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Sample records for pure ultrasonic communication

  1. Pure Ultrasonic Communication in an Endemic Bornean Frog

    PubMed Central

    Arch, Victoria S.; Grafe, T. Ulmar; Gridi-Papp, Marcos; Narins, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Huia cavitympanum, an endemic Bornean frog, is the first amphibian species known to emit exclusively ultrasonic (i.e., >20 kHz) vocal signals. To test the hypothesis that these frogs use purely ultrasonic vocalizations for intraspecific communication, we performed playback experiments with male frogs in their natural calling sites. We found that the frogs respond with increased calling to broadcasts of conspecific calls containing only ultrasound. The field study was complemented by electrophysiological recordings from the auditory midbrain and by laser Doppler vibrometer measurements of the tympanic membrane's response to acoustic stimulation. These measurements revealed that the frog's auditory system is broadly tuned over high frequencies, with peak sensitivity occurring within the ultrasonic frequency range. Our results demonstrate that H. cavitympanum is the first non-mammalian vertebrate described to communicate with purely ultrasonic acoustic signals. These data suggest that further examination of the similarities and differences in the high-frequency/ultrasonic communication systems of H. cavitympanum and Odorrana tormota, an unrelated frog species that produces and detects ultrasound but does not emit exclusively ultrasonic calls, will afford new insights into the mechanisms underlying vertebrate high-frequency communication. PMID:19401782

  2. Ultrasonic communication in frogs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Albert S; Narins, Peter M; Xu, Chun-He; Lin, Wen-Yu; Yu, Zu-Lin; Qiu, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Min; Shen, Jun-Xian

    2006-03-16

    Among vertebrates, only microchiropteran bats, cetaceans and some rodents are known to produce and detect ultrasounds (frequencies greater than 20 kHz) for the purpose of communication and/or echolocation, suggesting that this capacity might be restricted to mammals. Amphibians, reptiles and most birds generally have limited hearing capacity, with the ability to detect and produce sounds below approximately 12 kHz. Here we report evidence of ultrasonic communication in an amphibian, the concave-eared torrent frog (Amolops tormotus) from Huangshan Hot Springs, China. Males of A. tormotus produce diverse bird-like melodic calls with pronounced frequency modulations that often contain spectral energy in the ultrasonic range. To determine whether A. tormotus communicates using ultrasound to avoid masking by the wideband background noise of local fast-flowing streams, or whether the ultrasound is simply a by-product of the sound-production mechanism, we conducted acoustic playback experiments in the frogs' natural habitat. We found that the audible as well as the ultrasonic components of an A. tormotus call can evoke male vocal responses. Electrophysiological recordings from the auditory midbrain confirmed the ultrasonic hearing capacity of these frogs and that of a sympatric species facing similar environmental constraints. This extraordinary upward extension into the ultrasonic range of both the harmonic content of the advertisement calls and the frog's hearing sensitivity is likely to have co-evolved in response to the intense, predominantly low-frequency ambient noise from local streams. Because amphibians are a distinct evolutionary lineage from microchiropterans and cetaceans (which have evolved ultrasonic hearing to minimize congestion in the frequency bands used for sound communication and to increase hunting efficacy in darkness), ultrasonic perception in these animals represents a new example of independent evolution. PMID:16541072

  3. Ultrasonic speech translator and communications system

    DOEpatents

    Akerman, M. Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.; Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-01-01

    A wireless communication system undetectable by radio frequency methods for converting audio signals, including human voice, to electronic signals in the ultrasonic frequency range, transmitting the ultrasonic signal by way of acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium, including gases, liquids, or solids, and reconverting the ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves back to the original audio signal. The ultrasonic speech translator and communication system (20) includes an ultrasonic transmitting device (100) and an ultrasonic receiving device (200). The ultrasonic transmitting device (100) accepts as input (115) an audio signal such as human voice input from a microphone (114) or tape deck. The ultrasonic transmitting device (100) frequency modulates an ultrasonic carrier signal with the audio signal producing a frequency modulated ultrasonic carrier signal, which is transmitted via acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium such as gases, liquids or solids. The ultrasonic receiving device (200) converts the frequency modulated ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves to a frequency modulated electronic signal, demodulates the audio signal from the ultrasonic carrier signal, and conditions the demodulated audio signal to reproduce the original audio signal at its output (250).

  4. Ultrasonic speech translator and communications system

    DOEpatents

    Akerman, M.A.; Ayers, C.W.; Haynes, H.D.

    1996-07-23

    A wireless communication system undetectable by radio frequency methods for converting audio signals, including human voice, to electronic signals in the ultrasonic frequency range, transmitting the ultrasonic signal by way of acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium, including gases, liquids, or solids, and reconverting the ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves back to the original audio signal. The ultrasonic speech translator and communication system includes an ultrasonic transmitting device and an ultrasonic receiving device. The ultrasonic transmitting device accepts as input an audio signal such as human voice input from a microphone or tape deck. The ultrasonic transmitting device frequency modulates an ultrasonic carrier signal with the audio signal producing a frequency modulated ultrasonic carrier signal, which is transmitted via acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium such as gases, liquids or solids. The ultrasonic receiving device converts the frequency modulated ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves to a frequency modulated electronic signal, demodulates the audio signal from the ultrasonic carrier signal, and conditions the demodulated audio signal to reproduce the original audio signal at its output. 7 figs.

  5. Ultrasonic Communication Project, Phase 1, FY1999

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.D.; Akerman, M.A.; Baylor, V.M.

    2000-06-01

    This Phase 1 project has been successful in identifying, exploring, and demonstrating methods for ultrasonic-based communication with an emphasis on the application of digital signal processing techniques. During the project, at the direction of the agency project monitor, particular attention was directed at sending and receiving ultrasonic data through air and through pipes that would be commonly found in buildings. Efforts were also focused on development of a method for transmitting computer files ultrasonically. New methods were identified and evaluated for ultrasonic communication. These methods are based on a technique called DFS. With DFS, individual alphanumeric characters are broken down into a sequence of bits, and each bit is used to generate a discrete ultrasonic frequency. Characters are then transmitted one-bit-at-a-time, and reconstructed by the receiver. This technique was put into practice through the development of LabVIEW{trademark}VIs. These VIs were integrated with specially developed electronic circuits to provide a system for demonstrating the transmission and reception/reconstruction of typed messages and computer files. Tests were performed to determine the envelope for ultrasound transmission through pipes (with and without water) versus through air. The practical aspects of connections, efficient electronics, impedance matching, and the effect of damping mechanisms were all investigated. These tests resulted in a considerable number of reference charts that illustrate the absorption of ultrasound through different pipe materials, both with and without water, as a function of distance. Ultrasound was found to be least attenuated by copper pipe and most attenuated by PVC pipe. Water in the pipe provides additional damping and attenuation of ultrasonic signals. Dramatic improvements are observed, however, in ultrasound signal strength if the transducers are directly coupled to the water, rather than simply attaching them to the outside of

  6. The role of ultrasonic vocalizations in mouse communication.

    PubMed

    Portfors, Christine V; Perkel, David J

    2014-10-01

    Human speech and language underlie many aspects of social behavior and thus understanding their ultimate evolutionary function and proximate genetic and neural mechanisms is a fundamental goal in neuroscience. Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations have recently received enormous attention as possible models for human speech. This attention has raised the question of whether these vocalizations are learned and what roles they play in communication. In this review, we first discuss recent evidence that ultrasonic vocalizations are not learned. We then review current evidence addressing how adult vocalizations may communicate courtship, territorial and/or other information. While there is growing evidence that these signals play key roles in communication, many important questions remain unanswered. PMID:25062471

  7. Recording Mouse Ultrasonic Vocalizations to Evaluate Social Communication

    PubMed Central

    Ferhat, Allain-Thibeault; Torquet, Nicolas; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Mice emit ultrasonic vocalizations in different contexts throughout development and in adulthood. These vocal signals are now currently used as proxies for modeling the genetic bases of vocal communication deficits. Characterizing the vocal behavior of mouse models carrying mutations in genes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorders will help to understand the mechanisms leading to social communication deficits. We provide here protocols to reliably elicit ultrasonic vocalizations in pups and in adult mice. This standardization will help reduce inter-study variability due to the experimental settings. Pup isolation calls are recorded throughout development from individual pups isolated from dam and littermates. In adulthood, vocalizations are recorded during same-sex interactions (without a sexual component) by exposing socially motivated males or females to an unknown same-sex conspecific. We also provide a protocol to record vocalizations from adult males exposed to an estrus female. In this context, there is a sexual component in the interaction. These protocols are established to elicit a large amount of ultrasonic vocalizations in laboratory mice. However, we point out the important inter-individual variability in the vocal behavior of mice, which should be taken into account by recording a minimal number of individuals (at least 12 in each condition). These recordings of ultrasonic vocalizations are used to evaluate the call rate, the vocal repertoire and the acoustic structure of the calls. Data are combined with the analysis of synchronous video recordings to provide a more complete view on social communication in mice. These protocols are used to characterize the vocal communication deficits in mice lacking ProSAP1/Shank2, a gene associated with autism spectrum disorders. More ultrasonic vocalizations recordings can also be found on the mouseTube database, developed to favor the exchange of such data. PMID:27341321

  8. Recording Mouse Ultrasonic Vocalizations to Evaluate Social Communication.

    PubMed

    Ferhat, Allain-Thibeault; Torquet, Nicolas; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Mice emit ultrasonic vocalizations in different contexts throughout development and in adulthood. These vocal signals are now currently used as proxies for modeling the genetic bases of vocal communication deficits. Characterizing the vocal behavior of mouse models carrying mutations in genes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorders will help to understand the mechanisms leading to social communication deficits. We provide here protocols to reliably elicit ultrasonic vocalizations in pups and in adult mice. This standardization will help reduce inter-study variability due to the experimental settings. Pup isolation calls are recorded throughout development from individual pups isolated from dam and littermates. In adulthood, vocalizations are recorded during same-sex interactions (without a sexual component) by exposing socially motivated males or females to an unknown same-sex conspecific. We also provide a protocol to record vocalizations from adult males exposed to an estrus female. In this context, there is a sexual component in the interaction. These protocols are established to elicit a large amount of ultrasonic vocalizations in laboratory mice. However, we point out the important inter-individual variability in the vocal behavior of mice, which should be taken into account by recording a minimal number of individuals (at least 12 in each condition). These recordings of ultrasonic vocalizations are used to evaluate the call rate, the vocal repertoire and the acoustic structure of the calls. Data are combined with the analysis of synchronous video recordings to provide a more complete view on social communication in mice. These protocols are used to characterize the vocal communication deficits in mice lacking ProSAP1/Shank2, a gene associated with autism spectrum disorders. More ultrasonic vocalizations recordings can also be found on the mouseTube database, developed to favor the exchange of such data. PMID:27341321

  9. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications.

    PubMed

    Cañete, Francisco J; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J; Paris, José F

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  10. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Francisco J.; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J.; Paris, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  11. Evaluation of multiple-channel OFDM based airborne ultrasonic communications.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2016-09-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) modulation has been extensively used in both wired and wireless communication systems. The use of OFDM technology allows very high spectral efficiency data transmission without using complex equalizers to correct the effect of a frequency-selective channel. This work investigated OFDM methods in an airborne ultrasonic communication system, using commercially available capacitive ultrasonic transducers operating at 50kHz to transmit information through the air. Conventional modulation schemes such as binary phase shift keying (BPSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) were used to modulate sub-carrier signals, and the performances were evaluated in an indoor laboratory environment. Line-of-sight (LOS) transmission range up to 11m with no measurable errors was achieved using BPSK at a data rate of 45kb/s and a spectral efficiency of 1b/s/Hz. By implementing a higher order modulation scheme (16-QAM), the system data transfer rate was increased to 180kb/s with a spectral efficiency of 4b/s/Hz at attainable transmission distances up to 6m. Diffraction effects were incorporated into a model of the ultrasonic channel that also accounted for beam spread and attenuation in air. The simulations were a good match to the measured signals and non-LOS signals could be demodulated successfully. The effects of multipath interference were also studied in this work. By adding cyclic prefix (CP) to the OFDM symbols, the bit error rate (BER) performance was significantly improved in a multipath environment. PMID:27365316

  12. Ultrasonic ablation as a novel technique for producing pure aluminium nanoparticles dispersed in different liquids for different applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Yasser A. M.; Kishi, Naoki; Soga, Tetsuo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel physical method for producing surfactant-free aluminium nanoparticles (Al NPs) by irradiating ultrasonic waves on Al thin films immersed in different liquids used for different applications. We suggest naming this technique “ultrasonic ablation”. Our method has many advantages compared with other chemical and physical methods such as (1) fabrication of Al NPs using low-cost and easy procedures, (2) fabrication of pure Al NPs without any chemical additives, (3) fabrication of Al NPs dispersed in different liquids used for different applications, and (4) fabrication of individual Al NPs without aggregations. We have prepared Al NPs in 1,2-dichlorobenzene, which is used as a solvent for preparing active layer solutions of organic solar cells (OSCs), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-blend-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), which is a representative aqueous solution used as a buffer layer in OSCs, and ethanol, which is a representative polar solvent used for different applications. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical absorption techniques have verified the fabrication of individual and surfactant-free Al NPs dispersed in different liquids that can be safely used in different applications.

  13. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and corrosion resistance of commercially pure titanium through surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening and stress relieving.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Shitu; Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, Bijay P; Pandey, Rajiv; Narayanan, Shankar; Wani, Mohan R; Singh, Vakil

    2014-07-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the effect of a novel process of surface modification, surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening, on osteoblast proliferation and corrosion behavior of commercially pure titanium (c p-Ti) in simulated body fluid. A mechanically polished disc of c p-Ti was subjected to ultrasonic shot peening with stainless steel balls to create nanostructure at the surface. A nanostructure (<20 nm) with inhomogeneous distribution was revealed by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. There was an increase of approximately 10% in cell proliferation, but there was drastic fall in corrosion resistance. Corrosion rate was increased by 327% in the shot peened condition. In order to examine the role of residual stresses associated with the shot peened surface on these aspects, a part of the shot peened specimen was annealed at 400°C for 1 hour. A marked influence of annealing treatment was observed on surface structure, cell proliferation, and corrosion resistance. Surface nanostructure was much more prominent, with increased number density and sharper grain boundaries; cell proliferation was enhanced to approximately 50% and corrosion rate was reduced by 86.2% and 41% as compared with that of the shot peened and the as received conditions, respectively. The highly significant improvement in cell proliferation, resulting from annealing of the shot peened specimen, was attributed to increased volume fraction of stabilized nanostructure, stress recovery, and crystallization of the oxide film. Increase in corrosion resistance from annealing of shot peened material was related to more effective passivation. Thus, the surface of c p-Ti, modified by this novel process, possessed a unique quality of enhancing cell proliferation as well as the corrosion resistance and could be highly effective in reducing treatment time of patients adopting dental and orthopedic implants of titanium and its alloys. PMID:25020216

  14. Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. E.; Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is discussed as a primary means of nondestructive evaluation of subsurface flaws. The advantages and disadvantages are listed. The elementary principles, basic components of test units, scan modes, resonance testing, detection of fatigue cracks, monitoring fatigue crack growth, and determination of residual stress are discussed.

  15. Separable operations and local operations with classical communication on triqubit pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Kan, Haibin

    2014-12-01

    Entanglement plays an important role in quantum computation and information. We can only manipulate an entangled quantum state shared among several distant parties by local operations with classical communication (LOCC). Thus, it is of great importance to characterize the conditions by which we can determine whether one pure quantum state can be transformed to another pure state by LOCC. It is well known that separable operations and LOCC are not equivalent. Dozens of results have illustrated this difference. Little do we know about this difference despite these recent results. It is shown in this paper that if the initial state |ψ > and final state |ϕ > are genuine tripartite pure states in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) class then |ψ > can be transformed to |ϕ > by separable operations if and only if |ψ > can be transformed to |ϕ > by deterministic LOCC. That is, SEP equals LOCC on tripartite GHZ states.

  16. Communication Impairments in Mice Lacking Shank1: Reduced Levels of Ultrasonic Vocalizations and Scent Marking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wöhr, Markus; Roullet, Florence I.; Hung, Albert Y.; Sheng, Morgan; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2011-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong genetic component. Core symptoms are abnormal reciprocal social interactions, qualitative impairments in communication, and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior with restricted interests. Candidate genes for autism include the SHANK gene family, as mutations in SHANK2 and SHANK3 have been detected in several autistic individuals. SHANK genes code for a family of scaffolding proteins located in the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. To test the hypothesis that a mutation in SHANK1 contributes to the symptoms of autism, we evaluated Shank1−/− null mutant mice for behavioral phenotypes with relevance to autism, focusing on social communication. Ultrasonic vocalizations and the deposition of scent marks appear to be two major modes of mouse communication. Our findings revealed evidence for low levels of ultrasonic vocalizations and scent marks in Shank1−/− mice as compared to wildtype Shank1+/+ littermate controls. Shank1−/− pups emitted fewer vocalizations than Shank1+/+ pups when isolated from mother and littermates. In adulthood, genotype affected scent marking behavior in the presence of female urinary pheromones. Adult Shank1−/− males deposited fewer scent marks in proximity to female urine than Shank1+/+ males. Call emission in response to female urinary pheromones also differed between genotypes. Shank1+/+ mice changed their calling pattern dependent on previous female interactions, while Shank1−/− mice were unaffected, indicating a failure of Shank1−/− males to learn from a social experience. The reduced levels of ultrasonic vocalizations and scent marking behavior in Shank1−/− mice are consistent with a phenotype relevant to social communication deficits in autism. PMID:21695253

  17. Ultrasonic Digital Communication System for a Steel Wall Multipath Channel: Methods and Results

    SciTech Connect

    TL Murphy

    2006-02-16

    As of the development of this thesis, no commercially available products have been identified for the digital communication of instrumented data across a thick ({approx} 6 n.) steel wall using ultrasound. The specific goal of the current research is to investigate the application of methods for digital communication of instrumented data (i.e., temperature, voltage, etc.) across the wall of a steel pressure vessel. The acoustic transmission of data using ultrasonic transducers prevents the need to breach the wall of such a pressure vessel which could ultimately affect its safety or lifespan, or void the homogeneity of an experiment under test. Actual digital communication paradigms are introduced and implemented for the successful dissemination of data across such a wall utilizing solely an acoustic ultrasonic link. The first, dubbed the ''single-hop'' configuration, can communicate bursts of digital data one-way across the wall using the Differential Binary Phase-Shift Keying (DBPSK) modulation technique as fast as 500 bps. The second, dubbed the ''double-hop'' configuration, transmits a carrier into the vessel, modulates it, and retransmits it externally. Using a pulsed carrier with Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM), this technique can communicate digital data as fast as 500 bps. Using a CW carrier, Least Mean-Squared (LMS) adaptive interference suppression, and DBPSK, this method can communicate data as fast as 5 kbps. A third technique, dubbed the ''reflected-power'' configuration, communicates digital data by modulating a pulsed carrier by varying the acoustic impedance at the internal transducer-wall interface. The paradigms of the latter two configurations are believed to be unique. All modulation methods are based on the premise that the wall cannot be breached in any way and can therefore be viably implemented with power delivered wirelessly through the acoustic channel using ultrasound. Methods, results, and considerations for future research are discussed

  18. Multichannel Ultrasonic Data Communications in Air Using Range-Dependent Modulation Schemes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2016-01-01

    There are several well-developed technologies of wireless communication such as radio frequency (RF) and infrared (IR), but ultrasonic methods can be a good alternative in some situations. A multichannel airborne ultrasonic data communication system is described in this paper. ON-OFF keying (OOK) and binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulation schemes were implemented successfully in the system by using a pair of commercially available capacitive ultrasonic transducers in a relatively low multipath indoor laboratory environment. Six channels were used from 50 to 110 kHz with a channel spacing of 12 kHz, allowing multiple 8-bit data packets to be transmitted simultaneously. The system data transfer rate achieved was up to 60 kb/s and ultrasonic wireless synchronization was implemented instead of using a hard-wired link. A model developed in the work could accurately predict ultrasonic signals through the air channels. Signal root mean square (rms) values and system bit error rates (BERs) were analyzed over different distances. Error-free decoding was achieved over ranges up to 5 m using a multichannel OOK modulation scheme. To obtain the highest data transfer rate and the longest error-free transmission distance, a range-dependent multichannel scheme with variable data rates, channel frequencies, and different modulation schemes, was also studied in the work. Within 2 m, error-free transmission was achieved using a five-channel OOK with a data rate of 63 kb/s. Between 2 and 5 m, six-channel OOK with 60 kb/s data transfer rate was error free. Beyond 5 m, the error-free transmission range could be extended up to 10 m using three-channel BPSK with a reduced data rate of 30 kb/s. The situation when two transducers were misaligned using three-channel OOK and BPSK schemes was also investigated in the work. It was concluded that error-free transmission could still be achieved with a lateral displacement of less than 7% and oblique angles of less than 7°, and three

  19. Full-Duplex Airborne Ultrasonic Data Communication Using a Pilot-Aided QAM-OFDM Modulation Scheme.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2016-08-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has been extensively used in a variety of broadband digital wireless communications applications because of its high bandwidth utilization efficiency and effective immunity to multipath distortion. This paper has investigated quadrature amplitude modulation and OFDM methods in air-coupled ultrasonic communication, using broadband capacitive ultrasonic transducers with high- k dielectric layers. OFDM phase noise was discussed and corrected using a pilot-aided estimation algorithm. The overall system data rate achieved was up to 400 kb/s with a spectral efficiency of 2 b/s/Hz. An ultrasonic propagation model for signal prediction considered atmospheric absorption of sound in air, beam divergence, and transducer frequency response. The simulations were compared with the experimental results, and good agreement was found between the two. Two-way communication through air was also implemented successfully by applying three-way handshaking initialization and an adaptive modulation scheme with variable data rates depending on the transmission distance, estimated using received signal strength indication measurement. It was shown that the error-free transmission range could be extended up to 2.5 m using different system transfer rates from 400 kb/s down to 100 kb/s. In full-duplex transmission mode, the overall error-free system data rate achieved was 0.8 Mb/s up to 1.5 m. PMID:27214897

  20. A Role for Ultrasonic Vocalisation in Social Communication and Divergence of Natural Populations of the House Mouse (Mus musculus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    von Merten, Sophie; Hoier, Svenja

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that rodents emit signals in the ultrasonic range, but their role in social communication and mating is still under active exploration. While inbred strains of house mice have emerged as a favourite model to study ultrasonic vocalisation (USV) patterns, studies in wild animals and natural situations are still rare. We focus here on two wild derived mouse populations. We recorded them in dyadic encounters for extended periods of time to assess possible roles of USVs and their divergence between allopatric populations. We have analysed song frequency and duration, as well as spectral features of songs and syllables. We show that the populations have indeed diverged in several of these aspects and that USV patterns emitted in a mating context differ from those emitted in same sex encounters. We find that females vocalize not less, in encounters with another female even more than males. This implies that the current focus of USVs being emitted mainly by males within the mating context needs to be reconsidered. Using a statistical syntax analysis we find complex temporal sequencing patterns that could suggest that the syntax conveys meaningful information to the receivers. We conclude that wild mice use USV for complex social interactions and that USV patterns can diverge fast between populations. PMID:24816836

  1. Exercise Effects on Early Vocal Ultrasonic Communication Dysfunction in a PINK1 Knockout Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A.; Yang, Katie M.; Ciucci, Michelle R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease with vocal communication deficits that manifest early, progress, and are largely resistant to medical interventions; however, they do respond to exercise-based speech and voice therapies. Objective and Methods To study how exercise-based vocal treatment can affect the progression of communication deficits related to PD, we studied ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in rats with homozygous knockout (−/−) of PINK1, a gene mutation known to cause PD, under the manipulation of a behavioral vocal exercise paradigm that allows us to precisely control dose and timing of exercise in the prodromal (prior to diagnosis) stages. Results We show that intensive vocal-training rescues frequency range and intensity deficits as well as leads to an increase in call complexity and duration of calls compared to sham-training; however, over time this training regime loses significant effect as the disease progresses. We also show effects of frequent handling and conspecific (male-female) interaction in the sham-training group as they demonstrated significantly higher call rate, intensity, frequency range, and call complexity compared to rats without any form of training and consequently less handling/interaction. Further, we confirm that this model exhibits progressive gross motor deficits that indicate neurodegeneration. Discussion This study suggests that the evolving nature of vocal communication deficits requires an adjustment of therapy targets and more intensive training over the course of this progressive disease and demonstrates the importance of frequent social experiences. PMID:26577653

  2. Maximally entangled set of tripartite qutrit states and pure state separable transformations which are not possible via local operations and classical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, M.; Spee, C.; Kraus, B.

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement is the resource to overcome the restriction of operations to local operations assisted by classical communication (LOCC). The maximally entangled set (MES) of states is the minimal set of n -partite pure states with the property that any truly n -partite entangled pure state can be obtained deterministically via LOCC from some state in this set. Hence, this set contains the most useful states for applications. In this work, we characterize the MES for generic three-qutrit states. Moreover, we analyze which generic three-qutrit states are reachable (and convertible) under LOCC transformations. To this end, we study reachability via separable operations (SEP), a class of operations that is strictly larger than LOCC. Interestingly, we identify a family of pure states that can be obtained deterministically via SEP but not via LOCC. This gives an affirmative answer to the question of whether there is a difference between SEP and LOCC for transformations among pure states.

  3. Differential effects of social and physical environmental enrichment on brain plasticity, cognition, and ultrasonic communication in rats.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Juan C; Lackinger, Martin; Höglinger, Günter U; Schratt, Gerhard; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) exerts beneficial effects on brain plasticity, cognition, and anxiety/depression, leading to a brain that can counteract deficits underlying various brain disorders. Because the complexity of the EE commonly used makes it difficult to identify causal aspects, we examined possible factors using a 2 × 2 design with social EE (two vs. six rats) and physical EE (physically enriched vs. nonenriched). For the first time, we demonstrate that social and physical EE have differential effects on brain plasticity, cognition, and ultrasonic communication. Expectedly, physical EE promoted neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation, but not in the subventricular zone, and, as a novel finding, affected microRNA expression levels, with the activity-dependent miR-124 and miR-132 being upregulated. Concomitant improvements in cognition were observed, yet social deficits were seen in the emission of prosocial 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) paralleled by a lack of social approach in response to them, consistent with the intense world syndrome/theory of autism. In contrast, social EE had only minor effects on brain plasticity and cognition, but led to increased prosocial 50-kHz USV emission rates and enhanced social approach behavior. Importantly, social deficits following physical EE were prevented by additional social EE. The finding that social EE has positive whereas physical EE has negative effects on social behavior indicates that preclinical studies focusing on EE as a potential treatment in models for neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by social deficits, such as autism, should include social EE in addition to physical EE, because its lack might worsen social deficits. PMID:26132842

  4. Pure-quartic solitons.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; de Sterke, C Martijn; Martijn, de Sterke C; Sipe, J E; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  5. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  6. Pure-quartic solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, De Sterke C.; Sipe, J. E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers.

  7. Ultrasonic evaluation of high voltage circuit boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Riley, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary observations indicate that an ultrasonic scanning technique may be useful as a quick, low cost, nondestructive method for judging the quality of circuit board materials for high voltage applications. Corona inception voltage tests were conducted on fiberglass-epoxy and fiberglass-polyimide high pressure laminates from 20 to 140 C. The same materials were scanned ultrasonically by utilizing the single transducer, through-transmission technique with reflector plate, and recording variations in ultrasonic energy transmitted through the board thickness. A direct relationship was observed between ultrasonic transmission level and corona inception voltage. The ultrasonic technique was subsequently used to aid selection of high quality circuit boards for the Communications Technology Satellite.

  8. Ultrasonic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    Ultrasonic has proven its merit as one of the most promising sensing methods for food quality evaluation due to its non-destructive, noninvasive, precise, rapid, and on-line potential. Ultrasonic is mechanical wave at frequencies above 20 kHz propagating by vibration of the particles in the medium and penetrating through optically opaque materials to provide internal or surface information of physical attributes, such as texture and structure. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing is a way of characterizing materials by transmitting ultrasonic waves into a material, and investigating the characteristics of the transmitted and/or reflected ultrasonic waves. For the purpose of quality measurement of materials, low-intensity ultrasonic with the power level of up to 1 W/cm2 has been used. The low-intensity ultrasonic doesn't cause physical or chemical changes in the properties of the specimen when it transmits through the material. However, high-intensity ultrasonic of the power range above 1 W/cm2 may produce physical/chemical disruption and alteration in the material through which the wave propagates. High-intensity ultrasonic is usually used in cleaning, promotion of chemical reactions, homogenization, etc

  9. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Andre

    The following essays on communication are presented: communication as a condition of survival, communication for special purposes, the means of transmission of communication, communication within social and economic structures, the teaching of communication through the press, the teaching of modern languages, communication as a point of departure,…

  10. Ultrasonic Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Ultraprobe 2000, manufactured by UE Systems, Inc., Elmsford, NY, is a hand-held ultrasonic system that detects indications of bearing failure by analyzing changes in amplitude. It employs the technology of a prototype ultrasonic bearing-failure monitoring system developed by Mechanical Technology, Inc., Latham, New York and Marshall Space Flight Center (which was based on research into Skylab's gyroscope bearings). Bearings on the verge of failure send ultrasonic signals indicating their deterioration; the Ultraprobe changes these to audible signals. The operator hears the signals and gages their intensity with a meter in the unit.

  11. Graphene electrostatic microphone and ultrasonic radio.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zheng, Jinglin; Onishi, Seita; Crommie, M F; Zettl, Alex K

    2015-07-21

    We present a graphene-based wideband microphone and a related ultrasonic radio that can be used for wireless communication. It is shown that graphene-based acoustic transmitters and receivers have a wide bandwidth, from the audible region (20∼20 kHz) to the ultrasonic region (20 kHz to at least 0.5 MHz). Using the graphene-based components, we demonstrate efficient high-fidelity information transmission using an ultrasonic band centered at 0.3 MHz. The graphene-based microphone is also shown to be capable of directly receiving ultrasound signals generated by bats in the field, and the ultrasonic radio, coupled to electromagnetic (EM) radio, is shown to function as a high-accuracy rangefinder. The ultrasonic radio could serve as a useful addition to wireless communication technology where the propagation of EM waves is difficult. PMID:26150483

  12. Graphene electrostatic microphone and ultrasonic radio

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Zheng, Jinglin; Onishi, Seita; Crommie, M. F.; Zettl, Alex K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a graphene-based wideband microphone and a related ultrasonic radio that can be used for wireless communication. It is shown that graphene-based acoustic transmitters and receivers have a wide bandwidth, from the audible region (20∼20 kHz) to the ultrasonic region (20 kHz to at least 0.5 MHz). Using the graphene-based components, we demonstrate efficient high-fidelity information transmission using an ultrasonic band centered at 0.3 MHz. The graphene-based microphone is also shown to be capable of directly receiving ultrasound signals generated by bats in the field, and the ultrasonic radio, coupled to electromagnetic (EM) radio, is shown to function as a high-accuracy rangefinder. The ultrasonic radio could serve as a useful addition to wireless communication technology where the propagation of EM waves is difficult. PMID:26150483

  13. Ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Brashear, Hugh R.; Blair, Michael S.; Phelps, James E.; Bauer, Martin L.; Nowlin, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system determines a surveyor's position and automatically links it with other simultaneously taken survey data. An ultrasonic and radio frequency (rf) transmitter are carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The surveyor's position is determined by calculations that use the measured transmission times of an airborne ultrasonic pulse transmitted from the backpack to two or more prepositioned ultrasonic transceivers. Once a second, rf communications are used both to synchronize the ultrasonic pulse transmission-time measurements and to transmit other simultaneously taken survey data. The rf communications are interpreted by a portable receiver and microcomputer which are brought to the property site. A video display attached to the computer provides real-time visual monitoring of the survey progress and site coverage.

  14. Ultrasonic Polishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic polishing process makes use of the high-frequency (ultrasonic) vibrations of an abradable tool which automatically conforms to the work piece and an abrasive slurry to finish surfaces and edges on complex, highly detailed, close tolerance cavities in materials from beryllium copper to carbide. Applications range from critical deburring of guidance system components to removing EDM recast layers from aircraft engine components to polishing molds for forming carbide cutting tool inserts or injection molding plastics. A variety of materials including tool steels, carbides, and even ceramics can be successfully processed. Since the abradable tool automatically conforms to the work piece geometry, the ultrasonic finishing method described offers a number of important benefits in finishing components with complex geometries.

  15. Ultrasonic neuromodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naor, Omer; Krupa, Steve; Shoham, Shy

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves can be non-invasively steered and focused into mm-scale regions across the human body and brain, and their application in generating controlled artificial modulation of neuronal activity could therefore potentially have profound implications for neural science and engineering. Ultrasonic neuro-modulation phenomena were experimentally observed and studied for nearly a century, with recent discoveries on direct neural excitation and suppression sparking a new wave of investigations in models ranging from rodents to humans. In this paper we review the physics, engineering and scientific aspects of ultrasonic fields, their control in both space and time, and their effect on neuronal activity, including a survey of both the field’s foundational history and of recent findings. We describe key constraints encountered in this field, as well as key engineering systems developed to surmount them. In closing, the state of the art is discussed, with an emphasis on emerging research and clinical directions.

  16. Ultrasonic neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Naor, Omer; Krupa, Steve; Shoham, Shy

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves can be non-invasively steered and focused into mm-scale regions across the human body and brain, and their application in generating controlled artificial modulation of neuronal activity could therefore potentially have profound implications for neural science and engineering. Ultrasonic neuro-modulation phenomena were experimentally observed and studied for nearly a century, with recent discoveries on direct neural excitation and suppression sparking a new wave of investigations in models ranging from rodents to humans. In this paper we review the physics, engineering and scientific aspects of ultrasonic fields, their control in both space and time, and their effect on neuronal activity, including a survey of both the field's foundational history and of recent findings. We describe key constraints encountered in this field, as well as key engineering systems developed to surmount them. In closing, the state of the art is discussed, with an emphasis on emerging research and clinical directions. PMID:27153566

  17. Ultrasonic Vocalizations Emitted by Flying Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Murrant, Meghan N.; Bowman, Jeff; Garroway, Colin J.; Prinzen, Brian; Mayberry, Heather; Faure, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of ultrasound use by flying squirrels have existed for decades, yet there has been little detailed analysis of their vocalizations. Here we demonstrate that two species of flying squirrel emit ultrasonic vocalizations. We recorded vocalizations from northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels calling in both the laboratory and at a field site in central Ontario, Canada. We demonstrate that flying squirrels produce ultrasonic emissions through recorded bursts of broadband noise and time-frequency structured frequency modulated (FM) vocalizations, some of which were purely ultrasonic. Squirrels emitted three types of ultrasonic calls in laboratory recordings and one type in the field. The variety of signals that were recorded suggest that flying squirrels may use ultrasonic vocalizations to transfer information. Thus, vocalizations may be an important, although still poorly understood, aspect of flying squirrel social biology. PMID:24009728

  18. Ultrasonic vocalizations emitted by flying squirrels.

    PubMed

    Murrant, Meghan N; Bowman, Jeff; Garroway, Colin J; Prinzen, Brian; Mayberry, Heather; Faure, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of ultrasound use by flying squirrels have existed for decades, yet there has been little detailed analysis of their vocalizations. Here we demonstrate that two species of flying squirrel emit ultrasonic vocalizations. We recorded vocalizations from northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels calling in both the laboratory and at a field site in central Ontario, Canada. We demonstrate that flying squirrels produce ultrasonic emissions through recorded bursts of broadband noise and time-frequency structured frequency modulated (FM) vocalizations, some of which were purely ultrasonic. Squirrels emitted three types of ultrasonic calls in laboratory recordings and one type in the field. The variety of signals that were recorded suggest that flying squirrels may use ultrasonic vocalizations to transfer information. Thus, vocalizations may be an important, although still poorly understood, aspect of flying squirrel social biology. PMID:24009728

  19. Ultrasonic angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Robert J.

    1990-08-01

    Over the past 3 years we have developed a percutaneous ultrasonic angioplasty device and recently applied it in human peripheral arteries. This paper describes some of the background preceding the development of intravascular ultrasound for arterial recanalization. The chronology of our development of ultrasonic angioplasty is discussed from in vitro studies on atherosclerotic plaque to in vivo studies in canine models with differing types of arterial occlusions (thrombotic fibrotic calcific-atherosclerotic) and to initial human application. SPIE Vol. 1321 Modern Technologies Applied to Medical Practice (1989) / 69

  20. Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Automation Industries Inc. has had more than $2 million in contracts to produce innovative equipment for the Apollo program. When Marshall Space Flight Center sought a fast nondestructive way to inspect butt welds in aluminum alloys for spacecraft, the company developed a reliable ultrasonic device using multiple transducers called "delta manipulators" which detect lack of weld penetration not readily seen in radiograph automation. Industry soon adapted the ultrasonic equipment to a unique rail inspection device that saves countless man hours. Device is contained in self propelled railroad cars produced and operated by the company to check old track welds for deterioration.

  1. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  2. Ultrasonic test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anthony; Goff, Dan; Kruchowy, Roman; Rhoads, Carl

    1994-08-01

    An ultrasonic system for determining the quality of concrete under water without inaccuracies caused by electromagnetic interference from the ultrasonic generator. An ultrasonic generator applies pulses to the concrete. An ultrasonic detector detects the ultrasonic pulses and produces corresponding signals that are indicative of ultrasonic pulses that have passed through the material. Signal processing circuitry processes the signals to determine the transit time of the ultrasonic pulses through the material. The signal processing circuitry is disabled for a predetermined time after application of each ultrasonic pulse to the material to prevent noise produced by the means for applying ultrasonic pulses to the material from entering the signal processing circuitry and causing spurious measurements.

  3. A photoacoustic and ultrasonic study on jatropha oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Bama, G.; Ramachandran, K.

    2010-03-01

    Using the photoacoustic technique, the thermal diffusivity of a dimethoxymethane + jatropha liquid mixture and pure jatropha oil is measured at room temperature. The result is correlated with the result of ultrasonic measurements.

  4. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue on communication includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROM and computer software, videos, books, and professional resources that deal with various methods of communication. Sidebars discuss mythology, photojournalism, sharing ideas on the Web, and songs of protest. Suggestions for class activities are also included. (LRW)

  5. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  6. Ultrasonic Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    MicroUltrasonics PLR-1000 is a refined microprocessor-controlled version (usable on bolts, plates, liquids and gases) of the P2L2 developed by Langley Research Center. New technique is for nondestructive measurement of residual stress in various types of structures, for example, nuclear pressure vessels, pipes in nuclear reactors, offshore platforms, bridges, railroad tracks and wheels, aircraft wings, and engines. The instrument produces sound tone pulses that travel through a test specimen. PLR-1000 precisely measures speeds as stress increases speed of sound, tone changes, making precise measurements possible.

  7. Ultrasonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steven C.; Kraft, Nancy C.

    2007-03-13

    An ultrasonic transducer having an effective center frequency of about 42 MHz; a bandwidth of greater than 85% at 6 dB; a spherical focus of at least 0.5 inches in water; an F4 lens; a resolution sufficient to be able to detect and separate a 0.005 inch flat-bottomed hole at 0.005 inches below surface; and a beam size of approximately 0.006–0.008 inches measured off a 11/2 mm ball in water at the transducer's focal point.

  8. Ultrasonic Interferometers Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    I have been tinkering with ultrasonic transducers once more. In earlier notes I reported on optics-like experiments performed with ultrasonics, described a number of ultrasonic interferometers, and showed how ultrasonic transducers can be used for Fourier analysis. This time I became interested in trying the technique of using two detectors in…

  9. Ultrasonic Interferometers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2007-03-01

    I have been tinkering with ultrasonic transducers once more. In earlier notes I reported on optics-like experiments performed with ultrasonics, described a number of ultrasonic interferometers,2 and showed how ultrasonic transducers can be used for Fourier analysis.3 This time I became interested in trying the technique of using two detectors in acoustic interferometers instead of the usual one.

  10. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  11. Modern ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, V. M.; Truman, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    The current status of ultrasonic flowmeters were reviewed on the basis of materials published in the Soviet Union and elsewhere. The following advantages of ultrasonic flowmeters over earlier instruments are cited. A comparative analysis is made of the design methods employed in ultrasonic flowmeters. The evolution of ultrasonic flowmetering is traced from the first generation and trends in their development are analyzed.

  12. Ultrasonic hydrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Swoboda, C.A.

    1984-04-17

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time ''t'' between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance ''d'' between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time ''t'', the sonic velocity ''V'' is calculated with the equation ''V=2d/t''. The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0/sup 0/ and 40/sup 0/ C. and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation. The disclosed modified battery has a hollow spacer nub on the battery side wall, the sonic surfaces being on the inside of the nub and the electrolyte filling between the surfaces to the exclusion of intervening structure. An accessible pad exposed on the nub wall opposite one sonic surface allows the reliable placement thereagainst of the transducer.

  13. Ultrasonic hydrometer

    DOEpatents

    Swoboda, Carl A.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time "t" between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance "d" between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time "t", the sonic velocity "V" is calculated with the equation "V=2d/t". The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0.degree. and 40.degree. C. and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation. The disclosed modified battery has a hollow spacer nub on the battery side wall, the sonic surfaces being on the inside of the nub and the electrolyte filling between the surfaces to the exclusion of intervening structure. An accessible pad exposed on the nub wall opposite one sonic surface allows the reliable placement thereagainst of the transducer.

  14. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  15. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathorn, S.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Thin Route satellite telecommunication project is presented. Thin Route employs applications technology satellites (ATS) in place of more costly commercial multi- transponder telecommunications satellites. This system allows remote and underdeveloped areas to communicate with the outside world for purposes of obtaining medical assistance among other things. The system represents a substantial cost saving over commercial systems.

  16. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  17. Ultrasonic signal enhancement by resonator techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Ultrasonic resonators increase experimental sensitivity to acoustic dispersion and changes in attenuation. Experimental sensitivity enhancement line shapes are presented which were obtained by modulating the acoustic properties of a CdS resonator with a light beam. Small changes in light level are made to produce almost pure absorptive or dispersive changes in the resonator signal. This effect is due to the coupling of the ultrasonic wave to the CdS conductivity which is proportional to incident light intensity. The resonator conductivity is adjusted in this manner to obtain both dispersive and absorptive sensitivity enhancement line shapes. The data presented verify previous thoretical calculations based on a propagating wave model.

  18. ULTRASONIC NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Truell, R.; de Klerk, J.; Levy, P.W.

    1960-02-23

    A neutron dosimeter is described which utilizes ultrasonic waves in the megacycle region for determination of the extent of neutron damage in a borosilicate glass through ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation measurements before and after damage.

  19. Spark ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Nondestructive testing by spark transducer induces ultrasonic pulses in materials without physical contact. High power pulse generator connected to step up transformer produces sparking between two tungsten rods and ultrasonic energy pulses in test samples placed between rods.

  20. Ultrasonic pulser-receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steven C.

    2006-09-12

    Ultrasonic pulser-receiver circuitry, for use with an ultrasonic transducer, the circuitry comprising a circuit board; ultrasonic pulser circuitry supported by the circuit board and configured to be coupled to an ultrasonic transducer and to cause the ultrasonic transducer to emit an ultrasonic output pulse; receiver circuitry supported by the circuit board, coupled to the pulser circuitry, including protection circuitry configured to protect against the ultrasonic pulse and including amplifier circuitry configured to amplify an echo, received back by the transducer, of the output pulse; and a connector configured to couple the ultrasonic transducer directly to the circuit board, to the pulser circuitry and receiver circuitry, wherein impedance mismatches that would result if the transducer was coupled to the circuit board via a cable can be avoided.

  1. Ultrasonic Device for Assessing the Quality of a Wire Crimp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor); Cramer, Karl E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system for determining the quality of an electrical wire crimp between a wire and ferrule includes an ultrasonically equipped crimp tool (UECT) configured to transmit an ultrasonic acoustic wave through a wire and ferrule, and a signal processor in communication with the UECT. The signal processor includes a signal transmitting module configured to transmit the ultrasonic acoustic wave via an ultrasonic transducer, signal receiving module configured to receive the ultrasonic acoustic wave after it passes through the wire and ferrule, and a signal analysis module configured to identify signal differences between the ultrasonic waves. The signal analysis module is then configured to compare the signal differences attributable to the wire crimp to a baseline, and to provide an output signal if the signal differences deviate from the baseline.

  2. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  3. Ultrasonic Microtransport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroney, Richard Morgan, III

    We have observed numerous kinetic effects using ultrasonic flexural plate waves (FPWs) in 4mu -thick composite plates of low-stress silicon nitride, piezoelectric zinc oxide and aluminum. The wavelength is typically 100 mum, and the area 3 x 8 mm^2. A successful new surface micromachining fabrication process is presented here for the first time. FPWs have been used to move liquids and gasses with motion typically indicated by polysilicon blocks in air and polystyrene spheres in water; the velocity in air is 4.5 mm/s (with a zero-to-peak input of 3 V), and in water it is 100 mum/s (with an input of 7.8 V). Other observations include pumping of a liquid dye, and mixing near the FPW surface. All quantitative observations demonstrate that the kinetic effects of FPWs are proportional to the square of the wave amplitude. The amplitude for a typical device is 250 A at 9 V input; the power in a typical FPW is about 2 mW. The amplitude can be accurately measured using a laser diffraction technique. Experimental error is about +/-10%, and many of the results agree well with a simple theory to predict the FPW amplitude; extensions of the theory model the fluid loading of FPW devices, but experiment and theory disagree by about 15%. Pumping by flexural plate waves is an example of the phenomenon known as acoustic streaming. A common solution approach is the method of successive approximations, where the nonlinear equations are first linearized and solved. This "first-order" solution is then used to determine the inhomogeneous source terms in the linearized, "second -order" equations of motion. Theoretical predictions of streaming theory are in excellent agreement with experiment in the case where the FPW device contacts a half-space of fluid; predictions for flow in small channels encourage the development of integrated micropumps. Applications for microflow include thermal redistribution in integrated circuits and liquid movement in analytical instruments--particularly where

  4. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  5. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  6. Purely lytic osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Santos, L.A.; Eideken, B.

    1982-11-01

    The radiographic features of 42 purely lytic osteosarcomas are presented. Purely lytic osteosarcoma is identified as a lytic lesion of bone with no demonstrable osteoid matrix by conventional radiographic modalities. Purely lytic osteosarcoma represented 13.7% of a group of 305 osteosarcomas. The most common presentation was that of a lytic illdefined lesion with a moderate to large extraosseous mass component. Nine lesions presented with benign radiographic features. The differential diagnosis is outlined. The need for awareness of this type of presentation of osteosarcoma is stressed.

  7. pureS2HAT: S 2HAT-based Pure E/B Harmonic Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grain, J.; Stompor, R.; Tristram, M.

    2011-10-01

    The pS2HAT routines allow efficient, parallel calculation of the so-called 'pure' polarized multipoles. The computed multipole coefficients are equal to the standard pseudo-multipoles calculated for the apodized sky maps of the Stokes parameters Q and U subsequently corrected by so-called counterterms. If the applied apodizations fullfill certain boundary conditions, these multipoles correspond to the pure multipoles. Pure multipoles of one type, i.e., either E or B, are ensured not to contain contributions from the other one, at least to within numerical artifacts. They can be therefore further used in the estimation of the sky power spectra via the pseudo power spectrum technique, which has to however correctly account for the applied apodization on the one hand, and the presence of the counterterms, on the other. In addition, the package contains the routines permitting calculation of the spin-weighted apodizations, given an input scalar, i.e., spin-0 window. The former are needed to compute the counterterms. It also provides routines for maps and window manipulations. The routines are written in C and based on the S2HAT library, which is used to perform all required spherical harmonic transforms as well as all inter-processor communication. They are therefore parallelized using MPI and follow the distributed-memory computational model. The data distribution patterns, pixelization choices, conventions etc are all as those assumed/allowed by the S2HAT library.

  8. Science: Pure or Applied?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Through a description of some of the activities which take place in his science classroom, the author makes a strong case for the inclusion of technology, or applied science, rather than pure science in the primary curriculum. (KC)

  9. A Pure Theory of Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Michael J.

    Charles Tiebout's Pure Theory of Local Expenditures serves as a helpful framework in examining the emergence of the learning society, communications technologies, freer trade, and the effects these will have on the educational infrastructure. Tiebout argued that the failure of market-type systems of public good at the central government level does…

  10. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  11. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  12. The power of ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Profit, Alan L; Martini, Luigi G

    2005-01-01

    This overview of ultrasonic technologies describes their effectiveness for a number of applications. Product examples illustrate use for welding, cutting and boring as well as atomising. PMID:16334603

  13. Ultrasonic Bolt Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleman, Stuart M. (Inventor); Rowe, Geoffrey K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An ultrasonic bolt gage is described which uses a crosscorrelation algorithm to determine a tension applied to a fastener, such as a bolt. The cross-correlation analysis is preferably performed using a processor operating on a series of captured ultrasonic echo waveforms. The ultrasonic bolt gage is further described as using the captured ultrasonic echo waveforms to perform additional modes of analysis, such as feature recognition. Multiple tension data outputs, therefore, can be obtained from a single data acquisition for increased measurement reliability. In addition, one embodiment of the gage has been described as multi-channel, having a multiplexer for performing a tension analysis on one of a plurality of bolts.

  14. Pro-social 50-kHz ultrasonic communication in rats: post-weaning but not post-adolescent social isolation leads to social impairments—phenotypic rescue by re-socialization

    PubMed Central

    Seffer, Dominik; Rippberger, Henrike; Schwarting, Rainer K. W.; Wöhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rats are highly social animals and social play during adolescence has an important role for social development, hence post-weaning social isolation is widely used to study the adverse effects of juvenile social deprivation and to induce behavioral phenotypes relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia. Communication is an important component of the rat's social behavior repertoire, with ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) serving as situation-dependent affective signals. High-frequency 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations and induce approach behavior, supporting the notion that they serve as social contact calls; however, post-weaning isolation effects on the behavioral changes displayed by the receiver in response to USV have yet to be studied. We therefore investigated the impact of post-weaning isolation on socio-affective information processing as assessed by means of our established 50-kHz USV radial maze playback paradigm. We showed that post-weaning social isolation specifically affected the behavioral response to playback of pro-social 50-kHz but not alarm 22-kHz USV. While group-housed rats showed the expected preference, i.e., approach, toward 50-kHz USV, the response was even stronger in short-term isolated rats (i.e., 1 day), possibly due to a higher level of social motivation. In contrast, no approach was observed in long-term isolated rats (i.e., 4 weeks). Importantly, deficits in approach were reversed by peer-mediated re-socialization and could not be observed after post-adolescent social isolation, indicating a critical period for social development during adolescence. Together, these results highlight the importance of social experience for affiliative behavior, suggesting a critical involvement of play behavior on socio-affective information processing in rats. PMID:25983681

  15. Pure uterine lipoma.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Gulnur; Celik, Onder; Karakas, Hakki Muammer; Alkan, Alpay; Hascalik, Seyma

    2007-10-01

    Lipomatous tumors of the uterus are unusual, benign neoplasms seen in postmenopausal women. Although many of the mixed-type cases such as lipoleiomyoma and fibrolipoma have been reported, pure uterine lipomas are extremely rare. In the literature, a few cases with pure uterine lipoma have been reported. We first present the advanced magnetic resonance findings of pure uterine lipoma, followed by those of ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT). We markedly detected lipid peaks on the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and the apparent diffusion coefficient value to be 0.00 due to chemical-shift effects with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Although pelvic lipomatous tumors can be diagnosed with US and CT, in some cases, further workup may be required to localize the lesion. MRI may yield more valuable data for differential diagnosis. MRS and DWI findings provide additional clues on the nature of the lesion. PMID:17905250

  16. Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic/sonic anchor (U/S anchor) is an anchoring device that drills a hole for itself in rock, concrete, or other similar material. The U/S anchor is a recent addition to a series of related devices, the first of which were reported in "Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors"

  17. Experiments in Pulsed Ultrasonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Forster, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    Describes and apparatus designed to generate and detect pulsed ultrasonics in solids and liquids over the frequency range 1-20 MHz. Experiments are suggested for velocity of sound, elastic constant and ultrasonic attenuation measurements on various materials over a wide temperature range. The equipment should be useful for demonstration purposes.…

  18. Ultrasonic measurement apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, J.; Mayes, J.C.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes borehole measurement apparatus. It comprises a tool adapted for connection in a drill string in the borehole through earth formations, first and second ultra-sonic transmitter means disposed diametrically opposed from each other in the cylindrical body, first and second ultra-sonic transducer means disposed in the cylindrical body, and logic means, processing means, and memory means.

  19. A novel ultrasonic micro-dissection technique for biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lining; Wang, Huixiang; Chen, Liguo; Liu, Yaxin

    2006-12-22

    Molecular techniques are transforming our understanding of cellular function and disease. However, accurate molecular analysis methods will be limited if the input DNA, RNA, or protein is not derived from pure population of cells or is contaminated by the wrong cells. A novel Ultrasonic Vibration Micro-dissection (UVM) method was proposed to procure pure population of targeted cells from tissue sections for subsequent analysis. The principle of the ultrasonic vibration cutting is analyzed, and a novel micro-tool is designed. A multilayer piezoelectric actuator is used to actuate a sharp needle vibrating with high frequency and low amplitude (approx. 16-50 kHz, and 0-3 microm) to cut the tissue. Contrast experiment was done to test the feasibility of UVM method. Experimental results show that the embedded tissue can be quickly and precisely cut with the ultrasonic vibration micro-dissection method. PMID:16844160

  20. Auto-positioning ultrasonic transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Randy K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer apparatus and process for determining the optimal transducer position for flow measurement along a conduit outer surface. The apparatus includes a transmitting transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal, said transducer affixed to a conduit outer surface; a guide rail attached to a receiving transducer for guiding movement of a receiving transducer along the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer receives an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer and sends a signal to a data acquisition system; and a motor for moving the receiving transducer along the guide rail, wherein the motor is controlled by a controller. The method includes affixing a transmitting transducer to an outer surface of a conduit; moving a receiving transducer on the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer is moved along a guide rail by a motor; transmitting an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer that is received by the receiving transducer; communicating the signal received by the receiving transducer to a data acquisition and control system; and repeating the moving, transmitting, and communicating along a length of the conduit.

  1. Production of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra pure elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.

  2. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  3. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

    1988-06-20

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

  4. Ultrasonic Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, Steven (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An imaging system is described which can be used to either passively search for sources of ultrasonics or as an active phase imaging system. which can image fires. gas leaks, or air temperature gradients. This system uses an array of ultrasonic receivers coupled to an ultrasound collector or lens to provide an electronic image of the ultrasound intensity in a selected angular region of space. A system is described which includes a video camera to provide a visual reference to a region being examined for ultrasonic signals.

  5. Ultrasonic determination of recrystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation was measured for cold worked Nickel 200 samples annealed at increasing temperatures. Localized dislocation density variations, crystalline order and colume percent of recrystallized phase were determined over the anneal temperature range using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and metallurgy. The exponent of the frequency dependence of the attenuation was found to be a key variable relating ultrasonic attenuation to the thermal kinetics of the recrystallization process. Identification of this key variable allows for the ultrasonic determination of onset, degree, and completion of recrystallization.

  6. Ultrasonic washing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhee; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigation of ultrasonic washing of textiles. The results demonstrate that cavitation bubbles oscillating in acoustic fields are capable of removing soils from textiles. Since the washing performance is mitigated in a large washing bath when using an ultrasonic transducer, we propose a novel washing scheme by combining the ultrasonic vibration with a conventional washing method utilizing kinetic energy of textiles. It is shown that the hybrid washing scheme achieves a markedly enhanced performance up to 15% in comparison with the conventional washing machine. This work can contribute to developing a novel laundry machine with reduced washing time and waste water. PMID:26215790

  7. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  8. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.; Lundin, Ralph L.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation.

  9. Pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanho, Xián O.; Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred

    2015-09-01

    We study pure Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single Nth order Lovelock term in the action in d=2N+1,2N+2 dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. Pure Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, d=2N+1, is kinematic, i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for d=2N+1, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five- and six dimensional pure Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We also comment on a closely related family of exponential solutions and on the possibility of solutions with complex Kasner exponents. We show that the latter imply the existence of closed timelike curves in the geometry.

  10. Ultrasonic material property determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabian, S.

    1986-01-01

    The use and potential offered by ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to determine and/or monitor material properties is explored. The basis for such unique measurements along with examples of materials from a variety of industries are presented.

  11. Ultrasonic bone densitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A device, for measuring the density of a bone structure so as to monitor the calcium content, is described. A pair of opposed spaced ultrasonic transducers are held within a clamping apparatus closely adjacent the bone being analyzed. These ultrasonic transducers incude piezoelectric crystals shaped to direct signals through the bone encompassed in the heel and finger of the subject being tested. A pulse generator is coupled to one of the transducers and generates an electric pulse for causing the transducers to generate an ultrasonic sound wave which is directed through the bone structure to the other transducer. An electric circuit, including an amplifier and a bandpass filter couples the signals from the receiver transducer back to the pulse generator for retriggering the pulse generator at a frequency proportional to the duration that the ultrasonic wave takes to travel through the bone structure being examined.

  12. Laser ultrasonics: Current research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.W. . Center for Nondestructive Evaluation)

    1990-09-26

    Laser-ultrasonics refers to a range of technologies involving the use of laser electrooptical systems both to generate and to detect ultrasonic signals in and on materials and structures. Such systems have been developed to permit classical ultrasonic measurements for materials characterization and defect identification and measurement. From the point of view of one concerned with practical applications of ultrasonic inspection and measurement methods, laser-ultrasonic systems offer the flexibility which, in principle, should permit remote ultrasonic measurements to be performed on objects at elevated temperatures or in hostile environments. Laser-ultrasonic systems can be designed and constructed with extremely wide and flat detection bandwidth so that ultrasonic vibrational displacements can be recorded with high fidelity. In addition, there is no mechanical loading of the surface to damp, absorb, or otherwise distort the propagating acoustic energy. This feature has been used to great advantage in performing ultrasonic measurements in thin plates and films. In spite of the great advantages offered by laser-ultrasonics, there are severe limitations which restrict its application. In fact, based upon the performance of current state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic systems, it is almost always more advantageous to use conventional ultrasonic transduction methods, if possible for a given application, than it is to apply laser-ultrasonics. In short, the main reason leading to this conclusion is the poor system detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems compared with piezoelectric transducer systems. The ramifications of this limited sensitivity are many.

  13. Generation of extreme ultrasonics in rainforest katydids.

    PubMed

    Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Morris, Glenn K; Mason, Andrew C

    2006-12-01

    The calling song of an undescribed Meconematinae katydid (Tettigoniidae) from South America consists of trains of short, separated pure-tone sound pulses at 129 kHz (the highest calling note produced by an Arthropod). Paradoxically, these extremely high-frequency sound waves are produced by a low-velocity movement of the stridulatory forewings. Sound production during a wing stroke is pulsed, but the wings do not pause in their closing, requiring that the scraper, in its travel along the file, must do so to create the pulses. We hypothesize that during scraper pauses, the cuticle behind the scraper is bent by the ongoing relative displacement of the wings, storing deformation energy. When the scraper slips free it unbends while being carried along the file and its deformation energy contributes to a more powerful, higher-rate, one-tooth one-wave sound pulse, lasting no more than a few waves at 129 000 Hz. Some other katydid species make pure-tone ultrasonic pulses. Wing velocities and carriers among these pure-tone species fall into two groups: (1) species with ultrasonic carriers below 40 kHz that have higher calling frequencies correlated with higher wing-closing velocities and higher tooth densities: for these katydids the relationship between average tooth strike rate and song frequency approaches 1:1, as in cricket escapement mechanisms; (2) a group of species with ultrasonic carriers above 40 kHz (that includes the Meconematinae): for these katydids closing wing velocities are dramatically lower and they make short trains of pulses, with intervening periods of silence greater than the duration of the pulses they separate. This signal form may be the signature of scraper-stored elastic energy. PMID:17142681

  14. Dispersion Method Using Focused Ultrasonic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyel; Chu, Minchul

    2010-07-01

    The dispersion of powders into liquids has become one of the most important techniques in high-tech industries and it is a common process in the formulation of various products, such as paint, ink, shampoo, beverages, and polishing media. In this study, an ultrasonic system with a cylindrical transducer is newly introduced for pure nanoparticle dispersion. The acoustics pressure field and the characteristics of the shock pulse caused by cavitation are investigated. The frequency spectrum of the pulse from the collapse of air bubbles in the cavitation is analyzed theoretically. It was confirmed that a TiO2 water suspension can be dispersed effectively using the suggested system.

  15. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  16. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  17. Design of a Slender Tuned Ultrasonic Needle for Bone Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Rebecca; Mathieson, Andrew; Wallace, Robert; Simpson, Hamish; Lucas, Margaret

    This paper reports on an ultrasonic bone biopsy needle, particularly focusing on design guidelines applicable for any slender tuned ultrasonic device component. Ultrasonic surgical devices are routinely used to cut a range of biological tissues, such as bone. However the realisation of an ultrasonic bone biopsy needle is particularly challenging. This is due to the requirement to generate sufficient vibrational amplitude capable of penetrating mineralised tissue, while avoiding flexural vibrational responses, which are known to reduce the performance and reliability of slender ultrasonic devices. This investigation uses finite element analysis (FEA) to predict the vibrational behaviour of a resonant needle which has dimensions that match closely to an 8Gx4inch bone marrow biopsy needle. Features of the needle, including changes in material and repeated changes in diameter, have been included and systematically altered to demonstrate that the location of and geometry of these features can significantly affect the resonant frequency of bending and torsional modes of vibration while having a limited effect on the frequency and shape of the tuned longitudinal mode. Experimental modal analysis was used to identify the modal parameters of the selected needle design, validating the FEA model predictions of the longitudinal mode and the close flexural modes. This verifies that modal coupling can be avoided by judicious small geometry modifications. Finally, the tuned needle assembly was driven under typical operational excitation conditions to demonstrate that an ultrasonic biopsy needle can be designed to operate in a purely longitudinal motion.

  18. Old World frog and bird vocalizations contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narins, Peter M.; Feng, Albert S.; Lin, Wenyu; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich; Denzinger, Annette; Suthers, Roderick A.; Xu, Chunhe

    2004-02-01

    Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication. In contrast, frogs and birds produce sounds during night- and day-time hours that are audible to humans; their sounds are so pervasive that together with those of insects, they are considered the primary sounds of nature. Here we show that an Old World frog (Amolops tormotus) and an oscine songbird (Abroscopus albogularis) living near noisy streams reliably produce acoustic signals that contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics. Our findings provide the first evidence that anurans and passerines are capable of generating tonal ultrasonic call components and should stimulate the quest for additional ultrasonic species.

  19. Porous silicon nanoparticles as sensitizers for ultrasonic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Sviridov, A. P. Andreev, V. G.; Ivanova, E. M.; Osminkina, L. A.; Tamarov, K. P.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2013-11-04

    Aqueous suspensions of porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs) with average size ∼100 nm and concentration ∼1 g/L undergo significant heating as compared with pure water under therapeutic ultrasonic (US) irradiation with frequencies of 1–2.5 MHz and intensities of 1–20 W/cm{sup 2}. This effect is explained by taking into account the efficient absorption of US energy by NPs. The observed US-induced heating of biodegradable NPs is promising for applications in ultrasonic hyperthermia of tumors.

  20. Fundamental Development of Ultrasonic Information Transmission System for Wearable Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shin-nosuke; Ishihara, Manabu; Kobayashi, Yukio; Katane, Tamotsu; Saito, Osami; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2009-07-01

    A wearable device is an electronic device miniaturized to a wearable size with computing and wireless communication functions. In this study, we have applied a communication system using ultrasonic waves to a wearable device. Ultrasonic waves are safe for the human body and do not cause the malfunction of electronic equipment. In addition, communication using ultrasonic waves is effective for preventing “skimming” because ultrasonic waves can transmit through the human body and have a large attenuation in air. Wearable devices can also be used in areas where electromagnetic waves are limited. We have developed an experimental prototype device. The prototype contains a one-chip microcomputer used to verify the size and battery consumption of the wearable device. As a result, the developed prototype realized bidirectional communication with a suitable device size and power consumption. The communication speed corresponds to 250 kbps. This value is equivalent to that of a conventional IC card system using electromagnetic waves. With this proposed system, we can achive various practical applications that can maintain absolute privacy while transmitting information through the human body.

  1. Trapping and micromanipulation using ultrasonic fields and dual ultrasonic/magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Harris, Nicholas R.; Boltryk, Rosemary J.; Stanley, Christopher; Bond, Damian

    2010-08-01

    Ultrasonic fields can be used to trap and manipulate micron-scale particles and second-phase fluids, utilising energy densities that do not impair cell viability. The technology can be seen as complementary to optical trapping as the size of the potential wells generated can be relatively large, making ultrasound suitable for the formation and manipulation of cell agglomerates, but less suitable for the manipulation of individual cells. This paper discusses physical phenomena associated with ultrasonic manipulation, including radiation forces, cavitation, and acoustic streaming. The technology is well suited to integration within "Lab on a Chip" devices and can involve excitation by plane, focussed, flexural, or surface acoustic waves. Example applications of resonators are discussed including particle filtration and concentration, cell washing, and biosensor enhancement. A recently developed device that uses both ultrasonic and magnetic forces to enhance the detection of tuberculosis bacteria using magnetic beads is discussed in detail. This approach uses ultrasonic levitation forces to overcome some of the issues associated with purely magnetic trapping. The technology has been implemented in a device in which the main fluidic components are disposable to allow for low production costs and improved control of biohazards.

  2. Ultrasonic Inspection Of Thick Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friant, C. L.; Djordjevic, B. B.; O'Keefe, C. V.; Ferrell, W.; Klutz, T.

    1993-01-01

    Ultrasonics used to inspect large, relatively thick vessels for hidden defects. Report based on experiments in through-the-thickness transmission of ultrasonic waves in both steel and filament-wound composite cases of solid-fuel rocket motors.

  3. Ultrasonic characterization of materials hardness

    PubMed

    Badidi Bouda A; Benchaala; Alem

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental technique has been developed to measure velocities and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through a steel with a variable hardness. A correlation between ultrasonic measurements and steel hardness was investigated. PMID:10829663

  4. Pure Autonomic Failure.

    PubMed

    Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat

    2016-08-01

    Pure autonomic failure (PAF) is a rare sporadic neurodegenerative autonomic disorder characterized by slowly progressive pan autonomic failure without other features of neurologic dysfunctions. The main clinical symptoms result from neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and urinary and gastrointestinal autonomic dysfunctions. Autonomic failure in PAF is caused by neuronal degeneration of pre- and postganglionic sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons in the thoracic spinal cord and paravertebral autonomic ganglia. The presence of Lewy bodies and α-synuclein deposits in these neural structures suggests that PAF is one of Lewy body synucleinopathies, examples of which include multiple system atrophy, Parkinson disease, and Lewy body disease. There is currently no specific treatment to stop progression in PAF. Management of autonomic symptoms is the mainstay of treatment and includes management of orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. The prognosis for survival of PAF is better than for the other synucleinopathies. PMID:27338613

  5. Ultrasonics in Dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, A. D.

    Ultrasonic instruments have been used in dentistry since the 1950's. Initially they were used to cut teeth but very quickly they became established as an ultrasonic scaler which was used to remove deposits from the hard tissues of the tooth. This enabled the soft tissues around the tooth to return to health. The ultrasonic vibrations are generated in a thin metal probe and it is the working tip that is the active component of the instrument. Scanning laser vibrometry has shown that there is much variability in their movement which is related to the shape and cross sectional shape of the probe. The working instrument will also generate cavitation and microstreaming in the associated cooling water. This can be mapped out along the length of the instrument indicating which are the active areas. Ultrasonics has also found use for cleaning often inaccessible or different surfaces including root canal treatment and dental titanium implants. The use of ultrasonics to cut bone during different surgical techniques shows considerable promise. More research is indicated to determine how to maximize the efficiency of such instruments so that they are more clinically effective.

  6. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Poindexter, Allan M.; Ricks, Herbert E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and or wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities.

  7. Artificial Intelligence Assists Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.; Willenberg, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Subtle indications of flaws extracted from ultrasonic waveforms. Ultrasonic-inspection system uses artificial intelligence to help in identification of hidden flaws in electron-beam-welded castings. System involves application of flaw-classification logic to analysis of ultrasonic waveforms.

  8. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David E.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  9. Acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical development, methodology, and potential applications of acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive testing are set forth in an overview to assess the effectiveness of the technique. Stochastic wave propagation is utilized to isolate and describe defects in fiber-reinforced composites, particularly emphasizing the integrated effects of diffuse populations of subcritical flaws. The generation and nature of acousto-ultrasonic signals are described in detail, and stress-wave factor analysis of the signals is discussed. Applications of acousto-ultrasonics are listed including the prediction of failure sites, assessing fatique and impact damage, calculating ultimate tensile strength, and determining interlaminar bond strength. The method can identify subtle but important variations in fiber-reinforced composites, and development of the related instrumentation technology is emphasized.

  10. Ultrasonic/Sonic Jackhammer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Herz, Jack L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides a novel jackhammer that utilizes ultrasonic and/or sonic vibrations as source of power. It is easy to operate and does not require extensive training, requiring substantially less physical capabilities from the user and thereby increasing the pool of potential operators. An important safety benefit is that it does not fracture resilient or compliant materials such as cable channels and conduits, tubing, plumbing, cabling and other embedded fixtures that may be encountered along the impact path. While the ultrasonic/sonic jackhammer of the invention is able to cut concrete and asphalt, it generates little back-propagated shocks or vibrations onto the mounting fixture, and can be operated from an automatic platform or robotic system. PNEUMATICS; ULTRASONICS; IMPACTORS; DRILLING; HAMMERS BRITTLE MATERIALS; DRILL BITS; PROTOTYPES; VIBRATION

  11. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  12. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  13. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  14. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingyou

    2015-08-01

    Irradiation of high-energy ultrasonic vibration in metals and alloys generates oscillating strain and stress fields in solids, and introduces nonlinear effects such as cavitation, acoustic streaming, and radiation pressure in molten materials. These nonlinear effects can be utilized to assist conventional material processing processes. This article describes recent research at Oak Ridge National Labs and Purdue University on using high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations for degassing molten aluminum, processing particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites, refining metals and alloys during solidification process and welding, and producing bulk nanostructures in solid metals and alloys. Research results suggest that high-intensity ultrasonic vibration is capable of degassing and dispersing small particles in molten alloys, reducing grain size during alloy solidification, and inducing nanostructures in solid metals.

  15. Laser Communication--An Ideal Student Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, W. P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a project on the application of the laser which aims to stimulate the interest of undergraduate students in applied physics and to demonstrate the interaction between light and ultrasonic waves by building a simple laser communication system. (SK)

  16. Ultrasonic/Sonic Jackhammer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Herz, Jack

    2005-01-01

    An ultrasonic/sonic jackhammer (USJ) is the latest in a series of related devices. Each of these devices cuts into a brittle material by means of hammering and chiseling actions of a tool bit excited with a combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibrations. A small-scale prototype of the USJ has been demonstrated. A fully developed, full-scale version of the USJ would be used for cutting through concrete, rocks, hard asphalt, and other materials to which conventional pneumatic jackhammers are applied, but the USJ would offer several advantages over conventional pneumatic jackhammers.

  17. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  18. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  19. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  20. Pure autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Garland, Emily M; Hooper, William B; Robertson, David

    2013-01-01

    A 1925 report by Bradbury and Eggleston first described patients with extreme orthostatic hypotension and a low, steady heart rate. Evidence accumulated over the next two decades that patients with orthostatic hypotension include those with pure autonomic failure (PAF), characterized by isolated peripheral autonomic dysfunction and decreased norepinephrine synthesis; multiple system atrophy (MSA) with symptoms of a central Parkinson-like syndrome and normal resting plasma norepinephrine; and Parkinson's disease (PD), with lesions in postganglionic noradrenergic neurons and signs of autonomic dysfunction. All three disorders are classified as α-synucleinopathies. Insoluble deposits of α-synuclein are found in glia in MSA, whereas they take the form of neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions called Lewy bodies in PAF and PD. The exact relationship between α-synuclein deposits and the pathology remains undetermined. PAF occurs sporadically, and progresses slowly with a relatively good prognosis. However, it has been proposed that some cases of PAF may develop a central neurodegenerative disorder. Differentiation between PAF, MSA, and PD with autonomic failure can be facilitated by a number of biochemical and functional tests and by imaging studies. Cardiac sympathetic innervation is generally intact in MSA but decreased or absent in Parkinson's disease with autonomic failure and PAF. Treatment of PAF is directed at relieving symptoms with nonpharmacological interventions and with medications producing volume expansion and vasoconstriction. Future studies should focus on determining the factors that lead to central rather than solely peripheral neurodegeneration. PMID:24095130

  1. Pure optical photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2011-01-01

    The concept of pure optical photoacoustic microscopy(POPAM) was proposed based on optical rastering of a focused excitation beam and optically sensing the photoacoustic signal using a microring resonator fabricated by a nanoimprinting technique. After the refinements of the microring’s working wavelength and in the resonator structure and mold fabrication, an ultrahigh Q factor of 3.0×105 was achieved which provided high sensitivity with a noise equivalent detectable pressure(NEDP) value of 29Pa. This NEDP is much lower than the hundreds of Pascals achieved with existing optical resonant structures such as etalons, fiber gratings and dielectric multilayer interference filters available for acoustic measurement. The featured high sensitivity allowed the microring resonator to detect the weak photoacoustic signals from micro- or submicroscale objects. The inherent superbroad bandwidth of the optical microring resonator combined with an optically focused scanning beam provided POPAM with high resolution in the axial as well as both lateral directions while the axial resolution of conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) suffers from the limited bandwidth of PZT detectors. Furthermore, the broadband microring resonator showed similar sensitivity to that of our most sensitive PZT detector. The current POPAM system provides a lateral resolution of 5 μm and an axial resolution of 8 μm, comparable to that achieved by optical microscopy while presenting the unique contrast of optical absorption and functional information complementing other optical modalities. The 3D structure of microvasculature, including capillary networks, and even individual red blood cells have been discerned successfully in the proof-of-concept experiments on mouse bladders ex vivo and mouse ears in vivo. The potential of approximately GHz bandwidth of the microring resonator also might allow much higher resolution than shown here in microscopy of optical absorption and acoustic propagation

  2. Scanning ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Reimann, Karl J.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic testing device for rapid and complete examination of the test specimen, and is particularly well suited for evaluation of tubular test geometries. A variety of defect categories may be detected and analyzed at one time and their positions accurately located in a single pass down the test specimen.

  3. Experiments with Ultrasonic Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of 40 kHz ultrasonic transducers to study wave phenomena. Determines that the resulting wavelength of 9 mm allows acoustic experiments to be performed on a tabletop. Includes transducer characteristics and activities on speed of sound, reflection, double- and single-slit diffraction, standing waves, acoustical zone plate, and…

  4. Broadband Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    New geometry spreads out resonance region of piezoelectric crystal. In new transducer, crystal surfaces made nonparallel. One surface planar; other, concave. Geometry designed to produce nearly uniform response over a predetermined band of frequencies and to attenuate strongly frequencies outside band. Greater bandwidth improves accuracy of sonar and ultrasonic imaging equipment.

  5. Scanning ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Reimann, K.J.

    1980-12-09

    The invention is an ultrasonic testing device for rapid and complete examination of the test specimen, and is particularly well suited for evaluation of tubular test geometries. A variety of defect categories may be detected and anlayzed at one time and their positions accurately located in a single pass down the test specimen.

  6. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  7. Ultrasonic Transducer Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grounds, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducer-beam-intensity distributions are determined by analyzing echoes from a spherical ball. Computers control equipment and process data. Important beam characteristics, such as location of best beam focus and beam diameter at focus, can be determined quickly from extensive set of plots generated by apparatus.

  8. Ultrasonic cleaning: Fundamental theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, F. John

    1995-01-01

    This presentation describes: the theory of ultrasonics, cavitation and implosion; the importance and application of ultrasonics in precision cleaning; explanations of ultrasonic cleaning equipment options and their application; process parameters for ultrasonic cleaning; and proper operation of ultrasonic cleaning equipment to achieve maximum results.

  9. Femtosecond pulses propagation through pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveira, Lucas; Sokolov, Alexei; Byeon, Joong-Hyeok; Kattawar, George

    2007-10-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been dedicated to the field of optical precursors, which can possibly be applied to long-distance underwater communications. Input beam intensities have been carefully adjusted to keep experiments in the linear regime, and some experiments have shown violation of the Beer-Lambert law. We are presently carrying out experiments using femtosecond laser pulses propagating through pure water strictly in the linear regime to study this interesting and important behavior. We are also employing several new and innovative schemes to more clearly define the phenomena.

  10. Cheese maturity assessment using ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Benedito, J; Carcel, J; Clemente, G; Mulet, A

    2000-02-01

    The relationship between Mahon cheese maturity and ultrasonic velocity was examined. Moisture and textural properties were used as maturity indicators. The ultrasonic velocity of the cheese varied between 1630 and 1740 m/s, increasing with the curing time mainly because of loss of water, which also produced an increase of the textural properties. Because of the nature of low-intensity ultrasonics, velocity was better related to those textural parameters that involved small displacements. Ultrasonic velocity decreased with increasing temperature because of the negative temperature coefficient of the ultrasonic velocity of fat and the melting of fat. These results highlight the potential use of ultrasonic velocity measurements to rapidly and nondestructively assess cheese maturity. PMID:10714857

  11. Ultrasonic thermometer isolation standoffs

    DOEpatents

    Arave, Alvin E.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for minimizing sticking of the transmission line to the protective sheath and preventing noise echoes from interfering with signal echoes in an improved high temperature ultrasonic thermometer which includes an ultrasonic transmission line surrounded by a protective sheath. Small isolation standoffs are mounted on the transmission line to minimize points of contact between the transmission line and the protective sheath, the isolation standoffs serving as discontinuities mounted on the transmission line at locations where a signal echo is desired or where an echo can be tolerated. Consequently any noise echo generated by the sticking of the standoff to the protective sheath only adds to the amplitude of the echo generated at the standoff and does not interfere with the other signal echoes.

  12. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  13. [Ultrasonic diagnosis of chest injuries].

    PubMed

    Tsurupa, D I; Deriabin, A I

    1982-03-01

    Ultrasonic diagnostic examinations were used in 365 patients with closed injuries (150), wounds (181) and consequences of traumas (34). The ultrasonic method allows to rapidly and exactly determine the presence and limits of the exudate, blood, coagulated hemothorax, residual cavity, thickness of the parietal and visceral layers of the pleura, the state of the pulmonary tissue (inflammation, blood inhibition, atelectasis). The ultrasonic method is simple, harmless and applicable under conditions of any surgical hospital. PMID:7080405

  14. [Development of ultrasonic power meter].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongxin; Hu, Changming; Zheng, Yan; Xu, Honglei; Zhou, Wohua; Wu, Ziwen; Yu, Liudan; Hao, Jiandong; Luo, Yifan

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the design and development of an ultrasonic power meter which is consist of an electronic balance, a practice target, an acoustic enclosures and a blocking. The electronic balance mounted on the blocking is linked with the practice target by connecting rod. By adjusting the blocking makes the practice target suspended above ultrasound probe, and then the ultrasonic power can be measured. After initial tests, the ultrasonic power meter performanced with good stability and high precision. PMID:25330604

  15. Miniature implantable ultrasonic echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A miniature echosonometer adapted for implantation in the interior of an animal for imaging the internal structure of a organ, tissue or vessel is presented. The echosonometer includes a receiver/transmitter circuit which is coupled to an ultrasonic transducer. Power is coupled to the echosonometer by electromagnetic induction through the animal's skin. Imaging signals from the echosonometer are electromagnetically transmitted through the animal's skin to an external readout apparatus.

  16. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-05-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE?s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  17. Ultrasonic differential measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, George W.; Migliori, Albert

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for ultrasonic resonance testing of an object is shown and described. Acoustic vibrations are applied to an object at a plurality of frequencies. Measurements of the object's vibrational response are made simultaneously at different locations on said object. The input frequency is stepped by using small frequency changes over a predetermined range. There is a pause interval or ring delay which permits the object to reach a steady state resonance before a measurement is taken.

  18. Ultrasonic techniques for process monitoring and control.

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, H.-T.

    1999-03-24

    Ultrasonic techniques have been applied successfully to process monitoring and control for many industries, such as energy, medical, textile, oil, and material. It helps those industries in quality control, energy efficiency improving, waste reducing, and cost saving. This paper presents four ultrasonic systems, ultrasonic viscometer, on-loom, real-time ultrasonic imaging system, ultrasonic leak detection system, and ultrasonic solid concentration monitoring system, developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the past five years for various applications.

  19. Sharpening of ultrasonic scalers.

    PubMed

    Checchi, L; Pelliccioni, G A; D'Achille, C

    1991-08-01

    Instruments suitable for removing calculus, plaque and necrotic cementum, which hinder normal periodontal reattachment, are extremely important for successful therapy. The test was carried out in order to see if a standard scaler used for ultrasonic tartar removal maintains its physical features when sharpened. 6 scalers, compatible with piezo-electric generators, were tested and 2 diameters, A and B, weights and resonance frequencies were measured. Scalers no. 2, 3, 4, 5, were sharpened and was used as control. All measurements were taken again at the end of the test. Statistical analysis reveals significant variations, after sharpening, of A diameter (t = 4.14 greater than 3.55, p less than 0.01), B diameter (t = 5.34 greater than 3.355, p less than 0.01) and resonance frequency (t = 2.82 greater than 2.306, p less than 0.05); in contrast, there is no significant change of weights (t = 1.17 less than 2.306, p greater than 0.05). These results suggest that sharpening slightly modifies the physical features of ultrasonic tips, so that sharpening ultrasonic scalers, from a physical point of view, can be carried out, paying attention not to damage the water cooling system. PMID:1894743

  20. Ultrasonic Cutting of Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Yvonne; Zahn, Susann; Rohm, Harald

    In the field of food engineering, cutting is usually classified as a mechanical unit operation dealing with size reduction by applying external forces on a bulk product. Ultrasonic cutting is realized by superpositioning the macroscopic feed motion of the cutting device or of the product with a microscopic vibration of the cutting tool. The excited tool interacts with the product and generates a number of effects. Primary energy concentration in the separation zone and the modification of contact friction along the tool flanks arise from the cyclic loading and are responsible for benefits such as reduced cutting force, smooth cut surface, and reduced product deformation. Secondary effects such as absorption and cavitation originate from the propagation of the sound field in the product and are closely related to chemical and physical properties of the material to be cut. This chapter analyzes interactions between food products and ultrasonic cutting tools and relates these interactions with physical and chemical product properties as well as with processing parameters like cutting velocity, ultrasonic amplitude and frequency, and tool design.

  1. Ultrasonic Transducers for Fourier Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the ultrasonic transducer for demonstrating the Fourier components of waveshapes such as the square and triangular waves produced by laboratory function generators. (JRH)

  2. Development of an Ultrasonic Brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Tatsuya; Takemura, Kenjiro; Maeno, Takashi

    In the present paper, a newly developed ultrasonic brake is proposed. The ultrasonic brake can solve problems of conventional passive elements, such as time delay, instability, and large size, by using unique characteristics of ultrasonic motor, as fast response, silent motion, and non-magnetic feature. It can also be designed to be smaller than conventional elements due to its simple structure. The brake locks or releases the rotor by use of ultrasonic levitation phenomenon. First, we have designed the structure of the ultrasonic brake using an equation of ultrasonic levitation phenomenon, results from structural analysis and finite element (FE) analysis of piezoelectric material of the vibrator. Then we have manufactured the ultrasonic brake and have conducted a driving experiment. Finally, we have demonstrated that the maximum levitation force is around 40 N and the friction torque of the ultrasonic brake is up to 0.38 Nm. Moreover, we have confirmed that both response time and torque/inertia ratio of the ultrasonic brake are much more superior to the conventional ones.

  3. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Kenneth V.; Cunningham, Jr., Robert A.; Murrin, Horace T.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  4. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Murrin, H.T.

    1981-05-29

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  5. Vocal coselection in rat pup ultrasonic vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Spence, Heather R; Aslam, Ali M; Hofer, Myron A; Brunelli, Susan A; Shair, Harry N

    2016-04-01

    Selective breeding and natural selection that select for one trait often bring along other correlated traits via coselection. Selective breeding for an infantile trait, high or low call rates of isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalization of rat pups, also alters functions of some brain systems and emotional behaviors throughout life. We examined the effect of breeding for call rate on acoustic parameters that are of communicative significance. Selecting for higher call rate produced calls of significantly increased amplitude and bandwidth relative to a randomly bred line. Selecting for lower rate produced calls of decreased duration. These nonmorphological, functional trait changes demonstrate enhanced communicatory potential and energy expenditure for the High line and the opposite for the Low line. This demonstration of coselection in a communicatory system suggests an underlying heritable suite of linked acoustic vocalization characteristics that in noisy environments could enhance dam-pup communication and lead to selection of emotionality traits with beneficial responses to stress. PMID:27066218

  6. Faithful Transfer Arbitrary Pure States with Mixed Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Lin; Ma, Song-Ya; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we show that some special mixed quantum resource experience the same property of pure entanglement such as Bell state for quantum teleportation. It is shown that one mixed state and three bits of classical communication cost can be used to teleport one unknown qubit compared with two bits via pure resources. The schemes are easily implement with model physical techniques. Moreover, these resources are also optimal and typical for faithfully remotely prepare an arbitrary qubit, two-qubit and three-qubit states with mixed quantum resources. Our schemes are completed as same as those with pure quantum entanglement resources except only 1 bit additional classical communication cost required. The success probability is independent of the form of the mixed resources.

  7. Ultrasonic Bonding to Metalized Plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.; Cruzan, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    New technique makes it possible to bond wires ultrasonically to conductor patterns on such soft substrates as plain or ceramic-filled polytetrafluoroethylene. With ultrasonic bonding, unpackaged chips attached to soft circuit boards. Preferred because chips require substrate area and better matched electrically to circuit board at high frequencies.

  8. Acousto-ultrasonics - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    The application possibilities and limitations of acoustoultrasonics are reviewed. One of the most useful aspects of acousto-ultrasonics is its ability to assess degradation and damage states in composites. The sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic approach for detecting and measuring subtle but significant material property variations in composites has been demonstrated.

  9. Physical mechanism of ultrasonic machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A.; Grechishnikov, V.; Kozochkin, M.; Pivkin, P.; Petuhov, Y.; Romanov, V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the main aspects of ultrasonic machining of constructional materials are considered. Influence of coolant on surface parameters is studied. Results of experiments on ultrasonic lathe cutting with application of tangential vibrations and with use of coolant are considered.

  10. Ultrasonic cleaning: An historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Mason, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    The development of ultrasonic cleaning dates from the middle of the 20th century and has become a method of choice for a range of surface cleaning operations. The reasons why this has happened and the methods of assessing the efficiency of ultrasonic cleaning baths are reviewed. PMID:26054698

  11. Ultrasonic absortion in fatigued materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, S.; Arnold, W.

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive detection of fatigue damage, allowing an estimate of the residual life-time of components, could contribute to a safe and reliable operation of components and installations. Ultrasonic absorption, i.e. the internal friction, of a material increases with increasing fatigue or creep damage and there are many theories trying to explain the physics behind this phenomenon. Measurement of ultrasonic absorption directly on components could provide information on the degree of damage. A laser ultrasonic method, using laser-generated pulses and optical detection, was applied to study ultrasonic absorption in fatigue specimens of different metals. A characteristic behavior of the ultrasonic absorption coefficient with increasing levels of fatigue damage was found for the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Another aim of this study was to relate the absorption mechanisms to the behavior of ultrasonic absorption observed in metals with complex microstructure. To achieve this, different ultrasonic absorption mechanisms were analyzed with respect to experimental data. A thermoelastic effect related to the size and elasticity of the microstructure is discussed as the origin of the increased ultrasonic absorption.

  12. Synthesis of MCM-22 zeolite by an ultrasonic-assisted aging procedure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoyu; Wu, Jianmei; Yuan, Zhong-Yong; Li, Niu; Xiang, Shouhe

    2008-04-01

    The synthesis of MCM-22 zeolite under hydrothermal crystallization conditions has been performed by an ultrasonic-assisted aging procedure. The ultrasonic-assisted aging of the initial aluminosilicate gel can shorten the crystallization time of MCM-22, decrease the amount of hexamethyleneimine (HMI) used, and broaden the range of SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratios. By using the ultrasonic aging, pure phase of high-silica MCM-22 products with SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3)>100 can be obtained. When SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ultrasonic is believed to be responsible for these positive results due to its cracking the crystal seeds and improving the solubility of silicate species. PMID:17845863

  13. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing. PMID:26964959

  14. Ultrasonic flow nozzle cleaning apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fridsma, D.E.; Silvestri, G.J. Jr.; Twerdochlib, M.

    1992-06-23

    This patent describes an ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for a venturi flow measuring nozzle mounted in a pipe of a steam power plant and having an inlet, venturi throat, and an outlet, the pipe and nozzle having fluid flowing therethrough, the cleaning occurring while the fluid is flowing. It comprises first ultrasonic transducer means mounted to connect to the inside of the pipe, disposed adjacent the inlet of the venturi flow nozzle and the means being in direct contact with the fluid flowing through the pipe for transmitting ultrasonic waves directly into and thereby exciting the fluid flowing through the venturi flow nozzle; and control means coupled to the first ultrasonic transducer means for activating the first ultrasonic transducer means.

  15. Ultrasonic colour flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Wells, P N

    1994-12-01

    Real-time ultrasonic colour flow imaging, which was first demonstrated to be feasible only about a decade ago, has come into widespread clinical use. Ultrasound is scattered by ensembles of red blood cells. The ultrasonic frequency that gives the best signal-to-noise ratio for backscattering from blood depends on the required penetration. The frequency of ultrasound backscattered from flowing blood is shifted by the Doppler effect. The direction of flow can be determined by phase quadrature detection, and range selectivity can be provided by pulse-echo time-delay measurements. The Doppler frequency spectrum can be determined by Fourier analysis. Early two- and three-dimensional flow-imaging systems used slow manual scanning; velocity colour coding was introduced. Real-time colour flow imaging first became feasible when autocorrelation detection was used to extract the Doppler signal. Time-domain processing, which is a broad-band technique, was also soon shown to be practicable, for analysing both radio-frequency pulse-echo wavetrains and two-dimensional image speckle. Frequency- and time-domain processing both require effective cancellation of stationary echoes. The time-domain approach seems to have advantages in relation to both aliasing and the effects of attenuation in overlying tissues. Colour-coding schemes that can be interpreted without the need to refer to keys have been adopted, for both velocity and flow disturbance. Colour coding according to signal power has also been reintroduced. Three-dimensional display has been demonstrated. In interpreting colour flow images, it is important to understand the functions of critical system controls and the origins of artifacts. Various strategies can be adopted to increase the image frame rate. The problems of performance measurement and safety need to be kept under review. There are numerous opportunities for further development of ultrasonic colour flow imaging, including improvements in system design, methods of

  16. Ultrasonic aesthetic cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Robiony, Massimo; Casadei, Matteo; Sbuelz, Massimo; Della Pietra, Lorenzo; Politi, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    The management of frontal bone injury is an important issue, and inappropriate management of such injuries may give rise to serious complications. Piezosurgery is a technique used to perform safe and effective osteotomies using piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrations. This instrument allows a safe method for osteotomy of the cranial vault in close proximity to extremely injury-sensitive tissue such as the brain. After a wide review of the literature, the authors present this technical report, introduce the use of piezosurgery to perform a safe "slim-osteotomies" for treatment of posttraumatic frontal bone deformities, and suggest the use of this instrument for aesthetic recontouring of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24914759

  17. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  18. Ultrasonic cleaner evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, T. J.

    1980-10-01

    A method to evaluate the capabilities of ultrasonic cleaners is described. This method utilizes a ceramic plate on which a metallized coating has been deposited. The plate is immersed in a beaker filled with DI water and a few drops of liquid detergent. The plate is then subjected to a two-minute cleaning cycle. Measurement of the amount of metallized coating that is removed is determined with an image enhancement system. Use of this test reveals several factors that influence cleaning capabilities. These include system frequency, use of a wetting agent in the bath, bath temperature, fixture materials and fixture mounting.

  19. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  20. Ultrasonic scanning of multilayer ceramic chip capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, F. N.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic scanning is compared to neutron radiography and scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM). Data show that SLAM and ultrasonic scanning evaluations are in good agreement. There is poor agreement between N-ray and both ultrasonic techniques because N-ray is insensitive to all but the grossest delaminations. Statistical analysis show a good correlation between ultrasonic scanning and destructive physical analysis.

  1. Ultrasonic Inspection Of Welds On Tube Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Arjun N.; Nummelin, John L.

    1996-01-01

    Scanning ultrasonic apparatus designed for use in nondestructive inspection of electron-beam welds between heat-exchanger tube and end fittings. Includes ultrasonic probe, scanning mechanism, ultrasonic-signal-generating and -processing circuits, and computers. Not necessary to immerse any part of apparatus or tube/fitting assembly in water during inspection. Output ultrasonic-test signals displayed on computer to reveal defects.

  2. Female mice ultrasonically interact with males during courtship displays.

    PubMed

    Neunuebel, Joshua P; Taylor, Adam L; Arthur, Ben J; Egnor, S E Roian

    2015-01-01

    During courtship males attract females with elaborate behaviors. In mice, these displays include ultrasonic vocalizations. Ultrasonic courtship vocalizations were previously attributed to the courting male, despite evidence that both sexes produce virtually indistinguishable vocalizations. Because of this similarity, and the difficulty of assigning vocalizations to individuals, the vocal contribution of each individual during courtship is unknown. To address this question, we developed a microphone array system to localize vocalizations from socially interacting, individual adult mice. With this system, we show that female mice vocally interact with males during courtship. Males and females jointly increased their vocalization rates during chases. Furthermore, a female's participation in these vocal interactions may function as a signal that indicates a state of increased receptivity. Our results reveal a novel form of vocal communication during mouse courtship, and lay the groundwork for a mechanistic dissection of communication during social behavior. PMID:26020291

  3. Female mice ultrasonically interact with males during courtship displays

    PubMed Central

    Neunuebel, Joshua P; Taylor, Adam L; Arthur, Ben J; Egnor, SE Roian

    2015-01-01

    During courtship males attract females with elaborate behaviors. In mice, these displays include ultrasonic vocalizations. Ultrasonic courtship vocalizations were previously attributed to the courting male, despite evidence that both sexes produce virtually indistinguishable vocalizations. Because of this similarity, and the difficulty of assigning vocalizations to individuals, the vocal contribution of each individual during courtship is unknown. To address this question, we developed a microphone array system to localize vocalizations from socially interacting, individual adult mice. With this system, we show that female mice vocally interact with males during courtship. Males and females jointly increased their vocalization rates during chases. Furthermore, a female's participation in these vocal interactions may function as a signal that indicates a state of increased receptivity. Our results reveal a novel form of vocal communication during mouse courtship, and lay the groundwork for a mechanistic dissection of communication during social behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06203.001 PMID:26020291

  4. Ultrasonic thermoacoustic cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young S.; El-Gendy, H.; Symko, O. G.

    2005-09-01

    The development of a thermoacoustic cooler in the ultrasonic range is presented. This cooler was designed to operate at a drive frequency of 24 kHz using air as the working fluid; the resonator is 7.1 mm long and it contains a cotton wool stack with copper heat exchangers at each end. Since the ultrasonic driver is a key element in this device, a major effort was made to optimize its performance and coupling to the resonator. It is a resonant piezoelectric monomorph loaded with a metallic cone for impedance matching to the resonator. By its design it is capable of intense sound levels, of order 140 dB and higher. The attained cooling power scales with the sound power levels and a COP larger than one is achieved. Studies of heat losses consist of PIV imaging of acoustic streaming (such as Eckart) in this device and back heat flow along the stack. The developed device shows much promise for rapid cooling of small samples. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  5. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  6. Ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2002-12-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace structures using traditional methods is a complex, time-consuming process critical to maintaining mission readiness and flight safety. Limited access to corrosion-prone structure and the restricted applicability of available NDE techniques for the detection of hidden corrosion or other damage often compound the challenge. In this paper we discuss our recent work using ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography to address this pressing NDE technology need. Lamb waves are ultrasonic guided waves, which allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected for structural flaws such as disbonds, corrosion and delaminations. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the travel times of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. Our work focuses on tomographic reconstruction to produce quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians or fed directly into structural integrity and lifetime prediction codes. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using a square perimeter array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography is appropriate for detecting flaws in aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this paper.

  7. Ultrasonic mitigation investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, B.P.; Shepard, C.L.

    1993-04-01

    The suggestion was made that the introduction of ultrasound into Tank 101-SY might serve to release the hydrogen bubbles trapped in the slurry. This would cause a continuous release of bubbles and thereby prevent the turnover phenomenon. Two major considerations were (1) the method for delivering the energy into the slurry and (2) the effective volume of action. In this study, we attached the former by designing and testing a liquid-filled waveguide and radiator, and the latter by making ultrasonic property measurements on synthetic waste. Our conclusion is that ultrasonic mitigation may not be feasible, primarily because of the very high attenuation (1000 to 50000 dB/m) factor to 10 to 30 kHz. Such a high attenuation would restrict the action volume to such a low value as to make the method impractical. Further investigations are recommended to identify the cause of this effect and determine if this same effect will be seen in real 101-SY waste.

  8. Ultrasonics and space instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design topic selected was an outgrowth of the experimental design work done in the Fluid Behavior in Space experiment, which relies on the measurement of minute changes of the pressure and temperature to obtain reasonably accurate volume determinations. An alternative method of volume determination is the use of ultrasonic imaging. An ultrasonic wave system is generated by wall mounted transducer arrays. The interior liquid configuration causes reflection and refraction of the pattern so that analysis of the received wave system provides a description of the configuration and hence volume. Both continuous and chirp probe beams were used in a laboratory experiment simulating a surface wetting propellant. The hardware included a simulated tank with gaseous voids, transmitting and receiving transducers, transmitters, receivers, computer interface, and computer. Analysis software was developed for image generation and interpretation of results. Space instrumentation was pursued in support of a number of experiments under development for GAS flights. The program included thirty undergraduate students pursuing major qualifying project work under the guidance of eight faculty supported by a teaching assistant. Both mechanical and electrical engineering students designed and built several microprocessor systems to measure parameters such as temperature, acceleration, pressure, velocity, and circulation in order to determine combustion products, vortex formation, gas entrainment, EMR emissions from thunderstorms, and milli-g-accelerations due to crew motions.

  9. Vibration in The Ultrasonic Machining System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Chen, Zhigang; Zhong, Xinrong

    The rotary ultrasonic machining system is the vibration system, using the characteristics of the ultrasonic resonance. Based on the ultrasonic vibration model, the dynamic characteristics of the ultrasonic machining system are analyzed, and using the wave equations, the dynamic characteristics of the horn with the exponential transition are analyzed. Based on FEM, the dynamic characteristics of the horn with the exponential transition in the rotary ultrasonic machining system are analyzed.

  10. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  11. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  12. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  13. Thin Wall Pipe Ultrasonic Inspection through Paint Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin; Petre, Cristian Cătălin

    Classical ultrasonic inspection of welds is currently done for plates thicker than 8 mm. The inspection of but welds in thin walled pipes has considerable implementation difficulties, due to guided waves dominating ultrasonic pulses propagation. Generation of purely symmetric modes, either torsional or longitudinal, requires a circumferential uniform distribution of transducers and dedicated inspection equipment, which are increasing the inspection costs. Moreover, if the surface is paint coated, the received signals are close to the detection level. The present work implies a single transducer, coupled to the painted surface. The proper choice of the guided mode and frequency range, allows the detection of a standard, small diameter through thickness hole. In this way, the inspection of pipe welds can use the same equipment as for thick materials, with only wedge adaptation.

  14. Effect of tool geometry on ultrasonic welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Tomohiro; Sakata, Yutaro; Watanabe, Takehiko

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasonic welding of pure aluminum sheets is performed using two weld tools, one with a knurled surface and one with a cylindrical surface. Relative motion behaviors of each weld tool, with respect to the working materials, during ultrasonic welding tests are analyzed using the digital correlation method. Weld microstructure development is investigated on the basis of transitional weld stages in the context of relative motion behaviors. The dominant relative motion is between the two work materials at the beginning of the weld but changes to be the motion between the weld tool and the work material it is in contact with as weld time increases. Thermo-mechanical effects of the relative motion of the weld tool and the work materials, on the development of weld microstructure, are discussed.

  15. Ultrasonic decontamination in perfluorinated liquids of radioactive circuit boards

    SciTech Connect

    Yam, C.S.; Harling, O.K.; Kaiser, R.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory-scale ultrasonic decontamination system has been developed to demonstrate the application of Entropic System`s enhanced particle removal process to the radioactive decontamination of electronic circuit boards. The process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as the working media; the liquids have zero ozone depletion potential, are nontoxic, non-flammable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. The parts to be cleaned are first sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid. The combination of ultrasonic agitation and liquid flow promotes the detachment of the particles from the surface of the part being cleaned, their transfer from the boundary layer into the bulk liquid, and their removal from the cleaning environment, thereby reducing the probability of particle redeposition. After the cleaning process, the parts are rinsed with the pure perfluorinated liquid to remove residual surfactant. The parts are recovered after the perfluorinated liquid is evaporated into air.

  16. Ultrasonic characterization of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements were used to characterize density and microstructure in monolithic silicon nitride and silicon carbide. Research samples of these structural ceramics exhibited a wide range of density and microstructural variations. It was shown that bulk density variations correlate with and can be estimated by velocity measurements. Variations in microstructural features such as grain size or shape and pore morphology had a minor effect on velocity. However, these features had a pronounced effect on ultrasonic attenuation. The ultrasonic results are supplemented by low-energy radiography and scanning laser acoustic microscopy.

  17. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  18. Analytical ultrasonics for structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupperman, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to characterize the microstructure of structural materials is discussed. Velocity measurements in cast stainless steel are correlated with microstructural variations ranging from equiaxed (elastically isotropic) to columnar (elastically anisotropic) grain structure. The effect of the anisotropic grain structure on the deviation of ultrasonic waves in cast stainless steel is also reported. Field-implementable techniques for distinguishing equiaxed from columnar grain structures in cast strainless steel structural members are presented. The application of ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize structural ceramics in the green state is also discussed.

  19. Computer automation of ultrasonic testing. [inspection of ultrasonic welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, B. G. W.; Kerlin, E. E.; Gardner, A. H.; Dunmyer, D.; Wells, T. G.; Robinson, A. R.; Kunselman, J. S.; Walker, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    Report describes a prototype computer-automated ultrasonic system developed for the inspection of weldments. This system can be operated in three modes: manual, automatic, and computer-controlled. In the computer-controlled mode, the system will automatically acquire, process, analyze, store, and display ultrasonic inspection data in real-time. Flaw size (in cross-section), location (depth), and type (porosity-like or crack-like) can be automatically discerned and displayed. The results and pertinent parameters are recorded.

  20. Turbulence in pure superfluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, R.A.; Opatowsky, L.B.; Tough, J.T.

    1981-03-09

    A series of experiments is described which provide an unambiguous description of the steady-state properties of turbulence in pure superfluid flow. The turbulence is qualitatively different from that observed in counterflow but comparable to the homogeneous turbulence described by theory.

  1. Production of substantially pure fructose

    DOEpatents

    Hatcher, Herbert J.; Gallian, John J.; Leeper, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of substantially pure fructose from sucrose-containing substrates. The process comprises converting the sucrose to levan and glucose, purifying the levan by membrane technology, hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose monomers, and recovering the fructose.

  2. Entanglement convertibility for infinite-dimensional pure bipartite states

    SciTech Connect

    Owari, Masaki; Matsumoto, Keiji; Murao, Mio

    2004-11-01

    It is shown that the order property of pure bipartite states under stochastic local operations and classical communications (SLOCC) changes radically when dimensionality shifts from finite to infinite. In contrast to finite-dimensional systems where there is no pure incomparable state, the existence of infinitely many mutually SLOCC incomparable states is shown for infinite-dimensional systems even under the bounded energy and finite information exchange condition. These results show that the effect of the infinite dimensionality of Hilbert space, the 'infinite workspace' property, remains even in physically relevant infinite-dimensional systems.

  3. Ultrasonic Membrane Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    A membrane is a sermipermeable material that permits the passage of some molecules while retaining others. Ultrasound can enhance membrane operation through the asymmetric collapse of cavitating bubbles and through the turbulence associated with acoustic streaming. The added turbulence can lead to a looser, more porous fouling cake layer and may agglomerate fine particles, reducing pore blockage and cake compaction.These effects are dependent upon the ultrasonic intensity, the operating pressure, crossflow velocity and solids concentration.Membrane cleaning can also be enhanced by the use of ultrasound, but this application may not be economic when used in isolation. One of the greatest challenges facing the technology is the generation of a uniform acoustic field across the entire membrane surface in a full-scale module.

  4. Apparatus for ultrasonic nebulization

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Kenneth W.; Haas, Jr., William J.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1978-08-29

    An improved apparatus for ultrasonic nebulization of liquid samples or suspensions in which the piezoelectric transducer is protected from chemical attack and erosion. The transducer is protected by being bonded to the inner surface of a glass plate which forms one end wall of a first hollow body provided with apparatus for circulating a fluid for cooling and stabilizing the transducer. The glass plate, which is one-half wavelength in thickness to provide an acoustically coupled outer nebulizing surface, seals an opening in a second hollow body which encloses an aerosol mixing chamber. The second body includes apparatus for delivering the sample solution to the nebulizing surface, a gas inlet for providing a flow of carrier gas for transporting the aerosol of the nebulized sample and an aerosol outlet.

  5. Metrology for ultrasonic applications.

    PubMed

    Zeqiri, Bajram

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a review of current metrological capability applied to the characterisation of the acoustic output of equipment used within medical ultrasonic applications. Key measurement devices, developed to underpin metrology in this area, are the radiation force balance, used to determine total output power, and the piezo-electric hydrophone, used to resolve the spatial and temporal distribution of acoustic pressure. The measurement infrastructure in place within the United Kingdom ensuring users are able to carry out traceable measurements of these quantities in a meaningful way, is described. This includes the relevant primary standards, the way international equivalence of national standards is demonstrated and the routes by which the standards are disseminated to the user community. Emerging measurement techniques that may in future lead to improved measurement capability, are also briefly discussed. PMID:17081597

  6. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  7. Repeat scanning technology for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yenn Chong, See; Sunuwar, Nitam; Park, Chan Yik

    2013-08-01

    Laser ultrasonic scanning in combination with contact or non-contact sensors provides new paradigms in structural health management (SHM) and non-destructive in-process quality control (IPQC) for large composite structures. Wave propagation imaging technology based on laser ultrasonic scanning and fixed-point sensing shows remarkable advantages, such as minimal need for embedded sensors in SHM, minimum invasive defect visualization in IPQC and general capabilities of curved and complex target inspection, and temporal reference-free inspection. However, as with other SHM methods and non-destructive evaluation based on ultrasound, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prevalent issue in real structural applications, especially with non-contact thin-composite sensing or with thick and heterogeneous composites. This study proposes a high-speed repeat scanning technique for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) technology, which is realized with the scanning speed of 1 kHz of a Q-switched continuous wave laser, and precise control of the laser beam pulses for identical point scanning. As a result, the technique enables the achievement of significant improvement in the SNR to inspect real-world composite structures. The proposed technique provides enhanced results for impact damage detection in a 2 mm thick wing box made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the low sensitivity of non-contact laser ultrasonic sensing. A field-applicable pure laser UPI system has been developed using a laser Doppler vibrometer as the non-contact ultrasonic sensor. The proposed technique enables the visualization of the disbond defect in a 15 mm thick wind blade specimen made of glass-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the high dissipation of ultrasound in the thick composite.

  8. Ultrasonic extensometer measures bolt preload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Extensometer using ultrasonic pulse reflections to measure elongations in tightened belts and studs is much more accurate than conventional torque wrenches in application of specified preload to bolts and other threaded fasteners.

  9. Ultrasonic Technology in Duress Alarms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Martha A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides the pros and cons of the most commonly used technologies in personal duress alarm systems in the school environment. Discussed are radio frequency devices, infrared systems, and ultrasonic technology. (GR)

  10. Experimental determination of the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate by ultrasonic velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürbüz, H.; Özdemir, B.

    2003-05-01

    The metastable zone width of borax decahydrate (disodium tetraborate decahydrate), represented by the maximum undercooling Δ Tmax, both in pure and impure aqueous solutions were determined according to polythermal method by using the ultrasonic technique. It is found that the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate in pure solutions determined by ultrasonic method fulfills well the linear relation between logΔ Tmax and log(-d T/d t). However, the sensitivity of the method using the ultrasonic technique increases with increasing saturation temperature, probably due to the increase of temperature dependence of solubility with increasing saturation temperature. A comparison of the nucleation temperatures from ultrasonic measurements and from visual determination shows that both detection techniques give almost the same results for borax decahydrate. The results obtained from ultrasonic measurements show, that the presence of Ca 2+ as impurity has only a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate as long as the impurity concentrations is in the range of 25-200 ppm. Similar to the effect of Ca 2+, Mg 2+ also has a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax up to the impurity concentration of 100 ppm. However, the presence of 200 ppm Mg 2+ results in a reasonable increase of the metastable zone width.

  11. Ultrasonic Imaging Of Deep Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.; Heyser, Richard C.; Lecroissette, Dennis H.

    1990-01-01

    Swept-frequency sound replaces pulsed sound. Ultrasonic medical instrument produces images of peripheral and coronary arteries with resolutions higher and at depths greater than attainable by previous ultrasonic systems. Time-delay-spectrometry imager includes scanning, image-processing, and displaying equipment. It sweeps in frequency from 0 to 10 MHz in 20 ms, pauses for 5 ms, and repeats sweep. Intended for use in noninvasive detection and measurement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  12. Shifting from preconceptions to pure wonderment.

    PubMed

    Porr, Caroline

    2005-07-01

    The author reflects upon her role as a public health nurse striving to attain practice authenticity. Client assessment and nursing interventions were seemingly sufficient until she became curious about 'Who is this person sitting across from me?' and 'What are her experiences in the world as a lone parent living in poverty at the margins of society?' The author begins to think that she could shift from mere client investigation to pure wonderment about the Other by imagining herself as a researcher, an explorer of another's life world. Ultimately this process enables her to enhance the 'caring' in her practice with the knowledge gained of the perceptions and meanings impoverished clients assigned to their everyday lives. Jurgen Habermas' theory of communicative competence serves as the reference map guiding exploration. The author uses Habermas' theoretical principles of intersubjective mutuality--the validity claims of comprehensibility, truth, sincerity, and legitimacy. Comprehensibility embodies understanding, an attitude of unconditional acceptance, and care respect of another's individual person and self-defined reality. Intersubjective mutuality also requires that one dwell in the moment with the Other, satisfied that communication is founded on truth. Sincerity implies fostering the Other's expression of authentic self apart from oppressive distracters. Lastly, legitimacy reconciles the author's altruistic pursuit to know the Other's ontological truth with the reality of the present world. PMID:15935084

  13. The acousto-ultrasonic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1987-01-01

    The nature and underlying rationale of the acousto-ultrasonic approach is reviewed, needed advanced signal analysis and evaluation methods suggested, and application potentials discussed. Acousto-ultrasonics is an NDE technique combining aspects of acoustic emission methodology with ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. This approach uses analysis of simulated stress waves for detecting and mapping variations of mechanical properties. Unlike most NDE, acousto-ultrasonics is less concerned with flaw detection than with the assessment of the collective effects of various flaws and material anomalies. Acousto-ultrasonics has been applied chiefly to laminated and filament-wound fiber reinforced composites. It has been used to assess the significant strength and toughness reducing effects that can be wrought by combinations of essentially minor flaws and diffuse flaw populations. Acousto-ultrasonics assesses integrated defect states and the resultant variations in properties such as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and fracture resistance. Matrix cure state, porosity, fiber orientation, fiber volume fraction, fiber-matrix bonding, and interlaminar bond quality are underlying factors.

  14. Rodent ultrasonic vocalizations are bound to active sniffing behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sirotin, Yevgeniy B.; Costa, Martín Elias; Laplagne, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    During rodent active behavior, multiple orofacial sensorimotor behaviors, including sniffing and whisking, display rhythmicity in the theta range (~5–10 Hz). During specific behaviors, these rhythmic patterns interlock, such that execution of individual motor programs becomes dependent on the state of the others. Here we performed simultaneous recordings of the respiratory cycle and ultrasonic vocalization emission by adult rats and mice in social settings. We used automated analysis to examine the relationship between breathing patterns and vocalization over long time periods. Rat ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs, “50 kHz”) were emitted within stretches of active sniffing (5–10 Hz) and were largely absent during periods of passive breathing (1–4 Hz). Because ultrasound was tightly linked to the exhalation phase, the sniffing cycle segmented vocal production into discrete calls and imposed its theta rhythmicity on their timing. In turn, calls briefly prolonged exhalations, causing an immediate drop in sniffing rate. Similar results were obtained in mice. Our results show that ultrasonic vocalizations are an integral part of the rhythmic orofacial behavioral ensemble. This complex behavioral program is thus involved not only in active sensing but also in the temporal structuring of social communication signals. Many other social signals of mammals, including monkey calls and human speech, show structure in the theta range. Our work points to a mechanism for such structuring in rodent ultrasonic vocalizations. PMID:25477796

  15. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  16. Canonical Thermal Pure Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Sho; Shimizu, Akira

    2013-07-01

    A thermal equilibrium state of a quantum many-body system can be represented by a typical pure state, which we call a thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state. We construct the canonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the canonical ensemble of the conventional statistical mechanics. It is related to the microcanonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the microcanonical ensemble, by simple analytic transformations. Both TPQ states give identical thermodynamic results, if both ensembles do, in the thermodynamic limit. The TPQ states corresponding to other ensembles can also be constructed. We have thus established the TPQ formulation of statistical mechanics, according to which all quantities of statistical-mechanical interest are obtained from a single realization of any TPQ state. We also show that it has great advantages in practical applications. As an illustration, we study the spin-1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

  17. Ultrasensitive ultrasonic transducer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.; Darling, T.; Migliori, A.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to continue development of the ultrasensitive ultrasonic transducers that won a 1994 R&D 100 Award. These transducers have a very smooth response across a broad frequency range and thus are extremely well- suited for resonant ultrasound spectroscopy as well as pulsed-echo and acoustic-emission applications. Current work on these transducers has indicated that bonding the piezoelectric and wear surface to a metal foil and attaching the foil to a body is less expensive and produces a transducer that is as good or better than commercially produced transducers. We have diffusion- bonded piezoelectric crystals and backings to stainless-steel-foil and wear surfaces. These are then attached onto stainless-steel tubes with electrical connectors to form the transducers. The transducers have been characterized using a reciprocity technique, electrical response, and optical interferometry. After characterization, the transducers have been compared to existing transducers by measuring and testing identical properties.

  18. Inexpensive Ultrasonic Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, John; Svitelskiy, Oleksiy; Suslov, Alexey

    2013-03-01

    Growing interest of small universities and colleges in research determines an increasing need in affordable laboratory equipment that would be capable of producing scientifically valuable experimental results. In this report we present the current status of our efforts to develop a simple and low-cost version of a classical experimental setup for ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements that would be easily reproducible in the electronics shop of any small educational institution. In particular, usage of a dual timer microchip LM556 allowed us to simplify the design of a probing pulse generator. Also, we propose that using modern broadband RF components in phase detection circuits will allow us to substitute the complicated and expensive superheterodyne design of receiver with the technique of direct transformation and analysis of the echo signal right at the probe frequency. Our analysis shows that these simplifications can be achieved without compromising for sensitivity of the experiment or precision of measurements. This work is supported by Research Council of Colgate University

  19. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  20. Ultrasonic metal etching for metallographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrasonic etching delineates microstructural features not discernible in specimens prepared for metallographic analysis by standard chemical etching procedures. Cavitation bubbles in ultrasonically excited water produce preferential damage /etching/ of metallurgical phases or grain boundaries, depending on hardness of metal specimens.

  1. [Ultrasonics in endodontics: mechanism of action].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Plaza, M C; Kessler Nieto, F; Orts Rodríguez, M T; Ruiz de Temiño Malo, P

    1989-01-01

    The present study, first of three dwelling with ultrasonics in endodontic therapy, is a review of the literature about mechanisms involved and appliance of some of the sonic and ultrasonic system. PMID:2700391

  2. Study of ultrasonic thermometry based on ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ruixi; Xiong, Qingyu; Wang, Lijie; Wang, Kai; Shen, Xuehua; Liang, Shan; Shi, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry is a kind of acoustic pyrometry and it has been evolving as a new temperature measurement technology for various environment. However, the accurate measurement of the ultrasonic time-of-flight is the key for ultrasonic thermometry. In this paper, we study the ultrasonic thermometry technique based on ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement with a pair of ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving signal. The ultrasonic transducers are installed in a single path which ultrasonic travels. In order to validate the performance of ultrasonic thermometry, we make a contrast about the absolute error between the measured temperature value and the practical one. With and without heater source, the experimental results indicate ultrasonic thermometry has high precision of temperature measurement.

  3. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ultrasonic propulsion is a novel technique that uses short bursts of focused ultrasonic pulses to reposition stones transcutaneously within the renal collecting system and ureter. The purpose of this review is to discuss the initial testing of effectiveness and safety, directions for refinement of technique and technology, and opinions on clinical application. Recent findings Preclinical studies with a range of probes, interfaces, and outputs have demonstrated feasibility and consistent safety of ultrasonic propulsion with room for increased outputs and refinement toward specific applications. Ultrasonic propulsion was used painlessly and without adverse events to reposition stones in 14 of 15 human study participants without restrictions on patient size, stone size, or stone location. The initial feasibility study showed applicability in a range of clinically relevant situations, including facilitating passage of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, moving a large stone at the UPJ with relief of pain, and differentiating large stones from a collection of small fragments. Summary Ultrasonic propulsion shows promise as an office-based system for transcutaneously repositioning kidney stones. Potential applications include facilitating expulsion of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, repositioning stones prior to treatment, and repositioning obstructing UPJ stones into the kidney to alleviate acute renal colic. PMID:26845428

  4. How pure are your vesicles?

    PubMed

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  5. Production of substantially pure fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, H.J.; Gallian, J.J.; Leeper, S.A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production of a substantially pure product containing greater than 60% fructose. It comprises: combining a sucrose-containing substrate with effective amounts of a levansucrase enzyme preparation to form levan and glucose; purifying the levan by at least one of the following purification methods: ultrafiltration, diafiltration, hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, liquid--liquid partition, solvent extraction, chromatography, and precipitation; hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose substantially free of glucose and sucrose; and recovering the fructose by at least one of the following recovery methods: hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, evaporation, drying, crystallization, and chromatography.

  6. Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Anthracyclinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmatowicz, Osman; Szechner, Barbara

    The anthracycline antibiotics are among the most important clinical drugs used in the treatment of human cancer. The search for new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced cardiotoxicity stimulated considerable efforts in the synthesis of new analogues. Since the biological activity of anthracyclines depends on their natural absolute configuration, various strategies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones (aglycones) have been developed. They comprise: resolution of racemic intermediate, incorporation of a chiral fragment derived from natural and non-natural chiral pools, asymmetric synthesis with the use of a chiral auxiliary or a chiral reagent, and enantioselective catalysis. Synthetic advances towards enantiopure anthracyclinones reported over the last 17 years are reviewed.

  7. Ultrasonic stir welding process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding device provides a method and apparatus for elevating the temperature of a work piece utilizing at least one ultrasonic heater. Instead of relying on a rotating shoulder to provide heat to a workpiece an ultrasonic heater is utilized to provide ultrasonic energy to the workpiece. A rotating pin driven by a motor assembly performs the weld on the workpiece. A handheld version can be constructed as well as a fixedly mounted embodiment.

  8. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Caines, M.J.

    1983-07-12

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  9. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  10. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Harris, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  11. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  14. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  15. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  16. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scaler is a device intended for use during dental cleaning and periodontal (gum) therapy to...

  17. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scaler is a device intended for use during dental cleaning and periodontal (gum) therapy to...

  18. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scaler is a device intended for use during dental cleaning and periodontal (gum) therapy to...

  19. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scaler is a device intended for use during dental cleaning and periodontal (gum) therapy to...

  20. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scaler is a device intended for use during dental cleaning and periodontal (gum) therapy to...

  1. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, M.S.; Harris, R.V.

    1999-03-23

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  2. Application of ultrasonic guided waves to the characterization of texture in metal sheets of cubic and hexagonal crystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan.

    1990-10-08

    Ultrasonic techniques have recently been applied to the texture characterization in polycrystalline aggregates of hexagonal crystals. The basis of this application lies in the relations between the elastic constants {bar C}{sub ij} of the aggregates, which can be inferred from ultrasonic wave velocity measurements, and the orientation distribution coefficients. This communication present such relations for aggregates which possess orthotopic material symmetry and hexagonal crystal symmetry for Voigt, Reuss, and Hill averaging methods in a unified and concise representation.

  3. Multiple pure tone noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Sharma, Anupam; Paliath, Umesh; Shieh, Chingwei

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a fully numerical method for predicting multiple pure tones, also known as “Buzzsaw” noise. It consists of three steps that account for noise source generation, nonlinear acoustic propagation with hard as well as lined walls inside the nacelle, and linear acoustic propagation outside the engine. Noise generation is modeled by steady, part-annulus computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. A linear superposition algorithm is used to construct full-annulus shock/pressure pattern just upstream of the fan from part-annulus CFD results. Nonlinear wave propagation is carried out inside the duct using a pseudo-two-dimensional solution of Burgers' equation. Scattering from nacelle lip as well as radiation to farfield is performed using the commercial solver ACTRAN/TM. The proposed prediction process is verified by comparing against full-annulus CFD simulations as well as against static engine test data for a typical high bypass ratio aircraft engine with hardwall as well as lined inlets. Comparisons are drawn against nacelle unsteady pressure transducer measurements at two axial locations as well as against near- and far-field microphone array measurements outside the duct. This is the first fully numerical approach (no experimental or empirical input is required) to predict multiple pure tone noise generation, in-duct propagation and far-field radiation. It uses measured blade coordinates to calculate MPT noise.

  4. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation

    SciTech Connect

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  5. Lamb Wave Helical Ultrasonic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, K. R.; Hinders, M. K.

    2004-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT). This new technique, among other things, has direct application to advanced pipe inspection. HUT uses guided ultrasonic waves along with an adaptation of the tomographic reconstruction algorithms developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel in various helical crisscross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar crisscross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. We demonstrate the feasibility of the HUT technique via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  6. Delaminations Investigated With Ultrasonic Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.

    2003-01-01

    A previous study suggested that the ultrasonic spectroscopy technique identified possible disbonds or delaminations in polymer matrix composite (PMC) rings sectioned from flywheel rotors (ref. 1). These results went unsubstantiated by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. To explain the results, PMC rings were further investigated with ultrasonic spectroscopy (ref. 2). The ultrasonic spectroscopy system utilizes a continuous-swept sine waveform as the input. After the swept sine wave traverses the material, the captured waveform is subjected to two fast Fourier transforms. The second fast Fourier transform along with equalization of the frequency spectrum, allows for evaluation of the fundamental resonant frequency. The full-thickness resonance, the resonance corresponding to the location of the intentional disbond, and the frequency spectrum were examined in an effort to characterize the sensitivity of the NDE method to various delamination conditions.

  7. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  8. Ultrasonic cleaning of fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, Keisuke; Fujita, Chitoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    1994-12-31

    During fuel transportation, contamination of the transfer cask can lead to radiation dosage. That is radioactive crud becomes detached from the fuel surface and is deposited inside the cask. To avoid this at the Tsuruga Power Station Unit 1, crud was removed from fuel assemblies in advance of fuel transportation work. An ultrasonic cleaning process was adopted for this purpose; ultrasonic methods excel over other methods for this type of cleaning. Our process is also able to clean fuel assemblies without removing the channel box. Since this is the first time that the ultrasonic method was applied to fuel assemblies at the light water reactor in Japan on a large scale, the efficiency and the impact on plant instrumentation of the method were examined by performing preliminary test. Based on these tests, an optimum cleaning procedure was established.

  9. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, Charles F.; Howard, Boyd D.

    1998-01-01

    A flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus, comprising a flexible, hollow shaft that carries a plurality of modules, including at least one rotatable ultrasonic transducer, a motor/gear unit, and a position/signal encoder. The modules are connected by flexible knuckle joints that allow each module of the apparatus to change its relative orientation with respect to a neighboring module, while the shaft protects electrical wiring from kinking or buckling while the apparatus moves around a tight corner. The apparatus is moved through a pipe by any suitable means, including a tether or drawstring attached to the nose or tail, differential hydraulic pressure, or a pipe pig. The rotational speed of the ultrasonic transducer and the forward velocity of the apparatus are coordinated so that the beam sweeps out the entire interior surface of the pipe, enabling the operator to accurately assess the condition of the pipe wall and determine whether or not leak-prone corrosion damage is present.

  10. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  11. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  12. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist. PMID:17100459

  13. Ultrasonics: Fundamentals, Technologies, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, Dale; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-09-17

    This is a new edition of a bestselling industry reference. Discusses the science, technology, and applications of low and high power ultrasonics, including industrial implementations and medical uses. Reviews the basic equations of acoustics, starting from basic wave equations and their applications. New material on property determination, inspection of metals (NDT) and non-metals, imaging, process monitoring and control. Expanded discussion of transducers, transducer wave-fields, scattering, attenuation and measurement systems and models. New material that discusses high power ultrasonics - in particular using mechanical effects and sonochemistry, including applications to nano-materials. Examines diagnosis, therapy, and surgery from a technology and medical physics perspective.

  14. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  15. Improved Portable Ultrasonic Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Moerk, John S.; Haskell, William D.; Cox, Robert B.; Polk, Jimmy D.; Strobel, James P.; Luaces, Frank

    1995-01-01

    Improved portable ultrasonic leak detector features three interchangeable ultrasonic-transducer modules, each suited for operation in unique noncontact or contact mode. One module equipped with ultrasound-collecting horn for use in scanning to detect leaks from distance; horn provides directional sensitivity pattern with sensitivity multiplied by factor of about 6 in forward direction. Another module similar, does not include horn; this module used for scanning close to suspected leak, where proximity of leak more than offsets loss of sensitivity occasioned by lack of horn. Third module designed to be pressed against leaking vessel; includes rugged stainless-steel shell. Improved detectors perform significantly better, smaller, more rugged, and greater sensitivity.

  16. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1985-09-04

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  17. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1987-12-15

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

  18. Ultrasonic fluid densitometry and densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, M.S.; Lail, J.C.

    1998-01-13

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge having an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the fluid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the fluid. The invention also includes a wedge having at least two transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  19. Ultrasonic fluid densitometry and densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Lail, Jason C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge having an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the fluid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the fluid. The invention also includes a wedge having at least two transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  20. Ultrasonic magnetostrictive transducers for guided ultrasonic waves in thin wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropf, Matthew M.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2007-04-01

    The magnetostrictive effect is used to generate ultrasonic waves for a variety of health monitoring applications. Given the ductile nature of many ferromagnetic materials and the common geometrical configuration of magnetic inductance coils, magnetostrictive generation of ultrasound is especially suitable for long cylindrical waveguides such as thin wires. Furthermore, utilizing ultrasonic guided wave modes in such waveguides provides a robust tool for remote inspection of materials or environments over long distances. Through the use of different guided wave modes, structural health monitoring sensors could be tailored to suit individual applications. Guided wave modes offer a choice in displacement profile allowing sensors to be designed to be either sensitive or impervious to surface effects. The dispersivity of the guided wave velocity can also be optimized for applications involving time-of-flight measurements. Despite the advantages afforded by guided wave analysis, current magnetostrictive transducers, consisting of coil of wire and a bias magnet, can not perform at the frequencies necessary to excite higher order guided wave modes. In order to advance the capability of magnetostrictive transducers for ultrasonic guided waves in wires, the design parameters of inductance coils are examined. Using a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, ultrasonic displacements are measured over a range of excitation frequencies for different coil configurations and parameters to determine the feasibility of developing a higher mode magnetostrictive transducer.

  1. Materials analysis by ultrasonics: Metals, ceramics, composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properties, and dynamic response.

  2. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  3. Pure optical dynamical color encryption.

    PubMed

    Mosso, Fabian; Tebaldi, Myrian; Barrera, John Fredy; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto

    2011-07-18

    We introduce a way to encrypt-decrypt a color dynamical phenomenon using a pure optical alternative. We split the three basic chromatic channels composing the input, and then each channel is processed through a 4f encoding method and a theta modulation applied to the each encrypted frame in every channel. All frames for a single channel are multiplexed. The same phase mask is used to encode all the information. Unlike the usual procedure we do not multiplex the three chromatic channels into a single encoding media, because we want to decrypt the information in real time. Then, we send to the decoding station the phase mask and the three packages each one containing the multiplexing of a single channel. The end user synchronizes and decodes the information contained in the separate channels. Finally, the decoding information is conveyed together to bring the decoded dynamical color phenomenon in real-time. We present material that supports our concepts. PMID:21934738

  4. Pure optical dynamical color encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosso, Fabian; Tebaldi, Myrian; Fredy Barrera, John; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a way to encrypt-decrypt a color dynamical phenomenon using a pure optical alternative. We split the three basic chromatic channels composing the input, and then each channel is processed through a 4f encoding method and a theta modulation applied to the each encrypted frame in every channel. All frames for a single channel are multiplexed. The same phase mask is used to encode all the information. Unlike the usual procedure we do not multiplex the three chromatic channels into a single encoding media, because we want to decrypt the information in real time. Then, we send to the decoding station the phase mask and the three packages each one containing the multiplexing of a single channel. The end user synchronizes and decodes the information contained in the separate channels. Finally, the decoding information is conveyed together to bring the decoded dynamical color phenomenon in real-time. We present material that supports our concepts.

  5. Ultrasonic investigation of the superconducting properties of the Nb-Mo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.

    1972-01-01

    The superconducting properties of single crystals of Nb and two alloys of Nb with Mo were investigated by ultrasonic techniques. The results of measurements of the ultrasonic attenuation and velocities as a function of temperature, Mo composition, crystallographic direction, and ultrasonic frequency are reported. The attenuation and small velocity changes associated with the superconductivity of the samples are shown to be dependent on the sample resistivity ratio which varied from 4.3 for Nb-9% Mo to 6500 for pure Nb. The ultrasonic attenuation data are analyzed in terms of the superconducting energy gap term of the BCS theory. A new model is proposed for the analysis of ultrasonic attenuation in pure superconductors with two partially decoupled energy bands. To analyze the attenuation in pure superconducting Nb, the existence of two energy gaps was assumed to be associated with the two partially decoupled energy bands. One of the gaps was found to have the normal BCS value of 3.4 and the other gap was found to have the anomalously large value of 10. No experimental evidence was found to suggest that the second energy gap had a different transition temperature. The interpretation of the results for the Nb-Mo alloys is shown to be complicated by the possible existence of a second superconducting phase in Nb-Mo alloys with a transition temperature of 0.35 of the transition temperature of the first phase. The elastic constants of Nb and Nb-Mo alloys are shown to be approximately independent of Mo composition to nine atomic percent Mo. These results do not agree with the current microscopic theory of transition temperature for the transition elements.

  6. Small-angle x-ray scattering measurement of a mist of ethanol nanodroplets: an approach to understanding ultrasonic separation of ethanol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Matsuura, Kazuo; Fukazu, Tetsuo; Abe, Fusatsugu; Wakisaka, Akihiro; Kobara, Hitomi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Kumagai, Atsushi; Katsuya, Yoshio; Tanaka, Masahiko

    2007-07-21

    Small-angle x-ray scattering measurements using a brilliant x-ray source revealed nanometer sized liquid droplets in a mist formed by ultrasonic atomization. Ultrasonic atomization of ethanol-water mixtures produced a combination of water-rich droplets of micrometer order and ethanol-rich droplets as small as 1 nm, which is 10(-3) times smaller than the predicted size. These sizes were also obtained for mists generated from the pure liquids. These results will help to clarify the mechanism of "ultrasonic ethanol separation," which has the potential to become an alternative to distillation. PMID:17655423

  7. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  8. Wire Crimp Connectors Verification using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Perey, Daniel F.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp connections is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp connector and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which previously has been used to assess crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies (missing wire strands, incorrect wire gauge, incomplete wire insertion in connector) are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with pull-testing data) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying the technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented.

  9. Correlation between Local Ultrasonic Properties and Grain Size within Jet-Engine Nickel Alloy Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldipur, P.; Margetan, F. J.; Thompson, R. B.

    2003-03-01

    Ultrasonic velocity, attenuation, and back-scattered grain noise have been measured in rectangular coupons cut from representative 10″-diameter billets of IN718 and Waspaloy. Ultrasonic attenuation and backscattered noise were found to vary significantly with position within a billet, principally with radial depth. However, at a given measurement site there was little dependence of ultrasonic properties on inspection direction, suggesting an approximately equiaxed, untextured microstructure. Subsequent metallographic examinations revealed equiaxed grain structures in which the average grain diameter varied with position, tending to be largest at sites with large attenuations and large grain noise levels. The manner in which attenuation or backscattered-noise capacity (FOM) grows with increasing average grain diameter is similar to that expected for Pure-Ni microstructures. However, the rise rates are somewhat smaller for the jet-engine alloys, likely due to differences between the single-crystal elastic constants of the alloys and those of pure Ni. This paper reviews the methods used for ultrasonic measurements and metallographic analyses, and summarizes the interrelationships between attenuation, backscattered noise capacity and average grain diameter.

  10. Improved ultrasonic biomedical measuring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Device for making measurements of organs in living specimens and recording movements of organs is described. System uses series of ultrasonic pulses beamed into body of animal and reflected echo pulses are picked up by transducers and recorded. Diagram of equipment required and method of application is included.

  11. Ultrasonic-impact grinder system

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, N.C.

    1982-09-30

    The disclosure relates to an ultrasonic impact grinding apparatus utilizing a counterweight to set an unloaded friction free condition. An added weight is used to optimize feed rate in accordance with the material to be cut, tool size and the like.

  12. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor); Goodfriend, Roger (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup-shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduces breakage thereof.

  13. Ultrasonic seam welding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Darner, G.S.

    1980-06-01

    Ultrasonic seam welding has been evaluated for making continuous seam welds on aluminum and copper-foil conductors. A seam welding system has been designed and fabricated, weldable material combinations have been identified, and the process parameters for welding materials applicable to flat cable production have been established.

  14. Ultrasonic approach for surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Skorb, Ekaterina V; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-03-01

    The review is about solid surface modifications by cavitation induced in strong ultrasonic fields. The topic is worth to be discussed in a special issue of surface cleaning by cavitation induced processes since it is important question if we always find surface cleaning when surface modifications occur, or vice versa. While these aspects are extremely interesting it is important for applications to follow possible pathways during ultrasonic treatment of the surface: (i) solely cleaning; (ii) cleaning with following surface nanostructuring; and (iii) topic of this particular review, surface modification with controllably changing its characteristics for advanced applications. It is important to know what can happen and which parameters should be taking into account in the case of surface modification when actually the aim is solely cleaning or aim is surface nanostructuring. Nanostructuring should be taking into account since is often accidentally applied in cleaning. Surface hydrophilicity, stability to Red/Ox reactions, adhesion of surface layers to substrate, stiffness and melting temperature are important to predict the ultrasonic influence on a surface and discussed from these points for various materials and intermetallics, silicon, hybrid materials. Important solid surface characteristics which determine resistivity and kinetics of surface response to ultrasonic treatment are discussed. It is also discussed treatment in different solvents and presents in solution of metal ions. PMID:26382299

  15. Federal technology alert: Ultrasonic humidifiers

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Humidifiers are used in buildings to maintain humidity levels to ensure quality and handling capabilities in manufacturing processes, to lower the transmission rate of disease-causing bacteria in hospitals, to reduce static electricity in manufacturing clean rooms and in computer rooms, and to provide higher levels of employee comfort in offices. Ultrasonic humidifiers generate a water mist without raising its temperature. An electronic oscillation is converted to a mechanical oscillation using a piezo disk immersed in a reservoir of mineral-free water. The mechanical oscillation is directed at the surface of the water, where at very high frequencies it creates a very fine mist of water droplets. This adiabatic process, which does not heat the supply water, reduces humidifier energy use by 90 to 93% compared with systems that do boil the water. Ultrasonic humidifiers have been demonstrated to be more efficient and to require less maintenance than competing humidifier technologies such as electrode canisters, quartz lamps, and indirect steam-to-steam. They do not require anticorrosive additives that affect the indoor air quality of buildings using direct steam humidifiers. There are two potential disadvantages of ultrasonic humidifiers. They must use mineral-free, deionized water or water treated with reverse osmosis. Treated water reduces maintenance costs because it eliminates calcium deposits, but increases other operating costs. Also, the cool mist from ultrasonic humidifiers absorbs energy from the supply air as it evaporates and provides a secondary cooling effect.

  16. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  17. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  18. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

  19. Ultrasonic/Sonic Impacting Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Stark, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasonic/sonic impacting penetrators (USIPs) are recent additions to the series of apparatuses based on ultrasonic/sonic drill corers (USDCs). A USIP enables a rod probe to penetrate packed soil or another substance of similar consistency, without need to apply a large axial force that could result in buckling of the probe or in damage to some buried objects. USIPs were conceived for use in probing and analyzing soil to depths of tens of centimeters in the vicinity of buried barrels containing toxic waste, without causing rupture of the barrels. USIPs could also be used for other purposes, including, for example, searching for pipes, barrels, or other hard objects buried in soil; and detecting land mines. USDCs and other apparatuses based on USDCs have been described in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The ones reported previously were designed, variously, for boring into, and/or acquiring samples of, rock or other hard, brittle materials of geological interest. To recapitulate: A USDC can be characterized as a lightweight, low-power, piezoelectrically driven jackhammer in which ultrasonic and sonic vibrations are generated and coupled to a tool bit. As shown in the figure, a basic USDC includes a piezoelectric stack, a backing and a horn connected to the stack, a free mass (free in the sense that it can slide axially a short distance between the horn and the shoulder of tool bit), and a tool bit, i.e., probe for USIP. The piezoelectric stack is driven at the resonance frequency of the stack/horn/backing assembly to create ultrasonic vibrations that are mechanically amplified by the horn. To prevent fracture during operation, the piezoelectric stack is held in compression by a bolt. The bouncing of the free mass between the horn and the tool bit at sonic frequencies generates hammering actions to the bit that are more effective for drilling than is the microhammering action of ultrasonic vibrations in ordinary ultrasonic drills. The hammering actions

  20. Decryption of pure-position permutation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Dong, Guang-Chang

    2004-07-01

    Pure position permutation image encryption algorithms, commonly used as image encryption investigated in this work are unfortunately frail under known-text attack. In view of the weakness of pure position permutation algorithm, we put forward an effective decryption algorithm for all pure-position permutation algorithms. First, a summary of the pure position permutation image encryption algorithms is given by introducing the concept of ergodic matrices. Then, by using probability theory and algebraic principles, the decryption probability of pure-position permutation algorithms is verified theoretically; and then, by defining the operation system of fuzzy ergodic matrices, we improve a specific decryption algorithm. Finally, some simulation results are shown. PMID:15495308

  1. Experience-dependent overrepresentation of ultrasonic vocalization frequencies in the rat primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heesoo

    2013-01-01

    Cortical sensory representation is highly adaptive to the environment, and prevalent or behaviorally important stimuli are often overrepresented. One class of such stimuli is species-specific vocalizations. Rats vocalize in the ultrasonic range >30 kHz, but cortical representation of this frequency range has not been systematically examined. We recorded in vivo cortical electrophysiological responses to ultrasonic pure-tone pips, natural ultrasonic vocalizations, and pitch-shifted vocalizations to assess how rats represent this ethologically relevant frequency range. We find that nearly 40% of the primary auditory cortex (AI) represents an octave-wide band of ultrasonic vocalization frequencies (UVFs; 32–64 kHz) compared with <20% for other octave bands <32 kHz. These UVF neurons respond preferentially and reliably to ultrasonic vocalizations. The UVF overrepresentation matures in the cortex before it develops in the central nucleus of inferior colliculus, suggesting a cortical origin and corticofugal influences. Furthermore, the development of cortical UVF overrepresentation depends on early acoustic experience. These results indicate that natural sensory experience causes large-scale cortical map reorganization and improves representations of species-specific vocalizations. PMID:23741037

  2. Mixtures of maximally entangled pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M. M.; Galapon, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled pure states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled pure states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the pure states. For the latter case of mixing a number of pure states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled pure states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of pure states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled pure states with noise.

  3. Studies to control biofilm formation by coupling ultrasonication of natural waters and anodization of titanium.

    PubMed

    Nithila, S D Ruth; Anandkumar, B; Vanithakumari, S C; George, R P; Mudali, U Kamachi; Dayal, R K

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of ultrasonication of natural waters and anodization of titanium on microbial density and biofilm formation tendency on titanium surfaces. Application of 24 kHz, 400 W high power ultrasound through a 14 mm horn type SS (stainless steel) Sonicator with medium amplitude of 60% for 30 min brought about three order decrease in total bacterial density of laboratory tap water, cooling tower water and reservoir water and two order decrease in seawater. Studies on the effect of ultrasonication on dilute pure cultures of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria showed five order and three order decrease for Pseudomonas sp. and Flavobacterium sp. respectively and two order and less than one order decrease for Bacillus sp. and Micrococcus sp. respectively. Ultrasonication increased lag phase and reduced logarithmic population increase and specific growth rate of Gram-negative bacteria whereas for Gram-positive bacteria specific growth rate increased. Studies on the biofilm formation tendency of these ultrasonicated mediums on titanium surface showed one order reduction under all conditions. Detailed biofilm imaging by advanced microscopic techniques like AFM, SEM and epifluorescence microscopy clearly visualized the lysed/damaged cells and membrane perforations due to ultrasonication. Combination of ultrasonication and anodization brought about maximum decrease in bacterial density and biofilm formation with greater than two order decrease in seawater, two order decrease in Bacillus sp. culture and more than four order decrease in Flavobacterium sp. culture establishing the synergistic effect of anodization and ultrasonication in this study. PMID:23871547

  4. Fiber Optic Communications Technology. A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Joseph A.

    Fiber optic communications (communications over very pure glass transmission channels of diameter comparable to a human hair) is an emerging technology which promises most improvements in communications capacity at reasonable cost. The fiber transmission system offers many desirable characteristics representing improvements over conventional…

  5. Rapid bonding enhancement by auxiliary ultrasonic actuation for the fabrication of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Tor, S. B.; Loh, N. H.

    2014-11-01

    Thermal compression bonding is a straightforward, inexpensive and widely used method for enclosing open microchannels in thermoplastic microfluidic devices. It is advantageous over adhesive, solvent and grafting bonding methods in retaining material homogeneity. However, the trade-off between high bond strength and low microchannel deformation is always a crucial consideration in thermal compression bonding. In this study, an effective method for improving bond strength while retaining the microchannel integrity with negligible distortion is proposed and analyzed. Longitudinal ultrasonic actuation was applied to the preheated cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) substrates to achieve accelerated and enhanced bonding with an ultrasonic welding system. Intimate contact between the bonding surfaces before the ultrasonic actuation was found to be an important prior condition. With improper contact, several bonding defects would occur, such as voids, localized spot melting and edge melting. Under auxiliary ultrasonic vibration, within 10 s, the bond strength developed at the bonding interface could be dramatically improved compared with those achieved without ultrasonic actuation. The enhanced bond strength obtained at a preheating temperature of 20 °C lower than its Tg could be comparable to the strength for pure thermal compression at 5 °C higher than its Tg. It is believed that the ultrasonic energy introduced could elevate the interfacial temperature and facilitate the interdiffusion of molecular chain segments at the interface, consequently resulting in rapidly enhanced bonding. Also, the microchannel distortion after ultrasonic actuation was found to be satisfactory—another important requirement. From dynamic mechanical analysis, the glass transition temperature of COC was found to increase with increasing frequency, and the temperature of the bulk polymer under ultrasonic actuation was still well under Tg; therefore the deformation is minor under ultrasonic

  6. Bringing Planctomycetes into pure culture

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Olga M.; Bondoso, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Planctomycetes have been known since the description of Planctomyces bekefii by Gimesi at the beginning of the twentieth century (1924), although the first axenic cultures were only obtained in the 1970s. Since then, 11 genera with 14 species have been validly named and five candidatus genera belonging to the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox bacteria have also been discovered. However, Planctomycetes diversity is much broader than these numbers indicate, as shown by environmental molecular studies. In recent years, the authors have attempted to isolate and cultivate additional strains of Planctomycetes. This paper provides a summary of the isolation work that was carried out to obtain in pure culture Planctomycetes from several environmental sources. The following strains of planctomycetes have been successfully isolated: two freshwater strains from the sediments of an aquarium, which were described as a new genus and species, Aquisphaera giovannonii; several Rhodopirellula strains from the sediments of a water treatment recycling tank of a marine fish farm; and more than 140 planctomycetes from the biofilm community of macroalgae. This collection comprises several novel taxa that are being characterized and described. Improvements in the isolation methodology were made in order to optimize and enlarge the number of Planctomycetes isolated from the macroalgae. The existence of an intimate and an important relationship between planctomycetes and macroalgae reported before by molecular studies is therefore supported by culture-dependent methods. PMID:23335915

  7. Isomerically Pure Tetramethylrhodamine Voltage Reporters.

    PubMed

    Deal, Parker E; Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Al-Abdullatif, Sarah H; Miller, Evan W

    2016-07-27

    We present the design, synthesis, and application of a new family of fluorescent voltage indicators based on isomerically pure tetramethylrhodamines. These new Rhodamine Voltage Reporters, or RhoVRs, use photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) as a trigger for voltage sensing, display excitation and emission profiles in the green to orange region of the visible spectrum, demonstrate high sensitivity to membrane potential changes (up to 47% ΔF/F per 100 mV), and employ a tertiary amide derived from sarcosine, which aids in membrane localization and simultaneously simplifies the synthetic route to the voltage sensors. The most sensitive of the RhoVR dyes, RhoVR 1, features a methoxy-substituted diethylaniline donor and phenylenevinylene molecular wire at the 5'-position of the rhodamine aryl ring, exhibits the highest voltage sensitivity to date for red-shifted PeT-based voltage sensors, and is compatible with simultaneous imaging alongside green fluorescent protein-based indicators. The discoveries that sarcosine-based tertiary amides in the context of molecular-wire voltage indicators prevent dye internalization and 5'-substituted voltage indicators exhibit improved voltage sensitivity should be broadly applicable to other types of PeT-based voltage-sensitive fluorophores. PMID:27428174

  8. Reduced Scent Marking and Ultrasonic Vocalizations in the BTBR T+tf/J Mouse Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Wöhr, Markus; Roullet, Florence I.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative impairments in communication such as delayed language and poor interactive communication skills are fundamental to the diagnosis of autism. Investigations into social communication in adult BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) mice are needed to determine whether this inbred strain incorporates phenotypes relevant to the second diagnostic symptom of autism, communication deficits, along with its strong behavioral phenotypes relevant to the first and third diagnostic symptoms, impairments in social interactions and high levels of repetitive behavior. The aim of the present study was to simultaneously measure female urine-elicited scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations in adult male BTBR mice, in comparison to a standard control strain with high sociability, C57BL/6J (B6), for the assessment of a potential communication deficit in BTBR. Adult male BTBR mice displayed lower scent marking and minimal ultrasonic vocalization responses to female urine obtained from both B6 and BTBR females. Lower scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations in a social setting by BTBR as compared to B6 are consistent with the well-replicated social deficits in this inbred mouse strain. Our findings support the interpretation that BTBR incorporate communication deficits, and suggest that scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations offer promising measures of interest in social cues that may be widely applicable to investigations of mouse model of autism. PMID:20345893

  9. The contribution of ultrasonic vocalizations to mouse courtship.

    PubMed

    Egnor, Se Roian; Seagraves, Kelly M

    2016-06-01

    Vocalizations transmit information to social partners, and mice use these signals to exchange information during courtship. Ultrasonic vocalizations from adult males are tightly associated with their interactions with females, and vary as a function of male quality. Work in the last decade has established that the spectrotemporal features of male vocalizations are not learned, but that female attention toward specific vocal features is modified by social experience. Additionally, progress has been made on elucidating how mouse vocalizations are encoded in the auditory system, and on the olfactory circuits that trigger their production. Together these findings provide us with important insights into how vocal communication can contribute to social interactions. PMID:26789140

  10. Desulfurization of pure coal macerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J. ); Crelling, J.C. )

    1988-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to modify the present density gradient centrifugation (DGC) techniques for coal macerals to obtain 10-20 grams of target maceral concentrates and to determine the reactivity or ease of removing the organic sulfur in the various macerals with supercritical methanol extraction. Although the chemistry needed for this objective is not difficult, the accumulation of 10 to 20 gram quantities of ''pure'' petrographically verified single maceral concentrates has not been possible until now. The results of recent work have demonstrated that the individual macerals can be separated and verified. The accumulation of much larger quantities than have previously been separated was a problem that has been overcome by pre-concentrating target macerals at their density cut points. Supercritical fluid extraction of coals has previously been reported as a method in the production of liquid fuel products from coal under mild conditions and as a medium for selective desulfurization of coal. Alcohols are expected to exhibit greater solubility for polar organic molecules due to hydrogen bonding and dipole attractive forces, also providing the opportunity for chemical reactions during the extraction due to the nucleophilicity of the alcohol oxygen and the tendency to act as a hydrogen donor. In addition, enol rearrangements may play a role in desulfurization. As previously reported different supercritical reaction conditions produced different extents of desulfurization of coals (33.9 - 65.7%). These variable desulfurizations are probably a result of differences in extents of conversion of the pyritic sulfur (to various alteration products, such as pyrrhotite), as well as organic sulfur functionalities (thiophenol, sulfide, and thiopenes) to light gases such as dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and methylmercaptons.

  11. Desulfurization of pure coal macerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Crelling, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to modify the present density gradient centrifugation (DGC) techniques for coal macerals to obtain 10-20 grams of target maceral concentrates and to determine the reactivity or ease of removing the organic sulfur in the various macerals with supercritical methanol extraction. Although the chemistry needed for this objective is not difficult, the accumulation of 10 to 20 gram quantities of pure petrographically verified single maceral concentrates has not been possible until now. The results of recent work have demonstrated that the individual macerals can be separated and verified. The accumulation of much larger quantities than have previously been separated was a problem that has been overcome by pre-concentrating target macerals at their density cut points. Supercritical fluid extraction of coals has previously been reported as a method in the production of liquid fuel products from coal under mild conditions and as a medium for selective desulfurization of coal. Alcohols are expected to exhibit greater solubility for polar organic molecules due to hydrogen bonding and dipole attractive forces, also providing the opportunity for chemical reactions during the extraction due to the nucleophilicity of the alcohol oxygen and the tendency to act as a hydrogen donor. In addition, enol rearrangements may play a role in desulfurization. As previously reported different supercritical reaction conditions produced different extents of desulfurization of coals (33.9 - 65.7%). These variable desulfurizations are probably a result of differences in extents of conversion of the pyritic sulfur (to various alteration products, such as pyrrhotite), as well as organic sulfur functionalities (thiophenol, sulfide, and thiophenes) to light gases such as dimethylsulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and methylmercaptons.

  12. Ultrasonic propagation in inhomogeneous media: Toward quantitative ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trousil, Rebecca Leigh

    The goal of this dissertation is to explore the physics underpinning the use of quantitative acoustic measurements to extend the role of ultrasonic imaging. In the 30 year history of medical ultrasonic imaging, the diagnostic use of this modality has primarily relied upon morphology and motion to differentiate healthy from diseased tissue. Significant improvements in the bandwidth and dynamic range of clinical ultrasonic imaging systems in recent years offer the possibility of complementing existing qualitative information with truly quantitative information, derived from measurements of the acoustic properties of soft tissue. The phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and backscatter coefficient are three such acoustic properties that are often employed to characterize the state of soft tissues. One goal of this dissertation was to investigate the reliability of these measurements, based on systematic laboratory studies performed on well-characterized tissue-mimicking media. To this end, quantitative measurements of the frequency dependence of phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and backscatter coefficient were performed in tissue-mimicking phantoms as part of a national, multi-center study, sponsored by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. Both the intra- and inter-laboratory variability associated with these measurements were addressed. In addition to assessing the reproducibility of quantitative estimates of these acoustic parameters, this dissertation introduces and experimentally validates a novel measurement technique, based on the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations, that improves the robustness of frequency domain phase velocity estimates in tissue-like media.

  13. Characterization of ultrasonic vocalizations of Fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Belagodu, Amogh P; Johnson, Aaron M; Galvez, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the leading form of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by the transcriptional silencing of FMR1, the gene which codes for the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). Patients who have FXS exhibit numerous behavioral and cognitive impairments, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and autistic-like behaviors. In addition to these behavioral abnormalities, FXS patients have also been shown to exhibit various deficits in communication such as abnormal sentence structures, increased utterances, repetition of sounds and words, and reduced articulation. These deficits can dramatically hinder communication for FXS patients, exacerbating learning and cognition impairments while decreasing their quality of life. To examine the biological underpinnings of these communication abnormalities, studies have used a mouse model of the Fragile X Syndrome; however, these vocalization studies have resulted in inconsistent findings that often do not correlate with abnormalities observed in FXS patients. Interestingly, a detailed examination of frequency modulated vocalizations that are believed to be a better assessment of rodent communication has never been conducted. The following study used courtship separation to conduct a detailed examination of frequency modulated ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in FXS mice. Our analyses of frequency modulated USVs demonstrated that adult FXS mice exhibited longer phrases and more motifs. Phrases are vocalizations consisting of multiple frequency modulated ultrasonic vocalizations, while motifs are repeated frequency modulated USV patterns. Fragile X mice had a higher proportion of "u" syllables in all USVs and phrases while their wildtype counterparts preferred isolated "h" syllables. Although the specific importance of these syllables towards communication deficits still needs to be evaluated, these findings in production of USVs are consistent with the

  14. Strict optical orthogonal codes for purely asynchronous code-division multiple-access applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J G

    1996-12-10

    Strict optical orthogonal codes are presented for purely asynchronous optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA) applications. The proposed code can strictly guarantee the peaks of its cross-correlation functions and the sidelobes of any of its autocorrelation functions to have a value of 1 in purely asynchronous data communications. The basic theory of the proposed codes is given. An experiment on optical CDMA systems is also demonstrated to verify the characteristics of the proposed code. PMID:21151299

  15. Techniques for enhancing laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J; Chinn, D; Huber, R; Spicer, J; Thomas, G

    1999-02-16

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is an extremely powerful tool for characterizing materials and detecting defects. A majority of the ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is performed with piezoelectric transducers that generate and detect high frequency acoustic energy. The liquid needed to couple the high frequency acoustic energy from the piezoelectric transducers restricts the applicability of ultrasonics. For example, traditional ultrasonics cannot evaluate parts at elevated temperatures or components that would be damaged by contact with a fluid. They are developing a technology that remotely generates and detects the ultrasonic pulses with lasers and consequently there is no requirement for liquids. Thus the research in laser-based ultrasound allows them to solve inspection problems with ultrasonics that could not be done before. This technology has wide application in many Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory programs, especially when remote and/or non-contact sensing is necessary.

  16. Unified Ultrasonic/Eddy-Current Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James; Butler, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging station for detecting cracks and flaws in solid materials developed combining both ultrasonic C-scan and eddy-current imaging. Incorporation of both techniques into one system eliminates duplication of computers and of mechanical scanners; unifies acquisition, processing, and storage of data; reduces setup time for repetitious ultrasonic and eddy-current scans; and increases efficiency of system. Same mechanical scanner used to maneuver either ultrasonic or eddy-current probe over specimen and acquire point-by-point data. For ultrasonic scanning, probe linked to ultrasonic pulser/receiver circuit card, while, for eddy-current imaging, probe linked to impedance-analyzer circuit card. Both ultrasonic and eddy-current imaging subsystems share same desktop-computer controller, containing dedicated plug-in circuit boards for each.

  17. Novel method for driving the ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoung woo; Dong, Shuxiang; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Uchino, Kenji; Park, Tae gone

    2002-10-01

    This paper reports a novel driving method for an annular plate-type ultrasonic motor. Instead of the direct current/alternating current (DC/AC) converter type driver using conventional electromagnetic transformer, a compact disc-type piezoelectric transformer is used to obtain high voltage output for driving the ultrasonic motor. The piezoelectric transformer is operated in the radial vibration mode at resonance frequency close to the resonance frequency of the ultrasonic motor. Later, it was found that the piezoelectric transformer could drive the ultrasonic motor, even if their resonance frequencies are not exactly the same by incorporating the matching network in the circuit. The maximum speed of the ultrasonic motor obtained by using this driving method is over 300 rpm. It is believed that the results of this study will have impact on the integration and miniaturization of the ultrasonic motor and its driving circuit. PMID:12403137

  18. Enhanced ultrasonic characterization of assemblies, TLL_19

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Thomas, G

    1998-09-01

    Bonded joints, such as the autoclave bond, are critical to the performance of weapon systems. A nondestructive method to assess the integrity of these bonds is needed to certify the weapon for extended life. This project is developing ultrasonic technologies for bond quality assessment. Existing ultrasonic technology easily maps totally unbonded areas in a bond line but does not measure the quality of the bond. We are extracting information from the ultrasonic signals to quantify the mechanical. properties and assess the durability of the bond. Our approach is based on advanced signal processing and artificial intelligence techniques that process information from the ultrasonic signal after it interacts with the bondline. Computer algorithms recognize variations in bond quality from the acoustic signals. The ultrasonic signal processing and bond classification software will be installed on ultrasonic scanners at the appropriate sites.

  19. Enhanced ultrasonic characterization of assemblies, TLL 19

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Thomas, G.

    1998-09-01

    Bonded joints, such as the autoclave bond, are critical to the performance of weapon systems. A nondestructive method to assess the integrity of these bonds is needed to certify the weapon for extended life. This project is developing ultrasonic technologies for bond quality assessment. Existing ultrasonic technology easily maps totally unbonded areas in a bond line but does not measure the quality of the bond. We are extracting information from the ultrasonic signals to quantify the mechanical. properties and assess the durability of the bond. Our approach is based on advanced signal processing and artificial intelligence techniques that process information from the ultrasonic signal after it interacts with the bondline. Computer algorithms recognize variations in bond quality from the acoustic signals. The ultrasonic signal processing and bond classification software will be installed on ultrasonic scanners at the appropriate sites.

  20. Ultrasonic inspection of reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Majzlik, E.J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The subject of this presentation is ultrasonic inspection of reactor systems. This paper describes two current programs underway at Savannah River Site which provide state-of-the-art ultrasonic inspections of weld heat-affected zones in the primary cooling loop of the Savannah River Site reactors. It also describes the automated remote inspection equipment being developed and employed; briefly describe the procedures being used; and give you a general idea of the future direction of two major programs: Moderator Piping Inspection Program and the Reactor Tank Wall Weld Inspection Program. The objective of these programs is to provide inspection techniques to more fully determine the condition of the reactor primary system and provide data for prediction of maintenance needs and remaining service life. Detection and sizing of intergranular stress corrosion cracking is the focus of these programs.

  1. Hydrazine degradation by ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nakui, Hiroyuki; Okitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Rokurou

    2007-07-31

    The influence of pH on the degradation of hydrazine with a concentration of 0.1mmol/L was investigated under the stirring (300rpm) and ultrasonic irradiation conditions (200kHz, 200W) in the pH range of 1-9. It was found that the hydrazine degradation depended greatly upon pH under the ultrasonic irradiation condition, while it did not take place over the whole pH range under the stirring condition. Although it has been known that OH radicals and hydrogen peroxide are sonochemically formed from water, it was considered that the OH radicals played an important role of the hydrazine degradation, but not hydrogen peroxide. The pH dependence of the hydrazine degradation was discussed in terms of the relationship between the chemical structure and the basic dissociation constants of hydrazine. PMID:17513042

  2. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  3. Ultrasonic ranging for the oculometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic tracking techniques are investigated for an oculometer. Two methods are reported in detail. The first is based on measurements of time from the start of a transmit burst to a received echo. Knowing the sound velocity, distance can be calculated. In the second method, a continuous signal is transmitted. Target movement causes phase shifting of the echo. By accumulating these phase shifts, tracking from a set point can be achieved. Both systems have problems with contoured targets, but work well on flat plates and the back of a human head. Also briefly reported is an evaluation of an ultrasonic ranging system. Interface circuits make this system compatible with the echo time design. While the system is consistently accurate, it has a beam too narrow for oculometer use. Finally, comments are provided on a tracking system using the Doppler frequency shift to give range data.

  4. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning method for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The method uses an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  5. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    MacKenzie, D.; Odell, C.

    1994-03-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus is described for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface. 3 figures.

  6. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1994-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  7. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  8. Discriminating ultrasonic proximity detection system

    DOEpatents

    Annala, Wayne C.

    1989-01-01

    This invention uses an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver and a microprocessor to detect the presence of an object. In the reset mode the invention uses a plurality of echoes from each ultrasonic burst to create a reference table of the echo-burst-signature of the empty monitored environment. The invention then processes the reference table so that it only uses the most reliable data. In the detection mode the invention compares the echo-burst-signature of the present environment with the reference table, detecting an object if there is a consistent difference between the echo-burst-signature of the empty monitored environment recorded in the reference table and the echo-burst-signature of the present environment.

  9. Ultrasonic enhancement of battery diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hilton, R; Dornbusch, D; Branson, K; Tekeei, A; Suppes, G J

    2014-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that sonic energy can be harnessed to enhance convection in Galvanic cells during cyclic voltammetry; however, the practical value of this approach is limited due to the lack of open volumes for convection patterns to develop in most batteries. This study evaluates the ability of ultrasonic waves to enhance diffusion in membrane separators commonly used in sandwich-architecture batteries. Studies include the measuring of open-circuit performance curves to interpret performances in terms of reductions in concentration overpotentials. The use of a 40 kHz sonicator bath can consistently increase the voltage of the battery and reduce overpotential losses up to 30%. This work demonstrates and quantifies battery enhancement due to enhanced diffusion made possible with ultrasonic energy. PMID:24210813

  10. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1996-06-25

    An ultrasonic cleaning method is described for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The method uses an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface. 3 figs.

  11. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  12. Ultrasonic attenuation in pearlitic steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Expressions for the attenuation coefficients of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves are developed for steel with pearlitic microstructure. This type of lamellar duplex microstructure influences attenuation because of the lamellar spacing. In addition, longitudinal attenuation measurements were conducted using an unfocused transducer with 10 MHz central frequency on the cross section of a quenched railroad wheel sample. The dependence of longitudinal attenuation on the pearlite microstructure is observed from the changes of longitudinal attenuation from the quenched tread surface to deeper locations. The results show that the attenuation value is lowest and relatively constant within the quench depth, then increases linearly. The experimental results demonstrate a reasonable agreement with results from the theoretical model. Ultrasonic attenuation provides an important non-destructive method to evaluate duplex microstructure within grains which can be implemented for quality control in conjunction with other manufacturing processes. PMID:24268679

  13. Fundamentals of picosecond laser ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Osamu; Larciprete, Maria Cristina; Li Voti, Roberto; Wright, Oliver B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to picosecond laser ultrasonics, a means by which gigahertz-terahertz ultrasonic waves can be generated and detected by ultrashort light pulses. This method can be used to characterize materials with nanometer spatial resolution. With reference to key experiments, we first review the theoretical background for normal-incidence optical detection of longitudinal acoustic waves in opaque single-layer isotropic thin films. The theory is extended to handle isotropic multilayer samples, and is again compared to experiment. We then review applications to anisotropic samples, including oblique-incidence optical probing, and treat the generation and detection of shear waves. Solids including metals and semiconductors are mainly discussed, although liquids are briefly mentioned. PMID:24998119

  14. Ultrasonic Bonding of Solar-Cell Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rolling ultrasonic spot-bonding method successfully joins aluminum interconnect fingers to silicon solar cells with copper metalization. Technique combines best features of ultrasonic rotary seam welding and ultrasonic spot bonding: allows fast bond cycles and high indexing speeds without use of solder or flux. Achieves reliable bonds at production rates without damage to solar cells. Bonding system of interest for all solar-cell assemblies and other assemblies using flat leads (rather than round wires).

  15. The upcoming revolution in ultrasonic guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Joseph L.

    2011-04-01

    This paper will include discussions on fundamental principles and market forces associated with the upcoming revolution in ultrasonic guided waves. A literature survey is also outlined covering some selected major developments this past decade. A few applications in pipe, rail, bonding and composites, imaging and tomography, ultrasonic vibration, de-icing, structural health monitoring, gas entrapment, and non-linear methods are treated to provide an idea of where we are heading with ultrasonic guided waves.

  16. Calorimetric measurement of energy of ultrasonic cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1994-11-01

    The development of a calorimeter that measured the power within an ultrasonic cleaning tank is presented. The principle involved is explained. Several types of calorimeter that were tested are described. Measurement of the power in an ultrasonic cleaner permits: (1) comparing different ultrasonic cleaners; (2) monitoring the performance of a specific cleaner; (3) measuring the distribution of power in a cleaning tank, and (4) evaluating the effects of process variables on the power.

  17. Degassing of Aluminum Alloys Using Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, T. T.; Han, Q.; Xu, H.

    2006-06-01

    The research was intended to lead to a better fundamental understanding of the effect of ultrasonic energy on the degassing of liquid metals and to develop practical approaches for the ultrasonic degassing of alloys. The goals of the project described here were to evaluate core principles, establish a quantitative basis for the ultrasonic degassing of aluminum alloy melts, and demonstrate the application of ultrsaonic processing during ingot casting and foundry shape casting.

  18. Precision Ultrasonic Wave Measurements With Simple Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Steven E.; Palmer, C. Harvey

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design and construction of a relatively simple, inexpensive laser interferometer system for accurate measurements of ultrasonic surface displacement waveforms in reasonably friendly environments. We show how analysis of a single waveform can provide both the calibration constant required for absolute measurements and an estimate of the uncertainty of these measurements. We demonstrate the performance of this interferometer by measuring ultrasonic waveforms generated by a novel conical-element ultrasonic transducer.

  19. Cutting head for ultrasonic lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anguluo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is described. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduce breakage thereof.

  20. Ultrasonic Attenuation in Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.P.; Banchik, A.D.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    2005-04-09

    In this work the relationship between Zircaloy-4 grain size and ultrasonic attenuation behavior was studied for longitudinal waves in the frequency range of 10-90 MHz. The attenuation was analyzed as a function of frequency for samples with different mechanical and heat treatments having recrystallized and Widmanstatten structures with different grain size. The attenuation behavior was analyzed by different scattering models, depending on grain size, wavelength and frequency.

  1. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1998-06-23

    A flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus, comprises a flexible, hollow shaft that carries a plurality of modules, including at least one rotatable ultrasonic transducer, a motor/gear unit, and a position/signal encoder. The modules are connected by flexible knuckle joints that allow each module of the apparatus to change its relative orientation with respect to a neighboring module, while the shaft protects electrical wiring from kinking or buckling while the apparatus moves around a tight corner. The apparatus is moved through a pipe by any suitable means, including a tether or drawstring attached to the nose or tail, differential hydraulic pressure, or a pipe pig. The rotational speed of the ultrasonic transducer and the forward velocity of the apparatus are coordinated so that the beam sweeps out the entire interior surface of the pipe, enabling the operator to accurately assess the condition of the pipe wall and determine whether or not leak-prone corrosion damage is present. 7 figs.

  2. Ultrasonic destruction of kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Brannen, G E; Bush, W H

    1984-02-01

    Kidney stones may be removed without using a surgical incision by a combination of techniques and skills recently developed in the fields of urology and radiology. Percutaneous access to the kidney is established under fluoroscopic control. A guide wire placed into the renal pelvis allows a nephroscope to be inserted and the collecting system visualized. A long hollow metal probe is advanced through the nephroscope and placed in contact with the stone. This probe conducts the ultrasonic energy. The stone absorbs the energy and breaks into fine granules, which are evacuated by suction.Twenty-three consecutively seen patients presenting with 27 upper urinary tract calculi for which removal was indicated underwent successful percutaneous ultrasonic lithotripsy. Fifteen stones were located in the renal pelvis, eight in a calix, three at the ureteropelvic junction and one in the upper ureter. One infected staghorn calculus was removed. Two complications resulted in extended hospital stays, but in no patients were surgical incisions required. Of the 23 patients, 9 had previously had a surgical lithotomy. The authors believe that most renal and upper ureteral calculi for which removal is indicated may be extracted percutaneously with the aid of the ultrasonic lithotriptor. The patients may expect a rapid convalescence with diminished pain. PMID:6730470

  3. Ultrasonic NDE of Multilayered Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J; Fisher, K A; Lehman, S K

    2005-02-14

    This project developed ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques based on guided and bulk waves in multilayered structures using arrays. First, a guided wave technique was developed by preferentially exciting dominant modes with energy in the layer of interest via an ultrasonic array. Second, a bulk wave technique uses Fermat's principle of least time as well as wave-based properties to reconstruct array data and image the multilayered structure. The guided wave technique enables the inspection of inaccessible areas of a multilayered structure without disassembling it. Guided waves propagate using the multilayer as a waveguide into the inaccessible areas from an accessible position. Inspecting multi-layered structures with a guided wave relies on exciting modes with sufficient energy in the layer of interest. Multilayered structures are modeled to determine the possible modes and their distribution of energy across the thickness. Suitable modes were determined and excited by designing arrays with the proper element spacing and frequency. Bulk wave imaging algorithms were developed to overcome the difficulties of multiple reflections and refractions at interfaces. Reconstruction algorithms were developed to detect and localize flaws. A bent-ray algorithm incorporates Fermat's principle to correct time delays in the ultrasonic data that result from the difference in wave speeds in each layer and refractions at the interfaces. A planar wave-based algorithm was developed using the Green function for the multilayer structure to enhance focusing on reception for improved imaging.

  4. Stresses in ultrasonically assisted bone cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, K.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Bäker, M.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    Bone cutting is a frequently used procedure in the orthopaedic surgery. Modern cutting techniques, such as ultrasonic assisted drilling, enable surgeons to perform precision operations in facial and spinal surgeries. Advanced understanding of the mechanics of bone cutting assisted by ultrasonic vibration is required to minimise bone fractures and to optimise the technique performance. The paper presents results of finite element simulations on ultrasonic and conventional bone cutting analysing the effects of ultrasonic vibration on cutting forces and stress distribution. The developed model is used to study the effects of cutting and vibration parameters (e.g. amplitude and frequency) on the stress distributions in the cutting region.

  5. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  6. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Brodeur, Pierre H.; Jackson, Theodore G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  7. Method and means of transmitting and receiving broad-band unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.O.; Hsu, D.K.

    1993-12-14

    The invention includes a means and method for transmitting and receiving broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection. The method comprises generating a generally unipolar ultrasonic stress pulse from a low impedance voltage pulse transmitter along a low impedance electrical pathway to an ultrasonic transducer, and receiving the reflected echo of the pulse by the transducer, converting it to a voltage signal, and passing it through a high impedance electrical pathway to an output. The means utilizes electrical components according to the method. The means and method allow a single transducer to be used in a pulse/echo mode, and facilitates alternatingly transmitting and receiving the broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses. 25 figures.

  8. Method and means of transmitting and receiving broad-band unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Donald O.; Hsu, David K.

    1993-12-14

    The invention includes a means and method for transmitting and receiving broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection. The method comprises generating a generally unipolar ultrasonic stress pulse from a low impedance voltage pulse transmitter along a low impedance electrical pathway to an ultrasonic transducer, and receiving the reflected echo of the pulse by the transducer, converting it to a voltage signal, and passing it through a high impedance electrical pathway to an output. The means utilizes electrical components according to the method. The means and method allow a single transducer to be used in a pulse/echo mode, and facilitates alternatingly transmitting and receiving the broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses.

  9. Method of preparing pure fluorine gas

    DOEpatents

    Asprey, Larned B.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for purifying and storing pure fluorine is described. The method utilizes alkali metal-nickel fluorides to absorb tank fluorine by forming nickel complex salts and leaving the gaseous impurities which are pumped away. The complex nickel fluoride is then heated to evolve back pure gaseous fluorine.

  10. Electrodeposition of nickel-tungsten and nickel-molybdenum under ultrasonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshan, Gautam

    The advancement of science demands materials with superior properties. Surface coating technology can be used to impart required wear or corrosion resistance on surfaces. The current research relates to the development of a deposition method for coating nanostructured Ni-W alloy and Ni-Mo alloy onto contoured external and internal surfaces of metallic components for improved corrosion and erosion resistant applications. The coatings should have a high alloy content with reproducible concentration, and should not have through thickness cracks. Electrodeposition of pure tungsten or molybdenum from an aqueous solution is not possible. However, these metals can be co-deposited along with iron group metals as an alloy. These deposits are the result of an induced co-deposition mechanism that gives an anomalous amount of W or Mo in the deposit. Ultrasonic assisted electrodeposition has been developed to give reproducible results of the chemical composition of the coating. Ultrasonication results in higher current densities during cyclic voltammetry. Increasing the deposition current density increases the tungsten content of the deposit under ultrasonicated conditions. The coatings obtained with ultrasonication show a uniform chemical composition across the thickness of the coating. Ultrasonication also minimizes hydrogen incorporation in the coatings, distributes the defect concentration more uniformly in the deposit, and promotes finer crystallite nucleation. Furthermore, ultrasonication doubles the nucleation kinetics under otherwise similar electrochemical conditions. The TEM and XRD analyses also support the nano crystallite morphology of the Ni-W deposits. The newly developed deposition method is capable of producing crack-free coatings that are nanocrystalline with high hardness, which can be used for both corrosion and wear resistant applications.

  11. Dynamics of ultrasonic percussive drilling of hard rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiercigroch, M.; Wojewoda, J.; Krivtsov, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Ultrasonic percussive drilling with diamond-coated tools has been extensively studied under laboratory conditions on rocks such as sandstone, limestone, granite and basalt, in order to investigate the applicability of this technique to downhole drilling. An experimental set-up, a programme of work and example results are presented. The studies showed that an introduction of high-frequency axial vibration significantly enhances drilling rates compared to the traditional rotary type method. It has been found out that the material removal rate (MRR) as a function of static load has at least one maximum. Looking at the time histories of the measured drilling force, strong nonlinear effects have been observed, which were explained using simple nonlinear models. Among them, pure impact and impact with dry friction oscillators were used to provide an insight into the complex dynamics of ultrasonic percussive drilling. It is postulated that the main mechanism of the MRR enhancement is associated with high amplitudes of forces generated by impacts. Novel procedures for calculating MRR are proposed, explaining an experimentally observed fall of MRR at higher static loads.

  12. Range discrimination in ultrasonic vibrometry: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Martin, J S; Rogers, P H; Gray, M D

    2011-09-01

    A technique has been developed to demodulate periodic broadband ultrasonic interrogation signals that are returned from multiple scattering sites to simultaneously determine the low-frequency displacement time histories of each individual site. The technique employs a broadband periodic transmit signal. The motions of scattering sites are separately determined from the echoed receive signal by an algorithm involving comb filtering and pulse synthesis. This algorithm permits spatial resolution comparable to pulse-echo techniques and displacement sensitivities comparable to pure-tone techniques. A system based on this technique was used to image transient audio-frequency displacements on the order of 1-10 μm peak (≥ 50 nm/√Hz) that were produced by propagating shear waves in a tissue phantom. The system used concentric transmitting and receiving transducers and a carrier signal centered at 2.5 MHz with an 800 kHz bandwidth. The system was self-noise-limited and capable of detecting motions of strongly reflecting regions on the order of 1 nm/√Hz. System performance is limited by several factors including signal selection, component hardware, and ultrasonic propagation within the media of interest. PMID:21895110

  13. Ultrasonic studies of fly ash/polyurea composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jing; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Wu, Gaohui

    2013-04-01

    Due to its excellent thermo-mechanical properties, polyurea is attracting more and more attention in blast-mitigating applications. In order to enhance its capability of blast-induced stress-wave management, we seek to develop polyurea-based composites in this work. Fly ash which consists of hollow particles with porous shell and low apparent density was chosen as filler and a series of fly ash/polyurea composites with various fly ash volume fractions were fabricated. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the composites was determined by a personal computer (PC) based ultrasonic system in the 0.5-2MHz frequency range between -60°C to 30°C temperatures. Velocity and attenuation of both longitudinal and shear ultrasonic waves were measured. The complex longitudinal and shear moduli were then computed from these measurements. Combining these results provided an estimate of the complex bulk and Young's moduli of the fly ash/polyurea composites at high frequencies. These results will be presented and compared with those of pure polyurea elastomer.

  14. Transducer Joint for Kidney-Stone Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, E. D.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic therapy for kidney stones improved by new way of connecting wire-probe ultrasonic waveguide to transducer. Improved mounting allows joint to last long enough for effective treatment. Sheath and rubber dampers constrain lateral vibration of wire waveguide. Combination of V-shaped mounting groove, sheath, and rubber dampers increases life expectancy of wire 15 times or more.

  15. In sodium tests of ultrasonic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Lhuillier, C.; Descombin, O.; Baque, F.; Marchand, B.; Saillant, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are seen as suitable candidates for the in-service inspection and for the continuous surveillance of sodium cooled reactors (SFR). These techniques need the development and the qualification of immersed ultrasonic transducers, and materials. This paper presents some developments performed by CEA (DTN and LIST) and AREVA (NDE Solutions), and some results. (authors)

  16. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  17. Proceedings of the IEEE 1986 ultrasonics symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Avoy, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on ultrasonic testing. Topics considered at the conference included the use of multiprocessors, the laser generation of acoustic waves, ultrasonic techniques in oil well logging, digital systems, piezoelectric devices, computerized tomography, Doppler tomography, pulse shaping techniques, blood flow, surface acoustic wave attenuation, sputtering, and microstructure.

  18. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  19. Improved Ultrasonic Transducer For Measuring Cryogenic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis

    1991-01-01

    Improved ultrasonic transducer used to measure flow of cryogenic fluid. Includes wedge made nonintrusive by machining it out of bulk material of duct carrying fluid. Skewed surfaces of wedge suppress standing waves, thus reducing ringing and increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Increases accuracy of measurements of times of arrival of ultrasonic pulses, from which times flow inferred.

  20. Broadband, High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. Raymond; Winfree, William P.; Barrows, Danny A.

    1995-01-01

    Materials chosen for endurance at high temperatures and acoustic coupling and damping. Acoustic transducer designed to exhibit broad frequency response and to survive temperatures close to melting points of brazing alloys. Attached directly and continuously to hot object monitored ultrasonically: for example, it can be attached to relatively cool spot on workpiece during brazing for taking ultrasonic quality-control measurements.

  1. Ultrasonic cold forming of aircraft sheet materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, J.; Krause, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic forming was investigated as a means for shaping aircraft sheet materials, including titanium 6Al-4V alloy, nickel, and stainless steel AM355-CRT, into a helicopter rotor blade nosecap contour. Equipment for static forming of small coupons consisted of a modified 4000 watt ultrasonic spot welder provided with specially designed punch and die sets. The titanium alloy was successfully formed to a 60 degree angle in one step with ultrasonics, but invariably cracked under static force alone. Nickel had a low enough yield strength that it could be successfully formed either with or without ultrasonics. Insufficient ultrasonic power was available to produce beneficial effect with the high-strength steel. From analogy with commercially used ultrasonic tube drawing, it was postulated that dynamic forming of long lengths of the nosecap geometry could be achieved with an ultrasonic system mounted on a draw bench. It was recommended that the ultrasonic technique be considered for forming other aircraft sheet geometries, particularly involving titanium alloy.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation by acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics is an ultrasonic technique that was originally devised to cope with the particular problems associated with nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber/polymer composite structures. The fiber/polymer composites are more attenuating to ultrasound than any other material presently of interest. This limits the applicability of high-frequency ultrasonics. A common use of ultrasound is the imaging of flaws internal to a structure by scattering from the interface with the flaw. However, structural features of composites can scatter ultrasound internally, thus obscuring the flaws. A need relative to composites is to be able to nondestructively measure the strength of laminar boundaries in order to assess the integrity of a structure. Acousto-ultrasonics has exhibited the ability to use the internal scattering to provide information for determining the strength of laminar boundaries. Analysis of acousto-ultrasonic signals by the wave ray paths that compose it leads to waveform partitioning that enhances the sensitivity to mechanical strength parameters.

  3. Ultrasonic stress wave characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported covers three simultaneous projects. The first project was concerned with: (1) establishing the sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic method for evaluating subtle forms of damage development in cyclically loaded composite materials, (2) establishing the ability of the acousto-ultrasonic method for detecting initial material imperfections that lead to localized damage growth and final specimen failure, and (3) characteristics of the NBS/Proctor sensor/receiver for acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of laminated composite materials. The second project was concerned with examining the nature of the wave propagation that occurs during acoustic-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates and demonstrating the role of Lamb or plate wave modes and their utilization for characterizing composite laminates. The third project was concerned with the replacement of contact-type receiving piezotransducers with noncontacting laser-optical sensors for acousto-ultrasonic signal acquisition.

  4. Ultrasonic characterization of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Telschow, K. L.

    When a pulsed laser beam strikes the surface of an absorbing material, ultrasonic waves are generated due to thermoelectric expansion and, at higher laser power densities, ablation of the material. These sound generation mechanisms have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies and are now fairly well understood. In particular, it has been established that at low power densities the thermoelastic mechanism is well described by a surface center of expansion. This mechanism produces a characteristic waveform whose amplitude is proportional to the energy absorbed from the laser pulse and also dependent on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. The ablation ultrasonic source can be described by a point normal force acting on the material surface. For laser power densities near the ablation onset, the time dependence of the source is that of the laser pulse. The resultant waveform recorded on epicenter (source and detector collinear) has a sharp peak determined by the momentum impulse delivered to the material by the ablation process. Particularly in the near ablation onset region, this ultrasonic displacement peak can be used to characterize the ablation process occurring at the material surface. The onset power density for ablation and subsequent ablation dependence on power density are material dependent and thought to be a function of the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material. With this in mind, it is possible that these ablation signals could be used to characterize material microstructures, and perhaps material mechanical properties such as hardness, through microstructural changes of the material thermal parameters. This paper explores this question for samples of Type 304 stainless steel with microstructures controlled through work hardening and annealing.

  5. Vector Theory of Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. S.

    So far, works on ultrasonic diffraction imaging are based on scalar theory of sound wave. This is not correct as sound has vector nature. But when sound propagates in solids, its vector nature has to be considered as polarization occurs and transverse wave as well as longitudinal wave will appear. Vector theory is especially needed when the obstacle size is smaller than the wavelength. We use the Smythe-Kirchhoff approach for the vector theory of diffraction. We derive the image formation theory based on the vector diffraction theory. The effect of polarization on acoustical imaging is discussed.

  6. Passive wireless ultrasonic transducer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C. H.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-02-01

    Inductive coupling and capacitive coupling both offer simple solutions to wirelessly probe ultrasonic transducers. This paper investigates the theory and feasibility of such system in the context of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications. Firstly, the physical principles and construction of an inductively coupled transducer system (ICTS) and a capacitively coupled transducer system (CCTS) are introduced. Then the development of a transmission line model with the measured impedance of a bonded piezoelectric ceramic disc representing a sensor attached to an arbitrary solid substrate for both systems is described. The models are validated experimentally. Several applications of CCTS are presented, such CCTS for the underwater and through-composite testing.

  7. Ultrasonic Songs of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Previously it was shown that male mice, when they encounter female mice or their pheromones, emit ultrasonic vocalizations with frequencies ranging over 30–110 kHz. Here, we show that these vocalizations have the characteristics of song, consisting of several different syllable types, whose temporal sequencing includes the utterance of repeated phrases. Individual males produce songs with characteristic syllabic and temporal structure. This study provides a quantitative initial description of male mouse songs, and opens the possibility of studying song production and perception in an established genetic model organism. PMID:16248680

  8. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  9. Conformal pure radiation with parallel rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistner, Thomas; Nurowski, Paweł

    2012-03-01

    We define pure radiation metrics with parallel rays to be n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian metrics that admit a parallel null line bundle K and whose Ricci tensor vanishes on vectors that are orthogonal to K. We give necessary conditions in terms of the Weyl, Cotton and Bach tensors for a pseudo-Riemannian metric to be conformal to a pure radiation metric with parallel rays. Then, we derive conditions in terms of the tractor calculus that are equivalent to the existence of a pure radiation metric with parallel rays in a conformal class. We also give analogous results for n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian pp-waves.

  10. Estimation of Single-Crystal Elastic Constants from Ultrasonic Measurements on Polycrystalline Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldipur, P.; Margetan, F. J.; Thompson, R. B.

    2004-02-01

    In past work we reported on measurements of ultrasonic velocity, attenuation and backscattering in nickel-alloy materials used in the fabrication of rotating jet-engine components. Attenuation and backscattering were shown to be correlated to the average grain diameter, which varied with position in the billet specimens studied. The ultrasonic measurements and associated metallographic studies found the local microstructures to be approximately equiaxed and free of texture in these cubic-phase metals. In this paper we explore a method for deducing the single-crystal elastic constants of a metal using the combined ultrasonic and metallographic data for a polycrystalline specimen. We specifically consider the case seen in the jet-engine alloys: polycrystalline cubic microstructures having equiaxed, randomly oriented grains. We demonstrate how the three independent elastic constants {C11, C12, C44} can be deduced from the density, the mean grain diameter, the ultrasonic attenuation at one or more frequencies, and the longitudinal and shear wave speeds. The method makes use of the attenuation theory of Stanke and Kino, and the Hill averaging procedure for estimating the sonic velocity through a polycrystalline material. Elastic constant inputs to the velocity and attenuation models are adjusted to optimize the agreement with experiment. The method is demonstrated using several specimens of Inconel 718 and Waspaloy, and further tested using four specimens of pure Nickel.

  11. Estimation of Single-Crystal Elastic Constants from Ultrasonic Measurements on Polycrystalline Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Haldipur, P.; Margetan, F.J.; Thompson, R.B.

    2004-02-26

    In past work we reported on measurements of ultrasonic velocity, attenuation and backscattering in nickel-alloy materials used in the fabrication of rotating jet-engine components. Attenuation and backscattering were shown to be correlated to the average grain diameter, which varied with position in the billet specimens studied. The ultrasonic measurements and associated metallographic studies found the local microstructures to be approximately equiaxed and free of texture in these cubic-phase metals. In this paper we explore a method for deducing the single-crystal elastic constants of a metal using the combined ultrasonic and metallographic data for a polycrystalline specimen. We specifically consider the case seen in the jet-engine alloys: polycrystalline cubic microstructures having equiaxed, randomly oriented grains. We demonstrate how the three independent elastic constants {l_brace}C11, C12, C44{r_brace} can be deduced from the density, the mean grain diameter, the ultrasonic attenuation at one or more frequencies, and the longitudinal and shear wave speeds. The method makes use of the attenuation theory of Stanke and Kino, and the Hill averaging procedure for estimating the sonic velocity through a polycrystalline material. Elastic constant inputs to the velocity and attenuation models are adjusted to optimize the agreement with experiment. The method is demonstrated using several specimens of Inconel 718 and Waspaloy, and further tested using four specimens of pure Nickel.

  12. Characterization of Olive Oil by Ultrasonic and Physico-chemical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alouache, B.; Khechena, F. K.; Lecheb, F.; Boutkedjirt, T.

    Olive oil excels by its nutritional and medicinal benefits. It can be consumed without any treatment. However, its quality can be altered by inadequate storage conditions or if it is mixed with other kinds of oils. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the ability of ultrasonic methods to characterize and control olive oil quality. By using of a transducer of 2.25 MHz nominal frequency, in pulse echo mode, ultrasonic parameters, such as propagation velocity and attenuation,have been measured for pure olive oil and for its mixtures with sunflower oil at different proportions. Mechanical properties, such as density and viscosity, have also been determined. The results of ultrasonic measurements are consistent with those obtained by physico-chemical methods, such as rancidity degree, acid index, UV specific extinction coefficient and viscosity. They show that the ultrasonic method allows to distinguish between mixtures at different proportions. The study allows concluding that ultrasound techniques can be considered as a useful complement to existing physico-chemical analysis techniques.

  13. Fremdsprachenunterricht als Kommunikationsprozess (Foreign Language Teaching as a Communicative Process). Language Centre News, No. 1. Focus on Spoken Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butzkamm, Wolfgang

    Teaching, as a communicative process, ranges between purely message-oriented communication (the goal) and purely language-oriented communication (a means). Classroom discourse ("Close the window", etc.) is useful as a drill but is also message-oriented. Skill in message-oriented communication is acquired only through practice in this kind of…

  14. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  15. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  16. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  17. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  19. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification. An obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive...

  20. 21 CFR 884.2660 - Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. 884.2660... Devices § 884.2660 Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. (a) Identification. A fetal ultrasonic monitor is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from the pregnant...

  1. 21 CFR 884.2660 - Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. 884.2660... Devices § 884.2660 Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. (a) Identification. A fetal ultrasonic monitor is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from the pregnant...

  2. Early communication deficits in the Shank1 knockout mouse model for autism spectrum disorder: Developmental aspects and effects of social context.

    PubMed

    Sungur, A Özge; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in SHANK genes were repeatedly reported in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ASD is a group of neurodevelopmental disorders diagnosed by persistent deficits in social communication/interaction across multiple contexts, with restricted/repetitive patterns of behavior. To date, diagnostic criteria for ASD are purely behaviorally defined and reliable biomarkers have still not been identified. The validity of mouse models for ASD therefore strongly relies on their behavioral phenotype. Here, we studied communication by means of isolation-induced pup ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in the Shank1 mouse model for ASD by comparing Shank1(-/-) null mutant, Shank1(+/-) heterozygous, and Shank1(+/+) wildtype littermate controls. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Shank1 deletions on developmental aspects of communication in order to see whether ASD-related communication deficits are due to general impairment or delay in development. Second, we focused on social context effects on USV production. We show that Shank1(-/-) pups vocalized less and displayed a delay in the typical inverted U-shaped developmental USV emission pattern with USV rates peaking on postnatal day (PND) 9, resulting in a prominent genotype difference on PND6. Moreover, testing under social conditions revealed even more prominently genotype-dependent deficits regardless of the familiarity of the social context. As communication by definition serves a social function, introducing a social component to the typically nonsocial test environment could therefore help to reveal communication deficits in mouse models for ASD. Together, these results indicate that SHANK1 is involved in acoustic communication across species, with genetic alterations in SHANK1 resulting in social communication/interaction deficits. Autism Res 2016, 9: 696-709. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26419918

  3. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  4. Arctic acoustics ultrasonic modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamuel, Jacques R.

    1990-03-01

    A unique collection of laboratory ultrasonic modeling results are presented revealing and characterizing hidden pulsed seismoacoustic wave phenomena from 3-D range dependent liquid/solid boundaries. The research succeeded in isolating and identifying low frequency (10 to 500 Hz) transmission loss mechanisms and provided physical insight into Arctic acoustic problems generally beyond the state-of-the-art of theoretical and numerical analysis. The ultrasonic modeling studies dealt with controversial issues and existing discrepancies on seismo-acoustic waves at water/ice interface, sea ice thickness determination, low frequency transmission loss, and bottom leaky Rayleigh waves. The areas investigated include leaky Rayleigh waves at water/ice interface, leaky flexural waves in floating ice plates, effects of dry/wet cracks in sea ice on plate waves and near grazing acoustic waves, edge waves in floating plates, low frequency backscatter from ice keel width resonances, conversion of underwater acoustic waves into plate waves by keels, nondispersive flexural wave along apex of small angle solid wedge, Scholte and leaky Rayleigh waves along apex of immersed 90 ice wedge, backscatter from trailing edge of floes, floating plate resonances associated with near-grazing underwater acoustic waves, acoustic coupling between adjacent floes, and multiple bottom leaky Rayleigh wave components in water layer over solid bottom.

  5. Ultrasonic Characterization of Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara; Johnston, Patrick; Haldren, Harold; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials have seen an increased use in aerospace in recent years and it is expected that this trend will continue due to the benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and other factors. Ongoing work at NASA involves the investigation of the large-scale use of composites for spacecraft structures (SLS components, Orion Composite Crew Module, etc). NASA is also involved in work to enable the use of composites in advanced aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). In both areas (space and aeronautics) there is a need for new nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are appropriate for characterizing composite materials. This paper will present an overview of NASA's needs for characterizing aerospace composites, including a description of planned and ongoing work under ACP for the detection of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking. The research approaches include investigation of angle array, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods. The use of ultrasonic simulation tools for optimizing and developing methods will also be discussed.

  6. Split-mode ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskii, Igor; Cremaldi, Lucien

    2013-08-01

    A split-mode ultrasonic transducer is investigated in both theory and experiment. This transducer is a two-dimensional structure of periodically poled domains in a ferroelectric wafer with free surfaces. The acoustic vibrations are excited by a radio frequency electric current applied along the length of the wafer, which allows the basal-plane surfaces to be free of metal coatings and thus ready for further biomedical applications. A specific physical property of this transducer consists of the multiple acousto-electric resonances, which occur due to an acoustic mode split when the acoustic half-wavelength is equal to the domain length. Possible applications include ultrasonic generation and detection at the micro-scale, intravascular sonification and visualization, ultrasound therapy of localized small areas such as the eye, biomedical applications for cell cultures, and traditional nondestructive testing including bones and tissues. A potential use of a non-metallized wafer is a therapeutic application with double action that is both ultrasound itself and an electric field over the wafer. The experimental measurements and theoretical calculations are in good agreement. PMID:23927212

  7. [Biological properties of immunochemically pure tetanus antitoxin].

    PubMed

    Kornilova, A V; Khavkin, Iu A; Batalova, T A; Aleksevich, Ia I; Baschenko, I A

    1983-02-01

    Immunochemically pure tetanus antitoxin obtained from enzyme-treated horse serum is less reactogenic and anaphylactogenic and possesses higher therapeutic properties than antitoxin purified by nonspecific physico-chemical methods and containing ballast antigens. Due to its increased persistence in the recipient's body, the immunochemically pure antitoxin induces passive immunity in considerably lower doses than the preparations purified by the method "Diaferm-3". PMID:6340393

  8. Notes on the ambitwistor pure spinor string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusinskas, Renann Lipinski

    2016-05-01

    In this work, some aspects of the ambitwistor pure spinor string are investigated. The b ghost is presented and its main properties are derived in a simple way, very similar to the usual pure spinor b ghost construction. The heterotic case is also addressed with a new proposal for the BRST charge. The BRST cohomology is shown to correctly describe the heterotic supergravity spectrum and a semi-composite b ghost is constructed.

  9. Floating Ultrasonic Transducer Inspection System and Method for Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Johnston, Patrick H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for inspecting a structural sample using ultrasonic energy includes positioning an ultrasonic transducer adjacent to a surface of the sample, and then transmitting ultrasonic energy into the sample. Force pulses are applied to the transducer concurrently with transmission of the ultrasonic energy. A host machine processes ultrasonic return pulses from an ultrasonic pulser/receiver to quantify attenuation of the ultrasonic energy within the sample. The host machine detects a defect in the sample using the quantified level of attenuation. The method may include positioning a dry couplant between an ultrasonic transducer and the surface. A system includes an actuator, an ultrasonic transducer, a dry couplant between the transducer the sample, a scanning device that moves the actuator and transducer, and a measurement system having a pulsed actuator power supply, an ultrasonic pulser/receiver, and a host machine that executes the above method.

  10. A control system of mobile navigation robot for precise spraying based ultrasonic detecting and ARM embedded technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiuying; Li, Cuiling; Wang, Xiu; Yue, Xinpeng; Peng, Yankun

    2011-06-01

    This paper described a control system of mobile navigation robot for precision spraying in greenhouse environment, which were composed of main control module, motor driving module, ultrasonic detecting module and wirless remote control module. The hard circuits of control system were built. The main control module used ARM7TDMI-S-based LPC2210 micro-processing controller. The motor driving module consisted of voltage amplifier circuit based SN74LS245N and DM74LS244N chips, RC filter circuit, and HM-YZ-30 DC brush motor driver. The ultrasonic detecting module consisted of four standard ultrasonic ranging modules which were arranged on the four sides around the mobile navigation robot, and used GM8125 chip to expand serial communication interfaces. An obstacle-avoiding strategy and its algorithm were proposed and the control programs of mobile navigation robot were programmed. The mobile navigation robot for spraying can realize the actions such as starting and stopping, forward and backward moving, accelerate and decelerate motion, and right and left turn. Finally, the functional experiments of the mobile navigation robot were conducted in the laboratory environment. The results showed that the ultrasonic detecting distance of the robot was 50.5mm-1832.0mm and detecting blind zone was less than 50mm, the ultrasonic detecting angle of individual ultrasonic detecting module of robot was similar to U-shaped and its vaule was about 45.66°, and the moving path of navigation robot was approximately linear.

  11. Rehabilitation of pure alexia: A review

    PubMed Central

    Starrfelt, Randi; Ólafsdóttir, Rannveig Rós; Arendt, Ida-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Acquired reading problems caused by brain injury (alexia) are common, either as a part of an aphasic syndrome, or as an isolated symptom. In pure alexia, reading is impaired while other language functions, including writing, are spared. Being in many ways a simple syndrome, one would think that pure alexia was an easy target for rehabilitation efforts. We review the literature on rehabilitation of pure alexia from 1990 to the present, and find that patients differ widely on several dimensions, such as alexia severity and associated deficits. Many patients reported to have pure alexia in the reviewed studies, have associated deficits such as agraphia or aphasia and thus do not strictly conform to the diagnosis. Few studies report clear and generalisable effects of training, none report control data, and in many cases the reported findings are not supported by statistics. We can, however, tentatively conclude that Multiple Oral Re-reading techniques may have some effect in mild pure alexia where diminished reading speed is the main problem, while Tacile-Kinesthetic training may improve letter identification in more severe cases of alexia. There is, however, still a great need for well-designed and controlled studies of rehabilitation of pure alexia. PMID:23808895

  12. Wire Crimp Termination Verification Using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp terminations is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp termination and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which is a standard for assessing crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies such as undercrimping, missing wire strands, incomplete wire insertion, partial insulation removal, and incorrect wire gauge are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the nondestructive ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with destructive testing) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying this technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented. The instrument is based on a two-jaw type crimp tool suitable for butt-splice type connections. Finally, an approach for application to multipin indenter type crimps will be discussed.

  13. An ultrasonic transducer transient compensator design based on a simplified Variable Structure Control algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaodong; Wilkinson, Antony J; Paulson, Kevin S

    2014-02-01

    A non-linear control method, known as Variable Structure Control (VSC), is employed to reduce the duration of ultrasonic (US) transducer transients. A physically realizable system using a simplified form of the VSC algorithm is proposed for standard piezoelectric transducers and simulated. Results indicate a VSC-controlled transmitter reduces the transient duration to less than a carrier wave cycle. Applications include high capacity ultrasound communication and localization systems. PMID:23993746

  14. Compound cavity theory of resonant phase modulation in laser self-mixing ultrasonic vibration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yufeng; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical basis of self-mixing interference (SMI) employing a resonant phase modulator is explored to prove its tempting advantages. The adopted method induces a pure phase carrier without increasing system complexity. A simple time-domain signal process is used to estimate modulation depth and precisely track vibrating trail, which promises the flexibility of measuring ultrasonic vibration regardless of the constraint of the Bessel functions. The broad bandwidth, low speckle noise, compact, safe, and easy operating SMI system obtains the best resolution of a poor reflection environment. Numerical simulation discusses the spectrum broadening and errors due to multiple reflections. Experimental results agree with theory coherently and are compared with laser Doppler vibration meter showing a dynamical error better than 20 nm in ultrasonic vibration measurement.

  15. Ultrasonic angle beam standard reflector. [ultrasonic nondestructive inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method that provides an impression profile in a reference standard material utilized in inspecting critically stressed components with pulsed ultrasound is described. A die stamp having an I letter is used to impress the surface of a reference material. The die stamp is placed against the surface and struck with an inertia imparting member to impress the I in the reference standard material. Upset may appear on the surface as a result of the impression and is removed to form a smooth surface. The stamping and upset removal is repeated until the entire surface area of a depth control platform on the die stamp uniformly contacts the material surface. The I impression profile in the reference standard material is utilized for reflecting pulsed ultrasonic beams for inspection purposes.

  16. Ultrasonic sensing of porous granular media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathi, Sanjai; Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of phenomena for sensing porosity and grain growth in powder metallurgical processes using ultrasonic techniques is demonstrated. Ultrasonic velocity is a strong function of pore concentration and provides a potential means for in situ measurement of this quantity. Ultrasonic attenuation, measured in the low megahertz range, depends on grain size and pore content. When velocity data and a scattering theory are used to account for the attenuation due to pores, attenuation data may be used to infer the grain size. Predictions of existing scattering theories are compared with experimental observations, and substantial disagreements are attributed to modeling inadequacies.

  17. Ultrasonic technology improves drill cuttings disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Avern, N.; Copercini, A.

    1997-07-01

    Advancements are being made by employing ultrasonics for onsite cuttings size reduction for slurrification prior to disposal. The size reduction proficiency of this new ultrasonics slurrification system as a medium to reduce the particle size of drill cuttings presents operators with a system that can enhance existing disposal techniques. This article presents results from a recent field trial, where ultrasonic processors were used to Agip (UK) Limited to reduce the particle size of drill cuttings prior to disposal into the water column and natural dispersement.

  18. Ultrasonic flow imaging system: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Lawrence, W.P.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1991-09-01

    This report examines the feasibility and potential problems in developing a real-time ultrasonic flow imaging instrument for on-line monitoring of mixed-phased flows such as coal slurries. State-of-the-art ultrasonic imaging techniques are assessed for this application. Reflection and diffraction tomographies are proposed for further development, including image-reconstruction algorithms and parallel processing systems. A conventional ultrasonic C-scan technique is used to demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the particle motion in a solid/water flow. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Model-based optimization of ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Heikkola, Erkki; Laitinen, Mika

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulation and automated optimization of Langevin-type ultrasonic transducers are investigated. These kind of transducers are standard components in various applications of high-power ultrasonics such as ultrasonic cleaning and chemical processing. Vibration of the transducer is simulated numerically by standard finite element method and the dimensions and shape parameters of a transducer are optimized with respect to different criteria. The novelty value of this work is the combination of the simulation model and the optimization problem by efficient automatic differentiation techniques. The capabilities of this approach are demonstrated with practical test cases in which various aspects of the operation of a transducer are improved. PMID:15474952

  20. Waveguide ultrasonic force microscopy at 60 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, K.; Kolosov, O. V.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Wright, O. B.

    2000-04-01

    We present measurements using ultrasonic force microscopy at ˜60 MHz, operating in a "waveguide" mode in which the cantilever base is vibrated and flexural ultrasonic vibrations are launched down the cantilever without exciting any particular cantilever resonance. The nonlinearity of the tip-sample force-distance curve allows the conversion of a modulated ultrasonic frequency into a low frequency vibration of the cantilever, detected in a conventional atomic force microscope. Images of Ge quantum dots on a Si substrate show contrast related to elasticity and adhesion differences, and this is interpreted with the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model of the force-distance curve.

  1. Ultrasonic measurement of milk coagulation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali, F.; Moudden, A.; Faiz, B.; Amghar, A.; Maze, G.; Montero de Espinosa, F.; Akhnak, M.

    2001-12-01

    Using a pulse reflection technique an ultrasonic system has been developed to monitor in situ the coagulation process of rennetted milk. The velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through coagulating milk were continuously monitored. The observed changes in ultrasonic velocity during coagulation were used to predict the coagulation time. The coagulation time is indicative of the transition from the enzymatic phase to the physicochemical phase. The determination of coagulation time has a decisive role in determining the qualities of the end product in cheesemaking.

  2. On-line ultrasonic gas entrainment monitor

    DOEpatents

    Day, Clifford K.; Pedersen, Herbert N.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus employing ultrasonic energy for detecting and measuring the quantity of gas bubbles present in liquids being transported through pipes. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned along the longitudinal axis of a fluid duct, oriented to transmit acoustic energy radially of the duct around the circumference of the enclosure walls. The back-reflected energy is received centrally of the duct and interpreted as a measure of gas entrainment. One specific embodiment employs a conical reflector to direct the transmitted acoustic energy radially of the duct and redirect the reflected energy back to the transducer for reception. A modified embodiment employs a cylindrical ultrasonic transducer for this purpose.

  3. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing using two ultrasonic transducers for improved ultrasonic axial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiang; Xu, Xiao; Lai, Puxiang; Xu, Daxiong

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Focusing light inside highly scattering media is a challenging task in biomedical optical imaging, manipulation, and therapy. A recent invention has overcome this challenge by time reversing ultrasonically encoded diffuse light to an ultrasound-modulated volume inside a turbid medium. In this technique, a photorefractive (PR) crystal or polymer can be used as the phase conjugate mirror for optical time reversal. Accordingly, a relatively long ultrasound burst, whose duration matches the PR response time of the PR material, is usually used to encode the diffuse light. This long burst results in poor focusing resolution along the acoustic axis. In this work, we propose to use two intersecting ultrasound beams, emitted from two ultrasonic transducers at different frequencies, to modulate the diffuse light at the beat frequency within the intersection volume. We show that the time reversal of the light encoded at the beat frequency can converge back to the intersection volume. Experimentally, an acoustic axial resolution of ∼1.1  mm was demonstrated inside turbid media, agreeing with theoretical estimation. PMID:24194060

  4. Linear and Nonlinear Ultrasonic Properties of Granular Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.; Berge, P.A.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.M.; Bertete-Auguirre, H.; Wildenschild, D.; Trombino, C.N.; Hardy, E.

    2000-04-20

    The ultrasonic pulse transmission method (100-500 kHz) was adapted to measure compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities for synthetic soils fabricated from quartz-clay and quartz-peat mixtures. Velocities were determined as samples were loaded by small (up to 0.1 MPa) uniaxial stress to determine how stress at grain contacts affects ave amplitudes, velocities, and frequency content. Samples were fabricated from quartz sand mixed with either a swelling clay or peat (natural cellulose). P velocities in these dry synthetic soil samples were low, ranging from about 230 to 430 m/s for pure sand, about 91 to 420 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 230 to 470 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. S velocities were about half of the P velocity in most cases, about 130 to 250 m/s for pure sand, about 75-220 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 88-220 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. These experiments demonstrate that P and S velocities are sensitive to the amount and type of admixed second phase at low concentrations. They found that dramatic increases in all velocities occur with small uniaxial loads, indicating strong nonlinearity of the acoustic properties. Composition and grain packing contribute to the mechanical response at grain contacts and the nonlinear response at low stresses.

  5. Nokia PureView oversampling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuori, Tero; Alakarhu, Juha; Salmelin, Eero; Partinen, Ari

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes Nokia's PureView oversampling imaging technology as well as the product, Nokia 808 PureView, featuring it. The Nokia PureView imaging technology is the combination of a large, super high resolution 41Mpix with high performance Carl Zeiss optics. Large sensor enables a pixel oversampling technique that reduces an image taken at full resolution into a lower resolution picture, thus achieving higher definition and light sensitivity. One oversampled super pixel in image file is formed by using many sensor pixels. A large sensor enables also a lossless zoom. If a user wants to use the lossless zoom, the sensor image is cropped. However, up-scaling is not needed as in traditional digital zooming usually used in mobile devices. Lossless zooming means image quality that does not have the digital zooming artifacts as well as no optical zooming artifacts like zoom lens system distortions. Zooming with PureView is also completely silent. PureView imaging technology is the result of many years of research and development and the tangible fruits of this work are exceptional image quality, lossless zoom, and superior low light performance.

  6. Ultrasonic inspection and deployment apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Mech, Jr., Stephen J.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic inspection apparatus for the inspection of metal structures, especially installed pipes. The apparatus combines a specimen inspection element, an acoustical velocity sensing element, and a surface profiling element, all in one scanning head. A scanning head bellows contains a volume of oil above the pipe surface, serving as acoustical couplant between the scanning head and the pipe. The scanning head is mounted on a scanning truck which is mobile around a circular track surrounding the pipe. The scanning truck has sufficient motors, gears, and position encoders to allow the scanning head six degrees of motion freedom. A computer system continually monitors acoustical velocity, and uses that parameter to process surface profiling and inspection data. The profiling data is used to automatically control scanning head position and alignment and to define a coordinate system used to identify and interpret inspection data. The apparatus is suitable for highly automated, remote application in hostile environments, particularly high temperature and radiation areas.

  7. Ultrasonic thermometry using pulse techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Carnevale, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse techniques have been developed which, when applied to inert gases, provide temperature measurements up to 8000 K. The response time can be less than 1 msec. This is a significant feature in studying shock-heated or combusting gases. Using a momentary contact coupling technique, temperature has been measured inside steel from 300 to 1500 K. Thin-wire sensors have been used above 2000 K in nuclear and industrial applications where conditions preclude the use of thermocouples, resistance devices, or optical pyrometers. At 2500 K, temperature sensitivity of 0.1% is obtained in Re wire sensors 5 cm long by timing five round trips with an electronic instrument that resolves the time interval between selected echoes to 0.1 microsec. Sensors have been operated at rotational speeds over 2000 rpm and in noisy environments. Temperature profiling of up to ten regions using only a single guided path or beam has also been accomplished.

  8. Ultrasonic characterization of metallic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.D. Jr.

    1987-11-01

    A set of diffusion bonded copper samples was prepared at different temperatures and times, allowing the bonding to proceed across the planar interfaces. To obtain a second set, interfaces were roughened to various degrees followed by diffusion bonding at a designated time/temperature condition. On all samples, ultrasonic reflection coefficient (R) maps of the bonded interfaces were obtained over a broad frequency range. In addition, the bond strengths, ..sigma.., of the interfaces were determined, thus providing an empirical ..sigma..-R correlation. Nearly all of the specimens tested failed along the interfaces, exposing fracture planes with distinctive features indicating originally bonded and unbonded areas. These features, examined metallographically, allowed for the successful testing of the ''distributed spring model'' by Baik and Thompson (J. NDE 4, 177, 1984). This model was used as an intermediate step in the development of a bond strength model to explain the observed ..sigma..-R correlation, the beginnings of which are discussed. 32 refs., 22 figs.

  9. Ultrasonic sensing of powder densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1992-01-01

    An independent scattering theory has been applied to the interpretation of ultrasonic velocity measurements made on porous metal samples produced either by a cold or a high-temperature compaction process. The results suggest that the pores in both processes are not spherical, an aspect ration of 1:3 fitting best with the data for low (less than 4 percent) pore volume fractions. For the hot compacted powders, the pores are smooth due to active diffusional processes during processing. For these types of voids, the results can be extended to a pore fraction of 10 percent, at which point voids form an interconnected network that violates the model assumptions. The cold pressed samples are not as well predicted by the theory because of poor particle bonding.

  10. Ultrasonic assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.

    2002-06-01

    A means of assessing the internal structure of teeth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a short laser pulse is discussed. Some key advantages of laser-generated ultrasound over more traditional contact transducer methods are that it is noncontact and nondestructive in nature and requires no special surface preparation. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary nondestructive, noncontact technique with a very small detection footprint. This combination of techniques, termed laser-based ultrasonics, holds promise for future in-vivo diagnostics of tooth health. In this paper, initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented on an extracted human incisor. Results show the technique to be sensitive to the enamel/dentin, dentin/pulp, and dentin/cementum junctions as well as a region of dead tracts in the dentin.

  11. Ultrasonic flowmetering with reflected pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, D. C.; Glicksman, L. R.; Peterson, C. R.

    1984-09-01

    Consolidated Edison of New York City has expressed the need for a new gasmeter for accurately monitoring large diameter interdistrict gas transmission lines for loss due to theft or leakage. A research effort aimed at developing a new flowmeter for Con Edison is described. The new flowmeter uses ultrasonic flowmetering technology in a novel way to meet Con Edison's four major design specifications: the flowmeter should be accurate to 0.5 percent of totalized flow over one year, it should be much simpler to install than a conventional flowmeter, essentially meaning that excavation be limited to that necessary to expose the upper surface of a buried main; its installation must not require service shutdown; and, the flowmeter should not require zero-flow calibration once installed in the gas main.

  12. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  13. Satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Philip A.

    A review of the economic and technological status of the satellite communications industry is presented. The history of satellite communications is outlined, focusing on the launching of Syncom III in 1963. The basic operation of communication satellites is explained. The differences between C and Ku frequency bands are examined. Economic issues related to satellite communications are discussed in detail.

  14. Satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, M. K.

    1982-11-01

    The paper describes the basic principles and the historial development of satellite communications. Various satellite systems for global communications are discused and compared. Some typical operational communication satellite systems summary including geostationary systems are presented. Considerations leading to the system design including the link design for various multiple access techniques and the future trends in satellite communications systems are also discussed.

  15. Transracial Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur L.

    This book explores and explains communication among different racial groups within the scope of existing communication theory. Following a brief introduction, chapters cover "Directions in Transracial Communication" (definitions, process, structurization, and purpose); "Culture and Transracial Communication" (a viewpoint on culture, time, family,…

  16. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahk, K. J.; Dhar, D. K.; Malago, M.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  17. Ultrasonic atomization for spray drying: a versatile technique for the preparation of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bittner, B; Kissel, T

    1999-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BDA) loaded microspheres with a spherical shape and smooth surface structure were successfully prepared from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) using an ultrasonic nozzle installed in a Niro laboratory spray dryer. Process and formulation parameters were investigated with respect to their influence on microsphere characteristics, such as particle size, loading capacity, and release properties. Preparation of microspheres in yields of more than 50% was achieved using an ultrasonic atomizer connected to a stream of carrier air. Microsphere characteristics could be modified by changing several technological parameters. An increased polymer concentration of the feed generated larger particles with a significantly reduced initial release of the protein. Moreover, microspheres with a smooth surface structure were obtained from the organic polymer solution with the highest viscosity. Microparticles with a low BSA loading showed a large central cavity surrounded by a thin polymer layer in scanning electron microspheres. A high protein loading led to an enlargement of the shell layer, or even to dense particles without any cavities. A continuous in vitro release pattern of BSA was obtained from the particles with low protein loading. Glass transition temperatures (Tg) of the microspheres before and after lyophilization did not differ from those of the BSA loaded particles prepared by spray drying with a rotary atomizer. Analysis of the polymer by gel permeation chromatography indicated that ultrasonication had no effect on polymer molecular weight. Molecular weight and polydispersity of the pure polymer, placebo microspheres prepared by spray drying, and placebo microspheres prepared using the ultrasonic nozzle were in the same range. In conclusion, ultrasonic atomization represents a versatile and reliable technique for the production of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres without inducing a degradation of the polymer matrix. Particle characteristics

  18. Ultrasonics used to measure residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to measure residual stress in metal structures. By using this method, various forms of wave propagation in metals are possible, and more thorough analysis of complex geometric structures may be had.

  19. Ultrasonic propagation in gases at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, C.; Carnevale, E. H.; Lynworth, L. C.; Uva, S.

    1970-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse method /1 to 3 MHz/ measures both sound speed and absorption in monatomic and polyatomic gases in a temperature range of 300 to 20000 degrees K at atmospheric pressure. Helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are investigated.

  20. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  1. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  2. Tailoring ultrasonic beams with optoacoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Alex; Gspan, Stefan J.; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2003-06-01

    A combination of laser-induced ultrasound generation and ultrasonic holography for spatial control of the generated ultrasonic pulse is presented. Ultrasound is produced by absorption of laser pulses at an absorbing layer in a water tank via the optoacoustic effect. In order to produce a defined ultrasonic frequency in the MHz range, the laser pulses are harmonically time-modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). Additionally, the laser intensity is spatially controlled. This is realized with a high resolution liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCD). A computer generated pattern is displayed at the LCD and projected by the expanded laser beam to an absorptive layer in the water tank. As a result, the emitted ultrasonic wave emerges in a predetermined way, which is an acoustical analogue to the effect of a "diffractive optical element" in laser optics. The flexible method of optical ultrasound generation and diffractive steering promises new applications in medical and technical ultrasound diagnostics.

  3. Continuous flow measurements using fixed ultrasonic meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Rick

    1993-01-01

    USGS has or soon will be installing four continuous flow-monitoring stations in the delta that will use ultrasonic velocity meters (DVM). Funding for the stations has been provided by USGS, DWR, USBR, and Contra Costa Water District.

  4. Ultrasonic temperature measurements with fiber optic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Wu, Nan; Zhou, Jingcheng; Ma, Tong; Liu, Yuqian; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic temperature measurements have been developed and widely applied in non-contact temperature tests in many industries. However, using optical fibers to build ultrasound generators are novel. This paper reports this new fiber optic ultrasonic system based on the generator of gold nanoparticles/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites. The optical acoustic system was designed to test the change of temperature on the aluminum plate and the temperature of the torch in the air. This paper explores the relationship between the ultrasonic transmission and the change of temperature. From the experimental results, the trend of ultrasonic speed was different in the aluminum plate and air with the change of temperature. Since the system can measure the average temperature of the transmission path, it will have significant influence on simulating the temperature distribution.

  5. New pressure cell for ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, Michal; Huxley, Andrew; Kamenev, Konstantin

    2013-06-01

    Ultrasonic interferometry at high pressure remains a technical challenge as the small sample space requires the application of very high-frequency ultrasound. Here we present the design of a new cell developed specifically for ultrasonic measurements of single crystals at low temperatures (2K) and high pressures (5GPa). The design allows greater sample space (compared to a conventional diamond anvil cell) and simultaneous measurement of ultrasonic attenuation and velocities. Coupling the fine transducers to spherical sapphire anvils reduces background and enables different polarizations of the ultrasonic wave to be measured at the same pressure and temperature conditions. The results are used to deduce the elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of a crystal. The finite element analysis of the cell together with the pressure calibration curves and test data taken on UGe2 are presented.

  6. Semiconductor measurement technology: Microelectronic ultrasonic bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, G. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Information for making high quality ultrasonic wire bonds is presented as well as data to provide a basic understanding of the ultrasonic systems used. The work emphasizes problems and methods of solving them. The required measurement equipment is first introduced. This is followed by procedures and techniques used in setting up a bonding machine, and then various machine- or operator-induced reliability problems are discussed. The characterization of the ultrasonic system and its problems are followed by in-process bonding studies and work on the ultrasonic bonding (welding) mechanism. The report concludes with a discussion of various effects of bond geometry and wire metallurgical characteristics. Where appropriate, the latest, most accurate value of a particular measurement has been substituted for an earlier reported one.

  7. [Study of pure titanium electrolytic polishing].

    PubMed

    Morita, N

    1990-03-01

    This study attempted to polish pure titanium test pieces electrolytically to mirror surface at the size of cast denture frames. Electrolytic polishing of pure titanium could be done on an area of 30 cm2 with a non-aqueous electrolyte. Small pure titanium plates could be polished electrolytically, but a uniformly smooth surface could not be obtained easily with large testpiece. The optimal electrolytic conditions were 30 V for 6 min at 25 degrees C using a solution consisting of 70 ml ethyl alcohol, 30 ml iso-propyl alcohol, 6 g aluminum chloride, and 25 g zinc chloride. The solution was safe and had less restriction of frequency of use. PMID:2135513

  8. Engineering arbitrary pure and mixed quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Pechen, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    Controlled manipulation by atomic- and molecular-scale quantum systems has attracted a lot of research attention in recent years. A fundamental problem is to provide deterministic methods for controlled engineering of arbitrary quantum states. This work proposes a deterministic method for engineering arbitrary pure and mixed states of a wide class of quantum systems. The method exploits a special combination of incoherent and coherent controls (incoherent and coherent radiation) and has two properties which are specifically important for manipulating by quantum systems: it realizes the strongest possible degree of their state control, complete density matrix controllability, meaning the ability to steer arbitrary pure and mixed initial states into any desired pure or mixed final state, and it is all-to-one, such that each particular control transfers all initial system states into one target state.

  9. Surface vibrational spectroscopy of pure liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Du, Q.; Shen, Y.R.

    1991-03-01

    We report the use of infrared visible sum frequency generation (SFG) to obtain the surface vibrational spectra of pure liquid methanol and water. These are the first surface vibrational spectra ever obtained for pure liquids. We have also deduced from the SFG results the absolute orientations of molecules at the pure liquid/vapor interface. The surface methanol molecules appear to have their CH{sub 3} groups projecting out of the liquid in agreement with the theoretical prediction. For the orientation of surface water molecules, however, different calculations have yielded very different predictions. Our SFG measurement provides clear evidence that the molecules are oriented with an unbonded hydrogen projecting out of the liquid. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Ultrasonic intensification as a tool for enhanced microbial biofuel yields.

    PubMed

    Naveena, Balakrishnan; Armshaw, Patricia; Tony Pembroke, J

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonication has recently received attention as a novel bioprocessing tool for process intensification in many areas of downstream processing. Ultrasonic intensification (periodic ultrasonic treatment during the fermentation process) can result in a more effective homogenization of biomass and faster energy and mass transfer to biomass over short time periods which can result in enhanced microbial growth. Ultrasonic intensification can allow the rapid selective extraction of specific biomass components and can enhance product yields which can be of economic benefit. This review focuses on the role of ultrasonication in the extraction and yield enhancement of compounds from various microbial sources, specifically algal and cyanobacterial biomass with a focus on the production of biofuels. The operating principles associated with the process of ultrasonication and the influence of various operating conditions including ultrasonic frequency, power intensity, ultrasonic duration, reactor designs and kinetics applied for ultrasonic intensification are also described. PMID:26379772

  11. Thermography And Ultrasonics Find Flaws In Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Smith, Barry T.; Winfree, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Flaws first located in infrared imagery, then probed ultrasonically to reveal details. Thermographic and ultrasonic techniques, applied sequentially, constitute basis of developmental method of nondestructive inspection of structures made of lightweight composite materials like carbon-fiber/epoxy-matrix laminates. Method enables rapid detection and evaluation of damage and other flaws in composite structures. Does not require access to both sides of structure to be inspected.

  12. Method of ultrasonic measurement of texture

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R. Bruce; Smith, John F.; Lee, Seung S.; Li, Yan

    1993-10-12

    A method for measuring texture of metal plates or sheets using non-destructive ultrasonic investigation includes measuring the velocity of ultrasonic energy waves in lower order plate modes in one or more directions, and measuring phase velocity dispersion of higher order modes of the plate or sheet if needed. Texture or preferred grain orientation can be derived from these measurements with improves reliability and accuracy. The method can be utilized in production on moving metal plate or sheet.

  13. Method of ultrasonic measurement of texture

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R.B.; Smith, J.F.; Lee, S.S.; Taejon Ch'ungmam; Yan Li.

    1993-10-12

    A method for measuring texture of metal plates or sheets using non-destructive ultrasonic investigation includes measuring the velocity of ultrasonic energy waves in lower order plate modes in one or more directions, and measuring phase velocity dispersion of higher order modes of the plate or sheet if needed. Texture or preferred grain orientation can be derived from these measurements with improves reliability and accuracy. The method can be utilized in production on moving metal plate or sheet. 9 figures.

  14. General relationships between ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, M.; Jaynes, E. T.; Miller, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    General relationships between the ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion are presented. The validity of these nonlocal relationships hinges only on the properties of causality and linearity, and does not depend upon details of the mechanism responsible for the attenuation and dispersion. Approximate, nearly local relationships are presented and are demonstrated to predict accurately the ultrasonic dispersion in solutions of hemoglobin from the results of attenuation measurements.

  15. Ultrasonic sensor and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    An ultrasonic sensor system and method of use for measuring transit time though a liquid sample, using one ultrasonic transducer coupled to a precision time interval counter. The timing circuit captures changes in transit time, representing small changes in the velocity of sound transmitted, over necessarily small time intervals (nanoseconds) and uses the transit time changes to identify the presence of non-conforming constituents in the sample.

  16. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

  17. Ultrasonic Sensor and Method of use

    SciTech Connect

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1999-07-22

    An ultrasonic sensor system and method of use for measuring transit time through a liquid sample, comprising at least one ultrasonic transducer coupled to a precision time interval counter. The timing circuit captures changes in transit time, representing small changes in the velocity of sound transmitted, over necessarily small time intervals (nanoseconds) and uses the transit time changes to identify the presence of non-conforming constituents in the sample.

  18. Ultrasonic flow measurements for irrigation process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziani, Elmostafa; Bennouna, Mustapha; Boissier, Raymond

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents the state of the art of the general principle of liquid flow measurements by ultrasonic method, and problems of flow measurements. We present an ultrasonic flowmeter designed according to smart sensors concept, for the measurement of irrigation water flowing through pipelines or open channels, using the ultrasonic transit time approach. The new flowmeter works on the principle of measuring time delay differences between sound pulses transmitted upstream and downstream in the flowing liquid. The speed of sound in the flowing medium is eliminated as a variable because the flowrate calculations are based on the reciprocals of the transmission times. The transit time difference is digitally measured by means of a suitable, microprocessor controlled logic. This type of ultrasonic flowmeter will be widely used in industry and water management, it is well studied in this work, followed by some experimental results. For pressurized channels, we use one pair of ultrasonic transducer arranged in proper positions and directions of the pipe, in this case, to determine the liquid velocity, a real time on-line analysis taking account the geometries of the hydraulic system, is applied to the obtained ultrasonic data. In the open channels, we use a single or two pairs of ultrasonic emitter-receiver according to the desired performances. Finally, the goals of this work consist in integrating the smart sensor into irrigation systems monitoring in order to evaluate potential advantages and demonstrate their performance, on the other hand, to understand and use ultrasonic approach for determining flow characteristics and improving flow measurements by reducing errors caused by disturbances of the flow profiles.

  19. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals. PMID:25261361

  20. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients. PMID:27088926

  1. BRST and the pure spinor formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J. Antonio

    2008-03-06

    The aim of this talk is to show the relation between the standard BRST approach of the GS superstring with the quantization technics used in the pure spinor approach to superstring. To that end we will use the Batalin-Fradkin-Tyutin (BFT) conversion program of second class constraints to first class constraints in the GS superstring using light cone coordinates. By applying this systematic procedure we were able to obtain a gauge system that is equivalent to the recent model proposed in [1] to relate the GS superstring to the pure spinor formalism.

  2. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  3. Ultrasonic imaging techniques for breast cancer detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.; Huang, L.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology can enhance its relevance to detection of early-stage breast cancers. Ultrasonic evaluation of breast lesions is desirable because it is quick, inexpensive, and does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors, thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering mortality, morbidity, and remission percentages. In this work, a novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method that exploits straight-ray migration is described. This technique, commonly used in seismic imaging, accounts for scattering more accurately than standard ultrasonic approaches, thus providing superior image resolution. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using a pulse-echo approach. The data are processed using the ultrasonic migration method and results are compared to standard linear ultrasound and to x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions and features of approximately 1mm are resolved, although better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also briefly discussed.

  4. A finite element model for ultrasonic cutting.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Margaret; MacBeath, Alan; McCulloch, Euan; Cardoni, Andrea

    2006-12-22

    Using a single-blade ultrasonic cutting device, a study of ultrasonic cutting of three very different materials is conducted using specimens of cheese, polyurethane foam and epoxy resin. Initial finite element models are created, based on the assumption that the ultrasonic blade causes a crack to propagate in a controlled mode 1 opening, and these are validated against experimental data from three point bend fracture tests and ultrasonic cutting experiments on the materials. Subsequently, the finite element model is developed to represent ultrasonic cutting of a multi-layered material. Materials are chosen whose properties allow a model to be developed that could represent a multi-layer food product or biological structure, to enable ultrasonic cutting systems to be designed for applications both in the field of food processing and surgical procedures. The model incorporates an estimation of the friction condition between the cutting blade and the material to be cut and allows adjustment of the frequency, cutting amplitude and cutting speed. PMID:16814351

  5. Absolute calibration technique for broadband ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Calibrating an ultrasonic transducer can be performed with a reduced number of calculations and testing. A wide-band pulser is connected to an ultrasonic transducer under test to generate ultrasonic waves in a liquid. A single frequency is transmitted to the electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) and the voltage change produced is monitored. Then a broadband ultrasonic pulse is generated by the ultrasonic transducer and received by the ESAT. The output of the ESAT is amplified and input to a digitized oscilloscope for fast Fourier transform. The resulting plot is normalized with the monitored signal from the single frequency pulse. The plot is then corrected for characteristics of the membrane and diffraction effects. The transfer function of the final plot is determined. The transfer function gives the final sensitivity of the ultrasonic transducer as a function of frequency. The advantage of the system is the speed of calibrating the transducer by a reduced number of measurements and removal of the membrane and diffraction effects.

  6. Second-order coding rates for pure-loss bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark M.; Renes, Joseph M.; Guha, Saikat

    2016-03-01

    A pure-loss bosonic channel is a simple model for communication over free-space or fiber-optic links. More generally, phase-insensitive bosonic channels model other kinds of noise, such as thermalizing or amplifying processes. Recent work has established the classical capacity of all of these channels, and furthermore, it is now known that a strong converse theorem holds for the classical capacity of these channels under a particular photon-number constraint. The goal of the present paper is to initiate the study of second-order coding rates for these channels, by beginning with the simplest one, the pure-loss bosonic channel. In a second-order analysis of communication, one fixes the tolerable error probability and seeks to understand the back-off from capacity for a sufficiently large yet finite number of channel uses. We find a lower bound on the maximum achievable code size for the pure-loss bosonic channel, in terms of the known expression for its capacity and a quantity called channel dispersion. We accomplish this by proving a general "one-shot" coding theorem for channels with classical inputs and pure-state quantum outputs which reside in a separable Hilbert space. The theorem leads to an optimal second-order characterization when the channel output is finite-dimensional, and it remains an open question to determine whether the characterization is optimal for the pure-loss bosonic channel.

  7. Structure of Rat Ultrasonic Vocalizations and Its Relevance to Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kashino, Makio; Hironaka, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Rats are known to emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). These USVs have been hypothesized to hold biological meaning, and the relationship between USVs and behavior has been extensively studied. However, most of these studies looked at specific conditions, such as fear-inducing situations and sexual encounters. In the present experiment, the USVs of pairs of rats in ordinary housing conditions were recorded and their features were examined. Three clusters of USVs in the 25-, 40-, and 60-kHz range were detected, which roughly corresponded to fighting, feeding, and moving, respectively. We analyzed sequential combinations of two or more clusters using a state transition model. The results revealed a more specific correspondence between the USVs and behaviors, suggesting that rat USV may work as a type of communication tool. PMID:21124767

  8. Molecular tectonics: from enantiomerically pure sugars to enantiomerically pure triple stranded helical coordination network.

    PubMed

    Grosshans, Philippe; Jouaiti, Abdelaziz; Bulach, Véronique; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais; Nicoud, Jean-François

    2003-06-21

    The self-assembly between a bis-monodentate tecton based on two pyridine units connected to an enantiomerically pure isomannide stereoisomer and HgCl2 leads to the formation of an enantiomerically pure triple stranded helical infinite coordination network which was structurally characterised by X-ray diffraction on single crystal. PMID:12841229

  9. Method for measuring liquid viscosity and ultrasonic viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Lawrence, William P.; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1994-01-01

    An ultrasonic viscometer and method for measuring fluid viscosity are provided. Ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves are generated and coupled to the fluid. Reflections from the generated ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves are detected. Phase velocity of the fluid is determined responsive to the detected ultrasonic longitudinal waves reflections. Viscosity of the fluid is determined responsive to the detected ultrasonic shear waves reflections. Unique features of the ultrasonic viscometer include the use of a two-interface fluid and air transducer wedge to measure relative signal change and to enable self calibration and the use of a ratio of reflection coefficients for two different frequencies to compensate for environmental changes, such as temperature.

  10. Ultrasonic frogs show hyperacute phonotaxis to female courtship calls.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun-Xian; Feng, Albert S; Xu, Zhi-Min; Yu, Zu-Lin; Arch, Victoria S; Yu, Xin-Jian; Narins, Peter M

    2008-06-12

    Sound communication plays a vital role in frog reproduction, in which vocal advertisement is generally the domain of males. Females are typically silent, but in a few anuran species they can produce a feeble reciprocal call or rapping sounds during courtship. Males of concave-eared torrent frogs (Odorrana tormota) have demonstrated ultrasonic communication capacity. Although females of O. tormota have an unusually well-developed vocal production system, it is unclear whether or not they produce calls or are only passive partners in a communication system dominated by males. Here we show that before ovulation, gravid females of O. tormota emit calls that are distinct from males' advertisement calls, having higher fundamental frequencies and harmonics and shorter call duration. In the field and in a quiet, darkened indoor arena, these female calls evoke vocalizations and extraordinarily precise positive phonotaxis (a localization error of <1 degrees ), rivalling that of vertebrates with the highest localization acuity (barn owls, dolphins, elephants and humans). The localization accuracy of O. tormota is remarkable in light of their small head size (interaural distance of <1 cm), and suggests an additional selective advantage of high-frequency hearing beyond the ability to avoid masking by low-frequency background noise. PMID:18469804

  11. Temporal Ventriloquism in a Purely Temporal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jessica; Alais, David

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how audiovisual signals are combined in time for a temporal analogue of the ventriloquist effect in a purely temporal context, that is, no spatial grounding of signals or other spatial facilitation. Observers were presented with two successive intervals, each defined by a 1250-ms tone, and indicated in which interval a brief…

  12. Thrust Measurement of Pure Magnetic Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuma; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Ayabe, Tomohiro; Funaki, Ikkoh; Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Horisawa, Hideyuki

    A Pure Magnetic Sail is a deep space propulsion system consisting of a coil mounted on a spacecraft. In order to predict the thrust characteristics of a Pure Magnetic Sail in space, thrust measurement and magnetic field measurement were conducted using a scale model in a laboratory. To simulate the solar wind, a magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet provides a high density (2×1019 m-3) and high velocity (47 km/s) plasma flow that impinges on a 20-turn 25-mm-radius coil simulating a Pure Magnetic Sail. When the magnetic cavity size of the scale model (L) is increased from 0.12 to 0.17 m, the thrust increases from 0.47 to 0.92 N. Scaling up, this experiment corresponds to a 300-km diameter Pure Magnetic Sail in space. The thrust also depends on the coil tilt angle, which is the angle between the direction of the solar wind flow and the coil axis. The maximum thrust of 1.5 N is obtained for a tilt angle of 90 degrees.

  13. Implicit Reading in Chinese Pure Alexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Chunlei; Zhu, Renjing; Xu, Mingwei; Luo, Benyan; Weng, Xuchu

    2010-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that some patients with pure alexia display evidence of implicit access to lexical and semantic information about words that they cannot read explicitly. This phenomenon has not been investigated systematically in Chinese patients. We report here a case study of a Chinese patient who met the criteria for pure…

  14. Exploring the simplest purely baryonic decay processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, C. Q.; Hsiao, Y. K.; Rodrigues, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    Though not considered in general, purely baryonic decays could shed light on the puzzle of the baryon number asymmetry in the universe by means of a better understanding of the baryonic nature of our matter world. As such, they constitute a yet unexplored class of decay processes worth investigating. We propose to search for purely baryonic decay processes at the LHCb experiment. No such type of decay has ever been observed. In particular, we concentrate on the decay Λb0→p p ¯n , which is the simplest purely baryonic decay mode, with solely spin-1 /2 baryons involved. We predict its decay branching ratio to be B (Λb0→p p ¯ n )=(2. 0-0.2+0.3)×10-6 , which is sufficiently large to make the decay mode accessible to LHCb. Our study can be extended to other purely baryonic decays such as Λb0→p p ¯ Λ , Λb0→Λ p ¯ Λ , and Λb0→Λ Λ ¯Λ , as well as to similar decays of antitriplet b baryons such as Ξb0 ,-.

  15. Design of embedded endoscopic ultrasonic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhou, Hao; Wen, Shijie; Chen, Xiodong; Yu, Daoyin

    2008-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonic imaging system is an important component in the endoscopic ultrasonography system (EUS). Through the ultrasonic probe, the characteristics of the fault histology features of digestive organs is detected by EUS, and then received by the reception circuit which making up of amplifying, gain compensation, filtering and A/D converter circuit, in the form of ultrasonic echo. Endoscopic ultrasonic imaging system is the back-end processing system of the EUS, with the function of receiving digital ultrasonic echo modulated by the digestive tract wall from the reception circuit, acquiring and showing the fault histology features in the form of image and characteristic data after digital signal processing, such as demodulation, etc. Traditional endoscopic ultrasonic imaging systems are mainly based on image acquisition and processing chips, which connecting to personal computer with USB2.0 circuit, with the faults of expensive, complicated structure, poor portability, and difficult to popularize. To against the shortcomings above, this paper presents the methods of digital signal acquisition and processing specially based on embedded technology with the core hardware structure of ARM and FPGA for substituting the traditional design with USB2.0 and personal computer. With built-in FIFO and dual-buffer, FPGA implement the ping-pong operation of data storage, simultaneously transferring the image data into ARM through the EBI bus by DMA function, which is controlled by ARM to carry out the purpose of high-speed transmission. The ARM system is being chosen to implement the responsibility of image display every time DMA transmission over and actualizing system control with the drivers and applications running on the embedded operating system Windows CE, which could provide a stable, safe and reliable running platform for the embedded device software. Profiting from the excellent graphical user interface (GUI) and good performance of Windows CE, we can not

  16. Ultrasonic isolation of buried pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, Eli; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Cawley, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Long-range guided wave testing (GWT) is used routinely for the monitoring and detection of corrosion defects in above ground pipelines. The GWT test range in buried, coated pipelines is greatly reduced compared to above ground configurations due to energy leakage into the embedding soil. In this paper, the effect of pipe coatings on the guided wave attenuation is investigated with the aim of increasing test ranges for buried pipelines. The attenuation of the T(0,1) and L(0,2) guided wave modes is measured using a full-scale experimental apparatus in a fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated 8 in. pipe, buried in loose and compacted sand. Tests are performed over a frequency range typically used in GWT of 10-35 kHz and compared with model predictions. It is shown that the application of a low impedance coating between the FBE layer and the sand effectively decouples the influence of the sand on the ultrasound leakage from the buried pipe. Ultrasonic isolation of a buried pipe is demonstrated by coating the pipe with a Polyethylene (PE)-foam layer that has a smaller impedance than both the pipe and sand, and has the ability to withstand the overburden load from the sand. The measured attenuation in the buried PE-foam-FBE-coated pipe is found to be substantially reduced, in the range of 0.3-1.2 dB m-1 for loose and compacted sand conditions, compared to measured attenuation of 1.7-4.7 dB m-1 in the buried FBE-coated pipe without the PE-foam. The acoustic properties of the PE-foam are measured independently using ultrasonic interferometry and incorporated into model predictions of guided wave propagation in buried coated pipe. Good agreement is found between the experimental measurements and model predictions. The attenuation exhibits periodic peaks in the frequency domain corresponding to the through-thickness resonance frequencies of the coating layer. The large reduction in guided wave attenuation for PE-coated pipes would lead to greatly increased GWT test ranges; such

  17. Data communications

    SciTech Connect

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining computer communication systems used in nuclear power plants. The recommendations cover three areas important to these communications systems: system design, communication protocols, and communication media. The first area, system design, considers three aspects of system design--questions about architecture, specific risky design elements or omissions to look for in designs being reviewed, and recommendations for multiplexed data communication systems used in safety systems. The second area reviews pertinent aspects of communication protocol design and makes recommendations for newly designed protocols or the selection of existing protocols for safety system, information display, and non-safety control system use. The third area covers communication media selection, which differs significantly from traditional wire and cable. The recommendations for communication media extend or enhance the concerns of published IEEE standards about three subjects: data rate, imported hazards and maintainability.

  18. Clear communication.

    PubMed

    Gurden, Dean

    2016-02-10

    In health care, effective communication can directly affect positive outcomes. Ineffective or poor communication can cost lives, be it by a missed diagnosis, a medication error or treatment delay. PMID:26860179

  19. Communicating Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farris, Gaye S.

    2005-01-01

    For science to have an impact, it must be communicated and easily accessible. The USGS National Wetlands Research Center communicates its research findings through several ways: publishing, the Web, the library, and education and outreach.

  20. Lightwave Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheam, Harry

    1993-01-01

    Describes simple and inexpensive labs for introducing students to fiber optic communications. Students investigate light as a carrier wave; look into the difficulties associated with "light" communication; and learn about modulation, optical fibers, and critical angles. (PR)

  1. Communication, Communication, Communication! Growth through Laboratory Instructing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jamie J.; DeAngelo, Samantha; Mack, Nancy; Thompson, Claudia; Cooper, Jennifer; Sesma, Arturo, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined gains undergraduate students made in their communication and collaboration skills when they served as peer teachers, i.e., laboratory instructors (LIs), for a General Psychology laboratory. Self-ratings of communication and collaboration skills were completed before and after teaching the laboratory. When compared to before the…

  2. Communication (action with communicative content).

    PubMed

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term Communication generally designate the transmission of a message of concepts, feelings or needs from a speaker to a receiver by means of verbal or no verbal language. The pragmatic approach to human communication has put in evidence a further implication of this concept: every behaviour therefore has a value even when it is not intentional. Recently, a more dynamic concept of communication has been elaborated where communication means communicative action. This interpretation is the starting point for the theory of the "communicative acting" and subsequently of the so called discourse ethic elaborated by J. Habermas. PMID:20499038

  3. Ultrasonic monitoring of pitting corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, A. J. C.; Cegla, F. B.; Bazaz, H.; Lozev, M.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to corrosive substances in high temperature environments can cause damage accumulation in structural steels, particularly in the chemical and petrochemical industries. The interaction mechanisms are complex and varied; however initial damage propagation often manifests itself in the form of localized areas of increased material loss. Recent development of an ultrasonic wall thickness monitoring sensor capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 500°C has allowed permanent monitoring within such hostile environments, providing information on how the shape of a pulse which has reflected from a corroding surface can change over time. Reconstructing localized corrosion depth and position may be possible by tracking such changes in reflected pulse shape, providing extra information on the state of the backwall and whether process conditions should be altered to increase plant life. This paper aims to experimentally investigate the effect certain localized features have on reflected pulse shape by `growing' artificial defects into the backwall while wall thickness is monitored using the sensor. The size and complexity of the three dimensional scattering problem lead to the development of a semi-analytical simulation based on the distributed point source method (DPSM) which is capable of simulating pulse reflection from complex surfaces measuring approximately 17×10λ Comparison to experimental results show that amplitude changes are predicted to within approximately 1dB and that pulse shape changes are accurately modelled. All experiments were carried out at room temperature, measurements at high temperature will be studied in the future.

  4. CW ultrasonic bolt tensioning monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A CW ultrasonic device is described for measuring frequency shifts of the peak of a mechanical resonance in a body. One application of the device is measuring the strain in a bolt, and other applications such as measuring the thickness of a body, measuring the depth of a flaw in a body, measuring the elongation of a body, and measuring changes in velocity of sound in a body. The body is connected, by means of a CW transducer, to electrical circuit means including a narrow band RF amplifier to form a closed loop feedback marginal oscillator that frequency locks the device to the peak of a mechanical resonance in the body. When the frequency of this peak changes, because of a physical change in the body, the frequency of the oscillator changes. The device includes an automatic frequency resonant peak tracker that produces a voltage that is related to a change in frequency of the oscillator. This voltage is applied to the RF amplifier to change the center of its frequency band to include the frequency of the peak and is a measure of the frequency shift.

  5. Micromachining using ultrasonic impact grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medis, Praveen S.; Thurman Henderson, H.

    2005-08-01

    Although largely unknown in the MEMS community, micromachining using ultrasonic impact grinding (UIG) is a fascinating yet easy fabrication scheme to achieve virtually any shape, such as a shallow or deep reservoir, a channel, a via, etc, in silicon, glass and other commonly used ceramic and semiconductor materials in the MEMS field. Because of the patterning and masking issues, etching even shallow channels or vias in a pre-processed silicon/glass/ceramic substrate is somewhat difficult, if not impossible. However, by using UIG one can achieve such structures, up to millimeters in depth in virtually no time. Furthermore, in silicon substrates, the orientation or any other physical dimension of the feature will no longer be constrained as in anisotropic etching by the crystallographic planes and directions; and in amorphous glass or ceramic substrates, features with vertical walls can be achieved, otherwise usually accomplished only by expensive laser ablation. Thus, the authors believe that this UIG process could open up many avenues to easily and quickly achieve the larger MEMS structures as well as packaging for both prototype and for production in silicon, glass and ceramic.

  6. Optimization of Ultrasonic Fabric Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.

    1998-05-13

    The fundamental purpose of this project was to research and develop a process that would reduce the cost and improve the environmental efficiency of the present dry-cleaning industry. This second phase of research (see report KCP-94-1006 for information gathered during the first phase) was intended to allow the optimal integration of all factors of ultrasonic fabric cleaning. For this phase, Garment Care performed an extensive literature search and gathered data from other researchers worldwide. The Garment Care-AlliedSignal team developed the requirements for a prototype cleaning tank for studies and acquired that tank and the additional equipment required to use it properly. Garment Care and AlliedSignal acquired the transducers and generators from Surftran Martin-Walter in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Amway's Kelly Haley developed the test protocol, supplied hundreds of test swatches, gathered the data on the swatches before and after the tests, assisted with the cleaning tests, and prepared the final analysis of the results. AlliedSignal personnel, in conjunction with Amway and Garment Care staff, performed all the tests. Additional planning is under way for future testing by outside research facilities. The final results indicated repeatable performance and good results for single layered fabric swatches. Swatches that were cleaned as a ''sandwich,'' that is, three or more layers.

  7. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  8. Computer Simulation for Air-coupled Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, H.

    2014-06-01

    Air-coupled ultrasound is used as non-contact ultrasonic testing method. For wider application of air-coupled ultrasonic technique, it is required to know situation of ultrasonic propagation between air and solid. Transmittance of the ultrasonic waves from air to solids is extremely small with 10-5 however it was revealed that, by using computer simulation methods based on the two-stage elastic wave equation in which two independent variables of stress and particle velocity are used, visualization calculation of ultrasonic propagation between air and solid was possible. In this report, the calculation of air-coupled ultrasound using the new Improved-FDM for computer simulation of ultrasonic propagation in solids is shown. Waveforms obtained by 1-dimensional calculation are discussed for principle and performance of the calculation. Visualization of ultrasonic incidence to cylindrical steel pipe is demonstrated as an example to show availability for ultrasonic testing.

  9. Researches and applications of the ultrasonic emulsifications and dispersions.

    PubMed

    Quanlu, Li; Yinhong, Zhang; Jing, Wu

    2013-11-01

    This paper defines power ultrasonics and their two important directions: Ultrasonic emulsification and dispersion from a practical point of view, brief reports on recent research results are ultrasonic emulsification to be used for the preparation of composite electrorheological fluid, and ultrasonic dispersion to be used dispersion as a new type cold cloud catalytic agent metaldehyde [CH3CH]4-6 (this is used for artificial rain), etc., and produce good results or gain progress. Then, the principle and applications of power ultrasonics (including magnetostriction type ultrasonic transducer and piezoelectric type ultrasonic transducer) in the emulsification or dispersion, are pointed out. Also, ultrasonic extensive applications in chemistry, materials, and life sciences are briefly introduced. PMID:24180765

  10. Apparatus for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, John A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the concurrent nondestructive evaluation of partially completed welds is described and which is used in combination with an automated welder and which includes an ultrasonic signal generator mounted on the welder and which generates an ultrasonic signal which is directed toward one side of the partially completed welds; an ultrasonic signal receiver mounted on the automated welder for detecting ultrasonic signals which are transmitted by the ultrasonic signal generator and which are reflected or diffracted from one side of the partially completed weld or which passes through a given region of the partially completed weld; and an analysis assembly coupled with the ultrasonic signal receiver and which processes the ultrasonic signals received by the ultrasonic signal receiver to identify welding flaws in the partially completed weld.

  11. Relation between the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-entanglement cost of preparing a multipartite pure state and its quantum discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seungho; Jeong, Hyunseok

    2015-08-01

    We investigate how much amount of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement is required in order to prepare a given multipartite state by local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We present a LOCC procedure that asymptotically converts GHZ states into an arbitrary multipartite pure state, whose conversion rate is given by the multipartite discord of the state. This reveals that the GHZ-entanglement cost of preparing a pure state is not higher than the multipartite discord of the state. It also provides an operational interpretation of multipartite discord for pure states, namely, the consumption rate of GHZ entanglement in the devised procedure.

  12. Cultural Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  13. Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  14. Stereotypes Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Shuli; Deng, Dongyuan

    2009-01-01

    We live in a world, which is becoming a Global Village in which information and communication attract people's attention more than ever before. Our desire to communicate with strangers and our relationships with them depend on the degree to which we are effective in communicating with them. There are so many factors restricting or improving…

  15. Existential Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Charles C.

    Focusing on the seminal work "Being and Nothingness," this paper explores the implications of the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre for the study of communication in society. The paper redefines communication from an existential point of view, explores some implications of this redefinition for the study of communication within the social setting, and…

  16. Soft tissue cutting with ultrasonic mechanical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Mark. P.; McGuinness, Garrett; Gavin, Graham P.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic vibrations transmitted via small diameter wire waveguides represents a technology that has potential for minimally invasive procedures in surgery. This form of energy delivery results in distal tip mechanical vibrations with amplitudes of vibration of up to 50 μm and at frequencies between 20-50 kHz commonly reported. This energy can then be used by micro-cutting surgical tools and end effectors for a range of applications such as bone cutting, cement removal in joint revision surgery and soft tissue cutting. One particular application which has gained regulatory approval in recent years is in the area of cardiovascular surgery in the removal of calcified atherosclerotic plaques and chronic total occlusions. This paper builds on previous work that was focused on the ultrasonic perforation of soft vascular tissue using ultrasonically activated mechanical waveguides and the applied force required to initiate failure in soft tissue when compared with non-ultrasonic waveguides. An ultrasonic device and experimental rig was developed that can deliver ultrasonic vibrations to the distal tip of 1.0 mm diameter nickel-titanium waveguides. The operation of the ultrasonic device has been characterized at 22.5 kHz with achievable amplitudes of vibration in the range of 16 - 40μm. The experimental rig allows the ultrasonically activated waveguide to be advanced through a tissue sample over a range of feedrates and the waveguide-tissue interaction force can be measured during perforation into the tissue. Preliminary studies into the effects of feedrate on porcine aortic arterial tissue perforation forces are presented as part of this work. A range of amplitudes of vibration at the wire waveguide distal tip were examined. The resulting temperature increase when perforating artery wall when using the energized wire waveguides is also examined. Results show a clear multistage failure of the tissue. The first stage involves a rise in force up to some

  17. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ningli

    2011-12-01

    Wave propagation in porous media is studied in a wide range of technological applications. In the manufacturing industry, determining porosity of materials in the manufacturing process is required for strict quality control. In the oil industry, acoustic signals and seismic surveys are used broadly to determine the physical properties of the reservoir rock which is a porous media filled with oil or gas. In porous noise control materials, a precise prediction of sound absorption with frequency and evaluation of tortuosity are necessary. Ultrasonic nondestructive methods are a very important tool for characterization of porous materials. The dissertation deals with two types of porous media: materials with relatively low and closed porosity and materials with comparatively high and open porosity. Numerical modeling, Finite Element simulations and experimental characterization are all discussed in this dissertation. First, ultrasonic scattering is used to determine the porosity in porous media with closed pores. In order get a relationship between the porosity in porous materials and ultrasonic scattering independently and to increase the sensitivity to obtain scattering information, ultrasonic imaging methods are applied and acoustic waves are focused by an acoustic lens. To verify the technique, engineered porous acrylic plates with varying porosity are measured by ultrasonic scanning and ultrasonic array sensors. Secondly, a laser based ultrasonic technique is explored for predicting the mechanical integrity and durability of cementitious materials. The technique used involves the measurement of the phase velocity of fast and slow longitudinal waves in water saturated cement paste. The slow wave velocity is related to the specimen's tortuosity. The fast wave speed is dependent on the elastic properties of porous solid. Experimental results detailing the generation and detection of fast and slow wave waves in freshly prepared and aged water-saturated cement samples

  18. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  19. Noncontact Acousto-Ultrasonics for Material Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1998-01-01

    A NdYAG 1064 nm, laser pulse was employed to produce ultrasonic waves in specimens of SiC/SiC and SiC/Ti 6-4 composites which are high temperature materials of interest for aerospace applications. Air coupled transducers were used to detect and collect the signals used for acousto-ultrasonic analysis. Conditions for detecting ultrasonic decay signals were examined. The results were compared to those determined on the same specimens with contact coupling. Some non-contact measurements were made employing conventional air focused detectors. Others were performed with a more novel micromachined capacitance transducer. Concerns of the laser-in technology include potential destructiveness of the laser pulse. Repeated laser pulsing at the same location does lead to deterioration of the ultrasonic signal in some materials, but seems to recover with time. Also, unlike contact AU, the frequency regime employed is a function of laser-material interaction rather than the choice of transducers. Concerns of the air coupled-out technology include the effect of air attenuation. This imposes a practical upper limit to frequency of detection. In the case of the experimental specimens studied ultrasonic decay signals could be imaged satisfactorily.

  20. Ultrasonic energy welds copper to aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, G.

    1997-01-01

    Attempting to weld copper to aluminum by conventional means through the application of thermal energy to melt and fuse the two metals (fusion welding) can result in an unreliable weld. The oxide layer on aluminum is difficult to remove, the melt temperatures of the two metals are not close, the two metals exhibit high thermal conductivity and alloying of the two metals creates a brittle intermetallic that is mechanically and electrically unreliable. An alternative for design engineers is to weld copper to aluminum by applying ultrasonic energy, which joins the metals without melting. The ultrasonic process creates a high quality weld both mechanically and electrically without forming a brittle intermetallic and without intermediate steps. Ultrasonic welding of copper to aluminum has been shown to be efficient and effective as demonstrated by a number of practical production applications. The problems of tough oxides, high thermal conductivity, high electrical conductivity, intermetallics and brittle alloys are not significant with the ultrasonic welding process. And similarly, the problems associated with pre and postweld cleaning, fluxes, hot metal and high energy costs are eliminated. Modern ultrasonic welding equipment is capable of monitoring energy and controlling the critical welding process variables.

  1. Human Face Classification Using Ultrasonic Sonar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhenwei; Ji, Wei; Xu, Yong; Yang, Jun

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, human face classification using ultrasonic sonar imaging is investigated. On the basis of Freedman's “image pulse” model, the scattering centers model is employed to simplify the complex geometry of the human face into a series of scattering centers. A chirp signal is utilized to detect the human face for its high range resolution and large signal-to-noise ratio. Ultrasonic sonar images, also named high-resolution range profiles, are obtained by demodulating the echoes with a reference chirp signal. Features directly related to the geometry of the human face are extracted from ultrasonic sonar images and verified in the experiments designed with different configurations of transmitter-receiver (TR) pairs. Experimental results indicate that the improved feature extraction method can achieve a high recognition rate of over 99% in the case of ultrasonic transmitters angled at 45° above and orthogonal to the face, and this method improves the performance of ultrasonic face recognition compared with our previous result.

  2. Impact-absorbing characteristics by applying ultrasonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Ueki, Eiichiro; Tsujino, Jiromaru

    2012-05-01

    An impact-absorbing device that facilitates the application of ultrasonic vibrations was devised. Vibration distributions, springback characteristics, and impact-absorption characteristics were measured. We confirm that the springback amount decreases and the impact is absorbed upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations. When an aluminum alloy plate is crumpled, the maximum output voltage of the attached shock sensor decreases to 65% upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations as compared to when the ultrasonic vibrations are not applied.

  3. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation, microstructure, and mechanical property interrelations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques for mechanical property characterizations are reviewed and conceptual models are advanced for explaining and interpreting the empirically based results. At present, the technology is generally empirically based and is emerging from the research laboratory. Advancement of the technology will require establishment of theoretical foundations for the experimentally observed interrelations among ultrasonic measurements, mechanical properties, and microstructure. Conceptual models are applied to ultrasonic assessment of fracture toughness to illustrate an approach for predicting correlations found among ultrasonic measurements, microstructure, and mechanical properties.

  4. Pure field theories and MACSYMA algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ament, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    A pure field theory attempts to describe physical phenomena through singularity-free solutions of field equations resulting from an action principle. The physics goes into forming the action principle and interpreting specific results. Algorithms for the intervening mathematical steps are sketched. Vacuum general relativity is a pure field theory, serving as model and providing checks for generalizations. The fields of general relativity are the 10 components of a symmetric Riemannian metric tensor; those of the Einstein-Straus generalization are the 16 components of a nonsymmetric. Algebraic properties are exploited in top level MACSYMA commands toward performing some of the algorithms of that generalization. The light cone for the theory as left by Einstein and Straus is found and simplifications of that theory are discussed.

  5. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1997-11-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) and Corey et al. (spatial averaging) for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla qubits and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high temperature and low temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal to noise behavior of each.

  6. Black Hole Attractors and Pure Spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Jonathan P.; Maloney, Alexander; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2006-02-21

    We construct black hole attractor solutions for a wide class of N = 2 compactifications. The analysis is carried out in ten dimensions and makes crucial use of pure spinor techniques. This formalism can accommodate non-Kaehler manifolds as well as compactifications with flux, in addition to the usual Calabi-Yau case. At the attractor point, the charges fix the moduli according to {Sigma}f{sub k} = Im(C{Phi}), where {Phi} is a pure spinor of odd (even) chirality in IIB (A). For IIB on a Calabi-Yau, {Phi} = {Omega} and the equation reduces to the usual one. Methods in generalized complex geometry can be used to study solutions to the attractor equation.

  7. Effect of the cortex on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Brent K.; Holt, Andrew P.; Kaste, Sue C.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques offer a promising new approach for detecting changes in bone caused by osteoporosis. However, several challenges impede clinical implementation of backscatter techniques. This study examines how the dense outer surface of bone (the cortex) affects backscatter measurements of interior regions of porous (cancellous) bone tissue. Fifty-two specimens of bone were prepared from 13 human femoral heads so that the same region of cancellous bone could be ultrasonically interrogated through the cortex or along directions that avoided the cortex. Backscatter signals were analyzed over a frequency range of 0.8-3.0 MHz to determine two ultrasonic parameters: apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) and frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB). The term “apparent” means that the parameters are sensitive to the frequency dependent effects of diffraction and attenuation. Significant (p < 0.001) changes in AIB and FSAB indicated that measurements through the cortex decreased the apparent backscattered power and increased the frequency dependence of the power. However, the cortex did not affect the correlation of AIB and FSAB with the x-ray bone mineral density of the specimens. This suggests that results from many previous in vitro backscatter studies of specimens of purely cancellous bone may be extrapolated with greater confidence to in vivo conditions. PMID:21896966

  8. Analytical ultrasonics for evaluation of composite materials response. Part 1: Physical interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneke, E. G., II; Duke, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The phenomena associated with the propagation of elastic waves in anisotropic materials are discussed. Wave modes propagating in general directions relative to the material coordinate system are not purely longitudinal nor transverse. Hence the generation of ultrasonic waves by common piezoelectric transducers will generate multiple modes to some extent. The received signals will likely be a combination of different modes. When using two transducers to send and receive ultrasonic waves, deviation of the energy flux vector may reduce the apparent value of the received signal unless the proper orientation of the two transducers with respect to one another is taken into account. And application of reflection from plane boundaries for the purposes of making certain measurements may lead to misinterpretation of results unless one is aware of the differences in multiple mode generation and critical angle phenomena between isotropic and anisotropic materials. When studies or characterizations of composite materials by ultrasonics are to be performed, these phenomena must be taken into consideration so that proper and correct application and interpretation of the measurements can be made. Finally, attention must be drawn again to the fact that composite materials are heterogeneous by definition. The results discussed here have been determined for homogeneous materials only. While the assumption of homogeneity appears to be valid for certain wavelength ranges in composites, future work must continue to study the phenomena of wave propagation in anisotropic, nonhomogeneous materials.

  9. Computing Properties Of Pure And Mixed Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    GASPLUS created as two-part code: first designed for use with pure fluids and second designed for use with mixtures of fluids and phases. Offers routines for mathematical modeling of conditions of fluids in pumps, turbines, compressors and other machines. Other routines for calculating performance of para/ortho-hydrogen reactor and heat of para/normal-hydrogen reaction as well as unique convergence routine demonstrates engineering flavor of GASPLUS. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1998-05-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) [Science {bold 275}, 350 (1997)] and Cory {ital et al.} (spatial averaging) [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA {bold 94}, 1634 (1997)] for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla quantum bits, and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high-temperature and low-temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal-to-noise behavior of each. Most of these algorithms require only a constant multiple of the number of experiments needed by the other methods for creating effective pure states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  12. Graphical calculus for Gaussian pure states

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Flammia, Steven T.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-04-15

    We provide a unified graphical calculus for all Gaussian pure states, including graph transformation rules for all local and semilocal Gaussian unitary operations, as well as local quadrature measurements. We then use this graphical calculus to analyze continuous-variable (CV) cluster states, the essential resource for one-way quantum computing with CV systems. Current graphical approaches to CV cluster states are only valid in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing, and the associated graph transformation rules only apply when the initial and final states are of this form. Our formalism applies to all Gaussian pure states and subsumes these rules in a natural way. In addition, the term 'CV graph state' currently has several inequivalent definitions in use. Using this formalism we provide a single unifying definition that encompasses all of them. We provide many examples of how the formalism may be used in the context of CV cluster states: defining the 'closest' CV cluster state to a given Gaussian pure state and quantifying the error in the approximation due to finite squeezing; analyzing the optimality of certain methods of generating CV cluster states; drawing connections between this graphical formalism and bosonic Hamiltonians with Gaussian ground states, including those useful for CV one-way quantum computing; and deriving a graphical measure of bipartite entanglement for certain classes of CV cluster states. We mention other possible applications of this formalism and conclude with a brief note on fault tolerance in CV one-way quantum computing.

  13. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  16. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882.1925 Section 882.1925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test...

  17. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882.1925 Section 882.1925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test...

  18. 21 CFR 1050.10 - Ultrasonic therapy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic therapy products. 1050.10 Section 1050... § 1050.10 Ultrasonic therapy products. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section are applicable as specified herein to any ultrasonic therapy product for use in physical therapy manufactured on...

  19. High-temperature pressure-coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, M.J.

    1981-02-11

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  20. Shear-Wave Ultrasonic Inspection With A Dry Couplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willenberg, James D; Van Wyk, Lisa

    1994-01-01

    Automated ultrasonic inspection system includes dry couplant pad attached to ultrasonic transducer. Designed to be mounted on robot arm in automated manufacturing (robotic welding) work cell. Between, during, or after manufacturing operations, robot scans ultrasonic transducer along workpiece. Workpiece reworked in place, if necessary. In principle, computer program controlling inspection overlaid on program controlling welding operations.

  1. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  2. 21 CFR 892.1570 - Diagnostic ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diagnostic ultrasonic transducer. 892.1570 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1570 Diagnostic ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. A diagnostic ultrasonic transducer is a device made of a piezoelectric...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning medical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments....

  4. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning medical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments....

  5. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning medical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments....

  6. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning medical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments....

  7. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning medical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments....

  8. Field testing and applications of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data (USRAD) System

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, K.S.; Pickering, D.A.; Blair, M.S.; Espegren, M.L.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Ultrasonic Ranging and Data (USRAD) System is a patented, computerized data acquisition system developed to relate the radiological surveyor's precise physical location to instantaneous radiation data taken during walk-on surveys. The USRAD System incorporates three technologies: radio frequency communications, ultrasonics, and microcomputers. Initial field testing of the USRAD System has resulted in several improvements to walk-on radiological surveys including real-time position data, reproducible survey results, on-site verification of survey coverage, on-site data reduction and graphics, and permanent data storage on magnetic media. Although the USRAD System was developed specifically for use with a gamma-ray detector, it is adaptable to other instruments. Applications of the USRAD System may include verification of remediated and uncontaminated areas, emergency response in mapping pollutant locations after accidents, and characterization of hazardous waste areas. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Pure tentorial subdural hematoma from rupture of aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Zaidat, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pure subdural hematoma (without subarachnoid, intraventricular, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage) due to a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare. Most reported cases involve an aneurysm along the internal carotid artery, posterior communicating artery, or middle cerebral artery. No reports have described an aneurysm along the transmastoid branches of the occipital artery. Case Description: A 70-year-old female presented with sudden-onset, excruciating headaches, associated with dizziness, nausea, and emesis. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) head demonstrated a pure tentorial subdural hematoma. Vascular imaging revealed bilateral aneurysms along the transmastoid branches of the intracranial portion of both the occipital arteries. Consequently, these branches were embolized, with no residual filling of the aneurysms. After the procedure, the patient remained neurologically well. The patient was monitored appropriately for vasospasm, and was discharged home 10 days after presentation. Conclusion: Rupture of aneurysms along intracranial branches of the occipital artery can lead to pure subdural hematoma along the tentorium. PMID:27583173

  10. Mass Communication as Public Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stappers, James G.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses problems with the term "mass communication." Contends that mass communication research must include the study of public communication in the sense of finding out what people do with media and what are the problems of diffusing information or public knowledge. (PD)

  11. Guided wave helical ultrasonic tomography of pipes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin R; Hinders, Mark K

    2003-08-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT) that uses guided ultrasonic waves along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms that have been developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel the various helical criss-cross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar criss-cross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. In this paper we demonstrate HUT via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced. PMID:12942959

  12. Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields. [STEALTH

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    A code for calculating ultrasonic fields has been developed by revisng the thermal-hydraulics code STEALTH. This code may be used in a wide variety of situations in which a detailed knowledge of a propagating wave field is required. Among the potential used are: interpretation of pulse-echo or pitch-catch ultrasonic signals in complicated geometries; ultrasonic transducer modeling and characterization; optimization and evaluation of transducer design; optimization and reliability of inspection procedures; investigation of the response of different types of reflectors; flaw modeling; and general theoretical acoustics. The code is described, and its limitations and potential are discussed. A discussion of the required input and of the general procedures for running the code is presented. Three sample problems illustrate the input and the use of the code.

  13. Novel Applications of Power Ultrasonic Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Ke-Ming

    Atomization is a process where a liquid is dispersed into droplets in a gas. Ultrasonic atomization was discovered in the 1920s (Loomis and Woods, 1927). Since then, atomization has seen diversified applications in devices such as drug nebulizers, room humidifiers, and air refreshers, as well as in industrial processes such as combustion, prilling, and web coating. In contrast to conventional liquid atomizers, ultrasound atomizers generally handle lower flow rates, and atomization of the liquid is achieved not by pressure, but by the vibration of ultrasonic waves (Morgan, 1993). This latter feature decouples the requirement of orifice geometry and pressure from the flow rate, allowing the flow to be controlled independently. Typically, ultrasonic atomizers excel in accurately processing low flow rates and slurry without clogging issues.

  14. Ultrasonic non invasive techniques for microbiological instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvira, L.; Sierra, C.; Galán, B.; Resa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Non invasive techniques based on ultrasounds have advantageous features to study, characterize and monitor microbiological and enzymatic reactions. These processes may change the sound speed, viscosity or particle distribution size of the medium where they take place, which makes possible their analysis using ultrasonic techniques. In this work, two different systems for the analysis of microbiological liquid media based on ultrasounds are presented. In first place, an industrial application based on an ultrasonic monitoring technique for microbiological growth detection in milk is shown. Such a system may improve the quality control strategies in food production factories, being able to decrease the time required to detect possible contaminations in packed products. Secondly, a study about the growing of the Escherichia coli DH5 α in different conditions is presented. It is shown that the use of ultrasonic non invasive characterization techniques in combination with other conventional measurements like optical density provides complementary information about the metabolism of these bacteria.

  15. Ultrasonic filtration of industrial chemical solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosma, T.

    1974-01-01

    The practical results obtained as a result of filtering industrial chemical solutions under continuous flow conditions with the aid of an ultrasonic filter are presented. The main part of the assembly consists of an ultrasonic generator with an output power of about 400 W and the filtration assembly, in which there is a magnetostrictive amplifier constructed for 20.5 kHz. In addition to ensuring a continuous flow of filtered solution, ultrasonic filters can be replaced or cleaned at intervals of time that are 8-10 times greater than in the case of mechanical filters. They yield considerably better results as far as the size of the filtered particles is concerned. The parameters on which filtration quality depends are also presented.

  16. Guided wave helical ultrasonic tomography of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2003-08-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT) that uses guided ultrasonic waves along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms that have been developed by seismologists for what they call ``cross borehole'' tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel the various helical criss-cross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar criss-cross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. In this paper we demonstrate HUT via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  17. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  18. Stress evolution during ultrasonic Al ribbon bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masaya; Takashima, Kazumasa; Maeda, Masakatsu; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    The present study reveals the stress distribution in the substrate during ultrasonic bonding. The deformations of the Si substrate, Al ribbon, and Al pad were numerically analyzed using a finite element method. Experimental observation of the interface using a highspeed video camera was also conducted to determine the actual interfacial slip amplitude. This amplitude becomes smaller than that of tool-tip with bonding time. It was suggested from the numerical simulations that frictional adhesion enhanced the friction force, resulting in an increase in the equivalent stress in the ribbon and pad. As a result, very large stresses occur in the substrate during ultrasonic bonding. These stresses evolve with the progress of ultrasonic bonding, i.e., frictional adhesion.

  19. Setting Time Measurement Using Ultrasonic Wave Reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Suraneni, Prannoy; Popovics, John S.; Struble, Leslie J.

    2012-01-09

    Ultrasonic shear wave reflection was used to investigate setting times of cement pastes by measuring the reflection coefficient at the interface between hydrating cement pastes of varying water-to-cement ratio and an ultrasonic buffer material. Several different buffer materials were employed, and the choice of buffer was seen to strongly affect measurement sensitivity; high impact polystyrene showed the highest sensitivity to setting processes because it had the lowest acoustic impedance value. The results show that ultrasonic shear-wave reflection can be used successfully to monitor early setting processes of cement paste with good sensitivity when such a very low impedance buffer is employed. Criteria are proposed to define set times, and the resulting initial and final set times agreed broadly with those determined using the standard penetration resistance test.

  20. Investigating of precision measurement on ultrasonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fangliang; Ji, Qizheng; Zhai, Dongwei; Dong, Yibo; Dong, Chun

    2015-02-01

    The flow rate is calculated via ultrasonic flow meter (UFM), which is through measuring the difference of time transmitting flow between flow direction and reverse direction. This paper describes the uncertainty analysis for the method of time difference which is commonly used in ultrasonic flow measurement, and the analysis of error source of uncertainty components as well as the general method of elimination. Based on the technique of pseudo random sequence, this paper presents a precise time difference method based on digital correlation technology, and its principle, realization way and uncertainty evaluation are introduced. On the DSP and FPGA system platform, an ultrasonic flow meter scheme based on the digital correlation technology is suggested.

  1. Flexible ultrasonic array sensors for health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Wu, K.-T.; Song, L.; Liu, Q.; Jen, C.-K.

    2007-04-01

    Flexible ultrasonic array transducers which can be attached to the desired structures or materials for nondestructive testing and structural health monitoring applications at room and elevated temperatures are developed. These flexible ultrasonic transducers (UTs) arrays consist of a thin polyimide membrane with a bottom electrode or stainless steel foil, a piezoelectric lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) composite film and top electrodes. The flexibility is realized owing to the porosity of piezoelectric film and the thinness of substrate and electrodes. Top and bottom electrode materials are silver paste, silver paint or electroless plated nickel alloys. The UT array is configured by the several top electrodes. The flexible UT has been successfully tested at 150°C and also immersed into water as immersion ultrasonic probe operated in the pulse-echo mode with good signal to noise ratio.

  2. Folded Resonant Horns for Power Ultrasonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Askins, Stephen; Gradziel, Michael; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Dolgin, Benjamin; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Peterson, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Folded horns have been conceived as alternatives to straight horns used as resonators and strain amplifiers in power ultrasonic systems. Such systems are used for cleaning, welding, soldering, cutting, and drilling in a variety of industries. In addition, several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles have described instrumented drilling, coring, and burrowing machines that utilize combinations of sonic and ultrasonic vibrational actuation. The main advantage of a folded horn, relative to a straight horn of the same resonance frequency, is that the folded horn can be made shorter (that is, its greatest linear dimension measured from the outside can be made smaller). Alternatively, for a given length, the resonance frequency can be reduced. Hence, the folded-horn concept affords an additional degree of design freedom for reducing the length of an ultrasonic power system that includes a horn.

  3. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation, frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness, the two types of transducers, and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  4. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Div. of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation; frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness; the two types of transducers; and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  5. Method of noncontacting ultrasonic process monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Gabriel V.; Walter, John B.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1992-01-01

    A method of monitoring a material during processing comprising the steps of (a) shining a detection light on the surface of a material; (b) generating ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material to cause a change in frequency of the detection light; (c) detecting a change in the frequency of the detection light at the surface of the material; (d) detecting said ultrasonic waves at the surface point of detection of the material; (e) measuring a change in the time elapsed from generating the ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material and return to the surface point of detection of the material, to determine the transit time; and (f) comparing the transit time to predetermined values to determine properties such as, density and the elastic quality of the material.

  6. Ultrasonic actuators: Remote strain measurements, high strain horns and ultrasonic chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung Hoon

    In this thesis, optical diffraction strain measurement, silicon-based ultrasonic horn actuators for thin film testing, and mufluidic assay systems are presented. Optical ultrasonic strain measurement: Using optical diffraction gratings integrated on a PZT/silicon laminate actuator, the strain on the actuator was optically and remotely measured. The methodology, limitations, analytical and numerical (ANSYS) analysis are presented. This technology of diffraction grating for ultrasonic strain measurements could lead to an instrument useful for remote monitoring of strain on MEMS sensors. Design of high efficiency silicon-based ultrasonic horn, and their fabrication for thin film testing under cyclic load: A detailed ultrasonic horn design and its analysis are resented. For this application a Gaussian horn is utilized. Most ultrasonic horns have a single point maximum strain point along the horn resulting in strain gradient at all points. For the purpose of straining thin films it is desirable to have areas of spatially constant strain fields. Remarkably, the Gaussian horn has a constant strain area suitable for thin film testing. High strain values can lead to testing not only fatigue, but also fracture of thin films. We feel that the ability to generate constant ultrasonic strain areas on silicon is a technique suitable for industrial and academic material characterization. A portable high-intensity ultrasonic actuator for mufluidic separation (ultrasonic chromatography): Micro-particle manipulation in a liquid using ultrasonic fields in a micro-channel, principle of operation, and analysis are presented. Beads of different sizes could be separated within an optically viewable aperture (˜100 mum). It is found that the separation occurs due to ultrasonic radiation force and a new inertial force, acting on the beads. The key mechanism of focusing beads at the nodes of ultrasonic standing waves, and the origin of the inertial force for the separation are described. The

  7. Laboratory ultrasonic generator. [characteristics of ultrasonic sound generator for experimental and industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tudose, C.; Dobrescu, F.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of an ultrasonic generator with magnetostrictive amplifiers are described. The generator was designed to supply an output power of about 400 watts at a consumption of about 1 kilowatt. The generator produces sound waves in the frequency range of 18 to 30 KHz. The circuit design is described and examples of the construction are illustrated. The generator is used to study different industrial processes such as the effect of ultrasonic radiation of the emulsification of liquids, the dispersion of solids, and ultrasonic filtration.

  8. Reflection on Teaching and Epistemological Structure: Reflective and Critically Reflective Processes in "Pure/Soft" and "Pure/Hard" Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreber, Carolin; Castleden, Heather

    2009-01-01

    We empirically explored whether academics from pure/soft and pure/hard fields engage in reflective practice on teaching differently and, if so, whether these differences could be partially explained by the epistemological structure of their discipline. Interview data from academics in pure/hard (N = 30) and pure/soft fields (N = 10) were…

  9. Ultrasonic sludge pretreatment under pressure.

    PubMed

    Le, Ngoc Tuan; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine; Delmas, Henri

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to optimize the ultrasound (US) pretreatment of sludge. Three types of sewage sludge were examined: mixed, secondary and secondary after partial methanisation ("digested" sludge). Thereby, several main process parameters were varied separately or simultaneously: stirrer speed, total solid content of sludge (TS), thermal operating conditions (adiabatic vs. isothermal), ultrasonic power input (PUS), specific energy input (ES), and for the first time external pressure. This parametric study was mainly performed for the mixed sludge. Five different TS concentrations of sludge (12-36 g/L) were tested for different values of ES (7000-75,000 kJ/kgTS) and 28 g/L was found as the optimum value according to the solubilized chemical oxygen demand in the liquid phase (SCOD). PUS of 75-150 W was investigated under controlled temperature and the "high power input - short duration" procedure was the most effective at a given ES. The temperature increase in adiabatic US application significantly improved SCOD compared to isothermal conditions. With PUS of 150 W, the effect of external pressure was investigated in the range of 1-16 bar under isothermal and adiabatic conditions for two types of sludge: an optimum pressure of about 2 bar was found regardless of temperature conditions and ES values. Under isothermal conditions, the resulting improvement of sludge disintegration efficacy as compared to atmospheric pressure was by 22-67% and 26-37% for mixed and secondary sludge, respectively. Besides, mean particle diameter (D[4,3]) of the three sludge types decreased respectively from 408, 117, and 110 μm to about 94-97, 37-42, and 36-40 μm regardless of sonication conditions, and the size reduction process was much faster than COD extraction. PMID:23587728

  10. Ultrasonic precision optical grinding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Michael J.; Bechtold, Michael J.; Fess, Edward; Wolfs, Frank L.; Bechtold, Rob

    2015-10-01

    As optical geometries become more precise and complex and a wider range of materials are used, the processes used for manufacturing become more critical. As the preparatory stage for polishing, this is especially true for grinding. Slow processing speeds, accelerated tool wear, and poor surface quality are often detriments in manufacturing glass and hard ceramics. The quality of the ground surface greatly influences the polishing process and the resulting finished product. Through extensive research and development, OptiPro Systems has introduced an ultrasonic assisted grinding technology, OptiSonic, which has numerous advantages over traditional grinding processes. OptiSonic utilizes a custom tool holder designed to produce oscillations in line with the rotating spindle. A newly developed software package called IntelliSonic is integral to this platform. IntelliSonic automatically characterizes the tool and continuously optimizes the output frequency for optimal cutting while in contact with the part. This helps maintain a highly consistent process under changing load conditions for a more accurate surface. Utilizing a wide variety of instruments, test have proven to show a reduction in tool wear and increase in surface quality while allowing processing speeds to be increased. OptiSonic has proven to be an enabling technology to overcome the difficulties seen in grinding of glass and hard optical ceramics. OptiSonic has demonstrated numerous advantages over the standard CNC grinding process. Advantages are evident in reduced tool wear, better surface quality, and reduced cycle times due to increased feed rates. These benefits can be seen over numerous applications within the precision optics industry.

  11. Model validation of untethered, ultrasonic neural dust motes for cortical recording.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongjin; Carmena, Jose M; Rabaey, Jan M; Maharbiz, Michel M; Alon, Elad

    2015-04-15

    A major hurdle in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) is the lack of an implantable neural interface system that remains viable for a substantial fraction of the user's lifetime. Recently, sub-mm implantable, wireless electromagnetic (EM) neural interfaces have been demonstrated in an effort to extend system longevity. However, EM systems do not scale down in size well due to the severe inefficiency of coupling radio-waves at those scales within tissue. This paper explores fundamental system design trade-offs as well as size, power, and bandwidth scaling limits of neural recording systems built from low-power electronics coupled with ultrasonic power delivery and backscatter communication. Such systems will require two fundamental technology innovations: (1) 10-100 μm scale, free-floating, independent sensor nodes, or neural dust, that detect and report local extracellular electrophysiological data via ultrasonic backscattering and (2) a sub-cranial ultrasonic interrogator that establishes power and communication links with the neural dust. We provide experimental verification that the predicted scaling effects follow theory; (127 μm)(3) neural dust motes immersed in water 3 cm from the interrogator couple with 0.002064% power transfer efficiency and 0.04246 ppm backscatter, resulting in a maximum received power of ∼0.5 μW with ∼1 nW of change in backscatter power with neural activity. The high efficiency of ultrasonic transmission can enable the scaling of the sensing nodes down to 10s of micrometer. We conclude with a brief discussion of the application of neural dust for both central and peripheral nervous system recordings, and perspectives on future research directions. PMID:25109901

  12. The precision of bacterial quantification techniques on different kinds of environmental samples and the effect of ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Böllmann, Jörg; Rathsack, Kristina; Martienssen, Marion

    2016-07-01

    The precision of cell number quantification in environmental samples depends on the complexity of the sample and on the applied technique. We compared fluorescence microscopy after filtration, quantification of gene copies and the cultivation based most probable number technique for their precision. We further analyzed the effect of increasing complexity of the sample material on the precision of the different methods by using pure cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, fresh water samples and sediment slurries with and without ultrasonic treatment for analyses. Microscopy reached the highest precision, which was similar between pure cultures and water samples, but lower for sediment samples due to a higher percentage of cells in clusters and flocks. The PCR based quantification was most precise for pure cultures. Water and sediment samples were similar but less precise, which might be caused by the applied DNA extraction techniques. MPN measurements were equally precise for pure cultures and water samples. For sediment slurries the precision was slightly lower. The applied ultrasonic treatment of the slurries dispersed the cell clusters and flocks, increased the precision of microscopical and MPN measurements and also increased the number of potential colony forming units. However, the culturable cell number decreased by half. For MPN quantification of viable cells in samples with a high proportion of clustered cells we therefore recommend an optimization of ultrasonic treatment and a confirmation by microscopy and cultivation to reach highest possible dispersion of the cells with a minimum of inactivation. As a result of these observations we suggest a correction factor for MPN measurements to consider the effect of sonication on complex samples. The results are most likely applicable to other complex samples such as soil or biofilms. PMID:27184085

  13. Elastic properties of sand-peat moss mixtures from ultrasonic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trombino, C N

    1998-09-02

    Effective remediation of an environmental site requires extensive knowledge of the geologic setting, as well as the amount and distribution of contaminants. Seismic investigations provide a means to examine the subsurface with minimum disturbance, Laboratory measurements are needed to interpret field data. In this experiment, laboratory tests were performed to characterize manufactured soil samples in terms of their elastic properties. The soil samples consisted of small (mass) percentages (1 to 20 percent) of peat moss mixed with pure quartz sand. Sand was chosen as the major component because its elastic properties are well known except at the lowest pressures. The ultrasonic pulse transmission technique was used to collect elastic wave velocity data. These data were analyzed and mathematically processed to calculate the other elastic properties such as the modulus of elasticity. This experiment demonstrates that seismic data are affected by the amount~of peat moss added to pure sand samples. Elastic wave velocities, velocity gradients, and elastic moduli vary with pressure and peat moss amounts. In particular, ultrasonic response changes dramatically when pore space fills with peat. With some further investigation, the information gathered in this experiment could be applied to seismic field research.

  14. Computerized certification of digital ultrasonic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, M. W.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized inspection system is being set up at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to enable certification of the Krautkramer Branson ultrasonic instrumentation used extensively in Y-12 production operations. The system takes the data required to certify the linearity and frequency response of the receiver and to certify the correct operation of the pulsers, gates, and computer interface. A subset of the program will be able to verify correct instrumentation in the field by using the actual computer and instrumentation being used for production ultrasonic weld inspections. The system can reduce the certification time from approximately one week to less than an hour.

  15. Droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Praveen Priyaranjan; Kar, Durga Prasanna; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan

    2016-01-01

    A new technique of droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation has been proposed and experimentally investigated in this work. The proposed method is based on the principle of resonant inductive coupling and piezoelectric resonance. When a mechanical vibration is excited in a piezoelectric plate, the ultrasonic vibration transmitted to the droplets placed on its surface and induces merging. It has been observed that the merging rate of water droplets depends on the operating frequency, mechanical vibration of piezoelectric plate, separation distance between the droplets, and volume of droplets. The investigated technique of droplets merging through piezoelectric actuation is quite useful for microfluidics, chemical and biomedical engineering applications. PMID:26299402

  16. High frequency ultrasonic mitigation of microbial corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahamedh, Hussain H.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.; Spear, John R.

    2012-05-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in oil industry facilities, and considerable effort has been spent to mitigate this costly issue. More environmentally benign methods are under consideration as alternatives to biocides, among which are ultrasonic techniques. In this study, a high frequency ultrasonic technique (HFUT) was used as a mitigation method for MIC. The killing percentages of the HFUT were higher than 99.8 percent and their corrosivity on steel was reduced by more than 50 percent. The practice and result will be discussed.

  17. Ultrasonic Inspection Of The LTAB Floor

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G

    2001-07-31

    The National Ignition Facility's (NIF) floor is damaged by transporter operations. Two basic operations, rotating the wheels in place and traversing the floor numerous times can cause failure in the grout layer. The floor is composed of top wear surface (Stonhard) and an osmotic grout layer on top of concrete, Fig. 1. An ultrasonic technique was implemented to assess the condition of the floor as part of a study to determine the damage mechanisms. The study considered damage scenarios and ways to avoid the damage. A possible solution is to install thin steel plates where the transporter traverses on the floor. These tests were conducted with a fully loaded transporter that applies up to 1300 psi loads to the floor. A contact ultrasonic technique evaluated the condition of the grout layer in NIF's floor. Figure 1 displays the configuration of the ultrasonic transducer on the floor. We inspected the floor after wheel rotation damage and after wheel traversal damage. Figure 2a and 2b are photographs of the portable ultrasonic system and data acquisition. We acquired ultrasonic signals in a known pristine area and a damaged area to calibrate the inspection. Figure 3 is a plot of the typical ultrasonic response from an undamaged area (black) overlapped with a signal (red) from a damaged area. The damage area data was acquired at a location next to a hole in the floor that was caused by the transporter. Five megahertz pulses are propagated from the transducer and through a Plexiglas buffer rod into the floor. The ultrasonic pulse reflects from each discontinuity in the floor. The ultrasonic signal reflects from the top surface, the Stonhard-to-grout interface, and the grout to concrete interface. We expect to see reflections from each of these interfaces in an undamaged floor. If the grout layer pulverizes then the high frequency signal cannot traverse the layer and the grout to concrete interface signal will decrease or vanish. The more damage to the grout the more the

  18. Ultrasonic Device Would Open Pipe Bombs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, Michael S.; Adams, Marc A.; Zwissler, James G.

    1991-01-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer, energized by frequency generator and power supply, vibrates shell of pipe bomb while hardly disturbing explosive inner material. Frequency-control circuitry senses resonance in shell and holds generator at that frequency to induce fatigue cracking in threads of end cap. In addition to disarming bombs, ultrasonically induced fatigue may have other applications. In manufacturing, replaces some machining and cutting operations. In repair of equipment, cleanly and quickly disassembles corroded parts. In demolition of buildings used to dismember steel framework safely and controllably.

  19. Characterization methods for ultrasonic test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, L.J.; Becker, F.L.; Bowey, R.E.; Doctor, S.R.; Gribble, R.P.; Posakony, G.J.

    1982-07-01

    Methods for the characterization of ultrasonic transducers (search units) and instruments are presented. The instrument system is considered as three separate components consisting of a transducer, a receiver-display, and a pulser. The operation of each component is assessed independently. The methods presented were chosen because they provide the greatest amount of information about component operation and were not chosen based upon such conditions as cost, ease of operation, field implementation, etc. The results of evaluating a number of commercially available ultrasonic test instruments are presented.

  20. Embedded spacecraft thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Jared W.

    Research has been completed in order to rapidly manufacture spacecraft thermal control technologies embedded in spacecraft structural panels using ultrasonic consolidation. This rapid manufacturing process enables custom thermal control designs in the time frame necessary for responsive space. Successfully embedded components include temperature sensors, heaters, wire harnessing, pre-manufactured heat pipes, and custom integral heat pipes. High conductivity inserts and custom integral pulsating heat pipes were unsuccessfully attempted. This research shows the viability of rapid manufacturing of spacecraft structures with embedded thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation.