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Sample records for putative catalytic glutamate-arginine

  1. Quantum-mechanical calculations and spectroscopic characteristics of magnesium glutamate glycine and magnesium glutamate arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcoin, W.; Pasterny, K.; Pasterna, G.; Wrzalik, R.

    2006-07-01

    Theoretical calculations of magnesium glutamate-glycine ([Mg(glu-gly)]) and magnesium glutamate-arginine ([Mg(glu-arg)]) structures and their spectroscopic characteristics have been performed in the gas phase with the GAUSSIAN 98 software package using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3PW91 level. The 6-31+G* basis set was selected due to their reasonable quality and size. NMR and IR measurements were carried out and obtained experimental 1H and 13C chemical shifts and IR spectra are compared with calculated spectral parameters.

  2. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  3. Catalytic synthesis of biologically important metabolites from formaldehyde and ammonia as a putative way of their prebiotic emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delidovich, Irina; Taran, Oxana; Simonov, Alexander; Parmon, Valentin

    The modern `RNA-world' theory considering the primary life as a system of self-replicating informational and catalytic oligomers is the most widespread hypothesis of life's origin. At the same time an alternative major theory antithetic to the genetic one exists. It is based on the primary formation of important metabolites and building blocks of biopolymers and appearance of the primordial autocatalytic cycles in geochemical environment. [1]. Encouraged by this theory, we suggest the putative emergence pathways to biologically relevant metabolites from simple precursors: formaldehyde (FA) and ammonia, which are known to be present in the interstellar space [2]. Based on our earlier [3, 4] and novel findings as well as on the literature data [5, 6] the scheme of conjugate autocatalytic processes including photochemical condensation of FA yielding C-C bond and catalytic formation of pyruvaldehyde, pyruvic acid, sugars, aminoacids catalyzed by minerals (aluminum silicate, phoshates) and by aminoacids themselves is proposed. Acetaldehyde, glyoxal, glycol-and glyceraldehydes (GA and GCA) were identified in this work as products of photolysis of FA aqueous solution with summary selectivity up to 20% and can serve as substrates for the synthesis of more complex organic compounds. In turn, alanine and pyruvic acid are formed during UV-irradiation of aqueous solution of acetaldehyde and ammonium nitrate [6]. Pyruvaldehyde formation from GCA and FA in presence of amino acids was observed by A. Weber [5]. Finally, we revealed the catalytic activity of zeolite HZSM-5-17 in acid form towards formation of pyruvaldehyde from GA and GCA in presence of alanine with the yield about 5%. This observation indicates that the assumption of catalytic activity of silica-alumina towards the synthesis of metabolites could be realistic. Prebiotic synthesis of sugars from lower monosacharides, as we showed earlier, could take place over phosphate catalysts [4]. The substrates and the products

  4. Absence of catalytic domain in a putative protein kinase C (PkcA) suppresses tip dominance in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wasima; Ray, Sibnath; Brazill, Derrick; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-09-01

    A number of organisms possess several isoforms of protein kinase C but little is known about the significance of any specific isoform during embryogenesis and development. To address this we characterized a PKC ortholog (PkcA; DDB_G0288147) in Dictyostelium discoideum. pkcA expression switches from prestalk in mound to prespore in slug, indicating a dynamic expression pattern. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of PkcA (pkcA(-)) did not exhibit tip dominance. A striking phenotype of pkcA- was the formation of an aggregate with a central hollow, and aggregates later fragmented to form small mounds, each becoming a fruiting body. Optical density wave patterns of cAMP in the late aggregates showed several cAMP wave generation centers. We attribute these defects in pkcA(-) to impaired cAMP signaling, altered cell motility and decreased expression of the cell adhesion molecules - CadA and CsaA. pkcA(-) slugs showed ectopic expression of ecmA in the prespore region. Further, the use of a PKC-specific inhibitor, GF109203X that inhibits the activity of catalytic domain phenocopied pkcA(-). PMID:26183108

  5. Triosephosphate isomerase: removal of a putatively electrophilic histidine residue results in a subtle change in catalytic mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Nickbarg, E.B.; Davenport, R.C.; Petsko, G.A.; Knowles, J.R.

    1988-08-09

    An important active-site residue in the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase is His-95, which appears to act as an electrophilic component in catalyzing the enolization of the substrates. With the techniques of site-directed mutagenesis, His-95 has been replaced by Gln in the isomerase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutant isomerase has been expressed in Escherichia coli strain DF502 and purified to homogeneity. The specific catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme is less than that of wild type by a factor of nearly 400. The mutant enzyme can be resolved from the wild-type isomerase on nondenaturing isoelectric focusing gels, and an isomerase activity stain shows that the observed catalytic activity indeed derives from the mutant protein. The mutant enzyme shows the same stereospecificity of proton transfer as the wild type. Tritium exchange experiments similar to those used to define the free energy profile for the wild-type yeast isomerase, together with a new method of analysis involving /sup 14/C and /sup 3/H doubly labeled substrates, have been used to investigate the energetics of the mutant enzyme catalyzed reaction. The deuterium kinetic isotope effects observed with the mutant isomerase using (1(R)-/sup 2/H)dihydroxyacetone phosphate and (2-/sup 2/H)glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate are 2.15 +/- 0.04 and 2.4 +/- 0.1, respectively. These results lead to the conclusion that substitution of Gln for His-95 so impairs the ability of the enzyme to stabilize the reaction intermediate that there is a change in the pathways of proton transfer mediated by the mutant enzyme.

  6. Structure of the Pseudokinase VRK3 Reveals a Degraded Catalytic Site, a Highly Conserved Kinase Fold, and a Putative Regulatory Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Scheeff, Eric D.; Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Bunkoczi, Gabor; Knapp, Stefan; Manning, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Summary About 10% of all protein kinases are predicted to be enzymatically inactive pseudokinases, but the structural details of kinase inactivation have remained unclear. We present the first structure of a pseudokinase, VRK3, and that of its closest active relative, VRK2. Profound changes to the active site region underlie the loss of catalytic activity, and VRK3 cannot bind ATP because of residue substitutions in the binding pocket. However, VRK3 still shares striking structural similarity with VRK2, and appears to be locked in a pseudoactive conformation. VRK3 also conserves residue interactions that are surprising in the absence of enzymatic function; these appear to play important architectural roles required for the residual functions of VRK3. Remarkably, VRK3 has an “inverted” pattern of sequence conservation: although the active site is poorly conserved, portions of the molecular surface show very high conservation, suggesting that they form key interactions that explain the evolutionary retention of VRK3. PMID:19141289

  7. The 1.6-Å crystal structure of the class of chaperones represented by Escherichia coli Hsp31 reveals a putative catalytic triad

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, Paulene M.; Korotkov, Konstantin; Baneyx, François; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-11-10

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) play essential protective roles under stress conditions by preventing the formation of protein aggregates and degrading misfolded proteins. EcHsp31, the yedU (hchA) gene product, is a representative member of a family of chaperones that alleviates protein misfolding by interacting with early unfolding intermediates. The 1.6-{angstrom} crystal structure of the EcHsp31 dimer reveals a system of hydrophobic patches, canyons, and grooves, which may stabilize partially unfolded substrate. The presence of a well conserved, yet buried, triad in each two-domain subunit suggests a still unproven hydrolytic function of the protein. A flexible extended linker between the A and P domains may play a role in conformational flexibility and substrate binding. The {alpha}-{beta} sandwich of the EcHsp31 monomer shows structural similarity to PhPI, a protease belonging to the DJ-1 superfamily. The structure-guided sequence alignment indicates that Hsp31 homologs can be divided in three classes based on variations in the P domain that dramatically affect both oligomerization and catalytic triad formation.

  8. Identification of Putative RuBisCo Activase (TaRca1)-The Catalytic Chaperone Regulating Carbon Assimilatory Pathway in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) under the Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjeet R; Goswami, Suneha; Singh, Khushboo; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Renu; Verma, Neeraj; Kala, Yugal K; Rai, Gyanendra K; Grover, Monendra; Mishra, Dwijesh C; Singh, Bhupinder; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    RuBisCo activase (Rca) is a catalytic chaperone involved in modulating the activity of RuBisCo (key enzyme of photosynthetic pathway). Here, we identified eight novel transcripts from wheat through data mining predicted to be Rca and cloned a transcript of 1.4 kb from cv. HD2985, named as TaRca1 (GenBank acc. no. KC776912). Single copy number of TaRca1 was observed in wheat genome. Expression analysis in diverse wheat genotypes (HD2985, Halna, PBW621, and HD2329) showed very high relative expression of TaRca1 in Halna under control and HS-treated, as compared to other cultivars at different stages of growth. TaRca1 protein was predicted to be chloroplast-localized with numerous potential phosphorylation sites. Northern blot analysis showed maximum accumulation of TaRca1 transcript in thermotolerant cv. during mealy-ripe stage, as compared to thermosusceptible. Decrease in the photosynthetic parameters was observed in all the cultivars, except PBW621 in response to HS. We observed significant increase in the Rca activity in all the cultivars under HS at different stages of growth. HS causes decrease in the RuBisCo activity; maximum reduction was observed during pollination stage in thermosusceptible cvs. as validated through immunoblotting. We observed uniform carbon distribution in different tissues of thermotolerant cvs., as compared to thermosusceptible. Similarly, tolerance level of leaf was observed maximum in Halna having high Rca activity under HS. A positive correlation was observed between the transcript and activity of TaRca1 in HS-treated Halna. Similarly, TaRca1 enzyme showed positive correlation with the activity of RuBisCo. There is, however, need to manipulate the thermal stability of TaRca1 enzyme through protein engineering for sustaining the photosynthetic rate under HS-a novel approach toward development of "climate-smart" crop. PMID:27462325

  9. Characterization of two putative prolinases (PepR1 and PepR2) from Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1: occurrence of two isozymes with structural similarity and different catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyu; Tanaka, Takuji

    2015-02-01

    Two putative prolinases (PepR1 and PepR2) of Lactobacillus plantarum WCSF1 share 48.5% amino acid sequence identity (55.5% at the DNA level); however, PepR1 exhibits over 80% identity at the protein level with other lactobacilli prolinases while PepR2 exhibits only 51% or less identity. In this study, the putative genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to gel electrophoretic homogeneity, and then characterized. Purified PepR1 and PepR2 hydrolysed Pro-Xaa dipeptide substrates at similar rates, proving their nature as prolinases. Structural analyses using circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, gel filtration, and molecular modelling revealed that the two prolinases have similar structural characteristics: high β-sheet content, homotetrameric structure, and similar folding to the PepI/PepL/PepR peptidase family. However, kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of PepR1 and PepR2 indicated differences in many aspects: optimum temperatures (25 and 30°C, respectively), optimum pH (pH7.5 and 8.0, respectively), substrate specificities (high stringency of PepR2), kinetic parameters, and thermal stability (29 and 48°C, respectively). Also, these prolinases behaved differently towards inhibitor treatments, suggesting structural and/or functional differences in their active sites. Differences in the two prolinases would contribute to a diversity of catalytic activities, so that they work together cooperatively and complementarily to hydrolyse proline-containing peptides with broader specificity, working pH, working temperature, and higher efficiency, thus allowing adaptation to a wider range of environments. PMID:25463046

  10. Identification of Putative RuBisCo Activase (TaRca1)—The Catalytic Chaperone Regulating Carbon Assimilatory Pathway in Wheat (Triticum aestivum) under the Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Suneha; Singh, Khushboo; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Renu; Verma, Neeraj; Kala, Yugal K.; Rai, Gyanendra K.; Grover, Monendra; Mishra, Dwijesh C.; Singh, Bhupinder; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly

    2016-01-01

    RuBisCo activase (Rca) is a catalytic chaperone involved in modulating the activity of RuBisCo (key enzyme of photosynthetic pathway). Here, we identified eight novel transcripts from wheat through data mining predicted to be Rca and cloned a transcript of 1.4 kb from cv. HD2985, named as TaRca1 (GenBank acc. no. KC776912). Single copy number of TaRca1 was observed in wheat genome. Expression analysis in diverse wheat genotypes (HD2985, Halna, PBW621, and HD2329) showed very high relative expression of TaRca1 in Halna under control and HS-treated, as compared to other cultivars at different stages of growth. TaRca1 protein was predicted to be chloroplast-localized with numerous potential phosphorylation sites. Northern blot analysis showed maximum accumulation of TaRca1 transcript in thermotolerant cv. during mealy-ripe stage, as compared to thermosusceptible. Decrease in the photosynthetic parameters was observed in all the cultivars, except PBW621 in response to HS. We observed significant increase in the Rca activity in all the cultivars under HS at different stages of growth. HS causes decrease in the RuBisCo activity; maximum reduction was observed during pollination stage in thermosusceptible cvs. as validated through immunoblotting. We observed uniform carbon distribution in different tissues of thermotolerant cvs., as compared to thermosusceptible. Similarly, tolerance level of leaf was observed maximum in Halna having high Rca activity under HS. A positive correlation was observed between the transcript and activity of TaRca1 in HS-treated Halna. Similarly, TaRca1 enzyme showed positive correlation with the activity of RuBisCo. There is, however, need to manipulate the thermal stability of TaRca1 enzyme through protein engineering for sustaining the photosynthetic rate under HS—a novel approach toward development of “climate-smart” crop. PMID:27462325

  11. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  12. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  13. Design and synthesis of inositolphosphoglycan putative insulin mediators.

    PubMed

    López-Prados, Javier; Cuevas, Félix; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; de Paz, José-Luis; Morales, Ezequiel Q; Martín-Lomas, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    The binding modes of a series of molecules, containing the glucosamine (1-->6) myo-inositol structural motif, into the ATP binding site of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) have been analysed using molecular docking. These calculations predict that the presence of a phosphate group at the non-reducing end in pseudodisaccharide and pseudotrisaccharide structures properly orientate the molecule into the binding site and that pseudotrisaccharide structures present the best shape complementarity. Therefore, pseudodisaccharides and pseudotrisaccharides have been synthesised from common intermediates using effective synthetic strategies. On the basis of this synthetic chemistry, the feasibility of constructing small pseudotrisaccharide libraries on solid-phase using the same intermediates has been explored. The results from the biological evaluation of these molecules provide additional support to an insulin-mediated signalling system which involves the intermediacy of inositolphosphoglycans as putative insulin mediators. PMID:15731862

  14. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  15. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  16. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  17. Catalytic cracking process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  18. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  19. The Putative Son's Attractiveness Alters the Perceived Attractiveness of the Putative Father.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol

    2015-08-01

    A body of literature has investigated female mate choice in the pre-mating context (pre-mating sexual selection). Humans, however, are long-living mammals forming pair-bonds which sequentially produce offspring. Post-mating evaluations of a partner's attractiveness may thus significantly influence the reproductive success of men and women. I tested herein the theory that the attractiveness of putative sons provides extra information about the genetic quality of fathers, thereby influencing fathers' attractiveness across three studies. As predicted, facially attractive boys were more frequently attributed to attractive putative fathers and vice versa (Study 1). Furthermore, priming with an attractive putative son increased the attractiveness of the putative father with the reverse being true for unattractive putative sons. When putative fathers were presented as stepfathers, the effect of the boy's attractiveness on the stepfather's attractiveness was lower and less consistent (Study 2). This suggests that the presence of an attractive boy has the strongest effect on the perceived attractiveness of putative fathers rather than on non-fathers. The generalized effect of priming with beautiful non-human objects also exists, but its effect is much weaker compared with the effects of putative biological sons (Study 3). Overall, this study highlighted the importance of post-mating sexual selection in humans and suggests that the heritable attractive traits of men are also evaluated by females after mating and/or may be used by females in mate poaching. PMID:25731909

  20. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  1. Crystal structure and putative substrate identification for the Entamoeba histolytica low molecular weight tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Linford, Alicia S; Jiang, Nona M; Edwards, Thomas E; Sherman, Nicholas E; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Stewart, Lance J; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Petri, William A

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a eukaryotic intestinal parasite of humans, and is endemic in developing countries. We have characterized the E. histolytica putative low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP). The structure for this amebic tyrosine phosphatase was solved, showing the ligand-induced conformational changes necessary for binding of substrate. In amebae, it was expressed at low but detectable levels as detected by immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblotting. A mutant LMW-PTP protein in which the catalytic cysteine in the active site was replaced with a serine lacked phosphatase activity, and was used to identify a number of trapped putative substrate proteins via mass spectrometry analysis. Seven of these putative substrate protein genes were cloned with an epitope tag and overexpressed in amebae. Five of these seven putative substrate proteins were demonstrated to interact specifically with the mutant LMW-PTP. This is the first biochemical study of a small tyrosine phosphatase in Entamoeba, and sets the stage for understanding its role in amebic biology and pathogenesis. PMID:24548880

  2. Crystal structure and putative substrate identification for the Entamoeba histolytica low molecular weight tyrosine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Linford, Alicia S.; Jiang, Nona M.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Stewart, Lance J.; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Petri, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a eukaryotic intestinal parasite of humans, and is endemic in developing countries. We have characterized the E. histolytica putative low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP). The structure for this amebic tyrosine phosphatase was solved, showing the ligand-induced conformational changes necessary for binding of substrate. In amebae, it was expressed at low but detectable levels as detected by immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblotting. A mutant LMW-PTP protein in which the catalytic cysteine in the active site was replaced with a serine lacked phosphatase activity, and was used to identify a number of trapped putative substrate proteins via mass spectrometry analysis. Seven of these putative substrate protein genes were cloned with an epitope tag and overexpressed in amebae. Five of these seven putative substrate proteins were demonstrated to interact specifically with the mutant LMW-PTP. This is the first biochemical study of a small tyrosine phosphatase in Entamoeba, and sets the stage for understanding its role in amebic biology and pathogenesis. PMID:24548880

  3. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  4. Catalytic distillation process

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  5. Evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    An RNA-based evolution system was constructed in the laboratory and used to develop RNA enzymes with novel catalytic function. By controlling the nature of the catalytic task that the molecules must perform in order to survive, it is possible to direct the evolving population toward the expression of some desired catalytic behavior. More recently, this system has been coupled to an in vitro translation procedure, raising the possibility of evolving protein enzymes in the laboratory to produce novel proteins with desired catalytic properties. The aim of this line of research is to reduce darwinian evolution, the fundamental process of biology, to a laboratory procedure that can be made to operate in the service of organic synthesis.

  6. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  7. Clean catalytic combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstedt, E. E.; Lyon, T. F.; Sabla, P. E.; Dodds, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    A combustor program was conducted to evolve and to identify the technology needed for, and to establish the credibility of, using combustors with catalytic reactors in modern high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines. Two selected catalytic combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The combustors were sized for use in the NASA/General Electric Energy Efficient Engine (E3). One of the combustor designs was a basic parallel-staged double-annular combustor. The second design was also a parallel-staged combustor but employed reverse flow cannular catalytic reactors. Subcomponent tests of fuel injection systems and of catalytic reactors for use in the combustion system were also conducted. Very low-level pollutant emissions and excellent combustor performance were achieved. However, it was obvious from these tests that extensive development of fuel/air preparation systems and considerable advancement in the steady-state operating temperature capability of catalytic reactor materials will be required prior to the consideration of catalytic combustion systems for use in high-pressure-ratio aircraft turbine engines.

  8. Crystal Structures of Putative Sugar Kinases from Synechococcus Elongatus PCC 7942 and Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 encodes a putative sugar kinase (SePSK), which shares 44.9% sequence identity with the xylulose kinase-1 (AtXK-1) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence alignment suggests that both kinases belong to the ribulokinase-like carbohydrate kinases, a sub-family of FGGY family carbohydrate kinases. However, their exact physiological function and real substrates remain unknown. Here we solved the structures of SePSK and AtXK-1 in both their apo forms and in complex with nucleotide substrates. The two kinases exhibit nearly identical overall architecture, with both kinases possessing ATP hydrolysis activity in the absence of substrates. In addition, our enzymatic assays suggested that SePSK has the capability to phosphorylate D-ribulose. In order to understand the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, we solved the structure of SePSK in complex with D-ribulose and found two potential substrate binding pockets in SePSK. Using mutation and activity analysis, we further verified the key residues important for its catalytic activity. Moreover, our structural comparison with other family members suggests that there are major conformational changes in SePSK upon substrate binding, facilitating the catalytic process. Together, these results provide important information for a more detailed understanding of the cofactor and substrate binding mode as well as the catalytic mechanism of SePSK, and possible similarities with its plant homologue AtXK-1. PMID:27223615

  9. rbCLCA1 is a putative metalloprotease family member: localization and catalytic domain identification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ra Mi; Han, Kyu Ho; Han, Jin Soo

    2016-03-01

    Here, we identify the rat brain (rb) CLCA1 metalloprotease motif and its role in rbCLCA1 processing. GFP tagging or c-myc tagging adjacent to the rbCLCA1 signal sequence was used to detect rbCLCA1 expression and localization patterns if they matched those of other CLCA family members. Immunoblot analysis revealed that massive deletion of the metalloprotease motif affects the protein cleavage process by restricting two cleavage products to only one product. rbCLCA1 as well as the mutant proteins H155A, E156Q, H159A, D166A, E167A, E170A, and D171A overexpressed in HEK293T cells showed plasma membrane localization; and intracellular localizations of H159A and E167A were observed in permeabilized and non-permeabilized conditions. C-terminally GFP-tagged rbCLCA1 showed either ER localization or overall signal within the cells rather than on the cell surface. Cell surface biotinylation analysis was used to show that rbCLCA1, H155A, E156Q, D166A, E170A, and D171A reach the cell surface while little H159A and E167A reach the cell surface. Taken together, our findings indicate that the amino acids H159 and E167 in the rbCLCA1 metalloprotease motif are important in rbCLCA1 processing for localization to the cell surface. Our data demonstrate that rbCLCA1 localization is dependent on the H159 and E167, suggesting either the metalloprotease motif including H159 and E167 may be the key site for rbCLCA1 cellular processing or that a novel rbCLCA1 regulation mechanism exists with a metalloprotease activity. PMID:26510883

  10. Magnetism and the putative early Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.

    2001-08-01

    A short critical review is provided on three questions linking magnetism and the putative early Mars life. Was there a large internal Martian magnetic field, during which period, and is it a requisite for life? What is the origin of the paleomagnetic signal of Martian meteorites, including ALH84001? What is the present credibility of the case for fossil bacterial magnetite grains in ALH84001?

  11. Catalytic coherence transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  12. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  13. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  14. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  15. Catalytic membranes beckon

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Chemical engineers here and abroad are finding that the marriage of catalysts and membranes holds promise for faster and more specific reactions, although commercialization of this technology is several years away. Catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) combine a heterogeneous catalyst and a permselective membrane. Reactions performed by CMRs provide higher yields--sometimes as much as 50% higher--because of better reaction selectivity--as opposed to separation selectivity. CMRs also can work at very high temperatures, using ceramic materials that would not be possible with organic membranes. Although the use of CMRs is not widespread presently, the development of new membranes--particularly porous ceramic and zeolite membranes--will increase the potential to improve yields of many catalytic processes. The paper discusses ongoing studies, metal and advanced materials for membranes, the need for continued research, hydrogen recovery from coal-derived gases, catalytic oxidation of sulfides, CMRs for water purification, and oxidative coupling of methane.

  16. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  17. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    DOEpatents

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1990-03-20

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  18. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  19. Hollow fiber catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yi Hua; Moser, W.; Shelekhin, A.; Pien, Shyhing

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the present research is to investigate the possibility of the enhancement of the H{sub 2}S thermal decomposition in the IGCC system by employing the hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactor. To accomplish the objective, the following major components in the analysis of the high temperature membrane reactor must be investigated: high-temperature stability of the porous glass membrane; catalytic properties of MoS{sub 2} and of the porous glass membrane; catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2}S in a packed bed reactor; catalytic decomposition of 100%, 8.6%, and 1.1% H{sub 2}S gas mixtures in the membrane reactor. The study has been shown that the conversion of the H{sub 2}S can be increased in the packed bed membrane reactor compared to the equilibrium conversion on the shell side. The development of a mathematical model for the proposed process is in progress. The model will enable optimization of the H{sub 2}S decomposition. These conditions include selectivity factors and pressure drop across the membrane.

  20. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  1. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  2. Putative Excitatory and Putative Inhibitory Inputs Localize to Different Dendritic Domains in a Drosophila Flight Motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Claudia; Duch, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Input-output computations of individual neurons may be affected by the three-dimensional structure of their dendrites and by the targeting of input synapses to specific parts of their dendrites. However, only few examples exist where dendritic architecture can be related to behaviorally relevant computations of a neuron. By combining genetic, immunohistochemical, and confocal laser scanning methods this study estimates the location of the spike initiating zone and the dendritic distribution patterns of putative synaptic inputs on an individually identified Drosophila flight motorneuron, MN5. MN5 is a monopolar neuron with more than 4000 dendritic branches. The site of spike initiation was estimated by mapping sodium channel immunolabel onto geometric reconstructions of MN5. Maps of putative excitatory cholinergic and of putative inhibitory GABAergic inputs on MN5 dendrites were created by charting tagged Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Rdl GABAA receptors onto MN5 dendritic surface reconstructions. Although these methods provided only an estimate of putative input synapse distributions, the data indicated that inhibitory and excitatory synapses were targeted preferentially to different dendritic domains of MN5, and thus, computed mostly separately. Most putative inhibitory inputs were close to spike initiation, which was consistent with sharp inhibition, as predicted previously based on recordings of motoneuron firing patterns during flight. By contrast, highest densities of putative excitatory inputs at more distant dendritic regions were consistent with the prediction that in response to different power demands during flight, tonic excitatory drive to flight motoneuron dendrites must be smoothly translated into different tonic firing frequencies. PMID:23279094

  3. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  4. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  5. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  6. Catalytic Antioxidants and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Tamara R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress, resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, or neuroinflammation, is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative conditions. Damage due to superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and peroxynitrite has been observed in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as in acute conditions that lead to neuronal death, such as stroke and epilepsy. Antioxidant therapies to remove these toxic compounds have been of great interest in treating these disorders. Catalytic antioxidants mimic the activities of superoxide dismutase or catalase or both, detoxifying superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases, peroxynitrite and other toxic species as well. Several compounds have demonstrated efficacy in in vitro and in animal models of neurodegeneration, leading to optimism that catalytic antioxidants may prove to be useful therapies in human disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 555–569. PMID:18754709

  7. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  8. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  9. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  10. Catalytic combustion nears application

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This article is a brief review of efforts to develope a catalytic combustion system with emissions levels less than 10 ppm. Two efforts are discussed: (1) tests by General Electric using a GE Frame 7E/9E and 7F/9F gas turbine, and (2) tests by AES using a Kawasaki M1A-13A industrial gas turbine. The latter also employs a heat recovery steam generator and produces 3 MWe and 28,000 lbm/hr of steam.

  11. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Hryn, John N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of putative peroxiredoxin in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes with wide variations in genome sizes and ecological habitats. Peroxiredoxin (PRX) is an important protein that plays essential roles in protecting own cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS). PRXs have been identified from mammals, fungi and higher plants. However, knowledge on cyanobacterial PRXs still remains obscure. With the availability of 37 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of PRXs and explored their diversity, distribution, domain structure and evolution. Results Overall 244 putative prx genes were identified, which were abundant in filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, and unicellular cyanobacteria inhabiting freshwater and hot-springs, while poor in all Prochlorococcus and marine Synechococcus strains. Among these putative genes, 25 open reading frames (ORFs) encoding hypothetical proteins were identified as prx gene family members and the others were already annotated as prx genes. All 244 putative PRXs were classified into five major subfamilies (1-Cys, 2-Cys, BCP, PRX5_like, and PRX-like) according to their domain structures. The catalytic motifs of the cyanobacterial PRXs were similar to those of eukaryotic PRXs and highly conserved in all but the PRX-like subfamily. Classical motif (CXXC) of thioredoxin was detected in protein sequences from the PRX-like subfamily. Phylogenetic tree constructed of catalytic domains coincided well with the domain structures of PRXs and the phylogenies based on 16s rRNA. Conclusions The distribution of genes encoding PRXs in different unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria especially those sub-families like PRX-like or 1-Cys PRX correlate with the genome size, eco-physiology, and physiological properties of the organisms. Cyanobacterial and eukaryotic PRXs share similar conserved motifs, indicating that cyanobacteria adopt similar catalytic mechanisms as eukaryotes. All

  13. Functional reclassification of the putative cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase multigene family in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Mi-Ran; Bedgar, Diana L.; Moinuddin, Syed G. A.; Cardenas, Claudia L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Kang, ChulHee; Lewis, Norman G.

    2004-01-01

    Of 17 genes annotated in the Arabidopsis genome database as cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) homologues, an in silico analysis revealed that 8 genes were misannotated. Of the remaining nine, six were catalytically competent for NADPH-dependent reduction of p-coumaryl, caffeyl, coniferyl, 5-hydroxyconiferyl, and sinapyl aldehydes, whereas three displayed very low activity and only at very high substrate concentrations. Of the nine putative CADs, two (AtCAD5 and AtCAD4) had the highest activity and homology (≈83% similarity) relative to bona fide CADs from other species. AtCAD5 used all five substrates effectively, whereas AtCAD4 (of lower overall catalytic capacity) poorly used sinapyl aldehyde; the corresponding 270-fold decrease in kenz resulted from higher Km and lower kcat values, respectively. No CAD homologue displayed a specific requirement for sinapyl aldehyde, which was in direct contrast with unfounded claims for a so-called sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase in angiosperms. AtCAD2, 3, as well as AtCAD7 and 8 (highest homology to sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase) were catalytically less active overall by at least an order of magnitude, due to increased Km and lower kcat values. Accordingly, alternative and/or bifunctional metabolic roles of these proteins in plant defense cannot be ruled out. Comprehensive analyses of lignified tissues of various Arabidopsis knockout mutants (for AtCAD5, 6, and 9) at different stages of growth/development indicated the presence of functionally redundant CAD metabolic networks. Moreover, disruption of AtCAD5 expression had only a small effect on either overall lignin amounts deposited, or on syringyl-guaiacyl compositions, despite being the most catalytically active form in vitro. PMID:14745009

  14. Catalytic reforming methods

    DOEpatents

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  15. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production.

    PubMed

    Morlon, Hélène; O'Connor, Timothy K; Bryant, Jessica A; Charkoudian, Louise K; Docherty, Kathryn M; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W; Green, Jessica L; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  16. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Docherty, Kathryn M.; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W.; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  17. Magnetic Pulse Affects a Putative Magnetoreceptor Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Alfonso F.; Winklhofer, Michael; Shcherbakov, Valera P.; Petersen, Nikolai

    2005-01-01

    Clusters of superparamagnetic (SP) magnetite crystals have recently been identified in free nerve endings in the upper-beak skin of homing pigeons and are interpreted as being part of a putative magnetoreceptor system. Motivated by these findings, we developed a physical model that accurately predicts the dynamics of interacting SP clusters in a magnetic field. The main predictions are: 1), under a magnetic field, a group of SP clusters self-assembles into a chain-like structure that behaves like a compass needle under slowly rotating fields; 2), in a frequently changing field as encountered by a moving bird, a stacked chain is a structurally more stable configuration than a single chain; 3), chain-like structures of SP clusters disrupt under strong fields applied at oblique angles; and 4), reassemble on a timescale of hours to days (assuming a viscosity of the cell plasma η ∼ 1 P). Our results offer a novel mechanism for magnetic field perception and are in agreement with the response of birds observed after magnetic-pulse treatments, which have been conducted in the past to specifically test if ferrimagnetic material is involved in magnetoreception, but which have defied explanation so far. Our theoretical results are supported by experiments on a technical SP model system using a high-speed camera. We also offer new predictions that can be tested experimentally. PMID:15863473

  18. Toddlers’ Duration of Attention towards Putative Threat

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2010-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk for developing anxious behavior, toddlers’ attention towards a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined how attention towards an angry-looking gorilla mask in a room with alternative opportunities for play in 24-month-old toddlers predicted social inhibition when children entered kindergarten. Analyses examined attention to threat above and beyond and in interaction with both proximity to the mask and fear of novelty observed in other situations. Attention to threat interacted with proximity to the mask to predict social inhibition, such that attention to threat most strongly predicted social inhibition when toddlers stayed furthest from the mask. This relation occurred above and beyond the predictive relation between fear of novelty and social inhibition. Results are discussed within the broader literature of anxiety development and attentional processes in young children. PMID:21373365

  19. Biogenic Origin for Earth's Oldest Putative Microfossils

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregorio, B.; Sharp, T; Flynn, G; Wirick, S; Hervig, R

    2009-01-01

    Carbonaceous microbe-like features preserved within a local chert unit of the 3.5 Ga old Apex Basalt in Western Australia may represent some of the oldest evidence of life on Earth. However, the biogenicity of these putative microfossils has been called into question, primarily because the sample collection locality is a black, carbon-rich, brecciated chert dike representing an Archean submarine hydrothermal spring, suggesting a formation via an abiotic organic synthesis mechanism. Here we describe the macromolecular hydrocarbon structure, carbon bonding, functional group chemistry, and biotic element abundance of carbonaceous matter associated with these filamentous features. These characteristics are similar to those of biogenic kerogen from the ca. 1.9 Ga old Gunflint Formation. Although an abiotic origin cannot be entirely ruled out, it is unlikely that known abiotic synthesis mechanisms could recreate both the structural and compositional complexity of this ancient carbonaceous matter. Thus, we find that a biogenic origin for this material is more likely, implying that the Apex microbe-like features represent authentic biogenic organic matter.

  20. Catalytic considerations in temperature measurement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.; Crossman, G. R.; Chitnis, R. V.

    1972-01-01

    Literature discussing catalytic activity in platinum group temperature sensors is surveyed. Methods for the determination and/or elimination of catalytic activity are reported. A particular application of the literature is discussed in which it is possible to infer that a shielded platinum total temperature probe does not experience significant catalytic activity in the wake of a supersonic hydrogen burner, while a bare iridium plus rhodium, iridium thermocouple does. It is concluded that catalytic data corrections are restricted and that it is preferable to coat the temperature sensor with a noncatalytic coating. Furthermore, the desirability of transparent coatings is discussed.

  1. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  2. Catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Gladrow, E.M.; Winter, W.E.

    1980-04-29

    The octane number of a cracked naphtha can be significantly improved in a catalytic cracking unit, without significant decrease in naphtha yield, by maintaining certain critical concentrations of metals on the catalyst, suitably by blending or adding a heavy metals-containing component to the gas oil feed. Suitably, in a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking reactor (Zone) at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regenerator (Regeneration zone) by burning coke off the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the reactor and regenerator, sufficient of a metals-containing heavy feedstock is admixed, intermittantly or continuously, with the gas oil feed to deposit metals on said catalyst and raise the metals-content of said catalyst to a level of from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million, preferably from about 2500 to about 4000 parts per million expressed as equivalent nickel, base the weight of the catalyst, and said metals level is maintained on the catalyst throughout the operation by withdrawing high metals-containing catalyst and adding low metals-containing catalyst to the regenerator.

  3. Crystal structure of the TK2203 protein from Thermococcus kodakarensis, a putative extradiol dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Yuichi; Simons, Jan Robert; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Miki, Kunio

    2016-06-01

    The TK2203 protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 (262 residues, 29 kDa) is a putative extradiol dioxygenase catalyzing the cleavage of C-C bonds in catechol derivatives. It contains three metal-binding residues, but has no significant sequence similarity to proteins for which structures have been determined. Here, the first crystal structure of the TK2203 protein was determined at 1.41 Å resolution to investigate its functional role. Structure analysis reveals that this protein shares the same fold and catalytic residues as other extradiol dioxygenases, strongly suggesting the same enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the important region contributing to substrate selectivity is discussed. PMID:27303894

  4. Putative Lineage of Novel African Usutu Virus, Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cadar, Daniel; Bosch, Stefan; Jöst, Hanna; Börstler, Jessica; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie; Becker, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the complete genome of a putative novel Usutu virus (USUV) strain (Usutu-BONN) detected in a dead blackbird from Germany. Genomic analysis revealed several unique amino acid substitutions among the polyprotein gene. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that Usutu-BONN constitutes a putative novel African USUV lineage, which was probably recently introduced to central Europe. PMID:26291923

  5. Identification of Putative Fallopian Tube Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Snegovskikh, Victoria; Mutlu, Levent; Massasa, Effi

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are used to repair and regenerate multiple tissues in the adult. We have previously shown that stem cells play a significant role in mediating endometrial repair and tissue regeneration. We hypothesized that the oviduct may possess a similar population of stem cells that contribute to the maintenance of this tissue. Here we identify label-retaining cells (LRCs) in the murine oviduct which indicate the presence of a stem/progenitor cell population in this tissue as well. Two-day-old CD-1 mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) or vehicle control. Female animals (n = 36 for each group) were killed at 6 weeks post injection. Reproductive tracts were removed, specimens were embedded in paraffin, and 5-µ sections were prepared. Oviduct was identified by hematoxylin and eosin staining and morphology. Immunofluorescence studies were performed on serial sections tissues (n = 12 per animal) using antibodies against BrdU. Confocal microscopy was used to identify 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)- and BrdU-stained nuclei. In the group of mice exposed to BrdU, we identified a population of LRCs in all specimens and not in controls. The putative stem cells are located at the base of each villi, suggesting the location of the stem cell niche. The number of DAPI-stained nuclei divided by the number of LRCs; LRCs constituted 0.5% of all nucleated cells. The oviduct contains a population of progenitor cells, likely used in the repair and regeneration of fallopian tube. Defective or insufficient stem cell reserve may underlie common tubal diseases, including hydrosalpinx and ectopic pregnancy. PMID:25305130

  6. Catalytic reactor with disposable cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    Catalytic reactor, disposable cartridge enclosing iron catalyst, acts as container for solid carbon formed by decomposition of carbon monoxide. Deposition of carbon in other parts of oxygen recovery system does not occur because of lack of catalytic activity; filters trap carbon particles and prevent their being transported outside reaction zone.

  7. Functional analysis of conserved residues in the putative "finger" domain of telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Bosoy, D; Lue, N F

    2001-12-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase (RT) responsible for the maintenance of one strand of telomere terminal repeats. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase, known generically as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), exhibits significant homology to RTs encoded by retroviruses and retroelements. The polymerization mechanisms of telomerase may therefore be similar to those of the "conventional" RTs. In this study, we explored the extent of mechanistic conservation by analyzing mutations of conserved residues within the putative "finger" domain of TERT. Previous analysis has implicated this domain of retroviral RTs in nucleotide and RNA binding and in processivity control. Our results demonstrate that residues conserved between TERT and human immunodeficiency virus-1 RT are more likely than TERT-specific residues to be required for enzyme activity. In addition, residues presumed to make direct contact with either the RNA or nucleotide substrate appear to be functionally more important. Furthermore, distinct biochemical defects can be observed for alterations in the putative RNA- and nucleotide-binding TERT residues in a manner that can be rationalized by their postulated mechanisms of action. This study thus supports a high degree of mechanistic conservation between telomerase and retroviral RTs and underscores the roles of distinct aspects of telomerase biochemistry in telomere length maintenance. PMID:11581271

  8. ``OPTICAL Catalytic Nanomotors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosary-Oyong, Se, Glory

    D. Kagan, et.al, 2009:'' a motion-based chemical sensing involving fuel-driven nanomotors is demonstrated. The new protocol relies on the use of an optical microscope for tracking charge in the speed of nanowire motors in the presence of target analyte''. Synthetic nanomotors are propelled by catalytic decomposition of .. they do not require external electric, magnetic or optical fields as energy... Accompanying Fig 2.6(a) of optical micrograph of a partial monolayer of silica microbeads [J.Gibbs, 2011 ] retrieves WF Paxton:''rods were characterized by transmission electron & dark-field optical microscopy..'' & LF Valadares:''dimer due to the limited resolution of optical microscopy, however the result..'. Acknowledged to HE. Mr. Prof. SEDIONO M.P. TJONDRONEGORO.

  9. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  10. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  11. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  12. Catalytic conversions of chlorodecalin

    SciTech Connect

    Takhistov, U.V.; Kovyazin, V.E.

    1985-10-01

    This paper studies catalytic conversions of chlorinated decahydronaphthalene (chlorodecalin), since the introduction of chlorine into the hydrocarbon molecule would facilitate formation of the original carbonium ion required for conversion to adamantane. Analysis of the fractions obtained showed that two main products are formed: the tricyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/ and the bicyclic hydrocarbon C/sub 10/H/sub 16/. Therefore, the C/sub 10/H/sub 17/ cation formed by removal of chlorine from chlorodecalin, C/sub 10/H/sub 17/CI, undergoes changes in two directions: addition of hydride ions from other chlorodecalin molecules to form Decalin, and loss of a proton to give a tricyclic system of the adamantane weries and its isomer. Introduction of a substituent (chlorine) into the Decalin molecule made it possible to conduct the process at low temperatures.

  13. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoruiko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  14. Catalytic Microtube Rocket Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Devices that generate both high energy and high temperature are required to ignite reliably the propellant mixtures in combustion chambers like those present in rockets and other combustion systems. This catalytic microtube rocket igniter generates these conditions with a small, catalysis-based torch. While traditional spark plug systems can require anywhere from 50 W to multiple kW of power in different applications, this system has demonstrated ignition at less than 25 W. Reactants are fed to the igniter from the same tanks that feed the reactants to the rest of the rocket or combustion system. While this specific igniter was originally designed for liquid methane and liquid oxygen rockets, it can be easily operated with gaseous propellants or modified for hydrogen use in commercial combustion devices. For the present cryogenic propellant rocket case, the main propellant tanks liquid oxygen and liquid methane, respectively are regulated and split into different systems for the individual stages of the rocket and igniter. As the catalyst requires a gas phase for reaction, either the stored boil-off of the tanks can be used directly or one stream each of fuel and oxidizer can go through a heat exchanger/vaporizer that turns the liquid propellants into a gaseous form. For commercial applications, where the reactants are stored as gases, the system is simplified. The resulting gas-phase streams of fuel and oxidizer are then further divided for the individual components of the igniter. One stream each of the fuel and oxidizer is introduced to a mixing bottle/apparatus where they are mixed to a fuel-rich composition with an O/F mass-based mixture ratio of under 1.0. This premixed flow then feeds into the catalytic microtube device. The total flow is on the order of 0.01 g/s. The microtube device is composed of a pair of sub-millimeter diameter platinum tubes connected only at the outlet so that the two outlet flows are parallel to each other. The tubes are each

  15. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  16. Catalytic Mechanisms for Phosphotriesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Andrew N.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphotriesters are one class of highly toxic synthetic compounds known as organophosphates. Wide spread usage of organophosphates as insecticides as well as nerve agents has lead to numerous efforts to identify enzymes capable of detoxifying them. A wide array of enzymes has been found to have phosphotriesterase activity including phosphotriesterase (PTE), methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH), organophosphorus acid anhydrolase (OPAA), diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFP), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1). These enzymes differ widely in protein sequence and three-dimensional structure, as well as in catalytic mechanism, but they also share several common features. All of the enzymes identified as phosphotriesterases are metal-dependent hydrolases that contain a hydrophobic active site with three discrete binding pockets to accommodate the substrate ester groups. Activation of the substrate phosphorus center is achieved by a direct interaction between the phosphoryl oxygen and a divalent metal in the active site. The mechanistic details of the hydrolytic reaction differ among the various enzymes with both direct attack of a hydroxide as well as covalent catalysis being found. PMID:22561533

  17. Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Halocyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Pons, Amandine; Ivashkin, Pavel; Poisson, Thomas; Charette, André B; Pannecoucke, Xavier; Jubault, Philippe

    2016-04-25

    A catalytic asymmetric synthesis of halocyclopropanes is described. The developed method is based on a carbenoid cyclopropanation of 2-haloalkenes with tert-butyl α-cyano-α-diazoacetate using a chiral rhodium catalyst that permits access to a broad range of highly functionalized chiral halocyclopropanes (F, Cl, Br, and I) in good yields, moderate diastereoselectivity, and excellent enantiomeric ratios. The reported methodology represents the first general catalytic enantioselective approach to halocyclopropanes. PMID:26945553

  18. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs) were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8). The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are metal-dependent hydrolases

  19. A putative hybrid swarm within Oonopsis foliosa (Asteraceae: Astereae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.F.; Brown, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Oo??nopsis foliosa var. foliosa and var. monocephala are endemic to short-grass steppe of southeastern Colorado and until recently were considered geographically disjunct. The only known qualitative feature separating these 2 varieties is floral head type; var. foliosa has radiate heads, whereas var. monocephala heads are discoid. Sympatry between these varieties is restricted to a small area in which a range of parental types and intermediate head morphologies is observed. We used distribution mapping, morphometric analyses, chromosome cytology, and pollen stainability to characterize the sympatric zone. Morphometrics confirms that the only discrete difference between var. foliosa and var. monocephala is radiate versus discoid heads, respectively. The outer florets of putative hybrid individuals ranged from conspicuously elongated yet radially symmetric disc-floret corollas, to elongated radially asymmetric bilabiate- or deeply cleft corollas, to stunted ray florets with appendages remnant of corolla lobes. Chromosome cytology of pollen mother cells from both putative parental varieties and a series of intermediate morphological types collected at the sympatric zone reveal evidence of translocation heterozygosity. Pollen stainability shows no significant differences in viability between the parental varieties and putative hybrids. The restricted distribution of putative hybrids to a narrow zone of sympatry between the parental types and the presence of meiotic chromosome-pairing anomalies in these intermediate plants are consistent with a hybrid origin. The high stainability of putative-hybrid pollen adds to a growing body of evidence that hybrids are not universally unfit.

  20. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  1. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  2. Catalytic Enantioselective Carboannulation with Allylsilanes

    PubMed Central

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R.; Badillo, Joseph J.; Tran, Ngon T.; Franz, Annaliese K.

    2015-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a Sc(III)-indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (via trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  3. Catalytic enantioselective carboannulation with allylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Ball-Jones, Nicolas R; Badillo, Joseph J; Tran, Ngon T; Franz, Annaliese K

    2014-09-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric carboannulation with allylsilanes is presented. The enantioselective [3+2] annulation is catalyzed using a scandium(III)/indapybox complex with tetrakis-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-borate (BArF) to enhance catalytic activity and control stereoselectivity. Functionalized cyclopentanes containing a quaternary carbon center are derived from alkylidene oxindole, coumarin, and malonate substrates with high stereoselectivity. The enantioselective 1,4-conjugate addition and enantioselective lactone formation (by trapping of the β-silyl carbocation) is also described. PMID:25045133

  4. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  5. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Brian C.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Cannon, Richard D.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  6. Architecture of a single membrane spanning cytochrome P450 suggests constraints that orient the catalytic domain relative to a bilayer.

    PubMed

    Monk, Brian C; Tomasiak, Thomas M; Keniya, Mikhail V; Huschmann, Franziska U; Tyndall, Joel D A; O'Connell, Joseph D; Cannon, Richard D; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Rodriguez, Andrew; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Stroud, Robert M

    2014-03-11

    Bitopic integral membrane proteins with a single transmembrane helix play diverse roles in catalysis, cell signaling, and morphogenesis. Complete monospanning protein structures are needed to show how interaction between the transmembrane helix and catalytic domain might influence association with the membrane and function. We report crystal structures of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a membrane monospanning cytochrome P450 of the CYP51 family that catalyzes the first postcyclization step in ergosterol biosynthesis and is inhibited by triazole drugs. The structures reveal a well-ordered N-terminal amphipathic helix preceding a putative transmembrane helix that would constrain the catalytic domain orientation to lie partly in the lipid bilayer. The structures locate the substrate lanosterol, identify putative substrate and product channels, and reveal constrained interactions with triazole antifungal drugs that are important for drug design and understanding drug resistance. PMID:24613931

  7. Putative excitatory and putative inhibitory inputs are localised in different dendritic domains in a Drosophila flight motoneuron.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Claudia; Duch, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    Input-output computations of individual neurons may be affected by the three-dimensional structure of their dendrites and by the location of input synapses on specific parts of their dendrites. However, only a few examples exist of dendritic architecture which can be related to behaviorally relevant computations of a neuron. By combining genetic, immunohistochemical and confocal laser scanning methods this study estimates the location of the spike-initiating zone and the dendritic distribution patterns of putative synaptic inputs on an individually identified Drosophila flight motorneuron, MN5. MN5 is a monopolar neuron with > 4,000 dendritic branches. The site of spike initiation was estimated by mapping sodium channel immunolabel onto geometric reconstructions of MN5. Maps of putative excitatory cholinergic and of putative inhibitory GABAergic inputs on MN5 dendrites were created by charting tagged Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Rdl GABAA receptors onto MN5 dendritic surface reconstructions. Although these methods provide only an estimate of putative input synapse distributions, the data indicate that inhibitory and excitatory synapses were located preferentially on different dendritic domains of MN5 and, thus, computed mostly separately. Most putative inhibitory inputs were close to spike initiation, which was consistent with sharp inhibition, as predicted previously based on recordings of motoneuron firing patterns during flight. By contrast, highest densities of putative excitatory inputs at more distant dendritic regions were consistent with the prediction that, in response to different power demands during flight, tonic excitatory drive to flight motoneuron dendrites must be smoothly translated into different tonic firing frequencies. PMID:23279094

  8. Catalytic condensation of formaldehyde in aqueous solution initiated by UV irradiation as putative "prebiological" route of the monosaccharides formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestunova, O. P.; Simonov, A. N.; Matvienko, L. G.; Snytnikov, V. N.; Parmon, V. N.; Snytnikova, O. A.; Tsentalovich, Yu. P.

    The condensation of formaldehyde into higher monosaccharides in aqueous alkaline solutions catalyzed by several metal ions in particular Ca 2 and Mg 2 named as formose reaction is considered as a probable source of carbohydrates in prebiotic conditions Formaldehyde is detected in significant amounts in molecular clouds in space Undoubtedly it was an important gas component of circumsolar protoplanet disk Naturally formaldehyde could be dissolved in water of the Protoearth Calcium and magnesium that are capable of creating an alkaline medium are the abundant elements Thus the basic conditions for the formose reaction and for formation of monosaccharides in nature could be met However the formose reaction is autocatalytic since it can be initiated only in the presence of carbohydrates In spite of the fact that Russian chemist Butlerov discovered the formose reaction almost 150 years ago the reason of autocatalytic character of the process and the mechanism of initiation till now remained not quite clear In our work regular investigation of the mechanism of the formose reaction was carried out Influence of various initiators on reaction kinetics and composition of products was studied The composition of the formose reaction products in presence of different initiators is practically invariable under steady-state conditions and is caused by an aldol condensation of the lowest N 2 - and C 3 -carbohydrates The ability of the C 4 -C 6 sugars to initiate the formose reaction is revealed to correlate with the

  9. Catalytically enhanced packed tower scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Stitt, E.H.; Taylor, F.J.; Kelly, K.

    1996-12-31

    An enhanced wet scrubbing process for the treatment of gas streams containing odours and low level VOC`s is presented. It comprises essentially a single scrubbing column and a fixed bed catalytic reactor through which the dilute alkaline bleach scrubbing liquor is recirculated. The process has significant cost advantages over conventional chemical scrubbing technology, and copes well with peaks in odour levels. Traditional bleach scrubbing, and the improvements in process chemistry and the flowsheet afforded by inclusion of the catalyst, are discussed. The catalyst enables many of the well known problems associated with bleach scrubbing to be overcome, and facilitates odour removal efficiencies of greater than 99% in a single column. Pilot plant data from trials on sewage treatment works are presented. These show clearly the ability of the catalytically enhanced process to achieve sulphide and odour removals in excess of 99% in the single column. Case studies of some of the existing commercial installations are given, indicating the wide range of applications, industries and scale of the installed units. Comparative data are presented, measured on a commercial unit for the conventional operation of a bleach scrubber, and with the retrofitted catalyst in use. These data show clearly the benefits of the catalytic process in terms of removal efficiencies; and hence by inference also in equipment size and costs. The catalytic process is also shown to achieve very high removal efficiencies of organo-sulphides in a single column. 8 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of waste materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Aqueous stream of human waste is mixed with soluble ruthenium salts and is introduced into reactor at temperature where ruthenium black catalyst forms on internal surfaces of reactor. This provides catalytically active surface to convert oxidizable wastes into breakdown products such as water and carbon dioxide.

  11. Social Entrepreneurs and Catalytic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddock, Sandra A.; Post, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Social entrepreneurs are private citizens who play critical roles in bringing about catalytic changes in the public sector agenda and the perception of social issues. Factors that make their projects--such as the Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Earth Day--successful include problem complexity, credibility, and a commitment to a collective…

  12. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION COMPONENT AND SYSTEM PROTOTYPE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop the components required for catalytic combustion system operation and evaluation. The systems investigated (firetube boiler, watertube boiler, and gas turbine), when integrated with the catalytic combustor, have potential for both ...

  13. DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION OF PUTATIVE VIRULENCE GENES IN Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A shot-gun genomic library of the Flavobacterium columnare ALG-530 virulent strain has been constructed and more than 3,000 clones have been sequenced to date (800 contigs). Based on sequence identity with putative known virulence genes from related species, seven genes were selected for differentia...

  14. Bartonella henselae AS A PUTATIVE CAUSE OF CONGENITAL CHOLESTASIS

    PubMed Central

    VELHO, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; BELLOMO-BRANDÃO, Maria Ângela; DRUMMOND, Marina Rovani; MAGALHÃES, Renata Ferreira; HESSEL, Gabriel; BARJAS-CASTRO, Maria de Lourdes; ESCANHOELA, Cecília Amélia Fazzio; NEGRO, Gilda Maria Barbaro DEL; OKAY, Thelma Suely

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Severe anemia and cholestatic hepatitis are associated with bartonella infections. A putative vertical Bartonella henselae infection was defined on the basis of ultrastructural and molecular analyses in a three-year-old child with anemia, jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly since birth. Physicians should consider bartonellosis in patients with anemia and hepatitis of unknown origin. PMID:27410916

  15. Sulfur Isotope Composition of Putative Primary Troilite in Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachibana, Shogo; Huss, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur isotope compositions of putative primary troilites in chondrules from Bishunpur were measured by ion probe. These primary troilites have the same S isotope compositions as matrix troilites and thus appear to be isotopically unfractionated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  17. Structure of putative 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Ebihara, Akio; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Ellis, Mark J.; Strange, Richard W.; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Hasnain, S. Samar; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    The pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzyme 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase converts 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate to p-aminobenzoate and pyruvate in one of the crucial steps in the folate-biosynthesis pathway. The primary structure of the hypothetical protein TTHA0621 from Thermus thermophilus HB8 suggests that TTHA0621 is a putative 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase. Here, the crystal structure of TTHA0621 is reported at 1.93 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained four NCS molecules related by 222 noncrystallographic symmetry, in which the formation of intact dimers may be functionally important. The cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) binds to the protein in the large cleft formed by the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of TTHA0621. The high structural similarity and the conservation of the functional residues in the catalytic region compared with 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase (PabC; EC 4.1.3.38) from Escherichia coli suggest that the TTHA0621 protein may also possess 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase activity. PMID:20054118

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of a putative endoglucanase in Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Xiang-zi; Lan, Lan; Lin, Chen-zeng; Wu, Yu-bing; Lin, Xiong-jie; Ebbole, Daniel; Lu, Guo-dong; Wang, Zong-hua

    2008-04-01

    Microbial pathogens secrete an array of cell wall-degrading enzymes to break down the structure of the host cell wall to facilitate colonization of the host tissue. To better understand their role in the pathogenesis, a putative endoglucanase from Magnaporthe grisea was characterized in this paper. SignalP-3.0 analysis indicates that the protein encoded by gene MGG_02532.5 in M. grisea (named MgEGL1 for M. grisea endoglucanase 1) contains a secretory signal peptide. Multiple alignment shows that MgEGL1 has high level of homology to endoglucanases (EC 3.1.1.4) from Aspergillus nidulans and Trichoderma reesei. The three proteins share a conserved catalytic domain, but only the one from T. reesei contains a cellulose binding module. MgEGL1 was constitutively expressed with the highest level in mycelia and the lowest in conidia. Interestingly, the MgEGL1 RNA could be alternatively processed when cultured in vitro and after infection of rice. Expression analysis confirmed that the MgEGL1 is a secreted protein. Its endoglucanase activity was assayed by Congo red plates, and further confirmed by the dinitrosalicylic acid method. The finding in this paper will provide the basis for further determination of the biochemical properties of the endoglucanase protein and its relevant function in fungal pathogenesis. PMID:18247030

  19. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Jahn, G; Bürkle, A; Freese, U K; Fleckenstein, B; zur Hausen, H

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSV-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at Tm - 25 degrees C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Epstein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein. Images PMID:3023689

  20. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase as a putative target for anticancer action of clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Cristiane M; Marcondes, Mariah C; Carvalho, Renato S; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Zancan, Patricia

    2015-05-01

    Clotrimazole (CTZ) has been proposed as an antitumoral agent because of its properties that inhibit glycolytic enzymes and detach them from the cytoskeleton. However, the broad effects of the drug, e.g., acting on different enzymes and pathways, indicate that CTZ might also affect several signaling pathways. In this study, we show that CTZ interferes with the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 after a short incubation period (4 h), thereby diminishing cell viability, promoting apoptosis, depolarizing mitochondria, inhibiting key glycolytic regulatory enzymes, decreasing the intracellular ATP content, and permeating plasma membranes. CTZ treatment also interferes with autophagy. Moreover, when the incubation is performed under hypoxic conditions, certain effects of CTZ are enhanced, such as phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase (PI3K), which is inhibited upon CTZ treatment; this inhibition is potentiated under hypoxia. CTZ-induced PI3K inhibition is not caused by upstream effects of CTZ because the drug does not affect the interaction of the PI3K regulatory subunit and the insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1. Additionally, CTZ directly inhibits human purified PI3K in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Pharmacologic and in silico results suggest that CTZ may bind to the PI3K catalytic site. Therefore, we conclude that PI3K is a novel, putative target for the antitumoral effects of CTZ, interfering with autophagy, apoptosis, cell division and viability. PMID:25794423

  1. Primary characterization of a putative novel TBC1 domain family member 13 from Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhancheng; Du, Junzheng; Gao, Shandian; Yang, Jifei; Luo, Jin; Xing, Shanshan; Du, Xiaoyue; Liu, Guangyuan; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-06-15

    A putative novel TBC1 domain family member 13 (HqTBC1D13) from Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis was cloned using rapid amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE), the HqTBC1D13 cDNA is 1702bp in length and encodes 396 amino acid residues with predicted molecular weight of 46.09kDa. The TBC-domain containing protein has a catalytic 'arginine finger' analogous to those of Ras and Rho family GAPs, which is critical determinants of GAP activity. The amino acid sequences of TBC domain were evolutionarily highly conserved across species. The partial coding sequence of HqTBC1D13 with the predicted molecular weight of 37.2kDa was expressed and purified in the PGEX-4T-1 vector. Real-time RT PCR analysis showed that the HqTBC1D13 was extensively expressed in the tested organs (salivary glands, midguts, ovaries and cuticles), and its transcriptional levels in salivary glands were significantly up-regulate induced by blood-feeding. The recombinant HqTBC1D13 protein vaccination in the rabbit model resulted in the extension of the duration of feeding and the reduction of 37% female engorgement and 14.8% oviposition compared to the control group. These results indicated that the HqTBC1D13 in ticks could be invovled in the regulation of feeding and oviposition. PMID:27198770

  2. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, T.; Jahn, G.; Buerkle, A.; Freese, U.K.; Fleckenstein, B.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSF-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at T/sub m/ - 25/degrees/C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Esptein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein.

  3. Structural and functional analysis of Rv0554 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: testing a putative role in menaquinone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jodie M; Jiang, Ming; Guo, Zhihong; Baker, Edward N

    2010-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of tuberculosis, is a devastating human pathogen against which new drugs are urgently needed. Enzymes from the biosynthetic pathway for menaquinone are considered to be valid drug targets. The protein encoded by the open reading frame Rv0554 has been expressed, purified and subjected to structural and functional analysis to test for a putative role in menaquinone biosynthesis. The crystal structure of Rv0554 has been solved and refined in two different space groups at 2.35 and 1.9 A resolution. The protein is dimeric, with an alpha/beta-hydrolase monomer fold. In each monomer, a large cavity adjacent to the catalytic triad is enclosed by a helical lid. Dimerization is mediated by the lid regions. Small-molecule additives used in crystallization bind in the active site, but no binding of ligands related to menaquinone biosynthesis could be detected and functional assays failed to support possible roles in menaquinone biosynthesis. PMID:20693690

  4. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  5. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  6. Catalytic asymmetric alkylation of acylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Jiawei; Oost, Rik; Desmarchelier, Alaric; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R

    2015-03-01

    The highly enantioselective addition of Grignard reagents to acylsilanes is catalyzed by copper diphosphine complexes. This transformation affords α-silylated tertiary alcohols in up to 97% yield and 98:2 enantiomeric ratio. The competing Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reduction is suppressed by the use of a mixture of Lewis acid additives. The chiral catalyst can be recovered as a copper complex and used repeatedly without any loss of catalytic activity. PMID:25403641

  7. The Putative O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase SPINDLY Inhibits Class I TCP Proteolysis to Promote Sensitivity to Cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Evyatar; Livne, Sivan; Kobinson-Katz, Tammy; Tal, Lior; Pri-Tal, Oded; Mosquna, Assaf; Tarkowská, Danuše; Mueller, Bruno; Tarkowski, Petr; Weiss, David

    2016-06-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SPINDLY (SPY) is a putative serine and threonine O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT). While SPY has been shown to suppress gibberellin signaling and to promote cytokinin (CK) responses, its catalytic OGT activity was never demonstrated and its effect on protein fate is not known. We previously showed that SPY interacts physically and functionally with TCP14 and TCP15 to promote CK responses. Here, we aimed to identify how SPY regulates TCP14/15 activities and how these TCPs promote CK responses. We show that SPY activity is required for TCP14 stability. Mutation in the putative OGT domain of SPY (spy-3) stimulated TCP14 proteolysis by the 26S proteasome, which was reversed by mutation in CULLIN1 (CUL1), suggesting a role for SKP, CUL1, F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase in TCP14 proteolysis. TCP14 proteolysis in spy-3 suppressed all TCP14 misexpression phenotypes, including the enhanced CK responses. The increased CK activity in TCP14/15-overexpressing flowers resulted from increased sensitivity to the hormone and not from higher CK levels. TCP15 overexpression enhanced the response of the CK-induced synthetic promoter pTCS to CK, suggesting that TCP14/15 affect early steps in CK signaling. We propose that posttranslational modification of TCP14/15 by SPY inhibits their proteolysis and that the accumulated proteins promote the activity of the CK phosphorelay cascade in developing Arabidopsis leaves and flowers. PMID:27208284

  8. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, S.M.; Weaver, D.R.; Rivkees, S.A.; Stopa, E.G.

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  9. Catalytic nanomotors: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2011-06-01

    The fabrication of integrated nanomachinary systems can enable break-through applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, bioengineering, and drug delivery or disease treatment. Naturally occurring nanomotors are biological motor proteins powered by catalytic reactions, which convert the chemical energy from the environment into mechanical energy directly. It has been demonstrated recently that using a simple catalytic reaction and an asymmetric bimetallic nanorod, one can produce catalytic nanomotors that mimic the autonomous motions of bionanomotors. Yet the construction of artificial nanomachines remains a major contemporary challenge due to the lack of a flexible fabrication technique that can design the desired dynamic components. We use a design technique called dynamic shadowing growth that allows for the fabrication of a wide range of various geometries and the asymmetric placement of the catalyst is easily accomplished as well which is necessary for directed propulsion. Programming nanomotor behavior is possible through geometrically-focused design and by incorporating different materials into the nanomotor structure is a simple process as well. A propulsion mechanism based upon bubble ejection from the catalyst surface is introduced to explain the driving force, and the comparison of this driving mechanism with the self-electrophoresis mechanism is also studied. We have also successfully incorporated multiple parts to form complex nanomotor assemblies which exhibit motions not observed from individual parts by using magnetic interactions.

  10. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  11. Structural identification of putative USPs in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Bahieldin, Ahmed; Atef, Ahmed; Shokry, Ahmed M; Al-Karim, Saleh; Al Attas, Sanaa G; Gadallah, Nour O; Edris, Sherif; Al-Kordy, Magdy A; Omer, Abdulkader M Shaikh; Sabir, Jamal S M; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Al-Hajar, Abdulrahman S M; Makki, Rania M; Hassan, Sabah M; El-Domyati, Fotouh M

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the C. roseus SRA database were assembled and translated in order to detect putative universal stress proteins (USPs). Based on the known conserved USPA domain, 24 Pfam putative USPA proteins in C. roseus were detected and arranged in six architectures. The USPA-like domain was detected in all architectures, while the protein kinase-like (or PK-like), (tyr)PK-like and/or U-box domains are shown downstream it. Three other domains were also shown to coexist with the USPA domain in C. roseus putative USPA sequences. These domains are tetratricopeptide repeat (or TPR), apolipophorin III (or apoLp-III) and Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Subsequent analysis divided USPA-like domains based on the ability to bind ATP. The multiple sequence alignment indicated the occurrence of eight C. roseus residues of known features of the bacterial 1MJH secondary structure. The data of the phylogenetic tree indicated several distinct groups of USPA-like domains confirming the presence of high level of sequence conservation between the plant and bacterial USPA-like sequences. PMID:26318047

  12. Structural Basis for Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT Binding to RNA Template and Telomeric DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.; Gillis, A; Futahashi, M; Fujiwara, H; Skordalakes, E

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized DNA polymerase that extends the 3{prime} ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, a process required for genomic stability and cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of the active Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA. The RNA-DNA hybrid adopts a helical structure, docked in the interior cavity of the TERT ring. Contacts between the RNA template and motifs 2 and B{prime} position the solvent-accessible RNA bases close to the enzyme active site for nucleotide binding and selectivity. Nucleic acid binding induces rigid TERT conformational changes to form a tight catalytic complex. Overall, TERT-RNA template and TERT-telomeric DNA associations are remarkably similar to those observed for retroviral reverse transcriptases, suggesting common mechanistic aspects of DNA replication between the two families of enzymes.

  13. Crystal Structures of the Viral Protease Npro Imply Distinct Roles for the Catalytic Water in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zögg, Thomas; Sponring, Michael; Schindler, Sabrina; Koll, Maria; Schneider, Rainer; Brandstetter, Hans; Auer, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Summary Npro is a key effector protein of pestiviruses such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and abolishes host cell antiviral defense mechanisms. Synthesized as the N-terminal part of the viral polyprotein, Npro releases itself via an autoproteolytic cleavage, triggering its immunological functions. However, the mechanisms of its proteolytic action and its immune escape were unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of Npro to 1.25 Å resolution. Structures of pre- and postcleavage intermediates identify three catalytically relevant elements. The trapping of the putative catalytic water reveals its distinct roles as a base, acid, and nucleophile. The presentation of the substrate further explains the enigmatic latency of the protease, ensuring a single in cis cleavage. Additionally, we identified a zinc-free, disulfide-linked conformation of the TRASH motif, an interaction hub of immune factors. The structure opens additional opportunities in utilizing Npro as an autocleaving fusion protein and as a pharmaceutical target. PMID:23643950

  14. Rho-associated kinase, a novel serine/threonine kinase, as a putative target for small GTP binding protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Amano, M; Yamamoto, T; Chihara, K; Nakafuku, M; Ito, M; Nakano, T; Okawa, K; Iwamatsu, A; Kaibuchi, K

    1996-01-01

    The small GTP binding protein Rho is implicated in cytoskeletal responses to extracellular signals such as lysophosphatidic acid to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Here we have purified a Rho-interacting protein with a molecular mass of approximately 164 kDa (p164) from bovine brain. This protein bound to GTPgammaS (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog).RhoA but not to GDP.RhoA or GTPgammaS.RhoA with a mutation in the effector domain (RhoAA37).p164 had a kinase activity which was specifically stimulated by GTPgammaS.RhoA. We obtained the cDNA encoding p164 on the basis of its partial amino acid sequences and named it Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase). Rho-kinase has a catalytic domain in the N-terminal portion, a coiled coil domain in the middle portion and a zinc finger-like motif in the C-terminal portion. The catalytic domain shares 72% sequence homology with that of myotonic dystrophy kinase and the coiled coil domain contains a Rho-interacting interface. When COS7 cells were cotransfected with Rho-kinase and activated RhoA, some Rho-kinase was recruited to membranes. Thus it is likely that Rho-kinase is a putative target serine/threonine kinase for Rho and serves as a mediator of the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Images PMID:8641286

  15. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  16. A sustainable catalytic pyrrole synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlik, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-02-01

    The pyrrole heterocycle is a prominent chemical motif and is found widely in natural products, drugs, catalysts and advanced materials. Here we introduce a sustainable iridium-catalysed pyrrole synthesis in which secondary alcohols and amino alcohols are deoxygenated and linked selectively via the formation of C-N and C-C bonds. Two equivalents of hydrogen gas are eliminated in the course of the reaction, and alcohols based entirely on renewable resources can be used as starting materials. The catalytic synthesis protocol tolerates a large variety of functional groups, which includes olefins, chlorides, bromides, organometallic moieties, amines and hydroxyl groups. We have developed a catalyst that operates efficiently under mild conditions.

  17. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  18. Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.; Rogers, M.L.

    1980-09-30

    Starting from an effort to control airborne emissions, the Mound tritium containment program has evolved to include development of the Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process. This process separates tritiated aqueous streams into detritiated water and an enriched hydrogen stream that is suitable for use by other tritium recovery processes. Experimentation has shown that the process performs as predicted by bench-scale measurements, and that available process components exhibit acceptable resistance to damage by radiation from tritium exposure. Planned future efforts are concentrated on finalizing automatic control of the process and on developing feed treatment methods for the protection of process components.

  19. Modeling a Transient Catalytic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Transient model of monolith catalytic combustor presented in report done under NASA/DOE contract. Model assumes quasi-steady gas phase and thermally "thin" solid. In gas-phase treatment, several quasi-global chemical reactions assumed capable of describing CO and unburnt hydrocarbon emissions in fuel-lean operations. In steady-state computation presented, influence of selected operating and design parameters on minimum combustor length studied. When fast transient responses required, both steady and unsteady studies made to achieve meaningful compromise in design.

  20. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF HAZARDOUS AND TOXIC CHEMICALS: CATALYTIC HYDRODECHLORINATION OF POLYCHLORINATED PESTICIDES AND RELATED SUBSTANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study has been undertaken of the catalytic conversion of chlorinated pesticides and other environmentally undesirable chlorinated materials into acceptable compounds. The results of this study show that chlorine can be catalytically removed and replaced by hydrogen to produce r...

  1. Replacement of the catalytic nucleophile cysteine-296 by serine in class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mediated synthesis of a new polyester: identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Amara, Amro A; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-09-01

    The class II PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) synthases [PHA(MCL) synthases (medium-chain-length PHA synthases)] are mainly found in pseudomonads and catalyse synthesis of PHA(MCL)s using CoA thioesters of medium-chain-length 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C6-C14) as a substrate. Only recently PHA(MCL) synthases from Pseudomonas oleovorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were purified and in vitro activity was achieved. A threading model of the P. aeruginosa PHA(MCL) synthase PhaC1 was developed based on the homology to the epoxide hydrolase (1ek1) from mouse which belongs to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily. The putative catalytic residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 were replaced by site-specific mutagenesis. In contrast to class I and III PHA synthases, the replacement of His-480, which aligns with the conserved base catalyst of the alpha/beta-hydrolases, with Gln did not affect in vivo enzyme activity and only slightly in vitro enzyme activity. The second conserved histidine His-453 was then replaced by Gln, and the modified enzyme showed only 24% of wild-type in vivo activity, which indicated that His-453 might functionally replace His-480 in class II PHA synthases. Replacement of the postulated catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 by Ser only reduced in vivo enzyme activity to 30% of wild-type enzyme activity and drastically changed substrate specificity. Moreover, the C296S mutation turned the enzyme sensitive towards PMSF inhibition. The replacement of Asp-452 by Asn, which is supposed to be required as general base catalyst for elongation reaction, did abolish enzyme activity as was found for the respective amino acid residue of class I and III enzymes. In the threading model residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 reside in the core structure with the putative catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 localized at the highly conserved gamma-turns of the alpha/beta-hydrolases. Inhibitor studies indicated that catalytic histidines reside in the active site. The conserved

  2. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  3. Evolution of a Catalytic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rauwerdink, Alissa; Lunzer, Mark; Devamani, Titu; Jones, Bryan; Mooney, Joanna; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Xu, Jian-He; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Dean, Antony M

    2016-04-01

    The means by which superfamilies of specialized enzymes arise by gene duplication and functional divergence are poorly understood. The escape from adaptive conflict hypothesis, which posits multiple copies of a gene encoding a primitive inefficient and highly promiscuous generalist ancestor, receives support from experiments showing that resurrected ancestral enzymes are indeed more substrate-promiscuous than their modern descendants. Here, we provide evidence in support of an alternative model, the innovation-amplification-divergence hypothesis, which posits a single-copied ancestor as efficient and specific as any modern enzyme. We argue that the catalytic mechanisms of plant esterases and descendent acetone cyanohydrin lyases are incompatible with each other (e.g., the reactive substrate carbonyl must bind in opposite orientations in the active site). We then show that resurrected ancestral plant esterases are as catalytically specific as modern esterases, that the ancestor of modern acetone cyanohydrin lyases was itself only very weakly promiscuous, and that improvements in lyase activity came at the expense of esterase activity. These observations support the innovation-amplification-divergence hypothesis, in which an ancestor gains a weak promiscuous activity that is improved by selection at the expense of the ancestral activity, and not the escape from adaptive conflict in which an inefficient generalist ancestral enzyme steadily loses promiscuity throughout the transition to a highly active specialized modern enzyme. PMID:26681154

  4. A Putative Chloroplast Thylakoid Metalloprotease VIRESCENT3 Regulates Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yafei; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Rui; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhao, Jun; Shao, Jingxia; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-02-12

    The chloroplast is the site of photosynthesis and many other essential plant metabolic processes, and chloroplast development is an integral part of plant growth and development. Mutants defective in chloroplast development can display various color phenotypes including the intriguing virescence phenotype, which shows yellow/white coloration at the leaf base and greening toward the leaf tip. Through large scale genetic screens, we identified a series of new virescent mutants including virescent3-1 (vir3-1), vir4-1, and vir5-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We showed that VIR3 encodes a putative chloroplast metalloprotease by map-based cloning. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that the conserved histidine 235 residue in the zinc binding motif HEAGH of VIR3 is indispensable for VIR3 accumulation in the chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of VIR3 was confirmed by the transient expression of VIR3-GFP in leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, taking advantage of transgenic lines expressing VIR3-FLAG, we demonstrated that VIR3 is an intrinsic thylakoid membrane protein that mainly resides in the stromal lamellae. Moreover, topology analysis using transgenic lines expressing a dual epitope-tagged VIR3 indicated that both the N and C termini of VIR3 are located in the stroma, and the catalytic domain of VIR3 is probably facing the stroma. Blue native gel analysis indicated that VIR3 is likely present as a monomer or part of a small complex in the thylakoid membrane. This work not only implicates VIR3 as a new factor involved in early chloroplast development but also provides more insight into the roles of chloroplast proteases in chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:26702056

  5. Structure Determination and Biochemical Characterization of a Putative HNH Endonuclease from Geobacter metallireducens GS-15

    PubMed Central

    Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Gutjahr, Alice; Chan, Siu-Hong; Chen, Yang; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of a putative HNH endonuclease, Gmet_0936 protein from Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, has been determined at 2.6 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure contains a two-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet that are surrounded by two helices on each face, and reveals a Zn ion bound in each monomer, coordinated by residues Cys38, Cys41, Cys73, and Cys76, which likely plays an important structural role in stabilizing the overall conformation. Structural homologs of Gmet_0936 include Hpy99I endonuclease, phage T4 endonuclease VII, and other HNH endonucleases, with these enzymes sharing 15–20% amino acid sequence identity. An overlay of Gmet_0936 and Hpy99I structures shows that most of the secondary structure elements, catalytic residues as well as the zinc binding site (zinc ribbon) are conserved. However, Gmet_0936 lacks the N-terminal domain of Hpy99I, which mediates DNA binding as well as dimerization. Purified Gmet_0936 forms dimers in solution and a dimer of the protein is observed in the crystal, but with a different mode of dimerization as compared to Hpy99I. Gmet_0936 and its N77H variant show a weak DNA binding activity in a DNA mobility shift assay and a weak Mn2+-dependent nicking activity on supercoiled plasmids in low pH buffers. The preferred substrate appears to be acid and heat-treated DNA with AP sites, suggesting Gmet_0936 may be a DNA repair enzyme. PMID:24039739

  6. Chloroplast diversity in a putative hybrid swarm of Ponderosae (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Epperson, Bryan K; Telewski, Frank W; Willyard, Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Ponderosae subsection of the genus Pinus contains numerous taxa in disjunct mountain ranges of southern Arizona and New Mexico, differing for several leaf and cone traits, key among which is the number of leaf needles per fascicle. Trees with three needles are often found together with trees having five needles and mixed numbers. One taxonomic hypothesis is that there are swarms of hybrids between P. ponderosa and P. arizonica. A second hypothesis is that there are spatial mixtures of two separate taxa, five-needle P. arizonica and a "taxon X" containing three needle and mixed needle trees. We genotyped chloroplasts in one putative hybrid swarm on Mt. Lemmon using microsatellite markers and show that cpDNA is almost completely differentiated between two separate morphotypes corresponding to P. arizonica and "taxon X." Little if any introgression has occurred on Mt. Lemmon, and the simplest explanation is that little or no effective hybridization has occurred. Further results indicate that not only is taxon X not of hybrid origin, it is more closely related to nonregional Ponderosae other than P. ponderosa and P. arizonica. The results further suggest that other putative hybrid swarms in the region are also spatial mixtures of distinct taxa. PMID:21628225

  7. Evidence for a putative biomarker for substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jeanette; James, Lisa M

    2009-09-01

    Electrodermal response modulation (ERM) reflects the reduction in skin conductance response to an aversive stimulus that is temporally predictable relative to when it is unpredictable. Poor ERM is associated with substance dependence (SD). It was hypothesized that ERM is a putative biomarker for SD rather than for externalizing disorders generally. Participants included 83 controls (no SD, antisocial personality disorder [PD] or borderline PD), 52 participants with SD only (SD and no PD), 12 with PD only (antisocial and/or borderline PD and no SD), and 35 comorbid (having SD and PD). Diagnoses at definite and probable certainty levels were used and were determined by semistructured clinical interviews. ERM was calculated from skin conductance responses to predictable and unpredictable 2-s 110-dB white noise blasts. As expected, the SD-only and comorbid groups had significantly lower ERM scores than the control group, which did not differ significantly from the PD-only group. Results provide preliminary evidence that ERM is a putative biomarker for SD. Future research should examine cognitive correlates of ERM in an effort to understand why it relates to SD. PMID:19769433

  8. Tuberculosis and nature's pharmacy of putative anti-tuberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing problem of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, coupled with the twinning of tuberculosis (TB) to human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), the burden of TB is now difficult to manage. Therefore, new antimycobacterial agents are being sought from natural sources. This review focuses on natural antimycobacterial agents from endophytes and medicinal plants of Africa, Europe, Asia, South America and Canada. In the countries mentioned in this review, numerous plant species display putative anti-TB activity. Several antimycobacterial chemical compounds have also been isolated, including: ellagitannin punicalagin, allicin, anthraquinone glycosides, iridoids, phenylpropanoids, beta-sitosterol, galanthimine, crinine, friedelin, gallic acid, ellagic acids, anthocyanidin, taraxerol, termilignan B, arjunic acid, glucopyranosides, 1-epicatechol, leucopelargonidol, hydroxybenzoic acids, benzophenanthridine alkaloids, neolignans, and decarine. These compounds may provide leads to novel and more efficacious drugs to lessen the global burden of TB and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. If there is a long-term remedy for TB, it must lie in nature's pharmacy of putative antimycobacterial agents. PMID:26464047

  9. Hundreds of putatively functional small open reading frames in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between DNA sequence and encoded information is still an unsolved puzzle. The number of protein-coding genes in higher eukaryotes identified by genome projects is lower than was expected, while a considerable amount of putatively non-coding transcription has been detected. Functional small open reading frames (smORFs) are known to exist in several organisms. However, coding sequence detection methods are biased against detecting such very short open reading frames. Thus, a substantial number of non-canonical coding regions encoding short peptides might await characterization. Results Using bio-informatics methods, we have searched for smORFs of less than 100 amino acids in the putatively non-coding euchromatic DNA of Drosophila melanogaster, and initially identified nearly 600,000 of them. We have studied the pattern of conservation of these smORFs as coding entities between D. melanogaster and Drosophila pseudoobscura, their presence in syntenic and in transcribed regions of the genome, and their ratio of conservative versus non-conservative nucleotide changes. For negative controls, we compared the results with those obtained using random short sequences, while a positive control was provided by smORFs validated by proteomics data. Conclusions The combination of these analyses led us to postulate the existence of at least 401 functional smORFs in Drosophila, with the possibility that as many as 4,561 such functional smORFs may exist. PMID:22118156

  10. Categorization of Putative Factors Against Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Heteroptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Zeb, Qamar; Rondon, Silvia I; Naeem, Mohammad; Khan, Shah Alam; Goyer, Aymeric; Vleet, Steve Van; Corp, Mary K

    2016-02-01

    The bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Heteroptera: Aphididae), causes heavy losses to wheat crops worldwide by direct damage and virus transmission. This study was conducted to identify putative resistance mechanisms in four wheat varieties (Bobtail, Ladd, Stephens, and Skiles) and one advanced line (YS434)where R. padi was subjected to choice and no-choice tests. Antixenosis, antibiosis and tolerance studies were conducted in controlled environmental conditions at temperature of 20±5°C, 50–65% RH, and a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) h. Based on the antixenosis test, the variety Skiles was found susceptible to R. padi, while the line YS434 showed a significant level of resistance; the varieties Bobtail, Ladd, and Stephens showed intermediate response. In the antibiosis experiment, R. padi produced less progeny on the variety Skiles as compared with other varieties, but the developmental time for nymphs was also significantly shorter on Skiles and recorded higher intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(m)) values as compared with the varieties YS434, Bobtail, and Ladd. In the tolerance tests, the variety Ladd showed significantly lower tolerance index value than YS434, followed by Skiles, Bobtail, and Stephens. The plant resistance index value was greater for the variety Ladd, followed by Stephens, YS434, and Bobtail. In conclusion, this study provides baseline information that will contribute to the identification of putative resistance factors for a future breeding program against this aphid. PMID:26568060

  11. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  12. Brain response to putative pheromones in homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Savic, Ivanka; Berglund, Hans; Lindström, Per

    2005-05-17

    The testosterone derivative 4,16-androstadien-3-one (AND) and the estrogen-like steroid estra-1,3,5(10),16-tetraen-3-ol (EST) are candidate compounds for human pheromones. AND is detected primarily in male sweat, whereas EST has been found in female urine. In a previous positron emission tomography study, we found that smelling AND and EST activated regions covering sexually dimorphic nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus, and that this activation was differentiated with respect to sex and compound. In the present study, the pattern of activation induced by AND and EST was compared among homosexual men, heterosexual men, and heterosexual women. In contrast to heterosexual men, and in congruence with heterosexual women, homosexual men displayed hypothalamic activation in response to AND. Maximal activation was observed in the medial preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus, which, according to animal studies, is highly involved in sexual behavior. As opposed to putative pheromones, common odors were processed similarly in all three groups of subjects and engaged only the olfactory brain (amygdala, piriform, orbitofrontal, and insular cortex). These findings show that our brain reacts differently to the two putative pheromones compared with common odors, and suggest a link between sexual orientation and hypothalamic neuronal processes. PMID:15883379

  13. FEASIBILITY OF BURNING COAL IN CATALYTIC COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study, showing that pulverized coal can be burned in a catalytic combustor. Pulverized coal combustion in catalytic beds is markedly different from gaseous fuel combustion. Gas combustion gives uniform bed temperatures and reaction rates over the ent...

  14. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  15. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen/oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a unique monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant inlet temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of a catalytic igniter. The test results showed that the gaseous hydrogen/oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using both the granular and monolithic catalysts are presented. The capabilities of a facility constructed to conduct the igniter testing and the advantages of a catalytic igniter over other ignition systems for gaseous hydrogen and oxygen are also discussed.

  16. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalysts are presented.

  17. Catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Green, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the catalytic ignition of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellants. Shell 405 granular catalyst and a monolithic sponge catalyst were tested. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, propellant temperature, and back pressure were varied parametrically in testing to determine the operational limits of the catalytic igniter. The test results show that the gaseous hydrogen and oxygen propellant combination can be ignited catalytically using Shell 405 catalyst over a wide range of mixture ratios, mass flow rates, and propellant injection temperatures. These operating conditions must be optimized to ensure reliable ignition for an extended period of time. A cyclic life of nearly 2000, 2 sec pulses at nominal operating conditions was demonstrated with the catalytic igniter. The results of the experimental program and the established operational limits for a catalytic igniter using the Shell 405 catalyst are presented.

  18. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    DOEpatents

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  19. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  20. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  1. Catalytic decarbonylation of biosourced substrates.

    PubMed

    Ternel, Jérémy; Lebarbé, Thomas; Monflier, Eric; Hapiot, Frédéric

    2015-05-11

    Linear α-olefins (LAO) are one of the main targets in the field of surfactants, lubricants, and polymers. With the depletion of petroleum resources, the production of LAO from renewable feedstocks has gained increasing interest in recent years. In the present study, we demonstrated that Ir catalysts were suitable to decarbonylate a wide range of biosourced substrates under rather mild conditions (160 °C, 5 h reaction time) in the presence of potassium iodide and acetic anhydride. The resulting LAO were obtained with good conversion and selectivity provided that the purity of the substrate, the nature of the ligand, and the amounts of the additives were controlled accurately. The catalytic system could be recovered efficiently by using a Kugelrohr distillation apparatus and recycled. PMID:25855489

  2. APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-08-12

    A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

  3. Catalytic reactor with improved burner

    DOEpatents

    Faitani, Joseph J.; Austin, George W.; Chase, Terry J.; Suljak, George T.; Misage, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    To more uniformly distribute heat to the plurality of catalyst tubes in a catalytic reaction furnace, the burner disposed in the furnace above the tops of the tubes includes concentric primary and secondary annular fuel and air outlets. The fuel-air mixture from the primary outlet is directed towards the tubes adjacent the furnace wall, and the burning secondary fuel-air mixture is directed horizontally from the secondary outlet and a portion thereof is deflected downwardly by a slotted baffle toward the tubes in the center of the furnace while the remaining portion passes through the slotted baffle to another baffle disposed radially outwardly therefrom which deflects it downwardly in the vicinity of the tubes between those in the center and those near the wall of the furnace.

  4. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  5. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  6. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    SciTech Connect

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  7. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-05-06

    A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

  8. Exceptional error minimization in putative primordial genetic codes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The standard genetic code is redundant and has a highly non-random structure. Codons for the same amino acids typically differ only by the nucleotide in the third position, whereas similar amino acids are encoded, mostly, by codon series that differ by a single base substitution in the third or the first position. As a result, the code is highly albeit not optimally robust to errors of translation, a property that has been interpreted either as a product of selection directed at the minimization of errors or as a non-adaptive by-product of evolution of the code driven by other forces. Results We investigated the error-minimization properties of putative primordial codes that consisted of 16 supercodons, with the third base being completely redundant, using a previously derived cost function and the error minimization percentage as the measure of a code's robustness to mistranslation. It is shown that, when the 16-supercodon table is populated with 10 putative primordial amino acids, inferred from the results of abiotic synthesis experiments and other evidence independent of the code's evolution, and with minimal assumptions used to assign the remaining supercodons, the resulting 2-letter codes are nearly optimal in terms of the error minimization level. Conclusion The results of the computational experiments with putative primordial genetic codes that contained only two meaningful letters in all codons and encoded 10 to 16 amino acids indicate that such codes are likely to have been nearly optimal with respect to the minimization of translation errors. This near-optimality could be the outcome of extensive early selection during the co-evolution of the code with the primordial, error-prone translation system, or a result of a unique, accidental event. Under this hypothesis, the subsequent expansion of the code resulted in a decrease of the error minimization level that became sustainable owing to the evolution of a high-fidelity translation system

  9. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the

  10. Mycobacteriophage putative GTPase-activating protein can potentiate antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuangquan; Xu, Mengmeng; Duan, Xiangke; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Li, Qiming; Xie, Longxiang; Fan, Xiangyu; Xie, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The soaring incidences of infection by antimicrobial resistant (AR) pathogens and shortage of effective antibiotics with new mechanisms of action have renewed interest in phage therapy. This scenario is exemplified by resistant tuberculosis (TB), caused by resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacteriophage SWU1 A321_gp67 encodes a putative GTPase-activating protein. Mycobacterium smegmatis with gp67 overexpression showed changed colony formation and biofilm morphology and supports the efficacy of streptomycin and capreomycin against Mycobacterium. gp67 down-regulated the transcription of genes involved in cell wall and biofilm development. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that phage protein in addition to lysin or recombination components can synergize with existing antibiotics. Phage components might represent a promising new clue for better antibiotic potentiators. PMID:27345061

  11. Putative Genes Involved in Saikosaponin Biosynthesis in Bupleurum Species

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsai-Yun; Chiou, Chung-Yi; Chiou, Shu-Jiau

    2013-01-01

    Alternative medicinal agents, such as the herb Bupleurum, are increasingly used in modern medicine to supplement synthetic drugs. First, we present a review of the currently known effects of triterpene saponins-saikosaponins of Bupleurum species. The putative biosynthetic pathway of saikosaponins in Bupleurum species is summarized, followed by discussions on identification and characterization of genes involved in the biosynthesis of saikosaponins. The purpose is to provide a brief review of gene extraction, functional characterization of isolated genes and assessment of expression patterns of genes encoding enzymes in the process of saikosaponin production in Bupleurum species, mainly B. kaoi. We focus on the effects of MeJA on saikosaponin production, transcription patterns of genes involved in biosynthesis and on functional depiction. PMID:23783277

  12. Putative Regulatory Factors Associated with Intramuscular Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Aline S. M.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Koltes, James E.; Fritz-Waters, Eric R.; Lanna, Dante P. D.; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mourão, Gerson B.; Oliveira, Priscila S. N.; Reecy, James M.; Coutinho, Luiz L.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies) were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG), biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT), regulatory impact factor (RIF) and phenotypic impact factor (PIF) were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H) and low (L) GEBV) and 77 DEG (FDR 10%) were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1), MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2) and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF). These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption. PMID:26042666

  13. Putative regulatory factors associated with intramuscular fat content.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Aline S M; Regitano, Luciana C A; Koltes, James E; Fritz-Waters, Eric R; Lanna, Dante P D; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mourão, Gerson B; Oliveira, Priscila S N; Reecy, James M; Coutinho, Luiz L

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies) were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG), biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT), regulatory impact factor (RIF) and phenotypic impact factor (PIF) were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H) and low (L) GEBV) and 77 DEG (FDR 10%) were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1), MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2) and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF). These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption. PMID:26042666

  14. Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express putative mechanosensitive channels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Joo; Sun, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether optic nerve head astrocytes express candidate molecules to sense tissue stretch. Methods We used conventional PCR, quantitative PCR, and single-cell reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR) to assess the expression of various members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family and of the recently characterized mechanosensitive channels Piezo1 and 2 in optic nerve head tissue and in single, isolated astrocytes. Results Most TRP subfamilies (TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, and TRPP) and Piezo1 and 2 were expressed in the optic nerve head of the mouse. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that TRPC1, TRPM7, TRPV2, TRPP2, and Piezo1 are the dominant isoforms in each subfamily. Single-cell RT–PCR revealed that many TRP isoforms, TRPC1–2, TRPC6, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6–7, TRPP1–2, and Piezo1–2, are expressed in astrocytes of the optic nerve head, and that most astrocytes express TRPC1 and TRPP1–2. Comparisons of the TRPP and Piezo expression levels between different tissue regions showed that Piezo2 expression was higher in the optic nerve head and the optic nerve proper than in the brain and the corpus callosum. TRPP2 also showed higher expression in the optic nerve head. Conclusions Astrocytes in the optic nerve head express multiple putative mechanosensitive channels, in particular the recently identified channels Piezo1 and 2. The expression of putative mechanosensitive channels in these cells may contribute to their responsiveness to traumatic or glaucomatous injury. PMID:26236150

  15. Cryptic Species in Putative Ancient Asexual Darwinulids (Crustacea, Ostracoda)

    PubMed Central

    Schön, Isa; Pinto, Ricardo L.; Halse, Stuart; Smith, Alison J.; Martens, Koen; Birky, C. William

    2012-01-01

    Background Fully asexually reproducing taxa lack outcrossing. Hence, the classic Biological Species Concept cannot be applied. Methodology/Principal Findings We used DNA sequences from the mitochondrial COI gene and the nuclear ITS2 region to check species boundaries according to the evolutionary genetic (EG) species concept in five morphospecies in the putative ancient asexual ostracod genera, Penthesilenula and Darwinula, from different continents. We applied two methods for detecting cryptic species, namely the K/θ method and the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC). We could confirm the existence of species in all five darwinulid morphospecies and additional cryptic diversity in three morphospecies, namely in Penthesilenula brasiliensis, Darwinula stevensoni and in P. aotearoa. The number of cryptic species within one morphospecies varied between seven (P. brasiliensis), five to six (D. stevensoni) and two (P. aotearoa), respectively, depending on the method used. Cryptic species mainly followed continental distributions. We also found evidence for coexistence at the local scale for Brazilian cryptic species of P. brasiliensis and P. aotearoa. Our ITS2 data confirmed that species exist in darwinulids but detected far less EG species, namely two to three cryptic species in P. brasiliensis and no cryptic species at all in the other darwinulid morphospecies. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly demonstrate that both species and cryptic diversity can be recognized in putative ancient asexual ostracods using the EG species concept, and that COI data are more suitable than ITS2 for this purpose. The discovery of up to eight cryptic species within a single morphospecies will significantly increase estimates of biodiversity in this asexual ostracod group. Which factors, other than long-term geographic isolation, are important for speciation processes in these ancient asexuals remains to be investigated. PMID:22802945

  16. Are Putative Periodontal Pathogens Reliable Diagnostic Markers?▿

    PubMed Central

    Riep, Birgit; Edesi-Neuß, Lilian; Claessen, Friderike; Skarabis, Horst; Ehmke, Benjamin; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Göbel, Ulf B.; Moter, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. A number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease and are used as diagnostic markers. In the present study, we compared the prevalence of oral bacterial species in the subgingival biofilm of generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) (n = 44) and chronic periodontitis (CP) (n = 46) patients with that of a periodontitis-resistant control group (PR) (n = 21). The control group consisted of subjects at least 65 years of age with only minimal or no periodontitis and no history of periodontal treatment. A total of 555 samples from 111 subjects were included in this study. The samples were analyzed by PCR of 16S rRNA gene fragments and subsequent dot blot hybridization using oligonucleotide probes specific for Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, a Treponema denticola-like phylogroup (Treponema phylogroup II), Treponema lecithinolyticum, Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum, as well as Capnocytophaga ochracea. Our data confirm a high prevalence of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and T. forsythia in the periodontitis groups. However, these species were also frequently detected in the PR group. For most of the species tested, the prevalence was more associated with increased probing depth than with the subject group. T. lecithinolyticum was the only periodontopathogenic species showing significant differences both between GAP and CP patients and between GAP patients and PR subjects. C. ochracea was associated with the PR subjects, regardless of the probing depth. These results indicate that T. lecithinolyticum may be a diagnostic marker for GAP and C. ochracea for periodontal health. They also suggest that current presumptions of the association of specific bacteria with periodontal health and disease require further

  17. The Putative Use of Lithium in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gerwyn; Berk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer`s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative illness characterized by the invariant existence of β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Presently approved pharmaceutical approaches offer only marginal efficacy and as yet there is no effective treatment which reverses or arrests the disease. Thus far, drugs targeting any single aspect of disease pathology have proved to be a failure or at best provided very slight clinical benefit. The consistent failure of drugs targeting aspects of the Aβ cascade has questioned the causal role of this pathway. There is a growing appreciation that the pathogenesis of the illness is multifactorial with Amyloid Beta, Phosphorylated Tau (ptau), inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, calcium dyshomeostasis, heavy metal imbalances, and GSK-3 interact in a highly complex manner to provoke a selfsustaining spiraling cascade of pathology, driving disease progression. In the light of such complex pathology, the failure of drugs aimed a targeting single molecules is not surprising as such approaches are usually ineffective against other complex diseases with a multifactorial pathogenesis. Combination therapies or multi target drugs might be more effective in controlling such illnesses. The putative neuroprotective effects of Lithium are achieved via the positive modulation of numerous homeostatic mechanisms regulating autophagy, oxidative stress, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction likely achieved by inhibiting GSK-3 and inositol-145 triphosphate. Data regarding efficacy in human trials and animal models of AD are mixed, but recent data using "microdose" lithium in mild cognitive impairment is encouraging, hence lithium could be a putative multi target treatment in these patients. However, additional well designed long-term trials are needed to confirm its efficacy and safety, given that long term use is necessary to achieve reasonable therapeutic benefit. PMID:26892287

  18. Topological entropy of catalytic sets: Hypercycles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of catalytic networks have been widely studied over the last decades because of their implications in several fields like prebiotic evolution, virology, neural networks, immunology or ecology. One of the most studied mathematical bodies for catalytic networks was initially formulated in the context of prebiotic evolution, by means of the hypercycle theory. The hypercycle is a set of self-replicating species able to catalyze other replicator species within a cyclic architecture. Hypercyclic organization might arise from a quasispecies as a way to increase the informational containt surpassing the so-called error threshold. The catalytic coupling between replicators makes all the species to behave like a single and coherent evolutionary multimolecular unit. The inherent nonlinearities of catalytic interactions are responsible for the emergence of several types of dynamics, among them, chaos. In this article we begin with a brief review of the hypercycle theory focusing on its evolutionary implications as well as on different dynamics associated to different types of small catalytic networks. Then we study the properties of chaotic hypercycles with error-prone replication with symbolic dynamics theory, characterizing, by means of the theory of topological Markov chains, the topological entropy and the periods of the orbits of unimodal-like iterated maps obtained from the strange attractor. We will focus our study on some key parameters responsible for the structure of the catalytic network: mutation rates, autocatalytic and cross-catalytic interactions.

  19. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues

    PubMed Central

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-01-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z-scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: 1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both type I and type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; 2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and 3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets – one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously-evaluated datasets – our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/~meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  20. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-06-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: (1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both Type I and Type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; (2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and (3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets, one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously evaluated datasets, our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to the evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/∼meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  1. Effect of Porosity on Surface Catalytic Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Pallix, Joan; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of surface porosity of thermal protection materials on surface catalytic efficiency using test data taken from both arc-jet and side-arm reactor facilities. Relative surface porosity of the samples varied from 6% to 50%. Surface porosity was measured using a flow apparatus and Bernoulli equation. The surface catalytic efficiency of the materials was calculated using aerothermodynamic, and kinetic theories. The catalytic efficiency of the materials are compared at surface temperatures between room temperature and 2500 F. The data are presented in the form of graphs and tables.

  2. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  3. Structure of a Putative Lipoate Protein Ligase from Thermoplasma acidophilum and the Mechanism of Target Selection for Post-Translational Modification

    SciTech Connect

    McManus,E.; Luisi, B.; Perham, R.

    2006-01-01

    Lipoyl-lysine swinging arms are crucial to the reactions catalysed by the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes. A gene encoding a putative lipoate protein ligase (LplA) of Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, a monomer of molecular mass 29 kDa, was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures in the absence and presence of bound lipoic acid were solved at 2.1 Angstroms resolution. The protein was found to fall into the a/{beta} class and to be structurally homologous to the catalytic domains of class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and biotin protein ligase, BirA. Lipoic acid in LplA was bound in the same position as biotin in BirA. The structure of the T. acidophilum LplA and limited proteolysis of E. coli LplA together highlighted some key features of the post-translational modification. A loop comprising residues 71-79 in the T. acidophilumligase is proposed as interacting with the dithiolane ring of lipoic acid and discriminating against the entry of biotin. A second loop comprising residues 179-193 was disordered in the T. acidophilum structure; tryptic cleavage of the corresponding loop in the E. coli LplA under non-denaturing conditions rendered the enzyme catalytically inactive, emphasizing its importance. The putative LplA of T. acidophilum lacks a C-terminal domain found in its counterparts in E. coli (Gram-negative) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (Gram-positive). A gene encoding a protein that appears to have structural homology to the additional domain in the E. coli and S. pneumoniae enzymes was detected alongside the structural gene encoding the putative LplA in the T. acidophilum genome. It is likely that this protein is required to confer activity on the LplA as currently purified, one protein perhaps catalysing the formation of the obligatory lipoyl-AMP intermediate, and the other transferring the lipoyl group from it to the specific lysine residue in the target protein.

  4. Characterization of a family 43 β-xylosidase from the xylooligosaccharide utilizing putative probiotic Weissella sp. strain 92

    PubMed Central

    Falck, Peter; Linares-Pastén, Javier A; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present the first XOS degrading glycoside hydrolase from Weissella, WXyn43, a two-domain enzyme from GH43. The gene was amplified from genomic DNA of the XOS utilizing Weissella strain 92, classified under the species-pair Weissella cibaria/W.confusa, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme is lacking a putative signal peptide and is, from a homology model, shown to be composed of an N-terminal 5-fold β-propeller catalytic domain and a C-terminal β-sandwich domain of unknown function. WXyn43 hydrolyzed short (1–4)-β-d-xylooligosaccharides, with similar kcat/KM for xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3) and clearly lower efficiency in xylotetraose (X4) conversion. WXyn43 displays the highest reported kcat for conversion of X3 (900 s−1 at 37°C) and X4 (770 s−1), and kcat for hydrolysis of X2 (907 s−1) is comparable with or greater than the highest previously reported. The purified enzyme adopted a homotetrameric state in solution, while a truncated form with isolated N-terminal catalytic domain adopted a mixture of oligomeric states and lacked detectable activity. The homology model shows that residues from both domains are involved in monomer–monomer hydrogen bonds, while the bonds creating dimer–dimer interactions only involved residues from the N-terminal domain. Docking of X2 and X3 in the active site shows interactions corresponding to subsites −1 and +1, while presence of a third subsite is unclear, but interactions between a loop and the reducing-end xylose of X3 may be present. PMID:26494804

  5. Identification of putative cathepsin S in mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus and its role in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Li, Lei; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a key enzyme employed in the histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted antigens, which are presented by processing class II-associated invariant chains and loaded antigen peptides into class II molecules. To date, little is known about the character and function of CTSS in fish. In the present study, we screened and identified a CTSS cDNA sequence from the mangrove red snapper head kidney cDNA library. The full-length CTSS cDNA contained 1339-bp nucleotide acids encoding 337 amino acids. The sequence shared high identity and similarity with other known cathepsins, especially CTSS (about 56-78% and 79-89%, respectively). Like other cathepsins, the deduced peptide consisted of regions with N-terminal signal peptides, propeptides, and mature peptides. A typical ERWNIN motif in L-like cathepsins and three conservative catalytic activity sites forming a catalytic triad active center were respectively identified in the pro-peptide and mature peptide regions of CTSS. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that mangrove red snapper CTSS was located in the CTSS clade belonging to the L-like cathepsin group, and evolved from the same ancestry. To further characterize the biological activity of the putative CTSS of mangrove snapper, CTSS was expressed in Escherichia coli M15 strains. Like other mammalian CTSS, the recombinant CTSS (rCTSS) had autocatalytic activation properties, can remove pro-peptides, and can release active mature peptides. Active CTSS had the ability to catalyze Z-Phe-Arg-AMC substrates in acidic conditions (pH 5.0) and weak alkaline environments (pH 7.5); this activity could be blocked by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64. Active CTSS can process recombinant Ii chains (invariant chains) in a stepwise manner in vitro. The results indicate that mangrove red snapper CTSS is a lysosomal cysteine protease family member with a key role in antigen processing in fish. PMID:22210546

  6. Characterization of a family 43 β-xylosidase from the xylooligosaccharide utilizing putative probiotic Weissella sp. strain 92.

    PubMed

    Falck, Peter; Linares-Pastén, Javier A; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we present the first XOS degrading glycoside hydrolase from Weissella, WXyn43, a two-domain enzyme from GH43. The gene was amplified from genomic DNA of the XOS utilizing Weissella strain 92, classified under the species-pair Weissella cibaria/W.confusa, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme is lacking a putative signal peptide and is, from a homology model, shown to be composed of an N-terminal 5-fold β-propeller catalytic domain and a C-terminal β-sandwich domain of unknown function. WXyn43 hydrolyzed short (1-4)-β-D-xylooligosaccharides, with similar kcat/KM for xylobiose (X2) and xylotriose (X3) and clearly lower efficiency in xylotetraose (X4) conversion. WXyn43 displays the highest reported kcat for conversion of X3 (900 s(-1) at 37 °C) and X4 (770 s(-1)), and kcat for hydrolysis of X2 (907 s(-1)) is comparable with or greater than the highest previously reported. The purified enzyme adopted a homotetrameric state in solution, while a truncated form with isolated N-terminal catalytic domain adopted a mixture of oligomeric states and lacked detectable activity. The homology model shows that residues from both domains are involved in monomer-monomer hydrogen bonds, while the bonds creating dimer-dimer interactions only involved residues from the N-terminal domain. Docking of X2 and X3 in the active site shows interactions corresponding to subsites -1 and +1, while presence of a third subsite is unclear, but interactions between a loop and the reducing-end xylose of X3 may be present. PMID:26494804

  7. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  8. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  9. Catalytic reactions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R

    2001-12-01

    The chemical industry is under considerable pressure to replace many of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are currently used as solvents in organic synthesis. The toxic and/or hazardous properties of many solvents, notably chlorinated hydrocarbons, combined with serious environmental issues, such as atmospheric emissions and contamination of aqueous effluents is making their use prohibitive. This is an important driving force in the quest for novel reaction media. Curzons and coworkers, for example, recently noted that rigorous management of solvent use is likely to result in the greatest improvement towards greener processes for the manufacture of pharmaceutical intermediates. The current emphasis on novel reaction media is also motivated by the need for efficient methods for recycling homogeneous catalysts. The key to waste minimisation in chemicals manufacture is the widespread substitution of classical 'stoichiometric' syntheses by atom efficient, catalytic alternatives. In the context of homogeneous catalysis, efficient recycling of the catalyst is a conditio sine qua non for economically and environmentally attractive processes. Motivated by one or both of the above issues much attention has been devoted to homogeneous catalysis in aqueous biphasic and fluorous biphasic systems as well as in supercritical carbon dioxide. Similarly, the use of ionic liquids as novel reaction media may offer a convenient solution to both the solvent emission and the catalyst recycling problem. PMID:12239988

  10. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years. PMID:26788065

  11. The Controversy, Challenges, and Potential Benefits of Putative Female Germline Stem Cells Research in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zezheng; Sun, Mengli; Liang, Xia; Li, Jia; Zhou, Fangyue; Zhong, Zhisheng; Zheng, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The conventional view is that female mammals lose their ability to generate new germ cells after birth. However, in recent years, researchers have successfully isolated and cultured a type of germ cell from postnatal ovaries in a variety of mammalian species that have the abilities of self-proliferation and differentiation into oocytes, and this finding indicates that putative germline stem cells maybe exist in the postnatal mammalian ovaries. Herein, we review the research history and discovery of putative female germline stem cells, the concept that putative germline stem cells exist in the postnatal mammalian ovary, and the research progress, challenge, and application of putative germline stem cells in recent years. PMID:26788065

  12. A review of tin oxide-based catalytic systems: Preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the important aspects of the preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior of tin oxide-based catalytic systems including doped tin oxide, mixed oxides which contain tin oxide, Pt supported on tin oxide and Pt/Sn supported on alumina. These systems have a broad range of applications and are continually increasing in importance. However, due to their complex nature, much remains to be understood concerning how they function catalytically.

  13. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF GROUNDWATER STRIPPING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air stripping gaseous effluents, with special attention to system designs and case histories. The variety of contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed....

  14. A Putative Multiple-Demand System in the Macaque Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew H.; Buckley, Mark J.; Mitchell, Anna S.; Sallet, Jerome; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    In humans, cognitively demanding tasks of many types recruit common frontoparietal brain areas. Pervasive activation of this “multiple-demand” (MD) network suggests a core function in supporting goal-oriented behavior. A similar network might therefore be predicted in nonhuman primates that readily perform similar tasks after training. However, an MD network in nonhuman primates has not been described. Single-cell recordings from macaque frontal and parietal cortex show some similar properties to human MD fMRI responses (e.g., adaptive coding of task-relevant information). Invasive recordings, however, come from limited prespecified locations, so they do not delineate a macaque homolog of the MD system and their positioning could benefit from knowledge of where MD foci lie. Challenges of scanning behaving animals mean that few macaque fMRI studies specifically contrast levels of cognitive demand, so we sought to identify a macaque counterpart to the human MD system using fMRI connectivity in 35 rhesus macaques. Putative macaque MD regions, mapped from frontoparietal MD regions defined in humans, were found to be functionally connected under anesthesia. To further refine these regions, an iterative process was used to maximize their connectivity cross-validated across animals. Finally, whole-brain connectivity analyses identified voxels that were robustly connected to MD regions, revealing seven clusters across frontoparietal and insular cortex comparable to human MD regions and one unexpected cluster in the lateral fissure. The proposed macaque MD regions can be used to guide future electrophysiological investigation of MD neural coding and in task-based fMRI to test predictions of similar functional properties to human MD cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In humans, a frontoparietal “multiple-demand” (MD) brain network is recruited during a wide range of cognitively demanding tasks. Because this suggests a fundamental function, one might expect a similar

  15. Chemical and catalytic properties of elemental carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.G.; Brodzinsky, R.; Gundel, L.A.; Novakov, T.

    1980-10-01

    Elemental carbon particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fossil fuel are one of the major constituents of airborne particulate matter. These particles are a chemically and catalytically active material and can be an effective carrier for other toxic air pollutants through their adsorptive capability. The chemical, adsorptive, and catalytic behaviors of carbon particles depend very much on their crystalline structure, surface composition, and electronic properties. This paper discusses these properties and examines their relevance to atmospheric chemistry.

  16. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Chemler, Sherry R.; Bovino, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review. PMID:23828735

  17. An Iron Reservoir to the Catalytic Metal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fange; Geng, Jiafeng; Gumpper, Ryan H.; Barman, Arghya; Davis, Ian; Ozarowski, Andrew; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The rubredoxin motif is present in over 74,000 protein sequences and 2,000 structures, but few have known functions. A secondary, non-catalytic, rubredoxin-like iron site is conserved in 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAO), from single cellular sources but not multicellular sources. Through the population of the two metal binding sites with various metals in bacterial HAO, the structural and functional relationship of the rubredoxin-like site was investigated using kinetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational approaches. It is shown that the first metal presented preferentially binds to the catalytic site rather than the rubredoxin-like site, which selectively binds iron when the catalytic site is occupied. Furthermore, an iron ion bound to the rubredoxin-like site is readily delivered to an empty catalytic site of metal-free HAO via an intermolecular transfer mechanism. Through the use of metal analysis and catalytic activity measurements, we show that a downstream metabolic intermediate can selectively remove the catalytic iron. As the prokaryotic HAO is often crucial for cell survival, there is a need for ensuring its activity. These results suggest that the rubredoxin-like site is a possible auxiliary iron source to the catalytic center when it is lost during catalysis in a pathway with metabolic intermediates of metal-chelating properties. A spare tire concept is proposed based on this biochemical study, and this concept opens up a potentially new functional paradigm for iron-sulfur centers in iron-dependent enzymes as transient iron binding and shuttling sites to ensure full metal loading of the catalytic site. PMID:25918158

  18. Correlation of Catalytic Rates With Solubility Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D.; England, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    Catalyst maximizes activity when its solubility parameter equals that of reactive species. Catalytic activities of some binary metal alloys at maximum when alloy compositions correspond to Hildebrand solubility parameters equal to those of reactive atomic species on catalyst. If this suggestive correlation proves to be general, applied to formulation of other mixed-metal catalysts. Also used to identify reactive species in certain catalytic reactions.

  19. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  20. Identification of the catalytic residues of the first family of beta(1-3)glucanosyltransferases identified in fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Mouyna, I; Monod, M; Fontaine, T; Henrissat, B; Léchenne, B; Latgé, J P

    2000-01-01

    A new family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored beta(1-3)glucanosyltransferases (Gelp), recently identified and characterized in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, showed functional similarity to the Gas/Phr/Epd protein families, which are involved in yeast morphogenesis. Sequence comparisons and hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) showed that all the Gas/Phr/Epd/Gel proteins belong to a new family of glycosylhydrolases, family 72. We confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical analysis that the two conserved glutamate residues (the putative catalytic residues of this family, as determined by HCA) are involved in the active site of this family of glycosylhydrolases. PMID:10769178

  1. Insights into the catalytic mechanism of PPM Ser/Thr phosphatases from the atomic resolution structures of a mycobacterial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bellinzoni, Marco; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Shepard, William; Alzari, Pedro M

    2007-07-01

    Serine/threonine-specific phosphatases (PPs) represent, after protein tyrosine phosphatases, the second major class of enzymes that catalyze the dephosphorylation of proteins. They are classed in two large families, known as PPP and PPM, on the basis of sequence similarities, metal ion dependence, and inhibitor sensitivity. Despite their wide species distribution and broad physiological roles, the catalytic mechanism of PPM phosphatases has been primarily inferred from studies of a single enzyme, human PP2Calpha. Here, we report the biochemical characterization and the atomic resolution structures of a soluble PPM phosphatase from the saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis in complex with different ligands. The structures provide putative snapshots along the catalytic cycle, which support an associative reaction mechanism that differs in some important aspects from the currently accepted model and reinforces the hypothesis of convergent evolution in PPs. PMID:17637345

  2. Generating Recombinant Antibodies against Putative Biomarkers of Retinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kierny, Michael R.; Cunningham, Thomas D.; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Edward, Deepak P.; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate biomarkers, indicative of disease or injury, are beginning to overwhelm the process of validation through immunological means. Recombinant antibodies developed through phage-display offer an alternative means of generating monoclonal antibodies faster than traditional immunization of animals. Peptide segments of putative biomarkers of laser induced injury in the rabbit, discovered through mass spectrometry, were used as targets for a selection against a library of phage-displayed human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. Highly specific antibodies were isolated to four of these unique peptide sequences. One antibody against the retinal protein, Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein Beta 5 (GBB5), had a dissociation constant ~300 nM and recognized the full-length endogenous protein in retinal homogenates of three different animal species by western blot. Alanine scanning of the peptide target identified three charged and one hydrophobic amino acid as the critical binding residues for two different scFvs. To enhance the utility of the reagent, one scFv was dimerized through a Fragment-crystallizable hinge region (i.e., Fc) and expressed in HEK-293 cells. This dimeric reagent yielded a 25-fold lower detection limit in western blots. PMID:25902199

  3. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M.; Walker, Blair A.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Marra, Marco A.; Jones, Steven J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options. PMID:27148585

  4. Inhalation of two putative Gulf War toxins by mice.

    PubMed

    Repine, John E; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Klawitter, Jelena; Christians, Uwe; Peters, Ben; Smith, Dwight M

    2016-06-01

    We employed our inhalation methodology to examine whether biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress would be produced in mice following inhalation of aerosols containing carbonaceous particles or the vapor of pesticides prevalent during the first Gulf War. Exposure to two putative Gulf War Illness toxins, fine airborne particles and the pesticide malathion, increased biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in Friend virus B (FVB) female mice. Mice inhaling particles 24 h before had increased lung lavage and plasma Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) (a biomarker of inflammation) and PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) levels, lung lavage protein and lung lavage lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. These changes were a function of particle density and exposure time. Compared to particle inhalation, mice inhaling malathion 24 h before had small increase in plasma LTB4 and PGF2α levels but no increase in lung lavage LTB4, lung lavage protein, lung lavage LDH, and lung lavage alveolar macrophage (AM) levels compared to unexposed control mice. AM from particle-exposed mice contained phagocytosed particles, while AM from malathion-exposed mice showed no abnormalities. Our results indicate that inhaling particles or malathion can alter inflammatory and oxidative biomarkers in mice and raise the possibility that these toxins may have altered inflammation and oxidative stress biomarkers in Gulf War-exposed individuals. PMID:26950528

  5. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M; Walker, Blair A; Schein, Jacqueline E; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M

    2016-03-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options. PMID:27148585

  6. Phytophthora infestans specific phosphorylation patterns and new putative control targets.

    PubMed

    Frades, Itziar; Andreasson, Erik

    2016-04-01

    In this study we applied biomathematical searches of gene regulatory mechanisms to learn more about oomycete biology and to identify new putative targets for pesticides or biological control against Phytophthora infestans. First, oomycete phylum-specific phosphorylation motifs were found by discriminative n-gram analysis. We found 11.600 P. infestans specific n-grams, mapping 642 phosphoproteins. The most abundant group among these related to phosphatidylinositol metabolism. Due to the large number of possible targets found and our hypothesis that multi-level control is a sign of usefulness as targets for intervention, we identified overlapping targets with a second screen. This was performed to identify proteins dually regulated by small RNA and phosphorylation. We found 164 proteins to be regulated by both sRNA and phosphorylation and the dominating functions where phosphatidylinositol signalling/metabolism, endocytosis, and autophagy. Furthermore we performed a similar regulatory study and discriminative n-gram analysis of proteins with no clear orthologs in other species and proteins that are known to be unique to P. infestans such as the RxLR effectors, Crinkler (CRN) proteins and elicitins. We identified CRN proteins with specific phospho-motifs present in all life stages. PITG_12626, PITG_14042 and PITG_23175 are CRN proteins that have species-specific phosphorylation motifs and are subject to dual regulation. PMID:27020162

  7. The evolution of putative starch-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Machovic, Martin; Janecek, Stefan

    2006-11-27

    The present bioinformatics analysis was focused on the starch-binding domains (SBDs) and SBD-like motifs sequentially related to carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families CBM20 and CBM21. Originally, these SBDs were known from microbial amylases only. At present homologous starch- and glycogen-binding domains (or putative SBD sequences) have been recognised in various plant and animal proteins. The sequence comparison clearly showed that the SBD-like sequences in genethonin-1, starch synthase III and glucan branching enzyme should possess the real SBD function since the two tryptophans (or at least two aromatics) of the typical starch-binding site 1 are conserved in their sequences. The same should apply also for the sequences corresponding with the so-called KIS-domain of plant AKINbetagamma protein that is a homologue of the animal AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The evolutionary tree classified the compared SBDs into three distinct groups: (i) the family CBM20 (the motifs from genethonins, laforins, starch excess 4 protein, beta-subunits of the animal AMPK and all plant and yeast homologues, and eventually from amylopullulanases); (ii) the family CBM21 (the motifs from regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 1 together with those from starch synthase III); and (iii) the (CBM20+CBM21)-related group (the motifs from the pullulanase subfamily consisting of pullulanase, branching enzyme, isoamylase and maltooligosyl trehalohydrolase). PMID:17084392

  8. Rapid Discrimination Among Putative Mechanistic Models of Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lomnitz, Jason G.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    An overarching goal in molecular biology is to gain an understanding of the mechanistic basis underlying biochemical systems. Success is critical if we are to predict effectively the outcome of drug treatments and the development of abnormal phenotypes. However, data from most experimental studies is typically noisy and sparse. This allows multiple potential mechanisms to account for experimental observations, and often devising experiments to test each is not feasible. Here, we introduce a novel strategy that discriminates among putative models based on their repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes, without relying on knowledge of specific values for rate constants and binding constants. As an illustration, we apply this strategy to two synthetic gene circuits exhibiting anomalous behaviors. Our results show that the conventional models, based on their well-characterized components, cannot account for the experimental observations. We examine a total of 40 alternative hypotheses and show that only 5 have the potential to reproduce the experimental data, and one can do so with biologically relevant parameter values. PMID:27578053

  9. The inducible CAM plants in putative lunar lander experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, Olexii; Zaetz, Iryna; Soldatkin, Olexii; Rogutskyy, Ivan; Danilchenko, Boris; Mikheev, Olexander; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Vidmachenko, Anatolii; Foing, Bernard H.; Kozyrovska, Natalia

    Precursory lunar lander experiments on growing plants in locker-based chambers will increase our understanding of effect of lunar conditions on plant physiology. The inducible CAM (Cras-sulacean Acid Metabolism)-plants are reasonable model for a study of relationships between environmental challenges and changes in plant/bacteria gene expression. In inducible CAM-plants the enzymatic machinery for the environmentally activated CAM switches on from a C3-to a full-CAM mode of photosynthesis in response to any stresses (Winter et al., 2008). In our study, Kalanchoe spp. are shown to be promising candidates for putative lunar experiments as resistant to irradiation and desiccation, especially after inoculation with a bacterial consortium (Boorlak et al., 2010). Within frames of the experiment we expect to get information about the functional activity of CAM-plants, in particular, its organogenesis, photosystem, the circadian regulation of plant metabolism on the base of data gaining with instrumental indications from expression of the reporter genes fused to any genes involved in vital functions of the plant (Kozyrovska et al., 2009). References 1. Winter K., Garcia M., Holtum J. (2008) J. Exp. Bot. 59(7):1829-1840 2. Bourlak O., Lar O., Rogutskyy I., Mikheev A., Zaets I., Chervatyuk N., de Vera J.-P., Danilchenko A.B. Foing B.H., zyrovska N. (2010) Space Sci. Technol. 3. Kozyrovska N.O., Vidmachenko A.P., Foing B.H. et al. Exploration/call/estec/ESA. 2009.

  10. Flamingo cadherin: a putative host receptor for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Blau, Karin; Portnoi, Maxim; Shagan, Marilou; Kaganovich, Antonina; Rom, Slava; Kafka, Daniel; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Porgador, Angel; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Dagan, Ron; Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa

    2007-06-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) is a cell wall-localized lectin. We demonstrate that recombinant (r) FBA and anti-rFBA antibodies inhibit encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae serotype 3 adherence to A549 type II lung carcinoma epithelial cells. A random combinatorial peptide library expressed by filamentous phage was screened with rFBA. Eleven of 30 rFBA-binding phages inhibited 90% of S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptide sequence of 9 of these phages matched the Flamingo cadherin receptor (FCR) when aligned against the human genome. A peptide comprising a putative FBA-binding region of FCR (FCRP) inhibited 2 genetically and capsularly unrelated pairs of encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains from binding to A549 cells. Moreover, FCRP inhibited S. pneumoniae nasopharyngeal and lung colonization and, possibly, pneumonia development in the mouse intranasal inoculation model system. These data indicate that FBA is an S. pneumoniae adhesin and that FCR is its host receptor. PMID:17492599

  11. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thaver, S.S.; Bhava, D.; Castelfranco, P.A.

    1986-04-01

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C)-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed.

  12. Ameloblastin as a putative marker of specific bone compartments.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jaime; Hotton, Dominique; Asselin, Audrey; De la Dure-Molla, Muriel; Coudert, Amélie E; Isaac, Juliane; Berdal, Ariane

    2014-08-01

    Ameloblastin (AMBN), a member of the enamel matrix protein family, has been recently identified as integral part of the skeleton beyond the enamel. However, the specific role of endogenous AMBN in bone tissue is not fully elucidated. This study aims at investigating mRNA expression of AMBN in wild-type mice in different bone sites from early embryonic to adult stages. AMBN mRNA expression started at pre-dental stages in mouse embryos (E10.5) in both head and body parts. Using laser capture microdissection on 3-day-old mice, we showed an unambiguous mRNA expression of AMBN in extra-dental tissue (mandible bone). Screening of AMBN mRNA expression in adult mice (15-week-old) revealed that mRNA expression of AMBN varied according to the bone site; a higher mRNA levels in mandibular and frontal bone compartments were observed when compared to tibia and occipital bones. These results strongly suggest that AMBN expression may be regulated in a site-specific manner and identify AMBN as a putative in vivo marker of the site-specific fingerprint of bone organs. PMID:25158194

  13. Hematopoietic activity in putative mouse primordial germ cell populations.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, Maria Lucia; Klinger, Francesca Gioia; Farini, Donatella; Di Carlo, Anna; Carsetti, Rita; Giorda, Ezio; De Felici, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, starting from the observation of heterogeneous expression of the GOF-18ΔPE-GFP Pou5f1 (Oct3/4) transgene in putative mouse PGC populations settled in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, we identified various OCT3/4 positive populations showing distinct expression of PGC markers (BLIMP-1, AP, TG-1, STELLA) and co-expressing several proteins (CD-34, CD-41, FLK-1) and genes (Brachyury, Hox-B4, Scl/Tal-1 and Gata-2) of hematopoietic precursors. Moreover, we found that Oct3/4-GFP(weak) CD-34(weak/high) cells possess robust hematopoietic colony forming activity (CFU) in vitro. These data indicate that the cell population usually considered PGCs moving toward the gonadal ridges encompasses a subset of cells co-expressing several germ cell and hematopoietic markers and possessing hematopoietic activity. These results are discussed within of the current model of germline segregation. PMID:25684074

  14. Structure of inositol monophosphatase, the putative target of lithium therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bone, R; Springer, J P; Atack, J R

    1992-01-01

    Inositol monophosphatase (EC 3.1.3.25), the putative molecular site of action of lithium therapy for manic-depressive illness, plays a key role in the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway by catalyzing the hydrolysis of inositol monophosphates. To provide a structural basis from which to design better therapeutic agents for manic-depressive illness, the structure of human inositol monophosphatase has been determined to 2.1-A resolution by using x-ray crystallography. The enzyme exists as a dimer of identical subunits, each folded into a five-layered sandwich of three pairs of alpha-helices and two beta-sheets. Sulfate and an inhibitory lanthanide cation (Gd3+) are bound at identical sites on each subunit and establish the positions of the active sites. Each site is located in a large hydrophilic cavern that is at the base of the two central helices where several segments of secondary structure intersect. Comparison of the phosphatase aligned sequences of several diverse genes with the phosphatase structure suggests that the products of these genes and the phosphatase form a structural family with a conserved metal binding site. Images PMID:1332026

  15. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  16. Identification of a putative alpha-glucan synthase essential for cell wall construction and morphogenesis in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hochstenbach, Frans; Klis, Frans M.; van den Ende, Herman; van Donselaar, Elly; Peters, Peter J.; Klausner, Richard D.

    1998-01-01

    The cell wall protects fungi against lysis and determines their cell shape. Alpha-glucan is a major carbohydrate component of the fungal cell wall, but its function is unknown and its synthase has remained elusive. Here, we describe a fission yeast gene, ags1+, which encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase. In contrast to the structure of other carbohydrate polymer synthases, the predicted Ags1 protein consists of two probable catalytic domains for alpha-glucan assembly, namely an intracellular domain for alpha-glucan synthesis and an extracellular domain speculated to cross-link or remodel alpha-glucan. In addition, the predicted Ags1 protein contains a multipass transmembrane domain that might contribute to transport of alpha-glucan across the membrane. Loss of Ags1p function in a temperature-sensitive mutant results in cell lysis, whereas mutant cells grown at the semipermissive temperature contain decreased levels of cell wall alpha-glucan and fail to maintain rod shapes, causing rounding of the cells. These findings demonstrate that alpha-glucan is essential for fission yeast morphogenesis. PMID:9689051

  17. Structure of a bacterial putative acetyltransferase defines the fold of the human O-GlcNAcase C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Francesco V.; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W.; Dorfmueller, Helge C.; Ferenbach, Andrew T.; Navratilova, Iva; van Aalten, Daan M. F.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic modification of proteins by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is an essential posttranslational modification present in higher eukaryotes. Removal of O-GlcNAc is catalysed by O-GlcNAcase, a multi-domain enzyme that has been reported to be bifunctional, possessing both glycoside hydrolase and histone acetyltransferase (AT) activity. Insights into the mechanism, protein substrate recognition and inhibition of the hydrolase domain of human OGA (hOGA) have been obtained via the use of the structures of bacterial homologues. However, the molecular basis of AT activity of OGA, which has only been reported in vitro, is not presently understood. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a putative acetyltransferase (OgpAT) that we identified in the genome of the marine bacterium Oceanicola granulosus, showing homology to the hOGA C-terminal AT domain (hOGA-AT). The structure of OgpAT in complex with acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) reveals that, by homology modelling, hOGA-AT adopts a variant AT fold with a unique loop creating a deep tunnel. The structures, together with mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance data, reveal that while the bacterial OgpAT binds AcCoA, the hOGA-AT does not, as explained by the lack of key residues normally required to bind AcCoA. Thus, the C-terminal domain of hOGA is a catalytically incompetent ‘pseudo’-AT. PMID:24088714

  18. Structural Insights into the Catalytic Active Site and Activity of Human Nit2/ω-Amidase

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chin-Hsiang; Gao, Quan-Ze; Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Lyu, Jyun-Hong; Sheu, Sheh-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Human nitrilase-like protein 2 (hNit2) is a putative tumor suppressor, recently identified as ω-amidase. hNit2/ω-amidase plays a crucial metabolic role by catalyzing the hydrolysis of α-ketoglutaramate (the α-keto analog of glutamine) and α-ketosuccinamate (the α-keto analog of asparagine), yielding α-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate, respectively. Transamination between glutamine and α-keto-γ-methiolbutyrate closes the methionine salvage pathway. Thus, hNit2/ω-amidase links sulfur metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate the catalytic specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild type enzyme and its mutants to investigate enzyme-substrate interactions. Binding free energies were computed to characterize factors contributing to the substrate specificity. The predictions resulting from these computations were verified by kinetic analyses and mutational studies. The activity of hNit2/ω-amidase was determined with α-ketoglutaramate and succinamate as substrates. We constructed three catalytic triad mutants (E43A, K112A, and C153A) and a mutant with a loop 116–128 deletion to validate the role of key residues and the 116–128 loop region in substrate binding and turnover. The molecular dynamics simulations successfully verified the experimental trends in the binding specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase toward various substrates. Our findings have revealed novel structural insights into the binding of substrates to hNit2/ω-amidase. A catalytic triad and the loop residues 116–128 of hNit2 play an essential role in supporting the stability of the enzyme-substrate complex, resulting in the generation of the catalytic products. These observations are predicted to be of benefit in the design of new inhibitors or activators for research involving cancer and hyperammonemic diseases. PMID:22674578

  19. Putative Risk Factors in Developmental Dyslexia: A Case-Control Study of Italian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascheretti, Sara; Marino, Cecilia; Simone, Daniela; Quadrelli, Ermanno; Riva, Valentina; Cellino, Maria Rosaria; Maziade, Michel; Brombin, Chiara; Battaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Although dyslexia runs in families, several putative risk factors that cannot be immediately identified as genetic predict reading disability. Published studies analyzed one or a few risk factors at a time, with relatively inconsistent results. To assess the contribution of several putative risk factors to the development of dyslexia, we conducted…

  20. SOFC system with integrated catalytic fuel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Caine; Tompsett, Geoff. A.; Kendall, Kevin; Ormerod, R. Mark

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the development of solid oxide fuel cell technology operating directly on hydrocarbon fuels. The development of a catalytic fuel processing system, which is integrated with the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power source is outlined here. The catalytic device utilises a novel three-way catalytic system consisting of an in situ pre-reformer catalyst, the fuel cell anode catalyst and a platinum-based combustion catalyst. The three individual catalytic stages have been tested in a model catalytic microreactor. Both temperature-programmed and isothermal reaction techniques have been applied. Results from these experiments were used to design the demonstration SOFC unit. The apparatus used for catalytic characterisation can also perform in situ electrochemical measurements as described in previous papers [C.M. Finnerty, R.H. Cunningham, K. Kendall, R.M. Ormerod, Chem. Commun. (1998) 915-916; C.M. Finnerty, N.J. Coe, R.H. Cunningham, R.M. Ormerod, Catal. Today 46 (1998) 137-145]. This enabled the performance of the SOFC to be determined at a range of temperatures and reaction conditions, with current output of 290 mA cm -2 at 0.5 V, being recorded. Methane and butane have been evaluated as fuels. Thus, optimisation of the in situ partial oxidation pre-reforming catalyst was essential, with catalysts producing high H 2/CO ratios at reaction temperatures between 873 K and 1173 K being chosen. These included Ru and Ni/Mo-based catalysts. Hydrocarbon fuels were directly injected into the catalytic SOFC system. Microreactor measurements revealed the reaction mechanisms as the fuel was transported through the three-catalyst device. The demonstration system showed that the fuel processing could be successfully integrated with the SOFC stack.

  1. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  2. Credibility Analysis of Putative Disease-Causing Genes Using Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Olubunmi; Powell, John F.; Andersen, Peter M.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic studies are challenging in many complex diseases, particularly those with limited diagnostic certainty, low prevalence or of old age. The result is that genes may be reported as disease-causing with varying levels of evidence, and in some cases, the data may be so limited as to be indistinguishable from chance findings. When there are large numbers of such genes, an objective method for ranking the evidence is useful. Using the neurodegenerative and complex disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as a model, and the disease-specific database ALSoD, the objective is to develop a method using publicly available data to generate a credibility score for putative disease-causing genes. Methods Genes with at least one publication suggesting involvement in adult onset familial ALS were collated following an exhaustive literature search. SQL was used to generate a score by extracting information from the publications and combined with a pathogenicity analysis using bioinformatics tools. The resulting score allowed us to rank genes in order of credibility. To validate the method, we compared the objective ranking with a rank generated by ALS genetics experts. Spearman's Rho was used to compare rankings generated by the different methods. Results The automated method ranked ALS genes in the following order: SOD1, TARDBP, FUS, ANG, SPG11, NEFH, OPTN, ALS2, SETX, FIG4, VAPB, DCTN1, TAF15, VCP, DAO. This compared very well to the ranking of ALS genetics experts, with Spearman's Rho of 0.69 (P = 0.009). Conclusion We have presented an automated method for scoring the level of evidence for a gene being disease-causing. In developing the method we have used the model disease ALS, but it could equally be applied to any disease in which there is genotypic uncertainty. PMID:23755159

  3. NMDA antagonist properties of the putative antiaddictive drug, ibogaine.

    PubMed

    Popik, P; Layer, R T; Fossom, L H; Benveniste, M; Geter-Douglass, B; Witkin, J M; Skolnick, P

    1995-11-01

    Both anecdotal reports in humans and preclinical studies indicate that ibogaine interrupts addiction to a variety of abused substances including alcohol, opiates, nicotine and stimulants. Based on the similarity of these therapeutic claims to recent preclinical studies demonstrating that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists attenuate addiction-related phenomena, we examined the NMDA antagonist properties of ibogaine. Pharmacologically relevant concentrations of ibogaine produce a voltage-dependent block of NMDA receptors in hippocampal cultures (Ki, 2.3 microM at -60 mV). Consistent with this observation, ibogaine competitively inhibits [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)-cyclohexyl]piperidine binding to rat forebrain homogenates (Ki, 1.5 microM) and blocks glutamate-induced cell death in neuronal cultures (IC50, 4.5 microM). Moreover, at doses previously reported to interfere with drug-seeking behaviors, ibogaine substitutes as a discriminative stimulus (ED50, 64.9 mg/kg) in mice trained to discriminate the prototypic voltage-dependent NMDA antagonist, dizocilpine (0.17 mg/kg), from saline. Consistent with previous reports, ibogaine reduced naloxone-precipitated jumping in morphine-dependent mice (ED50, 72 mg/kg). Although pretreatment with glycine did not affect naloxone-precipitated jumping in morphine-dependent mice, it abolished the ability of ibogaine to block naloxone-precipitated jumping. Taken together, these findings link the NMDA antagonist actions of ibogaine to a putative "antiaddictive" property of this alkaloid, its ability to reduce the expression of morphine dependence. PMID:7473163

  4. Molecular diagnosis of putative Stargardt disease probands by exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The commonest genetic form of juvenile or early adult onset macular degeneration is Stargardt Disease (STGD) caused by recessive mutations in the gene ABCA4. However, high phenotypic and allelic heterogeneity and a small but non-trivial amount of locus heterogeneity currently impede conclusive molecular diagnosis in a significant proportion of cases. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) of nine putative Stargardt Disease probands and searched for potentially disease-causing genetic variants in previously identified retinal or macular dystrophy genes. Follow-up dideoxy sequencing was performed for confirmation and to screen for mutations in an additional set of affected individuals lacking a definitive molecular diagnosis. Results Whole exome sequencing revealed seven likely disease-causing variants across four genes, providing a confident genetic diagnosis in six previously uncharacterized participants. We identified four previously missed mutations in ABCA4 across three individuals. Likely disease-causing mutations in RDS/PRPH2, ELOVL, and CRB1 were also identified. Conclusions Our findings highlight the enormous potential of whole exome sequencing in Stargardt Disease molecular diagnosis and research. WES adequately assayed all coding sequences and canonical splice sites of ABCA4 in this study. Additionally, WES enables the identification of disease-related alleles in other genes. This work highlights the importance of collecting parental genetic material for WES testing as the current knowledge of human genome variation limits the determination of causality between identified variants and disease. While larger sample sizes are required to establish the precision and accuracy of this type of testing, this study supports WES for inherited early onset macular degeneration disorders as an alternative to standard mutation screening techniques. PMID:22863181

  5. Identification of Putative Natriuretic Hormones Isolated from Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Herbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport – i.e., as ouabain-like factors (OLF) that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lyophilized and reconstituted 24 h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2, whose mass (Ms)-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1, 2). Further identification was attempted by Ms-, infrared (IR)-, ultraviolet (UV)-, and 1H-NMR-spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (di)ascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V)-Vv-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3) and VIV-diascorbate. OLF-1 and Vv-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and VIV-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study, Cain et al. (4) isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats, a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-β-d-glucoside (Mr 368) and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284) were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g., by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume, or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors, and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s) or hormone(s) will be needed. PMID:26052310

  6. SUT2, a Putative Sucrose Sensor in Sieve Elements

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Laurence; Kühn, Christina; Weise, Andreas; Schulz, Alexander; Gebhardt, Christiane; Hirner, Brigitte; Hellmann, Hanjo; Schulze, Waltraud; Ward, John M.; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2000-01-01

    In leaves, sucrose uptake kinetics involve high- and low-affinity components. A family of low- and high-affinity sucrose transporters (SUT) was identified. SUT1 serves as a high-affinity transporter essential for phloem loading and long-distance transport in solanaceous species. SUT4 is a low-affinity transporter with an expression pattern overlapping that of SUT1. Both SUT1 and SUT4 localize to enucleate sieve elements of tomato. New sucrose transporter–like proteins, named SUT2, from tomato and Arabidopsis contain extended cytoplasmic domains, thus structurally resembling the yeast sugar sensors SNF3 and RGT2. Features common to these sensors are low codon bias, environment of the start codon, low expression, and lack of detectable transport activity. In contrast to LeSUT1, which is induced during the sink-to-source transition of leaves, SUT2 is more highly expressed in sink than in source leaves and is inducible by sucrose. LeSUT2 protein colocalizes with the low- and high-affinity sucrose transporters in sieve elements of tomato petioles, indicating that multiple SUT mRNAs or proteins travel from companion cells to enucleate sieve elements. The SUT2 gene maps on chromosome V of potato and is linked to a major quantitative trait locus for tuber starch content and yield. Thus, the putative sugar sensor identified colocalizes with two other sucrose transporters, differs from them in kinetic properties, and potentially regulates the relative activity of low- and high-affinity sucrose transport into sieve elements. PMID:10899981

  7. Identification of Putative Natriuretic Hormones Isolated from Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Herbert J

    2015-01-01

    This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport - i.e., as ouabain-like factors (OLF) that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lyophilized and reconstituted 24 h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2, whose mass (Ms)-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1, 2). Further identification was attempted by Ms-, infrared (IR)-, ultraviolet (UV)-, and (1)H-NMR-spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (di)ascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V)-V(v)-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3) and V(IV)-diascorbate. OLF-1 and V(v)-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and V(IV)-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study, Cain et al. (4) isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats, a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-β-d-glucoside (Mr 368) and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284) were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g., by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume, or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors, and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s) or hormone(s) will be needed. PMID:26052310

  8. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  9. Materials for high-temperature catalytic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.S.; Cox, J.L.; Parks, W.P. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    Catalytic combustion systems for gas turbines must operate at temperatures of at least 1200{degrees}C. Support structure material must retain its integrity under prolonged exposure to high temperature, thermal cycling, and severe chemical conditions; and the material must be capable of being formed into thin sections. The performance requirements of a high-temperature stable ceramic support must be balanced with reasonable costs of preparation. An increasing number of materials have potential for successful exposure to high-temperature conditions. Two major problems of high-temperature catalyst systems are loss of surface area and catalytic activity. Incorporation of the catalytic component into the host lattice can circumvent this problem. Use of supporting active metal oxides on carrier materials with high thermal resistance appears to be a very promising way to make stable catalysts. The challenge will be to provide sufficient low-temperature activity and high-temperature stability; therefore, there exists a need to engineer catalytic materials for high-temperature combustion environments. Developments in catalytic materials and preparation procedures are reviewed. Future areas of research are discussed.

  10. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  11. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  12. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina; P. Szedlacsek

    2006-03-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1-Implementation Plan, Phase 2-Validation Testing and Phase 3-Field Testing. The Phase 1 program has been completed. Phase II was initiated in October 2004. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL{trademark}) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to react part of the fuel, increasing the fuel/air mixture temperature. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the catalytic concept will be demonstrated through subscale testing. Phase III will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  13. Abundant Intergenic TAACTGA Direct Repeats and Putative Alternate RNA Polymerase β′ Subunits in Marine Beggiatoaceae Genomes: Possible Regulatory Roles and Origins

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequences of several giant marine sulfur-oxidizing bacteria present evidence of a possible post-transcriptional regulatory network that may have been transmitted to or from two distantly related bacteria lineages. The draft genome of a Cand. “Maribeggiatoa” filament from the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) seafloor contains 169 sets of TAACTGA direct repeats and one indirect repeat, with two to six copies per set. Related heptamers are rarely or never found as direct repeats. TAACTGA direct repeats are also found in some other Beggiatoaceae, Thiocystis violascens, a range of Cyanobacteria, and five Bacteroidetes. This phylogenetic distribution suggests they may have been transmitted horizontally, but no mechanism is evident. There is no correlation between total TAACTGA occurrences and repeats per genome. In most species the repeat units are relatively short, but longer arrays of up to 43 copies are found in several Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria. The majority of TAACTGA repeats in the Cand. “Maribeggiatoa” Orange Guaymas (BOGUAY) genome are within several nucleotides upstream of a putative start codon, suggesting they may be binding sites for a post-transcriptional regulator. Candidates include members of the ribosomal protein S1, Csp (cold shock protein), and Csr (carbon storage regulator) families. No pattern was evident in the predicted functions of the open reading frames (ORFs) downstream of repeats, but some encode presumably essential products such as ribosomal proteins. Among these is an ORF encoding a possible alternate or modified RNA polymerase beta prime subunit, predicted to have the expected subunit interaction domains but lacking most catalytic residues. A similar ORF was found in the Thioploca ingrica draft genome, but in no others. In both species they are immediately upstream of putative sensor kinase genes with nearly identical domain structures. In the marine Beggiatoaceae, a role for the TAACTGA repeats in

  14. Abundant Intergenic TAACTGA Direct Repeats and Putative Alternate RNA Polymerase β' Subunits in Marine Beggiatoaceae Genomes: Possible Regulatory Roles and Origins.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequences of several giant marine sulfur-oxidizing bacteria present evidence of a possible post-transcriptional regulatory network that may have been transmitted to or from two distantly related bacteria lineages. The draft genome of a Cand. "Maribeggiatoa" filament from the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) seafloor contains 169 sets of TAACTGA direct repeats and one indirect repeat, with two to six copies per set. Related heptamers are rarely or never found as direct repeats. TAACTGA direct repeats are also found in some other Beggiatoaceae, Thiocystis violascens, a range of Cyanobacteria, and five Bacteroidetes. This phylogenetic distribution suggests they may have been transmitted horizontally, but no mechanism is evident. There is no correlation between total TAACTGA occurrences and repeats per genome. In most species the repeat units are relatively short, but longer arrays of up to 43 copies are found in several Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria. The majority of TAACTGA repeats in the Cand. "Maribeggiatoa" Orange Guaymas (BOGUAY) genome are within several nucleotides upstream of a putative start codon, suggesting they may be binding sites for a post-transcriptional regulator. Candidates include members of the ribosomal protein S1, Csp (cold shock protein), and Csr (carbon storage regulator) families. No pattern was evident in the predicted functions of the open reading frames (ORFs) downstream of repeats, but some encode presumably essential products such as ribosomal proteins. Among these is an ORF encoding a possible alternate or modified RNA polymerase beta prime subunit, predicted to have the expected subunit interaction domains but lacking most catalytic residues. A similar ORF was found in the Thioploca ingrica draft genome, but in no others. In both species they are immediately upstream of putative sensor kinase genes with nearly identical domain structures. In the marine Beggiatoaceae, a role for the TAACTGA repeats in translational

  15. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  16. The catalytic core of RNase P.

    PubMed Central

    Green, C J; Rivera-León, R; Vold, B S

    1996-01-01

    A deletion mutant of the catalytic RNA component of Escherichia coli RNase P missing residues 87-241 retains the ability to interact with the protein component to form a functional catalyst. The deletion of this phylogenetically conserved region significantly increases the Km, indicating that the deleted structures may be important for binding to the precursor tRNA substrate but not for the cleavage reaction. Under some reaction conditions, this RNase P deletion mutant can become a relatively non-specific nuclease, indicating that this RNA's catalytic center may be more exposed. The catalytic core of the RNase P is formed by less than one third of the 377 residues of the RNase P RNA. PMID:8628683

  17. Asymmetric catalytic transformations in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shaoguang; Tumas, W.; Gross, M.F.; Burk, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Supercritical carbon dioxide can be a useful environmentally benign solvent for a wide range of catalytic reactions. We have been exploring the utility of supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction medium for catalytic asymmetric transformations. We will present results on the asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins, ketones, and unsaturated acids by Rh and Ru catalysts containing chiral phosphine ligands using hydrogen or hydrogen transfer agents. We have found that asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation reactions of enamide esters work as well or better in CO{sub 2} than in conventional solvents. We have been able to effect high conversions and ee`s using hydrogen transfer systems such as HCOOH/NEt{sub 3}, We will discuss temperature, pressure and solvent density effects on selectivity and reactivity. Kinetic studies will also be presented in order to understand the enhanced enantioselectivity that we observed in SC CO{sub 2}.

  18. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  19. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brauns, Eike; Morsbach, Eva; Kunz, Sebastian; Baeumer, Marcus; Lang, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additional information about the gas characteristics can be measured and drift effects caused by material shifting or environmental temperature changes can be avoided. In this work a miniaturized catalytic gas sensor which offers a very short response time (<150 ms) was developed. Operation with modulated temperature allows analysis of the signal spectrum with advanced information content, based on the Arrhenius approach. Therefore, a high-precise electronic device was developed, since theory shows that harmonics induced by the electronics must be avoided to generate a comprehensible signal. PMID:25356643

  20. Olefin fractionation and catalytic conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, H.; Hsia, C.H.; Wright, B.S.

    1989-05-23

    A continuous catalytic system is described for converting a fraction of olefinic feedstock comprising ethylene and C/sub 3/+ olefins to heavier liquid hydrocarbon product comprising: (a) means for prefractionating the olefinic feedstock to obtain a gaseous stream rich in ethylene and a liquid stream containing C/sub 3/+ olefin; (b) means for vaporizing and contacting the liquid stream from the prefractionating step with hydrocarbon conversion oligomerization catalyst in a catalytic reactor system to provide a heavier hydrocarbon effluent stream comprising distillate, gasoline and lighter hydrocarbons; (c) means for fractionating the effluent stream to recover distillate, gasoline and lighter hydrocarbon separately; (d) means for recycling at least a portion of the recovered gasoline as a liquid sorption stream to prefractionating step (a); and (e) means for further reacting the recycled gasoline together with sorbed C/sub 3/+ olefin in the catalytic reactor system of step (b).

  1. Controlling the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Kenneth Virgel N; Fall, Yacoub; Petitjean, Laurène; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2014-05-28

    The oxidation of phenols is the subject of extensive investigation, but there are few catalytic aerobic examples that are chemo- and regioselective. Here we describe conditions for the ortho-oxygenation or oxidative coupling of phenols under copper (Cu)-catalyzed aerobic conditions that give rise to ortho-quinones, biphenols or benzoxepines. We demonstrate that each product class can be accessed selectively by the appropriate choice of Cu(I) salt, amine ligand, desiccant and reaction temperature. In addition, we evaluate the effects of substituents on the phenol and demonstrate their influence on selectivity between ortho-oxygenation and oxidative coupling pathways. These results create an important precedent of catalyst control in the catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols and set the stage for future development of catalytic systems and mechanistic investigations. PMID:24784319

  2. Mass transfer in composite catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Langhendries, G.; Claessens, R.; Baron, G.V.

    1996-12-31

    The partial oxidation of cyclohexane was studied in a composite polymer-zeolite catalytic membrane reactor. In a first step the equilibrium and mass transfer properties (swelling, diffusion and sorption) of dense composite membranes were examined. The swelling behavior of the crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) network was determined for several solvents and related to the differences between the Hildebrand solubility parameters of solvent and polymer. Time lag experiments, which enable us to measure simultaneously diffusion and partition coefficients, were carried out on a dense poly(dimethylsiloxane) membrane. A mathematical model describing the mass transfer behavior of these catalytic membranes was derived and validated with experimental data. Mass transfer through composite catalytic membranes can be predicted using the properties of pure catalyst and polymer material, and a single tortuosity factor. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Catalytic nanomotors: fabrication, mechanism, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Zhao, Yiping

    2011-03-01

    Catalytic nanomotors are nano-to-micrometer-sized actuators that carry an on-board catalyst and convert local chemical fuel in solution into mechanical work. The location of this catalyst as well as the geometry of the structure dictate the swimming behaviors exhibited. The nanomotors can occur naturally in organic molecules, combine natural and artificial parts to form hybrid nanomotors or be purely artificial. Fabrication techniques consist of template directed electroplating, lithography, physical vapor deposition, and other advanced growth methods. Various physical and chemical propulsion mechanisms have been proposed to explain the motion behaviors including diffusiophoresis, bubble propulsion, interfacial tension gradients, and self-electrophoresis. The control and manipulation based upon external fields, catalytic alloys, and motion control through thermal modulation are discussed as well. Catalytic nanomotors represent an exciting technological challenge with the end goal being practical functional nanomachines that can perform a variety of tasks at the nanoscale.

  4. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and

  5. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  6. Mind Operational Semantics and Brain Operational Architectonics: A Putative Correspondence

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Giulio; Marchetti, Giorgio; Fingelkurts, Alexander A; Fingelkurts, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    ) of different complexity within OA’s theory: EOMC could correspond to simple OMs, correlators to complex OMs and the correlational network to a set of simple and complex OMs. Finally, a set of experiments is proposed to verify the putative correspondence between OS and OA and prove the existence of an integrated continuum between brain and mind. PMID:21113277

  7. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  8. Putative cryomagma interaction with aerosols deposit at Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Patrice; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Raulin, Francois; Coscia, David; Ramirez, Sandra I.; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Poch, Olivier; Cabane, Michel; Brassé, Coralie

    The largest moon of Saturn, Titan, is known for its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan’s atmosphere are of great astrobiological interest, particularly because of their potential evolution when they reach the surface and may interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma [1]. In this context we have followed the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis (25wt% ammonia-water) of Titan aerosol analogues, that have been qualified as representative of Titan’s aerosols [2]. Indeed the first results obtained by the ACP experiment onboard Huygens probe revealed that the main products obtained after thermolysis of Titan’s collected aerosols, were ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Then performing a direct comparison of the volatiles produced after a thermal treatment done in conditions similar to the ones used by the ACP experiment, we may estimate that the tholins we used are relevant to chemical analogues of Titan’s aerosols, and to note free of oxygen. Taking into account recent studies proposing that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less [3]), and assuming the presence of specific gas species [4, 5], in particular CO2 and H2S, trapped in likely internal ocean, we determine a new probable composition of the cryomagma which could potentially interact with deposited Titan’s aerosols. We then carried out different hydrolyses, taking into account this composition, and we established the influence of the hydrolysis temperature on the organic molecules production. References: [1] Mitri et al., 2008. Resurfacing of Titan by ammonia-water cryomagma. Icarus. 196, 216-224. [2] Coll et al. 2013, Can laboratory tholins mimic the chemistry producing Titan's aerosols? A review in light of ACP experimental results, Planetary and Space Science 77, 91-103. [3] Tobie et al. 2012. Titan’s Bulk Composition Constrained by Cassini-Huygens: implication for internal outgassing. The

  9. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  10. Structure- and context-based analysis of the GxGYxYP family reveals a new putative class of Glycoside Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gut microbiome metagenomics has revealed many protein families and domains found largely or exclusively in that environment. Proteins containing the GxGYxYP domain are over-represented in the gut microbiota, and are found in Polysaccharide Utilization Loci in the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, suggesting their involvement in polysaccharide metabolism, but little else is known of the function of this domain. Results Genomic context and domain architecture analyses support a role for the GxGYxYP domain in carbohydrate metabolism. Sparse occurrences in eukaryotes are the result of lateral gene transfer. The structure of the GxGYxYP domain-containing protein encoded by the BT2193 locus reveals two structural domains, the first composed of three divergent repeats with no recognisable homology to previously solved structures, the second a more familiar seven-stranded β/α barrel. Structure-based analyses including conservation mapping localise a presumed functional site to a cleft between the two domains of BT2193. Matching to a catalytic site template from a GH9 cellulase and other analyses point to a putative catalytic triad composed of Glu272, Asp331 and Asp333. Conclusions We suggest that GxGYxYP-containing proteins constitute a novel glycoside hydrolase family of as yet unknown specificity. PMID:24938123

  11. Comparison of catalytic properties of multiple β-glucosidases of Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Guo, Boyang; Sato, Nobuaki; Biely, Peter; Amano, Yoshihiko; Nozaki, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    Ten putative Trichoderma reesei β-glucosidase (BGL) isozymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and Aspergillus oryzae and purified to homogeneity. Catalytic properties of nine enzymes which showed hydrolytic activity on cellobiose and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG) were investigated. Three BGLs, encoded by the genes cel3A, cel3B, and cel3E, contained a predicted signal peptide, showed higher hydrolytic activity on cello-oligosaccharides than on pNPG, and preferred longer oligosaccharides. Another three putative extracellular BGLs, Cel3B, Cel3F, and Cel3G, and two intracellular enzymes, Cel3C and Cel3D, exhibited preference for pNPG. Intracellular Cel1A showed the highest affinity for cellobiose as a typical cellobiase. Four BGLs, Cel3A, Cel3B, Cel3E, Cel1A, that showed high activity against cello-oligosaccharides were capable of catalyzing transglycosylation reactions from cellobiose, leading to formation of cellotriose and isomeric glucobioses. While Cel3A, Cel3B, and Cel3E synthesized mainly gentiobiose, glycosyl transfer reactions of Cel1A led mainly to sophorose and laminaribiose. Conversion of cellobiose to sophorose by Cel1A reached about 3.6 and 10 % at 1 and 10 % cellobiose concentration, respectively. The formation and persistence of individual cellobiose isomers in incubation mixtures of four BGLs (Cel3A, Cel3B, Cel3E, and Cel1A) with cellobiose correlated well with the k cat values for isomeric glucobioses. Cel1A also showed the lowest sensitivity to inhibition by glucose. Based on all studied catalytic properties, Cel1A appears to be unambiguously the best candidate for site-directed mutations or directed evolution toward improvement of activity, thermostability, and, eventually, efficiency of sophorose synthesis. PMID:26846743

  12. Catalytic Enantioselective Functionalization of Unactivated Terminal Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Morken, James P

    2016-02-18

    Terminal alkenes are readily available functional groups which appear in α-olefins produced by the chemical industry, and they appear in the products of many contemporary synthetic reactions. While the organic transformations that apply to alkenes are amongst the most studied reactions in all of chemical synthesis, the number of reactions that apply to nonactivated terminal alkenes in a catalytic enantioselective fashion is small in number. This Minireview highlights the cases where stereocontrol in catalytic reactions of 1-alkenes is high enough to be useful for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:26764019

  13. Continuous in vitro evolution of catalytic function.

    PubMed

    Wright, M C; Joyce, G F

    1997-04-25

    A population of RNA molecules that catalyze the template-directed ligation of RNA substrates was made to evolve in a continuous manner in the test tube. A simple serial transfer procedure was used to achieve approximately 300 successive rounds of catalysis and selective amplification in 52 hours. During this time, the population size was maintained against an overall dilution of 3 x 10(298). Both the catalytic rate and amplification rate of the RNAs improved substantially as a consequence of mutations that accumulated during the evolution process. Continuous in vitro evolution makes it possible to maintain laboratory "cultures" of catalytic molecules that can be perpetuated indefinitely. PMID:9110984

  14. A premixed hydrogen/oxygen catalytic igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The catalytic ignition of hydrogen and oxygen propellants was studied using a premixing hydrogen/oxygen injector. The premixed injector was designed to eliminate problems associated with catalytic ignition caused by poor propellant mixing in the catalyst bed. Mixture ratio, mass flow rate, and propellant inlet temperature were varied parametrically in testing, and a pulse mode life test of the igniter was conducted. The results of the tests showed that the premixed injector eliminated flame flashback in the reactor and increased the life of the igniter significantly. The results of the experimental program and a comparison with data collected in a previous program are given.

  15. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  16. Continuous in vitro evolution of catalytic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    A population of RNA molecules that catalyze the template-directed ligation of RNA substrates was made to evolve in a continuous manner in the test tube. A simple serial transfer procedure was used to achieve approximately 300 successive rounds of catalysis and selective amplification in 52 hours. During this time, the population size was maintained against an overall dilution of 3 x 10(298). Both the catalytic rate and amplification rate of the RNAs improved substantially as a consequence of mutations that accumulated during the evolution process. Continuous in vitro evolution makes it possible to maintain laboratory "cultures" of catalytic molecules that can be perpetuated indefinitely.

  17. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  18. Intensification of catalytic cracking process by addition of heavy catalytic gasoil

    SciTech Connect

    Serikov, P.Yu.; Zaitseva, N.P.; Smidovich, E.V.

    1987-11-01

    The addition of heavy catalytic gasoil to cat cracker feed as a means of reducing the formation of coke was investigated. A vacuum gasoil was used as the feedstock, and a lube oil solvent extract and heavy catalytic gasoil were used as the activating additives. Data showed that feedstocks with the highest kinetic stability had the lowest coke formation in cracking. Kinetic stability was determined by the viscometric method. Test results show that heavy catalytic gasoil has a greater effect on reducing coke yield than the extract used.

  19. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation. PMID:26004805

  20. DESTRUCTION OF AIR EMISSIONS USING CATALYTIC OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses key emission stream characteristics and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) characteristics that affect the applicability of catalytic oxidation as an air pollution control technique in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and vapor-phase air toxics in an air emi...

  1. Process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexene

    DOEpatents

    Mizuno, Noritaka; Lyon, David K.; Finke, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexenes, to form a variety of oxygenates. The catalyst used in the process is a covalently bonded iridium-heteropolyanion species. The process uses the catalyst in conjunction with a gaseous oxygen containing gas to form 2-cyclohexen-1-ol and also 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  2. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  3. Catalytic desulfurization of industrial waste gases

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, Th.

    1985-07-30

    Industrial waste gases containing objectionable/polluting compounds of sulfur, e.g., H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/ and such organosulfur derivatives as COS, CS/sub 2/ and mercaptans, are catalytically desulfurized, e.g., by Claus process, employing an improved catalyst comprising titanium dioxide and calcium, barium, strontium or magnesium sulfate.

  4. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  5. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  6. Catalytic processes for space station waste conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonover, M. W.; Madsen, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Catalytic techniques for processing waste products onboard space vehicles were evaluated. The goal of the study was the conversion of waste to carbon, wash water, oxygen and nitrogen. However, the ultimate goal is conversion to plant nutrients and other materials useful in closure of an ecological life support system for extended planetary missions. The resulting process studied involves hydrolysis at 250 C and 600 psia to break down and compact cellulose material, distillation at 100 C to remove water, coking at 450 C and atmospheric pressure, and catalytic oxidation at 450 to 600 C and atmospheric pressure. Tests were conducted with a model waste to characterize the hydrolysis and coking processes. An oxidizer reactor was sized based on automotive catalytic conversion experience. Products obtained from the hydrolysis and coking steps included a solid residue, gases, water condensate streams, and a volatile coker oil. Based on the data obtained, sufficient component sizing was performed to make a preliminary comparison of the catalytic technique with oxidation for processing waste for a six-man spacecraft. Wet oxidation seems to be the preferred technique from the standpoint of both component simplicity and power consumption.

  7. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION MERCURY FIELD SAMPLING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A lack of data still exists as to the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and flue gas conditioning on the speciation and removal of mercury (Hg) at power plants. This project investigates the impact that SCR, SNCR, and flue gas...

  8. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION MERCURY FIELD SAMPLING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report details an investigation on the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and flue gas conditioning on the speciation and removal of mercury at power plants. If SCR and/or SNCR systems enhance mercury conversion/capture, t...

  9. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  10. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaqing; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe₂O₃ nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts) and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in "green" environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials' development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis. PMID:26393550