaped, reaching 150 μm in size, and having remarkably large specific surface area (88.55 m2/g for magnetite, 40.14 m2/g for maghemite) were obtained via topotactical conversion, starting from hydrothermally grown siderite single crystals. The increase in density (from 3.9 g/cm3 for siderite to 5.24 g/cm3 for magnetite and 4.9 g/cm3 for maghemite) caused quasi-ordered internal pores-grains pattern, with mesocrystalline appearance. The X-ray Line-Profile Fitting-based microstructure analysis gave 64±6 nm and 84±8 nm for the average inner grains size in magnetite and maghemite. Structure and phase content analysis indicated high purity and crystallinity. Magnetic measurements indicated saturation magnetization (92.1 emu/g for magnetite and 85.5 emu/g for maghemite) approaching the upper limits reported for the pure bulk oxides.

  14. Investigation of thermophysical characteristics of SrMoO4 crystals, nominally pure and doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, P. A.; Skrobov, S. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Ivleva, L. I.; Dunaeva, E. E.; Shekhovtsov, A. N.; Kosmyna, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Thermophysical characteristics of SrMoO4 crystals (grown by the Czochralski method from intrinsic melts), nominally pure and doped with rare earth ions, have been investigated. The temperature and concentration dependences of the thermal conductivity are obtained for SrMoO4 samples containing Nd3+ (0.28, 0.56, 0.84, and 1.33 at %), Pr3+ (0.01 and 0.41 at %), Ho3+ (0.01 and 0.06 at %), and Ho3+ (0.13 at %) + Tm3+ (0.13 at %) in a temperature range of 50-300 K. The thermal conductivities are measured in the directions parallel and/or perpendicular to the crystal optical axis. The thermal conductivity of nominally pure SrMoO4 at 300 K in the direction perpendicular to the c axis has been found to be 4.2 W/(m K). The introduction of impurities of rare earth metals reduces the thermal conductivity of SrMoO4 crystals. The anisotropy of the thermal conductivity is weak. The measured molar specific heat C P ( T) of a nominally pure SrMoO4 crystal is 116.2 J/(mol K) at 300 K. The temperature dependence of the phonon mean free path l( T) in a SrMoO4 crystal is calculated for the temperature range of 80-300 K based on experimental data.

  15. Influence of downsizing of zeolite crystals on the orthorhombic ↔ monoclinic phase transition in pure silica MFI-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalan, Ihab; Michelin, Laure; Rigolet, Séverinne; Marichal, Claire; Daou, T. Jean; Lebeau, Bénédicte; Paillaud, Jean-Louis

    2016-08-01

    The impact of crystal size on the transition orthorhombic ↔ monoclinic phase in MFI-type purely silica zeolites is investigated between 293 and 473 K using 29Si MAS NMR and powder X-ray diffraction. Three silicalite-1 zeolites are synthesized: a material constituted of micron-sized crystals, pseudospherical nanometer-sized crystals and hierarchical porous zeolites with a mesoporous network created by the use of a gemini-type diquaternary ammonium surfactant giving nanosheet zeolites. Our results show for the first time that the orthorhombic ↔ monoclinic phase transition already known for micron-sized particles also occurs in nanometer-sized zeolite crystals whereas our data suggest that the extreme downsizing of the zeolite crystal to one unit cell in thickness leads to an extinction of the phase transition.

  16. Effect of swift heavy ion beam irradiation on the dielectric and ferroelectric properties of pure and cobalt doped TGS crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, P. K.; Shah, Deepak; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Effect of swift heavy ion (100 MeV O 7+ ion) beam irradiation on the temperature and frequency dependence of real ( ɛ') and imaginary ( ɛ″) parts of dielectric permittivity in pure and Co 2+ doped TGS crystals are analyzed. Irradiation with swift heavy ion beam changes the dielectric response considerably. Observed dielectric peak in irradiated crystals shifts towards lower temperature and broadens up; the reduction in peak value, shift in temperature and broadening changes systematically with fluence. The most interesting results of SHI irradiation are (i) the dielectric loss peak value ( emax″) in all crystals is invariably less in comparison to the value in unirradiated crystals (ii) the minimum value of dielectric loss peak ( emax″) occurs at different fluence in different crystals, and (iii) a second loss peak is observed below Tc in CTGS10 especially at higher fluence. It seems that irradiation creates/strengthens internal field in the crystals by orienting the domains through some mechanism that is not clear at present. The observed results could be explained if one presumes that irradiation annihilate the defects already present in the crystals by creating local charges and thermal gradient resulting into internal bias field. Ferroelectric hysteresis loops demonstrate the internal bias field developing in the SHI irradiated crystals. It is argued that SHI irradiation is a better alternate in comparison to cobalt doping in inhibiting dipolar switching in TGS crystal.

  17. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation. PMID:26348458

  18. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs. PMID:26843122

  19. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-02-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs.

  20. Critical Reexamination of Resonant Soft X-Ray Bragg Forbidden Reflections in Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Di Matteo, S.; Beale, T.A.W.; Joly, Y.; Mazzoli, C.; Hatton, P.D.; Bencok, P.; Yakhou, F.; Brabers, V.A.M.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, displays a highly complex low-temperature crystal structure that may be charge and orbitally ordered. Many of the recent experimental claims of such ordering rely on resonant soft x-ray diffraction at the oxygen K and iron L edges. We have reexamined this system and undertaken soft x-ray diffraction experiments on a high-quality single crystal. Contrary to previous claims in the literature, we show that the intensity observed at the Bragg forbidden (001/2){sub c} reflection can be explained purely in terms of the low-temperature structural displacements around the resonant atoms. This does not necessarily mean that magnetite is not charge or orbitally ordered but rather that the present sensitivity of resonant soft x-ray experiments does not allow conclusive demonstration of such ordering.

  1. Growth of large, defect-free pure C60 single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, R. L.; Ramirez, D.; Jiang, X.; Chow, P. C.; Diaz, C.; Matsuishi, K.; Moss, S. C.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Millimeter-sized single crystals of C60 were grown by sublimation of C60 powder in a vacuum for 6-24 h. The crystals had excellent facets, were free of C70 or solvent, and showed face-centered cubic symmetry with a very small mosaic spread down to 0.01 deg.

  2. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-09-14

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. As a result, this article highlights recent advances inmore » the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization.« less

  3. Magnetite and its production

    SciTech Connect

    Koebbe, E.R.

    1993-12-31

    The supply of high quality magnetite for the cleaning of coal using dense medium cyclones and vessels is of concern to all coal preparation operations. This paper describes the production of high purity magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) from a domestic underground mining operation in Missouri, Pea Ridge Iron Ore Company. Emphasis will be placed on the mining and processing of the magnetite ore into the various magnetite products required by coal preparation plants.

  4. An Alignment Medium for Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Pure DMSO: Liquid Crystals from Graphene Oxide Grafted with Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wen; Li, Gao-Wei; Cao, Jiang-Ming; Lei, Xinxiang; Hu, Mao-Lin; Sun, Han; Griesinger, Christian; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) have attracted attention in light of their great impact on the structural elucidation of organic molecules. However, the effectiveness of RDC measurements is limited by the shortage of alignment media compatible with widely used organic solvents, such as DMSO. Herein, we present the first liquid crystal (LC) based alignment medium that is compatible with pure DMSO, thus enabling RDC measurements of polar and intermediate polarity molecules. The liquid crystals were obtained by grafting polymer brushes onto graphene oxide (GO) using free radical polymerization. The resulting new medium offers several advantages, such as absence of background signals, narrow line shapes, and tunable alignment. Importantly, this medium is compatible with π-conjugated molecules. Moreover, sonication-induced fragmentation can reduce the size of GO sheets. The resulting anisotropic medium has moderate alignment strength, which is a prerequisite for an accurate RDC measurement. PMID:26890579

  5. Morphological and growth rate distributions of small self-nucleated paracetamol crystals grown from pure aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnie, S. D.; Ristic, R. I.; Sherwood, J. N.; Zikic, A. M.

    1999-12-01

    The growth rate dispersion of small paracetamol crystals nucleated and grown from pure solution was measured over the range of supersaturation, 0%< s<20%, in the three different crystallographic directions: [0 0 1], [1 1 0] and [0 1 0]. The results were fitted to three parameter log-normal and gamma distribution functions. The average growth rates obtained from these distributions were used to predict the morphological behaviour of an assembly of small paracetamol crystals as a function of supersaturation. It was shown that a columnar shape (dominant {1 1 0}) was formed in regions of low supersaturation while a plate-like form (dominant {0 0 1}) prevailed at high supersaturations. Using optical microscopy and X-ray topography, the potential causes for both the growth rate distribution and morphological change were investigated.

  6. Growth conditions, structure and superconductivity of pure and metal-doped FeTe1 - xSex single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawryluk, D. J.; Fink-Finowicki, J.; Wiśniewski, A.; Puźniak, R.; Domukhovski, V.; Diduszko, R.; Kozłowski, M.; Berkowski, M.

    2011-06-01

    Superconducting single crystals of pure FeTe1 - xSex and FeTe0.65Se0.35 doped with Co, Ni, Cu, Mn, Zn, Mo, Cd, In, Pb, Hg, V, Ga, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Sr or Nd into Fe ion sites have been grown applying Bridgman's method. It has been found that the sharpness of the transition to the superconducting state in FeTe1 - xSex is evidently inversely correlated with the crystallographic quality of the crystals. Among all of the studied dopants only Co, Ni and Cu substitute Fe ions in FeTe0.65Se0.35 crystals. The remaining ions examined do not incorporate into the crystal structure. Nevertheless, they form inclusions together with selenium, tellurium and/or iron, which change the chemical composition of the host matrix and therefore influence the Tc value. The small disorder introduced into the magnetic sublattice, by partial replacement of Fe ions by a slight amount of nonmagnetic ions of Cu (~1.5 at.%) or by magnetic ions of Ni (~2 at.%) and Co (~5 at.%) with spin values different than that of the Fe ion, completely suppresses superconductivity in the FeTe1 - xSex system. This indicates that, even if superconductivity is observed in the system containing magnetic ions, it cannot survive when the disorder in the magnetic ion sublattice is introduced, most likely because of magnetic scattering of Cooper pairs.

  7. Antimony oxofluorides - a synthesis concept that yields phase pure samples and single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sk Imran; Johnsson, Mats

    2016-07-26

    The single crystals of the new isostructural compounds Sb3O4F and Y0.5Sb2.5O4F and the two previously known compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 were successfully grown by a hydrothermal technique at 230 °C. The new compound Sb3O4F crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c; a = 5.6107(5) Å, b = 4.6847(5) Å, c = 20.2256(18) Å, β = 94.145(8)°, z = 4. The replacing part of Sb with Y means a slight increase in the unit cell dimensions. The compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 have not been grown as single crystals before and it can be concluded that hydrothermal synthesis has proved to be a suitable technique for growing single crystals of antimony oxofluorides because of the relatively low solubility of such compounds compared to other antimony oxohalides that most often have been synthesised at high temperatures by solid state reactions or gas-solid reactions. PMID:27402498

  8. Pure and Nd added NBT-BT single crystals - Growth and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundari, S. Shanmuga; Baskar, K.; Dhanasekaran, R.

    2014-04-01

    The lead free piezoelectric materials are secured an important place in the field of material science and engineering. In the present work single crystals of sodium bismuth titanate- barium titanate (0.94NBT-0.06BT) and 0.6 wt % of Nd added NBT-BT has been grown by flux method. The addition of 0.6 wt% of Nd shows the inhomogeneity in melt and the crystals collected from the top, middle and bottom portions of the crucible have been characterized for their structural and dielectric properties. The Nd concentration is found to be more in the crystals grown from the bottom portion of crucible and it was confirmed by optical and structural analysis. After the addition of Nd the color of the crystal changes form pale yellow to muddy green. The depolarization temperature (Td) and the temperature where the dielectric constant reaches its maximum (Tm) are increased from 442 K to 475 K and 595 K and 628 K respectively after the addition the of Nd in NBT-BT.

  9. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1982-01-01

    The undercooling behavior of large spheroids of Pd40Ni40P40 was investigated. By surface etching, supporting the specimens on a fused silica substrate, and successive heating and cooling, crystallization can be eliminated, presumable due to the removal of surface heterogeneities. By this method samples up to 3.2g with a 0.53 mm minor diameter, were made entirely glassy, except for some superficial crystals comprising less than 0.5% of the volume. These experiments show that a cooling rate of approximately 1 K/sec is adequate to avoid copious homogeneous nucleation in the alloy, and that by eliminating or reducing the effectiveness of heterogeneous nucleation sites, it is possible to form bulk samples of this metallic glass with virtually unlimited dimensions.

  10. Helium and neon diffusion in pure hematite (α-Fe2O3) crystal lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balout, Hilal; Roques, Jérôme; Gautheron, Cécile; Tassan-Got, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) has the corundum-type structure and is relatively present on Earth and Mars surface associated to ore mineral precipitation or as a weathering phase. He and Ne retention in such mineral has been intensively investigated experimentally because of the potential use of (U‑Th‑Sm)/(He‑Ne) chronometer and thermochronometer. Therefore, the He/Ne diffusion in hematite crystal is an important issue for the interpretation of (U‑Th)/(He‑Ne) thermochronometric ages. For this purpose an accurate investigation of helium and neon diffusion in hematite crystal lattice has been achieved by computational multi-scale approach. Different insertion sites and diffusion pathways are first characterized where the spin polarized density functional theory (sp‑DFT) approach coupled to the nudged elastic band (NEB) method is used to determine the migration energies between the insertion sites. Then, a statistical method, based on transition state theory (TST), is used to compute the jump probability between sites. The previous results are used as input data in a 3D random walk simulation, which permits to determine the effective activation energy and diffusion coefficient. Using the He/Ne diffusion coefficients, the closure temperature Tc has been calculated. For typical grain size of 100 microns, Tc will be of 116° C and 297° C for He and Ne atoms, respectively. These results Show that He and Ne atoms are highly retained in the crystal lattice at surface temperature. The obtained diffusion coefficients confirm that He/Ne retentively power in hematite lattice is very important, allowing a large range of different geological applications such the measurement of hematite crystallization ages on Earth and Mars.

  11. The I-Xe Age of Orgueil Magnetite: New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Meshik, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    I-Xe ages of Murchison and Orgueil magnetites were reported to be the oldest [1] and interpreted as the condensation time of the solar nebula. More recent measurements, conducted on a highly magnetic separate from Orgueil (but not pure magnetite), gave much younger I-Xe ages [2]. We have since performed new studies on two pure separates of Orgueil magnetite, confirming the later closing time of the I-Xe system in this mineral phase. In the previous work of Lewis and Anders [1] special attention was paid to the purity of the analyzed material. It was shown, that the trapped Xe resided mostly in hydrated silicates and the radiogenic 129Xe in magnetite [3]. Therefore, Orgueil was finely ground and stirred with a saturated LiCl solution for 8 days at 60 C to remove the silicate-magnetite intergrowth. Although this procedure yields magnetic fractions that are at least 90% pure [1], it could potentially contaminate the magnetite with iodine and produce noncorrelated 128Xe and spurious I-Xe ages. To avoid this possibility, in our first work with Orgueil we deliberately omitted separation in LiCl solution. Instead, the meteorite was ground into a fine powder and the highly magnetic fraction was separated with a hand magnet and was confirmed to be largely magnetite [2]. The new work, reported here, was done in order to confirm our previous results and investigate the effects of the LiCl treatment on the I-Xe system in magnetite.

  12. A comparative study on pure, L-arginine and glycine doped ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate single crystals grown by slow solvent evaporation and temperature-gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaboonmee, N.; Ramasamy, P.; Yimnirun, R.; Manyum, P.

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of pure, L-arginine and glycine doped ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate (ADP) were grown by both the slow solvent evaporation method and the temperature-gradient method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR). The metastable zone width for different saturation temperatures of pure glycine and L-arginine added solutions were carried out. The grown crystals were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical transmission, dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and Vickers microhardness. The DSC and TG curves of the grown crystals indicated that they were stable up to 200 °C. The XRD study confirmed the structure of the grown crystal. The optical transmission analysis revealed that the pure and doped ADP crystals had very high percentage of transmission in the entire visible region. The important optical parameters such as reflectance and extinction coefficients of the grown crystals were calculated. L-arginine and glycine were used as dopants to reduce dielectric constant of ADP. The a.c. resistivity and a.c. conductivity were calculated. Dielectric loss of the doped ADP crystals grown by the SR method is lower than the doped ADP crystals grown by the conventional method. Larger hardness value for the SR method grown crystals confirmed greater crystalline perfection.

  13. Remanence in authigenic magnetite: Testing the hydrocarbon-magnetite hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, R.D.; Crawford, L. )

    1990-04-10

    Paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, petrographic, and geochemical studies of hydrocarbon-saturated speleothems in southern Oklahoma indicate there is a relation between hydrocarbons and a chemical magnetization that resides in magnetite. The speleothems, which are composed of light and dark calcite bands, occur in caves of karst origin in the Ordovician Kindblade Formation. Vertebrate fossils interbedded with the deposits indicate they are Permian in age. The dark bands contain primary hydrocarbon-filled fluid inclusions. The dark calcites possess over an order of magnitude stronger natural remanent magnetization than the lighter bands which do not yield stable decay during demagnetization. Alternating field (AF) and thermal demagnetization of specimens of the dark bands reveal a Permian direction of magnetization (declination = 160, inclination = 3, k = 17, {alpha}95 = 5, n = 56). The results of rock magnetic experiments, and the fact that most maximum unblocking temperatures are below 580 C, suggest that the dominant component resides in magnetite. In some specimens stable decay to 640 C suggests the presence of a weak component residing in hematite. The presence of authigenic magnetite spheres in magnetic extracts of the dark calcites supports a chemical origin for the magnetization. Shallow burial depths probably eliminate the possibility of a thermoviscous magnetization. The occurrence of primary hydrocarbons seeped into the caves during precipitation of the speleothems and were trapped in the calcite crystals. The relationship between intensity of magnetization and hydrocarbon abundance leads the authors to propose that chemical conditions created by the hydrocarbons caused precipitation of authigenic magnetite and acquisition of the associated chemical remanence.

  14. Magnetite biomineralization induced by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Neal, Andrew L.; Rull-Perez, Fernando; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Fernandez-Vivas, Antonia; Iañez-Pareja, Enrique

    2010-02-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium capable of inducing the extracellular precipitation of magnetite. This precipitation requires a combination of passive and active mechanisms. Precipitation occurs as a consequence of active production of Fe 2+(aq) when bacteria utilize ferrihydrite as a terminal electron acceptor, and the pH rise probably due to the bacterial metabolism of amino acids. As for passive mechanisms, the localized concentration of Fe 2+(aq) and Fe 3+(aq) at the net negatively charged cell wall, cell structures and/or cell debris induces a local rise of supersaturation of the system with respect to magnetite, triggering the precipitation of such a phase. These biologically induced magnetites are morphologically identical to those formed inorganically in free-drift experiments (closed system; 25 °C, 1 atm total pressure), both from aqueous solutions containing Fe(ClO 4) 2, FeCl 3, NaHCO 3, NaCO 3 and NaOH, and also from sterile culture medium added with FeCl 2. However, organic material becomes incorporated in substantial amounts into the crystal structure of S. oneidensis-induced magnetites, modifying such a structure compared to that of inorganic magnetites. This structural change and the presence of organic matter are detected by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopic analyses and may be used as a biomarker to recognize the biogenic origin of natural magnetites.

  15. Characterisation of plastic zones around crack-tips in pure single-crystal tungsten using electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. D.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Roberts, S. G.

    2009-07-01

    Plastic zones around crack-tips in tungsten were characterised by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Pre-cracks were made in ~1mm square cross section beams of pure single-crystal tungsten using a spark erosion method. The beams were loaded at different temperatures to a range of stress intensity factors below the fracture toughness. High resolution EBSD patterns were recorded in a two dimensional array in the vicinity of the crack-tip on sectioned samples. Cross-correlation based analysis of these patterns was used to determine lattice rotations associated with the plastic deformation near the cracks. Crystal rotations in the plane of observation were found to dominate over rotations in other planes. For all specimens deformed above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature, plastic zones were found to extend from the crack tips on along narrow bands along {110} planes. The sizes of the plastic zones and their associated lattice rotations were determined as a function of loading history.

  16. Growth and scintillation properties of pure CsI crystals grown by micro-pulling-down method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuka, Daisuke; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Pejchal, Jan; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2012-05-01

    Single crystals of pure cesium iodide (CsI) have been grown from the melt using micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) method. Two kinds of crucible (graphite one and quartz one) were used for the growth and the grown crystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray rocking curve (XRC) analysis. The XRD analysis did not confirm any impurity phases and a sub-grain structure was observed for each sample in the rocking curve measurement. Under X-ray irradiation, strong STE emission peaks around 300 nm were observed together with some luminescence related to unintentionally present impurities. The STE emission peaks are characterized by fast decay times of several ns and about 20 ns which are interpreted as the on-center-type STE (VK + e) and off-center type STE (H + F) recombinations, respectively. The light yield of the STE-related emissions has been estimated to be 3000 ph/MeV. Other emission peaks were observed at 410 nm and 515 nm. The former one can be related to Br-contamination and it is characterized by a relatively slow decay time of 6 μs. Concerning the latter one at 515 nm, similar luminescence was observed for the water-doped CsI grown by Bridgman method.

  17. Anisotropy of Silicate-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, G. R.; Feinberg, J. M.; Renne, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic properties is a hallmark of silicate crystals with oriented iron-oxide inclusions. Strongly magnetic magnetite-bearing silicates (10-1 A m-1) are common components of gabbros and layered intrusions, contributing to local and regional magnetic anomalies. Additionally, these iron-oxide silicates hold the promise of being exceptional paleomagnetic recorders owing to their features of: physical/chemical isolation from altering fluids, chemical equilibrium with their silicate host, and long relaxation times (enhanced coercivity). However, anisotropy of remanence must be understood before these advantageous features can be utilized. Measurements of single crystals of clinopyroxene and plagioclase (10-4 g) show anisotropy in direction and intensity that directly reflect the crystallography of the silicate host. The host controls both the crystallographic orientation of the magnetite (magnetocrystalline anisotropy) and the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusion (shape anisotropy). We have found another source of anisotropy that involves an internal exsolution of ulvöspinel within titanomagnetite inclusions. This also reflects a host control as this second exsolution occurs along the magnetite \\{100\\}. This fixed wall shape anisotropy creates an array of interacting single domain magnetite parallelepipeds, parallel to \\{100\\}. Each of these anisotropies contributes to enhanced coercivity of remanence, which significantly exceeds the IRM saturation magnetization for magnetite (300 mT). The anisotropy of IRM (aIRM@ 1.1 T) of magnetite-bearing clinopyroxene and plagioclase shows clustering of directions, reflecting the mixture of variables that include: inclusion elongation direction and abundance, orientation of magnetite easy axes relative to the applied field, inclusion aspect ratio and diameter, and pre-existing magnetic domain structure. For pyroxene (monoclinic) with two arrays of needle-shaped magnetite inclusions, the aIRM is

  18. Trace elements in magnetite from massive iron oxide-apatite deposits indicate a combined formation by igneous and magmatic-hydrothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipping, Jaayke L.; Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur P.; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Holtz, François; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits are an important source of iron and other elements (e.g., REE, P, U, Ag and Co) vital to modern society. However, their formation, including the namesake Kiruna-type IOA deposit (Sweden), remains controversial. Working hypotheses include a purely magmatic origin involving separation of an Fe-, P-rich, volatile-rich oxide melt from a Si-rich silicate melt, and precipitation of magnetite from an aqueous ore fluid, which is either of magmatic-hydrothermal or non-magmatic surface or metamorphic origin. In this study, we focus on the geochemistry of magnetite from the Cretaceous Kiruna-type Los Colorados IOA deposit (∼350 Mt Fe) located in the northern Chilean Iron Belt. Los Colorados has experienced minimal hydrothermal alteration that commonly obscures primary features in IOA deposits. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) transects and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectrometry mapping demonstrate distinct chemical zoning in magnetite grains, wherein cores are enriched in Ti, Al, Mn and Mg. The concentrations of these trace elements in magnetite cores are consistent with igneous magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt, whereas magnetite rims show a pronounced depletion in these elements, consistent with magnetite grown from an Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. Further, magnetite grains contain polycrystalline inclusions that re-homogenize at magmatic temperatures (>850 °C). Smaller inclusions (<5 μm) contain halite crystals indicating a saline environment during magnetite growth. The combination of these observations are consistent with a formation model for IOA deposits in northern Chile that involves crystallization of magnetite microlites from a silicate melt, nucleation of aqueous fluid bubbles on magnetite surfaces, and formation and ascent of buoyant fluid bubble-magnetite aggregates. Decompression of the fluid-magnetite aggregate

  19. First-principles Exploration of Crystal Structures of Pure Iron at Earth’s Inner Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Tsuchiya, T.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2009-12-01

    Determining the structure of Earth’s inner core has been a long standing challenge for geoscience. Iron has been considered as a main composition of the inner core and expected to exist as an iron-nickel-light elements alloy there. In order to get some information about the structure of the inner core, pure iron has been also investigated by many experimental and ab-initio studies. Pure iron has been expected to take the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure at the inner core conditions (Jephcoat and Olson, Nature 325, 332-335, 1987.; Mao et al., Nature 396, 741-743, 1998.; Fiquet et al., Science 291, 468-471, 2001.; Uchida et al., J. Geophys. Res. 106, 21799-21810, 2001.). On the other hand, the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure (Mikhaylushkin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 165505-165508, 2007.) and the body-centered cubic structure (Vocadlo et al., Phys. Earth Planet In. 170, 52-59, 2008.) have been also considered as the candidate structures. In this study, first we explored the crystal structures of pure iron at 400 GPa by our originally developing algorithm for the structure exploration, Free Energy Surface Trekking (FEST). In FEST, using a minus sign of driving force acting on a simulation cell, we force a system to climb up to a ridge of a free energy surface (ascent-run). Then, flipping the negative driving force to an original one, we make the system go down to a neighboring potential well (descent-run). The more different directions we examine in the ascent-run, the more accurate topography we capture of free energy surface. For the exploration of the ultrahigh-pressure structures of pure iron, we used 16 atoms supercell and explored 64 pathways around the initial local minimum corresponding to hcp. As the result, 30 pathways lead to a complex hcp (chcp) structure, which has ABCACABCBCAB stacking with 12 layers. Other 33 pathways lead to hcp and 1 pathway fcc. The enthalpy of chcp was found higher than that of hcp but only by 4 mRy/atom and lower than

  20. Crystallography of magnetite plaquettes and their significance as asymmetric catalysts for the synthesis of chiral organics in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials [1]. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  1. Crystallography of Magnetite Plaquettes and their Significance as Asymmetric Catalysts for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  2. Magnetite nano-islands on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nathaniel; Zhang, Qiang; Rosenberg, Richard; Vaknin, David

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) of ex-situ iron nano-islands grown on graphene reveals that iron oxidation spontaneously leads to the formation of magnetite nano-particles - i.e, the formation of the inverse spinel Fe3O4. Fe islands have been grown with two different heights (20 and 75 MLs) on epitaxial graphene and we have determined their magnetic behavior both as function of temperature and applied external field. Our XAS and XMCD at an applied magnetic field of B = 5 T show that the thin film (20 MLs) is totally converted to magnetite whereas the thicker film (75 MLs) exhibits magnetite properties but also those of pure metal iron. For both samples, temperature dependence of the XMCD shows clear transitions at ~120 K consistent with the Verwey transition of bulk magnetite. XMCD at low temperatures shows a weak hysteresis and provide the average spin and angular-momentum moments, the dipolar term, and the total moment . In addition, manipulation and comparison of the XMCD data from both samples allows us to extract information about the pure iron nano-islands from the thicker sample. Ames Laboratory is supported by the U.S. DOE, BES, MSE Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. APS is supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Structure and superparamagnetic behaviour of magnetite nanoparticles in cellulose beads

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Jose R.; Bordallo, Eduardo; Canetti, Dora; Leon, Vivian; Otero-Diaz, Luis C.; Negro, Carlos; Gomez, Adrian; Saez-Puche, Regino

    2010-08-15

    Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles were obtained starting from a mixture of iron(II) and iron(III) solutions in a preset total iron concentration from 0.04 to 0.8 mol l{sup -1} with ammonia at 25 and 70 {sup o}C. The regeneration of cellulose from viscose produces micrometrical spherical cellulose beads in which synthetic magnetite were embedded. The characterization of cellulose-magnetite beads by X-ray diffraction, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy and magnetic measurement is reported. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the higher is the total iron concentration and temperature the higher is the crystal size of the magnetite obtained. Transmission Electron Microscopy studies of cellulose-magnetite beads revealed the distribution of magnetite nanoparticles inside pores of hundred nanometers. Magnetite as well as the cellulose-magnetite composites exhibit superparamagnetic characteristics. Field cooling and zero field cooling magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the superparamagnetic behaviour and the blocking temperature for the magnetite with a mean size of 12.5 nm, which is 200 K.

  4. Preparation and characterization of pure and Pr(III)-doped lead chloride single crystals grown by modified micro-pulling-down method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Král, R.; Nitsch, K.; Jarý, V.; Yokota, Y.; Futami, F.; Yoshikawa, A.; Nikl, M.

    2013-07-01

    Single crystals of lead chloride pure and doped with Pr(III) were grown for the first time using the modified micro-pulling-down method. Due to hygroscopicity of both lead chloride and doping Pr(III) chloride the standard micro-pulling-down apparatus had to be equipped with a removable protective chamber. Prepared single crystals 25 mm long and 3 mm in diameter were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and DSC thermal analysis. Optical and luminescence characteristics of lead chloride single crystals, such as absorption, radioluminescence, photoluminescence, and decay curves, were measured as well.

  5. Scaffold of Asymmetric Organic Compounds - Magnetite Plaquettes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Martinez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Life on Earth shows preference towards the set of organics with particular spatial configurations, this 'selectivity' is a crucial criterion for life. With only rare exceptions, life prefers the left- (L-) form over the right- (D-) form of amino acids, resulting in an L-enantiomeric excess (L-ee). Recent studies have shown Lee for alpha-methyl amino acids in some chondrites. Since these amino acids have limited terrestrial occurrence, the origin of their stereoselectivity is nonbiological, and it seems appropriate to conclude that chiral asymmetry, the molecular characteristic that is common to all terrestrial life form, has an abiotic origin. A possible abiotic mechanism that can produce chiral asymmetry in meteoritic amino acids is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts, as mineral crystallization can produce spatially asymmetric structures. Magnetite is shown to be an effective catalyst for the formation of amino acids that are commonly found in chondrites. Magnetite 'plaquettes' (or 'platelets'), first described by Jedwab, show an interesting morphology of barrel-shaped stacks of magnetite disks with an apparent dislocation-induced spiral growth that seem to be connected at the center. A recent study by Singh et al. has shown that magnetites can self-assemble into helical superstructures. Such molecular asymmetry could be inherited by adsorbed organic molecules. In order to understand the distribution of 'spiral' magnetites in different meteorite classes, as well as to investigate their apparent spiral configurations and possible correlation to molecular asymmetry, we observed polished sections of carbonaceous chondrites (CC) using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. The sections were also studied by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in order to reconstruct the crystal orientation along the stack of magnetite disks.

  6. Effect of magnetite on GPR for detection of buried landmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Remke L.; Borchers, Brian; Hendrickx, Jan M. H.

    2006-05-01

    Ferrimagnetic minerals such as magnetite and maghaemite can affect ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals. This may lead to false alarms and missed targets when surveying for the detection of buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). In most field situations ferrimagnetic mineral content is too low to affect GPR wave behavior. However, in soils and sedimentary material with magnetite-rich parent material large concentrations of magnetite can be found. This paper is a first systematic experimental effort to study the effects of large concentrations of magnetite for GPR detection of subsurface targets. We study the effects of (i) different homogeneous mixtures of magnetite and quartz sand and (ii) magnetite concentrated in layers (placer deposits), on the propagation behavior of GPR waves and reflection characteristics of steel and plastic balls. The balls are buried in homogeneous mixtures of magnetite and quartz sand and below a layer of pure magnetite. Important observations include that the simulated placer deposits did have a large effect on the detectability of balls below the placer deposits and that homogeneous mixtures had no significant effect.

  7. Insight into magnetite's redox catalysis from observing surface morphology during oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shu; Starodub, Elena; Monti, Matteo; Siegel, David A; Vergara, Lucía; El Gabaly, Farid; Bartelt, Norman C; de la Figuera, Juan; McCarty, Kevin F

    2013-07-10

    We study how the (100) surface of magnetite undergoes oxidation by monitoring its morphology during exposure to oxygen at ~650 °C. Low-energy electron microscopy reveals that magnetite's surface steps advance continuously. This growth of Fe3O4 crystal occurs by the formation of bulk Fe vacancies. Using Raman spectroscopy, we identify the sinks for these vacancies, inclusions of α-Fe2O3 (hematite). Since the surface remains magnetite during oxidation, it continues to dissociate oxygen readily. At steady state, over one-quarter of impinging oxygen molecules undergo dissociative adsorption and eventual incorporation into magnetite. From the independence of growth rate on local step density, we deduce that the first step of oxidation, dissociative oxygen adsorption, occurs uniformly over magnetite's terraces, not preferentially at its surface steps. Since we directly observe new magnetite forming when it incorporates oxygen, we suggest that catalytic redox cycles on magnetite involve growing and etching crystal. PMID:23763580

  8. Gd-DTPA Adsorption on Chitosan/Magnetite Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pylypchuk, Ie V; Kołodyńska, D; Kozioł, M; Gorbyk, P P

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of the chitosan/magnetite nanocomposites is presented. Composites were prepared by co-precipitation of iron(II) and iron(III) salts by aqueous ammonia in the 0.1 % chitosan solution. It was shown that magnetite synthesis in the chitosan medium does not affect the magnetite crystal structure. The thermal analysis data showed 4.6 % of mass concentration of chitosan in the hybrid chitosan/magnetite composite. In the concentration range of initial Gd-DTPA solution up to 0.4 mmol/L, addition of chitosan to magnetite increases the adsorption capacity and affinity to Gd-DTPA complex. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe adsorption processes. Nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and specific surface area determination (ASAP) methods. PMID:27030468

  9. Gd-DTPA Adsorption on Chitosan/Magnetite Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypchuk, Ie. V.; Kołodyńska, D.; Kozioł, M.; Gorbyk, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    The synthesis of the chitosan/magnetite nanocomposites is presented. Composites were prepared by co-precipitation of iron(II) and iron(III) salts by aqueous ammonia in the 0.1 % chitosan solution. It was shown that magnetite synthesis in the chitosan medium does not affect the magnetite crystal structure. The thermal analysis data showed 4.6 % of mass concentration of chitosan in the hybrid chitosan/magnetite composite. In the concentration range of initial Gd-DTPA solution up to 0.4 mmol/L, addition of chitosan to magnetite increases the adsorption capacity and affinity to Gd-DTPA complex. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe adsorption processes. Nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and specific surface area determination (ASAP) methods.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial activity of pure, Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped organic NLO l-arginine trifluoroacetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanyaa, T.; Haris, M.; Jayaramakrishnan, V.; Amgalan, M.; Mathivanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    Optically transparent Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped l-arginine trifluoroacetate (LATF) single crystals were grown from its aqueous solution using the slow solvent evaporation technique. The grown crystals were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction to confirm the monoclinic crystal structure. The percentage of transmittance measured using the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrophotometer was found to be more than 80% for doped crystals. The functional group analysis of the grown crystals has been made by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis was performed for the grown crystals. An atomic absorption study was carried out to determine the presence of Cu2+ and Cd2+. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show a significant variation in the hardness value between the pure and doped LATF crystals. The second harmonic generation measurements show that Cu2+ doped LATF is 2.8 times greater and Cd2+ doped is 2.6 times greater than KDP. The anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities of the title compound were performed using the disc diffusion method against standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus.

  11. Magnetite biomineralization in the human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschvink, J L; Kobayashi-Kirschvink, A; Woodford, B J

    1992-01-01

    Although the mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is precipitated biochemically by bacteria, protists, and a variety of animals, it has not been documented previously in human tissue. Using an ultrasensitive superconducting magnetometer in a clean-lab environment, we have detected the presence of ferromagnetic material in a variety of tissues from the human brain. Magnetic particle extracts from solubilized brain tissues examined with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and elemental analyses identify minerals in the magnetite-maghemite family, with many of the crystal morphologies and structures resembling strongly those precipitated by magnetotactic bacteria and fish. These magnetic and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements imply the presence of a minimum of 5 million single-domain crystals per gram for most tissues in the brain and greater than 100 million crystals per gram for pia and dura. Magnetic property data indicate the crystals are in clumps of between 50 and 100 particles. Biogenic magnetite in the human brain may account for high-field saturation effects observed in the T1 and T2 values of magnetic resonance imaging and, perhaps, for a variety of biological effects of low-frequency magnetic fields. Images PMID:1502184

  12. Pure low-frequency flexural mode of [011]c poled relaxor-PbTiO3 single crystals excited by k32 mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhu, Jiaqi; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-05-01

    Rhombohedral phase relaxor-PbTiO3 solid solution single crystals poled along [011]c exhibits superior lateral extensional piezoelectric response, which enables the excitation of a pure low frequency flexural mode with a bridge-type electrode configuration. For the ternary 0.24Pb(In1/2Nb1/2) O3-0.46Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.30PbTiO3 single crystal poled along [011]c, the electromechanical coupling factor of the flexural mode reached as high as 0.66, and the resonance frequency of this mode can be easily made in kHz range, making it possible to fabricate very small size low frequency sensors and actuators. We have delineated theoretically the coupling between flexural mode and other modes and realized a strong pure flexure mode.

  13. Comparison of magnetite nanocrystal formed by biomineralization and chemosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lei; Li, Shuangyan; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Fengmei; Huang, Jie; Chang, Jin

    2007-06-01

    Magnetite nanocrystal has been widely used in many fields. Recently, a new magnetite nanocrystal, called magnetosome, has been found in magnetotactic bacteria. In this article, we compared properties of magnetites prepared by co-precipitation with those of magnetosomes isolated from MSR-1 in detail, such as crystalline, morphology, crystal-size distributions, vitro cytotoxicity, and magnetic properties and quantified primary amino groups on the magnetosomes membrane surface by fluorescamine assay for the first time. From the results, it was clear that the magnetosomes might have potential in the biomedical applications in the future.

  14. Growth of phase-pure, crack-free single crystals and large-grained polycrystals of molybdenum disilicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossetti, M.

    1970-01-01

    High purity molybdenum disilicide crystals are prepared by zone melting sintered compacts. This method yields single crystals or polycrystals free from macrocracks which allow better measurement and evaluation of mechanical properties.

  15. Comments on recently published "L-threonine phthalate" and pure and doped "L-lysinium succinate" crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that the recently published papers on "L-threonine phthalate" (Theras et al. (2015) [2]) and pure and doped "L-lysinium succinate" (Kalaivani et al. (2015) [11,16]) misidentified the targeted compounds.

  16. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J M; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  17. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J. M.; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  18. Exsolution of Iron-Titanium Oxides in Magnetite in Miller Range (MIL) 03346 Nakhlite: Evidence for Post Crystallization Reduction in the Nakhlite Cumulate Pile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Christoffersen, R.

    2012-01-01

    MIL 03346 is one of the most mesostasis-rich nakhlites [1] and thought to have equilibrated at oxygen fugacities near the fayalite-magnetite-quartz oxygen (FMQ) buffer ([2,3]). Studies of FeTi oxides in nakhlites have led to additional constraints on their equilibration temperatures and fO2s [4,5,6,7]. Comparison of these results to fO2s calculated for shergottites indicates that nakhlites are among the most oxidized samples from the martian meteorite suite [2]. The mesostasis of MIL 03346 contains skeletal titanomagnetite. Several scientists noticed several years ago (e.g. [8]) that this titanomagnetite contains very fine oxidation-driven exsolution lamellae (Figure 1). However, the lamellae are so small that they cannot be characterized by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). Here we select several areas for focused ion beam (FIB) extraction, prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) foils, and identify and analyze the lamellae using TEM at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The resulting analyses are combined with previous work on nakhlites to interpret the thermal and oxidation history of this meteorite group.

  19. Ultrahigh efficiency laser wavelength conversion in a gas-filled hollow core photonic crystal fiber by pure stimulated rotational Raman scattering in molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Benabid, F; Bouwmans, G; Knight, J C; Russell, P St J; Couny, F

    2004-09-17

    We report on the generation of pure rotational stimulated Raman scattering in a hydrogen gas hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Using the special properties of this low-loss fiber, the normally dominant vibrational stimulated Raman scattering is suppressed, permitting pure conversion to the rotational Stokes frequency in a single-pass configuration pumped by a microchip laser. We report 92% quantum conversion efficiency (40 nJ pulses in 2.9 m fiber) and threshold energies (3 nJ in 35 m) more than 1 x 10(6) times lower than previously reported. The control of the output spectral components by varying only the pump polarization is also shown. The results point to a new generation of highly engineerable and compact laser sources. PMID:15447265

  20. Multiple ordering in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a self-consistent band calculation of the ground-state energy and charge orderings based on a tight-binding scheme in magnetite are presented. They show that below a critical (about 2.2) value of the ratio of interatomic Coulomb energy to bandwidth the lowest energy state has no order. Between this critical value and 2.5, the preferred state is multiply ordered.

  1. Synthesis, magnetic and ethanol gas sensing properties of semiconducting magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Al-Hazmi, Faten; Al-Tuwirqi, R. M.; Alnowaiser, F.; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.; El-Tantawy, Farid; Yakuphanoglu, F.

    2013-05-01

    The superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with an average size of 7 nm were synthesized using a rapid and facile microwave hydrothermal technique. The structure of the magnetite nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction (X-ray), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The prepared Fe3O4 was shown to have a cubic phase of pure magnetite. Magnetization hysteresis loop shows that the synthesized magnetite exhibits no hysteretic features with a superparamagnetic behavior. The ethanol gas sensing properties of the synthesized magnetite were investigated, and it was found that the responsibility time is less than 10 s with good reproducibility for ethanol sensor. Accordingly, it is evaluated that the magnetite nanoparticles can be effectively used as a solid state ethanol sensor in industrial commercial product applications.

  2. Synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates designed for controlled deposition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Galindo-Gonzalez, C.; Kasama, T.; Cervera, L.; Posfai, M.; Harrison, R. J.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    The behavior of magnetic particles in fluid environments is key to the acquisition of detrital remanence magnetization and is essential to a multitude of industrial applications. This study introduces a series of synthetic clay-magnetite aggregates whose physical attributes can be tailored for controlled depositional experiments. We describe the mineralogical structure and magnetic behavior of montmorillonite platelets coated with nanometer-scale magnetite crystals using both electron microscopy and rock magnetism techniques. Selected area electron diffraction of the magnetite and the montmorillonite host shows no evidence of preferred orientation or oriented aggregation. Grain size distributions of magnetite in three different clay-magnetite assemblages were directly measured using conventional bright-field transmission electron microscopy. The spacing of the magnetite grains and their three-dimensional distribution around individual clay platelets was imaged using a tomographic reconstruction generated from high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) images. The grain size distributions determined from the bright-field images and the tomographic reconstruction agree within error with estimates derived from magnetic granulometry techniques based on magnetic hysteresis and low-field susceptibility measurements. All three samples behave superparamagnetically at room temperature, and display increasing levels of single domain behavior as the samples are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures (- 195°C). Off-axis electron holography images show that superparamagnetic grains are also stabilized into flux closure structures at -195°C. The average spacing between adjacent magnetite crystals and the overall platelet shape of the aggregates creates an anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility that allows assemblages to align with external magnetic fields at room temperature. By adjusting the dimensions and concentrations of the magnetite grains in these aggregates, we can create

  3. Nanophase Magnetite and Pyrrhotite in ALH84001 Martian Meteorite: Evidence for an Abiotic Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr. III; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2006-01-01

    The nanophase magnetite crystals in the black rims of pancake-shaped carbonate globules of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al.that they are biogenic in origin. A subpopulation of these magnetite crystals are reported to conform to a unique elongated shape called "truncated hexa-octahedral" or "THO" by Thomas-Keprta et al. They claim these THO magnetite crystals can only be produced by living bacteria thus forming a biomarker in the meteorite. In contrast, thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate has been suggested as an alternate hypothesis for the elongated magnetite formation in ALH84001 carbonates. The experimental and observational evidence for the inorganic formation of nanophase magnetite and pyrrhotite in ALH84001 by decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate in the presence of pyrite are provided.

  4. Atmospheric ice crystals over complex terrain: Pure ice cloud conditions observed in CLACE2013 at Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenczek, Oliver; Fugal, Jacob P.; Bower, Keith N.; Crosier, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael J.; Henneberger, Jan; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Lloyd, Gary; Borrmann, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The CLACE2013 field campaign took place in January and February 2013 at the High Alpine Research Station, Jungfraujoch, in Switzerland. During this field campaign some events of atmospheric ice crystals in the absence of supercooled water droplets were observed. These included precipitation events from a cloud above and also ice crystals which likely formed in-situ under ice supersaturated conditions similar to "diamond-dust" events. From each event, approx. 1 hour of holographic measurements has been analysed (~1800 images with a 36x24x350 mm3 or ~0.3 L sample volume each). Ice crystals are detected and classified according to their shape to distinguish between different particle habit classes (e.g. columns and needles, plates, irregular crystals) and with this method, drifting snow and ice particles formed in-situ can be distinguished to a certain degree. The major axis length of detected ice particles varied between some tens of microns up to a few millimetres. Size distributions will be shown partitioned by crystal habit. Preliminary results show these ice particles appear similar to diamond dust events observed in Antarctica. For clarification of the meteorological conditions, we use the meteorological parameters from several instruments measured at the site as well as data from additional cloud hydrometeor probes and a ceilometer.

  5. Magnetite: What it reveals about the origin of the banded iron formations. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4 is produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, magnetite is a late magmatic mineral and forms as a consequence of the cooling of iron rich magma. Biotically, magnetite is produced by several organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria. Hematite, Fe2O3, is also produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, hematite rarely occurs as a primary mineral in igneous rocks, but is common as an alteration product, fumarole deposit, and in some metamorphosed Fe-rich rocks. Biotically, hematite is produced by several types of microorganisms. Biologically-produced magnetite and hematite are formed under the control of the host organism, and consequently, have characteristics not found in abiotically produced magnetite and hematite crystals. To determine if the magnetite and hematite in the Banded Iron Formation was biologically or abiotically produced, the characteristics of biologically-produced magnetite and hematite (concentrated from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum) and abiotically-produced magnetite and hematite obtained from Wards Scientific Supply Company, were compared with characteristics of magnetite and hematite concentrated from the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation (Ontario, Canada) using thermal and crystallographic analytical techniques. Whole rock analysis of the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed the presence of quartz, hematite, siderite and dolomite as the major minerals, and magnetite, greenalite, pyrite, pyrrhotite and apatite as the minor minerals. Analysis of a crude magnetic fraction of the Gunflint showed the minerals quartz, hematite, siderite, dolomite, and magnetite. Analysis of the crude magnetic fraction from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum revealed organic compounds plus hematite and magnetite. The mineral identification and particle size distribution data obtained from the DTA along with XRD data indicate that the magnetite and hematite from the Gunflint

  6. Plagioclase-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions From the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.; Wenk, H.

    2004-12-01

    Gabbros from the Main Zone of the 2.064 Ga Bushveld Complex have long been known to possess unusually stable magnetizations due to the presence of high coercivity, exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic pole for these rocks has been used to anchor apparent polar wander paths for the Kaapval craton during the Early-Mid Proterozoic. To better understand the rock magnetic properties of silicate-hosted magnetite inclusions, oriented paleomagnetic samples of gabbro were collected from quarries near Belfast and Rustenberg, South Africa, sampling the eastern and western limbs of the Complex, respectively. Plagioclase composition at both sites ranges from An55 (rims) to An65 (cores) based on optical and electron microprobe data. Four kinds of inclusions are present within the plagioclase: elongate magnetite needles, nanometer-scale magnetite particles (responsible for the "cloudy" appearance of some crystals), translucent brown hematite/ilmenite platelets, and colorless euhedral inclusions of pyroxene and/or feldspar. Magnetite inclusions are most abundant at the cores of the plagioclase crystals. Orientations of the needles and the platelets are crystallographically controlled by the silicate host. Although the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusions can occur in any of five possible orientations, only two or three of these directions dominates each plagioclase crystal. Alternating field demagnetization of bulk samples (NRM = 1.5 x 101 A m-1) shows univectorial remanence with average median destructive fields (MDF) of 115 mT (Belfast) and 90 mT (Rustenberg). AF demagnetization of single plagioclase crystals (NRM = 100 A m-1) also shows single component remanence with average MDFs >150 mT. The NRM coercivity spectra of single plagioclase crystals are indistinguishable from that of the bulk samples. When normalized to their abundance in bulk samples the magnetite-bearing plagioclase fully accounts for the NRM of Bushveld

  7. Magnetite morphology and life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Buseck, P R; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Devouard, B; Frankel, R B; McCartney, M R; Midgley, P A; Pósfai, M; Weyland, M

    2001-11-20

    Nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) in a meteorite from Mars provide the strongest, albeit controversial, evidence for the former presence of extraterrestrial life. The morphological and size resemblance of the crystals from meteorite ALH84001 to crystals formed by certain terrestrial bacteria has been used in support of the biological origin of the extraterrestrial minerals. By using tomographic and holographic methods in a transmission electron microscope, we show that the three-dimensional shapes of such nanocrystals can be defined, that the detailed morphologies of individual crystals from three bacterial strains differ, and that none uniquely match those reported from the Martian meteorite. In contrast to previous accounts, we argue that the existing crystallographic and morphological evidence is inadequate to support the inference of former life on Mars. PMID:11717421

  8. Magnetite morphology and life on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Buseck, Peter R.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Devouard, Bertrand; Frankel, Richard B.; McCartney, Martha R.; Midgley, Paul A.; Pósfai, Mihály; Weyland, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) in a meteorite from Mars provide the strongest, albeit controversial, evidence for the former presence of extraterrestrial life. The morphological and size resemblance of the crystals from meteorite ALH84001 to crystals formed by certain terrestrial bacteria has been used in support of the biological origin of the extraterrestrial minerals. By using tomographic and holographic methods in a transmission electron microscope, we show that the three-dimensional shapes of such nanocrystals can be defined, that the detailed morphologies of individual crystals from three bacterial strains differ, and that none uniquely match those reported from the Martian meteorite. In contrast to previous accounts, we argue that the existing crystallographic and morphological evidence is inadequate to support the inference of former life on Mars. PMID:11717421

  9. Natural Magnetite: an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongping; Zhong, Yuanhong; Liang, Xiaoliang; Tan, Wei; Zhu, Jianxi; Yan Wang, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous earth materials that have high adsorption capacities for toxic elements and degradation ability towards organic contaminants. Many studies have investigated the reactivity of synthetic magnetite, while little is known about natural magnetite. Here, we first report the reactivity of natural magnetites with a variety of elemental impurities for catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) and the consequent degradation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP). We observed that these natural magnetites show higher catalytic performance than that of the synthetic pure magnetite. The catalytic ability of natural magnetite with high phase purity depends on the surface site density while that for the magnetites with exsolutions relies on the mineralogical nature of the exsolved phases. The pleonaste exsolution can promote the generation of •OH and the consequent degradation of p-NP; the ilmenite exsolution has little effect on the decomposition of H2O2, but can increase the adsorption of p-NP on magnetite. Our results imply that natural magnetite is an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants in nature.

  10. Natural Magnetite: an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminant

    PubMed Central

    HE, Hongping; ZHONG, Yuanhong; LIANG, Xiaoliang; TAN, Wei; ZHU, Jianxi; Yan WANG, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous earth materials that have high adsorption capacities for toxic elements and degradation ability towards organic contaminants. Many studies have investigated the reactivity of synthetic magnetite, while little is known about natural magnetite. Here, we first report the reactivity of natural magnetites with a variety of elemental impurities for catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) and the consequent degradation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP). We observed that these natural magnetites show higher catalytic performance than that of the synthetic pure magnetite. The catalytic ability of natural magnetite with high phase purity depends on the surface site density while that for the magnetites with exsolutions relies on the mineralogical nature of the exsolved phases. The pleonaste exsolution can promote the generation of •OH and the consequent degradation of p-NP; the ilmenite exsolution has little effect on the decomposition of H2O2, but can increase the adsorption of p-NP on magnetite. Our results imply that natural magnetite is an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants in nature. PMID:25958854

  11. Evidence for exclusively inorganic formation of magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetite crystals produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacterium MV-1 are elongated on a [111] crystallographic axis, in a so-called truncated hexa-Octahedral shape. This morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes). A subpopulation of magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 is reported to have this morphology, and the observation has been taken as evidence for biological activity on Mars. In this study, we present evidence for the exclusively inorganic origin of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals in ALH84001. We report three-dimensional(3-D) morphologies for approx.1000 magnetite crystals extracted from: (1) thermal decomposition products of Fe-rich carbonate produced by inorganic hydrothermal precipitation in laboratory experiments; (2) carbonate globules in Martian meteoriteeALH84001; and (3) cells of magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1. The 3-D morphologies were derived by fitting 3-D shape models to two-dimensional bright-field transmission-electron microscope (TEAM) images obtained at a series of viewing angles. The view down the {110} axes closest to the [111] elongation axis of magnetite crystals ([111]x{110) not equal to 0) provides a 2-D projection that uniquely discriminates among the three [111]-elongated magnetite morphologies found in these samples: [111]-elongated truncated hexaoctahedron ([111]-THO), [111]-elongated cubo-octahedron ([111]-ECO), and [111]-elongated simple octahedron ([111]-ESO). All [111] -elongated morphologies are present in the three types of sample, but in different proportions. In the ALH84001 Martian meteorite and in our inorganic laboratory products, the most common [111]-elongated magnetite crystal morphology is [111]-ECO. In contrast, the most common morphology for magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 is [111]-THO. These results show that: (1) the morphology of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals associated with the carbonate

  12. Fluid-induced martitization of magnetite in BIFs from the Dharwar Craton, India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christiane; Orberger, Beate; Tudryn, Alina; Wirth, Richard; Morgan, Rachael

    2013-04-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) represent the largest iron deposits on Earth, which mainly formed in the Late Archean and Early Proterozoic. The complex geological history of BIFs makes it difficult to reconstruct the primary mineralogy and thus the initial depositional environment. Magnetite and hematite are the most important iron oxide minerals in BIFs. Magnetite (FeOFe2O3) comprising of both ferrous and ferric iron, easily undergoes transformation at low temperature. Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is often a result of the pseudomorphic replacement of magnetite, in the processus called martitisation. Despite the process of martitization having been widely studied, in both synthetic and natural magnetites, the mechanics of the transformation are poorly understood. What is generally agreed is that the transformation from magnetite to hematite occurs via a maghemite (g-Fe2O3) intermediate. The 2.9 Ga BIF from the Western Dharwar Craton, Southern India (a 500 m thick Archean BIF), is characterized by millimetric to centrimetric alternating white quartz and grey Fe-oxide bands. The Fe-oxide bands consist of martite crystals (~20µm) which represent the hematitisation of euhedral magnetite. The hematite crystals are in part euhedral, cubic shaped pointing to the replacement of magnetite. The crystals show a trellis pattern. Magnetite patches occur within the hematite. Raman spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, Curie balance and magnetic hysteresis analyses and FIB-TEM investigation indicate the presence of maghemite, and the presence of subhedral magnetite and interstitial hematite crystal. The latter are characterized by dislocation with fluid inclusions and high porosity zones. The magnetite grains contain lamellae and the interfaces between magnetite-maghemite and hematite are curved suggesting grain boundary migrations with the growth of hematite at the expense of magnetite and maghemite. It is thus suggested that martite result from low-T exsolutions along cleavage resulting in

  13. Crystal Plasticity Analysis of Texture Evolution of Pure Aluminum During Processing by a New Severe Plastic Deformation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajezade, Ali; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2016-02-01

    Texture evolution in a newly developed severe plastic deformation technique, named multi-axial incremental forging and shearing (MAIFS), was studied applying the visco-plastic self-consistent crystal plasticity formulation by consideration of macroscopic deformation history. The simulated texture evolutions revealed that although shear-like texture had developed by the MAIFS process, texture components rotated around normal to mid-plane section. This could be ascribed to the complex deformation history that naturally develops during processing by the MAIFS process. The increased complexity of the deformation history in the MAIFS process, compared to the techniques that are solely based on the simple shear deformation, causes more activated slip planes, which in turn can result in an enhanced grain refinement ability of this processing technique.

  14. A Comparison between Chemical Synthesis Magnetite Nanoparticles and Biosynthesis Magnetite

    PubMed Central

    Kahani, Seyed Abolghasem; Yagini, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of Fe3O4 from ferrous salt by air in alkaline aqueous solution at various temperatures was proposed. The synthetic magnetites have different particle size distributions. We studied the properties of the magnetite prepared by chemical methods compared with magnetotactic bacterial nanoparticles. The results show that crystallite size, morphology, and particle size distribution of chemically prepared magnetite at 293 K are similar to biosynthesis of magnetite. The new preparation of Fe3O4 helps to explain the mechanism of formation of magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectra, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:24982609

  15. A Comparison between Chemical Synthesis Magnetite Nanoparticles and Biosynthesis Magnetite.

    PubMed

    Kahani, Seyed Abolghasem; Yagini, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of Fe3O4 from ferrous salt by air in alkaline aqueous solution at various temperatures was proposed. The synthetic magnetites have different particle size distributions. We studied the properties of the magnetite prepared by chemical methods compared with magnetotactic bacterial nanoparticles. The results show that crystallite size, morphology, and particle size distribution of chemically prepared magnetite at 293 K are similar to biosynthesis of magnetite. The new preparation of Fe3O4 helps to explain the mechanism of formation of magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectra, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:24982609

  16. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Razavi, Mehdi; E Bahrololoom, Mohammad; Bazargan-Lari, Reza; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Kotturi, Hari; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe3O4) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan. PMID:27157760

  17. Electrical resistivity study of Magnetite under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Takaki; Struzhkin, Viktor; Gasparov, Lev

    2014-03-01

    Magnetite is known as one of the oldest magnetic materials and crystallizes in the inversed spinel structure. At about 120 K magnetite undergoes a structural phase transition called Verway transition where electrical resistivity abruptly increases with decreasing temperature. Pressure effects of Verway transition studied by magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity by several groups revealed Verway transition decreased with pressure and the precise pressure effects depend on the pressure condition i.e., pressure transmitting media. In this work, electrical resistivity measurements were made to revisit the property of magnetite under pressure. Both metallization observed in precedent work using cubic anvil press and the higher pressure properties beyond metallization are examined by diamond anvil cell.

  18. Synthesis of stabilized myrrh-capped hydrocolloidal magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A

    2014-01-01

    Herein we report a new method for synthesizing stabilized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) colloids. A new class of monodisperse water-soluble magnetite nano-particles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The ferrous and ferric ions were hydrolyzed at low temperature at pH 9 in the presence of iodine to produce iron oxide nanoparticles. The natural product myrrh gum was used as capping agent to produce highly dispersed coated magnetite nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogel was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to examine the crystal structure of the produced magnetite nanoparticles. PMID:25090117

  19. Hydrothermal Preparation of Apatite Composite with Magnetite or Anatase

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Setsuaki; Ishida, Emile H.; Ioku, Koji

    2006-05-15

    Microstructure designed porous hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) composites with magnetite (Fe3O4) particles or anatase (TiO2) dispersion were prepared by hydrothermal treatment. These composites had micro-pores of about 0.1-0.5 {mu}m in size. Magnetite / Hydroxyapatite composites should be suitable for medical treatment of cancer, especially in bones, because HA can bond to bones directly and magnetite can generate heat. They must be used for hyperthermia therapies of cancer in bones. Meanwhile, anatase / Hydroxyapatite composite should be suitable for environmental purification, because HA rod-shape particles expose the specific crystal face, which adsorbs organic contaminants and so on.

  20. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D; Kopp, Robert E; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V; Sears, S Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-11-18

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 microm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 microm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability--a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming--drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes. PMID:18936486

  1. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D.; Kopp, Robert E.; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Sears, S. Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M.; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 μm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 μm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability—a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming—drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes. PMID:18936486

  2. The transformation of magnetite to hematite and its influence on the rheology of iron oxide rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Barbosa, Paola; Goncalves, Fabio; Rodrigues, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Phase transformation is an important process for strain localization after the initiation of ductile shear zones. In polyphase aggregates one important aspect to consider is likely to be the interconnectivity of weak phase after the transformation of the load-bearing framework grains. However the physical processes involved in that transition is not well understood, partially because the microstructures of the initial weakening are generally obliterated by subsequent deformation. Iron oxide-quartz rocks from paleoproterozoic Iron Formations in southern Brazil preserve microstructures that allow a good insight into the evolution of the deformation mechanisms and fabrics during the transition from a load-bearing framework (magnetite) to an interconnected weak phase (hematite). We conducted microstructural and textural analyses of aggregates of magnetite and hematite combining observations in an optical microscope and measurements in the electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD). The samples were cut parallel to the mineral lineation (the X-axis) and perpendicular to the foliation. Our goal was to understand the evolution of fabric and texture of the iron oxide aggregates caused by the change in deformation behavior resulting from the phase transformation. The studied samples consist mainly of aggregates of magnetite and hematite in a varied proportions. Samples that preserve the early microstructures consist in aggregate of magnetite grains of varied sizes. The grains are partially transformed to hematite along {111} planes but no foliation is observed in the samples. Basically the samples consist of grains of irregular shapes and a weak or absent crystallographic preferred orientation. The newly transformed hematite crystals share the (0001) planes and directions <11-20> with planes {111} and directions <110> of magnetite grains. Other samples present relicts of initial magnetite grains surrounded by a matrix of tabular to platy hematite crystals. The matrix show a

  3. Incorporation and retention of 99-Tc(IV) in magnetite under high pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Timothy A; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Bots, Pieter; Parry, Stephen A; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-10-21

    Technetium incorporation into magnetite and its behavior during subsequent oxidation has been investigated at high pH to determine the technetium retention mechanism(s) on formation and oxidative perturbation of magnetite in systems relevant to radioactive waste disposal. Ferrihydrite was exposed to Tc(VII)(aq) containing cement leachates (pH 10.5-13.1), and crystallization of magnetite was induced via addition of Fe(II)aq. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical extraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques provided direct evidence that Tc(VII) was reduced and incorporated into the magnetite structure. Subsequent air oxidation of the magnetite particles for up to 152 days resulted in only limited remobilization of the incorporated Tc(IV). Analysis of both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data indicated that the Tc(IV) was predominantly incorporated into the magnetite octahedral site in all systems studied. On reoxidation in air, the incorporated Tc(IV) was recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution with less than 40% remobilization to solution despite significant oxidation of the magnetite to maghemite/goethite: All solid associated Tc remained as Tc(IV). The results of this study provide the first direct evidence for significant Tc(IV) incorporation into the magnetite structure and confirm that magnetite incorporated Tc(IV) is recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution. Immobilization of Tc(VII) by reduction and incorporation into magnetite at high pH and with significant stability upon reoxidation has clear and important implications for limiting technetium migration under conditions where magnetite is formed including in geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:25236360

  4. Intermediate magnetite formation during dehydration of goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Özden; Dunlop, David J.

    2000-04-01

    The dehydration of goethite has been studied by low-temperature induced magnetization (LTIM) and X-ray diffraction on well-characterized acicular crystals. Fresh samples were heated in air to temperatures between 155°C and 610°C. Goethite and hematite were the magnetically dominant phases after all runs except 500°C and 610°C, for which only hematite was found. However, partially dehydrated goethites after the 238-402°C runs had broad peaks or inflections in the LTIM curves around 120 K, suggesting the formation of an intermediate spinel phase. These samples were next given a saturation remanence in a field of 2 T at 10 K and the remanence was measured continuously during zero-field warming to 300 K. There was a decrease in remanence at the Verwey transition (120 K), diagnostic of magnetite. The possible formation of a small amount of magnetite is of serious concern in studies of goethite-bearing sediments and rocks. Chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) of this strongly magnetic spinel phase could significantly modify the direction as well as the intensity of the original goethite CRM. As well, it would be a new source of paleomagnetic noise as far as primary remanence carried by other mineral phases is concerned.

  5. Hydrogen-bond-dynamics-based switching of conductivity and magnetism: a phase transition caused by deuterium and electron transfer in a hydrogen-bonded purely organic conductor crystal.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akira; Yamada, Shota; Isono, Takayuki; Kamo, Hiromichi; Nakao, Akiko; Kumai, Reiji; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Nishio, Yutaka; Mori, Hatsumi

    2014-08-27

    A hydrogen bond (H-bond) is one of the most fundamental and important noncovalent interactions in chemistry, biology, physics, and all other molecular sciences. Especially, the dynamics of a proton or a hydrogen atom in the H-bond has attracted increasing attention, because it plays a crucial role in (bio)chemical reactions and some physical properties, such as dielectricity and proton conductivity. Here we report unprecedented H-bond-dynamics-based switching of electrical conductivity and magnetism in a H-bonded purely organic conductor crystal, κ-D3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-D). This novel crystal κ-D, a deuterated analogue of κ-H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-H), is composed only of a H-bonded molecular unit, in which two crystallographically equivalent catechol-fused ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (Cat-EDT-TTF) skeletons with a +0.5 charge are linked by a symmetric anionic [O···D···O](-1)-type strong H-bond. Although the deuterated and parent hydrogen systems, κ-D and κ-H, are isostructural paramagnetic semiconductors with a dimer-Mott-type electronic structure at room temperature (space group: C2/c), only κ-D undergoes a phase transition at 185 K, to change to a nonmagnetic insulator with a charge-ordered electronic structure (space group: P1). The X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrates that this dramatic switching of the electronic structure and physical properties originates from deuterium transfer or displacement within the H-bond accompanied by electron transfer between the Cat-EDT-TTF π-systems, proving that the H-bonded deuterium dynamics and the conducting TTF π-electron are cooperatively coupled. Furthermore, the reason why this unique phase transition occurs only in κ-D is qualitatively discussed in terms of the H/D isotope effect on the H-bond geometry and potential energy curve. PMID:25127315

  6. Site-specific magnetization reversal studies of magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, A.; Haskel, D.; Lang, J. C.; Islam, Z.; Srajer, G.; Ankudinov, A.; Subias, G.; Garcia, J.

    2006-04-01

    The mechanism of magnetization reversal in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) single crystals was studied using site-specific magnetic sensitive diffraction anomalous near-edge structure. By exploiting the angular dependence of the cross section, we are able to show that the mechanism of reversal involves a mixture of coherent rotation and domain formation. The results reveal additional details to that provided by XMCD measurements, which average over nonequivalent sites.

  7. Structural insight into magnetochrome-mediated magnetite biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Siponen, Marina I; Legrand, Pierre; Widdrat, Marc; Jones, Stephanie R; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Chang, Michelle C Y; Faivre, Damien; Arnoux, Pascal; Pignol, David

    2013-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria align along the Earth's magnetic field using an organelle called the magnetosome, a biomineralized magnetite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2O4) or greigite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2S4) crystal embedded in a lipid vesicle. Although the need for both iron(II) and iron(III) is clear, little is known about the biological mechanisms controlling their ratio. Here we present the structure of the magnetosome-associated protein MamP and find that it is built on a unique arrangement of a self-plugged PDZ domain fused to two magnetochrome domains, defining a new class of c-type cytochrome exclusively found in magnetotactic bacteria. Mutational analysis, enzyme kinetics, co-crystallization with iron(II) and an in vitro MamP-assisted magnetite production assay establish MamP as an iron oxidase that contributes to the formation of iron(III) ferrihydrite eventually required for magnetite crystal growth in vivo. These results demonstrate the molecular mechanisms of iron management taking place inside the magnetosome and highlight the role of magnetochrome in iron biomineralization. PMID:24097349

  8. Structural insight into magnetochrome-mediated magnetite biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siponen, Marina I.; Legrand, Pierre; Widdrat, Marc; Jones, Stephanie R.; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Chang, Michelle C. Y.; Faivre, Damien; Arnoux, Pascal; Pignol, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria align along the Earth's magnetic field using an organelle called the magnetosome, a biomineralized magnetite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2O4) or greigite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2S4) crystal embedded in a lipid vesicle. Although the need for both iron(II) and iron(III) is clear, little is known about the biological mechanisms controlling their ratio. Here we present the structure of the magnetosome-associated protein MamP and find that it is built on a unique arrangement of a self-plugged PDZ domain fused to two magnetochrome domains, defining a new class of c-type cytochrome exclusively found in magnetotactic bacteria. Mutational analysis, enzyme kinetics, co-crystallization with iron(II) and an in vitro MamP-assisted magnetite production assay establish MamP as an iron oxidase that contributes to the formation of iron(III) ferrihydrite eventually required for magnetite crystal growth in vivo. These results demonstrate the molecular mechanisms of iron management taking place inside the magnetosome and highlight the role of magnetochrome in iron biomineralization.

  9. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-11-03

    Iron oxide films were deposited onto Si substrates using ion-beam-assisted deposition. The films were ~300 nm thick polycrystalline magnetite with an average crystallite size of ~6 nm. Additionally, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction both indicate that the films are single-phase magnetite. Since no direct evidence of a second phase could be found, exchange bias likely arises due to defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples have such small grains, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field. The high energy deposition process results in an oxygen-rich, argon-containing magnetite film with low temperature exchange bias due to defects at the high concentration of grain boundaries.

  10. Some Properties of Magnetite Nanoparticles Produced Under Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Umar Saeed; Khattak, Nazir Shah; Manan, Abdul; Rahman, Aminur; Khan, Faridullah; Rahim, Abdur

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, stirring rate, stirring time, reaction pH, and concentration of precursors during synthesis were found to be crucial in determining the size of the magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) obtained. The relationship between synthetic conditions and the crystal structure, particle size, and size distribution of the NPs was studied. Surface coating of iron oxide NPs was performed in two steps. Magnetite NPs were prepared by coprecipitation then coated with silica by use of a sol-gel process. Saturation magnetization of the magnetite NPs increased from 47.23 to 49.12 emu/g when their size was increased from 8.89 to 9.39 nm. Magnetite NPs in the size range 11-12 nm, coated with silica, are monodispersed and their corresponding saturation magnetization is 40.67 emu/g (11 nm) and 34.65 emu/g (12 nm). The decrease in the saturation magnetization of the coated samples is attributed to the increase in the amount of tetraethyl orthosilicate.

  11. Magnetism of Al-substituted magnetite reduced from Al-hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Heslop, David; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum-substituted magnetite (Al-magnetite) reduced from Al-substituted hematite or goethite (Al-hematite or Al-goethite) is an environmentally important constituent of magnetically enhanced soils. In order to characterize the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite, two series of Al-magnetite samples were synthesized through reduction of Al-hematite by a mixed gas (80% CO2 and 20% CO) at 395°C for 72 h in a quartz tube furnace. Al-magnetite samples inherited the morphology of their parent Al-hematite samples, but only those transformed from Al-hematite synthesized at low temperature possessed surficial micropores, which originated from the release of structural water during heating. Surface micropores could thus serve as a practical fingerprint of fire or other high-temperature mineralogical alteration processes in natural environments, e.g., shear friction in seismic zones. In addition, Al substitution greatly affects the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite. For example, coercivity (Bc) increases with increasing Al content and then decreases slightly, while the saturation magnetization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc), and Verwey transition temperature (Tv) all decrease with increasing Al content due to crystal defect formation and dilution of magnetic ions caused by Al incorporation. Moreover, different trends in the correlation between Tc and Bc can be used to discriminate titanomagnetite from Al-magnetite, which is likely to be important in environmental and paleomagnetic studies, particularly in soil.

  12. A facile approach to enhance the high temperature stability of magnetite nanoparticles with improved magnetic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, S. S.; Philip, John

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of Zn2+ doping on crystal structure, magnetic properties, blocking and Curie temperatures, and the high temperature phase stability of magnetite nanoparticles under air and vacuum annealing. The Zn2+ doped nanoparticles (ZnxFe3-xO4 with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6) are prepared by simple co-precipitation technique and are characterized by high temperature X-ray powder diffraction (HTXRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, small angle X-ray scattering, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy. Our HTXRD studies show that the decomposition temperature of pure magnetite (Fe3O4) in vacuum is increased by 300 °C (from 700 to 1000 °C), with 0.2 fraction of Zn2+ doping. The DSC studies under air environment also show that the γ-Fe2O3 to α-Fe2O3 phase transition temperature increases with the zinc fraction. The increase in transition temperature is attributed to the increase in the activation energy of the maghemite to hematite phase transition after the replacement of Fe3+ with larger diameter Zn2+ in the A site. Interestingly, the saturation magnetization increases from 61 to 69 emu/g upon 0.2 fraction of Zn2+, which augments the utility of the doped compound for practical applications. While the Curie temperature is found to increase with doping concentration, the blocking temperature shows an opposite trend. The blocking temperature values were found to be 262, 196, 144, and 153 K for 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 fraction of zinc, respectively. The reduction in TB is attributed to weak dipole-dipole interactions and local exchange coupling between nanoparticles. All the Zn2+ doped samples show superparamagnetic nature. These findings are extremely useful in producing superparamagnetic nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for high temperature applications.

  13. Biophysics of Magnetic Orientation: Radical Pairs, Biogenic Magnetite, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joe

    2011-03-01

    Two major biophysical mechanisms for magnetoreception in terrestrial animals, one based on biogenic magnetite and another on radical-pair biochemical reactions, have been the subject of experiment and debate for the past 30 years. The magnetite hypothesis has stood the test of time: biogenic magnetite is synthesized biochemically in Bacteria, Protists, and numerous Animal phyla, as well as in some plants. Chains of single-domain crystals have been detected by clean-lab based SQUID magnetometry in animal tissues in all major phyla, followed by high-resolution TEM in selected model organisms, as well as by electrophysiological studies demonstrating the role of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in the magnetoreceptive process. Pulse-remagnetization - configured to uniquely flip the polarity of single-domain ferromagnets - has dramatic effects on the behavior of many birds, honeybees, mole rats, turtles, and bats, to cite a growing list. Magnetite-containing cells in the vicinity of these neurons in fish are now the subject of intense study by our consortium. The existence of a specialized class of magnetite-containing magnetoreceptor cells in animal tissues is no longer controversial. In contrast, less success has been achieved in gaining experimental support across a range of taxa for the radical-pair hypothesis. Although this mechanism was proposed to explain an early observation that birds would not respond to complete inversion of the magnetic vector, many organisms (even some birds) do indeed respond to the field polarity. We also note that few, if any, of these critical experiments have been done using fully double-blind methods. This is joint work with: M. M. Walker (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and M. Winklhofer (LMU Munich, Germany).

  14. Magnetite-Based Magnetoreceptor Cells in the Olfactory Organ of Rainbow Trout and Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Cadiou, H.; Dixson, A. D.; Eder, S.; Kobayashi, A.; McNaughton, P. A.; Muhamad, A. N.; Raub, T. D.; Walker, M. M.; Winklhofer, M.; Yuen, B. B.

    2011-12-01

    Many vertebrate and invertebrate animals have a geomagnetic sensory system, but the biophysics and anatomy of how magnetic stimuli are transduced to the nervous system is a challenging problem. Previous work in our laboratories identified single-domain magnetite chains in olfactory epithelium in cells proximal to the ros V nerve, which, in rainbow trout, responds to magnetic fields. Our objectives are to characterize these magnetite-containing cells and determine whether they form part of the mechanism of magnetic field transduction in teleost fishes, as a model for other Vertebrates. Using a combination of reflection mode confocal microscopy and a Prussian Blue technique modified to stain specifically for magnetite, our Auckland group estimated that both juvenile rainbow trout (ca. 7 cm total length) olfactory rosettes have ~200 magnetite-containing cells. The magnetite present in two types of cells within the olfactory epithelium appears to be arranged in intracellular chains. All of our groups (Munich, Auckland, Cambridge and Caltech) have obtained different types of structural evidence that magnetite chains closely associate with the plasma membrane in the cells, even in disaggregated tissues. In addition, our Cambridge group used Ca2+ imaging to demonstrate a clear response by individual magnetite-containing cells to a step change in the intensity of the external magnetic field and a slow change in Ca2+ activity when the external magnetic field was cancelled. In the teleost, zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small (~4 cm adult length in captivity) genetic and developmental biology model organism, our Caltech group detected ferromagnetic material throughout the body, but concentrated in the rostral trunk, using NRM and IRM scans of whole adults. Our analysis suggests greater than one million, 80-100 nm crystals, with Lowrie-Fuller curves strongly consistent with single-domain magnetite in 100-100,000 magnetocytes. Ferromagentic resonance (FMR) spectra show crystals

  15. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostka, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis.

  16. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kostka, J E; Nealson, K H

    1995-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis. PMID:11539843

  17. Magnetite-apatite mineralization in Khanlogh iron deposit, northwest of Neyshaboor, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafzadeh Tehrani, Parvin; Asghar Calagari, Ali; Velasco Roldan, Francisco; Simmonds, Vartan; Siahcheshm, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    Khanlogh iron deposit lies on Sabzehvar-Ghoochan Cenozoic magmatic belt in northwest of Neyshaboor, NE Iran. The lithologic units in this area include a series of sub-volcanic intrusive rocks like diorite porphyry, quartz-diorite porphyry, and micro-granodiorite of Oligocene age. Mineralization in this area occurred as veins, dissemination, and open space filling in brecciated zones within the host sub-volcanic intrusive bodies. Three distinct types of mineral associations can be distinguished, (1) diopside-magnetite, (2) magnetite-apatite, and (3) apatite-calcite. Microscopic examinations along with SEM and EPMA studies demonstrated that magnetite is the most common ore mineral occurring as solitary crystals. The euhedral magnetite crystals are accompanied by lamellar destabilized ilmenite and granular fluorapatite in magnetite-apatite ores. The results of EPMA revealed that the lamellar ilmenite, relative to host magnetite crystal, is notably enriched in MgO and MnO (average of 3.3 and 2.6 wt%, respectively; n=5), whereas magnetite is slighter enriched in Ti (TiO2 around 1.8 wt%) being average of MgO, MnO and V2O3 of 0.6wt%, 0.2wt%, and 0.6 wt% (respectively; n=20). Minerals such as chlorapatite, calcite, and chalcedony are also present in the magnetite-apatite ores. The samples from apatite-calcite ores contain coarse crystals of apatite and rhomboedral calcite. The plot of the EPMA data of Khanlogh iron ore samples on diagram of TiO2-V2O5 (Hou et al, 2011) illustrated that the data points lies between the well-known Kiruna and El Laco (Chile) iron deposits. The magnetite crystals in the sub-volcanic host rocks were possibly formed by immiscible iron oxide fluids during magmatic stage. However, the magnetite and apatite existing in the veins and breccia zones may have developed by high temperature hydrothermal fluids. Studies done by Purtov and Kotelnikova (1993) proved that the proportion of Ti in magnetite is related to fluoride complex in the hydrothermal

  18. Thermal treatment of magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wykowska, Urszula; Satula, Dariusz; Nordblad, Per

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper presents the results of a thermal treatment process for magnetite nanoparticles in the temperature range of 50–500 °C. The tested magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using three different methods that resulted in nanoparticles with different surface characteristics and crystallinity, which in turn, was reflected in their thermal durability. The particles were obtained by coprecipitation from Fe chlorides and decomposition of an Fe(acac)3 complex with and without a core–shell structure. Three types of ferrite nanoparticles were produced and their thermal stability properties were compared. In this study, two sets of unmodified magnetite nanoparticles were used where crystallinity was as determinant of the series. For the third type of particles, a Ag shell was added. By comparing the coated and uncoated particles, the influence of the metallic layer on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles was tested. Before and after heat treatment, the nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was observed that the fabrication methods determine, to some extent, the sensitivity of the nanoparticles to external factors. PMID:26199842

  19. Magnetite fractionation of "chalcophile" elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrogenes, J. A.; Jenner, F. E.; Arculus, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Submarine-quenched glasses provide the clearest record of magmatic evolution available, especially with respect to potentially volatile elements and compounds. A comprehensive suite of arc- and backarc glasses recovered during several research voyages in the SW Pacific are being analysed by a number of research teams in an effort to document genesis and fractionation processes involved in the evolution of subduction- related magma systems. As part of these studies, a suite of basalt to dacite composition glasses recovered from the arc-like Pacmanus Site in the Manus Backarc Basin have been examined in detail. Sun et al. (2004) found trends of increasing enrichments of Re, Cu, and Au with SiO2 in the range from 50 to 60 wt% SiO2. From this stage of magmatic evolution, marked depletions in all these elements are observed in glasses of higher SiO2 contents. The reasons for this trend have been unclear, although a mechanism involving the cessation of olivine and initiation of magnetite saturation was proposed by Sun et al. Our analysis of a larger suite of glasses from the Manus Basin has now confirmed these trends, and found the same behaviour for Zn and Mn. Similarly, analysis of a suite of basalt to dacite glasses recovered from the arc-like Valu Fa Ridge in the Lau Backarc Basin has produced trends for these elements very similar to those of the Pacmanus location. LA-ICP-MS analysis of microphenocrysts in these glasses has shown that magnetite is highly enriched in Re relative to the coexisting melt (Kd up to 7.8 for Re). Magnetite/melt partition coefficients for Re, Mn and Yb can be used to precisely model the liquid line of descent during magnetite (plus clinopyroxene and plagioclase) fractionation using Re vs. Mn/Yb. The variation of Pt abundances with SiO2 for both these suites contrasts with other nominally chalcophile trace elements in showing rapid early depletion from the most Mg-rich basalt through to more SiO2-rich compositions, with no maximum at 60 wt

  20. The origin and stability of lunar goethite, hematite and magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Gibson, E. K.

    1972-01-01

    Extra-lunar contamination, fumarolic activity, and exposure to oxidizing gases from comet or carbonaceous meteorite impacts have been previously proposed as the causes of magnetite, hematite, and goethite in lunar materials. However, these minerals can occur in the stable low-temperature gas-solid equilibrium assemblages of lunar rocks. Below 600 C magnetite is in equilibrium with C-O-H gases with compositions compatible with high-temperature equilibrium with metallic iron; below 150 C hematite is stable in these same gases. Goethite is not stable in carbonaceous gases at low total pressure, and thus gases from impacting carbonaceous material cannot have produced it. Goethite is stable at low temperatures and pressures in almost pure H2-H2O gases. Its minimum stability against hematite is 2 bars total pressure at 130 C and 0.001 bars at 30 C for H2 to H2O ratios compatible with the high-temperature redox state of lunar materials. Thus the traces of magnetite, hematite, and goethite in lunar materials may be the result of normal low-temperature processes indigenous to the moon and not special processes.

  1. Biogenic Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Bazylinski, Dennis; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Clemett, SImon J.; Bell, Mary Sue; Golden, D. C.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Fine-grained magnetite (Fe3O4) in martian meteorite ALH84001, generally less than 200 nm in size, is located primarily in the rims that surround the carbonate globules. There are two populations of ALH84001 magnetites, which are likely formed at low temperature by inorganic and biogenic processes. Nearly 27% of ALH84001 magnetite particles, also called elongated prisms, have characteristics which make them uniquely identifiable as biological precipitates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    SciTech Connect

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-10-15

    and recrystallised as goethite. The {gamma}-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure substoichiometric nanosize magnetite particles of about 25 nm in size and with the stoichiometry of Fe{sub 2.83}O{sub 4}.

  3. Raman study of the Verwey transition in magnetite at high-pressure and low-temperature: Effect of Al doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparov, L.; Shirshikova, Z.; Pekarek, T. M.; Blackburn, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Gavriliuk, A.; Rueckamp, R.; Berger, H.

    2012-08-01

    We employed Raman spectroscopy to investigate how the hydrostatic pressure affects the temperature of the Verwey transition in pure (Fe3O4) and Al-doped (Fe2.8Al0.2O4) magnetite. In both samples, pressure suppresses the transition. The Al-doped sample displays no transition above 8 GPa. We do not observe such discontinuity in a pure magnetite, which suggests that the discontinuity is doping driven. Our Clausius-Clapeyron formula based analysis of the pressure-transition temperature dependence is in excellent agreement with our data in pure magnetite. The Al doping leads to a smaller entropy change and larger volume expansion consistent with partial charge ordering at the transition.

  4. Vortex magnetic structure in framboidal magnetite reveals existence of water droplets in an ancient asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Nozawa, Jun; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    The majority of water has vanished from modern meteorites, yet there remain signatures of water on ancient asteroids. How and when water disappeared from the asteroids is important, because the final fluid-concentrated chemical species played critical roles in the early evolution of organics and in the final minerals in meteorites. Here we show evidence of vestigial traces of water based on a nanometre-scale palaeomagnetic method, applying electron holography to the framboids in the Tagish Lake meteorite. The framboids are colloidal crystals composed of three-dimensionally ordered magnetite nanoparticles and therefore are only able to form against the repulsive force induced by the surface charge of the magnetite as a water droplet parches in microgravity. We demonstrate that the magnetites have a flux closure vortex structure, a unique magnetic configuration in nature that permits the formation of colloidal crystals just before exhaustion of water from a local system within a hydrous asteroid.

  5. Vortex magnetic structure in framboidal magnetite reveals existence of water droplets in an ancient asteroid.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Nozawa, Jun; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The majority of water has vanished from modern meteorites, yet there remain signatures of water on ancient asteroids. How and when water disappeared from the asteroids is important, because the final fluid-concentrated chemical species played critical roles in the early evolution of organics and in the final minerals in meteorites. Here we show evidence of vestigial traces of water based on a nanometre-scale palaeomagnetic method, applying electron holography to the framboids in the Tagish Lake meteorite. The framboids are colloidal crystals composed of three-dimensionally ordered magnetite nanoparticles and therefore are only able to form against the repulsive force induced by the surface charge of the magnetite as a water droplet parches in microgravity. We demonstrate that the magnetites have a flux closure vortex structure, a unique magnetic configuration in nature that permits the formation of colloidal crystals just before exhaustion of water from a local system within a hydrous asteroid. PMID:24149376

  6. Composition of coarse-grained magnetite from pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Overstreet, William C.; Mousa, Hassan; Matzko, John J.

    1985-01-01

    Crystals of magnetite as large as 30 mm long and 7 mm thick are locally present in quartz-rich zones of interior and exterior pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area. Niobium, tin, and yttrium are strongly enriched in six specimens of magnetite from interior pegmatite dikes in a small pluton where these elements form geochemical anomalies in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrates from wadi sediment. Less abundant anomalous elements in the magnetite are molybdenum, lead, and zirconium, which also tend to be present in anomalous amounts in the nonmagnetic concentrates from the niobium-bearing pluton. The most anomalous trace element in the magnetite is zinc, which is at least 10 times as abundant as it is in the quartz monzonite plutons or in the nonmagnetic concentrates. The capacity of magnetite to scavenge molybdenum, zinc, niobium, lead, tin, yttrium, and zirconium suggests the possible utility of magnetite as a geochemical sample medium.

  7. Surface complexation modeling of Fe3O4-H+ and Mg(II) sorption onto maghemite and magnetite.

    PubMed

    Jolsterå, Rickard; Gunneriusson, Lars; Holmgren, Allan

    2012-11-15

    The surface acid/base properties of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) particles and the sorption of Mg(2+) onto magnetite and maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) have been studied using high precision potentiometric titrations, batch experiments, and zeta potential measurements. The acid/base properties of magnetite were found to be very similar to maghemite except for the difference in surface site density, N(s) (sites nm(-2)), 1.50±0.08 for magnetite, and 0.99±0.05 for maghemite. The experimental proton exchange of the magnetite surface increased from pH 10 and above, indicating dissolution/transformation reactions of magnetite at alkaline conditions. Thus, magnetite with its Fe(II) content proved to be less stable toward dissolution in comparison with pure Fe(III) oxides also at high pH values. Three different ratios between surface sites and added Mg(2+) were used in the sorption experiments viz. 0.5, 1, and 2Mg(2+)site(-1). Surface complexation modeling of the Mg(2+) sorption onto maghemite and magnetite was restricted to pH conditions where the interference from Mg(OH)(2)(s) precipitation could be ruled out. The model calculations showed that Mg(2+) sorb onto the magnetite and maghemite surfaces as a mixture of mono- or bidentate surface complexes at 0.5Mg(2+)site(-1) and as monodentate complexes at 1 and 2Mg(2+)site(-1) conditions. Mg(2+) was also found to adsorb more readily at the maghemite surfaces in comparison with magnetite surfaces. For experiments with excess Mg(2+) relative to the number of surface sites, the calculations suggested the formation of polynuclear surface complexes on maghemite. PMID:22889624

  8. Structure-function studies of the magnetite-biomineralizing magnetosome-associated protein MamC.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Valverde-Tercedor, Carmen; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Grimberg, Noam; Levi, Hilla; Nelkenbaum, Or; Davidov, Geula; Faivre, Damien; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are Gram-negative bacteria that navigate along geomagnetic fields using the magnetosome, an organelle that consists of a membrane-enveloped magnetic nanoparticle. Magnetite formation and its properties are controlled by a specific set of proteins. MamC is a small magnetosome-membrane protein that is known to be active in iron biomineralization but its mechanism has yet to be clarified. Here, we studied the relationship between the MamC magnetite-interaction loop (MIL) structure and its magnetite interaction using an inert biomineralization protein-MamC chimera. Our determined structure shows an alpha-helical fold for MamC-MIL with highly charged surfaces. Additionally, the MamC-MIL induces the formation of larger magnetite crystals compared to protein-free and inert biomineralization protein control experiments. We suggest that the connection between the MamC-MIL structure and the protein's charged surfaces is crucial for magnetite binding and thus for the size control of the magnetite nanoparticles. PMID:26970040

  9. [Adsorption of methylene blue onto vanadium-doped magnetite].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuan-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Liang; Zhu, Jian-Xi; He, Hong-Ping; Yuan, Peng

    2010-06-01

    A series of vanadium-doped magnetite (Fe3-x VxO4, x < 0.4) synthesized by an oxidation-precipitation method, were characterized using chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analyses. The obtained results show that the synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 has spinel structure while vanadium mostly replaces Fe3+ in the octahedral sites. The synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 is magnetic material, with crystal size ranging from 28 to 35 nm. The substitution of vanadium in the magnetite structure increases the amount of surface hydroxyls. The experimental adsorption results indicate that, in neutral pH condition, the maximum adsorption capacities of Fe3-x VxO4 increase obviously with the increase of vanadium concentration in magnetite while the adsorption isotherm complies well with the Langmuir model. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on Fe3-x VxO4 can get equilibrium in the first 25 min, supporting a pseudo-second order equation. Moreover, the rise of the solution pH value results in an increase of the adsorption capability of MB on Fe3-x VxO4. PMID:20698274

  10. Magnetite Particle Size Distribution and Pellet Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyeon Jeong; Tang, Ming; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2014-08-01

    Oxidation of magnetite pellets is commonly performed to prepare strong pellets for ironmaking. This article presents a contribution to quantitative understanding of fundamental pellet oxidation kinetics, based on measured oxidation kinetics of magnetite particles and pellets. The commonly observed "plateau" oxidation behavior is confirmed to be consistent with the effect of very large differences in magnetite particle sizes in the concentrate from which pellets are produced. The magnetite particles range in size from less than a micron to several tens of a microns; changing the size distribution by inert sintering of pellets decreases both the plateau level of oxidation and the specific surface area, in ways that are compatible with an assumed Rosin-Rammler magnetite particle size distribution.

  11. Comparison of the inhibitory capacity of two groups of pure natural extract on the crystallization of two types of material compound urinary stones in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghalia, Mohamed; Ghalem, Said; Allali, Hocine

    2015-10-01

    Urolithiasis is defined as the result of an abnormal precipitation within the urinary tract. This precipitation is most often from the normal constituents of the urine. This is a fairly common condition in the population. She is happy and recurrent etiology is often unknown if hypothetical. In Algeria, as in many countries, a large number of patients use herbal medicines in the treatment of their diseases including urolithiasis. Thus the aim of this study is the most widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extracts of medicinal plants, in the treatment of calcium urolithiasis oxalo-and magnesium-amoniaco in vitro. The study also examines the effect of these extracts on the states of crystallization (nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation), followed by photography on polarized light microscope.In this regard, we are devoted to studying the crystallization steps from oxalo-calcium and phospho-calcic prepared as artificial urine and supersaturated aqueous solutions, maintained at 37 °C to remain close to biological conditions. Extracts of the first group of herbs: Ammodaucus leucotrichus, Ajuga iva, Globularia alypum, Atriplex halimus are studied on the crystallization calcium oxalate, we cite the Ammodaucus leucotrichus which acts on the stages of nucleation, growth and the aggregation with a total inhibition. The second group of extracts plants tested on calcium phosphate crystallization : Acacia raddiana, Citrullus colocynthis, Rhus tripartita, Pistacia lentiscu, Warionia saharae, are able to significantly reduce phosphate crystallization in vitro. It is easily proved by FTIR and optical microscope. In conclusion the results of our work allows us to confirm the use of these plants as an aqueous decoction, in the field of urolithiasis. These activities may help to strengthen the body in depressed situations.

  12. Magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles with diluted magnet-like behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Garza-Navarro, Marco; Gonzalez, Virgilio; Ortiz, Ubaldo; De la Rosa, Elder

    2010-01-15

    In the present work is reported the use of the biopolymer chitosan as template for the preparation of magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems, following a two step procedure of magnetite nanoparticles in situ precipitation and subsequent silver ions reduction. The crystalline and morphological characteristics of both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nanobeam diffraction patterns (NBD). The results of these studies corroborate the core/shell morphology and the crystalline structure of the magnetite core and the silver shell. Moreover, magnetization temperature dependent, M(T), measurements show an unusual diluted magnetic behavior attributed to the dilution of the magnetic ordering in the magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems. - Graphical abstract: Biopolymer chitosan was used as stabilization media to synthesize both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles. Results of HRTEM and NBD patterns confirm core/shell morphology of the obtained nanoparticles. It was found that the composites show diluted magnet-like behavior.

  13. High Efficiency DNA Extraction by Graphite Oxide/Cellulose/Magnetite Composites Under Na+ Free System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-04-01

    DNA extraction is the key step at various research areas like biotechnology, diagnostic development, paternity determination, and forensic science . Solid support extraction is the most common method for DNA purification. In this method, Na+ ions have often been applied as binding buffers in order to obtain high extraction efficiency and high quality of DNA; however, the presence of Na+ ions might be interfering with the downstream DNA applications. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/magnetite composite/cellulose as an innovative material for Na+-free DNA extraction. The total wt.% of GO was fixed at 4.15% in the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite . The concentration of magnetite within the composites were controlled at 0-3.98 wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of magnetite. The highest yield was achieved at 3.98 wt.% magnetite, where the extraction efficiency was reported to be 338.5 ng/µl. The absorbance ratios between 260 nm and 280 nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution volume was demonstrated as 1.81, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The mechanism of adsorption of DNA was provided by (1) π-π interaction between the aromatic ring in GO and nucleobases of DNA molecule, and (2) surface charge interaction between the positive charge magnetite and anions such as phosphates within the DNA molecules. The results proved that the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite provides a Na+-free method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA.

  14. Three-Dimensional Morphological Analysis of ALH84001 Magnetite Using Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Shimmin, Joel; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2003-01-01

    We report here the crystal morphologies of MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites as calculated by back-projection using electron tomography. In the present study, we used a 300 keV TEM with a field emission gun (Tecnai F-30 from FEI Inc.), equipped with a 2048 x 2048 pixel CCD camera from Gatan Inc. to image magnetite crystals over tilt ranges of approx. +/- 72 deg in 2 deg tilt intervals. The images were aligned for back-projection, either manually, or through the use of fiducial 5 nm Au spheres affixed to the specimen prior to microscopy. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were computed using weighted back-projection of the tilted views. The tomograms were viewed and analyzed as a series of slices 1.0 nm thick, taken parallel to the specimen-supporting grid, using the IMOD software package. The shape of each magnetite crystal was determined by defining the external contour of a given magnetite in each slice and assembling a stack of these contours in 3-D. To aid in visualization, the stacked contour array was reduced to an optimal mesh by Delaunay triangulation. The surface normal to each of the triangles in the mesh was calculated and the triangle faces colored according to the orientation of that surface normal relative to the principal crystallographic axis of magnetite. Green surfaces correspond to {111} orientations, blue surfaces to {100} orientations, and red surfaces to {110} orientations. Triangles whose surface normal did not correspond to one of the principal axes were colored gray. Within the experimental and numerical uncertainties of the deconvolution, the tomographic reconstruction of both MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites are equivalent and correspond to a truncated hexa-octahedral morphology.

  15. Raman study of the Verwey transition in Magnetite at high-pressure and low-temperature; effect of Al doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparov, Lev; Shirshikova, Z.; Pekarek, T. M.; Blackburn, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Gavriliuk, A.; Rueckamp, R.; Berger, H.

    2012-02-01

    We report high-pressure low-temperature Raman measurements of the Verwey transition in pure and Al --doped magnetite (Fe3O4) Al-doped magnetite Fe2.8Al0.2O4 (TV=116.5K) displays a nearly linear decrease of the transition temperature with an increase of pressure yielding dP/dTV=-0.096±0.013 GPa/K. In contrast pure magnetite displays a significantly steeper slope of the PT equilibrium line with dP/dTV = -0.18±0.013 GPa/K. Contrary to earlier high pressure resistivity reports we do not observe quantum critical point behavior at 8 GPa in the pure magnetite. Our data indicates that Al doping leads to a smaller entropy change and larger volume expansion at the transition. The trends displayed by the data are consistent with the mean field model of the transition that assumes charge ordering in magnetite.

  16. Influence of cobalt doping on the hyperthermic efficiency of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantechi, Elvira; Innocenti, Claudia; Albino, Martin; Lottini, Elisabetta; Sangregorio, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) are extensively investigated for biomedical applications, particularly as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and as heat mediators in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia. For the latter, one of the goal of the research is to obtain materials with improved hyperthermic properties. A valuable strategy is the increase of the magnetic anisotropy of commonly employed magnetite through the total or partial substitution of Fe2+ ions with Co2+ ions. Here we present a study on a family of 8 nm Co-doped magnetite NPs (CoxFe3-xO4), with composition ranging from pure magnetite (x=0) to stoichiometric cobalt ferrite (x=1), aimed to investigate the evolution of the hyperthermic properties with the increase of Co content. We found that the addition of a small amount of Co is enough to sharply increase the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). The SAR further increases with x but it reaches a maximum for an intermediate value (x=0.6). Such anomalous behavior is ascribed to the intrinsic magnetic properties of the material, and, in particular, to the magnetic anisotropy, which displays the same peculiar trend. The Co-doping thus may represent an effective strategy to improve the poor hyperthermic efficiency of very small magnetite NPs (<10 nm).

  17. Intercalation crystallization of phase-pure α-HC(NH2)2PbI3 upon microstructurally engineered PbI2 thin films for planar perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yang, Mengjin; Kwun, Joonsuh; Game, Onkar S.; Zhao, Yixin; Pang, Shuping; Padture, Nitin P.; Zhu, Kai

    2016-03-01

    The microstructure of the solid-PbI2 precursor thin film plays an important role in the intercalation crystallization of the formamidinium lead triiodide perovskite (α-HC(NH2)2PbI3). It is shown that microstructurally engineered PbI2 thin films with porosity and low crystallinity are the most favorable for conversion into uniform-coverage, phase-pure α-HC(NH2)2PbI3 perovskite thin films. Planar perovskite solar cells fabricated using these thin films deliver power conversion efficiency (PCE) up to 13.8%.The microstructure of the solid-PbI2 precursor thin film plays an important role in the intercalation crystallization of the formamidinium lead triiodide perovskite (α-HC(NH2)2PbI3). It is shown that microstructurally engineered PbI2 thin films with porosity and low crystallinity are the most favorable for conversion into uniform-coverage, phase-pure α-HC(NH2)2PbI3 perovskite thin films. Planar perovskite solar cells fabricated using these thin films deliver power conversion efficiency (PCE) up to 13.8%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06189j

  18. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO{sub 3} crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  19. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-01-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments. PMID:21776027

  20. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-02-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments. PMID:21776027

  1. Crystallization of Enantiomerically Pure Proteins from Quasi-Racemic Mixtures: Structure Determination by X-Ray Diffraction of Isotope-Labeled Ester Insulin and Human Insulin.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Kent, Stephen B H

    2016-03-01

    As a part of a program aimed towards the study of the dynamics of human insulin-protein dimer formation using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we used total chemical synthesis to prepare stable isotope labeled [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] human insulin, via [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] ester insulin as a key intermediate product that facilitates folding of the synthetic protein molecule (see preceding article). Here, we describe the crystal structure of the synthetic isotope-labeled ester insulin intermediate and the product synthetic human insulin. Additionally, we present our observations on hexamer formation with these two proteins in the absence of phenol derivatives and/or Zn metal ions. We also describe and discuss the fractional crystallization of quasi-racemic protein mixtures containing each of these two synthetic proteins. PMID:26707939

  2. Smart hollow microspheres of chondroitin sulfate conjugates and magnetite nanoparticles for magnetic vector.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Marcos R; Reis, Adriano V; Alves, Bruno R V; Kunita, Marcos H; Rubira, Adley F; Tambourgi, Elias B

    2010-12-01

    Smart hollow microspheres composed of vinyled-chondroitin sulfate conjugates (CSπ) and magnetite nanoparticles were obtained by the intermediate of a multiple emulsion in absence of a surfactant, attributable to stabilizing properties of the CS. It was formed an oil-water multiple emulsion in which the CS played a role as an anionic stabilizer for magnetite nanoparticles via complexation. Iron oxides were bonded to the microspheres by the formation of a complex of Fe(3+) ions on the crystalline phase with oxygen atoms at the carboxyl groups without their magnetic properties being affected. The average crystal size of embedded magnetite nanoparticles was approximately 16.5nm, indicative of a good dispersion in microspheres. Furthermore, the introduction of iron oxides resulted in microspheres with a higher diameter and a narrower particle size distribution. PMID:20832809

  3. Phase evolution of magnetite nanocrystals on oxide supports via template-free bismuth ferrite precursor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Jeffrey; Bogle, Kashinath; Cheng, Xuan; Sullaphen, Jivika; Kuo, Chang-Yang; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, Chien-Te; Yang, Jan-Chi; Chu, Ying-Hao; Valanoor, Nagarajan

    2012-11-01

    This report investigates the phase evolution pathway of magnetite nanocrystal synthesis on oxide-supported substrates. A template-free phase separation approach, which exploits the thermodynamic instability of ternary perovskite BiFeO3 and inherent volatility of bismuth oxide in low oxygen pressure and high temperature is presented. The formation of an intermediate hematite nanocrystal phase is found as a key step that controls the eventual size and morphology of the magnetite nanocrystals. X-ray absorption spectra measurements and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism confirm that the spectral fingerprints of the magnetite nanocrystals match with that of bulk crystals. Magnetic measurements show that magnetic anisotropy is directly attributed to the nanocrystal morphology.

  4. Biogenic Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Bazylinski, Dennis; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bell, Mary Sue; Golden, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    Fine-grained magnetite (Fe3O4) in martian meteorite ALH84001, generally less than 200 microns in size, is located primarily in the rims that surround the carbonate globules. There are two populations of ALH84001 magnets, which are likely formed at low temperature by inorganic and biogenic processes. Nearly 27/o of ALH84001 magnetite particles. also called elongated prisms, have characteristics which make them uniquely identifiable as biological precipitates.

  5. Magnetite nanoparticles for nonradionuclide brachytherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Safronov, Victor; Sozontov, Evgeny; Polikarpov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles possess several properties that can make them useful for targeted delivery of radiation to tumors for the purpose of brachytherapy. Such particles are biodegradable and magnetic and can emit secondary radiation when irradiated by an external source. In this work, the dose distribution around a magnetite particle of 10 nm diameter being irradiated by monochromatic X-rays with energies in the range 4–60 keV is calculated. PMID:26089761

  6. Using the chemical analysis of magnetite to constrain various stages in the formation and genesis of the Kiruna-type chadormalu magnetite-apatite deposit, Bafq district, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarian, Hassan; Lentz, David; Alirezaei, Saeed; Peighambari, Sima; Hall, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Textural and compositional data are presented for different types of magnetite in the Chadormalu iron deposit to discern the genesis of various styles of mineralization. Samples were chosen according to their paragenetic relations to apatite and their host setting: magnetite-apatite veins in the altered host rocks, disseminated magnetite-apatite assemblages in the marginal parts of the main ore body, and massive magnetite associated with irregular apatite veinlets from internal part of the main ore body. Scanning electron microscopy - back scatter electron (SEM-BSE) images reveal that there are three main generations of magnetite in each of the different magnetite-apatite assemblages. Primary magnetite (Mag1) features abundant porosity and a dark appearance. A second generation of magnetite (Mag2) replacing Mag1 shows a lighter appearance with both sharp and gradational contacts with the primary magnetite crystals. The two magnetite types are related to dissolution-precipitation processes due to changing physico-chemical parameters of the ore fluids. A third type of magnetite (Mag3) with a recrystallized appearance and foam-like triple junctions was mostly observed in magnetite-apatite veins in the main ore body and in veins hosted by altered rocks. Electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) were utilized to discriminate the various magnetite generations in the different magnetite-apatite assemblages. Applying published elemental discrimination diagrams shows that most primary magnetites fall into the hydrothermal- and Kiruna-type fields. Primary magnetite contains lower FeO (88.77-93.65 wt.%; average 91.5 wt.%), and higher SiO2 (0.21-2.26 wt.%; ave. 0.32 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.001-0.45 wt.%; ave. 0.053 wt.%), and CaO (0.002-0.48 wt.%; ave. 0.078 wt.%) contents, which might be related to magmatically derived fluids. Secondary magnetites have higher FeO (89.23-93.49 wt.%; ave. 92.11 wt.%), lower SiO2 (0.037-0.189 wt.%; ave. 0.072 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.004-0.072 wt.%; ave. 0.019 wt

  7. Arsenite sorption at the magnetite water interface during aqueous precipitation of magnetite: EXAFS evidence for a new arsenite surface complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuheng; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Menguy, Nicolas; Juillot, Farid; Aubry, Emmanuel; Guyot, François; Calas, Georges; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of aqueous As(III) with magnetite during its precipitation from aqueous solution at neutral pH has been studied as a function of initial As/Fe ratio. Arsenite is sequestered via surface adsorption and surface precipitation reactions, which in turn influence the crystal growth of magnetite. Sorption samples were characterized using EXAFS spectroscopy at the As K-edge in combination with HRTEM observations, energy dispersive X-ray analysis at the nanoscale, electron energy loss spectroscopy at the Fe L 3-edge, and XRD-Rietveld analyses of reaction products. Our results show that As(III) forms predominantly tridentate hexanuclear As(III)O 3 complexes ( 3C), where the As(III)O 3 pyramids occupy vacant tetrahedral sites on {1 1 1} surfaces of magnetite particles. This is the first time such a tridentate surface complex has been observed for arsenic. This complex, with a dominant As-Fe distance of 3.53 ± 0.02 Å, occurs in all samples examined except the one with the highest As/Fe ratio (0.33). In addition, at the two highest As/Fe ratios (0.133 and 0.333) arsenite tends to form mononuclear edge-sharing As(III)O 3 species ( 2E) within a highly soluble amorphous As(III)-Fe(III,II)-containing precipitate. At the two lowest As/Fe ratios (0.007 and 0.033), our results indicate the presence of additional As(III) species with a dominant As-Fe distance of 3.30 ± 0.02 Å, for which a possible structural model is proposed. The tridentate 3C As(III)O 3 complexes on the {1 1 1} magnetite surface, together with this additional As(III) species, dramatically lower the solubility of arsenite in the anoxic model systems studied. They may thus play an important role in lowering arsenite solubility in putative magnetite-based water treatment processes, as well as in natural iron-rich anoxic media, especially during the reductive dissolution-precipitation of iron minerals in anoxic environments.

  8. Thermal Analysis of Acicular Shaped Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Golden, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a database on the thermal properties of well-characterized Martian analog materials in support of future Mars surface missions. The database contains the thermal behaviors of these analog materials under reduced and Earth ambient pressures. Magnetite in planetary materials has received considerable attention in recent years since the identification of fine grain single-domain magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 and their possible link to past life on Mars (i.e., possible biominerals of magnetotactic bacteria). Because of its possible importance to Mars science, we report here the thermal properties of magnetite particles with acicular morphology, i.e., needle-shaped magnetite. Acicular shaped magnetite can be commercially produced from goethite (FeOOH) as the starting material via a H2 reduction process. However, instead of using this process or procedure, we report here on the thermal characterization of acicular magnetite formed under reducing conditions from well-characterized needle-shaped goethite at low temperature in controlled CO-CO2 1-bar atmosphere gas mixing furnaces.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and applications of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanmukhla, Vikram Kumar

    In the past few years, the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has received considerable attention due to their potential use in clinical applications. Since the properties of these nanoparticles depend strongly on their size, shape and crystallinity, there is a need for a general method to produce these particles with a controlled size, shape and crystal type. Of the many magnetic materials (Co, Ni, and Fe), the magnetite (Fe3O 4) is least toxic and hence most promising for applications in medical diagnostics. Microemulsion-based synthesis utilizes the local aqueous environment within a reverse micelle as a nano-scale reactor and allows synthesizing nanoparticles with a hydrophilic surface for subsequent functionalization. By controlling the water-to-surfactant ratio, the type of surfactants, and the ionic strength of the aqueous core, one can control the size and shape of the resulting particles. We developed such a system that allows the multi-step synthesis of surface-functionalized, magnetic nanoparticles in a one-pot synthesis reaction. By altering the system chemistry, we were further able to produce either spheres or cylinders of controlled dimension in the size range of 5 nm to 30 nm. Using standard bio-conjugation techniques, we successfully immobilized an enzyme onto the nanoparticles. We also developed a theoretical model for the separation and fractionation of nanoparticles based on their size and magnetic properties. Using the multiphysics and finite element modeling capabilities of FEMLAB(TM), we solved the coupled system of PDEs describing the interaction of magnetic particles within a magnetic field for either static (cylindrical beaker) or convective flow (capillary) conditions. A net retention time as high as 310 s is achieved for 200 nm particles at field strength of 1250 kA/m. The model allows the design of a magnetic, field-flow fractionation (MFFF) system to separate nanoparticles by size.

  10. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase

  11. The effect of humic acid adsorption on pH-dependent surface charging and aggregation of magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Illes, E.; Tombacz, E.

    2006-03-01

    The pH-dependent adsorption of humic acid (HA) on magnetite and its effect on the surface charging and the aggregation of oxide particles were investigated. HA was extracted from brown coal. Synthetic magnetite was prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of iron(II) and iron(III) salts. The pH-dependent particle charge and aggregation, and coagulation kinetics at pH around to 4 were measured by laser Doppler electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The charge of pure magnetite reverses from positive to negative at pH around 8, which may consider as isoelectric point (IEP). Near this pH, large aggregates form, while stable sols exist further from it. In the presence of increasing HA loading, the IEP shifts to lower pH, then at higher loading, magnetite becomes negatively charged even at low pHs, which indicate the neutralization and gradual recharging positive charges on surface. In acidic region, the trace HA amounts are adsorbed on magnetite surface as oppositely charged patches, systems become highly unstable due to heterocoagulation. Above the adsorption saturation, however, the nanoparticles are stabilized in a way of combined steric and electrostatic effects. The HA coated magnetite particles form stable colloidal dispersion, particle aggregation does not occur in a wide range of pH and salt tolerance is enhanced.

  12. The chemistry of hydrothermal magnetite: a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, Patrick; Angerer, Thomas; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; French, David; Walshe, John

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a well-recognized petrogenetic indicator and is a common accessory mineral in many ore deposits and their host rocks. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of hydrothermal magnetite for provenance studies and as a pathfinder for mineral exploration. A number of studies have investigated how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of the respective magnetite. Two fundamental questions underlie these efforts — (i) How can the composition of igneous and, more importantly, hydrothermal magnetite be used to discriminate mineralized areas from barren host rocks, and (ii) how can this assist exploration geologists to target ore deposits at greater and greater distances from the main mineralization? Similar to igneous magnetite, the most important factors that govern compositional variations in hydrothermal magnetite are (A) temperature, (B) fluid composition — element availability, (C) oxygen and sulfur fugacity, (D) silicate and sulfide activity, (E) host rock buffering, (F) re-equilibration processes, and (G) intrinsic crystallographic controls such as ionic radius and charge balance. We discuss how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of magnetite and review studies that investigate the chemistry of hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from various mineral deposits and their host rocks. Furthermore, we discuss the redox-related alteration of magnetite (martitization and mushketovitization) and mineral inclusions in magnetite and their effect on chemical analyses. Our database includes published and previously unpublished magnetite minor and trace element data for magnetite from (1) banded iron formations (BIF) and related high-grade iron ore deposits in Western Australia, India, and Brazil, (2) Ag–Pb–Zn veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, United States, (3) porphyry Cu–(Au)–(Mo) deposits and associated (4) calcic and magnesian skarn deposits in the southwestern United

  13. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  14. Geochemistry of magnetite from Proterozoic Fe-Cu deposits in the Kangdian metallogenic province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei Terry; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Gao, Jian-Feng; Hu, Ruizhong

    2015-10-01

    -sulfide stage have slightly higher Cu, Zn, and Mn and are thought to have crystallized from relatively low-temperature and Cu-Zn-Mn-rich fluids evolved from the fluids of the early Fe-oxide stage. Our results show that magnetite from the Fe-Cu deposits in the Kangdian Province, banded iron formation, Fe skarn deposits, diabase-hosted hydrothermal Fe deposits, and magmatic deposits has significantly different compositions. We propose that covariations of Co-Ni, Zn-Sn, and Co/Ni-Mn can be used to effectively discriminate different deposit types.

  15. Orientations of Exsolved Magnetite Inclusions in Clinopyroxene and Plagioclase Determined With Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Wenk, H.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    Crystallographically oriented magnetite inclusions occur as subsolidus exsolution features in slowly cooled mafic rocks and are of interest to paleomagnetism because of their highly stable magnetic remanence. Many inclusions in both clinopyroxene and plagioclase exist as elongate laths with generalized dimensions of 1 μ m x 2 μ m x 50 μ m. Of initial interest is the formation temperature and orientation of these elongate inclusions with respect to their silicate hosts. In this study, the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique is used to determine orientation relationships across exsolution boundaries for magnetite inclusions > 0.5 μ m in diameter in host crystals of both clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Magnetite inclusions in clinopyroxenes from the Early Cretaceous Messum Complex of Namibia occur as two arrays growing within (010) of clinopyroxene and elongated subparallel to either the [100] or [001] axes. Inclusions subparallel to [100]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (-1-11)mag // (-101)cpx, and [112]mag // [101]cpx. Inclusions subparallel to [001]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (111)mag // (100)cpx, and [-1-12]mag // [001]cpx. Both arrays of inclusions are oriented such that planes of roughly close-packed oxygen atoms in both phases, \\{111\\} in magnetite and (-101) and (100) in clinopyroxene, are aligned. These EBSD-derived orientation relationships agree well with previous TEM and X-ray diffraction studies on similar materials, and are consistent with a high-temperature exsolution origin for the magnetite and coexistent amphibole. In contrast to clinopyroxene, the orientation relationships between plagioclase and its exsolved magnetite inclusions have so far been unexplored. Such inclusions are responsible for stable magnetic remanence in both layered intrusions and oceanic gabbros. Exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase crystals from anorthosites in the Early Jurassic Freetown Complex of Sierra Leone have been investigated. Preliminary

  16. TRM Anisotropy in Silicate-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.

    2006-05-01

    Currently there is a need for rock magnetic recorders that will allow researchers to examine the direction and intensity of the Earth's Precambrian magnetic field. Silicate-hosted magnetic inclusions (both exsolved and occluded) are uniquely suited to this task because (1) they are physically and chemically isolated from altering fluids, (2) they are at chemical equilibrium with their silicate hosts, (3) they have long relaxation times due to enhanced coercivity, and (4) they are common in mafic intrusive rocks, which are frequently found in Precambrian-aged terranes. Cretaceous-aged gabbros containing exsolved, crystallographically oriented, magnetite inclusions in clinopyroxene and plagioclase accurately record expected magnetic directions and intensities. Here we present new rock magnetic data on the anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization (aTRM) for single crystals of clinopyroxene and plagioclase containing exsolved inclusions. For clinopyroxene with two arrays of needle-shaped magnetite inclusions, the aTRM is strongly planar, showing two sets of antipodal direction clusters. The component of magnetization perpendicular to the applied TRM (transverse remanence) exceeds the parallel remanence in some crystallographic directions. For triclinic plagioclase with >4 arrays of needle shaped inclusions, the aTRM is subspherical with numerous minor clusters of directions. Transverse remanence is less important than parallel remanence in plagioclase. Thus, the greater number of inclusion arrays in plagioclase decreases the severity of the TRM anisotropy relative to the two arrays in pyroxene. Single crystals containing exsolved inclusions hold enormous potential as recorders of the Earth's magnetic direction and intensity. A statistical approach that combines remanence data from oriented single crystals successfully constrains the orientation and intensity of the ancient magnetic field.

  17. Electron thermalization and trapping rates in pure and doped alkali and alkaline-earth iodide crystals studied by picosecond optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G.; Burger, A.; Gektin, A.; Trefilova, L.; Williams, R. T.

    2014-04-01

    Although light continues to be emitted from insulating crystals used as scintillators over a period of nanoseconds to microseconds after stopping of an energetic particle, much of what determines the nonlinearity of response goes on in the first picoseconds. On this time scale, free carriers and excitons are at high density near the track core and thus are subject to nonlinear quenching. The hot (free) electrons eventually cool to low enough energy that trapping on holes, dopants, or defects can commence. In the track environment, spatial distributions of trapped carriers determined on the picosecond time scale can influence the proportionality between light yield and the initial particle energy throughout the whole light pulse. Picosecond spectroscopy of optical absorption induced by a short pulse of above-gap excitation provides a useful window on what occurs during the crucial early evolution of excited populations. The laser excitation can be tuned to excite carriers that are initially very hot (˜3 eV) relative to the band edges, or that are almost thermalized (˜0.1 eV excess energy) at the outset. Undoped and doped samples of NaI:Tl(0%, 0.1%), CsI:Tl(0%, 0.01%, 0.04%, 0.3%), and SrI2:Eu(0%, 0.2%, 0.5%, 3%) are studied in this work.

  18. Polaronic Superlattice Formed on Oxidised Magnetite (111) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdunov, N.; Mariotto, G.; Murphy, S.; Ceballos, S. F.; Jordan, K.; Shvets, I. V.

    2003-12-01

    We present direct experimental evidence of the formation of a superstructure on the (111) surface of a magnetite, Fe3O4 single crystal. The superstructure, which has a periodicity of 42 A and three-fold symmetry has been observed by means of STM and LEED. Under the correct conditions of oxygen pressure and sample anneal temperature the superstructure is reproducibly formed throughout most of the sample surface. The characteristics of the superstructure, including its dependency on the tunnel bias voltage and its atomic scale periodicity, suggest that it is an electronic effect rather than a mosaic of several iron oxide phases. We explain the results in terms of the formation of giant static polarons, although we notice that other types of electron-lattice instabilities such as charge density wave may offer possible explanations. We suggest two possible scenarios of instability linking the electron band structure and lattice distortions in magnetite: either resulting from reallocation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ valence states between octahedral sites or alternatively from reallocation between octahedral and tetrahedral sites.

  19. Electrical conductivity of magnetite-bearing serpentinite during shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Seiya; Yoshino, Takashi; Katayama, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Electrical conductivity of serpentinite with various amounts of magnetite was measured during shear deformation at high pressure and temperatures (P = 1.0 GPa, T = 750 K) corresponding to mantle wedge conditions to evaluate the contribution of aligned magnetite to the bulk conductivity of serpentinite. Under hydrostatic conditions, the sample conductivity considerably increases when the magnetite volume fraction exceeds 25% in volume, suggesting the presence of the percolation threshold for magnetite interconnection. During shear deformation, the conductivity for the samples with less than 25 vol.% magnetite increased by an order of magnitude or higher with increasing shear strain up to 9, which is likely a result of the clustering or realignment of magnetite grains in the serpentinites. However, activation enthalpy was nearly constant before and after deformation experiments, suggesting that shear deformation is unlikely to enhance establishment of interconnection of magnetite. Consequently, more than 25 vol.% magnetite is needed to establish connectivity of magnetite in serpentinite. On the other hand, the conductivity of serpentinite with low volume fraction of magnetite (5%), which is typical concentration of natural serpentinites, is almost similar to that of magnetite-free serpentinites. The present results show that the interconnection of magnetite in serpentinites by shear deformation is not expected as an origin of the high conductivity anomaly occasionally observed at the slab interface in the mantle wedge. The origin of high conductivity, therefore, indicates the presence of aqueous fluid with high salinity rather than the magnetite interconnection.

  20. Pond sediment magnetite grains show a distinctive microbial community.

    PubMed

    Song, H-K; Sonkaria, S; Khare, V; Dong, K; Lee, H-T; Ahn, S-H; Kim, H-K; Kang, H-J; Lee, S-H; Jung, S P; Adams, J M

    2015-07-01

    Formation of magnetite in anaerobic sediments is thought to be enhanced by the activities of iron-reducing bacteria. Geobacter has been implicated as playing a major role, as in culture its cells are often associated with extracellular magnetite grains. We studied the bacterial community associated with magnetite grains in sediment of a freshwater pond in South Korea. Magnetite was isolated from the sediment using a magnet. The magnetite-depleted fraction of sediment was also taken for comparison. DNA was extracted from each set of samples, followed by PCR for 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and HiSeq sequencing. The bacterial communities of the magnetite-enriched and magnetite-depleted fractions were significantly different. The enrichment of three abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) suggests that they may either be dependent upon the magnetite grain environment or may be playing a role in magnetite formation. The most abundant OTU in magnetite-enriched fractions was Geobacter, bolstering the case that this genus is important in magnetite formation in natural systems. Other major OTUs strongly associated with the magnetite-enriched fraction, rather than the magnetite-depleted fraction, include a Sulfuricella and a novel member of the Betaproteobacteria. The existence of distinct bacterial communities associated with particular mineral grain types may also be an example of niche separation and coexistence in sediments and soils, which cannot usually be detected due to difficulties in separating and concentrating minerals. PMID:25592636

  1. Evaluating the cytotoxicity of palladium/magnetite nano-catalysts intended for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Heike; Kühnel, Dana; Potthoff, Annegret; Mackenzie, Katrin; Springer, Armin; Schirmer, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    Palladium/magnetite nanoparticulate catalysts were developed for efficient elimination of halogenated organic pollutants from contaminated wastewater. Particle recovery from treated water can be ensured via magnetic separation. However, in worst-case scenarios, this catalyst removal step might fail, leading to particle release into the environment. Therefore, a toxicological study was conducted to investigate the impact of both pure magnetite and palladium/magnetite nanoparticle exposure upon human skin (HaCaT) and human colon (CaCo-2) cell lines and a cell line from rainbow trout gills (RTgill-W1). To quantify cell viability after particle exposure, three endpoints were examined for all tested cell lines. Additionally, the formation of reactive oxygen species was studied for the human cells. The results showed only minor effects of the particles on the tested cell systems and support the assumption that palladium/magnetite nano-catalysts can be implemented for a new wastewater treatment technology in which advantageous catalyst properties outweigh the risks. PMID:19783337

  2. Oxidation of pyrite in coal to magnetite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Alexander, C.C.; Dulong, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    When bituminous coal is heated in an inert atmosphere (He) containing small amounts of oxygen at 393-455 ??C, pyrite (FeS2) in coal is partially converted to magnetite (Fe304). The maximum amount of Fe304 formed during the time of heating corresponds to 5-20% of the total pyrite present, depending on the coal sample. The magnetite forms as an outer crust on the pyrite grains. The fact that the magnetic properties of the pyrite grains are substantially increased by the magnetite crust suggests that pyrite can be separated from coal by use of a low magnetic field. In a laboratory test, 75% removal is obtained by means of a 500 Oe magnet on three samples, and 60% on a fourth sample. ?? 1984.

  3. Molecular tectonics: from enantiomerically pure sugars to enantiomerically pure triple stranded helical coordination network.

    PubMed

    Grosshans, Philippe; Jouaiti, Abdelaziz; Bulach, Véronique; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais; Nicoud, Jean-François

    2003-06-21

    The self-assembly between a bis-monodentate tecton based on two pyridine units connected to an enantiomerically pure isomannide stereoisomer and HgCl2 leads to the formation of an enantiomerically pure triple stranded helical infinite coordination network which was structurally characterised by X-ray diffraction on single crystal. PMID:12841229

  4. Remanent and induced magnetic anomalies over a layered intrusion: Effects from crystal fractionation and magma recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Brown, Laurie L.; Robinson, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) norite - quartz mangerite layered intrusion is part of the early Neoproterozoic Rogaland Anorthosite Province intruded into the Fennoscandian shield in south Norway at ~ 930 Ma. The BKS is exposed over an area of 230 km 2 with a thickness of ~ 7000 m and is of economic interest for ilmenite, magnetite and apatite deposits. From the point of view of magnetic minerals, in the course of fractional crystallization and magma evolution, the ilmenite becomes less Fe 3+-rich reflected by a change from ilmenite with hematite exsolution to nearly pure ilmenite. Magnetite starts to crystallize relatively late in the intrusive history, but its crystallization is interrupted by influxes of more primitive magma. The variations in aeromagnetic and ground-magnetic anomalies measured over the BKS can be explained in terms of the measured magnetic properties of NRM, susceptibility, and hysteresis presented here, and in terms of mineralogy. Early layers in the intrusion contain hemo-ilmenite. As the magma evolved and magnetite started to crystallize, this caused a distinct change over the layering from remanence-controlled negative anomalies to induced positive anomalies. When new, more primitive magma was injected into the system, hemo-ilmenite returned as the major oxide and the resulting magnetic anomalies are again negative. The most dramatic change in the magnetic signature is in the upper part of the intrusion in MCU IVe, where magnetite became a well established cumulate phase as indicated by susceptibility, but its induced magnetization is overcome by large NRMs associated either with hemo-ilmenite, or with hemo-ilmenite and magnetite exsolved from pyroxenes. The average natural remanent magnetizations change from ~ 3 A/m in MCU IVd, to 15 A/m in MCU IVe, and back to 2 A/m in the overlying MCU IVf, producing a strong negative remanent anomaly that has been followed along strike for at least 20 km by ground-magnetic measurements. The highly varied

  5. Rock magnetism linked to human brain magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Magnetite has a long and distinguished career as one of the most important minerals in geophysics, as it is responsible for most of the remanent magnetization in marine sediments and the oceanic crust. It may come as a surprise to discover that it also ranks as the third or fourth most diverse mineral product formed biochemically by living organisms, and forms naturally in a variety of human tissues [Kirschvink et al., 1992].Magnetite was discovered in teeth of the Polyplacophora mollusks over 30 years ago, in magnetotactic bacteria nearly 20 years ago, in honey bees and homing pigeons nearly 15 years ago, but only recently in human tissue.

  6. Magnetite whiskers and platelets in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite: evidence of vapor phase growth.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J P; Harvey, R P; McSween, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-sized magnetite crystals associated with carbonates in fracture zones within Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been examined using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Some of the crystals exhibit distinctive morphologies: filamentary rods and ribbon, and platelets. The rods and ribbons are elongated along the crystallographic [100] and [111] directions. Some of the rods contain microstructural defects indicating that they grew by spiral growth about screw dislocations. Platelets are flattened along the [100] and [110] directions. These unique morphologies and microstructures constrain the growth conditions of magnetite. The whiskers and platelets most likely formed in the temperature range 500-800 degrees C by direct condensation from a vapor or precipitation from a supercritical fluid, and their properties are inconsistent with a biogenic origin. PMID:11541129

  7. Origin of magnetite and pyrrhotite in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. M.; Rowe, M. W.; Larson, E. E.; Watson, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    It is proposed that a substantial fraction of the magnetite, at least, resulted from the oxidation of troilite. Pyrrhotite is expected as a direct consequence of magnetite formation through this reaction. During thermomagnetic experiments on troilite, magnetite formation was observed at temperatures as low as 373 K, provided that the oxygen fugacity was held in the magnetite stability field, and that the troilite was sufficiently finely divided.

  8. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  9. Biomimetic Magnetite Formation: From Biocombinatorial Approaches to Mineralization Effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biological materials typically display complex morphologies and hierarchical architectures, properties that are hardly matched by synthetic materials. Understanding the biological control of mineral properties will enable the development of new synthetic approaches toward biomimetic functional materials. Here, we combine biocombinatorial approaches with a proteome homology search and in vitro mineralization assays to assess the role of biological determinants in biomimetic magnetite mineralization. Our results suggest that the identified proteins and biomimetic polypeptides influence nucleation in vitro. Even though the in vivo role cannot be directly determined from our experiments, we can rationalize the following design principles: proteins, larger complexes, or membrane components that promote nucleation in vivo are likely to expose positively charged residues to a negatively charged crystal surface. In turn, components with acidic (negatively charged) functionality are nucleation inhibitors, which stabilize an amorphous structure through the coordination of iron. PMID:24499323

  10. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t < 300°C), and amphibolite facies metamorphism ( t > 500°C).

  11. Frequency and field dependent susceptibility of magnetite at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Özden; Dunlop, David J.; Jackson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report the temperature dependence of in-phase and quadrature susceptibilities, k' and k″, between 20 K and 300 K for a stoichiometric natural single crystal of magnetite. Measurements were made for amplitudes of the AC driving field ranging from H = 30 A/m to 2 kA/m and frequencies ranging from f = 40 Hz to 4 kHz. In cubic magnetite above the Verwey transition, TV = 120 K, k' is limited by self-demagnetization and does not vary greatly with T, H or f. As the crystal cools through TV and transforms to monoclinic structure, k' decreases by about a factor 2, with a further more gradual decrease of 10-20% in cooling from 40 to 20 K. Saturation remanence also drops sharply at T V but shows no further change in cooling below 40 K. Thus it appears that domain walls remain pinned throughout the 20-40 K range but small segments undergo reversible oscillations in an AC field, the amplitude of oscillation decreasing steadily with cooling below 40 K. In this same range, k″ reaches a peak, while the temperature at which k' decreases most rapidly changes with frequency. Both observations indicate that domain wall oscillations lag appreciably behind the driving field at very low temperature. Both k' and k″ increase markedly with increasing AC field amplitude below TV. The field dependence is particularly strong below 40 K. Analysis of the k'( f) data between 20 and 40 K based on an Arrhenius thermal activation equation gives a pre-exponential frequency factor f o ≈ 2.5 × 108 s-1 and an activation energy ΔE = 0.035 eV. The ΔE is appropriate for electron hopping but f o suggests an indirect mechanism for wall mobility related to changes in electron ordering within walls.

  12. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of magnetite and other iron phases in Ordovician carbonates from east Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Dongwoo; van der Voo, Rob; Peacor, Donald R.

    1990-08-01

    Previous paleomagnetic observations for the carbonates of the Lower Ordovician Knox Group have indicated that ancient magnetizations in these rocks are of the same age as the late Paleozoic Alleghenian Orogeny. Rock magnetic properties strongly suggest magnetite as the carrier of the magnetization, but the textural and crystalline characteristics, sizes, morphologies, and mineral associations of these magnetites are poorly known. We have examined magnetic extracts and iron oxides in thin sections with scanning (SEM) and scanning/transmission (STEM) electron microscope techniques to determine whether the observed iron-oxide grain textures match the rock magnetic properties and paleomagnetic inferences about the mode of formation of the magnetic carriers. Several different forms of magnetite in limestones and dolomites, which in places are host to Mississippi-Valley type deposits, are documented by imaging and energy-dispersive analysis using SEM and STEM, by X ray diffraction and electron diffraction patterns using STEM. The magnetite is either spherical with a dimpled surface or nonspherical in the form of void-filling single grains or grain aggregates. Most of the iron oxides have the composition of pure end-member magnetite, but occasional titanomagnetite and hematite, including rare zincian hematite, have been observed (only in limestone). Wherever found in thin section, nonspherical magnetites occur in association with secondary dolomite, potassium-feldspar, illite, and quartz. Some iron oxides have, in fact, inclusions of K-feldspar and quartz. Some of the magnetite (spherical and nonspherical) is polycrystalline; this implies that the larger observed grains may consist of single domains or pseudo-single domains. This provides an explanation of the observed rock magnetic properties that apparently reflect the presence of single-domain (but interacting?) subgrains, on the basis of remanent coercivities and blocking temperatures. We interpret the pure end

  13. Magnetite Biomineralization: Fifty years of progress, from beach-combing to the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Dixson, A. D.; Raub, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetite biomineralization was first discovered 50 years ago as a hardening agent in the teeth of the Polyplacophoran molluscs (chitons) by the late Prof. Heinz A. Lowenstam of Caltech, when he noticed unusual erosional effects produced by their grazing in the intertidal zones of Palau (Lowenstam, 1962). Since then, biogenic magnetite has been detected in a broad range of organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria, protists, insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans. In many species, the role of ferromagnetic material as a neurophysiological transducer is demonstrated clearly through the effects of pulse-remagnetization on behavior. A brief (1 uS), properly configured magnetic discharge from a rectified LC circuit, tailored to exceed the coercivity of the magnetite, will often abolish a magnetic behavioral response, or in some cases make the organism go the wrong way. This is a unique ferromagnetic effect. The genes controlling magnetite biomineralization are well characterized in several species of bacteria, and the ability of some of these bacterial genes to initiate magnetite precipitation in mammalian cell lines argues for a common descent, probably via a magnetotactic mitochondrial ancestor. Previous studies in fish reported the presence of single-domain magnetite crystals in cells near projections of the trigeminal nerve, co-located in the olfactory epithelium. Although the cells are rare, the recent development of a spinning magnetic field technique allows easy identification and isolation of these cells for individual study (Eder et al., 2012). The cells are surprisingly magnetic, with moments hundreds of times larger than typical magnetotactic bacteria. Subsequent efforts to identify the anatomical seat of magnetoreceptors have focused on the same locations in new organisms, excluding other areas. Using SQUID moment magnetometry and SQUID scanning microscopy, we report here the unexpected presence of biogenic magnetite in

  14. Magnetite biomineralization and ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R B; Buseck, P R

    2000-04-01

    Certain chemical and mineral features of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were reported in 1996 to be probable evidence of ancient life on Mars. In spite of new observations and interpretations, the question of ancient life on Mars remains unresolved. Putative biogenic, nanometer magnetite has now become a leading focus in the debate. PMID:10742183

  15. Originof magnetite in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E.; Fuller, M.

    2003-04-01

    The magnetization of ALH84001 is predominantly carried by single domain magnetite, which is found in association with carbonate. The magnetite is found in topotactic relationship with the carbonate in regions of iron rich carbonate, whereas in magnesium richer areas periclase is found. The magnetite formed from the carbonate by thermal decomposition of siderite at elevated temperature in a major impact event at about 4.0 Gyr. Chromite is also present in large amounts, but it is predominantly paramagnetic at room temperature with a Neel point close to 100^oK. Carbonate with associated magnetite is also found in the martian meteorite Nakhla. Experiments and theory show that siderite is a major product of percolation and evaporation of brines generated under pressures of more than 0.1bar of carbon dioxide. This is the preferred explanation for the carbonate in nakhla, as well as in ALH84001. Thermal decomposition of siderite may result from deep burial, magmatic heat sources, or as in the case of ALH84001, impact heating.

  16. Bisphosphonate release profiles from magnetite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Shirosaki, Yuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsubara, Takao; Matsumine, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthermia has been suggested as a novel, minimally invasive cancer treatment method. After implantation of magnetic nano- or microparticles around a tumour through blood vessels, irradiation with alternating magnetic fields facilitates the efficient in situ hyperthermia even for deep-seated tumours. On the basis of this idea, if the microspheres are capable of delivering drugs, they could be promising multifunctional biomaterials effective for chemotherapy as well as hyperthermia. In the present study, magnetite microspheres were prepared by aggregation of the iron oxide colloid in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The release behaviour of alendronate, a typical bisphosphonate, from the microspheres was examined in vitro as a model of the bone tumour prevention and treatment system. The alendronate was successfully incorporated onto the porous magnetite microspheres in vacuum conditions. The drug-loaded microspheres maintained their original spherical shapes even after shaking in ultrapure water for 3 days, suggesting that they have sufficient mechanical integrity for clinical use. It was attributed to high aggregation capability of the magnetite nanoparticles through van der Waals and weak magnetic attractions. The microspheres showed slow release of the alendronate in vitro, resulting from tight covalent or ionic interaction between the magnetite and the alendronate. The release rate was diffusion-controlled type and well controlled by the alendronate concentration in drug incorporation to the microspheres. PMID:24854985

  17. Charge ordering and ferroelectricity in magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomskii, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Magnetite Fe3O4 is one of the most fascinating material in solid state physics. Besides being the first magnetic material known to the mankind, it is also the first example of an insulator-metal transition in transition metal oxides -- the famous Verwey transition [1]. One usually connects this transition with the charge ordering of Fe^2+ and Fe^3+. However the detailed pattern of CO in Fe3O4 is still a matter of debate. Another aspect, which is not so widely known and which did not yet receive sufficient attention, is that below TV, besides being completely spin polarised, magnetite apparently is also ferroelectric (FE) [2]. Thus it seems that magnetite, besides being the first magnetic material and the first transition metal oxide with an insulator-metal transition, is also the first multiferroic material. Using the idea of a coexistence of site-centred and bond-centred charge ordering [3], I suggest a novel type of ordering in magnetite which explains the observed FE in Fe3O4 and which agrees with the structural data. [1] Verwey E.J.W., Nature 144, 327 (1939) [2] Rado G.T. and Ferrari J.M., Phys.Rev.B 12, 5166 (1975); Kato K. and Iida S., J.Phys.Soc.Japan 50, 2844 (1981) [3] Efremov D.V., van den Brink J. and Khomskii D.I., Nature Mater. 3, 853 (2004)

  18. Magnetite in Black Sea Turtles (Chelonia agassizi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Garduño, V.; Sanchez, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have reported experimental evidence for magnetoreception in marine turtles. In order to increase our knowledge about magnetoreception and biogenic mineralization, we have isolated magnetite particles from the brain of specimens of black sea turtles Chelonia agassizi. Our samples come from natural deceased organisms collected the reserve area of Colola Maruata in southern Mexico. The occurrence of magnetite particles in brain tissue of black sea turtles offers the opportunity for further studies to investigate possible function of ferrimagnetic material, its mineralogical composition, grain size, texture and its location and structural arrangement within the host tissue. After sample preparation and microscopic examination, we localized and identified the ultrafine unidimensional particles of magnetite by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Particles present grain sizes between 10.0 to 40.0Mm. Our study provides, for the first time, evidence for biogenic formation of this material in the black sea turtles. The ultrafine particles are apparently superparamagnetic. Preliminary results from rock magnetic measurements are also reported and correlated to the SEM observations. The black turtle story on the Michoacan coast is an example of formerly abundant resource which was utilized as a subsistence level by Nahuatl indigenous group for centuries, but which is collapsing because of intensive illegal commercial exploitation. The most important nesting and breeding grounds for the black sea turtle on any mainland shore are the eastern Pacific coastal areas of Maruata and Colola, in Michoacan. These beaches are characterized by important amounts of magnetic mineral (magnetites and titanomagnetites) mixed in their sediments.

  19. The metal-insulator transition in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E.

    1972-01-01

    We describe an electronic model for the low temperature transition in magnetite, in which the average number of electrons on a site is non-integral. The solution of the one-dimensional problem is reviewed, and the connection of the model with the Verwey ordering is discussed. Some of the implication of the three dimensional problem are discussed.

  20. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Schwartz, Cindy; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2004-01-01

    Dated at approximately 3.9 billion years of age, carbonate disks, found within fractures of the host rock of Martian meteorite ALH84001, have been interpreted as secondary minerals that formed at low temperature in an aqueous medium. Heterogeneously distributed within these disks are magnetite nanocrystals that are of Martian origin. Approximately one quarter of these magnetites have morphological and chemical similarities to magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, which are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats on Earth. Moreover, these types of magnetite particles are not known or expected to be produced by abiotic means either through geological processes or synthetically in the laboratory. The remaining three quarters of the ALH84001 magnetites are likely products of multiple processes including, but not limited to, precipitation from a hydrothermal fluid, thermal decomposition of the carbonate matrix in which they are embedded, and extracellular formation by dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria. We have proposed that the origins of magnetites in ALH84001 can be best explained as the products of multiple processes, one of which is biological. Recently the three-dimensional (3-D) external morphology of the purported biogenic fraction of the ALH84001 magnetites has been the subject of considerable debate. We report here the 3-D geometry of biogenic magnetite crystals extracted from MV-1 and of those extracted from ALH84001 carbonate disks using a combination of high resolution classical and tomographic transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We focus on answering the following questions: (1) which technique provides adequate information to deduce the 3-D external crystal morphology?; and, (2) what is the precise 3-D geometry of the ALH84001 and MV-1 magnetites?

  1. Title: Biogenic Magnetite Prevails in Oxic Pelagic Red Clay Core in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, T.; Yamazaki, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have been observed in wide variety of environments, including soils, freshwater lakes, and marine sediments, since Blakemore (1975) first described in 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) of aquatic environments, produce intracellular crystals of magnetic minerals, specifically magnetite or greigite. It is considered that the magnetite/greigite crystals facilitate the bacteria's search for optimal conditions within the sharp chemical gradients of the OATZ. Petermann and Bleil (1993) reported living magnetotactic bacteria in pelagic and hemipelagic sediments near OATZ in the eastern South Atlantic at water depths to about 3,000 m, but they couldn't find actively swimming magnetotactic bacteria in sediments of deeper water depths. The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is far from continents and the lowest productivity region on Earth. IODP site U1365 (water depth ~5,700 m) cored pelagic red clay of 75.5 m thick above ~100 Ma basement (except for the chart layer from ~42 to 63.5 m) in the western edge of the SPG. The core mainly consists of iron rich clay. The color is dark reddish and/or dark brown throughout the core. We conducted a paleomagnetic and environmental rock magnetic study of the pelagic clay core. The magnetostratigraphy revealed the top 5 m sediments cover the last 5 My, and sedimentation rate decreases downward from 1.7 to 0.6 m/m.y. Geochemical measurements of pore water indicate that dissolved oxygen was present throughout the core (>50 μM). Thus oxygen penetrates through the entire sediment column to the sediment/basalt interface, and there is no OATZ. Magnetic mineral assemblage of this core is dominated by biogenic magnetite despite no OATZ. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams of all specimens have a narrow central ridge along the Hc axis with very small vertical spread. This indicates very weak magnetostatic interaction (Roberts et al., 2000), and is the

  2. Influence of magnetite stoichiometry on U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Boyanov, Maxim I; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Kemner, Kenneth M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-01-17

    Hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) can be reduced enzymatically by various microbes and abiotically by Fe(2+)-bearing minerals, including magnetite, of interest because of its formation from Fe(3+) (oxy)hydroxides via dissimilatory iron reduction. Magnetite is also a corrosion product of iron metal in suboxic and anoxic conditions and is likely to form during corrosion of steel waste containers holding uranium-containing spent nuclear fuel. Previous work indicated discrepancies in the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Here, we demonstrate that the stoichiometry (the bulk Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ratio, x) of magnetite can, in part, explain the observed discrepancies. In our studies, magnetite stoichiometry significantly influenced the extent of U(VI) reduction by magnetite. Stoichiometric and partially oxidized magnetites with x ≥ 0.38 reduced U(VI) to U(IV) in UO(2) (uraninite) nanoparticles, whereas with more oxidized magnetites (x < 0.38) and maghemite (x = 0), sorbed U(VI) was the dominant phase observed. Furthermore, as with our chemically synthesized magnetites (x ≥ 0.38), nanoparticulate UO(2) was formed from reduction of U(VI) in a heat-killed suspension of biogenic magnetite (x = 0.43). X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy results indicate that reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is coupled to oxidation of Fe(2+) in magnetite. The addition of aqueous Fe(2+) to suspensions of oxidized magnetite resulted in reduction of U(VI) to UO(2), consistent with our previous finding that Fe(2+) taken up from solution increased the magnetite stoichiometry. Our results suggest that magnetite stoichiometry and the ability of aqueous Fe(2+) to recharge magnetite are important factors in reduction of U(VI) in the subsurface. PMID:22148359

  3. Ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature magnetic tests for biogenic magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Sam Kim, Soon; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-07-01

    Magnetite is both a common inorganic rock-forming mineral and a biogenic product formed by a diversity of organisms. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetites of high purity and crystallinity (magnetosomes) arranged in linear chains of crystals. Magnetosomes and their fossils (magnetofossils) have been identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in sediments dating back to ˜510-570 Ma, and possibly in 4 Ga carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We present the results from two rock magnetic analyses—the low-temperature Moskowitz test and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR)—applied to dozens of samples of magnetite and other materials. The magnetites in these samples are of diverse composition, size, shape, and origin: biologically induced (extracellular), biologically controlled (magnetosomes and chiton teeth), magnetofossil, synthetic, and natural inorganic. We confirm that the Moskowitz test is a distinctive indicator for magnetotactic bacteria and provide the first direct experimental evidence that this is accomplished via sensitivity to the magnetosome chain structure. We also demonstrate that the FMR spectra of four different strains of magnetotactic bacteria and a magnetofossil-bearing carbonate have a form distinct from all other samples measured in this study. We suggest that this signature also results from the magnetosomes' unique arrangement in chains. Because FMR can rapidly identify samples with large fractions of intact, isolated magnetosome chains, it could be a powerful tool for identifying magnetofossils in sediments.

  4. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; McCloy, John S.

    2014-11-07

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ∼6 nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  5. One step facile synthesis of ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppiah, Durga Devi; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2016-09-01

    The ferromagnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) were influenced by the nanoparticle size, hence importance were given to the synthesis method. This paper clearly shows that magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by employing one step controlled precipitation method using a single salt (Iron(II) sulfate) iron precursor. The acquired titration curve from this method provides vital information on the possible reaction mechanism leading to the magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles formation. Goethite (α-FeOOH) was obtained at pH 4, while the continuous addition of hydroxyl ions (OH-) forms iron hydroxides (Fe(OH)2). This subsequently reacts with the goethite, producing magnetite (Fe3O4) at pH 10. Spectroscopy studies validate the magnetite phase existence while structural and morphology analysis illustrates cubic shaped magnetite with an average size of 35 nm was obtained. The synthesized magnetite might be superparamagnetic though lower saturation magnetization (67.5 emu/g) measured at room temperature as compared to bulk magnetite. However the nanoparticles surface anisotropy leads to higher remanence (12 emu/g) and coercivity (117.7 G) making the synthesized magnetite an excellent candidate to be utilized in recording devices. The understanding of the magnetite synthesis mechanism can not only be used to achieve even smaller magnetite nanoparticles but also to prepare different types of iron oxides hydroxides using different iron precursor source.

  6. Production of substantially pure fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, H.J.; Gallian, J.J.; Leeper, S.A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production of a substantially pure product containing greater than 60% fructose. It comprises: combining a sucrose-containing substrate with effective amounts of a levansucrase enzyme preparation to form levan and glucose; purifying the levan by at least one of the following purification methods: ultrafiltration, diafiltration, hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, liquid--liquid partition, solvent extraction, chromatography, and precipitation; hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose substantially free of glucose and sucrose; and recovering the fructose by at least one of the following recovery methods: hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, evaporation, drying, crystallization, and chromatography.

  7. Process of magnetite fabric development during granite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtani, Manish A.; Piazolo, Sandra; Greiling, Reinhard O.; Kontny, Agnes; Hrouda, František

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluates the fabric defined by magnetite grains in a syntectonically deformed granite and deciphers the processes that led to magnetite fabric development. Anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence magnetization (AARM) analysis is performed in samples taken from different parts of the granite to establish that the magnetite grains define a fabric. Along with microstructural studies, the AARM data help conclude that this fabric is on account of shape preferred orientation (SPO) of the magnetite grains. The intensity of magnetite fabric (degree of anisotropy of the AARM ellipsoid) is higher in the southern parts as compared to the north, which is inferred to indicate a strain gradient. Electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) analyses of magnetite grains were performed to determine if there are intracrystalline deformation features that could have influenced magnetite shape and SPO, and thus AARM data. Detailed crystallographic orientation data coupled with orientation contrast imaging did not reveal any subgrains and/or significant variations in crystallographic orientations within magnetite grains. Instead, grains exhibit fractures and are in places associated with quartz pressure fringes. Hence, neither the SPO nor the variation in the magnetite fabric intensity in the granite can be attributed to intracrystalline deformation of magnetite by dislocation creep. It is concluded that the magnetite grains were rheologically rigid and there was relative movement between the magnetite and the matrix minerals (quartz, feldspar and biotite). These matrix minerals actually define the fabric attractor and the magnetite grains passively rotated to align with it. Thus it is demonstrated that the magnetite fabric in the granite stems from rigid body movement rather than dislocation creep.

  8. The contribution of vanadium and titanium on improving methylene blue decolorization through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction catalyzed by their co-doped magnetite.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoliang; Zhong, Yuanhong; Zhu, Sanyuan; Ma, Lingya; Yuan, Peng; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping; Jiang, Zheng

    2012-01-15

    This study investigated the methylene blue (MB) decolorization through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction catalyzed by V-Ti co-doped magnetites, with emphasis on comparing the contribution of V and Ti cations on improving the adsorption and catalytic activity of magnetite. In the well crystallized spinel structure, both Ti(4+) and V(3+) occupied the octahedral sites. Ti(4+) showed a more obvious effect on increasing specific surface area and superficial hydroxyl amount than V(3+) did, resulting in a significant improvement of the adsorption ability of magnetite to MB. The UV introduction greatly accelerated MB degradation. And magnetite with more Ti and less V displayed better catalytic activity in MB degradation through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction. The transformation of degradation products and individual contribution from vanadium and titanium on improving adsorption and catalytic activity of magnetite were also investigated. These new insights are of high importance for well understanding the interface interaction between contaminants and metal doped magnetites, and the environmental application of natural and synthetic magnetites. PMID:22119302

  9. The magnetosome membrane protein, MmsF, is a major regulator of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Murat, Dorothée; Falahati, Veesta; Bertinetti, Luca; Csencsits, Roseann; Körnig, André; Downing, Kenneth; Faivre, Damien; Komeili, Arash

    2012-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use magnetosomes, membrane-bound crystals of magnetite or greigite, for navigation along geomagnetic fields. In Magnetospirillum magneticum sp. AMB-1, and other MTB, a magnetosome gene island (MAI) is essential for every step of magnetosome formation. An 8-gene region of the MAI encodes several factors implicated in control of crystal size and morphology in previous genetic and proteomic studies. We show that these factors play a minor role in magnetite biomineralization in vivo. In contrast, MmsF, a previously uncharacterized magnetosome membrane protein encoded within the same region plays a dominant role in defining crystal size and morphology and is sufficient for restoring magnetite synthesis in the absence of the other major biomineralization candidates. In addition, we show that the 18 genes of the mamAB gene cluster of the MAI are sufficient for the formation of an immature magnetosome organelle. Addition of MmsF to these 18 genes leads to a significant enhancement of magnetite biomineralization and an increase in the cellular magnetic response. These results define a new biomineralization protein and lay down the foundation for the design of autonomous gene cassettes for the transfer of the magnetic phenotype in other bacteria. PMID:22716969

  10. The magnetosome membrane protein, MmsF, is a major regulator of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Dorothée; Falahati, Veesta; Bertinetti, Luca; Csencsits, Roseann; Körnig, André; Downing, Kenneth; Faivre, Damien; Komeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use magnetosomes, membrane bound crystals of magnetite or greigite, for navigation along geomagnetic fields. In Magnetospirillum magneticum sp. AMB-1, and other MTB, a magnetosome gene island (MAI) is essential for every step of magnetosome formation. An 8-gene region of the MAI encodes several factors implicated in control of crystal size and morphology in previous genetic and proteomic studies. We show that these factors play a minor role in magnetite biomineralization in vivo. In contrast, MmsF, a previously uncharacterized magnetosome membrane protein encoded within the same region plays a dominant role in defining crystal size and morphology and is sufficient for restoring magnetite synthesis in the absence of the other major biomineralization candidates. In addition, we show that the 18 genes of the mamAB gene cluster of the MAI are sufficient for the formation of an immature magnetosome organelle. Addition of MmsF to these 18 genes leads to a significant enhancement of magnetite biomineralization and an increase in the cellular magnetic response. These results define a new biomineralization protein and lay down the foundation for the design of autonomous gene cassettes for the transfer of the magnetic phenotype in other bacteria. PMID:22716969

  11. Remanent and Induced Magnetic Anomalies over the Bjerkreim-Sokndal Layered Intrusion: Effects from Crystal Fractionation and Magma Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, S. A.; Brown, L. L.; Robinson, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) norite-quartz mangerite layered intrusion is part of the early Neoproterozoic Rogaland Anorthosite Province intruded into the Fennoscandian shield in south Norway at ~930 Ma. The BKS is exposed over an area of 230 km2 with a thickness of ~7000m and is of economic interest for hemo-ilmenite, magnetite and apatite deposits. From the point of view of magnetic minerals, in the course of fractional crystallization and magma evolution, the ilmenite becomes less Fe3+-rich reflected by a change from ilmenite with hematite exsolution to nearly pure ilmenite. Magnetite starts to crystallize relatively late in the intrusive history, but its crystallization is interrupted by influxes of more primitive magma containing hemo-ilmenite. The variations in aeromagnetic and ground-magnetic anomalies measured over the BKS can be explained in terms of the magnetic properties of NRM, susceptibility, and hysteresis. Magnetic properties are correlated with the oxide mineralogy and mineral chemistry. Early layers in the intrusion contain hemo-ilmenite. As the magma evolved and magnetite started to crystallize, this caused a distinct change over the layering from remanence-controlled negative anomalies to induced positive anomalies. When new, more primitive magma was injected into the system, hemo-ilmenite returned as the major oxide and the resulting magnetic anomalies are again negative. The most dramatic change in the magnetic signature is in the upper part of the intrusion in MCU IVe, where magnetite became a well established cumulate phase as indicated by susceptibility, but its induced magnetization is overcome by large NRM's associated either with hemo-ilmenite or with hemo-ilmenite and magnetite exsolved from pyroxenes. The average natural remanent magnetizations change from ~3 A/m in MCU IVd, to 15 A/m in MCU IVe, and back to 2 A/m in the overlying MCU IVf, producing a strong negative remanent anomaly that has been followed along strike for at least 20

  12. The HtrA/DegP family protease MamE is a bifunctional protein with roles in magnetosome protein localization and magnetite biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Anna; Murat, Dorothée; Vali, Hojatollah; Komeili, Arash

    2011-01-01

    Summary Magnetotactic bacteria contain nanometer-sized, membrane-bound organelles, called magnetosomes, which are tasked with the biomineralization of small crystals of the iron oxide magnetite allowing the organism to use geomagnetic field lines for navigation. A key player in this process is the HtrA/DegP family protease MamE. In its absence, Magnetospirillum magneticum str AMB-1 is able to form magnetosome membranes but not magnetite crystals, a defect previously linked to the mislocalization of magnetosome proteins. In this work we use a directed genetic approach to find that MamE, and another predicted magnetosome-associated protease, MamO, likely function as proteases in vivo. However, as opposed to the complete loss of mamE where no biomineralization is observed, the protease-deficient variant of this protein still supports the initiation and formation of small, 20 nm-sized crystals of magnetite, too small to hold a permanent magnetic dipole moment. This analysis also reveals that MamE is a bifunctional protein with a protease-independent role in magnetosome protein localization and a protease-dependent role in maturation of small magnetite crystals. Together these results imply the existence of a previously unrecognized “checkpoint” in biomineralization where MamE moderates the completion of magnetite formation and thus committal to magneto-aerotaxis as the organism’s dominant mode of navigating the environment. PMID:21414040

  13. Origin of carbonate-magnetite-sulfide assemblages in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Scott, E R

    1999-02-25

    A review of the mineralogical, isotopic, and chemical properties of the carbonates and associated submicrometer iron oxides and sulfides in Martian meteorite ALH84001 provides minimal evidence for microbial activity. Some magnetites resemble those formed by magnetotactic microorganisms but cubic crystals <50 nm in size and elongated grains <25 nm long are too small to be single-domain magnets and are probably abiogenic. Magnetites with shapes that are clearly unique to magnetotactic bacteria appear to be absent in ALH84001. Magnetosomes have not been reported in plutonic rocks and are unlikely to have been transported in fluids through fractures and uniformly deposited where abiogenic magnetite was forming epitaxially on carbonate. Submicrometer sulfides and magnetites probably formed during shock heating. Carbonates have correlated variations in Ca, Mg, and 18O/16O, magnetite-rich rims, and they appear to be embedded in pyroxene and plagiociase glass. Carbonates with these features have not been identified in carbonaceous chondrites and terrestrial rocks, suggesting that the ALH84001 carbonates have a unique origin. Carbonates and hydrated minerals in ALH84001, like secondary phases in other Martian meteorites, have O and H isotopic ratios favoring formation from fluids that exchanged with the Martian atmosphere. I propose that carbonates originally formed in ALH84001 from aqueous fluids and were subsequently shock heated and vaporized. The original carbonates were probably dolomite-magnesite-siderite assemblages that formed in pores at interstitial sites with minor sulfate, chloride, and phyllosilicates. These phases, like many other volatile-rich phases in Martian meteorites, may have formed as evaporate deposits from intermittent floods. PMID:11542931

  14. Spin reorientation transition of magnetite (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-García, Laura; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Pabón, Beatriz M.; Bliem, Roland; Parkinson, Gareth S.; Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K.; de la Figuera, Juan

    2016-04-01

    We have imaged the rearrangement of the magnetic domains on magnetite (001) when crossing the spin reorientation transition and the Verwey transition with nanometer resolution. By means of spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy we have monitored the change in the easy axes lowering the temperature through both transitions in remanence. The spin reorientation transition occurs in two steps: initial nucleation and growth of domains with a new surface magnetic orientation is followed by a smooth evolution.

  15. Initial Test Determination of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, H.; Caffee, M. W.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides, such as 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl, are produced by cosmic rays in surficial materials on Earth, and used for determinations of cosmic-ray exposure ages and erosion rates. Quartz and limestone are routinely used as the target minerals for these geomorphological studies. Magnetite also contains target elements that produce abundant cosmogenic nuclides when exposed to the cosmic rays. Magnetite has several notable merits that enable the measurement of cosmogenic nuclides: (1) the target elements for production of cosmogenic nuclides in magnetite comprise the dominant mineral form of magnetite, Fe3O4; (2) magnetite can be easily isolated, using a magnet, after rock milling; (3) multiple cosmogenic nuclides are produced by exposure of magnetite to cosmic-ray secondaries; and (4) cosmogenic nuclides produced in the rock containing the magnetite, but not within the magnetite itself, can be separated using nitric acid and sodium hydroxide leaches. As part of this initial study, magnetite was separated from a basaltic sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chili (2,995 m). Then Be, Al, Cl, Ca, and Mn were separated from ~2 g of the purified magnetite. We measured cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl concentrations in the magnetite by accelerator mass spectrometry at PRIME Lab, Purdue University. Cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations of aliquot of the magnetite were measured by mass spectrometry at the University of Tokyo. We also measured the nuclide concentrations from magnetite collected from a mine at Ishpeming, Michigan as a blank. The 10Be and 36Cl concentrations as well as 3He concentration produce concordant cosmic ray exposure ages of ~0.4 Myr for the Atacama basalt. However, observed high 26Al and 21Ne concentrations attribute to those nuclides incorporation from silicate impurity.

  16. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  17. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  18. The oxidation state and microstructural environment of transition metals (V, Co, and Ni) in magnetite: an XAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoliang; He, Zisen; Tan, Wei; Liu, Peng; Zhu, Jianxi; Zhang, Jing; He, Hongping

    2015-05-01

    Transition metal-substituted magnetite minerals have attracted increasing attention for their wide application in industry and environmental protection. In this study, the valence and atomic environment of some substituting metals in magnetites (Fe3- x M x O4, M = V, Co, and Ni) were investigated using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The results deduced from X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy indicated that the valences of V, Co, and Ni in Fe3- x M x O4 were +3, +2, and +2, respectively. The valences did not change as the substitution extent increased. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy suggested that the substituting cations occupied octahedral sites in the magnetite structure. The M-O and M-M/Fe distances were consistent with the Feoct-O and Feoct-Fe distances, respectively, in the magnetite (Fe3O4) structure. The occupancy of the substituting cations was assessed by crystal-field theory. We also considered the relationship between the chemical environment of substituting cations and their effects on the physicochemical properties of magnetite, including thermal stability, surface properties, and catalytic reactivity.

  19. Magnetism of biotite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, David J.; Özdemir, Özden; Rancourt, Denis G.

    2006-03-01

    We report Mössbauer spectra, magnetic hysteresis, acquisition and demagnetization of isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), and low-temperature IRM warming curves of biotite crystals, as well as a summary of domain observations on magnetic extracts. The biotites are from 1.0 to 1.2 Ga gneisses and 1.85 Ga plutons of the Grenville, Churchill and Bear Provinces (Canada). Most have paramagnetic susceptibilities in the range (0.45-1.2) × 10 - 3 SI, similar to reported values for iron-rich biotites. Magnetite, identified by its 120 K Verwey transition, is an inclusion in all the biotites. Sizes and domain states of inclusions correlate with magnetite content as measured by saturation magnetization Ms. The higher Ms is, the lower are the domain state indicators Mrs / Ms ( Mrs is saturation IRM) and coercive force Hc. Added to a base population (0.003-0.1%) of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) grains with Mrs / Ms from 0.1 to 0.3 and Hc from 7 to 20 mT is ≤ 1% (in two exceptional cases, 7% and 14%) of coarse-grained multidomain (MD) magnetite with much softer hysteresis properties. The underlying PSD magnetite fraction in biotites potentially retains useful paleomagnetic remanence. In the more magnetic micas, this stable fraction may be swamped by MD magnetite with less stable behavior.

  20. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  1. Galvanostatic interruption of lithium insertion into magnetite: Evidence of surface layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Nicholas W.; Knehr, K. W.; Cama, Christina A.; Lininger, Christianna N.; Lin, Zhou; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; West, Alan C.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetite is a known lithium intercalation material, and the loss of active, nanocrystalline magnetite can be inferred from the open-circuit potential relaxation. Specifically, for current interruption after relatively small amounts of lithium insertion, the potential first increases and then decreases, and the decrease is hypothesized to be due to a formation of a surface layer, which increases the solid-state lithium concentration in the remaining active material. Comparisons of simulation to experiment suggest that the reactions with the electrolyte result in the formation of a thin layer of electrochemically inactive material, which is best described by a nucleation and growth mechanism. Simulations are consistent with experimental results observed for 6, 8 and 32-nm crystals. Furthermore, simulations capture the experimental differences in lithiation behavior between the first and second cycles.

  2. Galvanostatic interruption of lithium insertion into magnetite: Evidence of surface layer formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nicholas W. Brady; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Knehr, K. W.; Cama, Christina A.; Lininger, Christianna N.; Lin, Zhou; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; West, Alan C.

    2016-05-05

    Magnetite is a known lithium intercalation material, and the loss of active, nanocrystalline magnetite can be inferred from the open-circuit potential relaxation. Specifically, for current interruption after relatively small amounts of lithium insertion, the potential first increases and then decreases, and the decrease is hypothesized to be due to a formation of a surface layer, which increases the solid-state lithium concentration in the remaining active material. Comparisons of simulation to experiment suggest that the reactions with the electrolyte result in the formation of a thin layer of electrochemically inactive material, which is best described by a nucleation and growth mechanism.more » Simulations are consistent with experimental results observed for 6, 8 and 32-nm crystals. As a result, simulations capture the experimental differences in lithiation behavior between the first and second cycles.« less

  3. Preparation and characterization of MR fluid consisting of magnetite particle coated with PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, M. K.; Park, B. J.; Choi, H. J.

    2009-02-01

    To improve physical characteristics of MR fluid, we synthesize magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) in shape of magnetic core- poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymeric shell by atomic transfer radical polymerization. Prepared MNPs-PMMA which possesses a density lower than that of pure MNPs were characterized by FT-IR, XPS and TEM. Synthesized MNP-PMMA based MR fluid which was dispersed in non-magnetic medium lubricant oil (Yu-base 8) with 10 vol% was prepared. Rheological properties such as shear viscosity, shear stress and storage modulus were measured by both static and dynamic tests using a rotational rheometer with various external magnetic field strength applied.

  4. Hybrid DFT calculation of Fe57 NMR resonances and orbital order in magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, C. H.

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structure and charge and orbital order of magnetite below the Verwey temperature are calculated using a first-principles hybrid density functional theory (DFT) method. The initial atomic positions in the crystal-structure calculation are those recently refined from x-ray diffraction data for the Cc space-group unit cell [Senn, Wright, and Attfield, Nature (London) 481, 173 (2012), 10.1038/nature10704]. Fermi contact and magnetic dipolar contributions to hyperfine fields at Fe57 nuclei obtained from hybrid DFT calculations are used to obtain NMR resonance frequencies for magnetite for a range of external magnetic field directions in a relatively weak field. NMR frequencies from hybrid density functional theory calculations are compared to NMR data [M. Mizoguchi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 70, 2333 (2001), 10.1143/JPSJ.70.2333] for a range of applied magnetic field directions. NMR resonance frequencies of B-site Fe ions show large relative variations with applied field direction owing to anisotropic hyperfine fields from charge and orbital ordered Fe 3d minority-spin electrons at those sites. Good agreement between computed and measured NMR resonance frequencies confirms the pattern of charge and orbital order obtained from calculations. The charge and orbital order of magne-tite in its low-temperature phase obtained from hybrid DFT calculations is analyzed in terms of one-electron bonds between Fe ions. The Verwey transition in magnetite therefore resembles Mott-Peierls transitions in vanadium oxides which undergo symmetry-breaking transitions owing to electron-pair bond formation.

  5. A spectroscopic study of uranium(VI) interaction with magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamrani, S. El; Giménez, J.; Rovira, M.; Seco, F.; Grivé, M.; Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; de Pablo, J.

    2007-08-01

    The uranium sorbed onto commercial magnetite has been characterized by using two different spectroscopic techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Magnetite samples have been put in contact with uranium(VI) solutions in conditions in which a high uranium uptake is expected. After several days, the magnetite surface has been analysed by XPS and EXAFS. The XPS results obtained are not conclusive regarding the uranium oxidation state in the magnetite surface. On the other hand, the results obtained with the EXAFS technique show that the uranium-magnetite sample spectrum has characteristics from both the UO 2 and schoepite spectra, e.g. a relatively high coordination number of equatorial oxygens and two axial oxygens, respectively. These results would indicate that the uranium sorbed onto magnetite would be a mixture of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI).

  6. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O. N. C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J. M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-03-01

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications.

  7. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attallah, Olivia A.; Girgis, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M. S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20-30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications.

  8. Purely lytic osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Santos, L.A.; Eideken, B.

    1982-11-01

    The radiographic features of 42 purely lytic osteosarcomas are presented. Purely lytic osteosarcoma is identified as a lytic lesion of bone with no demonstrable osteoid matrix by conventional radiographic modalities. Purely lytic osteosarcoma represented 13.7% of a group of 305 osteosarcomas. The most common presentation was that of a lytic illdefined lesion with a moderate to large extraosseous mass component. Nine lesions presented with benign radiographic features. The differential diagnosis is outlined. The need for awareness of this type of presentation of osteosarcoma is stressed.

  9. Estimation of Sintering Kinetics of Magnetite Pellet Using Optical Dilatometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep Kumar, T. K.; Viswanathan, Neelakantan Nurni; Ahmed, Hesham M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Björkman, B.

    2016-02-01

    During induration of magnetite pellets, oxidation of magnetite followed by sintering of the oxidized magnetite (hematite) is desirable. Sintering of magnetite which hampers the oxidation of magnetite is aimed to be kept as low as possible. In succession to our earlier study on sintering behavior of oxidized magnetite (hematite), this paper focusses on the sintering behavior of magnetite phase in isolation with an objective to estimate their kinetic parameters. The pellets prepared from the concentrate of LKAB's mine, which majorly contains (>95 pct) magnetite, are used for the sintering studies. Optical Dilatometer is used to capture the sintering behavior of the magnetite pellet and determine their isothermal kinetics by deducing the three parameters, namely—activation energy ( Q), pre-exponential factor ( K'), and time exponent ( n) with the help of power law and Arrhenius equation. It is interesting to find that the time exponent ( n) is decreasing with the increase in sintering temperature. It is also interesting to note that the activation energy for sintering of magnetite pellet shows no single value. From the present investigation, two activation energies—477 kJ/mole [1173 K to 1373 K (900 °C to 1100 °C)] and 148 kJ/mole [1373 K to 1623 K (1100 °C to 1350 °C)]—were deduced for sintering of magnetite, suggesting two different mechanisms operating at lower and other at higher temperatures. The estimated kinetic parameters were used to predict the non-isothermal sintering behavior of magnetite using the sintering kinetic model. Predicted results were validated using experimental data.

  10. Silicon dioxide nanoporous structure with liquid crystal for optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushynskyi, Orest; Vistak, Maria; Gotra, Zenon; Fechan, Andriy; Mikityuk, Zinoviy

    2013-05-01

    It has been studied the spectral characteristics of the porous silicon dioxide and cholesteric liquid crystal. It has been shown that doping of the EE1 cholesteric liquid crystal with Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles doesn't shift significantly the position of the transmittance minimum of the material. It has been found that the deformation of chiral pitch of cholesteric liquid crystal with magnetite is observed in case of doping of porous nanocomposite host with following shifting of minimum of transmittance into short wavelength direction. It has been shown that influence of carbon monoxide on optical characteristics of the cholesteric liquid crystal with magnetite can be explained by the interaction of CARBON MONOXIDE molecules with magnetite nanodopants.

  11. Extended release of vitamins from magnetite loaded polyanionic polymeric beads.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Maria; Verisan, Cristina; Voicu, Georgeta; Ficai, Denisa; Ficai, Anton; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Vlad, Mihaela; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2016-08-30

    Here we explore a novel approach of increasing the release duration of folic and ascorbic acid from magnetite entrapped into calcium-alginate beads. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite-vitamins complexes are reported. The magnetite-vitamins complexes were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, BET and DTA-TG. Also calcium-alginate magnetic beads were prepared by dripping a mixture of sodium alginate with magnetite-vitamins complexes into calcium chloride solution. Extended release profile of the two experimental models was evaluated and quantified by UV-vis. PMID:26626225

  12. Science: Pure or Applied?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Through a description of some of the activities which take place in his science classroom, the author makes a strong case for the inclusion of technology, or applied science, rather than pure science in the primary curriculum. (KC)

  13. Pure-quartic solitons.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; de Sterke, C Martijn; Martijn, de Sterke C; Sipe, J E; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  14. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  15. Pure-quartic solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, De Sterke C.; Sipe, J. E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers.

  16. Molecular simulation of the magnetite-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bylaska, Eric J.

    2003-03-01

    This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations of the magnetite (001)-water interface, both in pure water and in the presence of a 2.3 molal solution of NaClO 4. The simulations are carried out using a potential model designed to allow the protonation states of the surface functional groups to evolve dynamically through the molecular dynamics trajectory. The primary structural quantities investigated are the populations of the surface functional groups, the distribution of electrolyte in the solution, and the surface hydrogen bonding relationships. The surface protonation states are dominated by extensive hydrolysis of interfacial water molecules, giving rise to a dipolar surface dominated by FeOH2+-OH 2-OH - arrangements. Triply coordinated, more deeply buried, surface sites are inert, probably due to the relative lack of solvent in their vicinity. The electrolyte distribution is oscillatory, arranging preferentially in layers defined by the solvating water molecules. The presence of electrolyte has a negligible effect on the protonation states of the surface functional groups. Steady-state behavior is obtained for the protonation states of the surface functional groups and hydrogen-bonding network. Although the overall structure of the electrolyte distribution is fairly well established, the electrolyte distribution has not fully equilibrated, as evidenced by the asymmetry in the distribution from the top to the bottom of the slab.

  17. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  18. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-03-15

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications. -- Graphical abstract: A large amount of Lewis acid sites were found in the highly dispersed magnetite which is supported on the SWCNT outer surface. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} The obtained materials were completely characterized with XRD, Raman and SEM-TEM. {yields} DRIFT, TGA and adsorption of the composites allowed understand the material formation. {yields} This is the first report of a study of Lewis sites by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  19. Magnetite in Desert Varnish and Applications to Rock Varnish on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Bishop, J. L.; de, S.

    2002-03-01

    Magnetite in desert varnish is characterized here using DTA, IR and SEM. The presence of magnetite in desert varnish is significant because of the oxidizing environment. This situation is similar to that of Mars where magnetite may also be present.

  20. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  1. Magnetic anisotropy modulation of magnetite in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/BaTiO{sub 3}(100) epitaxial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vaz, C. A. F.; Hoffman, J.; Posadas, A.-B.; Ahn, C. H.

    2009-01-12

    Temperature dependent magnetometry and transport measurements on epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films grown on BaTiO{sub 3}(100) single crystals by molecular beam epitaxy show a series of discontinuities, due to changes in the magnetic anisotropy induced by strain from the different crystal phases of BaTiO{sub 3}. The magnetite film is under tensile strain at room temperature, which is ascribed to the lattice expansion of BaTiO{sub 3} at the cubic to tetragonal transition, indicating that the magnetite film is relaxed at the growth temperature. From the magnetization versus temperature curves, the variation in the magnetic anisotropy is determined and compared with the magnetoelastic anisotropies. These results demonstrate the possibility of using the piezoelectric response of BaTiO{sub 3} to modulate the magnetic anisotropy of magnetite films.

  2. Ion microprobe analysis of oxygen isotope ratios in granulite facies magnetites: diffusive exchange as a guide to cooling history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John W.; Graham, Colin M.

    1991-03-01

    Ion microprobe analysis of magnetites from the Adirondack Mountains, NY, yields oxygen isotope ratios with spatial resolution of 2 8 μm and precision in the range of 1‰ (1 sigma). These analyses represent 11 orders of magnitude reduction in sample size compared to conventional analyses on this material and they are the first report of routinely reproducible precision in the 1 per mil range for analysis of δ18O at this scale. High precision micro-analyses of this sort will permit wide-ranging new applications in stable isotope geochemistry. The analyzed magnetites form nearly spherical grains in a calcite matrix with diopside and monticellite. Textures are characteristic of granulite facies marbles and show no evidence for retrograde recrystallization of magnetite. Magnetites are near to Fe3O4 in composition, and optically and chemically homogeneous. A combination of ion probe plus conventional BrF5 analysis shows that individual grains are homogeneous with δ18O=8.9±1‰ SMOW from the core to near the rim of 0.1 1.2 mm diameter grains. Depth profiling into crystal growth faces of magnetites shows that rims are 9‰ depleted in δ18O. These low δ18O values increase in smooth gradients across the outer 10 μm of magnetite rims in contact with calcite. These are the sharpest intracrystalline gradients measured to date in geological materials. This discovery is confirmed by bulk analysis of 150 350 μm diameter magnetites which average 1.2‰ lower in δ18O than coarse magnetites due to low δ18O rims. Conventional analysis of coexisting calcite yields °18O=18.19, suggesting that bulk Δ18O (Cc-Mt)=9.3‰ and yielding an apparent equilibration “temperature” of 525° C, over 200° C below the temperature of regional metamorphism. Consideration of experimental diffusion data and grain size distribution for magnetite and calcite suggests two contrasting cooling histories. The data for oxygen in calcite under hydrothermal conditions at high P(H2O) indicates that

  3. Synthesis, characterisation and application of silica-magnetite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Ian J.; Taylor, James; Todd, Michael; Davies, Martin J.; Borioni, Enrico; Sangregorio, Claudio; Sen, Tapas

    2004-12-01

    Silica-magnetite composites were prepared for eventual applications in biomolecular separations (nucleic acids). Their production on large scale has been optimised and they have been extensively characterised in a physical and chemical context. They perform at least as well, if not better than a commercially available equivalent at adsorbing and eluting DNA. Several methods for the preparation of magnetite were compared in order to select one, which produced particles, possessing high magnetic susceptibility, low rate of sedimentation and good chemical stability. Of the main methods studied: (i) oxidative hydrolysis of iron(II) sulphate in alkaline media, (ii) alkaline hydrolysis of iron(II) and iron(III) chloride solutions, and (iii) precipitation from iron(II) and iron(III) chloride solutions by hydrolysis of urea, method (i) produced the 'best' magnetite particles. Silica-magnetite composites were prepared using the 'best' magnetite, and, for comparison, two methods for depositing silica were used to coat the silica onto magnetite nanoparticles, from silicic acid at pH 10 and by acid hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) at 90 °C. The best method for yielding silica-magnetite composites that worked well in DNA adsorption and elution proved to be that involving silicic acid and this material could be made in 20 g batch sizes. Silica-magnetite composites from the two methods proved to have distinct and different physical and chemical properties. All magnetite and silica-magnetite samples were fully characterised for their relative chemical composition using Fourier-transform infrared, XRF and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Their physical characteristics were determined using scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption and Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of the iron oxides produced. Selected samples were comparatively tested for their ability to adsorb, and subsequently elute, 2-deoxyguanosine-5-monophosphate (GMP) and its non

  4. [Role of mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate) in the obtaining of stabilized magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical application].

    PubMed

    Vazhnichaya, Ye M; Mokliak, Ye V; Kurapov, Yu A; Zabozlaev, A A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) are studied as agents for magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia of malignant tumors, targeted drug delivery as well as anti-anemic action. One of the main problems of such NPs is their aggregation that requires creation of methods for magnetite NPs stabilization during preparation of liquid medicinal forms on their basis. The present work is devoted to the possibility of mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate) use for solubilization of magnetite NPs in hydrophilic medium. For this purpose, the condensate produced by electron-beam evaporation and condensation, with magnetite particles of size 5-8 nm deposited into the crystals of sodium chloride were used in conjunction with substance of mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate), and low molecular weight polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The NP condensate was dispersed in distilled water or PVP or mexidol solutions. NPs size distribution in the liquid phase of the systems was determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, iron (Fe) concentration was evaluated by atomic emission spectrometry. It is shown that in the dispersion prepared in distilled water, the major amount of NPs was of 13-120 nm in size, in mexidol solution - 270-1700 nm, in PVP solution - 30-900 nm. In the fluid containing magnetite NPs together with mexidol and PVP, the main fraction (99.9%) was characterized by the NPs size of 14-75 nm with maximum of 25 nm. This system had the highest iron concentration: it was similar to that in the sample with mexidol solution and 6.6-7.3 times higher than the concentration in the samples with distilled water or PVP. Thus, in the preparation of aqueous dispersions based on magnetite NPs condensate, mexidol provides a transition of Fe to the liquid phase in amount necessary to achieve its biological activity, and PVP stabilizes such modified NPs. PMID:26215417

  5. Magnetite as Possible Template for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    a perfect chance to attest this argument. In order to understand the distribution of spiral magnetites among different meteorite classes, as well as to investigate their spiral configurations and correlation to molecular asymmetry, we observed polished thin sections of CCs using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Individual magnetite grains were picked, embedded in epoxy, thin-sectioned using an ultra-microtome, and studied with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in order to reconstruct the crystal orientation along the stack of magnetite disks.

  6. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.; Padilla, Dennis D.; Wingo, Robert M.; Worl, Laura A.; Johnson, Michael D.

    2003-07-22

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  7. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2006-12-26

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  8. Biogeochemical role of magnetite in urban soils (Review of publications)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2013-03-01

    The surface horizons of urban soils are enriched in technogenic magnetite Fe3O4 accumulated from emissions. Its content there reaches 3-4% and more, whereas it does not exceed 0.1% in the back-ground soils. In urban soils, large spherical magnetite particles of pseudo-single-domain and multidomain fabric predominate; the cavities in magnetic spherules decrease their chemical stability and increase their reactivity. Magnetite is most often destroyed in urban soils due to complexing; its destruction may be initiated by mineral salts entering the soil with deicing mixtures and by organic acids excreted by roots (e.g., by oxalic acid). The high solubility of magnetite with ammonium oxalate should be taken into account when using Tamm's reagent for the analysis of urban soils. Magnetite is a mineral carrier of some heavy metals. Therefore, its content (as determined from the magnetic susceptibility) serves as an indirect index of soil pollution. In addition, magnetite may affect many soil properties as a reducer and sorbent. It adsorbs phosphorus thus preventing the penetration of this nutrient into rivers and lakes. Magnetite also oxidizes Cl-containing aliphatic hydrocarbons and purifies the soil. Although magnetite enters urban soils as a pollutant, its influence on the soil properties cannot be unambiguously judged as only negative.

  9. MAGNETITE RECOVERY IN COAL WASHING BY HIGH GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a demonstration of the successful recovery of magnetite from mixtures of magnetite and coal, like those found in a coal-washing circuit, by High Gradient Magnetic Separation. The demonstration was part of a research program at Francis Bitter National Magnet L...

  10. Pure uterine lipoma.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Gulnur; Celik, Onder; Karakas, Hakki Muammer; Alkan, Alpay; Hascalik, Seyma

    2007-10-01

    Lipomatous tumors of the uterus are unusual, benign neoplasms seen in postmenopausal women. Although many of the mixed-type cases such as lipoleiomyoma and fibrolipoma have been reported, pure uterine lipomas are extremely rare. In the literature, a few cases with pure uterine lipoma have been reported. We first present the advanced magnetic resonance findings of pure uterine lipoma, followed by those of ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT). We markedly detected lipid peaks on the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and the apparent diffusion coefficient value to be 0.00 due to chemical-shift effects with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Although pelvic lipomatous tumors can be diagnosed with US and CT, in some cases, further workup may be required to localize the lesion. MRI may yield more valuable data for differential diagnosis. MRS and DWI findings provide additional clues on the nature of the lesion. PMID:17905250

  11. Coating agents affected toward magnetite nanoparticles properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcharoen, Karat; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2012-02-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles --MNPs-- are innovative materials used in biological and medical applications. They respond to magnetic field through the superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. In this study, the MNPs were synthesized via the chemical co-precipitation method using various coating agents. Fatty acids, found naturally in the animal fats, can be used as a coating agent. Oleic acid and hexanoic acid were chosen as the surface modification agents to study the improvement in the suspension of MNPs in water and the magnetite properties. Suspension stability, particle size, and electrical conductivity of MNPs are critically affected by the modification process. The well-dispersed MNPs in water can be improved by the surface modification and the oleic acid coated MNPs possess excellent suspension stability over 1 week. The particle size of MNPs increases up to 40 nm using oleic acid coated MNPs. The electrical conductivity of the smallest particle size is 1.3x10-3 S/cm, which is 5 times higher than that of the largest particle, suggesting potential applications as a biomedical material under both of the electrical and magnetic fields.

  12. Magnetite deformation mechanism maps for better prediction of strain partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Moskowitz, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    Abstract A meta-analysis of existing experimental deformation data for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and other spinel-structured ferrites reveals that previously published flow laws are inadequate to describe the general deformation behavior of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Using updated rate equations for oxygen diffusion in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, we present new flow laws that closely predict creep rates similar to those found in deformation experiments and that can be used to predict strain partitioning between cubic Fe oxides and other phases in the Earth's crust. New deformation mechanism maps for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> have been constructed as functions of temperature and grain size. Using the revised creep parameters, estimates of strain partitioning between <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, ilmenite, and plagioclase indicate that concentrated zones of Fe-Ti oxides in oceanic crust near slow-spreading ridges could accommodate significant amounts of strain at moderate temperatures and may contribute to aseismic creep along spreading-segment faults.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25535350','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25535350"><span id="translatedtitle">No evidence for intracellular <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in putative vertebrate magnetoreceptors identified by magnetic screening.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Edelman, Nathaniel B; Fritz, Tanja; Nimpf, Simon; Pichler, Paul; Lauwers, Mattias; Hickman, Robert W; Papadaki-Anastasopoulou, Artemis; Ushakova, Lyubov; Heuser, Thomas; Resch, Guenter P; Saunders, Martin; Shaw, Jeremy A; Keays, David A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The cellular basis of the magnetic sense remains an unsolved scientific mystery. One theory that aims to explain how animals detect the magnetic field is the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> hypothesis. It argues that intracellular <span class="hlt">crystals</span> of the iron oxide <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) are coupled to mechanosensitive channels that elicit neuronal activity in specialized sensory cells. Attempts to find these primary sensors have largely relied on the Prussian Blue stain that labels cells rich in ferric iron. This method has proved problematic as it has led investigators to conflate iron-rich macrophages with magnetoreceptors. An alternative approach developed by Eder et al. [Eder SH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(30):12022-12027] is to identify candidate magnetoreceptive cells based on their magnetic moment. Here, we explore the utility of this method by undertaking a screen for magnetic cells in the pigeon. We report the identification of a small number of cells (1 in 476,000) with large magnetic moments (8-106 fAm(2)) from various tissues. The development of single-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) permitted subcellular analysis of magnetic cells. This revealed the presence of extracellular structures composed of iron, titanium, and chromium accounting for the magnetic properties of these cells. Application of single-cell CLEM to magnetic cells from the trout failed to identify any intracellular structures consistent with biogenically derived <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Our work illustrates the need for new methods to test the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> hypothesis of magnetosensation. PMID:25535350</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040121339&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040121339&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite"><span id="translatedtitle">Origin of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in oxidized CV chondrites: in situ measurement of oxygen isotope compositions of Allende <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and olivine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Choi, B. G.; McKeegan, K. D.; Leshin, L. A.; Wasson, J. T.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> in the oxidized CV chondrite Allende mainly occurs as spherical nodules in porphyritic-olivine (PO) chondrules, where it is associated with Ni-rich metal and/or sulfides. To help constrain the origin of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, we measured oxygen isotopic compositions of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and coexisting olivine grains in PO chondrules of Allende by an in situ ion microprobe technique. Five <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nodules form a relatively tight cluster in oxygen isotopic composition with delta 18O values from -4.8 to -7.1% and delta 17O values from -2.9 to -6.3%. Seven coexisting olivine grains have oxygen isotopic compositions from -0.9 to -6.3% in delta 18O and from -4.6 to -7.9% in delta 17O. The delta 17O values of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and coexisting olivine do not overlap; they range from -0.4 to -2.6%, and from -4.0 to -5.7%, respectively. Thus, the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is not in isotopic equilibrium with the olivine in PO chondrules, implying that it formed after the chondrule formation. The delta 17O of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is somewhat more negative than estimates for the ambient solar nebula gas. We infer that the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formed on the parent asteroid by oxidation of metal by H2O which had previously experienced minor O isotope exchange with fine-grained silicates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740022389','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740022389"><span id="translatedtitle">Production of <span class="hlt">pure</span> metals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra <span class="hlt">pure</span> elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ontology&pg=2&id=EJ1105980','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ontology&pg=2&id=EJ1105980"><span id="translatedtitle">Dahlbeck and <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Ontology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mackenzie, Jim</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a <span class="hlt">pure</span> ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3522128','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3522128"><span id="translatedtitle">Hexagonal Platelet-like <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> as a Biosignature of Thermophilic Iron-Reducing Bacteria and Its Applications to the Exploration of the Modern Deep, Hot Biosphere and the Emergence of Iron-Reducing Bacteria in Early Precambrian Oceans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> <span class="hlt">crystals</span> characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> with a size up to 120 nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> with such large <span class="hlt">crystal</span> sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these <span class="hlt">crystals</span> allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life. Key Words: Biosignatures—Magnetite—Iron-reducing bacteria—Deep subsurface biosphere—Banded iron formation. Astrobiology 12, 1100–1108. PMID:23145573</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23145573','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23145573"><span id="translatedtitle">Hexagonal platelet-like <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as a biosignature of thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria and its applications to the exploration of the modern deep, hot biosphere and the emergence of iron-reducing bacteria in early precambrian oceans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Yi-Liang</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> <span class="hlt">crystals</span> characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> with a size up to 120 nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> with such large <span class="hlt">crystal</span> sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these <span class="hlt">crystals</span> allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life. PMID:23145573</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MinDe..50..607D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MinDe..50..607D"><span id="translatedtitle">Did the massive <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> "lava flows" of El Laco (Chile) form by magmatic or hydrothermal processes? New constraints from <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> composition by LA-ICP-MS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dare, Sarah A. S.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Beaudoin, Georges</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The El Laco <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> deposits consist of more than 98 % <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> but show field textures remarkably similar to mafic lava flows. Therefore, it has long been suggested that they represent a rare example of an effusive Fe oxide liquid. Field and petrographic evidence, however, suggest that the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> deposits represent replacement of andesite flows and that the textures are pseudomorphs. We determined the trace element content of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) from various settings at El Laco and compared them with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from both igneous and hydrothermal environments. This new technique allows us to place constraints on the conditions under which <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in these supposed <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> "lava flows" formed. The trace element content of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the massive <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> samples is different to any known magmatic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, including primary <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> phenocrysts from the unaltered andesite host rocks at El Laco. Instead, the El Laco <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is most similar in composition to hydrothermal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from high-temperature environments (>500 °C), such as iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) and porphyry-Cu deposits. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> trace elements from massive <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are characterised by (1) depletion in elements considered relatively immobile in hydrothermal fluids (e.g. Ti, Al, Cr, Zr, Hf and Sc); (2) enrichment in elements that are highly incompatible with magmatic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (rare earth elements (REE), Si, Ca, Na and P) and normally present in very low abundance in magmatic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>; (3) high Ni/Cr ratios which are typical of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from hydrothermal environments; and (4) oscillatory zoning of Si, Ca, Mg, REE and most high field strength elements, and zoning truncations indicating dissolution, similar to that formed in hydrothermal Fe skarn deposits. In addition, secondary <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in altered, brecciated host rock, forming disseminations and veins, has the same composition as <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the massive</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JMMM..321.3093M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JMMM..321.3093M"><span id="translatedtitle">Studies of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in tri(ethylene glycol)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maity, Dipak; Kale, S. N.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika; Xue, Jun-Min; Ding, Jun</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>In this paper, water-soluble <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles have been directly synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate, Fe(acac) 3 in tri(ethyleneglycol). Size and morphology of the nanoparticles are determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements while the <span class="hlt">crystal</span> structure is identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface charge and surface coating of the nanoparticles are recognized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and zeta potential measurements. Magnetic properties are determined using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements. The results show that as-prepared <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles are relatively monodisperse, single crystalline and superparamagnetic in nature with the blocking temperature at around 100 K. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles are found to be highly soluble in water due to steric and electrostatic interactions between the particles arising by the surface adsorbed tri(ethyleneglycol) molecules and associated positive charges, respectively. Cytotoxicity studies on human cervical (SiHa), mouse melanoma (B16F10) and mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 80 μg/ml, the magnetic nanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. Specific absorption rate (SAR) value has been calculated to be 885 and 539 W/gm for samples with the iron concentration of 1 and 0.5 mg/ml, respectively. The high SAR value upon exposure to 20 MHz radiofrequency signifies the applicability of as-prepared <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles for a feasible magnetic hyperthermia treatment.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1810097','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1810097"><span id="translatedtitle">Biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the nematode caenorhabditis elegans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cranfield, Charles G; Dawe, Adam; Karloukovski, Vassil; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; de Pomerai, David; Dobson, Jon</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model system in biological research. Recently, examination of the production of heat-shock proteins in this organism in response to mobile phone-type electromagnetic field exposure produced the most robust demonstration to date of a non-thermal, deleterious biological effect. Though these results appear to be a sound demonstration of non-thermal bioeffects, to our knowledge, no mechanism has been proposed to explain them. We show, apparently for the first time, that biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, a ferrimagnetic iron oxide, is present in C. elegans. Its presence may have confounding effects on experiments involving electromagnetic fields as well as implications for the use of this nematode as a model system for iron biomineralization in multi-cellular organisms. PMID:15801597</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23594814','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23594814"><span id="translatedtitle">Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Byrne, J M; Coker, V S; Moise, S; Wincott, P L; Vaughan, D J; Tuna, F; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Pattrick, R A D; Lloyd, J R; Telling, N D</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Cobalt-doped <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (CoxFe3 -xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt-iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe(2+) site with Co(2+), with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3645421','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3645421"><span id="translatedtitle">Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Cobalt-doped <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3090322','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3090322"><span id="translatedtitle">Porphyrin-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoconjugates for biological imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background The use of silica coated magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents has resulted in the production of highly stable, non-toxic solutions that can be manipulated via an external magnetic field. As a result, the interaction of these nanocomposites with cells is of vital importance in understanding their behaviour and biocompatibility. Here we report the preparation, characterisation and potential application of new "two-in-one" magnetic fluorescent nanocomposites composed of silica-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles covalently linked to a porphyrin moiety. Method The experiments were performed by administering porphyrin functionalised silica-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles to THP-1 cells, a human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line. Cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 25 mM HEPES supplemented with heat-inactivated foetal bovine serum (FBS). Results We have synthesised, characterised and analysed in vitro, a new multimodal (magnetic and fluorescent) porphyrin magnetic nanoparticle composite (PMNC). Initial co-incubation experiments performed with THP-1 macrophage cells were promising; however the PMNC photobleached under confocal microscopy study. β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) was employed to counteract this problem and resulted not only in enhanced fluorescence emission, but also allowed for elongated imaging and increased exposure times of the PMNC in a cellular environment. Conclusion Our experiments have demonstrated that β-ME visibly enhances the emission intensity. No deleterious effects to the cells were witnessed upon co-incubation with β-ME alone and no increases in background fluorescence were recorded. These results should present an interest for further development of in vitro biological imaging techniques. PMID:21477294</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EOSTr..83..309S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EOSTr..83..309S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> reveals ambient field strength at low temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Smirnov, Alexei V.; Tarduno, John A.</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) is the most important and oldest known magnetic mineral on Earth (Figure l). We have come a long way from the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> loadstone compasses of ancient China; <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and titanomagnetite have been established as the principal carriers of geologically important remanent magnetizations in rocks, the study of which led to the plate tectonic paradigm. We now recognize that <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> plays an important role in the biosphere. Some organisms contain intra-cellular particles of Fe3O4 that they use for spatial orientation and navigation. When preserved in rocks, these particles—called "magnetofossils"— can provide important insight into the origin and development of life here, and perhaps, on other planets [e.g., Thomas-Keprta et al., 2000]. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> is now used in the medical field and in nanotechnology research. Nanoparticles of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are used as a contrasting agent in magnetic resonance imaging and are being developed to deliver site-specific drugs for the treatment of cancer [Alexiou et al., 2000]. Such applications add to a long list of industrial uses of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> that range from magnetic ink to magnetic recording media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18301753','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18301753"><span id="translatedtitle">Bats use <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to detect the earth's magnetic field.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Holland, Richard A; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Doak, Thomas G; Wikelski, Martin</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>While the role of magnetic cues for compass orientation has been confirmed in numerous animals, the mechanism of detection is still debated. Two hypotheses have been proposed, one based on a light dependent mechanism, apparently used by birds and another based on a "compass organelle" containing the iron oxide particles <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe(3)O(4)). Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method by which they detect the Earth's magnetic field remains unknown. Here we use the classic "Kalmijn-Blakemore" pulse re-magnetization experiment, whereby the polarity of cellular <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is reversed. The results demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to detect the Earths magnetic field and the response indicates a polarity based receptor. Polarity detection is a prerequisite for the use of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as a compass and suggests that big brown bats use <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to detect the magnetic field as a compass. Our results indicate the possibility that sensory cells in bats contain freely rotating <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles, which appears not to be the case in birds. It is crucial that the ultrastructure of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> containing magnetoreceptors is described for our understanding of magnetoreception in animals. PMID:18301753</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70034302','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70034302"><span id="translatedtitle">LA-ICP-MS of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>: Methods and reference materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nadoll, P.; Koenig, A.E.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) is a common accessory mineral in many geologic settings. Its variable geochemistry makes it a powerful petrogenetic indicator. Electron microprobe (EMPA) analyses are commonly used to examine major and minor element contents in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is applicable to trace element analyses of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> but has not been widely employed to examine compositional variations. We tested the applicability of the NIST SRM 610, the USGS GSE-1G, and the NIST SRM 2782 reference materials (RMs) as external standards and developed a reliable method for LA-ICP-MS analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. LA-ICP-MS analyses were carried out on well characterized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> samples with a 193 nm, Excimer, ArF LA system. Although matrix-matched RMs are sometimes important for calibration and normalization of LA-ICP-MS data, we demonstrate that glass RMs can produce accurate results for LA-ICP-MS analyses of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Cross-comparison between the NIST SRM 610 and USGS GSE-1G indicates good agreement for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> minor and trace element data calibrated with either of these RMs. Many elements show a sufficiently good match between the LA-ICP-MS and the EMPA data; for example, Ti and V show a close to linear relationship with correlation coefficients, R2 of 0.79 and 0.85 respectively. ?? 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015CQGra..32q5016C&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015CQGra..32q5016C&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pure</span> Lovelock Kasner metrics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Camanho, Xián O.; Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>We study <span class="hlt">pure</span> Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single Nth order Lovelock term in the action in d=2N+1,2N+2 dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, d=2N+1, is kinematic, i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for d=2N+1, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five- and six dimensional <span class="hlt">pure</span> Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We also comment on a closely related family of exponential solutions and on the possibility of solutions with complex Kasner exponents. We show that the latter imply the existence of closed timelike curves in the geometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800064650&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800064650&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite"><span id="translatedtitle">The case against UV photostimulated oxidation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. [on Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The kinetics of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> oxidation in O2-bearing atmospheres in the presence of electromagnetic radiation was studied. No perceptible oxidation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by ultraviolet (UV) photostimulation occurred. These results do not corroborate previous conclusions by Huguenin (1973, 1974) as to the occurrence of this process. Therefore, although the possibility that the process actually occurs cannot be ruled out, it is concluded that there is not yet a basis in laboratory experiments for inferring that UV photostimulated oxidation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> occurs naturally on the surface of Mars.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810054012&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810054012&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite"><span id="translatedtitle">Graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> aggregates in ordinary chondritic meteorites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Rubin, A. E.; Keil, K.; Okada, A.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>The graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> component has been found (1) as abundant isolated inclusions in eight ordinary-chondritic, regolith breccias; (2) as the sole matrix in a new kind of unequilibrated chondrite that forms clasts in these regolith breccias; and (3) together with a Huss matrix in six unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the component was formed by low-temperature, gas-solid reactions before the accretion of the meteorite, and that the isolated inclusions of graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in regolith breccias were derived from bodies composed of the new kind of chondrite that has graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as its sole matrix.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981Natur.291..544S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981Natur.291..544S"><span id="translatedtitle">Graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> aggregates in ordinary chondritic meteorites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Rubin, A. E.; Okada, A.; Keil, K.</p> <p>1981-06-01</p> <p>The graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> component has been found (1) as abundant isolated inclusions in eight ordinary-chondritic, regolith breccias; (2) as the sole matrix in a new kind of unequilibrated chondrite that forms clasts in these regolith breccias; and (3) together with a Huss matrix in six unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the component was formed by low-temperature, gas-solid reactions before the accretion of the meteorite, and that the isolated inclusions of graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in regolith breccias were derived from bodies composed of the new kind of chondrite that has graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as its sole matrix.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23607663','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23607663"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparative genomic analysis of magnetotactic bacteria from the Deltaproteobacteria provides new insights into <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and greigite magnetosome genes required for magnetotaxis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lefèvre, Christopher T; Trubitsyn, Denis; Abreu, Fernanda; Kolinko, Sebastian; Jogler, Christian; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Lins, Ulysses; Pignol, David; Schüler, Dirk; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Ginet, Nicolas</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a group of diverse motile prokaryotes that biomineralize magnetosomes, the organelles responsible for magnetotaxis. Magnetosomes consist of intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometre-sized <span class="hlt">crystals</span> of the magnetic minerals <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and are usually organized as a chain within the cell acting like a compass needle. Most information regarding the biomineralization processes involved in magnetosome formation comes from studies involving Alphaproteobacteria species which biomineralize cuboctahedral and elongated prismatic <span class="hlt">crystals</span> of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Many magnetosome genes, the mam genes, identified in these organisms are conserved in all known MTB. Here we present a comparative genomic analysis of magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria that synthesize bullet-shaped <span class="hlt">crystals</span> of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and/or greigite. We show that in addition to mam genes, there is a conserved set of genes, designated mad genes, specific to the magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria, some also being present in Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum of the Nitrospirae phylum, but absent in the magnetotactic Alphaproteobacteria. Our results suggest that the number of genes associated with magnetotaxis in magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria is larger than previously thought. We also demonstrate that the minimum set of mam genes necessary for magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum is also conserved in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-producing, magnetotactic Deltaproteobacteria. Some putative novel functions of mad genes are discussed. PMID:23607663</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.6421S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.6421S"><span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence of gigantic biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schumann, D.; Raub, T. D.; Kopp, R. E.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Wu, T. D.; Rouiller, I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Sears, S. K.; Lücken, U.; Tikoo, S. M.; Hesse, R.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Vali, H.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is one of the most severe climatic events of the Cenozoic Era. A massive injection of light carbon into the oceans and atmosphere over a few thousand of years triggered drastic perturbation of Earth's climate resulting in abrupt global warming of ~5-9oC [Sluijs et al., 2007] that persisted for ~180,000 years. This episode is marked by the diversification and radiation of terrestrial plants and mammals while in the marine realm numerous deep-sea benthic foraminifera species disappeared and new forms evolved. Sediments deposited during the PETM are clay-rich and contain distinct evidence of these climatic changes. Kopp et al., (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) report an extraordinary magnetofossil ‘Lagerstätte' in lowermost Eocene kaolinite-rich clay sediments deposited at subtropical paleolatitude in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of New Jersey, USA. Magnetofossils are magnetic particles produced most abundantly by magnetotactic bacteria. Kopp et al. (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) used ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy, other rock magnetic methods, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of magnetic separates to characterize sediments from boreholes at Ancora (ODP Leg 174AX) and Wilson Lake, NJ, respectively. These sediments contain abundant ~40- to 300-nm cuboidal, elongate-prismatic and bullet-shaped magnetofossils, sometimes arranged in short chains, resembling <span class="hlt">crystals</span> in living magnetotactic bacteria. Despite the scarcity of intact magnetofossil chains, the asymmetry ratios of the FMR spectra reflects a profusion of elongate single domain (SD) <span class="hlt">crystals</span> and/or chains. Here we address both conundrums by reporting the discovery from these same sediments of exceptionally large and novel biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> <span class="hlt">crystals</span> unlike any previously reported from living organisms or from sediments. Aside from abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like <span class="hlt">magnetite</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150010433','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150010433"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Plaquettes Provide an Extraterrestrial Source of Asymmetric Components</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Martinez, J. E.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Molecular selectivity is a crucial criterion for life. A possible abiotic mechanism that can produce chiral asymmetry in meteoritic amino acids is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe3O4), a common mineral in some carbonaceous chondrites (CCs), has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the formation of amino acids that are commonly found in these meteorites. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> sometimes takes the form of plaquettes that consist of barrel-shaped stacks of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> disks that resemble a spiral. However, a widely accepted description of the internal morphology of this particular <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> form is still lacking, which is necessary in order to confirm or disprove the spiral configuration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1003113','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1003113"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic Properties of Bio-Synthesized <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rawn, Claudia J; Yeary, Lucas W; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J; Thompson, James R; Phelps, Tommy Joe</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Magnetic nanoparticles, which are unique because of both structural and functional elements, have various novel applications. The popularity and practicality of nanoparticle materials create a need for a synthesis method that produces quality particles in sizable quantities. This paper describes such a method, one that uses bacterial synthesis to create nanoparticles of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. The thermophilic bacterial strain Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus TOR-39 was incubated under anaerobic conditions at 65 C for two weeks in aqueous solution containing Fe ions from a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> precursor (akaganeite). <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> particles formed outside of bacterial cells. We verified particle size and morphology by using dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Average crystallite size was 45 nm. We characterized the magnetic properties by using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer; a saturation magnetization of 77 emu/g was observed at 5 K. These results are comparable to those for chemically synthesized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJAsB..14..547H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJAsB..14..547H"><span id="translatedtitle">Hexagonal plate-like <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals produced in komatiite-H2O-CO2 reaction system at 450°C</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hao, Xi-Luo; Li, Yi-Liang</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Batch experiments of komatiite-H2O-CO2 system with temperatures from 200 to 450°C were performed to simulate the interactions between the newly formed ultramafic crust and the proto-atmosphere on Earth before the formation of its earliest ocean. Particularly, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals were observed in the experiment carried out at 450°C that are characterized by their hexagonal platelet-like morphology and porous structure. Exactly the same set of lattice fringes on the two opposite sides of one pore suggests post-<span class="hlt">crystallization</span> erosion. The results demonstrate that <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> could be produced by the direct interactions between the ultramafic rocky crust and the atmosphere before the formation of the ocean on the Hadean Earth. These <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles could serve as a catalyst in the synthesis of simple organic molecules during the organochemical evolution towards life.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol8-sec917-8.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol8-sec917-8.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 917.8 - <span class="hlt">Pure</span> grower or <span class="hlt">pure</span> producer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 <span class="hlt">Pure</span> grower or <span class="hlt">pure</span> producer. (a) For peaches,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol8-sec917-8.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol8-sec917-8.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 917.8 - <span class="hlt">Pure</span> grower or <span class="hlt">pure</span> producer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 <span class="hlt">Pure</span> grower or <span class="hlt">pure</span> producer. (a) For peaches,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GeCoA..73.6631T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GeCoA..73.6631T"><span id="translatedtitle">Origins of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals in Martian meteorite ALH84001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> (Fe 3O 4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is allochthonous. For example, the <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterization of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> present in the carbonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1025420','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1025420"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrophoretic mobility of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in high temperature water</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vidojkovic, Sonja; Rodriguez-Santiago, V; Fedkin, Mark V.; Wesolowski, David J; Lvov, Serguei N.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>(Fe3O4) isoneofthemostcommonoxidesformingdepositsandparticulatephasesin industrialhightemperaturewatercircuits.Itscolloidalcharacteristicsplayaprincipalroleinthe mechanismofdepositformationandcanbeusedascontrollingfactorstopreventorminimizedeposit formationanddamageofindustrialpipelinesduetounder-depositcorrosion.Inthisstudy,ahigh temperatureparticleelectrophoresistechniquewasemployedtomeasurethezetapotentialatthe <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/waterinterface the parameterthatcontrolscolloidalstabilityofparticles,theiraggrega- tion, anddeposition.Themeasurementsweremadeattemperaturesupto200 1C overawiderangeofpH. The isoelectricpointsofmagnetite,atwhichthedepositionofparticlesisincreased,weredeterminedatpH 6.35, 6.00,5.25,and5.05fortemperatures25,100,150,and200 1C, respectively.Theobserved temperaturedependenceofzetapotentialandtheisoelectricpHpointofmagnetitecanhelptoexplain the extentofinteractionsbetweenthecolloidalparticlesandthesteelwallsurfacesunderhydro- thermalconditions,andindicatemethodsforcontrollingandmitigatingoxidedepositioninhigh temperaturewatercycles.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22147200','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22147200"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in lung epithelial cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ramesh, Vani; Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Copeland, Clinton L; Gopikrishnan, Ramya; Biradar, Santhoshkumar; Goornavar, Virupaxi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Hall, Joseph C</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>There is an ongoing concern regarding the biocompatibility of nanoparticles with sizes less than 100 nm as compared to larger particles of the same nominal substance. In this study, we investigated the toxic properties of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> stabilized with polyacrylate sodium. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis, and the mean particle diameter was calculated using the Scherrer formula and was found to be 9.3 nm. In this study, we treated lung epithelial cells with different concentrations of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and investigated their effects on oxidative stress and cell proliferation. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-treated cells with a significant dose-dependent activation and induction of reactive oxygen species. Also, we observed a depletion of antioxidants, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase, respectively, as compared with control cells. In addition, apoptotic-related protease/enzyme such as caspase-3 and -8 activities, were increased in a dose-dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-treated cells compared to than control cells. Together, the present study reveals that <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> exposure induces oxidative stress and depletes antioxidant levels in the cells to stimulate apoptotic pathway for cell death. PMID:22147200</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3430331','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3430331"><span id="translatedtitle">The Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Nap Is Required for Anaerobic Growth and Involved in Redox Control of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Li, Yingjie; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The magnetosomes of many magnetotactic bacteria consist of membrane-enveloped <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> <span class="hlt">crystals</span>, whose synthesis is favored by a low redox potential. However, the cellular redox processes governing the biomineralization of the mixed-valence iron oxide have remained unknown. Here, we show that in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> biomineralization is linked to dissimilatory nitrate reduction. A complete denitrification pathway, including gene functions for nitrate (nap), nitrite (nir), nitric oxide (nor), and nitrous oxide reduction (nos), was identified. Transcriptional gusA fusions as reporters revealed that except for nap, the highest expression of the denitrification genes coincided with conditions permitting maximum <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> synthesis. Whereas microaerobic denitrification overlapped with oxygen respiration, nitrate was the only electron acceptor supporting growth in the entire absence of oxygen, and only the deletion of nap genes, encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase, and not deletion of nor or nos genes, abolished anaerobic growth and also delayed aerobic growth in both nitrate and ammonium media. While loss of nosZ or norCB had no or relatively weak effects on magnetosome synthesis, deletion of nap severely impaired <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> biomineralization and resulted in fewer, smaller, and irregular <span class="hlt">crystals</span> during denitrification and also microaerobic respiration, probably by disturbing the proper redox balance required for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> synthesis. In contrast to the case for the wild type, biomineralization in Δnap cells was independent of the oxidation state of carbon substrates. Altogether, our data demonstrate that in addition to its essential role in anaerobic respiration, the periplasmic nitrate reductase Nap has a further key function by participating in redox reactions required for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> biomineralization. PMID:22730130</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212517','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212517"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} nucleating agents on <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> behavior and magnetic properties of ferromagnetic glass-ceramic in the system Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaO{center_dot}ZnO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Abdel-Hameed, Salwa A.M.; Elwan, Rawhia L.</p> <p>2012-05-15</p> <p>Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer <span class="hlt">Crystallization</span> of magnetic glass ceramic with different nucleating agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} as nucleating agents was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD for as prepared samples revealed <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> of <span class="hlt">pure</span> <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment revealed minor calcium silicate, hematite and cristobalite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM revealed <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> of crystallite size in the range 50-100 nm. -- Abstract: Preparation and characterization of ferromagnetic glass ceramic in the system Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaO{center_dot}ZnO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2} with different nucleating agents was studied. The effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} as nucleating agents was investigated. Differential thermal analysis; X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope were used to investigate thermal behavior, sequence of <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> and microstructure of the samples. XRD analysis for as prepared samples revealed the <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> of single <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> phase. Heat treatment at 900 Degree-Sign C/2 h revealed the appearance of minor amounts of calcium silicate, hematite and cristobalite beside <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. TEM revealed <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> of crystallite size in the range 50-100 nm. Lattice parameters, cell volume and crystallite size were stimulated from XRD data. Magnetic properties of quenched samples were measured under 20 kG.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27338613','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27338613"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pure</span> Autonomic Failure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Pure</span> autonomic failure (PAF) is a rare sporadic neurodegenerative autonomic disorder characterized by slowly progressive pan autonomic failure without other features of neurologic dysfunctions. The main clinical symptoms result from neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and urinary and gastrointestinal autonomic dysfunctions. Autonomic failure in PAF is caused by neuronal degeneration of pre- and postganglionic sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons in the thoracic spinal cord and paravertebral autonomic ganglia. The presence of Lewy bodies and α-synuclein deposits in these neural structures suggests that PAF is one of Lewy body synucleinopathies, examples of which include multiple system atrophy, Parkinson disease, and Lewy body disease. There is currently no specific treatment to stop progression in PAF. Management of autonomic symptoms is the mainstay of treatment and includes management of orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. The prognosis for survival of PAF is better than for the other synucleinopathies. PMID:27338613</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014PhSS...56...91N&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014PhSS...56...91N&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Structure of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-oleic acid-decalin magnetic fluid from small-angle neutron scattering data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nagornyi, A. V.; Petrenko, V. I.; Bulavin, L. A.; Avdeev, M. V.; Almásy, L.; Rosta, L.; Aksenov, V. L.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Structural parameters of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-oleic acid-decalin magnetic fluid at various excesses of oleic acid (up to 25 vol %) have been determined using small-angle neutron scattering. Based on the comparison of the behavior of oleic acid in the magnetic fluid and in the <span class="hlt">pure</span> solvent (decalin), it has been concluded that the interaction between the molecules of free (unadsorbed) surfactant changes in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. However, the system remains stable and does not form aggregates of magnetic particles or free oleic acid. These results are compared with the previously presented data for similar benzene-based magnetic fluids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26117765','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26117765"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and characterization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ivashchenko, Olena; Lewandowski, Mikołaj; Peplińska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Wiesner, Maciej; Załęski, Karol; Babutina, Tetyana; Warowicka, Alicja; Jurga, Stefan</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>The article is devoted to preparation and characterization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanopowder was produced by thermochemical technique; silver was deposited on the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles in the form of silver clusters. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>/silver nanocomposite was investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM, AFM, XPS, EDX techniques. Adsorptivity of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver nanocomposite towards seven antibiotics from five different groups was investigated. It was shown that rifampicin, doxycycline, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and doxycycline may be attached by physical adsorption to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver nanocomposite. Electrostatic surfaces of antibiotics were modeled and possible mechanism of antibiotic attachment is considered in this article. Raman spectra of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver/antibiotic were collected. It was found that it is difficult to detect the bands related to antibiotics in the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver/antibiotic nanocomposite spectra due to their overlap by the broad carbon bands of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanopowder. Magnetic measurements revealed that magnetic saturation of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites decreased on 6-19 % in comparison with initial <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanopowder. Pilot study of antimicrobial properties of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites were performed towards Bacillus pumilus. PMID:26117765</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010GeCoA..74.5610Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010GeCoA..74.5610Q"><span id="translatedtitle">An experimental study of the mechanism of the replacement of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by pyrite up to 300 °C</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Skinner, William M.; Chen, Guorong; Pring, Allan</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>We present the results of an experimental study into the sulfidation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to form pyrite/marcasite under hydrothermal conditions (90-300 °C, vapor saturated pressures), a process associated with gold deposition in a number of ore deposits. The formation of pyrite/marcasite was studied as a function of reaction time, temperature, pH, sulfide concentration, solid-weight-to-fluid-volume ratio, and geometric surface area of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in polytetrafluoroethylene-lined autoclaves (PTFE) and a titanium and stainless steel flow-through cell. Marcasite was formed only at pH 21°C <4 and was the dominant Fe disulfide at pH 21°C 1.11, while pyrite predominated at pH 21°C >2 and formed even under basic conditions (up to pH 21°C 12-13). Marcasite formation was favored at higher temperatures. Fine-grained pyrrhotite formed in the initial stage of the reaction together with pyrite in some experiments with large surface area of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (grain size <125 μm). This pyrrhotite eventually gave way to pyrite. The transformation rate of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to Fe disulfide increased with decreasing pH (at 120 °C; pH 120°C 0.96-4.42), and that rate of the transformation increased from 120 to 190 °C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging revealed that micro-pores (0.1-5 μm scale) existed at the reaction front between the parent <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and the product pyrite, and that the pyrite and/or marcasite were euhedral at pH 21°C <4 and anhedral at higher pH. The newly formed pyrite was micro-porous (0.1-5 μm); this micro-porosity facilitates fluid transport to the reaction interface between <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and pyrite, thus promoting the replacement reaction. The pyrite precipitated onto the parent <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was polycrystalline and did not preserve the crystallographic orientation of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. The pyrite precipitation was also observed on the PTFE liner, which is consistent with pyrite <span class="hlt">crystallizing</span> from solution. The mechanism of the reaction is that of a dissolution</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMMM..408..213H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMMM..408..213H"><span id="translatedtitle">TEA controllable preparation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) with excellent magnetic properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Han, Chengliang; Zhu, Dejie; Wu, Hanzhao; Li, Yao; Cheng, Lu; Hu, Kunhong</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>A fast and controllable synthesis method for superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) was developed in Fe(III)-triethanolamine (TEA) solution. The phase structure, morphology and particle size of the as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the magnetic particles were <span class="hlt">pure</span> Fe3O4 with mean sizes of approximately 10 nm. The used TEA has key effects on the formation of well dispersing Fe3O4 NPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) result indicated that the as-obtained Fe3O4 NPs exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and the saturation magnetization (Ms) was about 70 emu/g, which had potential applications in magnetic science and technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090038967&hterms=meteorite+ALH84001&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmeteorite%2BALH84001','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090038967&hterms=meteorite+ALH84001&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmeteorite%2BALH84001"><span id="translatedtitle">Origins of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanocrystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Mckay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.; Wentworth, Susan J.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of mag- netite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is allochthonous. For example, the <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compo- sitional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> present in the car- bonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24095130','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24095130"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pure</span> autonomic failure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Garland, Emily M; Hooper, William B; Robertson, David</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A 1925 report by Bradbury and Eggleston first described patients with extreme orthostatic hypotension and a low, steady heart rate. Evidence accumulated over the next two decades that patients with orthostatic hypotension include those with <span class="hlt">pure</span> autonomic failure (PAF), characterized by isolated peripheral autonomic dysfunction and decreased norepinephrine synthesis; multiple system atrophy (MSA) with symptoms of a central Parkinson-like syndrome and normal resting plasma norepinephrine; and Parkinson's disease (PD), with lesions in postganglionic noradrenergic neurons and signs of autonomic dysfunction. All three disorders are classified as α-synucleinopathies. Insoluble deposits of α-synuclein are found in glia in MSA, whereas they take the form of neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions called Lewy bodies in PAF and PD. The exact relationship between α-synuclein deposits and the pathology remains undetermined. PAF occurs sporadically, and progresses slowly with a relatively good prognosis. However, it has been proposed that some cases of PAF may develop a central neurodegenerative disorder. Differentiation between PAF, MSA, and PD with autonomic failure can be facilitated by a number of biochemical and functional tests and by imaging studies. Cardiac sympathetic innervation is generally intact in MSA but decreased or absent in Parkinson's disease with autonomic failure and PAF. Treatment of PAF is directed at relieving symptoms with nonpharmacological interventions and with medications producing volume expansion and vasoconstriction. Future studies should focus on determining the factors that lead to central rather than solely peripheral neurodegeneration. PMID:24095130</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013AGUFMEP53A0736G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013AGUFMEP53A0736G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Production Rate of Cosmogenic 10Be in <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Granger, D. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Riebe, C. S.; Lifton, N. A.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Cosmogenic 10Be is widely used for determining exposure ages, soil production rates, and catchment-wide erosion rates. To date, measurements have been almost exclusively in the mineral quartz (SiO2), which is resistant to weathering and easily cleaned of meteoric 10Be contamination. However, this limits the method to quartz-bearing rocks and requires specialized laboratories due to the need for large quantities of hydrofluoric acid (HF). Here, we present initial results for 10Be production in the mineral <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4). <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> offers several advantages over quartz; it is (1) present in mafic rocks, (2) easily collected in the field, (3) quickly and easily separated in the lab, and (4) digested without HF. In addition, 10Be can be measured in both detrital quartz and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the same catchment to yield information about the intensity of chemical weathering (Rogers et al., this conference). The 10Be production rate in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> relative to quartz was determined for a granitic boulder from Mt. Evans, Colorado, USA. The boulder was crushed and homogenized to facilitate production rate comparisons among various minerals. We separated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> using a combination of hand magnets, froth flotation, and a variety of selective chemical dissolutions in dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate solution, 5% nitric acid (HNO3) and 1% HF/HNO3. Six aliquots of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> were analyzed for 10Be and compared to quartz. Three aliquots that were not exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 were contaminated with meteoric 10Be, probably associated with residual mica. Three aliquots that were exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 treatments agreed to within 2% measurement uncertainty. Our preliminary results indicate that the relative production rate by mass of 10Be in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and quartz is 0.462 × 0.012. Our results are similar to theoretically predicted values. Recently updated excitation functions for neutron and proton spallation reactions allow us to partition 10Be production in quartz and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> among</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017113','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017113"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrochemistry and dissolution kinetics of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and ilmenite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Hochella, M.F., Jr.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Natural samples of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and ilmenite were experimentally weathered in pH 1-7 anoxic solutions at temperatures of 2-65 ??C. Reaction of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is described as [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(<span class="hlt">magnetite</span>) + 2H+ ??? ??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + H2O. Dynamic polarization experiments using <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> electrodes confirmed that this reaction is controlled by two electrochemical half cells, 3[Fe2+Fe23+]O4(<span class="hlt">magnetite</span>) ??? 4??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2e- and [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(<span class="hlt">magnetite</span>) + 8 H+ + 2e- ??? 3Fe2+ + 4H2O, which result in solid state Fe3+ reduction, formation of an oxidized layer and release of Fe(II) to solution. XPS data revealed that iron is present in the ferric state in the surfaces of reacted <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and ilmenite and that the Ti Fe ratio increased with reaction pH for ilmenite. Short-term (<36 h) release rates of Fe(II) were linear with time. Between pH 1 and 7, rates varied between 0.3 and 13 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and 0.05 and 12.3 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for ilmenite. These rates are two orders of magnitude slower than electrochemical rates determined by Tafel and polarization resistance measurements. Discrepancies are due to both differences in geometric and BET surface area estimates and in the oxidation state of the mineral surface. In long-term closed-system experiments (<120 days), Fe(II) release slowed with time due to the passivation of the surfaces by increasing thicknesses of oxide surface layers. A shrinking core model, coupling surface reaction and diffusion transport, predicted that at neutral pH, the mean residence time for sand-size grains of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and ilmenite will exceed 107 years. This agrees with long-term stability of these oxides in the geologic record. ?? 1994.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/765801','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/765801"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic Separations with <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>: Theory, Operation, and Limitations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>G. B. Cotten</p> <p>2000-08-01</p> <p>This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based bed. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E6282L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E6282L"><span id="translatedtitle">Abnormal Elastic and Vibrational Behaviors of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> at High Pressures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H.; Leu, Bogdan M.; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe2+-Fe3+-Fe2+ ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25822876','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25822876"><span id="translatedtitle">Functionalization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles as oil spill collector.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In the present study, a new magnetic powder based on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> can be used as a petroleum crude oil collector. Amidoximes based on rosin as a natural product can be prepared from a reaction between hydroxylamine and rosin/acrylonitrile adducts. The produced rosin amidoximes were used as capping agents for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles to prepare hydrophobic coated magnetic powders. A new class of monodisperse hydrophobic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The structure and morphology of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> capped with rosin amidoxime were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic properties were determined from vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses. These prepared <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles were tested as bioactive nanosystems and their antimicrobial effects were investigated. The prepared nanomaterials were examined as a crude oil collector using magnetic fields. The results show promising data for the separation of the petroleum crude oil from aqueous solution in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:25822876</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4153994','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4153994"><span id="translatedtitle">Abnormal Elastic and Vibrational Behaviors of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> at High Pressures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H.; Leu, Bogdan M.; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe2+-Fe3+-Fe2+ ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70031464','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70031464"><span id="translatedtitle">Observations of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> dissolution in poorly drained soils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Grimley, D.A.; Arruda, N.K.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Dissolution of strongly magnetic minerals is a common and relatively rapid phenomenon in poorly drained soils of the central United States, resulting in low magnetic susceptibility (MS). Low Eh reducing conditions are primarily responsible for magnetic mineral dissolution; a process likely mediated by iron-reducing bacteria in the presence of soil organic matter. Based on transects across drainage sequences from nine sites, natural magnetic minerals (>5 ??m) extracted from surface soil consist of 54% ?? 18% <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, 21% ?? 11% titanomagnetite, and 17% ?? 14% ilmenite. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> and titanomagnetite dissolution, assessed by scanning electron microscopy on a 0-to-3 scale, inversely correlates with surface soil MS (r = 0.53), a proxy for soil drainage at studied transects. Altered <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> typically displays etch pits 5 ??m) include 26% ?? 18% anthropogenic fly ash that also exhibits greater dissolution in low MS soils (r = 0.38), indicating detectable alteration can occur within 150 years in low Eh soils. Laboratory induced reduction of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, titanomagnetite, and magnetic fly ash, with a citrate-bicarbonate- dithionite solution, resulted in dissolution textures similar to those of in situ soil particles. Although experiments indicate that reductive dissolution of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> can occur abiotically under extreme conditions, bacteria likely play an important role in the natural environment. ?? 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4424996','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4424996"><span id="translatedtitle">Functionalization of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanoparticles as Oil Spill Collector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Atta, Ayman M.; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.; Al-Hussain, Sami A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In the present study, a new magnetic powder based on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> can be used as a petroleum crude oil collector. Amidoximes based on rosin as a natural product can be prepared from a reaction between hydroxylamine and rosin/acrylonitrile adducts. The produced rosin amidoximes were used as capping agents for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles to prepare hydrophobic coated magnetic powders. A new class of monodisperse hydrophobic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The structure and morphology of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> capped with rosin amidoxime were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic properties were determined from vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses. These prepared <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles were tested as bioactive nanosystems and their antimicrobial effects were investigated. The prepared nanomaterials were examined as a crude oil collector using magnetic fields. The results show promising data for the separation of the petroleum crude oil from aqueous solution in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:25822876</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApNan...6..277S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApNan...6..277S"><span id="translatedtitle">Fabrication of chitosan-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocomposite strip for chromium removal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocomposite strip. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186916','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186916"><span id="translatedtitle">Abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> at high pressures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H; Leu, Bogdan M; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe(2+)-Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21960123','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21960123"><span id="translatedtitle">Reduction of iron by decarboxylation in the formation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pérez, Nicolás; López-Calahorra, Francisco; Labarta, Amílcar; Batlle, Xavier</p> <p>2011-11-21</p> <p>The process of formation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles has been investigated by liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy in the liquid phase decomposition of either Fe(III) acetylacetonate with decanoic acid or Fe(III) decanoate. In both cases, the dissociation into radicals of the iron carboxylate bonds provides the reduction of the Fe(III) cations and the oxygen atoms required for the formation of the mixed-valence inverse spinel <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> structure. A reaction mechanism is proposed. It is also shown that the reaction of free decanoic acid with the Fe(III) cations in solution promotes the growth of faceted particles at the reflux temperature of the solvent (ca. 280 °C), while, under the same conditions, the stepwise decomposition of the Fe(III) decanoate generates smaller and pseudo-spherical particles. The latter also yields faceted particles when the temperature is increased above that of the total decomposition of the salt. Magnetic measurements make evident that the reaction starting from Fe(III) acetylacetonate yields nanoparticles with higher magnetization and lower spin disorder, due to the improved regularity of the surface <span class="hlt">crystal</span> structure. The starting conditions for the decarboxylation process thus affect the morphology and magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticles. PMID:21960123</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2665750','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2665750"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> biomineralization and geomagnetic sensitivity in higher animals: an update and recommendations for future study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kirschvink, J L</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>, the only known biogenic material with ferromagnetic properties, has been identified as a biochemical precipitate in three of the five kingdoms of living organisms, with a fossil record that now extends back nearly 2 billion years. In the magnetotactic bacteria, protoctists, and fish, single-domain <span class="hlt">crystals</span> of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are arranged in membrane-bound linear structures called magnetosomes, which function as biological bar magnets. Magnetosomes in all three of these groups bear an overall structural similarity to each other, which includes alignment of the individual crystallographic [111] directions parallel to the long axis. Although the magnetosomes represent only a small volume fraction in higher organisms, enough of these highly energetic structures are present to provide sensitivity to extremely small fluctuations and gradients in the background geomagnetic field. Previous experiments with elasmobranch fish are reexamined to test the hypothesis that gradients played a role in their successful geomagnetic conditioning, and a variety of four-turn coil designs are considered that could be used to test the various hypotheses proposed for them. PMID:2665750</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3324262','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3324262"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pure</span> optical photoacoustic microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The concept of <span class="hlt">pure</span> optical photoacoustic microscopy(POPAM) was proposed based on optical rastering of a focused excitation beam and optically sensing the photoacoustic signal using a microring resonator fabricated by a nanoimprinting technique. After the refinements of the microring’s working wavelength and in the resonator structure and mold fabrication, an ultrahigh Q factor of 3.0×105 was achieved which provided high sensitivity with a noise equivalent detectable pressure(NEDP) value of 29Pa. This NEDP is much lower than the hundreds of Pascals achieved with existing optical resonant structures such as etalons, fiber gratings and dielectric multilayer interference filters available for acoustic measurement. The featured high sensitivity allowed the microring resonator to detect the weak photoacoustic signals from micro- or submicroscale objects. The inherent superbroad bandwidth of the optical microring resonator combined with an optically focused scanning beam provided POPAM with high resolution in the axial as well as both lateral directions while the axial resolution of conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) suffers from the limited bandwidth of PZT detectors. Furthermore, the broadband microring resonator showed similar sensitivity to that of our most sensitive PZT detector. The current POPAM system provides a lateral resolution of 5 μm and an axial resolution of 8 μm, comparable to that achieved by optical microscopy while presenting the unique contrast of optical absorption and functional information complementing other optical modalities. The 3D structure of microvasculature, including capillary networks, and even individual red blood cells have been discerned successfully in the proof-of-concept experiments on mouse bladders ex vivo and mouse ears in vivo. The potential of approximately GHz bandwidth of the microring resonator also might allow much higher resolution than shown here in microscopy of optical absorption and acoustic propagation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PEPI...65..165N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PEPI...65..165N"><span id="translatedtitle">Temperature dependence of critical sizes, wall widths and moments in two-domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> grains</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Newell, Andrew J.; Dunlop, David J.; Enkin, Randolph J.</p> <p></p> <p>We use a one-dimensional micromagnetic model with temperature-dependent parameters for the mineral <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to calculate the critical sizes dSDmax, above which a single-domain (SD) state does not exist; d2Dmin, below which no two-domain state exists; and d0, at which the SD and two-domain states have equal energies, all as a function of temperature up to the Curie point TC. We also compute the structures, widths, and net moments of domain walls in two-domain particles from room temperature up to TC. In two-domain grains just above d2Dmin, the domain wall expands to fill an increasing fraction of the particle volume. In cubic SD grains just below dSDmax, magnetic moments are twisted symmetrically away from the easy axis at opposite ends of the <span class="hlt">crystal</span>. The limits dSDmax and d2Dmin are determined with a precision of < 0.001 μm in particle size. There are no intermediate structures to indicate how the wall nucleates or denucleates. At room temperature, SD and two-domain states are both permitted over a range of grain lengths of about 0.4 μm in elongated ( q = 1.5) <span class="hlt">magnetites</span>, but this coexistence range narrows to about 0.1 μm from 400°C to TC. In cubic <span class="hlt">magnetites</span>, there is no significant size range over which SD and two-domain states are both metastable above ˜ 250°C. Domain walls in two-domain <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> expand with rising temperature; however, the expansion is slow and the domain wall fills no more than 50% of the particle except within a few degrees of TC. The √( A/ K) expansion predicted by Landau and Lifschitz and subsequent theories, in which there is no upper limit to the size of the walls, is a result of ignoring the demagnetizing energy of the domain wall. Domain walls have considerable structure, including 'skirts' of magnetic moments rotated beyond 0° and 180°. The skirts partly compensate the wall moment and expand as the temperature rises. As a result of the competing effects of expanding walls and expanding skirts flanking the walls, the net</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008Nanot..19r5603S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008Nanot..19r5603S"><span id="translatedtitle">Mesoporous silica <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocomposite synthesized by using a neutral surfactant</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Souza, K. C.; Salazar-Alvarez, G.; Ardisson, J. D.; Macedo, W. A. A.; Sousa, E. M. B.</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanoparticles coated by mesoporous silica were synthesized by an alternative chemical route using a neutral surfactant and without the application of any functionalization method. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were prepared by precipitation from aqueous media, and then coated with mesoporous silica by using nonionic block copolymer surfactants as the structure-directing agents. The mesoporous SiO2-coated Fe3O4 samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Our results revealed that the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles are completely coated by well-ordered mesoporous silica with free pores and stable (~8 nm thick) pore walls, and that the structural and magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles are preserved in the applied synthesis route.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27156089','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27156089"><span id="translatedtitle">Functionalized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles for adsorption of colloidal noble metal nanoparticles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lopes, Joana L; Marques, Karine L; Girão, Ana V; Pereira, Eduarda; Trindade, Tito</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (inverse spinel type) particles have been surface-modified with siliceous shells enriched in dithiocarbamate groups. The deposition of colloidal noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag, Pt, Pd) onto the modified <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> can be performed by treating the respective hydrosols with the magnetic sorbents, thus allowing their uptake from water under a magnetic gradient. In particular, for Au colloids, these magnetic particles are very efficient sorbents that we ascribe to the strong affinity of sulfur-containing groups at the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> surfaces for this metal. Considering the extensive use of Au colloids in laboratorial and industrial contexts, the approach described here might have an impact on the development of nanotechnologies to recover this precious metal. En route to these findings, we varied several operational parameters in order to investigate this strategy as a new bottom-up assembly method for producing plasmonic-magnetic nanoassemblies. PMID:27156089</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MRE.....2i5010I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MRE.....2i5010I"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and characterization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ibarra, Jaime; Melendres, Julio; Almada, Mario; Burboa, María G.; Taboada, Pablo; Juárez, Josué; Valdez, Miguel A.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new hybrid nanoparticles system performed by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles, loaded in a PLGA matrix, and stabilized by different concentrations of chitosan. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanoparticles were hydrophobized with oleic acid and entrapped in a PLGA matrix by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, after that, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles were obtained by adding dropwise <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/PLGA nanoparticles in chitosan solutions. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>/PLGA nanoparticles produced with different molar ratios did not show significant differences in size and the 3:1 molar ratio showed best spherical shapes as well as uniform particle size. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies demonstrated that the first stage of PLGA-chitosan interaction is mostly regulated by electrostatic forces. Based on a single set of identical sites model, we obtained for the average number of binding sites a value of 3.4, which can be considered as the number of chitosan chains per nanoparticle. This value was confirmed by using a model based on the DLVO theory and fitting zeta potential measurements of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles. From the adjusted parameters, we found that an average number of chitosan molecules of 3.6 per nanoparticle are attached onto the surface of the PLGA matrix. Finally, we evaluated the effect of surface charge of nanoparticles on a membrane model of endothelial cells performed by a mixture of three phospholipids at the air-water interface. Different isotherms and adsorption curves show that cationic surface of charged nanoparticles strongly interact with the phospholipids mixture and these results can be the basis of future experiments to understand the nanoparticles- cell membrane interaction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22273883','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22273883"><span id="translatedtitle">The Verwey transition in nanostructured <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> produced by a combination of chimie douce and spark plasma sintering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gaudisson, T.; Nowak, S.; Ammar, S.; Vázquez-Victorio, G.; Valenzuela, R.; Bañobre-López, M.; Rivas, J.; Mazaleyrat, F.</p> <p>2014-05-07</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanoparticles about 10 nm sized were synthesized by the polyol method. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC)-FC measurements showed a blocking temperature ∼170 K and the absence of the Verwey transition. They were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering at 750 °C for 15 min, leading to a high density (92% of the theoretical density), solid body, with grains in the 150 nm range. X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a spinel single phase with cell parameters corresponding to the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> structure. Magnetic measurements showed a decrease of coercivity from 685 Oe (54.5 kA/m) at 118 K to 90 Oe (7.2 kA/m) at 139 K. ZFC measurements at 25 Oe presented a three-fold magnetization increase as temperature increased; a small transition between 116 and 117.5 K, followed by a larger one from 117.6 to 124 K. The first transition can be associated with a complex crystallographic transition and delocalization of Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 3+}, while the second one can be attributed to spin reorientation due to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}) change of sign as previously observed only in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> single <span class="hlt">crystals</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26255597','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26255597"><span id="translatedtitle">Insight into the formation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> mesocrystals from ferrous precursors in ethylene glycol.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wan, Jiaqi; Tang, Jing; Zhang, Chongyu; Yuan, Ruiting; Chen, Kezheng</p> <p>2015-11-14</p> <p>Uniform <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> mesocrystals were fabricated by solvothermal treatment of ferrous chloride in ethylene glycol in the presence of sodium hydroxide. The formation mechanism of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> mesocrystals in ethylene glycol was deduced by a time-dependent experiment. PMID:26255597</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3676787','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3676787"><span id="translatedtitle">Simple and Rapid Synthesis of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>/Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hyperthermia Treatments via a Mechanochemical Route</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Ryo; Murase, Kenya; Takata, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents a simple method for the rapid synthesis of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/hydroxyapatite composite particles. In this method, superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles are first synthesized by coprecipitation using ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. Immediately following the synthesis, carbonate-substituted (B-type) hydroxyapatite particles are mechanochemically synthesized by wet milling dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium carbonate in a dispersed suspension of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles, during which the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles are incorporated into the hydroxyapatite matrix. We observed that the resultant <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/hydroxyapatite composites possessed a homogeneous dispersion of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles, characterized by an absence of large aggregates. When this material was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, the heat generated increased with increasing <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> concentration. For a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> concentration of 30 mass%, a temperature increase greater than 20 K was achieved in less than 50 s. These results suggest that our composites exhibit good hyperthermia properties and are promising candidates for hyperthermia treatments. PMID:23629669</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9111A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9111A"><span id="translatedtitle">Low-temperature oxidation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> - a humidity sensitive process?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Appel, Erwin; Fang, Xiaomin; Herb, Christian; Hu, Shouyun</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Extensive multi-parameter palaeoclimate records were obtained from two long-term lacustrine archives at the Tibetan Plateau: the Qaidam basin (2.69-0.08 Ma) and Heqing basin (0.90-0.03 Ma). At present the region of the Qaidam site has an arid climate (<100 mm mean annual precipitation) while the Heqing site is located in the sub-tropical region with monsoonal rainfall. Magnetic properties play a prominent role for palaeoclimate interpretation in both records. Several parameters show a 100 kyr eccentricity cyclicity; in the Qaidam record also the Mid-Pleistocene Transition is seen. Both magnetic records are controlled by different absolute and relative contributions of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and its altered (maghemitized) phases as well as hematite. Weathering conditions likely cause a systematic variation of magnetic mineralogy due to low-temperature oxidation (LTO). Maghemitization is well recognized as an alteration process in submarine basalts but about its relevance for climate-induced weathering in continental environments little is known. Various factors i.e., humidity, temperature, seasonality, duration of specific weathering conditions, and bacterial activity could be responsible for maghemitization (LTO) and transformation to hematite (or goethite) when a critical degree of LTO is reached. These factors may lead to a complex interplay, but one has to note that water acts as an electrolyte for Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidation at the <span class="hlt">crystal</span> surface and due to maghemitization-induced lattice shrinking a larger internal particle surface area becomes exposed to oxidation. We suggest that humidity is the most crucial driver for the two studied archives - for the following reasons: (1) The overall parameter variations and catchment conditions are well in agreement with an LTO scenario. (2) In the Qaidam record we observe a direct relationship of a humidity sensitive pollen Ratio with magnetic susceptibility (reflecting the degree of alteration by LTO). (3) In the Heqing record</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/930894','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/930894"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Evidence for Non-Redox Transformation Between <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> and Hermatite Under H2-Rich Hydrothermal Conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Otake, Tsubasa; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Transformations of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) to hematite (Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 3}) (and vice versa) have been thought by many scientists and engineers to require molecular O{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and/or hematite in rocks has been linked to a specific oxidation environment. However, the availability of reductants or oxidants in many geologic and industrial environments appears to have been too low to account for the transformations of iron oxides through redox reactions. Here, we report the results of hydrothermal experiments in mildly acidic and H{sub 2}-rich aqueous solutions at 150 C, which demonstrate that transformations of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to hematite, and hematite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, occur rapidly without involving molecular O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(Mt) + 2H{sub (aq)}{sup +} {leftrightarrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Hm) + Fe{sub (aq)}{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O The transformation products are chemically and structurally homogeneous, and typically occur as euhedral single <span class="hlt">crystals</span> much larger than the precursor minerals. This suggests that, in addition to the expected release of aqueous ferrous species to solution, the transformations involve release of aqueous ferric species from the precursor oxides to the solution, which reprecipitate without being reduced by H{sub 2}. These redox-independent transformations may have been responsible for the formation of some iron oxides in natural systems, such as high-grade hematite ores that developed from Banded Iron Formations (BIFs), hematite-rich deposits formed on Mars, corrosion products in power plants and other industrial systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1007876','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1007876"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental evidence for non-redox transformations between <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and hematite under H-2-rich hydrothermal conditions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Otake, Tsubasa; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>Transformations of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe{sup II}Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) to hematite (Fe{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 3}) (and vice versa) have been thought by many scientists and engineers to require molecular O{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and/or hematite in rocks has been linked to a specific oxidation environment. However, the availability of reductants or oxidants in many geologic and industrial environments appears to have been too low to account for the transformations of iron oxides through redox reactions. Here, we report the results of hydrothermal experiments in mildly acidic and H{sub 2}-rich aqueous solutions at 150 C, which demonstrate that transformations of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to hematite, and hematite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, occur rapidly without involving molecular O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(Mt) + 2H{sub (aq)}{sup +} {leftrightarrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Hm) + Fe{sub (aq)}{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O. The transformation products are chemically and structurally homogeneous, and typically occur as euhedral single <span class="hlt">crystals</span> much larger than the precursor minerals. This suggests that, in addition to the expected release of aqueous ferrous species to solution, the transformations involve release of aqueous ferric species from the precursor oxides to the solution, which reprecipitate without being reduced by H{sub 2}. These redox-independent transformations may have been responsible for the formation of some iron oxides in natural systems, such as high-grade hematite ores that developed from Banded Iron Formations (BIFs), hematite-rich deposits formed on Mars, corrosion products in power plants and other industrial systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27088645','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27088645"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracking the Verwey Transition in Single <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanocrystals by Variable-Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hevroni, Amir; Bapna, Mukund; Piotrowski, Stephan; Majetich, Sara A; Markovich, Gil</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Variable-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy revealed a sharp Verwey transition in individual ∼10 nm <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals prepared by the coprecipitation technique and embedded in the surface of a gold film. The transition was observed as a significant change in the electronic structure around the Fermi level, with an apparent band gap of ∼140-250 meV appearing below the transition temperature and a pseudogap of ∼75 ± 10 meV appearing above it. The transition temperature was invariably observed around 101 ± 2 K for different nanocrystals, as opposed to 123 K typically reported for stoichiometric bulk <span class="hlt">crystals</span>. This suggests that the lowering of the transition temperature is an intrinsic finite size effect, probably due to the presence of the surface. PMID:27088645</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26452936','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26452936"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis, characterization and adsorption properties of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qi, Tingting; Huang, Chenchen; Yan, Shan; Li, Xiu-Juan; Pan, Si-Yi</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Three kinds of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/reduced graphene oxide (MRGO) nanocomposites were prepared by solvothermal, hydrothermal and co-precipitation methods. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized and compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential. The results showed that MRGO made by different methods differed in surface functional groups, <span class="hlt">crystal</span> structure, particle sizes, surface morphology and surface charge. Due to their unlike features, these nanocomposites displayed dissimilar performances when they were used to adsorb drugs, dyes and metal ions. The MRGO prepared by the co-precipitation method showed special adsorption ability to negative ions, but those synthesized by the solvothermal method obtained the best extraction ability and reusability to the others and showed a good prospective in magnetic solid-phase extraction. Therefore, it is highly recommended to use the right preparation method before application in order to attain the best extraction performance. PMID:26452936</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020045590&hterms=Desert+varnish&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528Desert%2Bvarnish%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020045590&hterms=Desert+varnish&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528Desert%2Bvarnish%2529"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> in Desert Varnish and Applications to Rock Varnish on Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mancinelli, R. L.; Bishop, J. L.; De, S.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> in desert varnish is characterized here using DTA, IR and SEM. The presence of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in desert varnish is significant because of the oxidizing environment. This situation is similar to that of Mars where <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> may also be present. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4837838','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4837838"><span id="translatedtitle">SEPARATION OF TECHNETIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY COPRECIPITATION WITH <span class="hlt">MAGNETITE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Rimshaw, S.J.</p> <p>1961-10-24</p> <p>A method of separating technetium in the 4+ oxidation state from an aqueous basic solution containing products of uranium fission is described. The method consists of contacting the solution with finely divided <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and recovering a technetium-bearing precipitate. (AEC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010044732&hterms=ALH84001&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DALH84001','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010044732&hterms=ALH84001&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DALH84001"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> and Carbonate Textures in ALH84001: Experimental Insights</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Koziol, Andrea M.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Synthetic siderite and synthetic siderite-magnesite carbonates were equilibrated with hematite, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, and CO2 at elevated pressure and temperature. Comparisons are made to textures seen in the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2844004','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2844004"><span id="translatedtitle">Avian <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based magnetoreception: a physiologist's perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cadiou, Hervé; McNaughton, Peter A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>It is now well established that animals use the Earth's magnetic field to perform long-distance migration and other navigational tasks. However, the transduction mechanisms that allow the conversion of magnetic field variations into an electric signal by specialized sensory cells remain largely unknown. Among the species that have been shown to sense Earth-strength magnetic fields, birds have been a model of choice since behavioural tests show that their direction-finding abilities are strongly influenced by magnetic fields. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>, a ferromagnetic mineral, has been found in a wide range of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates. In birds, both superparamagnetic (SPM) and single-domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> have been found to be associated with the trigeminal nerve. Electrophysiological recordings from cells in the trigeminal ganglion have shown an increase in action potential firing in response to magnetic field changes. More recently, histological evidence has demonstrated the presence of SPM <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the subcutis of the pigeon's upper beak. The aims of the present review are to review the evidence for a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based mechanism in birds and to introduce physiological concepts in order to refine the proposed models. PMID:20106875</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=326171&keyword=chemistry&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77949568&CFTOKEN=23743668','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=326171&keyword=chemistry&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77949568&CFTOKEN=23743668"><span id="translatedtitle">Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Surface Modification and Synthetic Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in het...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010JMMM..322.1904S&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010JMMM..322.1904S&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Raman spectroscopy investigation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles in ferrofluids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Slavov, L.; Abrashev, M. V.; Merodiiska, T.; Gelev, Ch.; Vandenberghe, R. E.; Markova-Deneva, I.; Nedkov, I.</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>Raman spectroscopy is used to investigate <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles dispersed in two types of β-cyclodextrin suspensions. An approach is presented for characterization of the magnetic core in liquid surrounding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effect of elevating laser power on the structural stability and chemical composition of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the ferrofluids is discussed. The data are compared with data from dry by-products from the fluids. Powder samples undergo total phase transition from <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to hematite at laser power of 1.95 mW. The same nanoparticles in the fluid undergo transformation at 9 mW, but no hematite positions appear throughout that investigation. The Raman spectra revealed that the main phase of the magnetic core in the fluids is <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. That is indicated by a strong and non-diminishing in intensity peak at 670 cm -1. A second phase is present at the nanoparticle's surface with Raman spectroscopy unveiling maghemite-like and small fractions of goethite-like structures. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations confirm deviations in the surface structure and also point to the fact that the oxidation process starts at an early stage after formation of the nanoparticles. The analyses of the infrared data also show that β-cyclodextrin molecules retain their cyclic character and the coating does not affect the oxidation process once the particles are evicted from the fluids. A Mössbauer spectroscopy measurement on a ferrofluidic sample is also presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr72303','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr72303"><span id="translatedtitle">Benefaction studies on the Hasan Celebi <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> deposit, Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Pressler, Jean W.; Akar, Ali</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>Bench-scale and semicontinuous tests were performed on surface, trench, and diamond drill core samples from the Hasan Celebi low-grade <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> deposit to determine the optimum benefication procedures utilizing wet magnetic separation techniques. Composite core samples typically contain about 27 percent recoverable <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and require crushing and grinding through 1 mm in size to insure satisfactory separation of the gangue from the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Regrinding and cleaning the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> concentrate to 80 percent minus 150-mesh is necessary to obtain an optimum of 66 percent iron. Semicontinuous pilot-plant testing with the wet magnetic drum using the recycled middling technique indicates that as much as 83 percent of the acid-soluble iron can be recovered into a concentrate containing 66 percent iron, with minimum deleterious elements. This represents 27 weight percent of the original ore. Further tests will continue when the Maden Tetkik ve Arama Enstitusu (MTA) receives 24 tons of bulk sample from an exploratory drift and cross-cut now being driven through a section of the major reserve area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20106875','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20106875"><span id="translatedtitle">Avian <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based magnetoreception: a physiologist's perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cadiou, Hervé; McNaughton, Peter A</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>It is now well established that animals use the Earth's magnetic field to perform long-distance migration and other navigational tasks. However, the transduction mechanisms that allow the conversion of magnetic field variations into an electric signal by specialized sensory cells remain largely unknown. Among the species that have been shown to sense Earth-strength magnetic fields, birds have been a model of choice since behavioural tests show that their direction-finding abilities are strongly influenced by magnetic fields. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>, a ferromagnetic mineral, has been found in a wide range of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates. In birds, both superparamagnetic (SPM) and single-domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> have been found to be associated with the trigeminal nerve. Electrophysiological recordings from cells in the trigeminal ganglion have shown an increase in action potential firing in response to magnetic field changes. More recently, histological evidence has demonstrated the presence of SPM <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the subcutis of the pigeon's upper beak. The aims of the present review are to review the evidence for a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based mechanism in birds and to introduce physiological concepts in order to refine the proposed models. PMID:20106875</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1815178H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1815178H"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing of Fe removal in pyrophyllite using <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> ore susceptor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hack Lim, Dae; Myung, Eun Ji; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choul Choi, Nag; Cho, Kang Hee; Park, Cheon Young</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Pyrite and hematite are an impurity that reduces the grade of pyrophyllite in the final products. Because the impurity in pyrophyllite which was associated with hydrothermally altered rocks. Microwave has been extensively explored in various fields of materials processing. This technology exhibits unique characteristics including volumetric and selective heating, which eventually lead to many exceptional advantages over conventional processing methods including both energy and cost savings, improved product quality and faster processing. The aim of this study was to investigate the application possibility of microwave process for Fe removal in pyrophyllite. The pyrite and quartz of the pyrophyllite was determined by reflected light microscopy and XRD. The result of Fe removal experiment in pyrophyllite using microwave susceptor(<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> ore included ilmenite and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>) showed to decrease of Fe content in pyrophyllite. The Fe removal of 93.62% and parameters were obtained under the following conditions by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> ore was 20.0 g, the pyrophyllite was 10.0 g, and the microwave heating time was 10.0 min. By means of microwave, Fe removal in pyrophyllite can be rapidly and efficiently pyrolyze. if some of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> ore, which acts as a microwave susceptor, is mixed with the raw material. Acknowledgment : This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "Advanced Technology Program for Environmental Industry"</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800039428&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800039428&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-sulfide-metal complexes in the Allende meteorite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Haggerty, S. E.; Mcmahon, B. M.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A model of liquid immiscibility is presented that seemingly accounts for the sulfide-oxide-metal complexes that are present in olivine-rich chondrules in the Allende meteorite. The four major assemblages that are identified are: (1) <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> + Ni-Fe metal; (2) <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> + troilite + Ni-Fe metal; (3) <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> + troilite + pentlandite + Ni-Fe metal; and (4) troilite + or - pentlandite. Specific attention is focused on oxide-metal associations and experimental data confirm earlier suggestions that <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> results from the oxidation of an initially high-Fe-content metal alloy. Oxidation decreases the modal abundance of the Fe metal and this is accompanied by substantial increases in Ni contents which reach a maximum of approximately 70 wt % Ni. The proposed oxidation mechanism is entirely consistent with condensation of Fe-metal + olivine (Fa5) that subsequently reequilibrated at lower temperatures. Although the sulfide constituents could also have formed by the reaction of Fe-Ni metal + gaseous H2S, sulfide immiscibility under increased conditions of partial O2 pressure is the preferred process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014LPICo1800.5344B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014LPICo1800.5344B"><span id="translatedtitle">Clay and <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Formation at Yellowknife Bay, Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Sheepbed mudstone contains a clay-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> assemblage formed by dissolution of approximately 70% amorphous phase, 20% olivine, 10% host rock mixture, by a pore fluid at moderate W/R ratio. The clay is similar to Lafayette's ferric saponite and gel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19544872','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19544872"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> stoichiometry on Fe(II) uptake and nitrobenzene reduction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M</p> <p>2009-05-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) is a common biomineralization product of microbial iron respiration and is often found in subsurface anoxic environments, such as groundwater aquifers where aqueous Fe(II) is present We investigated the reaction between aqueous Fe(II) and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> using the isotopic selectivity of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and revisited the reduction of nitrobenzene by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Similar to our previous findings with Fe3+ oxides, we did not observe the formation of a stable sorbed Fe(II) species; instead, we observed oxidation of the Fe(II) to a partially oxidized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> phase. Oxidation of Fe(II) was accompanied by reduction of the octahedral Fe3+ atoms in the underlying <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to octahedral Fe2+ atoms. The lack of a stable, sorbed Fe(II) species on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> prompted us to reevaluate what is controlling the extent of Fe(II) uptake on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, as well as contaminant reduction in the presence of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and Fe(II). Uptake of Fe(II) by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> appears to be limited by the stoichiometry of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles, rather than the surface area of the particles. More oxidized (or less stoichiometric) <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles take up more Fe(II), with the formation of stoichiometric <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe2+/Fe3+ = 0.5) limiting the extent of Fe(II) uptake. We also showthat stoichiometric <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, in the absence of aqueous Fe(II), can rapidly reduce nitrobenzene. Based on these results, we speculate that contaminant reduction that was previously attributed to Fe(II) sorbed on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is due to a process similar to negative (n) doping of a solid, which increases the stoichiometry of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and alters the bulk redox properties of the particle to make reduction more favorable. PMID:19544872</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.400d2036K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.400d2036K"><span id="translatedtitle">Intensified magneto-resistance by rapid thermal annealing in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) thin film on SiO2 glass substrate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kobori, H.; Morii, K.; Yamasaki, A.; Sugimura, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Horie, T.; Naitoh, Y.; Shimizu, T.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We have observed large magneto-resistance (MR) intensified by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) thin film (MTF) on SiO2 glass (a-SiO2) substrate. The MTF was produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method by using a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> target. The electrical resistivity (ER) of as-grown MTF (AG-MTF) showed the Mott's variable range hopping behavior, which implies that the AG-MTF is amorphous-like. Although the magneto-resistance (MR) ratio of bulk single <span class="hlt">crystal</span> is very small except around the Verwey transition temperature (VTT), that of the AG-MTF showed moderately large below room temperature. Due to RTA of the AG-MTF by use of an IR image furnace, the MR ratio of MTFs was intensified, and especially by the annealing around the Curie temperature (585°C) of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Furthermore the ER of the rapid thermally annealed MTF (RTA-MTF) showed a slight kink at around the VTT, which indicates that the crystallinity of the RTA-MTF is higher than that of the AG-MTF The MTF produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method are composed of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> fine particles (MFPs). We consider that the directions of magnetic moments of MFPs in the MTF were spatially randomized by the RTA and the strong spin scattering of itinerant electrons transferring between adjacent MFPs caused the intensification of the MR ratio.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JMMM..311..282P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JMMM..311..282P"><span id="translatedtitle">Cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pradhan, Pallab; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Banerjee, Rinti; Bellare, Jayesh; Bahadur, Dhirendra</p> <p>2007-04-01</p> <p>In vitro cytocompatibility and cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles were evaluated with two different cell lines (mouse fibroblast and human cervical carcinoma). Lauric acid-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles were less cytocompatible than dextran-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles and cellular uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles was more than that of dextran-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles. Lesser cytocompatibility and higher uptake of lauric acid-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles as compared to dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles may be due to different cellular interactions by coating material. Thus, coating plays an important role in modulation of biocompatibility and cellular interaction of magnetic nanoparticles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAP...108j4107M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAP...108j4107M"><span id="translatedtitle">Detrapping and retrapping of free carriers in nominally <span class="hlt">pure</span> single <span class="hlt">crystal</span> GaP, GaAs, and 4H-SiC semiconductors under light illumination at cryogenic temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mouneyrac, David; Hartnett, John G.; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E.; Cros, Dominique; Krupka, Jerzy</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>We report on extremely sensitive measurements of changes in the microwave properties of high purity nonintentionally-doped single-<span class="hlt">crystal</span> semiconductor samples of gallium phosphide, gallium arsenide, and 4H-silicon carbide when illuminated with light of different wavelengths at cryogenic temperatures. Whispering gallery modes were excited in the semiconductors while they were cooled on the coldfinger of a single-stage cryocooler and their frequencies and Q-factors measured under light and dark conditions. With these materials, the whispering gallery mode technique is able to resolve changes of a few parts per million in the permittivity and the microwave losses as compared with those measured in darkness. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the observed changes, which result not from direct valence to conduction band transitions but from detrapping and retrapping of carriers from impurity/defect sites with ionization energies that lay in the semiconductor band gap. Detrapping and retrapping relaxation times have been evaluated from comparison with measured data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011538','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011538"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Formation from Thermal Decomposition of Siderite: Implications for Inorganic <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Formation in Martian Meteorite ALH84001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morris, RIchard V.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A biogenic mechanism for formation of a subpopulation <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been suggested [McKay et al., 1996; Thomas-Keprta, et al., 2000]. We are developing experimental evidence for an alternating working hypothesis, that the subpopulation was produced inorganically by the thermal decomposition of siderite [Golden et al., 2000].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2001JNuM..289..281P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2001JNuM..289..281P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Dissolution behaviour of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> film formed over carbon steel in dilute organic acid media</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Prince, A. A. M.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S. V.; Ramesh, C.; Murugesan, N.; Raghavan, P. S.; Gopalan, R.</p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> is the major corrosion product formed over the carbon steel in the primary heat transport system of the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). This <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> usually accumulates radioactivity during reactor operation. The dissolution of the host <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is achieved by chemical formulations in order to get rid of the radioactivity trapped in the oxide; the underlying base metal also participates in the process by contributing electron to reduce the ferric ion or by undergoing corrosion. In the present study, the role of base metal in the dissolution of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in various chelating agents has been investigated. The liberated hydrogen was measured by using an amperometric hydrogen sensor. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> dissolution rate and the corrosion rate of carbon steel in the formulations were calculated. The effect of temperature, pH and concentration of the chelating agents on the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> film dissolution was studied in detail. The mechanism of base metal aided <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> dissolution is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1040672','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1040672"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U(IV) nanoprecipitates on the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (111) surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn</p> <p>2012-04-03</p> <p>Sequestration of uranium (U) by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is a potentially important sink for U in natural and contaminated environments. However, molecular-scale controls which favor U(VI) uptake including both adsorption of U(VI) and reduction to U(VI) by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> remain poorly understood, in particular the role of U(VI)-CO3-Ca complexes in inhibiting U(VI) reduction. To investigate U uptake pathways on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as a function of U(VI) aqueous speciation, we performed batch sorption experiments on (111) surfaces of natural single <span class="hlt">crystals</span> under a range of solution conditions (pH 5 and 10; 0.1 mM U(VI); 1 mM NaCl; and with or without 0.5 mM CO3 and 0.1 mM Ca) and characterized surface-associated U using grazing incidence extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-EXAFS), grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the absence of both carbonate ([CO3]T, denoted here as CO3) and calcium (Ca), or in the presence of CO3 only, co-existing adsorption of U(VI) surface species and reduction to U(IV) occurs at both pH 5 and 10. In the presence of both CO3 and Ca, only adsorption of U(VI) occur. When U reduction occurs, nanoparticulate UO2 forms only within and adjacent to surface microtopographic features such as <span class="hlt">crystal</span> boundaries and cracks. This result suggests that U reduction is limited to defect-rich surface regions. Further, at both pH 5 and 10 in the presence of both CO3 and Ca, U(VI)-CO3-Ca ternary surface species develop and U reduction is precluded. These findings extend the range of conditions under which U (VI)-CO3-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.B31C1001K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.B31C1001K"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-based Magnetoreception in Animals: 25+ Years of Theory & Experimentation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kirschvink, J. L.; Walker, M. M.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Living organisms ranging from bacteria through higher vertebrates rely on orientation, navigation, and homing to survive. Any sensory cue that enhances these behaviors will be subject to intense natural selection over geological time. Reproducible behavioral responses to earth-strength magnetic fields(1) have been documented in Bacteria, Protoctists, and in nearly every major group of animals, and are possibly also present in the Archaea. Several groups of animals, including birds and cetaceans, respond behaviorally to magnetic anomalies below 100 nT in magnitude, implying that their magnetoreception ability approaches the thermal noise limit. This approach to thermal noise is commonly observed in other sensory systems, including hearing, olfaction, and electroreception. The hypothesis of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-based magnetoreception(2) is the only theory proposed so far that is capable of explaining all of the magnetic behavioral data. Tiny <span class="hlt">crystals</span> of single-domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (or in some bacteria, greigite) rotate the cells of microorganisms passively like a simple compass needle. The initial detection of biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> with rock magnetic techniques in birds and bees over 25 years ago has led progressively to the identification of a group of specialized cells in fish and birds which contain organized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-containing structures. In these animals (and presumably all vertebrates) magnetic signals are transmitted to the brain via the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve(3, 4). Experiments with pulse-remagnetization, like those that convert North-seeking bacteria into South-seekers, have dramatic effects on animal behavior, confirming the role of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the sensory system. This is therefore a general mechanism for a highly sensitive magnetic sense, the origin of which probably dates to the ancestral metazoan, and perhaps earlier. The largest debate presently occurring in the field concerns the interpretation of magnetic compass responses that vary with intensity</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MinDe..50..493N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MinDe..50..493N"><span id="translatedtitle">Geochemistry of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from porphyry Cu and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nadoll, Patrick; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Leveille, Richard A.; Koenig, Alan E.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>A combination of petrographic observations, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and statistical data exploration was used in this study to determine compositional variations in hydrothermal and igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from five porphyry Cu-Mo and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States, and igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the unmineralized, granodioritic Inner Zone Batholith, Japan. The most important overall discriminators for the minor and trace element chemistry of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the investigated porphyry and skarn deposits are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and Ga—of these the elements with the highest variance for (I) igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, for (II) hydrothermal porphyry <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are Mg, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and for (III) hydrothermal skarn <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are Mg, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Ga. Nickel could only be detected at levels above the limit of reporting (LOR) in two igneous <span class="hlt">magnetites</span>. Equally, Cr could only be detected in one igneous occurrence. Copper, As, Mo, Ag, Au, and Pb have been reported in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by other authors but could not be detected at levels greater than their respective LORs in our samples. Comparison with the chemical signature of igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the barren Inner Zone Batholith, Japan, suggests that V, Mn, Co, and Ga concentrations are relatively depleted in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the porphyry and skarn deposits. Higher formation conditions in combination with distinct differences between melt and hydrothermal fluid compositions are reflected in Al, Ti, V, and Ga concentrations that are, on average, higher in igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> than in hydrothermal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (including porphyry and skarn <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>). Low Ti and V concentrations in combination with high Mn concentrations are characteristic features of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from skarn deposits. High Mg concentrations (<1,000 ppm) are characteristic for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from magnesian skarn and likely reflect extensive fluid/rock interaction. In porphyry deposits</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70148578','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70148578"><span id="translatedtitle">Geochemistry of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from porphyry Cu and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Nadoll, Patrick; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; LeVeille, Richard A.; Koenig, Alan E.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A combination of petrographic observations, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and statistical data exploration was used in this study to determine compositional variations in hydrothermal and igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from five porphyry Cu–Mo and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States, and igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the unmineralized, granodioritic Inner Zone Batholith, Japan. The most important overall discriminators for the minor and trace element chemistry of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the investigated porphyry and skarn deposits are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and Ga—of these the elements with the highest variance for (I) igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, for (II) hydrothermal porphyry <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are Mg, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and for (III) hydrothermal skarn <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are Mg, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Ga. Nickel could only be detected at levels above the limit of reporting (LOR) in two igneous <span class="hlt">magnetites</span>. Equally, Cr could only be detected in one igneous occurrence. Copper, As, Mo, Ag, Au, and Pb have been reported in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by other authors but could not be detected at levels greater than their respective LORs in our samples. Comparison with the chemical signature of igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the barren Inner Zone Batholith, Japan, suggests that V, Mn, Co, and Ga concentrations are relatively depleted in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the porphyry and skarn deposits. Higher formation conditions in combination with distinct differences between melt and hydrothermal fluid compositions are reflected in Al, Ti, V, and Ga concentrations that are, on average, higher in igneous <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> than in hydrothermal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (including porphyry and skarn <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>). Low Ti and V concentrations in combination with high Mn concentrations are characteristic features of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from skarn deposits. High Mg concentrations (<1,000 ppm) are characteristic for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from magnesian skarn and likely reflect extensive fluid/rock interaction. In porphyry deposits</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MAR.C6010F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..MAR.C6010F"><span id="translatedtitle">Relaxometry imaging of superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles at ambient conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Finkler, Amit; Schmid-Lorch, Dominik; Häberle, Thomas; Reinhard, Friedemann; Zappe, Andrea; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Wrachtrup, Jörg</p> <p></p> <p>We present a novel technique to image superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via their fluctuating magnetic fields. The detection is based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond, which allows optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements on its electron spin structure. In combination with an atomic-force-microscope, this atomic-sized color center maps ambient magnetic fields in a wide frequency range from DC up to several GHz, while retaining a high spatial resolution in the sub-nanometer range. We demonstrate imaging of single 10 nm sized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles using this spin noise detection technique. By fitting simulations (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) to the data, we are able to infer additional information on such a particle and its dynamics, like the attempt frequency and the anisotropy constant. This is of high interest to the proposed application of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles as an alternative MRI contrast agent or to the field of particle-aided tumor hyperthermia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011JMMM..323.1216K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011JMMM..323.1216K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Preparation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> aqueous dispersion for magnetic fluid hyperthermia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kikuchi, Teppei; Kasuya, Ryo; Endo, Shota; Nakamura, Akira; Takai, Toshiyuki; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Tohji, Kazuyuki; Balachandran, Jeyadevan</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>An aqueous magnetic suspension was prepared by dispersing amphiphilic co-polymer-coated monodispersed <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles synthesized through thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate (Fe(acac) 3) in a mixture of oleic acid and oleylamine. The average diameter of narrow-size-distributed <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles varied between 5 and 12 nm depending on the experimental parameters such as reaction temperature, metal salt concentration and oleic acid/oleylamine ratio. Though the as-synthesized particles were coated with oleate and were dispersible in organic solvent, their surfaces were modified using amphiphilic co-polymers composed of poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) and polyethylene glycol-methyl ether and made dispersible in water. Infrared spectra of the sample indicated the existence of -COOH groups on the surface for further conjugation with biomolecules for targeted cancer therapy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23371771','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23371771"><span id="translatedtitle">Carboxymethyldextran/<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> hybrid microspheres designed for hyperthermia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miyazaki, Toshiki; Anan, Shota; Ishida, Eiichi; Kawashita, Masakazu</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Recently, organic-inorganic hybrids composed of derivatives of dextran, a polysaccharide, and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles have attracted much attention as novel thermoseeds. If they can be fabricated into microspheres of size 20-30 μm, they are expected to show not only hyperthermia effects but also embolization effects in human liver and kidney cancers. In this study, we examined the fabrication of carboxymethyldextran/<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> microspheres using a water/oil emulsion as the reaction medium. Improvement of the chemical stability of the microcapsules by coating with silica using a sol-gel process was also investigated. The obtained hollow microspheres contained particles of size 20-30 μm. Silica coating using an appropriate catalyst for hydrolysis and polycondensation of alkoxysilanes was found to be effective for preventing dissolution and collapse in simulated body environments. PMID:23371771</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004SPIE.5391...30S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004SPIE.5391...30S"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of structural steels and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> for NDE corrosion sensing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Singh, Varsha; Lloyd, George M.; Wang, Ming L.</p> <p>2004-07-01</p> <p>In this paper Jiles-Atherton model, a phenomenological model, is proposed to model physical properties of structural steel and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>(corrosion product). The Jiles-Atherton model parameters based on mean field approximation were optimized to simulate the curves obtained from magnetic measurements using conventional quasi-static method. Results from hot rolled steel, a low carbon steel, were simulated using Jiles model to understand and correlate the measured and simulated curves. Hysteresis curves for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, one of the most prevalent corrosion product and the only ferromagnetic component, are obtained to simulate the effect of corrosion products on the magnetic measurements of corroded structural steel. Since corrosion is initially a surface phenomenon, high frequency measurements were suggested from the simulations obtained to reduce the skin depth estimates and increase the accuracy of corrosion measurement.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.B33B0659R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.B33B0659R"><span id="translatedtitle">Field Evidence for <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Formation by a Methanogenic Microbial Community</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rossbach, S.; Beaver, C. L.; Williams, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lund, A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The aged, subsurface petroleum spill in Bemidji, Minnesota, has been surveyed with magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements. High MS values were found in the free-product phase around the fluctuating water table. Although we had hypothesized that high MS values are related to the occurrence of the mineral <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> resulting from the activity of iron-reducing bacteria, our microbial analysis pointed to the presence of a methanogenic microbial community at the locations and depths of the highest MS values. Here, we report on a more detailed microbial analysis based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of sediment samples from four consecutive years. In addition, we provide geochemical data (FeII/FeIII concentrations) to refine our conceptual model of methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation at aged petroleum spills and demonstrate that the microbial induced changes of sediment properties can be monitored with MS. The methanogenic microbial community at the Bemidji site consisted mainly of the syntrophic, hydrocarbon-degrading Smithella and the hydrogenotrophic, methane-generating Methanoregula. There is growing evidence in the literature that not only Bacteria, but also some methanogenic Archaea are able to reduce iron. In fact, a recent study reported that the methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila produced <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> during the reduction of ferrihydrite in a laboratory experiment when hydrogen was present. Therefore, our finding of high MS values and the presence of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the methanogenic zone of an aged, subsurface petroleum spill could very well be the first field evidence for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation during methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19990102924','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19990102924"><span id="translatedtitle">Hematite Versus <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> as the Signature for Planetary Magnetic Anomalies?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kletetshka, Gunther; Taylor, Patrick T.; Wasilewski, Peter J.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Crustal magnetic anomalies are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic anomalies due to remanent magnetization, while the Earth has some anomalies where remanence can be shown to be important. This picture, however, is less clear because of the nature and the magnitude of the geomagnetic field which is responsible for superimposed induced magnetization. Induced magnetization assumes a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> source, because of its much greater magnetic susceptibility when compared with other magnetic minerals. We investigated the TRM (thermoremanent magnetization) acquisition of hematite, in weak magnetic fields up to 1 mT, to determine if the remanent and induced magnetization of hematite could compete with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. TRM acquisition curves of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and hematite show that multi-domain hematite reaches TRM saturation (0.3 - 0.4 A sq m/kg) in fields as low as 100 microT. However, multi-domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> reaches only a few percent of its TRM saturation in a field of 100 microT (0.02 - 0.06 A sq m/kg). These results suggest that a mineral such as hematite and, perhaps, other minerals with significant remanence and minor induced magnetization may play an important role in providing requisite magnetization contrast. Perhaps, and especially for the Mars case, we should reevaluate where hematite and other minerals, with efficient remanence acquisition, exist in significant concentration, allowing a more comprehensive explanation of Martian anomalies and better insight into the role of remanent magnetization in terrestrial crustal magnetic anomalies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhD...47e5001M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhD...47e5001M"><span id="translatedtitle">Structural and magnetic properties of sonoelectrocrystallized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mosivand, S.; Monzon, L. M. A.; Ackland, K.; Kazeminezhad, I.; Coey, J. M. D.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>The effect of ultrasound power on the morphology, structure and magnetic properties of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles synthesized from iron electrodes by the electro-oxidation method was investigated. Samples made in aqueous solution in the absence or presence of an organic stabilizer (thiourea, tetramethylammonium chloride, sodium butanoate or β-cyclodextrine) were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, magnetometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. The iron is almost all in the form of 20-85 nm particles of slightly nonstoichiometric Fe3-δO4, with δ ≈ 0.10. Formation of a paramagnetic secondary phase in the presence of sodium butanoate or β-cyclodextrine is supressed by ultrasound. Specific magnetization of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles ranges from 19 to 90 A m2 kg-1 at room temperature, and it increases with particle size in each series. The particles show no sign of superparamagnetism, and the anhysteretic and practically temperature-independent magnetization curves are associated with a stable magnetic vortex state throughout the size range. The spin structure of the particles and the use of magnetization measurements to detect <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in unknown mixtures are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23313895','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23313895"><span id="translatedtitle">Mechanisms of ciprofloxacin removal by nano-sized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rakshit, Sudipta; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Elzinga, Evert J; Punamiya, Pravin; Datta, Rupali</p> <p>2013-02-15</p> <p>An understanding of the interaction mechanisms of antibiotics with environmentally relevant sorbents is important to determine the environmental fate of antibiotics and to develop wastewater treatment strategies. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe(3)O(4)(s)) is ubiquitous in the environment and occurs as a secondary corrosion product of iron nanoparticles that are commonly used as a remediation material. In this study, we aimed to assess the sorption mechanisms of ciprofloxacin (CIP), an important class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles using a combination of wet chemical and in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopic measurements. Ciprofloxacin sorption was characterized as a function of pH (3.4-8.0), CIP concentration (1-500 μM), ionic strength (0.5, 0.1, and 0.01 M NaCl), and competing anion such as phosphate (0.1mM) to cover a broad range of environmentally relevant geochemical conditions. Results indicated a bell-shaped sorption envelop where sorption of CIP on nano-Fe(3)O(4)(s) increased from 45% to 80% at pH 3.44-5.97; beyond that sorption gradually decreased to a value of 25% at pH 8.39. Phosphate had negligible effect on CIP sorption. In situ ATR-FTIR results indicated inner-sphere coordination of CIP at the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> surface mediated by carboxylic acid groups. Results suggest that nano-Fe(3)O(4)(s) has the potential to remove CIP from wastewater effectively. PMID:23313895</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26118409','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26118409"><span id="translatedtitle">Stable ferrofluids of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles in hydrophobic ionic liquids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mestrom, Luuk; Lenders, Jos J M; de Groot, Rick; Hooghoudt, Tonnis; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Artigas, Marcel Vilaplana</p> <p>2015-07-17</p> <p>Ferrofluids (FFs) of metal oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquids (ILs) are a potentially useful class of magnetic materials for many applications because of their properties related to temperature/pressure stability, hydrophobicity, viscosity and recyclability. In this work, the screening of several designer surfactants for their stabilizing capabilities has resulted in the synthesis of stable FFs of superparamagnetic 7 ± 2 nm <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the hydrophobic IL 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C(R)MIM][NTf2]). The designed and synthesized 1-butyl-3-(10-carboxydecyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bromide (ILC10-COOH) surfactant that combines the same imidazole moiety as the IL with a long alkyl chain ensured compatibility with the IL and increased the steric repulsion between the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles sufficiently such that stable dispersions of up to 50 wt% <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> were obtained according to stability tests in the presence of a magnetic field (0.5-1 Tesla). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) of the IL-based FFs allowed direct visualization of the surfactant-stabilized nanoparticles in the ILs and the native, hardly aggregated state of their dispersion. PMID:26118409</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015Nanot..26B5602M&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015Nanot..26B5602M&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Stable ferrofluids of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles in hydrophobic ionic liquids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mestrom, Luuk; Lenders, Jos J. M.; de Groot, Rick; Hooghoudt, Tonnis; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Vilaplana Artigas, Marcel</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Ferrofluids (FFs) of metal oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquids (ILs) are a potentially useful class of magnetic materials for many applications because of their properties related to temperature/pressure stability, hydrophobicity, viscosity and recyclability. In this work, the screening of several designer surfactants for their stabilizing capabilities has resulted in the synthesis of stable FFs of superparamagnetic 7 ± 2 nm <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the hydrophobic IL 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([CRMIM][NTf2]). The designed and synthesized 1-butyl-3-(10-carboxydecyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bromide (ILC10-COOH) surfactant that combines the same imidazole moiety as the IL with a long alkyl chain ensured compatibility with the IL and increased the steric repulsion between the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles sufficiently such that stable dispersions of up to 50 wt% <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> were obtained according to stability tests in the presence of a magnetic field (0.5-1 Tesla). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) of the IL-based FFs allowed direct visualization of the surfactant-stabilized nanoparticles in the ILs and the native, hardly aggregated state of their dispersion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JPhD...41x5002T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JPhD...41x5002T"><span id="translatedtitle">Polypyrrole coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles from water based nanofluids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Turcu, R.; Pana, O.; Nan, A.; Craciunescu, I.; Chauvet, O.; Payen, C.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The synthesis and characterization of hybrid structures obtained by coating Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles from water based nanofluid with a polypyrrole (PPy) layer are reported. The thin amorphous layer of polypyrrole surrounding the crystalline magnetic core was observed by HRTEM. The FTIR spectra of the nanocomposites show that the absorption bands characteristic for pyrrole ring vibrations significantly shifted to lower frequencies in the nanocomposite spectra, which indicates a higher degree of oxidation of the PPy shell covering the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as compared with conventional PPy. The existence of superparamagnetism in the investigated nanocomposites is evidenced by the missing hysterezis loop in the magnetization versus applied magnetic field dependences. The comparison between the physical size of nanoparticles determined from TEM analysis and the magnetic size deduced from magnetization measurements is discussed. The surface modification of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by polypyrrole coating results in an increase in the saturation magnetization and of the apparent magnetic diameter of the nanoparticles. This novel effect is attributed to a charge transfer process from the conducting polymer to the surface iron ions of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, producing an increase in the surface contribution to the overall magnetic moment of the nanoparticles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..MAR.K1096R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..MAR.K1096R"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-Alginate-AOT nanoparticles based drug delivery platform</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Regmi, R.; Sudakar, C.; Dixit, A.; Naik, R.; Lawes, G.; Toti, U.; Panyam, J.; Vaishnava, P. P.</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>Iron oxide having the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> structure is a widely used biomaterial, having applications ranging from cell separation and drug delivery to hyperthermia. In order to increase the efficacy of drug treatments, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles can be incorporated into a composite system with a surfactant-polymer nanoparticle, which can act as a platform for sustained and enhanced cellular delivery of water-soluble molecules. Here we report a composite formulation based on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and Alginate-aerosol OT (AOT) nanoparticles formulated using an emulsion-cross-linking process loaded with Rhodamine 6G [1]. We prepared two set of nanoparticles by using Ca^2+ or Fe^2+ to cross-link the alginate polymer. Additionally, we added ˜8 nm diameter Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles prepared by a soft chemical method to these alginate-AOT nanoparticles. The resulting composites were superparamagnetic at room temperature, with a saturation magnetization of approximately 0.006 emu/g of solution. We will present detailed studies on the structural and magnetic properties of these samples. We will also discuss HPLC measurements on Rhodamine uploading in these composites. [1] M.D.Chavanpatil, Pharmaceutical Research, vol.24, (2007) 803.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015STAdM..16c5010B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015STAdM..16c5010B"><span id="translatedtitle">Lanthanide sorbent based on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles functionalized with organophosphorus extractants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Basualto, Carlos; Gaete, José; Molina, Lorena; Valenzuela, Fernando; Yañez, Claudia; Marco, Jose F.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>In this work, an adsorbent was prepared based on the attachment of organophosphorus acid extractants, namely, D2EHPA, CYANEX 272, and CYANEX 301, to the surface of superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with oleic acid, first by a chemisorption mechanism and later by the respective extractant via physical adsorption. The obtained core-shell functionalized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle composites were characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, infrared absorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. All the prepared nanoparticles exhibited a high saturation magnetization capacity that varied between 72 and 46 emu g-1 and decreased as the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle was coated with oleic acid and functionalized. The scope of this study also included adsorption tests for lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium and the corresponding analysis of their results. Sorption tests indicated that the functionalized nanoparticles were able to extract the four studied lanthanide metal ions, although the best extraction performance was observed when the sorbent was functionalized with CYANEX 272, which resulted in a loading capacity of approximately 12-14 mgLa/gMNP. The magnetization of the synthesized nanoparticles was verified during the separation of the lanthanide-loaded sorbent from the raffinate by using a conventional magnet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24206770','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24206770"><span id="translatedtitle">Production of nano zinc, zinc sulphide and nanocomplex of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> zinc oxide by Brevundimonas diminuta and Pseudomonas stutzeri.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mirhendi, Mansoureh; Emtiazi, Giti; Roghanian, Rasoul</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>ZnO (Zincite) nanoparticle has many industrial applications and is mostly produced by chemical reactions, usually prepared by decomposition of zinc acetate or hot-injection and heating-up method. Synthesis of semi-conductor nanoparticles such as ZnS (Sphalerite) by ultrasonic was previously reported. In this work, high-zinc tolerant bacteria were isolated and used for nano zinc production. Among all isolated microorganisms, a gram negative bacterium which was identified as Brevundimonas diminuta could construct nano <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> zinc oxide on bacterial surface with 22 nm in size and nano zinc with 48.29 nm in size. A piece of zinc metal was immersed in medium containing of <span class="hlt">pure</span> culture of B. diminuta. Subsequently, a yellow-white biofilm was formed which was collected from the surface of zinc. It was dried at room temperature. The isolated biofilm was analysed by X-ray diffractometer. Interestingly, the yield of these particles was higher in the light, with pH 7 at 23°C. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the first report about the production of nano zinc metal and nano zinc oxide that are stable and have anti-bacterial activities with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> property. Also ZnS (sized 12 nm) produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri, was studied by photoluminescence and fluorescent microscope. PMID:24206770</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSSCh.237...19I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JSSCh.237...19I"><span id="translatedtitle">Growth mechanism and magnetic properties of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles during solution process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iwamoto, Takashi; Kinoshita, Toshiya; Takahashi, Kazuma</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>We investigated the growth mechanism of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles during chemical synthesis by analyzing their physicochemical properties. The transformation from metallic precursor to particles and the growth of the particle occurred during chemical synthesis. During the transformation process, Fe(acac)3, which was used as a metallic precursor, was decomposed, fabricating an Fe oleate. The Fe oleates then agglomerated to each other to form Fe oleate clusters. Finally, the Fe oleate cluster was reduced, and a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle was fabricated. During the growth process of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle, the diameter of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles increased as the reaction temperature increased. Then, the Fe oleates on the surface of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle were reduced at a constant rate, and as a result, the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle grew significantly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016ApSS..364..400I&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016ApSS..364..400I&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy studies on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ivashchenko, Olena; Jurga-Stopa, Justyna; Coy, Emerson; Peplinska, Barbara; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Jurga, Stefan</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>This article presents a study on the detection of antibiotics in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Antibiotics with different spectra of antimicrobial activities, including rifampicin, doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone, were studied. Mechanical mixtures of antibiotics and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/Ag nanocomposites, as well as antibiotics and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanopowder, were investigated in order to identify the origin of FTIR bands. FTIR spectroscopy was found to be an appropriate technique for this task. The spectra of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites exhibited very weak (for doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone) or even no (for rifampicin) antibiotic bands. This FTIR "invisibility" of antibiotics is ascribed to their adsorbed state. FTIR and Raman measurements show altered Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd S bonds, indicating adsorption of the antibiotic molecules on the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/Ag nanocomposite structure. In addition, a potential mechanism through which antibiotic molecules interact with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>/Ag nanoparticle surfaces is proposed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6535120','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6535120"><span id="translatedtitle">Turbulence in <span class="hlt">pure</span> superfluid flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ashton, R.A.; Opatowsky, L.B.; Tough, J.T.</p> <p>1981-03-09</p> <p>A series of experiments is described which provide an unambiguous description of the steady-state properties of turbulence in <span class="hlt">pure</span> superfluid flow. The turbulence is qualitatively different from that observed in counterflow but comparable to the homogeneous turbulence described by theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867395','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867395"><span id="translatedtitle">Production of substantially <span class="hlt">pure</span> fructose</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hatcher, Herbert J.; Gallian, John J.; Leeper, Stephen A.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A process is disclosed for the production of substantially <span class="hlt">pure</span> fructose from sucrose-containing substrates. The process comprises converting the sucrose to levan and glucose, purifying the levan by membrane technology, hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose monomers, and recovering the fructose.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGP41C1134H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGP41C1134H"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence For Weak Ferromagnetic Moment Within The Basal Plane Of Hematite Natural <span class="hlt">Crystals</span> At Low-Temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hernandez, F. M.; Hirt, A. M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Hematite is an iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) that represents the most oxidized state in the wüstite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-hematite system. Hematite is antiferromagnetic (AFM) at room temperature with a small canted moment lying within the <span class="hlt">crystal</span> symmetry plane or basal plane (weak ferromagnetism, WFM). Al low temperatures hematite undergoes a magnetic phase transition from WFM to a <span class="hlt">pure</span> antiferromagnetic configuration (AF), which is known as the Morin transition. Low-temperature magnetization of hematite within the basal has been studied in a collection of natural <span class="hlt">crystals</span> by means of torque magnetometry. Comparison between the torque curves at room temperature and at 77 K allows identification of a weak ferromagnetic moment constrained within the basal plane at temperatures well below the Morin transition. Annealing the samples produces the expected reduction of the weak ferromagnetic moment, but there is also a relationship between the ferromagnetic moment before and after annealing. Low temperature measurements after the annealing experiment reveal the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that survives the annealing. This observation suggests the magnetic structure of natural hematite <span class="hlt">crystals</span> below the Morin transition can still be a carrier of magnetization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1087262','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1087262"><span id="translatedtitle">Reaction of U-VI with titanium-substituted <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>: Influence of Ti on U-IV speciation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Latta, Drew; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Boyanov, Maxim I.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Reduction of hexavalent uranium (UVI) to less soluble tetravalent uranium (UIV) through enzymatic or abiotic redox reactions has the potential to alter U mobility in subsurface environments. As a ubiquitous natural mineral, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) is of interest because of its ability to act as a rechargeable reductant for UVI. Natural <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> are often impure with titanium, and structural Fe3+ replacement by TiIV yields a proportional increase in the relative Fe2+ content in the metal sublattice to maintain bulk charge neutrality. In the absence of oxidation, the Ti content sets the initial bulk Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio (R). Here, we demonstrate that Ti-doped <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> (Fe3 xTixO4) reduce UVI to UIV. The UVI-Fe2+ redox reactivity was found to be controlled directly by R, but was otherwise independent of Ti content (xTi). However, in contrast to previous studies with <span class="hlt">pure</span> <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> where UVI was reduced to nanocrystalline uraninite (UO2), the presence of structural Ti (xTi = 0.25 0.53) results in the formation of UIV species that lack the bidentate U-O2-U bridges of uraninite. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis indicated that the titanomagnetite-bound UIV phase has a novel UIV-Ti binding geometry, different from the coordination of UIV in the mineral brannerite (UIVTi2O6). The observed UIV-Ti coordination at a distance of 3.43 Å suggests a binuclear corner-sharing adsorption/incorporation UIV complex with the solid phase. Furthermore, we explored the effect of oxidation (decreasing R) and solids-to-solution ratio on the reduced UIV phase. The formation of the non-uraninite UIV-Ti phase appears to be controlled by availability of surface Ti sites, rather than R. Our work highlights a previously unrecognized role of Ti in the environmental chemistry of UIV and suggests that further work to characterize the long-term stability of UIV phases formed in the presence of Ti is warranted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070018211','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070018211"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite and the Origin of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> in Martian Meteorite ALH84001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bell, Mary Sue</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Shock recovery experiments to determine whether <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> could be produced by the decomposition of iron-carbonate were initiated. Naturally occurring siderite was first characterized by electron microprobe (EMP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements to be sure that the starting material did not contain detectable <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Samples were shocked in tungsten-alloy holders (W=90%, Ni=6%, Cu=4%) to further insure that any iron phases in the shock products were contributed by the siderite rather than the sample holder. Each sample was shocked to a specific pressure between 30 to 49 GPa. Previously reported results of TEM analyses on 49 GPa experiments indicated the presence of nano-phase spinel-structured iron oxide. Transformation of siderite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as characterized by TEM was found in the 49 GPa shock experiment. Compositions of most <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> are greater than 50% Fe sup(+2) in the octahedral site of the inverse spinel structure. <span class="hlt">Magnetites</span> produced in shock experiments display the same range of single-domain, superparamagnetic sizes (approx. 50 100 nm), compositions (100% <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to 80% <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-20% magnesioferrite), and morphologies (equant, elongated, euhedral to subhedral) as <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> synthesized by Golden et al. (2001) or <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> grown naturally by MV1 magnetotactic bacteria, and as the <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> in Martian meteorite ALH84001. Fritz et al. (2005) previously concluded that ALH84001 experienced approx. 32 GPa pressure and a resultant thermal pulse of approx. 100 - 110 C. However, ALH84001 contains evidence of local temperature excursions high enough to 1 melt feldspar, pyroxene, and a silica-rich phase. This 49 GPa experiment demonstrates that <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> can be produced by the shock decomposition of siderite as a result of local heating to greater than 470 C. Therefore, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the rims of carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could be a product of shock devolatilization of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PCM....42..319D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PCM....42..319D"><span id="translatedtitle">Force interactions between <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, silica, and bentonite studied with atomic force microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dobryden, I.; Potapova, E.; Holmgren, A.; Weber, H.; Hedlund, J.; Almqvist, N.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Iron ore pellets consist of variety of mineral particles and are an important refined product used in steel manufacturing. Production of high-quality pellets requires good understanding of interactions between different constituents, such as <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, gangue residues, bentonite, and additives. Much research has been reported on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, silica, and bentonite surface properties and their effect on pellet strength but more scant with a focus on a fundamental particle-particle interaction. To probe such particle interaction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using colloidal probe technique has proven to be a suitable tool. In this work, the measurements were performed between <span class="hlt">magnetite-magnetite</span>, bentonite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, silica-bentonite, and silica-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in 1 mM CaCl2 solution at various pH values. The interaction character, i.e., repulsion or attraction, was determined by measuring and analyzing AFM force curves. The observed quantitative changes in interaction forces were in good agreement with the measured zeta-potentials for the particles at the same experimental conditions. Particle aggregation was studied by measuring the adhesion force. Absolute values of adhesion forces for different systems could not be compared due to the difference in particle size and contact geometry. Therefore, the relative change of adhesion force between pH 6 and 10 was used for comparison. The adhesion force decreased for the <span class="hlt">magnetite-magnetite</span> and bentonite-silica systems and slightly increased for the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-bentonite system at pH 10 as compared to pH 6, whereas a pronounced decrease in adhesion force was observed in the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-silica system. Thus, the presence of silica particles on the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> surface could have a negative impact on the interaction between <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and bentonite in balling due to the reduction of the adhesion force.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26894690','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26894690"><span id="translatedtitle">Rotating Flow of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mustafa, M; Mushtaq, A; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4-water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the <span class="hlt">pure</span> fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4760931','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4760931"><span id="translatedtitle">Rotating Flow of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mustafa, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4–water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the <span class="hlt">pure</span> fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1050982','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1050982"><span id="translatedtitle">Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure of Oxidized and Partially Oxidized <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Yin, Yadong; Falcone, Roger; Waychunas, Glenn A.</p> <p>2010-10-24</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">crystal</span> structure of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles may be transformed to maghemite by complete oxidation, but under many relevant conditions the oxidation is partial, creating a mixed-valence material with structural and electronic properties that are poorly characterized. We used X-ray diffraction, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy to characterize the products of oxidizing uncoated and oleic acid-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles in air. The oxidization of uncoated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles creates a material that is structurally and electronically indistinguishable from maghemite. By contrast, while oxidized oleic acid-coated nanoparticles are also structurally indistinguishable from maghemite, Fe L-edge spectroscopy revealed the presence of interior reduced iron sites even after a 2-year period. We used X-ray emission spectroscopy at the O K-edge to study the valence bands (VB) of the iron oxide nanoparticles, using resonant excitation to remove the contributions from oxygen atoms in the ligands and from low-energy excitations that obscured the VB edge. The bonding in all nanoparticles was typical of maghemite, with no detectable VB states introduced by the long-lived, reduced-iron sites in the oleic acid-coated sample. However, O K-edge absorption spectroscopy observed a 0.2 eV shift in the position of the lowest unoccupied states in the coated sample, indicating an increase in the semiconductor band gap relative to bulk stoichiometric maghemite that was also observed by optical absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the ferrous iron sites within ferric iron oxide nanoparticles coated by an organic ligand can persist under ambient conditions with no evidence of a distinct interior phase and can exert an effect on the global electronic and optical properties of the material. This phenomenon resembles the band gap enlargement caused by electron accumulation in the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121....3C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121....3C"><span id="translatedtitle">Discrimination of biogenic and detrital <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> through a double Verwey transition temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Liao; Heslop, David; Roberts, Andrew P.; Rey, Daniel; Mohamed, Kais J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> occurs widely in natural environments in both inorganic and biogenic forms. Discrimination of the origin of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> has important implications, from searching for past microbial activity to interpreting paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic records in a wide range of settings. In this study, we present rock magnetic and electron microscopic analyses of marine sediments from the continental margin of Oman. Low-temperature magnetic data reveal two distinct Verwey transition (Tv) temperatures that are associated with the presence of biogenic and inorganic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. This interpretation is consistent with room temperature magnetic properties and is confirmed by electron microscopic analyses. Our study justifies the use of two distinct Tv temperatures as a diagnostic signature for discriminating inorganic and biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Simple low-temperature magnetic measurements, therefore, provide a tool to recognize rapidly the origin of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> within natural samples. In addition, our analyses reveal progressive down-core dissolution of detrital and biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, but with preservation of significant amounts of fine-grained <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> within sediments that have been subjected to severe diagenetic alteration. We demonstrate that preservation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in such environments is due to protection of fine-grained <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> inclusions within silicate hosts. Our results, therefore, also provide new insights into diagenetic processes in marine sediments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160003681','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160003681"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Reflectance Spectra Using Hapke Theory and Existing Optical Constants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Roush, T. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Cahill, J. T. S.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> is an accessory mineral found in terrestrial environments, some meteorites, and the lunar surface. The reflectance of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> powers is relatively low [1], and this property makes it an analog for other dark Fe- or Ti-bearing components, particularly ilmenite on the lunar surface. The real and imaginary indices of refraction (optical constants) for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> are available in the literature [2-3], and online [4]. Here we use these values to calculate the reflectance of particulates and compare these model spectra to reflectance measurements of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> available on-line [5].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19534143','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19534143"><span id="translatedtitle">Highly active Pd-on-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocatalysts for aqueous phase hydrodechlorination reactions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hildebrand, Heike; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter</p> <p>2009-05-01</p> <p>Nanoscale catalyst particles are already in focus as excellent tools in catalytic processes and intensive research is currently optimizing their performance. As known from nanosized metal particles, nanocatalysts have the potential of very high reaction rates due to their high specific surface areas and low mass transfer restrictions. In this study, we generated extremely active palladium catalysts on the basis of colloidal magnetic carriers. The most active catalyst contains only traces of Pd (0.15 wt %) on nanomagnetite as carrier. Pd-on-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was successfully tested in batch experiments for the hydrodechlorination (HDC) of the chlorohydrocarbons trichloroethene (TCE) and chlorobenzene. For the HDC of TCE, second-order rate coefficients of approximately 1.6 x 10(4) L g(-1) min(-1) were measured. Such high activities have never been described before for Pd-containing catalysts in aqueous phase HDC reactions. The ferrimagnetism of the carrier enables a separation of the nanocatalyst from the treated water by means of magnetic separation. This allows the catalyst to be reused several times, which is an important advantage compared to other nanoscale catalytic systems such as <span class="hlt">pure</span> Pd or Pd-on-Au colloids. PMID:19534143</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12780124','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12780124"><span id="translatedtitle">Excitability in liquid <span class="hlt">crystal</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Coullet, P.; Frisch, T.; Gilli, J. M.; Rica, S.</p> <p>1994-09-01</p> <p>The spiral waves observed in a liquid <span class="hlt">crystal</span> submitted to a vertical electric field and a horizontal rotating magnetic field are explained in the framework of a <span class="hlt">purely</span> mechanical description of the liquid <span class="hlt">crystal</span>. The originality of the experiment described in this paper is the presence of the vertical electric field which allows us to analyze the spiral waves in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory. PMID:12780124</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013PhRvL.111a0401S&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013PhRvL.111a0401S&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Canonical Thermal <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Quantum State</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sugiura, Sho; Shimizu, Akira</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>A thermal equilibrium state of a quantum many-body system can be represented by a typical <span class="hlt">pure</span> state, which we call a thermal <span class="hlt">pure</span> quantum (TPQ) state. We construct the canonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the canonical ensemble of the conventional statistical mechanics. It is related to the microcanonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the microcanonical ensemble, by simple analytic transformations. Both TPQ states give identical thermodynamic results, if both ensembles do, in the thermodynamic limit. The TPQ states corresponding to other ensembles can also be constructed. We have thus established the TPQ formulation of statistical mechanics, according to which all quantities of statistical-mechanical interest are obtained from a single realization of any TPQ state. We also show that it has great advantages in practical applications. As an illustration, we study the spin-1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012JAP...112d3917G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2012JAP...112d3917G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnetorheological behavior of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> covered clay particles in aqueous suspensions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Galindo-Gonzalez, C.; Lopez-Lopez, M. T.; Duran, J. D. G.</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Montmorillonite clay particles coated with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles suspended in aqueous media behave as magnetorheological fluids with enhanced stability as compared to conventional ones. In this work, the study of the magnetorheological behavior of these suspensions of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-clay composite particles has been carried out. For this purpose, both steady and dynamic rheological measurements were carried out in the absence and in the presence of external magnetic fields. In the first kind of experiments, the rheograms of the suspensions (shear stress versus shear rate plot) are analyzed as a function of the strength of the magnetic field applied. In the second one, oscillatory stresses are applied to the system, and the storage modulus is studied as a function of the external magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic field, the suspensions develop a weak yield stress due to the aggregation of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> covered clay particles. In the presence of magnetic field, the yield stress is strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength inside the samples, demonstrating that the suspensions experience a magnetorheological effect, moderate when the magnetic field strength is weak and stronger for values of magnetic field higher than 150-200 kA/m. Actually, the most intriguing result is the change of the trend in the dependence of the yield stress with the field. This dependence is approximately linear with the field for strength values smaller than 150-200 kA/m. On the other hand, for higher values, the yield stress increases with magnetic field following a power law with exponent 4.5.The results are interpreted by means of a model that relates the structure of the particles in the suspensions to the magnetic field applied and using the interaction energy between particles calculated by the extended DLVO theory to include magnetic interaction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25063152','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25063152"><span id="translatedtitle">Novel humic acid-bonded <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles for protein immobilization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bayrakci, Mevlut; Gezici, Orhan; Bas, Salih Zeki; Ozmen, Mustafa; Maltas, Esra</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>The present paper is the first report that introduces (i) a useful methodology for chemical immobilization of humic acid (HA) to aminopropyltriethoxysilane-functionalized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> iron oxide nanoparticles (APS-MNPs) and (ii) human serum albumin (HSA) binding to the obtained material (HA-APS-MNPs). The newly prepared <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis. Results indicated that surface modification of the bare <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles (MNPs) with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and HA was successfully performed. The protein binding studies that were evaluated in batch mode exhibited that HA-APS-MNPs could be efficiently used as a substrate for the binding of HSA from aqueous solutions. Usually, recovery values higher than 90% were found to be feasible by HA-APS-MNPs, while that value was around 2% and 70% in the cases of MNPs and APS-MNPs, respectively. Hence, the capacity of MNPs was found to be significantly improved by immobilization of HA. Furthermore, thermal degradation of HA-APS-MNPs and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs was evaluated in terms of the Horowitz-Metzger equation in order to determine kinetic parameters for thermal decomposition. Activation energies calculated for HA-APS-MNPs (20.74 kJmol(-1)) and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs (33.42 kJmol(-1)) implied chemical immobilization of HA to APS-MNPs, and tight interactions between HA and HA-APS-MNPs. PMID:25063152</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApSS..359..742P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ApSS..359..742P"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of the substrate on the magnetic anisotropy of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> thin films grown by ion-assisted deposition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Prieto, Pilar; Prieto, José Emilio; Gargallo-Caballero, Raquel; Marco, José Francisco; de la Figuera, Juan</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) thin films were deposited on MgO (0 0 1), SrTiO3 (0 0 1), LaAlO3 (0 0 1) single <span class="hlt">crystal</span> substrates as well on as silicon and amorphous glass in order to study the effect of the substrate on their magnetic properties, mainly the magnetic anisotropy. We have performed a structural, morphological and compositional characterization by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering ion channeling in oxygen resonance mode. The magnetic anisotropy has been investigated by vectorial magneto-optical Kerr effect. The results indicate that the magnetic anisotropy is especially influenced by the substrate-induced microstructure. In-plane isotropy and uniaxial anisotropy behavior have been observed on silicon and glass substrates, respectively. The transition between both behaviors depends on grain size. For LaAlO3 substrates, in which the lattice mismatch between the Fe3O4 films and the substrate is significant, a weak in-plane fourfold magnetic anisotropy is induced. However when <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is deposited on MgO (0 0 1) and SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrates, a well-defined fourfold in-plane magnetic anisotropy is observed with easy axes along [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] directions. The magnetic properties on these two latter substrates are similar in terms of magnetic anisotropy and coercive fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20873726','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20873726"><span id="translatedtitle">Sticking polydisperse hydrophobic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles to lipid membranes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Paulus, Michael; Degen, Patrick; Brenner, Thorsten; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Struth, Bernd; Tolan, Metin; Rehage, Heinz</p> <p>2010-10-19</p> <p>The formation of a layer of hydrophobic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles stabilized by lauric acid is analyzed by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The data analysis shows that the nanoparticles partially disperse their hydrophobic coating. Consequently, a Langmuir layer was formed by lauric acid molecules that can be compressed into an untilted condensed phase. A majority of the nanoparticles are attached to the Langmuir film integrating lauric acid residue on their surface into the Langmuir film. Hence, the particles at the liquid-gas interface can be identified as so-called Janus beads, which are amphiphilic solids having two sides with different functionality. PMID:20873726</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013IJT....34..609J&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2013IJT....34..609J&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Rheological Study of Dextran-Modified <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanoparticle Water Suspension</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Józefczak, A.; Hornowski, T.; Rozynek, Z.; Skumiel, A.; Fossum, J. O.</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of surface modification of superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles (sterically stabilized by sodium oleate) by the dextran biocompatible layer on the rheological behavior of water-based magnetic fluids. The flow curves were measured as a function of the magnetic field strength by means of rheometry. The measured viscosity is generally dependent on both the particle concentration and the geometrical factors such as the particle shape and thickness of the adsorbed layers. The rheological properties of the magnetic fluids studied show the effect of the magnetic field strength and the presence of the surfactant second layer (dextran) on their viscosity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMMM..324.1753A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMMM..324.1753A"><span id="translatedtitle">Preparation of size-controlled nanoparticles of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Andrade, Ângela L.; Valente, Manuel A.; Ferreira, José M. F.; Fabris, José D.</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>Samples of ferrofluids containing chemically stabilized nanoparticles of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) were prepared by a direct reduction-precipitation method. The influences of aging time and temperature on the size and monodispersion characteristics of the produced nanoparticles were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared, and magnetization measurements with applied magnetic field up to 2 T were used to characterize the synthesized iron oxides. Raising the temperature of the synthesized material in autoclave affects positively the monodispersion of the nanoparticles, but it was not found to significantly influence the size itself of individual particles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ascl.soft10014G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ascl.soft10014G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">pureS</span>2HAT: S 2HAT-based <span class="hlt">Pure</span> E/B Harmonic Transforms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grain, J.; Stompor, R.; Tristram, M.</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The pS2HAT routines allow efficient, parallel calculation of the so-called '<span class="hlt">pure</span>' polarized multipoles. The computed multipole coefficients are equal to the standard pseudo-multipoles calculated for the apodized sky maps of the Stokes parameters Q and U subsequently corrected by so-called counterterms. If the applied apodizations fullfill certain boundary conditions, these multipoles correspond to the <span class="hlt">pure</span> multipoles. <span class="hlt">Pure</span> multipoles of one type, i.e., either E or B, are ensured not to contain contributions from the other one, at least to within numerical artifacts. They can be therefore further used in the estimation of the sky power spectra via the pseudo power spectrum technique, which has to however correctly account for the applied apodization on the one hand, and the presence of the counterterms, on the other. In addition, the package contains the routines permitting calculation of the spin-weighted apodizations, given an input scalar, i.e., spin-0 window. The former are needed to compute the counterterms. It also provides routines for maps and window manipulations. The routines are written in C and based on the S2HAT library, which is used to perform all required spherical harmonic transforms as well as all inter-processor communication. They are therefore parallelized using MPI and follow the distributed-memory computational model. The data distribution patterns, pixelization choices, conventions etc are all as those assumed/allowed by the S2HAT library.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CoMP..169...59M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CoMP..169...59M"><span id="translatedtitle">Trace-element fingerprints of chromite, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and sulfides from the 3.1 Ga ultramafic-mafic rocks of the Nuggihalli greenstone belt, Western Dharwar craton (India)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mukherjee, Ria; Mondal, Sisir K.; González-Jiménez, José M.; Griffin, William L.; Pearson, Norman J.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p> andesitic melts, suggesting that <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> <span class="hlt">crystallized</span> from an evolved gabbroic melt. Enrichments of Ni, Co, Te, As and Bi in disseminated millerite and niccolite occurring within chromitites, and in disseminated bravoite within <span class="hlt">magnetites</span>, reflect element mobility during serpentinization. Monosulfide solid solution inclusions within pyroxenes (altered to actinolite) in pyroxenite, and interstitial pyrites and chalcopyrites in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, retain primary characteristics except for Fe-enrichment in chalcopyrite, probably due to sub-solidus re-equilibration with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Disseminated sulfides are depleted in platinum-group elements (PGE) due to late sulfide saturation and the PGE-depleted nature of the mantle source of the sill-like ultramafic-mafic plutonic rocks in the Nuggihalli greenstone belt.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2008PhDT........14Y&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2008PhDT........14Y&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Accessible and green manufacturing of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (ferrous ferric oxide) nanocrystals and their use in magnetic separations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yavuz, Cafer Tayyar</p> <p></p> <p>This work describes the first size dependent magnetic separation in nanoscale. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanocrystals of high quality and uniform size were synthesized with monodispersity below 10%. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanocrystals of 4 nm to 33 nm (average diameter) were produced. Batch synthesis was shown to go up to 20 grams which is more than 10 times of a standard nanocrystal synthesis, without loosing the quality and monodispersity. Reactor design for mass (1 gram per hour) production of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals is reported for the first time. The cost of a kg of lab purity <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals was shown to be 2600. A green synthesis that utilizes rust and edible oils was developed. The cost of a kg was brought down to 22. Size dependency of magnetism was shown in nanoscale for the first time. Reversible aggregation theory was developed to explain the low field magnetic separation and solution behavior of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals. Arsenic was removed from drinking water with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystals 200 times better than commercial adsorbents. Silica coating was successfully applied to enable the known silica related biotechnologies. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-silica nanoshells were functionalized with amino groups. For the first time, silver was coated on the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-silica nanoshells to produce triple multishells. Anti-microbial activity of multishells is anticipated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23363304','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23363304"><span id="translatedtitle">Physicochemical characterization of surfactant incorporating vesicles that incorporate colloidal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Melo Barbosa, Raquel; Luna Finkler, Christine L; Bentley, Maria Vitória L B; Santana, Maria Helena A</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Drug administration through the transdermal route has optimized for the comfort of patients and easy application. However, the main limitation of transdermal drug delivery is the impermeability of the human skin. Recent advances on improvement of drug transport through the skin include elastic liposomes as a penetration enhancer. Entrapment of ferrofluids in the core of liposomes produces magnetoliposomes, which can be driven by a high-gradient magnetic field. The association of both strategies could enhance the penetration of elastic liposomes. This work relies on the preparation and characterization of elastic-magnetic liposomes designed to permeate through the skin. The incorporation of colloidal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and the elastic component, octaethylene glycol laurate (PEG-8-L), in the structure of liposomes were evaluated. The capability of the elastic magnetoliposomes for permeation through nanopores of two stacked polycarbonate membranes was compared to conventional and elastic liposomes. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> incorporation was dependent on vesicle diameter and size distribution as well as PEG-8-L incorporation into liposomes, demonstrating the capability of the fluid bilayer to accommodate the surfactant without disruption. On the contrary, PEG-8-L incorporation into magnetoliposomes promoted a decrease of average diameter and a lower PEG-8-L incorporation percentage as a result of reduction on the fluidity of the bilayer imparted by iron incorporation into the lipid structure. Elastic liposomes demonstrated an enhancement of the deformation capability, as compared with conventional liposomes. Conventional and elastic magnetoliposomes presented a reduced capability for deformation and permeation. PMID:23363304</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15448967','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15448967"><span id="translatedtitle">Glucose oxidase-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle bioconjugate for glucose sensing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rossi, Liane M; Quach, Ashley D; Rosenzweig, Zeev</p> <p>2004-10-01</p> <p>Immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles is of great interest, because the magnetic properties of these bioconjugates promise to greatly improve the delivery and recovery of biomolecules in biomedical applications. Here we present the preparation and functionalization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter and the successful covalent conjugation of the enzyme glucose oxidase to the amino-modified nanoparticle surface. Functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticle surface with amino groups greatly increased the amount and activity of the immobilized enzyme compared with immobilization procedures involving physical adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the glucose oxidase-coated magnetic nanoparticles was investigated by monitoring oxygen consumption during the enzymatic oxidation of glucose using a ruthenium phenanthroline fluorescent complex for oxygen sensing. The glucose oxidase-coated <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles could function as nanometric glucose sensors in glucose solutions of concentrations up to 20 mmol L(-1). Immobilization of glucose oxidase on the nanoparticles also increased the stability of the enzyme. When stored at 4 degrees C the nanoparticle suspensions maintained their bioactivity for up to 3 months. PMID:15448967</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010JAP...108k4311J&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010JAP...108k4311J&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Monodisperse <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanofluids: Synthesis, aggregation, and thermal conductivity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Wei; Wang, Liqiu</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Magnetic nanofluids possess some unique properties that can significantly affect their thermal conductivity. We synthesize monodispersed <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanofluids in toluene with the particle size from 4 to 12 nm and obtain aqueous nanofluids by a simple "one-step" phase transfer. Even without the effect of external field, the magnetic-interaction-induced self-assembled aggregation can still be significant in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanofluids. Investigation of the microstructures of self-assembled aggregation is carried out by the dynamic light scattering, which unveils the variation of aggregated configurations with particle concentration and time. Based on the calculation from the existing models, the aggregates decrease the thermal conductivity of both themselves and the entire system, mainly due to the less solid contents and weaker mobility compared with the single particles as well as the increase in interfacial thermal resistance. As the manifestation of the aggregation-structure variation, the measured thermal conductivity is of a wavelike shape as a function of particle concentration. The particle coating layers are also of importance in cluster formation so that nanofluid thermal conductivity can be manipulated for some nanofluids by changing the stabilizer used and thus controlling the particle aggregated structures. Due to the effects of temperature, viscosity and coating layers, the thermal conductivity for aqueous system varies in a different way as that for the toluene system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JEOS....4E9024P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JEOS....4E9024P"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanoparticles for biosensor model based on bacteria fluorescence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Poita, A.; Creanga, D.-E.; Airinei, A.; Tupu, P.; Goiceanu, C.; Avadanei, O.</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>Fluorescence emission of pyoverdine - the siderophore synthesized by iron scavenger bacteria - was studied using in vitro cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the aim to design a biosensor system for liquid sample iron loading. Diluted suspensions of colloidal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles were supplied in the culture medium (10 microl/l and 100 microl/l) to simulate magnetic loading with iron oxides of either environmental waters or human body fluids. The electromagnetic exposure to radiofrequency waves of bacterial samples grown in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles was also carried out. Cell density diminution but fluorescence stimulation following 10 microl/l ferrofluid addition and simultaneous exposure to radiofrequency waves was evidenced. The inhibitory influence of 100 microl/l ferrofluid combined with RF exposure was evidenced by fluorescence data. Mathematical model was proposed to approach quantitatively the dynamics of cell density and fluorescence emission in relation with the consumption of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle supplied medium. The biosensor scheme was shaped based on the response to iron loading of bacterial sample fluorescence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16851439','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16851439"><span id="translatedtitle">Aqueous ferrofluid of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles: Fluorescence labeling and magnetophoretic control.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Goodarzi, Alireza; Swihart, Mark T; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Kaur, Navjot; Furlani, Edward P; Prasad, Paras N</p> <p>2005-03-10</p> <p>A method is presented for the preparation of a biocompatible ferrofluid containing dye-functionalized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles that can serve as fluorescent markers. This method entails the surface functionalization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles using citric acid to produce a stable aqueous dispersion and the subsequent binding of fluorescent dyes to the surface of the particles. Several ferrofluid samples were prepared and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), BET surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and SQUID magnetometry. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study the response of the fluorescent nanoparticles to an applied magnetic field and their uptake by cells in vitro. Results are presented on the distribution of particle sizes, the fluorescent and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles, and the nature of their surface bonds. Biocompatible ferrofluids with fluorescent nanoparticles enable optical tracking of basic processes at the cellular level combined with magnetophoretic manipulation and should be of substantial value to researchers engaged in both fundamental and applied biomedical research. PMID:16851439</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506936','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506936"><span id="translatedtitle">Moessbauer Characterization of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>/Polyaniline Magnetic Nanocomposite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rodriguez, Anselmo F. R.; Faria, Fernando S. E. D. V.; Lopez, Jorge L.; Mesquita, Antonio G. G.; Coaquira, Jose A. H.; Oliveira, Aderbal C.; Morais, Paulo C.; Azevedo, Ricardo B.; Araujo, Ana C. V. de; Alves, Severino Jr.; Azevedo, Walter M. de</p> <p>2010-12-02</p> <p>Aniline surface coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by UV irradiation varying the time and the acid media (HCl, HNO{sub 3}, or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). The synthesized material represents a promising platform for application in nerve regeneration. XRD patterns are consistent with the crystalline structure of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Nevertheless, for UV irradiation times longer than 2 h, extra XRD lines reveal the presence of goethite. The mean crystallite size of uncoated particles is estimated to be 25.4 nm, meanwhile that size is reduced to 19.9 nm for the UV irradiated sample in HCl medium for 4 h. Moessbauer spectra of uncoated nanoparticles reveal the occurrence of thermal relaxation at room temperature, while the 77 K-Moessbauer spectrum suggests the occurrence of electron localization effects similar to that expected in bulk <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. The Mossbauer spectra of UV irradiated sample in HCl medium during 4 h, confirms the presence of the goethite phase. For this sample, the thermal relaxation is more evident, since the room temperature spectrum shows larger spectral area for the nonmagnetic component due to the smaller crystallite size. Meanwhile, the 77 K-Moessbauer spectrum suggests the absence of the electron localization effect above 77 K.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NatMa..12..882D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NatMa..12..882D"><span id="translatedtitle">Speed limit of the insulator-metal transition in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Jong, S.; Kukreja, R.; Trabant, C.; Pontius, N.; Chang, C. F.; Kachel, T.; Beye, M.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Back, C. H.; Bräuer, B.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Krupin, O.; Doehler, M.; Zhu, D.; Hossain, M. A.; Scherz, A. O.; Fausti, D.; Novelli, F.; Esposito, M.; Lee, W. S.; Chuang, Y. D.; Lu, D. H.; Moore, R. G.; Yi, M.; Trigo, M.; Kirchmann, P.; Pathey, L.; Golden, M. S.; Buchholz, M.; Metcalf, P.; Parmigiani, F.; Wurth, W.; Föhlisch, A.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Dürr, H. A.</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>As the oldest known magnetic material, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) has fascinated mankind for millennia. As the first oxide in which a relationship between electrical conductivity and fluctuating/localized electronic order was shown, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> represents a model system for understanding correlated oxides in general. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism of the insulator-metal, or Verwey, transition has long remained inaccessible. Recently, three-Fe-site lattice distortions called trimerons were identified as the characteristic building blocks of the low-temperature insulating electronically ordered phase. Here we investigate the Verwey transition with pump-probe X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity techniques, and show how trimerons become mobile across the insulator-metal transition. We find this to be a two-step process. After an initial 300 fs destruction of individual trimerons, phase separation occurs on a 1.5±0.2 ps timescale to yield residual insulating and metallic regions. This work establishes the speed limit for switching in future oxide electronics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22285055','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22285055"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and characterization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles coated with lauric acid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mamani, J.B.; Costa-Filho, A.J.; Cornejo, D.R.; Vieira, E.D.; Gamarra, L.F.</p> <p>2013-07-15</p> <p>Understanding the process of synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is important for its implementation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In this work we report the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles made from ferrous oxide through coprecipitation chemical process. The nanostructured material was coated with lauric acid and dispersed in aqueous medium containing surfactant that yielded a stable colloidal suspension. The characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with distinct physico-chemical configurations is fundamental for biomedical applications. Therefore magnetic nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphology by means of TEM and DLS, which showed a polydispersed set of spherical nanoparticles (average diameter of ca. 9 nm) as a result of the protocol. The structural properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD pattern showed the presence of peaks corresponding to the spinel phase of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The relaxivities r{sub 2} and r{sub 2}* values were determined from the transverse relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* at 3 T. Magnetic characterization was performed using SQUID and FMR, which evidenced the superparamagnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Thermal characterization using DSC showed exothermic events associated with the oxidation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to maghemite. - Highlights: • Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles coated with lauric acid • Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles • Morphological, structural, magnetic, calorimetric and relaxometric characterization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1956/0101/plate-6.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1956/0101/plate-6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> deposits near Klukwan and Haines, southeastern Alaska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Robertson, Eugene C.</p> <p>1956-01-01</p> <p>Low-grade iron ore is found in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-bearing pyroxenite bodies near Klukwan and Haines in Southeastern Alaska. An alluvial fan at Haines also contains <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-bearing rock of possible economic significance. The Haines-Klukwan area is underlain by rocks of Mesozoic Including epidote diorite, quartz diorite, and alaskite of the Coast Range batholith, metabasalt (recrystallized lava flows and pyroclastic rocks), and, in the southern part, interbedded slate and limestone. Layering and foliation, where perceptible, generally strike northwest and dip steeply northeast. The iron deposits are found at or near the contact between the metabasalt and epidote diorite; they appear to represent highly-altered lava flows that were metamorphosed during the emplacement of the batholith. Several billion tens of rock containing about 13 percent magnetic iron are included in the pyroxenite body at Klukwan. Sampling and dip-needle data suggest the presence there of two or three tabular aches in which the rock has an average magnetic iron content of 20 percent or more. Pyroxenite bodies outcropping in three areas near Haines apparently are lower in grade than the Klukwan deposit; lack of exposures prevented thorough sampling but reconnaissance traverses with a dip needle failed to reveal important zones of high-grade iron ore. An alluvial fan adjoining the pyroxenite body at Klukwan contains several hundred million tons of broken rock having a magneticiron content of about 10 percent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24800764','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24800764"><span id="translatedtitle">Superelastic organic <span class="hlt">crystals</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takamizawa, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Superelastic materials (<span class="hlt">crystal-to-crystal</span> transformation pseudo elasticity) that consist of organic components have not been observed since superelasticity was discovered in a Au-Cd alloy in 1932. Superelastic materials have been exclusively developed in metallic or inorganic covalent solids, as represented by Ti-Ni alloys. Organosuperelasticity is now revealed in a <span class="hlt">pure</span> organic <span class="hlt">crystal</span> of terephthalamide, which precisely produces a large motion with high repetition and high energy storage efficiency. This process is driven by a small shear stress owing to the low density of strain energy related to the low lattice energy. PMID:24800764</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24009896','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24009896"><span id="translatedtitle">How <span class="hlt">pure</span> are your vesicles?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of <span class="hlt">pure</span> vesicles. PMID:24009896</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008acb1.book..143A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008acb1.book..143A"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis of Enantiomerically <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Anthracyclinones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Achmatowicz, Osman; Szechner, Barbara</p> <p></p> <p>The anthracycline antibiotics are among the most important clinical drugs used in the treatment of human cancer. The search for new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced cardiotoxicity stimulated considerable efforts in the synthesis of new analogues. Since the biological activity of anthracyclines depends on their natural absolute configuration, various strategies for the synthesis of enantiomerically <span class="hlt">pure</span> anthracyclinones (aglycones) have been developed. They comprise: resolution of racemic intermediate, incorporation of a chiral fragment derived from natural and non-natural chiral pools, asymmetric synthesis with the use of a chiral auxiliary or a chiral reagent, and enantioselective catalysis. Synthetic advances towards enantiopure anthracyclinones reported over the last 17 years are reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8978555','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8978555"><span id="translatedtitle">Optimization of Long-Term Stability of Magnetic Fluids from <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> and Synthetic Polyelectrolytes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mendenhall; Geng; Hwang</p> <p>1996-12-25</p> <p>Nanometer-sized suspensions of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) stabilized with polymeric surfactants, principally poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), were prepared by precipitation or sonication and studied by a variety of techniques. The long-term stability of the ferrofluids made with PMAA was optimal at pH 7 (close to the measured isoelectric point of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, 5.9) and improved at all pH values with increasing surfactant concentration. With extended times of sonication the molecular weight and polydispersity of the PMAA decreased, although <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the ferrofluid was not oxidized (X-ray). Particle diameters of 9-38 nm were measured by saturation magnetization, electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Centrifugation at 8,000 rpm removed the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the suspensions together with roughly one molecule of PMAA for each <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particle in the fluid, with the average number increasing with higher concentrations and average molecular weights of the polymer. PMID:8978555</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMMM..324..559C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMMM..324..559C"><span id="translatedtitle">Simple and facile approach to synthesize <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles and assessment of their effects on blood cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cótica, Luiz F.; Freitas, Valdirlei F.; Dias, Gustavo S.; Santos, Ivair A.; Vendrame, Sheila C.; Khalil, Najeh M.; Mainardes, Rubiana M.; Staruch, Margo; Jain, Menka</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, a very simple and facile approach for the large scale synthesis of uniform and size-controllable single-domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles is reported. These <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition of a ferric nitrate/ethylene glycol solution. The structural and morphological properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were carefully studied. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with inverted spinel structure and average particle and crystallite sizes smaller than 20 nm were obtained. The magnetic measurements revealed that <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles have a magnetic saturation value near that of the bulk <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. The erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of the samples containing <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles, indicating no cytotoxic activity on human erythrocytes, which makes these interesting for biotechnological applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MPLB...2950122A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MPLB...2950122A"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and investigating the magnetic properties of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocrystallites for drug delivery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ansar, Muhammad Zaka; Atiq, Shahid; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Ramay, Shahid M.; Mahmood, Asif</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>In recent years, use of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications has increased tremendously. In particular, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) nanoparticles being highly biocompatible are rated very high due to their potential applications in biomedicines, for instance in anticancer drug delivery. In this work, the Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been synthesized using a novel sol-gel based autocombustion technique. The <span class="hlt">crystal</span> structure of the Fe3O4 phase was confirmed by the data obtained from X-ray diffraction. Scherrer’s formula was employed to estimate the crystallite size of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The structural morphology, investigated by using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), revealed well-dispersed and uniform sized grains in the sample prepared using enhanced fuel concentration. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was employed to investigate the magnetic characteristics of the samples which confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of the Fe3O4 samples, essentially required for cancer treatment. These nanoparticles could further be modified and functionalized by suitable polymers to achieve better biocompatibility before being injected into the diseased cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/490865','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/490865"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles by pulsed alexandrite laser processing of metallic glass precursors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sorescu, M.; Schafer, S.A.; Knobbe, E.T.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>Samples of Fe{sub 78}B{sub 13}Si{sub 9} and Fe{sub 81}B{sub 13.5}Si{sub 3.5}C{sub 2} metallic glasses were irradiated with a pulsed alexandrite laser ({lambda} = 750 nm, {tau} = 60 {micro}s) using different laser fluences. Kinetics of laser-induced phase transformations and fluence dependence of magnetic properties were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Low laser fluences were found to induce changes in magnetic texture and onset of <span class="hlt">crystallization</span>. High laser fluences, however, correlated with additional oxidation effects and the formation of stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles in the irradiated alloy system. An activation energy of 11.9 eV was estimated for the laser-driven synthesis of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles. Pulsed alexandrite laser processing is an intriguing alternative technique for the controlled synthesis of iron oxide phases from ferromagnetic glass precursors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JSV...333.6942H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JSV...333.6942H"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiple <span class="hlt">pure</span> tone noise prediction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Han, Fei; Sharma, Anupam; Paliath, Umesh; Shieh, Chingwei</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>This paper presents a fully numerical method for predicting multiple <span class="hlt">pure</span> tones, also known as “Buzzsaw” noise. It consists of three steps that account for noise source generation, nonlinear acoustic propagation with hard as well as lined walls inside the nacelle, and linear acoustic propagation outside the engine. Noise generation is modeled by steady, part-annulus computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. A linear superposition algorithm is used to construct full-annulus shock/pressure pattern just upstream of the fan from part-annulus CFD results. Nonlinear wave propagation is carried out inside the duct using a pseudo-two-dimensional solution of Burgers' equation. Scattering from nacelle lip as well as radiation to farfield is performed using the commercial solver ACTRAN/TM. The proposed prediction process is verified by comparing against full-annulus CFD simulations as well as against static engine test data for a typical high bypass ratio aircraft engine with hardwall as well as lined inlets. Comparisons are drawn against nacelle unsteady pressure transducer measurements at two axial locations as well as against near- and far-field microphone array measurements outside the duct. This is the first fully numerical approach (no experimental or empirical input is required) to predict multiple <span class="hlt">pure</span> tone noise generation, in-duct propagation and far-field radiation. It uses measured blade coordinates to calculate MPT noise.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JCrGr.208..533T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JCrGr.208..533T"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Crystallization</span> kinetics of ammonium perchlorate in MSMPR <span class="hlt">crystallizer</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanrıkulu, S. Ü.; Eroğlu, İ.; Bulutcu, A. N.; Özkar, S.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The effects of supersaturation level, sodium chloride (NaCl) as impurity, and the suspension density of the <span class="hlt">crystallizer</span> content on the <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> kinetics of ammonium perchlorate (AP) were studied in a mixed-suspension mixed-product removal <span class="hlt">crystallizer</span>. The product <span class="hlt">crystals</span> have a plate-like morphology. The <span class="hlt">crystal</span> size distribution is not affected by the supersaturation level. There was a deviation from the ideal population density where the growth rate of <span class="hlt">pure</span> AP <span class="hlt">crystallization</span> was size dependent with the order of 0.4 according to Abegg, Stevens and Larson (ASL) model. However, the ASL model was not found to be suitable to express the growth rate of the <span class="hlt">crystals</span> in NaCl containing AP solution. Also when suspension density of the <span class="hlt">crystallizer</span> increased, secondary nucleation was observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1037911','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1037911"><span id="translatedtitle">Identification of Simultaneous U(VI) Sorption Complexes and U(IV) Nanoprecipitates on the <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (111) Surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Singer, David M.; Chatman, Shawn M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.</p> <p>2012-05-10</p> <p>Sequestration of uranium (U) by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is a potentially important sink for U in natural and contaminated environments. However, molecular-scale controls that favor U(VI) uptake including both adsorption of U(VI) and reduction to U(IV) by <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> remain poorly understood, in particular, the role of U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca complexes in inhibiting U(VI) reduction. To investigate U uptake pathways on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> as a function of U(VI) aqueous speciation, we performed batch sorption experiments on (111) surfaces of natural single <span class="hlt">crystals</span> under a range of solution conditions (pH 5 and 10; 0.1 mM U(VI); 1 mM NaNO{sub 3}; and with or without 0.5 mM CO{sub 3} and 0.1 mM Ca) and characterized surface-associated U using grazing incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-EXAFS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the absence of both carbonate ([CO{sub 3}]T, denoted here as CO{sub 3}) and calcium (Ca), or in the presence of CO{sub 3} only, coexisting adsorption of U(VI) surface species and reduction to U(IV) occurs at both pH 5 and 10. In the presence of both Ca and CO{sub 3}, only U(VI) adsorption (VI) occurs. When U reduction occurs, nanoparticulate UO{sub 2} forms only within and adjacent to surface microtopographic features such as <span class="hlt">crystal</span> boundaries and cracks. This result suggests that U reduction is limited to defect-rich surface regions. Further, at both pH 5 and 10 in the presence of both CO{sub 3} and Ca, U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca ternary surface species develop and U reduction is inhibited. These findings extend the range of conditions under which U(VI)-CO{sub 3}-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFMGP41A..01K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015AGUFMGP41A..01K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Biophysical Puzzles Concerning <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-Based Magnetoreception in the Common Nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p> magnetic field. If correct, the results of Vidal-Gadea et al. make clear predictions for the inheritance of single-domain <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> <span class="hlt">crystals</span> through ontogeny, and demand the presence of a gravity receptor. But if they have a gravity receptor, why would they need magnetotaxis? These are puzzles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24988280','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24988280"><span id="translatedtitle">Metastable growth of <span class="hlt">pure</span> wurtzite InGaAs microstructures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ng, Kar Wei; Ko, Wai Son; Lu, Fanglu; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J</p> <p>2014-08-13</p> <p>III-V compound semiconductors can exist in two major <span class="hlt">crystal</span> phases, namely, zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ). While ZB is thermodynamically favorable in conventional III-V epitaxy, the <span class="hlt">pure</span> WZ phase can be stable in nanowires with diameters smaller than certain critical values. However, thin nanowires are more vulnerable to surface recombination, and this can ultimately limit their performances as practical devices. In this work, we study a metastable growth mechanism that can yield <span class="hlt">purely</span> WZ-phased InGaAs microstructures on silicon. InGaAs nucleates as sharp nanoneedles and expand along both axial and radial directions simultaneously in a core-shell fashion. While the base can scale from tens of nanometers to over a micron, the tip can remain sharp over the entire growth. The sharpness maintains a high local surface-to-volume ratio, favoring hexagonal lattice to grow axially. These unique features lead to the formation of microsized <span class="hlt">pure</span> WZ InGaAs structures on silicon. To verify that the WZ microstructures are truly metastable, we demonstrate, for the first time, the in situ transformation from WZ to the energy-favorable ZB phase inside a transmission electron microscope. This unconventional core-shell growth mechanism can potentially be applied to other III-V materials systems, enabling the effective utilization of the extraordinary properties of the metastable wurtzite <span class="hlt">crystals</span>. PMID:24988280</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21934738','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21934738"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pure</span> optical dynamical color encryption.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mosso, Fabian; Tebaldi, Myrian; Barrera, John Fredy; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto</p> <p>2011-07-18</p> <p>We introduce a way to encrypt-decrypt a color dynamical phenomenon using a <span class="hlt">pure</span> optical alternative. We split the three basic chromatic channels composing the input, and then each channel is processed through a 4f encoding method and a theta modulation applied to the each encrypted frame in every channel. All frames for a single channel are multiplexed. The same phase mask is used to encode all the information. Unlike the usual procedure we do not multiplex the three chromatic channels into a single encoding media, because we want to decrypt the information in real time. Then, we send to the decoding station the phase mask and the three packages each one containing the multiplexing of a single channel. The end user synchronizes and decodes the information contained in the separate channels. Finally, the decoding information is conveyed together to bring the decoded dynamical color phenomenon in real-time. We present material that supports our concepts. PMID:21934738</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011OExpr..1913779M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011OExpr..1913779M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Pure</span> optical dynamical color encryption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mosso, Fabian; Tebaldi, Myrian; Fredy Barrera, John; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>We introduce a way to encrypt-decrypt a color dynamical phenomenon using a <span class="hlt">pure</span> optical alternative. We split the three basic chromatic channels composing the input, and then each channel is processed through a 4f encoding method and a theta modulation applied to the each encrypted frame in every channel. All frames for a single channel are multiplexed. The same phase mask is used to encode all the information. Unlike the usual procedure we do not multiplex the three chromatic channels into a single encoding media, because we want to decrypt the information in real time. Then, we send to the decoding station the phase mask and the three packages each one containing the multiplexing of a single channel. The end user synchronizes and decodes the information contained in the separate channels. Finally, the decoding information is conveyed together to bring the decoded dynamical color phenomenon in real-time. We present material that supports our concepts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-11-08/pdf/2011-28848.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-11-08/pdf/2011-28848.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 69284 - <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Magnesium From China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-11-08</p> <p>... COMMISSION <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on <span class="hlt">pure</span> magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Magnesium from China: Investigation No....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030110767&hterms=ALH84001&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DALH84001','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20030110767&hterms=ALH84001&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DALH84001"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-Magnesioferrite Phase Relations and Application to ALH84001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Koziol, Andrea M.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Oxygen fugacity (fO2) is an important factor in planetary formation and evolution. Certain minerals or assemblages of minerals are stable only under certain fO2 conditions (at a constant T and P) and can be recorders of ambient fO2 during geologic processes. The best estimate of oxygen fugacity from mineral assemblages has implications, from large-scale models of planetary evolution to interpretation of single meteorites. For example, redox conditions are part of the discussion of the origin and history of shergottites, basaltic rocks in meteorites from Mars [1-4]. In addition oxygen fugacity may be an important factor to consider in the interpretation of the carbonate and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> assemblages seen in ALH84001 [5].</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3947883','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3947883"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrocolloid-Stabilized <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> for Efficient Removal of Radioactive Phosphates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vellora Thekkae Padil, Vinod; Rouha, Michael; Černík, Miroslav</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Liquid radioactive waste is a common by-product when using radioactive isotopes in research and medicine. Efficient remediation of such liquid waste is crucial for increasing safety during the necessary storage of the material. Herein, we present a novel Gum Karaya stabilized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> for the efficient removal of radioactive phosphorus 32P from liquid radioactive waste. This environmentally friendly material is well suited to be used as a nanohydrogel for the removal of liquid waste, which can then be stored in a smaller space and without the risk of the spills inherent to the initial liquid material. The maximum adsorption capacity of the GK/M in this study was found to be 15.68 GBq/g. We present a thorough morphological characterization of the synthesised GK/M, as well as a discussion of the possible phosphorus adsorption mechanisms. PMID:24696854</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvL.110t7204H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvL.110t7204H"><span id="translatedtitle">Anharmonicity due to Electron-Phonon Coupling in <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hoesch, Moritz; Piekarz, Przemysław; Bosak, Alexey; Le Tacon, Mathieu; Krisch, Michael; Kozłowski, Andrzej; Oleś, Andrzej M.; Parlinski, Krzysztof</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>We present the results of inelastic x-ray scattering for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and analyze the energies and widths of the phonon modes with different symmetries in a broad range of temperature 125<T<293K. The phonon modes with X4 and Δ5 symmetries broaden in a nonlinear way with decreasing T when the Verwey transition is approached. It is found that the maxima of phonon widths occur away from high-symmetry points, which suggests the incommensurate character of critical fluctuations. Strong phonon anharmonicity induced by electron-phonon coupling is discovered by a combination of these experimental results with ab initio calculations which take into account local Coulomb interactions at Fe ions. It (i) explains observed anomalous phonon broadening and (ii) demonstrates that the Verwey transition is a cooperative phenomenon which involves a wide spectrum of phonons coupled to the electron charge fluctuations condensing in the low-symmetry phase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010AIPC.1311..337D&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2010AIPC.1311..337D&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanoparticles on Human Leukocyte Activity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Džarová, Anežka; Dubničková, Martina; Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Kopčanský, Peter; Gojzewski, Hubert; Timko, Milan</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Chemically synthesized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles coated by sodium oleate and PEG (MNP), and magnetosomes (MS) influence the process of phagocytosis and the metabolic activity (lysozyme and peroxidase activity) in leukocytes. Lysozyme activity is oxygen-independent liquidation mechanisms of engulfed microorganism, peroxidase activity is an oxygen-dependent mechanism. Both tested types of nanoparticles lysed leukocyte cells during incubation. MNP at concentrations of 10 and 20 μg/mL lysed almost all leukocytes and their cell viability was in the 14±0.05% range. On the other hand MS begin to influence leukocytes activity at the concentration of 1 μg/ml and this influence grows with increasing concentration up to 20 μg/ml. MS are more suitable for biological applications than MNP which are more aggressive material than MS. MS should not be used above 10 μg/mL.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009Nanot..20I5602D&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009Nanot..20I5602D&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Biofunctionalized magnetic hydrogel nanospheres of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and κ-carrageenan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Daniel-da-Silva, Ana L.; Fateixa, Sara; Guiomar, António J.; Costa, Benilde F. O.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Trindade, Tito; Goodfellow, Brian J.; Gil, Ana M.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Magnetic hydrogel κ-carrageenan nanospheres were successfully prepared via water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions combined with thermally induced gelation of the polysaccharide. The size of the nanospheres (an average diameter (∅) of about 50 and 75 nm) was modulated by varying the concentration of surfactant. The nanospheres contained superparamagnetic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles (∅8 nm), previously prepared by co-precipitation within the biopolymer. Carboxyl groups, at a concentration of about 4 mmol g-1, were successfully grafted at the surface of these magnetic nanospheres via carboxymethylation of the κ-carrageenan. The carboxylated nanospheres were shown to be thermo-sensitive in the 37-45 °C temperature range, indicating their potential as thermally controlled delivery systems for drugs and/or magnetic particles at physiological temperatures. Finally, preliminary results have been obtained for IgG antibody conjugation of the carboxylated nanospheres and the potential of these systems for bio-applications is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1536.1244B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1536.1244B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> decorated activated carbon composites for water purification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Activated carbon decorated with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SurSc.432L.583R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SurSc.432L.583R"><span id="translatedtitle">A molecular dynamics investigation of surface reconstruction on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (001)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rustad, J. R.; Wasserman, E.; Felmy, A. R.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>Molecular dynamics calculations using analytical potential functions with polarizable oxygen ions have been used to identify a novel mode of reconstruction on the half-occupied tetrahedral layer termination of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (Fe 3O 4) (001) surface. In the proposed reconstruction, the twofold coordinated iron ion in the top monolayer rotates downward to occupy a vacant half-octahedral site in the plane of the second-layer iron ions. At the same time, half of the tetrahedral iron ions in the third iron layer are pushed upward to occupy an adjacent octahedral vacancy at the level of the second-layer iron ions. The other half of the third-layer iron ions remain roughly in their original positions. The proposed reconstruction is consistent with recent low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. It also provides a compelling interpretation for the arrangement of atoms suggested by high-resolution scanning-tunneling microscopy studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061133','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061133"><span id="translatedtitle">Self-assembly of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanocubes into helical superstructures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Singh, Gurvinder; Chan, Henry; Baskin, Artem; Gelman, Elijah; Repnin, Nikita; Král, Petr; Klajn, Rafal</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Organizing inorganic nanocrystals into complex architectures is challenging and typically relies on preexisting templates, such as properly folded DNA or polypeptide chains. We found that under carefully controlled conditions, cubic nanocrystals of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> self-assemble into arrays of helical superstructures in a template-free manner with >99% yield. Computer simulations revealed that the formation of helices is determined by the interplay of van der Waals and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, Zeeman coupling, and entropic forces and can be attributed to spontaneous formation of chiral nanocube clusters. Neighboring helices within their densely packed ensembles tended to adopt the same handedness in order to maximize packing, thus revealing a novel mechanism of symmetry breaking and chirality amplification. PMID:25061133</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27398573','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27398573"><span id="translatedtitle">Antimicrobial Properties of Lysosomal Enzymes Immobilized on NH₂Functionalized Silica-Encapsulated <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nanoparticles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bang, Seung Hyuck; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, So Jeong; Le, Thai-Hoang; Kim, Pil; Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The immobilization efficiency, antimicrobial activity and recovery of lysosomal enzymes on NH2 functionalized <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles have been studied under various conditions. The immobi- lization efficiency depends upon the ratio of the amount of enzyme and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and it shows an increase with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> concentration which is due to the presence of amine group at the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> surface that leads to a strong attraction. The optimized reaction time to immobilize the lysosomal enzymes on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was determined by using a rolling method. The immobilization efficiency increases with reaction time and reached a plateau after 5 minutes and then remained constant for 10 minutes. However, after 30 minutes the immobilization efficiency decreased to 85%, which is due to the weaker electrostatic interactions between <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and detached lysosomal enzymes. The recovery and stability of immobilized lysosomal enzymes has also been studied. The antimicrobial activity was almost 100% but it decreased upon reuse and no activity was observed after its reuse for seven times. The storage stability of lysosomal enzymes as an antimicrobial agent was about 88%, which decreased to 53% after one day and all activity of immobilized lysosomal enzymes was maintained after five days. Thus, the lysosomal enzymes immobilized on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles could potentially be used as antimicrobial agents to remove bacteria. PMID:27398573</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11695639','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11695639"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe3O4) microcapsules prepared using a glass membrane and solvent removal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Omi, S; Kanetaka, A; Shimamori, Y; Supsakulchai, A; Nagai, M; Ma, G H</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Fine <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> powders dispersed in polymer solution were encapsulated from an oil-in-water emulsion prepared by an emulsification process employing a porous glass membrane and subsequent evaporation of the solvent. Styrene-based copolymers were dissolved in a magnetic fluid, and then continuously pushed through the pores of glass membrane into the aqueous phase, which had dissolved polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as a mixed stabilizer. P(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (PS-AA), P(stryrene-co-butyl acrylate) (PS-BA) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) were dissolved in the specially ordered <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> fluid (25 wt% <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> dispersed in toluene) separately or as a mixture, and uniform droplets suspending the magnetic particles were obtained. After the evaporation of toluene, PS-AA capsules retained a spherical shape and uniformity, whereas PS-AA/PS-BA capsules revealed a creased surface and broader size distribution. The microcapsules entrapped 30-40 wt% of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, and the encapsulation yield of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was 20-40%. Glass membranes with 9.5, 5.25 and 1.42 microm pore size were employed and 5-40 microm microcapsules were obtained depending on the pore size. When <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> suspended in chloroform was used, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> capsules with broader size distributions were obtained because of the sticking of the droplets to the membrane wall. The advantage of the membrane emulsification which provides uniform sized droplets was lost. PMID:11695639</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016MMTA...47.4316F&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016MMTA...47.4316F&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrodeposition of Nanostructured Permalloy and Permalloy-<span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Composite Coatings and Investigation of Their Magnetic Properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fazli, Sara; Bahrololoom, M. E.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Permalloy and permalloy-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> coatings were electrodeposited with the average thickness of 100 µm with certain operating parameters, such as the current density of 100 mA/cm2, pH 3.8, and the temperature of 298 K (25 °C), to fabricate alloy and composite coatings, respectively. The aim was to promote the magnetic properties of permalloy coating in order to extend its magnetic applications. For this purpose, nanocrystalline permalloy and permalloy-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> coatings were electrodeposited. The effect of the content of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in the bath on magnetic properties of the samples was investigated. Vibrating sample magnetometry was performed to investigate the variation of magnetic properties of the coatings. The optimum amount of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (2 g/L) was determined according to the highest amount of saturated magnetization and a sensible amount of coercivity. The morphology, phase, elemental analyses of the coatings and the chemical composition analysis of the bath were performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, quantometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The magnetization was increased initially and then decreased (after a limited amount of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>) by enhancing the content of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in the bath. Also, the coercivity was decreased by increasing the amount of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in the coatings, which was due to the reduction of the grain size of the permalloy matrix.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MMTA..tmp..289F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MMTA..tmp..289F"><span id="translatedtitle">Electrodeposition of Nanostructured Permalloy and Permalloy-<span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Composite Coatings and Investigation of Their Magnetic Properties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fazli, Sara; Bahrololoom, M. E.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Permalloy and permalloy-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> coatings were electrodeposited with the average thickness of 100 µm with certain operating parameters, such as the current density of 100 mA/cm2, pH 3.8, and the temperature of 298 K (25 °C), to fabricate alloy and composite coatings, respectively. The aim was to promote the magnetic properties of permalloy coating in order to extend its magnetic applications. For this purpose, nanocrystalline permalloy and permalloy-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> coatings were electrodeposited. The effect of the content of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in the bath on magnetic properties of the samples was investigated. Vibrating sample magnetometry was performed to investigate the variation of magnetic properties of the coatings. The optimum amount of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> (2 g/L) was determined according to the highest amount of saturated magnetization and a sensible amount of coercivity. The morphology, phase, elemental analyses of the coatings and the chemical composition analysis of the bath were performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, quantometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The magnetization was increased initially and then decreased (after a limited amount of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>) by enhancing the content of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in the bath. Also, the coercivity was decreased by increasing the amount of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in the coatings, which was due to the reduction of the grain size of the permalloy matrix.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016IJMMM..23..891Y&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016IJMMM..23..891Y&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of purification pretreatment on the recovery of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from waste ferrous sulfate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yu, Wang; Peng, Ying-lin; Zheng, Ya-jie</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The present study was conducted to elucidate the influence of impurities in waste ferrous sulfate on its recovery of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Ferrous sulfate solution was purified by the addition of NaOH solution to precipitate impurities, and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was recovered from ferrous sulfate solution without and with purification pretreatment. Calcium hydroxide was added to the solution of ferrous sulfate as a precipitator. A mixed product of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and gypsum was subsequently obtained by air oxidation and heating. Wet-milling was performed prior to magnetic separation to recover <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from the mixed products. The results show that with the purification pretreatment, the grade of iron in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> concentrate increased from 62.05% to 65.58% and the recovery rate of iron decreased from 85.35% to 80.35%. The purification pretreatment reduced the conglutination between <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and gypsum, which favors their subsequent magnetic separation. In summary, a higher-grade <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> with a better crystallinity and a larger particle size of 2.35 μm was obtained with the purification pretreatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23531452','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23531452"><span id="translatedtitle">Arsenic sorption by nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>: an example of environmentally promising interface with geosphere.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Zorkovská, A; Sayagués, M J; Kováč, J; Timko, M</p> <p>2013-11-15</p> <p>In this paper, the sorption of arsenic onto nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> mineral Fe3O4 was studied in a model system. Nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was produced by mechanical activation in a planetary ball mill from natural microcrystalline <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. As a consequence of milling, the specific surface area increased from 0.1m(2)/g to 11.9 m(2)/g and the surface site concentration enhanced from 2.2 sites/nm(2) to 8.4 sites/nm(2). These changes in surface properties of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> lead to the enhancement of arsenic removal from model system. The best sorption ability was achieved with <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> sample activated for 90 min. In this case the sample was able to absorb around 4 mg/g. The structural changes of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> were also observed and the new hematite phase was detected after 120 min of milling. A good correlation between the decreasing particle size, increasing specific surface area and reduction of saturation magnetization was found. In desorption study, KOH and NaOH were found as the best eluents where more than 70% of arsenic was released back into the solution. The principal novelty of the paper is that mineral <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, truly one nature's gift can be used after "smart" milling (mechanical activation) as an effective arsenic sorbent. PMID:23531452</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212446','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22212446"><span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and magnetic characterization of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> obtained by monowavelength visible light irradiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lin, Yulong; Wei, Yu; Sun, Yuhan; Wang, Jing</p> <p>2012-03-15</p> <p>Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> was synthesized under monowavelength LED irradiation at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different wavelength irradiations led to distinctive characteristics of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particle sizes of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> were controlled by different irradiation wavelengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wavelength affects the magnetic characteristics of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. -- Abstract: <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by aerial oxidation Fe{sup II}EDTA solution under different monowavelength light-emitting diode (LED) lamps irradiation at room temperature. The results of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra show the formation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticle further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and the difference in crystallinity of as-prepared samples. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles are nearly spherical in shape based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Average crystallite sizes of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> can be controlled by different irradiation light wavelengths from XRD and TEM: 50.1, 41.2, and 20.3 nm for red, green, and blue light irradiation, respectively. The magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples were investigated. Saturation magnetization values of magnetic nanoparticles were 70.1 (sample M-625), 65.3 (sample M-525), and 58.2 (sample M-460) emu/g, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920001033&hterms=solubility&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsolubility','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920001033&hterms=solubility&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsolubility"><span id="translatedtitle">Transformation products of submicron-sized aluminum-substituted <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>: Color and reductant solubility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>, when present as fine particles, is soluble in acid ammonium oxalate (pH equals 3). However, the commonly used extractant for free iron oxides (i.e., citrate dithionite-bicarbonate (CDB) is not very effective in dissolving <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in soils and geologic materials. Upon oxidation, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> transforms to maghemite; at elevated temperatures, maghemite inverts to hematite. This transformation causes a change in color from black to red and may affect the reductant solubility as well. The objectives here were to examine the color and reflectance spectral characteristics of products during the transformation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to maghemite to hematite and to study the effect of Al-substitution in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> on the above process. Reductant solubility of Al-substituted <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, maghemite, and hematite was also studied. In summary, the transformation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> to maghemite was accompanied by a change in color from black to red because of the oxidation of Fe2(+) to Fe3(+). The phase change maghemite to hematite had a relatively minor effect on the color and the reflectance spectra.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70014144','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70014144"><span id="translatedtitle">Anaerobic production of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by a dissimilatory iron-reducing microorganism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Lovley, D.R.; Stolz, J.F.; Nord, G.L., Jr.; Phillips, E.J.P.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The potential contribution of microbial metabolism to the magnetization of sediments has only recently been recognized. In the presence of oxygen, magnetotactic bacteria can form intracellular chains of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> while using oxygen or nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor for metabolism1. The production of ultrafine-grained <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> by magnetotactic bacteria in surficial aerobic sediments may contribute significantly to the natural remanent magnetism of sediments2-4. However, recent studies on iron reduction in anaerobic sediments suggested that bacteria can also generate <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in the absence of oxygen5. We report here on a sediment organism, designated GS-15, which produces copious quantities of ultrafine-grained <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> under anaerobic conditions. GS-15 is not magnetotactic, but reduces amorphic ferric oxide to extracellular <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> during the reduction of ferric iron as the terminal electron acceptor for organic matter oxidation. This novel metabolism may be the mechanism for the formation of ultrafine-grained <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in anaerobic sediments, and couldaccount for the accumulation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in ancient iron formations and hydrocarbon deposits. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25425339','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25425339"><span id="translatedtitle">Arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) speciation during transformation of lepidocrocite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Yuheng; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Brown, Gordon E</p> <p>2014-12-16</p> <p>Bioreduction of As(V) and As-bearing iron oxides is considered to be one of the key processes leading to arsenic pollution in groundwaters in South and Southeast Asia. Recent laboratory studies with simple aqueous media showed that secondary Fe(II)-bearing phases (e.g., <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and green rust), which commonly precipitate during bioreduction of iron oxides, captured arsenic species. The aim of the present study was to follow arsenic speciation during the abiotic Fe(II)-induced transformation of As(III)- and As(V)-doped lepidocrocite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, and to evaluate the influence of arsenic on the transformation kinetics and pathway. We found green rust formation is an intermediate phase in the transformation. Both As(III) and As(V) slowed the transformation, with the effect being greater for As(III) than for As(V). Prior to the formation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, As(III) adsorbed on both lepidocrocite and green rust, whereas As(V) associated exclusively with green rust, When <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> precipitated, As(III) formed surface complexes on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanoparticles and As(V) is thought to have been incorporated into the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> structure. These processes dramatically lowered the availability of As in the anoxic systems studied. These results provide insights into the behavior of arsenic during <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> precipitation in reducing environments. We also found that As(V) removal from solution was higher than As(III) removal following <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation, which suggests that conversion of As(III) to As(V) is preferred when using As-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> precipitation to treat As-contaminated groundwaters. PMID:25425339</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15495308','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15495308"><span id="translatedtitle">Decryption of <span class="hlt">pure</span>-position permutation algorithms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhao, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Dong, Guang-Chang</p> <p>2004-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Pure</span> position permutation image encryption algorithms, commonly used as image encryption investigated in this work are unfortunately frail under known-text attack. In view of the weakness of <span class="hlt">pure</span> position permutation algorithm, we put forward an effective decryption algorithm for all <span class="hlt">pure</span>-position permutation algorithms. First, a summary of the <span class="hlt">pure</span> position permutation image encryption algorithms is given by introducing the concept of ergodic matrices. Then, by using probability theory and algebraic principles, the decryption probability of <span class="hlt">pure</span>-position permutation algorithms is verified theoretically; and then, by defining the operation system of fuzzy ergodic matrices, we improve a specific decryption algorithm. Finally, some simulation results are shown. PMID:15495308</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016AnPhy.372..297F&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016AnPhy.372..297F&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Mixtures of maximally entangled <span class="hlt">pure</span> states</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Flores, M. M.; Galapon, E. A.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled <span class="hlt">pure</span> states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled <span class="hlt">pure</span> states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the <span class="hlt">pure</span> states. For the latter case of mixing a number of <span class="hlt">pure</span> states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled <span class="hlt">pure</span> states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of <span class="hlt">pure</span> states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled <span class="hlt">pure</span> states with noise.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3538630','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3538630"><span id="translatedtitle">Bringing Planctomycetes into <span class="hlt">pure</span> culture</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lage, Olga M.; Bondoso, Joana</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Planctomycetes have been known since the description of Planctomyces bekefii by Gimesi at the beginning of the twentieth century (1924), although the first axenic cultures were only obtained in the 1970s. Since then, 11 genera with 14 species have been validly named and five candidatus genera belonging to the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox bacteria have also been discovered. However, Planctomycetes diversity is much broader than these numbers indicate, as shown by environmental molecular studies. In recent years, the authors have attempted to isolate and cultivate additional strains of Planctomycetes. This paper provides a summary of the isolation work that was carried out to obtain in <span class="hlt">pure</span> culture Planctomycetes from several environmental sources. The following strains of planctomycetes have been successfully isolated: two freshwater strains from the sediments of an aquarium, which were described as a new genus and species, Aquisphaera giovannonii; several Rhodopirellula strains from the sediments of a water treatment recycling tank of a marine fish farm; and more than 140 planctomycetes from the biofilm community of macroalgae. This collection comprises several novel taxa that are being characterized and described. Improvements in the isolation methodology were made in order to optimize and enlarge the number of Planctomycetes isolated from the macroalgae. The existence of an intimate and an important relationship between planctomycetes and macroalgae reported before by molecular studies is therefore supported by culture-dependent methods. PMID:23335915</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27428174','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27428174"><span id="translatedtitle">Isomerically <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Tetramethylrhodamine Voltage Reporters.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Deal, Parker E; Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Al-Abdullatif, Sarah H; Miller, Evan W</p> <p>2016-07-27</p> <p>We present the design, synthesis, and application of a new family of fluorescent voltage indicators based on isomerically <span class="hlt">pure</span> tetramethylrhodamines. These new Rhodamine Voltage Reporters, or RhoVRs, use photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) as a trigger for voltage sensing, display excitation and emission profiles in the green to orange region of the visible spectrum, demonstrate high sensitivity to membrane potential changes (up to 47% ΔF/F per 100 mV), and employ a tertiary amide derived from sarcosine, which aids in membrane localization and simultaneously simplifies the synthetic route to the voltage sensors. The most sensitive of the RhoVR dyes, RhoVR 1, features a methoxy-substituted diethylaniline donor and phenylenevinylene molecular wire at the 5'-position of the rhodamine aryl ring, exhibits the highest voltage sensitivity to date for red-shifted PeT-based voltage sensors, and is compatible with simultaneous imaging alongside green fluorescent protein-based indicators. The discoveries that sarcosine-based tertiary amides in the context of molecular-wire voltage indicators prevent dye internalization and 5'-substituted voltage indicators exhibit improved voltage sensitivity should be broadly applicable to other types of PeT-based voltage-sensitive fluorophores. PMID:27428174</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26377144','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26377144"><span id="translatedtitle">Access to <span class="hlt">pure</span> and highly volatile hydrochalcogenide ionic liquids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Finger, L H; Wohde, F; Grigoryev, E I; Hansmann, A-K; Berger, R; Roling, B; Sundermeyer, J</p> <p>2015-11-21</p> <p>The reaction of methylcarbonate ionic liquids with H2S or H2Se offers a highly selective synthesis of analytically <span class="hlt">pure</span>, well-defined and soluble hydrosulphide and hydroselenide organic salts of general interest. Among them, imidazolium hydrochalcogenides show an astonishingly high volatility for cation-aprotic ILs, which allows their quantitative sublimation below 100 °C/10(-2) mbar and actually results in ionic single <span class="hlt">crystal</span> growth from the gas phase. Vaporisation and decomposition characteristics were investigated by isothermal TGA measurements and DFT calculations. PMID:26377144</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27327434','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27327434"><span id="translatedtitle">Redox-freezing and nucleation of diamond via <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation in the Earth's mantle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jacob, Dorrit E; Piazolo, Sandra; Schreiber, Anja; Trimby, Patrick</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Diamonds and their inclusions are unique probes into the deep Earth, tracking the deep carbon cycle to >800 km. Understanding the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and freezing is a prerequisite for quantifying the fluxes of carbon in the deep Earth. Here we show direct evidence for the formation of diamond by redox reactions involving FeNi sulfides. Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction identifies an arrested redox reaction from pyrrhotite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> included in diamond. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> corona shows coherent epitaxy with relict pyrrhotite and diamond, indicating that diamond nucleated on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Furthermore, structures inherited from h-Fe3O4 define a phase transformation at depths of 320-330 km, the base of the Kaapvaal lithosphere. The oxidation of pyrrhotite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is an important trigger of diamond precipitation in the upper mantle, explaining the presence of these phases in diamonds. PMID:27327434</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatCo...711891J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatCo...711891J"><span id="translatedtitle">Redox-freezing and nucleation of diamond via <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation in the Earth's mantle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jacob, Dorrit E.; Piazolo, Sandra; Schreiber, Anja; Trimby, Patrick</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Diamonds and their inclusions are unique probes into the deep Earth, tracking the deep carbon cycle to >800 km. Understanding the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and freezing is a prerequisite for quantifying the fluxes of carbon in the deep Earth. Here we show direct evidence for the formation of diamond by redox reactions involving FeNi sulfides. Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction identifies an arrested redox reaction from pyrrhotite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> included in diamond. The <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> corona shows coherent epitaxy with relict pyrrhotite and diamond, indicating that diamond nucleated on <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Furthermore, structures inherited from h-Fe3O4 define a phase transformation at depths of 320-330 km, the base of the Kaapvaal lithosphere. The oxidation of pyrrhotite to <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> is an important trigger of diamond precipitation in the upper mantle, explaining the presence of these phases in diamonds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010044899&hterms=ALH84001&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DALH84001','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010044899&hterms=ALH84001&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DALH84001"><span id="translatedtitle">Truncated Hexa-Octahedral <span class="hlt">Magnetites</span>: Biosignatures in Terrestrial Samples and Martian Meteorite ALH84001</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, Everett K.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>We suggest that the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral <span class="hlt">magnetites</span> in ALH84001 are both consistent with, and in the absence of terrestrial inorganic analogs, likely formed by biogenic processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=257116&keyword=asp&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=63970791&CFTOKEN=63245849','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=257116&keyword=asp&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=63970791&CFTOKEN=63245849"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-supported sulfonic acid: a retrievable nanocatalyst for the Ritter reaction and multicomponent reactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-sulfonic acid (NanocatFe-OSO3H), prepared by wet-impregnation method, serves as a magnetically retrievable sustainable catalyst for the Ritter reaction which can be used in several reaction cycles without any loss of activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000081427&hterms=oxygen+carbon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Doxygen%2Bcarbon','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000081427&hterms=oxygen+carbon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Doxygen%2Bcarbon"><span id="translatedtitle">Carbonate and <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Parageneses as Monitors of Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Fugacity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Koziol, Andrea M.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The stable coexistence of siderite with other key minerals, such as graphite or <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, is only possible under certain restrictive conditions of CO2 and O2 fugacity. Carbonate parageneses in Mars meteorite ALH 84001 are analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20552997','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20552997"><span id="translatedtitle">Water-dispersible <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-reduced graphene oxide composites for arsenic removal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chandra, Vimlesh; Park, Jaesung; Chun, Young; Lee, Jung Woo; Hwang, In-Chul; Kim, Kwang S</p> <p>2010-07-27</p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>-graphene hybrids have been synthesized via a chemical reaction with a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particle size of approximately 10 nm. The composites are superparamagnetic at room temperature and can be separated by an external magnetic field. As compared to bare <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles, the hybrids show a high binding capacity for As(III) and As(V), whose presence in the drinking water in wide areas of South Asia has been a huge problem. Their high binding capacity is due to the increased adsorption sites in the M-RGO composite which occurs by reducing the aggregation of bare <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Since the composites show near complete (over 99.9%) arsenic removal within 1 ppb, they are practically usable for arsenic separation from water. PMID:20552997</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000081279&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000081279&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite"><span id="translatedtitle">Ferrihydrite Alteration to <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>, Maghemite and Hematite; Implications for Iron Oxides on Mars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Zent, A. P.; Bishop, J. L.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Olsen, M.; Wagner, P. A.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Synthetic ferrihydrites have been altered to form <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, maghemite and hematite through low-temperature heating experiments (some with an organic reductant). Maghemite formed in this manner could become an indicator for Astrobiology on Mars.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820048209&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820048209&hterms=magnetite&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dmagnetite"><span id="translatedtitle">A unique type 3 ordinary chondrite containing graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> aggregates - Allan Hills A77011</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mckinley, S. G.; Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>ALHA 77011, which is the object of study in the present investigation, is a chondrite of the 1977 meteorite collection from Allan Hills, Antarctica. It contains an opaque and recrystallized silicate matrix (Huss matrix) and numerous aggregates consisting of micron- and submicron-sized graphite and <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. It is pointed out that no abundant graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> aggregates could be observed in other type 3 ordinary chondrites, except for Sharps. Attention is given to the results of a modal analysis, relations between ALHA 77011 and other type 3 ordinary chondrites, and the association of graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> and metallic Fe, Ni. The discovery of graphite-<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> aggregates in type 3 ordinary chondrites is found to suggest that this material may have been an important component in the formation of ordinary chondrites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6598526','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6598526"><span id="translatedtitle">Desulfurization of <span class="hlt">pure</span> coal macerals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hippo, E.J. ); Crelling, J.C. )</p> <p>1988-06-01</p> <p>The objectives of this study were to modify the present density gradient centrifugation (DGC) techniques for coal macerals to obtain 10-20 grams of target maceral concentrates and to determine the reactivity or ease of removing the organic sulfur in the various macerals with supercritical methanol extraction. Although the chemistry needed for this objective is not difficult, the accumulation of 10 to 20 gram quantities of ''<span class="hlt">pure</span>'' petrographically verified single maceral concentrates has not been possible until now. The results of recent work have demonstrated that the individual macerals can be separated and verified. The accumulation of much larger quantities than have previously been separated was a problem that has been overcome by pre-concentrating target macerals at their density cut points. Supercritical fluid extraction of coals has previously been reported as a method in the production of liquid fuel products from coal under mild conditions and as a medium for selective desulfurization of coal. Alcohols are expected to exhibit greater solubility for polar organic molecules due to hydrogen bonding and dipole attractive forces, also providing the opportunity for chemical reactions during the extraction due to the nucleophilicity of the alcohol oxygen and the tendency to act as a hydrogen donor. In addition, enol rearrangements may play a role in desulfurization. As previously reported different supercritical reaction conditions produced different extents of desulfurization of coals (33.9 - 65.7%). These variable desulfurizations are probably a result of differences in extents of conversion of the pyritic sulfur (to various alteration products, such as pyrrhotite), as well as organic sulfur functionalities (thiophenol, sulfide, and thiopenes) to light gases such as dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and methylmercaptons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5436770','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5436770"><span id="translatedtitle">Desulfurization of <span class="hlt">pure</span> coal macerals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hippo, E.J.; Crelling, J.C. )</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The objectives of this study were to modify the present density gradient centrifugation (DGC) techniques for coal macerals to obtain 10-20 grams of target maceral concentrates and to determine the reactivity or ease of removing the organic sulfur in the various macerals with supercritical methanol extraction. Although the chemistry needed for this objective is not difficult, the accumulation of 10 to 20 gram quantities of <span class="hlt">pure</span> petrographically verified single maceral concentrates has not been possible until now. The results of recent work have demonstrated that the individual macerals can be separated and verified. The accumulation of much larger quantities than have previously been separated was a problem that has been overcome by pre-concentrating target macerals at their density cut points. Supercritical fluid extraction of coals has previously been reported as a method in the production of liquid fuel products from coal under mild conditions and as a medium for selective desulfurization of coal. Alcohols are expected to exhibit greater solubility for polar organic molecules due to hydrogen bonding and dipole attractive forces, also providing the opportunity for chemical reactions during the extraction due to the nucleophilicity of the alcohol oxygen and the tendency to act as a hydrogen donor. In addition, enol rearrangements may play a role in desulfurization. As previously reported different supercritical reaction conditions produced different extents of desulfurization of coals (33.9 - 65.7%). These variable desulfurizations are probably a result of differences in extents of conversion of the pyritic sulfur (to various alteration products, such as pyrrhotite), as well as organic sulfur functionalities (thiophenol, sulfide, and thiophenes) to light gases such as dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and methylmercaptons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110008182','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110008182"><span id="translatedtitle">Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of <span class="hlt">Pure</span> Ferric Fayalite?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (<span class="hlt">magnetite</span> ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a <span class="hlt">pure</span> ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011GeCoA..75.6844P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2011GeCoA..75.6844P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Dependence of microbial <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation on humic substance and ferrihydrite concentrations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Piepenbrock, Annette; Dippon, Urs; Porsch, Katharina; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>Iron mineral (trans)formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction is of environmental relevance as it can influence the fate of pollutants such as toxic metal ions or hydrocarbons. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> is an important biomineralization product of microbial iron reduction and influences soil magnetic properties that are used for paleoclimate reconstruction and were suggested to assist in the localization of organic and inorganic pollutants. However, it is not well understood how different concentrations of Fe(III) minerals and humic substances (HS) affect <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction. We therefore used wet-chemical extractions, magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses to determine systematically how (i) different initial ferrihydrite (FH) concentrations and (ii) different concentrations of HS (i.e. the presence of either only adsorbed HS or adsorbed and dissolved HS) affect <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation during FH reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In our experiments <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation did not occur at FH concentrations lower than 5 mM, even though rapid iron reduction took place. At higher FH concentrations a minimum fraction of Fe(II) of 25-30% of the total iron present was necessary to initiate <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation. The Fe(II) fraction at which <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation started decreased with increasing FH concentration, which might be due to aggregation of the FH particles reducing the FH surface area at higher FH concentrations. HS concentrations of 215-393 mg HS/g FH slowed down (at partial FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) or even completely inhibited (at complete FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> formation due to blocking of surface sites by adsorbed HS. These results indicate the requirement of Fe(II) adsorption to, and subsequent interaction with, the FH surface for the transformation of FH into <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>. Additionally, we found that the microbially formed <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was further reduced by strain MR-1 leading to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22257187','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22257187"><span id="translatedtitle">Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> core-shell nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen</p> <p>2013-11-13</p> <p>In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. <span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JMMM..122..349P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JMMM..122..349P"><span id="translatedtitle">Study of colloidal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-binding erythrocytes: Prospects for cell preparation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pļaviņš, J.; Lauva, M.</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>Electrokinetic and magnetophoretic properties of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-binding erythrocytes are studied. A marked increase in the cell magnetic susceptibility is reported after cell treatment with a sialic acid stripping agent. The colloidal <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>-binding mechanism is discussed. Continuous repulsive-mode open gradient magnetic fractionation of gelatine microspheres is demonstrated. The selectivity of the process is estimated and its suitability for cell processing scheme is considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012991','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012991"><span id="translatedtitle">Trace elements in disseminated sulfides, <span class="hlt">magnetite</span>, and massive sulfides, West Shasta district, California.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Botinelly, T.; Siems, D.F.; Sanzolone, R.F.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Samples of pyrite separates from massive sulphide layers vary stratigraphically in trace-element content, and show an enrichment of many of the elements in the centre of the layers. Trace-element contents of pyrite of massive sulphide deposits, of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> from a <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> deposit, and of disseminated sulphides differ, presumably reflecting different origins. Trace-element contents of pyrite separates also differ among the sampled massive sulphide deposits. -G.J.N.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.V13B4772W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.V13B4772W"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span> Nucleation in Mantle Xenoliths During Quasi-Adiabatic Ascent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Walsh, K. B., Jr.; Filiberto, J.; Friedman, S. A.; Knafelc, J.; Conder, J. A.; Ferre, E. C.; Khakhalova, E.; Feinberg, J. M.; Neal, C. R.; Ionov, D. A.; Hernandez, F. M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Can <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> be a stable phase in the lithospheric mantle? Equilibrium-based thermodynamic calculations and petrologic models predict that it should not be stable. Studies of mantle xenoliths during the 1980s concluded that even though there were rare exceptions, mantle rocks do not host sufficient concentrations of ferromagnetic minerals and are too hot to allow any magnetic remanence. Thus, conventional wisdom dictates that the Moho constitutes a fundamental magnetic boundary. Yet, growing evidence from a more complete global mantle xenolith survey indicates the presence of ferromagnetic minerals in mantle materials. Examination of mantle xenoliths devoid of serpentinization and meteoric alteration show the presence of ferromagnetic minerals within primary silicate mineral phases, including olivine, pyroxene, and spinel. Nucleation of these magnetic minerals could occur at three different stages: in-situ in the mantle, upon ascent, and at the surface. This study reports the results of laboratory-based quasi-adiabatic decompression experiments that aim to simulate the ascent of mantle xenoliths through the lithosphere and test if <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> growth is promoted during the process. The starting material for these experiments is San Carlos olivine, which holds a magnetic remanence of less than ~10-10 A/m2-1kg2 (the detection limit of the vibrating sample magnetometer). This low starting remanence will allow us to identify whether new magnetic minerals are formed during the decompression experiments using either vibrating sample magnetometry or SQUID-based rock magnetometers. All olivine grains in these experiments were hand-picked under a light microscope in an effort to avoid the inclusion of grains with spurious magnetic minerals. Olivine powders from these carefully selected grains will be used to represent average mantle olivine compositions (Fo90-Fo92). Experiments will start at 1 GPa and be decompressed to 0.3 GPa over 60 hrs at constant temperature (1200° C</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT........48F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT........48F"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of electrically driven transition in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> nanostructures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fursina, Alexandra</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Magnetite</span>, Fe3O4, is a strongly electronically correlated system and thus exhibits remarkable electrical and magnetic properties, including the Verwey transition at TV 122 K, which has attracted much attention since its 1939 discovery. Fe3O 4 has recently revealed a new effect. By performing experiments at the nanoscale, we have discovered a novel electric-field driven transition (EFD) in <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> below TV, from high- to low-resistance states driven by application of high bias. The EFD transition is detected both in Fe3O4 nanoparticles and thin films, is hysteretic in voltage under continuous biasing, and is not caused by self-heating. In this thesis we report on a thorough investigation of this new EFD transition. First, we unveil the origin of hysteresis observed in I-V curves. By applying voltage in a pulsed manner with controlled parameters, we unambiguously demonstrate that while the transition is field-driven, hysteresis results from Joule heating in the low-resistance state. A simple relaxation-time thermal model captures the essentials of the hysteresis mechanism. Second, by doing multilead (four-terminal) electrical measurements, we quantitatively separate the contributions of the Fe3O4 channel and each metal/electrode interface, and explore the contact effects upon testing devices incorporating various contact metals We demonstrate that on the onset of the transition, contact resistances at both source and drain electrodes and the resistance of Fe3O4 channel decrease abruptly. Finally, we measured the distribution of switching voltages, V sw, its evolution with temperature, and its dependence on out-of-plane magnetic field. Based on the experimental facts collected in this work we suggest the possible mechanism of EFD transition in Fe 3O4 as a charge gap closure by electric field. This is one of the first experimental observation of a theoretically predicted EFD transition in correlated insulators. These studies demonstrate that nanoscale, nonequilibrium</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11136443','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11136443"><span id="translatedtitle">Structural and morphological anomalies in magnetosomes: possible biogenic origin for <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> in ALH84001.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Taylor, A P; Barry, J C; Webb, R I</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>We report biogenic <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> whiskers, with axial ratios of 6 : 1, elongated in the [1 1 1], [1 1 2] and [1 0 0] directions, resembling the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> whiskers detected in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 by Bradley et al., and interpreted by those authors as evidence of vapour-phase (abiogenic) growth. Magnetosomal whiskers with extended defects consistent with screw dislocations and magnetosomes resembling flattened twinned platelets, as well as other twinning phenomena and other structural defects, are also reported here. Magnetosomes with teardrop-shaped, cuboidal, irregular and jagged structures similar to those detected in ALH84001 by McKay et al., coprecipitation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> possibly with amorphous calcium carbonate, coprecipitation of <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> possibly with amorphous silica, the incorporation of titanium in volutin inclusions and disoriented arrays of magnetosomes are also described. These observations demonstrate that the structures of the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in ALH84001, their spatial arrangement and coprecipitation with carbonates and proximity to silicates are consistent with being biogenic. Electron-beam-induced flash-melting of magnetosomes produced numerous screw dislocations in the [1 1 1], [1 0 0], and [1 1 0] lattice planes and induced fusion of platelets. From this, the lack of screw dislocations reported in the <span class="hlt">magnetite</span> particles in ALH84001 (McKay et al., and Bradley et al.) indicates that they have a low-temperature origin. 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