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Sample records for putative g-protein mapping

  1. Cloning of a putative G-protein-coupled receptor from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, L G; Rask, L

    1997-10-15

    We have cloned and characterized a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana that most likely encodes a novel member of the vast superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs). By taking advantage of amino acid sequence similarities between plant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and established G-protein-coupled receptor sequences, a probe was obtained which was used for the screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library. The cDNA which was found is very infrequently represented in the cDNA library, suggesting a low and/or spatially restricted expression. A region of the translated sequence of the cDNA shows the highest similarity to cAMP receptors from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The same region is also similar to that in members of the animal calcitonin family of receptors. Another region of the putative receptor, however, is similar to sequences of serotonin receptors and other receptors of the so-called rhodopsin family of GPCRs. The rhodopsin family has numerous members in higher vertebrate species. Alignments and phylogenetic analyses of the regions of similarity yielded results in accordance with other evolutionary considerations. Our cDNA thus occurred on a distinct major branch in relation to the rest of the rhodopsin family. In relation to the calcitonin family, our cDNA and cAMP receptors occurred together on a distinct major branch but appear to have diverged from each other shortly after their divergence from the rest of the calcitonin family. Other features further argue for a tentative identification of it as a GPCR. It displays seven discrete and strongly predicted transmembrane domains when analyzed in hydropathy plots. The preferred orientation is with the amino terminus towards the outside. It has one Cys residue in extracellular loop 1 and another in extracellular loop 2. Cys residues in these loops are known to form disulfide bridges in many other GPCRs. Finally, it has several fully conserved amino acids that belong to the most conserved

  2. In silico cloning of genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors in a spider mite.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A; Rombauts, Stephane; Grbić, Miodrag

    2012-04-01

    The genome of the spider mite was prospected for the presence of genes coding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors. Fifty one candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or neurohormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of sulfakinin, corazonin, neuroparsin and PTTH. True orthologs of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) were neither found, but there are three genes encoding peptides similar in structure to both AKH and the AKH-corazonin-related peptide. We were also unable to identify the precursors for pigment dispersing factor (PDF) or the recently discovered trissin. However, the spider mite probably does have such genes, as we found their putative receptors. A novel arthropod neuropeptide gene was identified that shows similarity to previously described molluscan neuropeptide genes and was called EFLamide. A total of 65 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were also identified, of these 58 belong to the A-family and 7 to the B-family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 50 of them are closely related to insect GPCRs, which allowed the identification of their putative ligand in 39 cases with varying degrees of certainty. Other spider mite GPCRs however have no identifiable orthologs in the genomes of the four holometabolous insect species best analyzed. Whereas some of the latter have orthologs in hemimetabolous insect species, crustaceans or ticks, for others such arthropod homologs are currently unknown. PMID:22214827

  3. The mapping of yeast's G-protein coupled receptor with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Musashi; Miyachi, Yusuke; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) can measure the adhesion force between a sample and a cantilever while simultaneously applying a rupture force during the imaging of a sample. An AFM should be useful in targeting specific proteins on a cell surface. The present study proposes the use of an AFM to measure the adhesion force between targeting receptors and their ligands, and to map the targeting receptors. In this study, Ste2p, one of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), was chosen as the target receptor. The specific force between Ste2p on a yeast cell surface and a cantilever modified with its ligand, α-factor, was measured and found to be approximately 250 pN. In addition, through continuous measuring of the cell surface, a mapping of the receptors on the cell surface could be performed, which indicated the differences in the Ste2p expression levels. Therefore, the proposed AFM system is accurate for cell diagnosis.

  4. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  5. Isolation and sequencing of a putative promoter region of the murine G protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Hembree, Cambria M; Goodman, Nancy L; Uhl, George R

    2002-02-01

    The expression of the heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (GNB1) is regulated by psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Since the up-regulation appears to be one of the candidate processes of sensitization, it is necessary to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of the GNB1 gene regulation for a better understanding the establishment of sensitization. In the present study, we describe the isolation and nucleotide sequence analysis of the GNB1 gene promoter region. We have isolated approximately 10 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse of GNB1 gene and found potential elements involved in putative transcriptional control of the GNB1, such as AP1, AP2, Sp1, cyclic AMP response element, and nuclear factor kappa B recognition sites, within the sequences 0.3 kb upstream from the putative transcription start site. This region was highly rich in G + C content, but lacked TATA or CATT boxes. Comparing the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone with the human genome databases using the BLAST program a region containing putative exon 1 and promoter of the human GNB1 gene in chromosome 1 was found. The cloning and sequence analysis of an extensive portion of the 5'-flanking regulatory region of the GNB1 gene provides new insights into the factors involved in the regulation by psychostimulants of GNB1 expression. PMID:12180136

  6. Antibody epitopes on g protein-coupled receptors mapped with genetically encoded photoactivatable cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Ray-Saha, Sarmistha; Huber, Thomas; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2014-03-01

    We developed a strategy for creating epitope maps of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) containing photo-cross-linkers. Using human CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) as a model system, we genetically incorporated the photolabile unnatural amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine (azF) at various positions within extracellular loop 2 (EC2). We then mapped the interactions of the azF-CXCR4 variants with mAb 12G5 using targeted loss-of-function studies and photo-cross-linking in whole cells in a microplate-based format. We used a novel variation of a whole cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantitate cross-linking efficiency. 12G5 cross-linked primarily to residues 184, 178, and 189 in EC2 of CXCR4. Mapping of the data to the crystal structure of CXCR4 showed a distinct mAb epitope footprint with the photo-cross-linked residues clustered around the loss-of-function sites. We also used the targeted photo-cross-linking approach to study the interaction of human CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) with PRO 140, a humanized mAb that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus-1 cellular entry, and 2D7. The mAbs produced distinct cross-linking patterns on EC2 of CCR5. PRO 140 cross-linked primarily to residues 174 and 175 at the amino-terminal end of EC2, and 2D7 cross-linked mainly to residues 170, 176, and 184. These results were mapped to the recent crystal structure of CCR5 in complex with maraviroc, showing cross-linked residues at the tip of the maraviroc binding crevice formed by EC2. As a strategy for mapping mAb epitopes on GPCRs, our targeted photo-cross-linking method is complementary to loss-of-function mutagenesis results and should be especially useful for studying mAbs with discontinuous epitopes. PMID:24490954

  7. A Putative G Protein-Coupled Receptor, RDC1, Is a Novel Coreceptor for Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobuaki; Soda, Yasushi; Kanbe, Katsuaki; Liu, Hui-yu; Mukai, Ryozaburo; Kitamura, Toshio; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2000-01-01

    More than 10 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been shown to act as coreceptors for infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We have isolated HIV-1 variants infectious to primary brain-derived CD4-positive cells (BT-3 and BT-20/N) and U87/CD4 glioma cells that are resistant to T-cell line-tropic (T-tropic), macrophage-tropic (M-tropic), and T- and M-tropic (dualtropic) (X4, R5, and R5X4) HIV-1 strains. These primary brain-derived cells were also highly susceptible to HIV-2ROD, HIV-2SBL6669, and SIVmndGB-1. A factor or coreceptor that determines the susceptibility of these brain-derived cells to these HIV and SIV strains has not been fully identified. To identify this coreceptor, we examined amino acid sequences of all known HIV and SIV coreceptors and noticed that tyrosine residues are well conserved in their extracellular amino-terminal domains. By this criterion, we selected 18 GPCRs as candidates of coreceptors for HIV and SIV strains infectious to these brain-derived cells. mRNA expression of an orphan GPCR, RDC1, was detected in the brain-derived cells, the C8166 T-cell line, and peripheral blood lymphocytes, all of which are susceptible to HIV-1 variants, but not in macrophages, which are resistant to them. When a CD4-expressing cell line, NP-2/CD4, which shows strict resistance to infection not only with HIV-1 but also with HIV-2 or SIV, was transduced with the RDC1 gene, the cells became highly susceptible to HIV-2 and SIVmnd strains but to neither M- nor T-tropic HIV-1 strains. The cells also acquired a low susceptibility to the HIV-1 variants. These findings indicate that RDC1 is a novel coreceptor for several HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV strains which infect brain-derived cells. PMID:10623723

  8. A Homology Modeling Study toward the Understanding of Three-dimensional Structure and Putative Pharmacological Profile of the G-Protein Coupled Receptor GPR55

    PubMed Central

    Elbegdorj, Orgil; Westkaemper, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR55 was shown to bind to certain cannabinoid compounds which led to its initial classification as the third type of cannabinoid receptor. Later studies showed that lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) also activated GPR55, in particular 2-arachidonoyl-LPI was proposed to be its endogenous ligand. However, the results of pharmacological studies regarding GPR55 have been quite inconsistent. Despite its contradictory pharmacological profile, GPR55 has been implicated in various disease states including inflammatory and neuropathic pain, metabolic bone diseases, and cancer. Herein, we report the ligand binding properties of GPR55 by applying homology modeling and automated docking algorithms in order to understand its pharmacological profile. The 3D homology model of GPR55 was built based on the Adenosine A2A receptor crystal structure. Docking studies of several types of reported ligands were carried out afterwards. The results indicated that both hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions contributed significantly for its ligand binding and the amino acid residue Lys80 seemed to be the anchor residue for receptor recognition. In addition, its putative agonist and antagonist appeared to recognize different domains of the receptor corresponding to their reported pharmacological activities. PMID:23220281

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae putative G protein, Gtr1p, which forms complexes with itself and a novel protein designated as Gtr2p, negatively regulates the Ran/Gsp1p G protein cycle through Gtr2p.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, N; Noguchi, E; Nishimoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Prp20p and Rna1p are GDP/GTP exchanging and GTPase-activating factors of Gsp1p, respectively, and their mutations, prp20-1 and rna1-1, can both be suppressed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae gtr1-11. We found that gtr1-11 caused a single amino acid substitution in Gtr1p, forming S20L, which is a putative GDP-bound mutant protein, while Gtr1p has been reported to bind to GTP alone. Consistently, gtr1-S20N, another putative GDP-bound mutant, suppressed both prp20-1 and rna1-1. On the other hand, gtr1-Q65L, a putative GTP-bound mutant, was inhibitory to prp20-1 and rna1-1. Thus, the role that Gtr1p plays in vivo appears to depend upon the nucleotide bound to it. Our data suggested that the GTP-bound Gtr1p, but not the GDP-bound Gtr1p, interacts with itself through its C-terminal tail. S. cerevisiae possesses a novel gene, GTR2, which is homologous to GTR1. Gtr2p interacts with itself in the presence of Gtr1p. The disruption of GTR2 suppressed prp20-1 and abolished the inhibitory effect of gtr1-Q65L on prp20-1. This finding, taken together with the fact that Gtr1p-S20L is a putative, inactive GDP-bound mutant, implies that Gtr1p negatively regulates the Ran/Gsp1p GTPase cycle through Gtr2p. PMID:10388807

  10. Mapping functional group free energy patterns at protein occluded sites: nuclear receptors and G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Yu, Wenbo; Raman, E Prabhu; Hershfeld, Alena V; Fang, Lei; Deshpande, Deepak A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-03-23

    Occluded ligand-binding pockets (LBP) such as those found in nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a significant opportunity and challenge for computer-aided drug design. To determine free energies maps of functional groups of these LBPs, a Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo/Molecular Dynamics (GCMC/MD) strategy is combined with the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) methodology. SILCS-GCMC/MD is shown to map functional group affinity patterns that recapitulate locations of functional groups across diverse classes of ligands in the LBPs of the androgen (AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-γ (PPARγ) NRs and the metabotropic glutamate (mGluR) and β2-adreneric (β2AR) GPCRs. Inclusion of protein flexibility identifies regions of the binding pockets not accessible in crystal conformations and allows for better quantitative estimates of relative ligand binding affinities in all the proteins tested. Differences in functional group requirements of the active and inactive states of the β2AR LBP were used in virtual screening to identify high efficacy agonists targeting β2AR in Airway Smooth Muscle (ASM) cells. Seven of the 15 selected ligands were found to effect ASM relaxation representing a 46% hit rate. Hence, the method will be of use for the rational design of ligands in the context of chemical biology and the development of therapeutic agents. PMID:25692383

  11. Mapping Functional Group Free Energy Patterns at Protein Occluded Sites: Nuclear Receptors and G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Occluded ligand-binding pockets (LBP) such as those found in nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a significant opportunity and challenge for computer-aided drug design. To determine free energies maps of functional groups of these LBPs, a Grand-Canonical Monte Carlo/Molecular Dynamics (GCMC/MD) strategy is combined with the Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) methodology. SILCS-GCMC/MD is shown to map functional group affinity patterns that recapitulate locations of functional groups across diverse classes of ligands in the LBPs of the androgen (AR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-γ (PPARγ) NRs and the metabotropic glutamate (mGluR) and β2-adreneric (β2AR) GPCRs. Inclusion of protein flexibility identifies regions of the binding pockets not accessible in crystal conformations and allows for better quantitative estimates of relative ligand binding affinities in all the proteins tested. Differences in functional group requirements of the active and inactive states of the β2AR LBP were used in virtual screening to identify high efficacy agonists targeting β2AR in Airway Smooth Muscle (ASM) cells. Seven of the 15 selected ligands were found to effect ASM relaxation representing a 46% hit rate. Hence, the method will be of use for the rational design of ligands in the context of chemical biology and the development of therapeutic agents. PMID:25692383

  12. Inhibition of small G proteins by clostridium sordellii lethal toxin activates cdc2 and MAP kinase in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Rime, H; Talbi, N; Popoff, M R; Suziedelis, K; Jessus, C; Ozon, R

    1998-12-15

    The lethal toxin (LT) from Clostridium sordellii is a glucosyltransferase that modifies and inhibits small G proteins of the Ras family, Ras and Rap, as well as Rac proteins. LT induces cdc2 kinase activation and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) when microinjected into full-grown Xenopus oocytes. Toxin B from Clostridium difficile, that glucosylates and inactivates Rac proteins, does not induce cdc2 activation, indicating that proteins of the Ras family, Ras and/or Rap, negatively regulate cdc2 kinase activation in Xenopus oocyte. In oocyte extracts, LT catalyzes the incorporation of [14C]glucose into a group of proteins of 23 kDa and into one protein of 27 kDa. The 23-kDa proteins are recognized by anti-Rap1 and anti-Rap2 antibodies, whereas the 27-kDa protein is recognized by several anti-Ras antibodies and probably corresponds to K-Ras. Microinjection of LT into oocytes together with UDP-[14C]glucose results in a glucosylation pattern similar to the in vitro glucosylation, indicating that the 23- and 27-kDa proteins are in vivo substrates of LT. In vivo time-course analysis reveals that the 27-kDa protein glucosylation is completed within 2 h, well before cdc2 kinase activation, whereas the 23-kDa proteins are partially glucosylated at GVBD. This observation suggests that the 27-kDa Ras protein could be the in vivo target of LT allowing cdc2 kinase activation. Interestingly, inactivation of Ras proteins does not prevent the phosphorylation of c-Raf1 and the activation of MAP kinase that occurs normally around GVBD. PMID:9882492

  13. Mapping physiological G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways reveals a role for receptor phosphorylation in airway contraction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sophie J.; Iglesias, Max Maza; Kong, Kok Choi; Butcher, Adrian J.; Plouffe, Bianca; Goupil, Eugénie; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; LeGouill, Christian; Russell, Kirsty; Laporte, Stéphane A.; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Bouvier, Michel; Chung, Kian Fan; Amrani, Yassine; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to initiate a plethora of signaling pathways in vitro. However, it is unclear which of these pathways are engaged to mediate physiological responses. Here, we examine the distinct roles of Gq/11-dependent signaling and receptor phosphorylation-dependent signaling in bronchial airway contraction and lung function regulated through the M3-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR). By using a genetically engineered mouse expressing a G protein-biased M3-mAChR mutant, we reveal the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a role for M3-mAChR phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle contraction in health and in a disease state with relevance to human asthma. Furthermore, this mouse model can be used to distinguish the physiological responses that are regulated by M3-mAChR phosphorylation (which include control of lung function) from those responses that are downstream of G protein signaling. In this way, we present an approach by which to predict the physiological/therapeutic outcome of M3-mAChR–biased ligands with important implications for drug discovery. PMID:27071102

  14. Comparative inter-strain sequence analysis of the putative regulatory region of murine psychostimulant-regulated gene GNB1 (G protein beta 1 subunit gene).

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Nobue; Kitanaka, Junichi; Walther, Donna; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Uhl, George R

    2003-08-01

    We isolated a cDNA clone from a murine genomic library of C57BL/6 strain, carrying 13.8 kb of nucleotides including exon 1 of heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (genetic symbol, GNB1) and 10.6 kb of the 5' flanking region. Sequence comparison with GNB1 gene locus from 129Sv strain revealed a 0.2% divergence in a 13.2 kb common region between these two strains. The divergence consisted of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms, three insertions and one deletion, with 129Sv used as the reference. The exon 1 and the putative regulation elements, such as cyclic AMP response element, AP1, AP2, Sp1 and nuclear factor-kappa B recognition sites, were perfectly conserved. The expression of GNB1 mRNA was significantly increased in mouse striatum 2 h after single methamphetamine administration with an approximately 150% expression level compared with the basal level. In contrast, no change in the expression level was observed in the cerebral cortex. After the chronic methamphetamine treatment regimen, the expression level of GNB1 mRNA did not change in any brain regions examined. These results suggest (1) that the 5' flanking nucleotide sequence of GNB1 gene was strictly conserved for its possible contribution to the same change in the expression level between the mouse strains in response to psychostimulants and (2) that the initial process of development of behavioral sensitization appeared to occur parallel to the significant increase in the expression level of GNB1 gene in the mouse striatum. PMID:14631649

  15. Evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G protein families.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Mustafa, Arshi; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Williams, Michael J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins perform a crucial role as molecular switches controlling various cellular responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Recent data have shown that the vertebrate-like G protein families are found across metazoans and their closest unicellular relatives. However, an overall evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like G proteins, including gene family annotations and in particular mapping individual gene gain/loss events across diverse holozoan lineages is still incomplete. Here, with more expanded invertebrate taxon sampling, we have reconstructed phylogenetic trees for each of the G protein classes/families and provide a robust classification and hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G proteins. Our results further extend the evidence that the common ancestor (CA) of holozoans had at least five ancestral Gα genes corresponding to all major vertebrate Gα classes and contain a total of eight genes including two Gβ and one Gγ. Our results also indicate that the GNAI/O-like gene likely duplicated in the last CA of metazoans to give rise to GNAI- and GNAO-like genes, which are conserved across invertebrates. Moreover, homologs of GNB1-4 paralogon- and GNB5 family-like genes are found in most metazoans and that the unicellular holozoans encode two ancestral Gβ genes. Similarly, most bilaterian invertebrates encode two Gγ genes which include a representative of the GNG gene cluster and a putative homolog of GNG13. Interestingly, our results also revealed key evolutionary events such as the Drosophila melanogaster eye specific Gβ subunit that is found conserved in most arthropods and several previously unidentified species specific expansions within Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gα12/13 classes and the GNB1-4 paralogon. Also, we provide an overall proposed evolutionary scenario on the expansions of all G protein families in vertebrate tetraploidizations. Our robust classification/hierarchy is essential to further

  16. Genetically encoded photo-cross-linkers map the binding site of an allosteric drug on a G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Grunbeck, Amy; Huber, Thomas; Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Goddard, William A; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2012-06-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are dynamic membrane proteins that bind extracellular molecules to transduce signals. Although GPCRs represent the largest class of therapeutic targets, only a small percentage of their ligand-binding sites are precisely defined. Here we describe the novel application of targeted photo-cross-linking using unnatural amino acids to obtain structural information about the allosteric binding site of a small molecule drug, the CCR5-targeted HIV-1 co-receptor blocker maraviroc. PMID:22455376

  17. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  18. Linkage mapping of putative regulator genes of barley grain development characterized by expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Christof; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Wobus, Ulrich; Röder, Marion S

    2009-01-01

    Background Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seed development is a highly regulated process with fine-tuned interaction of various tissues controlling distinct physiological events during prestorage, storage and dessication phase. As potential regulators involved within this process we studied 172 transcription factors and 204 kinases for their expression behaviour and anchored a subset of them to the barley linkage map to promote marker-assisted studies on barley grains. Results By a hierachical clustering of the expression profiles of 376 potential regulatory genes expressed in 37 different tissues, we found 50 regulators preferentially expressed in one of the three grain tissue fractions pericarp, endosperm and embryo during seed development. In addition, 27 regulators found to be expressed during both seed development and germination and 32 additional regulators are characteristically expressed in multiple tissues undergoing cell differentiation events during barley plant ontogeny. Another 96 regulators were, beside in the developing seed, ubiquitously expressed among all tissues of germinating seedlings as well as in reproductive tissues. SNP-marker development for those regulators resulted in anchoring 61 markers on the genetic linkage map of barley and the chromosomal assignment of another 12 loci by using wheat-barley addition lines. The SNP frequency ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 SNP/kb in the parents of the various mapping populations and was 2.3 SNP/kb over all eight lines tested. Exploration of macrosynteny to rice revealed that the chromosomal orders of the mapped putative regulatory factors were predominantly conserved during evolution. Conclusion We identified expression patterns of major transcription factors and signaling related genes expressed during barley ontogeny and further assigned possible functions based on likely orthologs functionally well characterized in model plant species. The combined linkage map and reference expression map of regulators

  19. Magnificent seven: roles of G protein-coupled receptors in extracellular sensing in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaoyang; Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of transmembrane receptors and are responsible for transducing extracellular signals into intracellular responses that involve complex intracellular-signaling networks. This review highlights recent research advances in fungal GPCRs, including classification, extracellular sensing, and G protein-signaling regulation. The involvement of GPCRs in pheromone and nutrient sensing has been studied extensively over the past decade. Following recent advances in fungal genome sequencing projects, a panoply of GPCR candidates has been revealed and some have been documented to play key roles sensing diverse extracellular signals, such as pheromones, sugars, amino acids, nitrogen sources, and even photons. Identification and deorphanization of additional putative GPCRs may require the development of new research tools. Here, we compare research on GPCRs in fungi with information derived from mammalian systems to provide a useful road map on how to better understand ligand–GPCR–G protein interactions in general. We also emphasize the utility of yeast as a discovery tool for systemic studies of GPCRs from other organisms. PMID:18811658

  20. Activators of G Protein Signaling in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a crucial role in regulating signal processing to maintain normal cellular homeostasis, and subtle perturbations in its activity can potentially lead to the pathogenesis of renal disorders or diseases. Cell-surface receptors and accessory proteins, which normally modify and organize the coupling of individual G protein subunits, contribute to the regulation of heterotrimeric G protein activity and their convergence and/or divergence of downstream signaling initiated by effector systems. Activators of G protein signaling (AGS) are a family of accessory proteins that intervene at multiple distinct points during the activation–inactivation cycle of G proteins, even in the absence of receptor stimulation. Perturbations in the expression of individual AGS proteins have been reported to modulate signal transduction pathways in a wide array of diseases and disorders within the brain, heart, immune system, and more recently, the kidney. This review will provide an overview of the expression profile, localization, and putative biologic role of the AGS family in the context of normal and diseased states of the kidney. PMID:25628392

  1. A sweet cycle for Arabidopsis G-proteins: Recent discoveries and controversies in plant G-protein signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Willard, Melinda D; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2008-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are a class of signal transduction proteins highly conserved throughout evolution that serve as dynamic molecular switches regulating the intracellular communication initiated by extracellular signals including sensory information. This property is achieved by a guanine nucleotide cycle wherein the inactive, signaling-incompetent Galpha subunit is normally bound to GDP; activation to signaling-competent Galpha occurs through the exchange of GDP for GTP (typically catalyzed via seven-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled receptors [GPCRs]), which dissociates the Gbetagamma dimer from Galpha-GTP and initiates signal transduction. The hydrolysis of GTP, greatly accelerated by "Regulator of G-protein Signaling" (RGS) proteins, returns Galpha to its inactive GDP-bound form and terminates signaling. Through extensive characterization of mammalian Galpha isoforms, the rate-limiting step in this cycle is currently considered to be the GDP/GTP exchange rate, which can be orders of magnitude slower than the GTP hydrolysis rate. However, we have recently demonstrated that, in Arabidopsis, the guanine nucleotide cycle appears to be limited by the rate of GTP hydrolysis rather than nucleotide exchange. This finding has important implications for the mechanism of sugar sensing in Arabidopsis. We also discuss these data on Arabidopsis G-protein nucleotide cycling in relation to recent reports of putative plant GPCRs and heterotrimeric G-protein effectors in Arabidopsis. PMID:19513240

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Anopheles gambiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Catherine A.; Fox, A. Nicole; Pitts, R. Jason; Kent, Lauren B.; Tan, Perciliz L.; Chrystal, Mathew A.; Cravchik, Anibal; Collins, Frank H.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2002-10-01

    We used bioinformatic approaches to identify a total of 276 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the Anopheles gambiae genome. These include GPCRs that are likely to play roles in pathways affecting almost every aspect of the mosquito's life cycle. Seventy-nine candidate odorant receptors were characterized for tissue expression and, along with 76 putative gustatory receptors, for their molecular evolution relative to Drosophila melanogaster. Examples of lineage-specific gene expansions were observed as well as a single instance of unusually high sequence conservation.

  3. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1–1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:24614119

  4. G-protein-coupled receptor heteromer dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Agnati, Luigi F.; Fuxe, Kjell; Ciruela, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface receptors, and have evolved to detect and transmit a large palette of extracellular chemical and sensory signals into cells. Activated receptors catalyze the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, which modulate the propagation of second messenger molecules and the activity of ion channels. Classically thought to signal as monomers, different GPCRs often pair up with each other as homo- and heterodimers, which have been shown to modulate signaling to G proteins. Here, we discuss recent advances in GPCR heteromer systems involving the kinetics of the early steps in GPCR signal transduction, the dynamic property of receptor–receptor interactions, and how the formation of receptor heteromers modulate the kinetics of G-protein signaling. PMID:21123619

  5. A microsatellite-based genetic linkage map and putative sex-determining genomic regions in Lake Victoria cichlids.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yu; Nikaido, Masato; Kondo, Azusa; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Yoshida, Kohta; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okada, Norihiro

    2015-04-15

    Cichlid fishes in East Africa have undergone extensive adaptive radiation, which has led to spectacular diversity in their morphology and ecology. To date, genetic linkage maps have been constructed for several tilapias (riverine), Astatotilapia burtoni (Lake Tanganyika), and hybrid lines of Lake Malawi cichlids to facilitate genome-wide comparative analyses. In the present study, we constructed a genetic linkage map of the hybrid line of Lake Victoria cichlids, so that maps of cichlids from all the major areas of East Africa will be available. The genetic linkage map shown here is derived from the F2 progeny of an interspecific cross between Haplochromis chilotes and Haplochromis sauvagei and is based on 184 microsatellite and two single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Most of the microsatellite markers used in the present study were originally designed for other genetic linkage maps, allowing us to directly compare each linkage group (LG) among different cichlid groups. We found 25 LGs, the total length of which was 1133.2cM with an average marker spacing of about 6.09cM. Our subsequent linkage mapping analysis identified two putative sex-determining loci in cichlids. Interestingly, one of these two loci is located on cichlid LG5, on which the female heterogametic ZW locus and several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to adaptive evolution have been reported in Lake Malawi cichlids. We also found that V1R1 and V1R2, candidate genes for the fish pheromone receptor, are located very close to the recently detected sex-determining locus on cichlid LG5. The genetic linkage map study presented here may provide a valuable foundation for studying the chromosomal evolution of East African cichlids and the possible role of sex chromosomes in generating their genomic diversity. PMID:25639358

  6. Signaling through G protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα, Gβ/Gγ subunits) constitute one of the most important components of cell signaling cascade. G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) perceive many extracellular signals and transduce them to heterotrimeric G proteins, which further transduce these signals intracellular to appropriate downstream effectors and thereby play an important role in various signaling pathways. GPCRs exist as a superfamily of integral membrane protein receptors that contain seven transmembrane α-helical regions, which bind to a wide range of ligands. Upon activation by a ligand, the GPCR undergoes a conformational change and then activate the G proteins by promoting the exchange of GDP/GTP associated with the Gα subunit. This leads to the dissociation of Gβ/Gγ dimer from Gα. Both these moieties then become free to act upon their downstream effectors and thereby initiate unique intracellular signaling responses. After the signal propagation, the GTP of Gα-GTP is hydrolyzed to GDP and Gα becomes inactive (Gα-GDP), which leads to its re-association with the Gβ/Gγ dimer to form the inactive heterotrimeric complex. The GPCR can also transduce the signal through G protein independent pathway. GPCRs also regulate cell cycle progression. Till to date thousands of GPCRs are known from animal kingdom with little homology among them, but only single GPCR has been identified in plant system. The Arabidopsis GPCR was reported to be cell cycle regulated and also involved in ABA and in stress signaling. Here I have described a general mechanism of signal transduction through GPCR/G proteins, structure of GPCRs, family of GPCRs and plant GPCR and its role. PMID:19826234

  7. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 8 (MAP3K8) Mediates the Signaling Pathway of Estradiol Stimulating Progesterone Production Through G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30) in Mouse Corpus Luteum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Yueqin; Zhang, Di; Liu, Jiali; Gou, Kemian; Cui, Sheng

    2015-05-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient endocrine gland developed from the ovulated follicles, and the most important function is to synthesize and secrete progesterone (P(4)), a key hormone to maintain normal pregnancy and estrous cycle in most mammals. It is known that estrogen has a vital role in stimulating P(4) synthesis in CL, but it still remains unclear about the mechanism of estradiol (E(2)) regulating P(4) production in CL. Our results here first show that all of the CL cells express MAPK 8 (MAP3K8), and the MAP3K8 level is much higher at the midstage than at the early and late stages during CL development. The further functional studies show that the forced inhibition of endogenous MAP3K8 by using MAP3K8 small interfering RNA and MAP3K8 signaling inhibitor (MAP3K8i) in the luteal cells significantly block the P(4) synthesis and neutralize the enhancing effect of E(2) on P(4) production in the CL. In addition, our results here demonstrate that the stimulating effect of E(2) on P(4) synthesis relies on the estrogen no-classical protein-coupled receptor 30, and MAP3K8 is involved in mediating the protein-coupled receptor 30signaling of E(2) affecting P(4) synthesis via stimulating ERK phosphorylation. These novel findings are critical for our understanding the ovary physiology and pathological mechanism. PMID:25763610

  8. Orexin-stimulated MAP kinase cascades are activated through multiple G-protein signalling pathways in human H295R adrenocortical cells: diverse roles for orexins A and B.

    PubMed

    Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Conner, Alex C; Chen, Jing; Kumar, Prashanth; Brown, James E P; Jöhren, Olaf; Lehnert, Hendrik; Stanfield, Peter R; Randeva, Harpal S

    2009-08-01

    Orexins A and B (ORA and ORB) are neuropeptide hormones found throughout the central nervous system and periphery. They are required for a host of physiological processes including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulation, steroidogenesis, appetite control and energy regulation. While some signalling mechanisms have been proposed for individual recombinant orexin receptors in generic mammalian cell types, it is clear that the peripheral effects of orexin are spatially and temporally complex. This study dissects the different G-protein signalling and MAPK pathways activated in a pluripotent human adrenal H295R cell line capable of all the physiological steps involved in steroidogenesis. Both extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 were phosphorylated rapidly with a subsequent decline, in a time- and dose-dependent manner, in response to both ORA and ORB. Conversely, there was little or no direct activation of the ERK5 or JNK pathway. Analysis using signalling and MAPK inhibitors as well as receptor-specific antagonists determined the precise mediators of the orexin response in these cells. Both ERK1/2 and p38 activation were predominantly G(q)- and to a lesser extent G(s)-mediated; p38 activation even had a small G(i)-component. Effects were broadly comparable for both orexin sub-types ORA and ORB and although most of the effects were transmitted through the orexin receptor-1 subtype, we did observe a role for orexin receptor-2-mediated activation of both ERK1/2 and p38. Cortisol secretion also differed in response to ORA and ORB. These data suggest multiple roles for orexin-mediated MAPK activation in an adrenal cell-line, this complexity may help to explain the diverse biological actions of orexins with wide-ranging consequences for our understanding of the mechanisms initiated by these steroidogenic molecules. PMID:19460850

  9. Functional Reconstitution of an Atypical G Protein Heterotrimer and Regulator of G Protein Signaling Protein (RGS1) from Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Janice C.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Jones, Alan M.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that animal heterotrimeric Gαβγ proteins are activated by cell-surface receptors that promote GTP binding to the Gα subunit and dissociation of the heterotrimer. In contrast, the Gα protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtGPA1) can activate itself without a receptor or other exchange factor. It is unknown how AtGPA1 is regulated by Gβγ and the RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) protein AtRGS1, which is comprised of an RGS domain fused to a receptor-like domain. To better understand the cycle of G protein activation and inactivation in plants, we purified and reconstituted AtGPA1, full-length AtRGS1, and two putative Gβγ dimers. We show that the Arabidopsis Gα protein binds to its cognate Gβγ dimer directly and in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Although animal Gβγ dimers inhibit GTP binding to the Gα subunit, AtGPA1 retains fast activation in the presence of its cognate Gβγ dimer. We show further that the full-length AtRGS1 protein accelerates GTP hydrolysis and thereby counteracts the fast nucleotide exchange rate of AtGPA1. Finally, we show that AtGPA1 is less stable in complex with GDP than in complex with GTP or the Gβγ dimer. Molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical studies reveal that altered stability is likely due to increased dynamic motion in the N-terminal α-helix and Switch II of AtGPA1. Thus, despite profound differences in the mechanisms of activation, the Arabidopsis G protein is readily inactivated by its cognate RGS protein and forms a stable, GDP-bound, heterotrimeric complex similar to that found in animals. PMID:21325279

  10. Characterization of oocyte-expressed GDF9 gene in buffalo and mapping of its TSS and putative regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Roy, B; Rajput, S; Raghav, S; Kumar, P; Verma, A; Jain, A; Jain, T; Singh, D; De, S; Goswami, S L; Datta, T K

    2013-05-01

    Summary In spite of emerging evidence about the vital role of GDF9 in determination of oocyte competence, there is insufficient information about its regulation of oocyte-specific expression, particularly in livestock animals. Because of the distinct prominence of buffalo as a dairy animal, the present study was undertaken to isolate and characterize GDF9 cDNA using orthologous primers based on the bovine GDF9 sequence. GDF9 transcripts were found to be expressed in oocytes irrespective of their follicular origin, and shared a single transcription start site (TSS) at -57 base pairs (bp) upstream of ATG. Assignment of the TSS is consistent with the presence of a TATA element at -23 of the TSS mapped in this study. Localization of a buffalo-specific minimal promoter within 320 bp upstream of ATG was consolidated by identification of an E-box element at -113bp. Presence of putative transcription factor binding sites and other cis regulatory elements were analyzed at ~5 kb upstream of TSS. Various germ cell-specific cis-acting regulatory elements (BNCF, BRNF, NR2F, SORY, Foxh1, OCT1, LHXF etc.) have been identified in the 5' flanking region of the buffalo GDF9 gene, including NOBOX DNA binding elements and consensuses E-boxes (CANNTG). Presence of two conserved E-boxes found on buffalo sequence at -520 and -718 positions deserves attention in view of its sequence deviation from other species. Two NOBOX binding elements (NBE) were detected at the -3471 and -203 positions. The fall of the NBE within the putative minimal promoter territory of buffalo GDF9 and its unique non-core binding sequence could have a possible role in the control of the core promoter activity. PMID:22230197

  11. Genomic organization of the murine G protein beta subunit genes and related processed pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, J; Wang, X B; Kitanaka, N; Hembree, C M; Uhl, G R

    2001-12-01

    The functional significance of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) for the many physiological processes including the molecular mechanisms of drug addiction have been described. In investigating the changes of mRNA expression after acute psychostimulant administration, we previously identified a cDNA encoding a G protein beta1 subunit (Gbeta1) that was increased up to four-fold in certain brain regions after administration of psychostimulants. The mouse Gbeta1 gene (the mouse genetic symbol, GNB1) was mapped to chromosome 4, but little was known of its genetic features. To characterize the GNB1 gene further, we have cloned and analyzed the genomic structures of the mouse GNBI gene and its homologous sequences. The GNBI gene spans at least 50 kb, and consists of 12 exons and 11 introns. The exon/intron boundaries were determined and found to follow the GT/AG rule. Exons 3-11 encode the Gbeta1 protein, and the exon 2 is an alternative, resulting in putative two splicing variants. Although intron 11 is additional for GNBI compared with GNB2 and GNB3, the intron positions within the protein coding region of GNB1, GNB2 and GNB3 are identical, suggesting that GNB1 should have diverged from the ancestral gene family earlier than the genes for GNB2 and GNB3. We also found the 5'-truncated processed pseudogenes with 71-89% similarities to GNBI mRNA sequence, suggesting that the truncated cDNA copies, which have been reverse-transcribed from a processed mRNA for GNB1, might have been integrated into several new locations in the mouse genome. PMID:11913780

  12. High resolution micro-XRF maps of iron oxides inside sensory dendrites of putative avian magnetoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkenberg, G.; Fleissner, G. E.; Fleissner, G. U. E.; Schuchardt, K.; Kühbacher, M.; Chalmin, E.; Janssens, K.

    2009-09-01

    Iron mineral containing sensory dendrites in the inner lining of the upper beak of homing pigeons [1] and various bird species [2] are the first candidate structures for an avian magnetic field receptor. A new concept of magnetoreception [3, 4] is based on detailed ultra-structural optical and electron microscopy analyses in combination with synchrotron radiation microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis (micro-XRF) and microscopic X-ray absorption near edge structures (micro-XANES). Several behavioral experiments [5, 6] and first mathematical simulations [6] affirm our avian magnetoreceptor model. The iron minerals inside the dendrites are housed in three different subcellular compartments (bullets, platelets, vesicles), which could be clearly resolved and identified by electron microscopy on ultrathin sections [1, 3]. Micro-XRF and micro-XANES data obtained at HASYLAB beamline L added information about the elemental distribution and Fe speciation [3], but are averaged over the complete dendrite due to limited spatial resolution. Here we present recently performed micro-XRF maps with sub-micrometer resolution (ESRF ID21), which reveal for the first time subcellular structural information from almost bulk-like dendrite sample material. Due to the thickness of 30 μm the microarchitecture of the dendrites can be considered as undisturbed and artefacts introduced by sectioning might be widely reduced.

  13. Established and emerging fluorescence-based assays for G-protein function: heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Jones, Miller B; Shutes, Adam; Yerxa, Benjamin R; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2003-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that couple serpentine receptors to intracellular effector pathways and the regulation of cell physiology. Ligand-bound receptors cause G-protein alpha subunits to bind guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and activate effector pathways. Signal termination is facilitated by the intrinsic GTPase activity of G-protein alpha subunits. Regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the GTPase activity of the G-protein alpha subunit, and thus negatively regulate G-protein-mediated signal transduction. In vitro biochemical assays of heterotrimeric G-proteins commonly include measurements of nucleotide binding, GTPase activity, and interaction with RGS proteins. However, the conventional assays for most of these processes involve radiolabeled guanine nucleotide analogues and scintillation counting. In this article, we focus on fluorescence-based methodologies to study heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit regulation in vitro. Furthermore, we consider the potential of such techniques in high-throughput screening and drug discovery. PMID:12769684

  14. Fine Time Course Expression Analysis Identifies Cascades of Activation and Repression and Maps a Putative Regulator of Mammalian Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Looger, Loren L.; Ohler, Uwe; Capel, Blanche

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, primary sex determination refers to the decision within a bipotential organ precursor to differentiate as a testis or ovary. Bifurcation of organ fate begins between embryonic day (E) 11.0–E12.0 in mice and likely involves a dynamic transcription network that is poorly understood. To elucidate the first steps of sexual fate specification, we profiled the XX and XY gonad transcriptomes at fine granularity during this period and resolved cascades of gene activation and repression. C57BL/6J (B6) XY gonads showed a consistent ∼5-hour delay in the activation of most male pathway genes and repression of female pathway genes relative to 129S1/SvImJ, which likely explains the sensitivity of the B6 strain to male-to-female sex reversal. Using this fine time course data, we predicted novel regulatory genes underlying expression QTLs (eQTLs) mapped in a previous study. To test predictions, we developed an in vitro gonad primary cell assay and optimized a lentivirus-based shRNA delivery method to silence candidate genes and quantify effects on putative targets. We provide strong evidence that Lmo4 (Lim-domain only 4) is a novel regulator of sex determination upstream of SF1 (Nr5a1), Sox9, Fgf9, and Col9a3. This approach can be readily applied to identify regulatory interactions in other systems. PMID:23874228

  15. Chapter Two - Heterotrimeric G Protein Ubiquitination as a Regulator of G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Torres, M

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated regulation of G proteins has been known for over 20 years as a result of discoveries made independently in yeast and vertebrate model systems for pheromone and photoreception, respectively. Since that time, several details underlying the cause and effect of G protein ubiquitination have been determined-including the initiating signals, responsible enzymes, trafficking pathways, and their effects on protein structure, function, interactions, and cell signaling. The collective body of evidence suggests that Gα subunits are the primary targets of ubiquitination. However, longstanding and recent results suggest that Gβ and Gγ subunits are also ubiquitinated, in some cases impacting cell polarization-a process essential for chemotaxis and polarized cell growth. More recently, evidence from mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics coupled with advances in PTM bioinformatics have revealed that protein families representing G protein subunits contain several structural hotspots for ubiquitination-most of which have not been investigated for a functional role in signal transduction. Taken together, our knowledge and understanding of heterotrimeric G protein ubiquitination as a regulator of G protein signaling-despite 20 years of research-is still emerging. PMID:27378755

  16. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  17. The Emerging Mutational Landscape of G-proteins and G-protein Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Vázquez-Prado, José; Kufareva, Irina; Stawiski, Eric W.; Handel, Tracy M.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression and activity of G proteins and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently associated with tumorigenesis. Deep sequencing studies show that 4.2% of tumors carry activating mutations in GNAS (encoding Gαs), and that oncogenic activating mutants in genes encoding Gαq family members (GNAQ or GNA11) are present in ~66% and ~6% of melanomas arising in the eye and skin, respectively. Furthermore, nearly 20% of human tumors harbor mutations in GPCRs. Many human cancer-associated viruses also express constitutively active viral GPCRs. These studies indicate that G proteins, GPCRs and their linked signaling circuitry represent novel therapeutic targets for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:23640210

  18. Do plants contain g protein-coupled receptors?

    PubMed

    Taddese, Bruck; Upton, Graham J G; Bailey, Gregory R; Jordan, Siân R D; Abdulla, Nuradin Y; Reeves, Philip J; Reynolds, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Whether G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exist in plants is a fundamental biological question. Interest in deorphanizing new GPCRs arises because of their importance in signaling. Within plants, this is controversial, as genome analysis has identified 56 putative GPCRs, including G protein-coupled receptor1 (GCR1), which is reportedly a remote homolog to class A, B, and E GPCRs. Of these, GCR2 is not a GPCR; more recently, it has been proposed that none are, not even GCR1. We have addressed this disparity between genome analysis and biological evidence through a structural bioinformatics study, involving fold recognition methods, from which only GCR1 emerges as a strong candidate. To further probe GCR1, we have developed a novel helix-alignment method, which has been benchmarked against the class A-class B-class F GPCR alignments. In addition, we have presented a mutually consistent set of alignments of GCR1 homologs to class A, class B, and class F GPCRs and shown that GCR1 is closer to class A and/or class B GPCRs than class A, class B, or class F GPCRs are to each other. To further probe GCR1, we have aligned transmembrane helix 3 of GCR1 to each of the six GPCR classes. Variability comparisons provide additional evidence that GCR1 homologs have the GPCR fold. From the alignments and a GCR1 comparative model, we have identified motifs that are common to GCR1, class A, B, and E GPCRs. We discuss the possibilities that emerge from this controversial evidence that GCR1 has a GPCR fold. PMID:24246381

  19. GTPase acceleration as the rate-limiting step in Arabidopsis G protein-coupled sugar signaling.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher A; Taylor, J Philip; Gao, Yajun; Kimple, Adam J; Grigston, Jeffrey C; Chen, Jin-Gui; Siderovski, David P; Jones, Alan M; Willard, Francis S

    2007-10-30

    Heterotrimeric G protein signaling is important for cell-proliferative and glucose-sensing signal transduction pathways in the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRGS1 is a seven-transmembrane, RGS domain-containing protein that is a putative membrane receptor for d-glucose. Here we show, by using FRET, that d-glucose alters the interaction between the AtGPA1 and AtRGS1 in vivo. AtGPA1 is a unique heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit that is constitutively GTP-bound given its high spontaneous nucleotide exchange coupled with slow GTP hydrolysis. Analysis of a point mutation in AtRGS1 that abrogates GTPase-accelerating activity demonstrates that the regulation of AtGPA1 GTP hydrolysis mediates sugar signal transduction during Arabidopsis development, in contrast to animals where nucleotide exchange is the limiting step in the heterotrimeric G protein nucleotide cycle. PMID:17951432

  20. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E; Milner, Matthew J; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling. PMID:26157115

  1. Stack Heterotrimeric G Proteins and MAPK Cascades on a RACK.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzong; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are molecular switches that relay intracellular signaling in eukaryotes. Recent studies in plant immunity provide a link between heterotrimeric G proteins and an MAPK cascade via the RACK1 scaffolding proteins. Research also points to a potential regulation of G proteins by cell surface receptors. PMID:26612253

  2. Homologous and unique G protein alpha subunits in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Lochrie, M A; Mendel, J E; Sternberg, P W; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a known G protein alpha subunit, the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha), was isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence of C. elegans Go alpha is 80-87% identical to other Go alpha sequences. An mRNA that hybridizes to the C. elegans Go alpha cDNA can be detected on Northern blots. A C. elegans protein that crossreacts with antibovine Go alpha antibody can be detected on immunoblots. A cosmid clone containing the C. elegans Go alpha gene (goa-1) was isolated and mapped to chromosome I. The genomic fragments of three other C. elegans G protein alpha subunit genes (gpa-1, gpa-2, and gpa-3) have been isolated using the polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding cosmid clones were isolated and mapped to disperse locations on chromosome V. The sequences of two of the genes, gpa-1 and gpa-3, were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences of gpa-1 and gpa-3 are only 48% identical to each other. Therefore, they are likely to have distinct functions. In addition they are not homologous enough to G protein alpha subunits in other organisms to be classified. Thus C. elegans has G proteins that are identifiable homologues of mammalian G proteins as well as G proteins that appear to be unique to C. elegans. Study of identifiable G proteins in C. elegans may result in a further understanding of their function in other organisms, whereas study of the novel G proteins may provide an understanding of unique aspects of nematode physiology. Images PMID:1907494

  3. Crystallization of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Salom, David; Padayatti, Pius S.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Oligomerization is one of several mechanisms that can regulate the activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but little is known about the structure of GPCR oligomers. Crystallography and NMR are the only methods able to reveal the details of receptor–receptor interactions at an atomic level, and several GPCR homodimers already have been described from crystal structures. Two clusters of symmetric interfaces have been identified from these structures that concur with biochemical data, one involving helices I, II, and VIII and the other formed mainly by helices V and VI. In this chapter, we describe the protocols used in our laboratory for the crystallization of rhodopsin and the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR). For bovine rhodopsin, we developed a new purification strategy including a (NH4)2SO4-induced phase separation that proved essential to obtain crystals of photoactivated rhodopsin containing parallel dimers. Crystallization of native bovine rhodopsin was achieved by the classic vapor-diffusion technique. For β2-AR, we developed a purification strategy based on previously published protocols employing a lipidic cubic phase to obtain diffracting crystals of a β2-AR/T4-lysozyme chimera bound to the antagonist carazolol. PMID:24143992

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Myriam; Kancharla, Arun; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Agranovich, Daniel; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest signal-conveying receptor family and mediate many physiological processes, their role in tumor biology is underappreciated. Numerous lines of evidence now associate GPCRs and their downstream signaling targets in cancer growth and development. Indeed, GPCRs control many features of tumorigenesis, including immune cell-mediated functions, proliferation, invasion and survival at the secondary site. Technological advances have further substantiated GPCR modifications in human tumors. Among these are point mutations, gene overexpression, GPCR silencing by promoter methylation and the number of gene copies. At this point, it is imperative to elucidate specific signaling pathways of “cancer driver” GPCRs. Emerging data on GPCR biology point to functional selectivity and “biased agonism”; hence, there is a diminishing enthusiasm for the concept of “one drug per GPCR target” and increasing interest in the identification of several drug options. Therefore, determining the appropriate context-dependent conformation of a functional GPCR as well as the contribution of GPCR alterations to cancer development remain significant challenges for the discovery of dominant cancer genes and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27529230

  5. Competing G protein-coupled receptor kinases balance G protein and β-arrestin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heitzler, Domitille; Durand, Guillaume; Gallay, Nathalie; Rizk, Aurélien; Ahn, Seungkirl; Kim, Jihee; Violin, Jonathan D; Dupuy, Laurence; Gauthier, Christophe; Piketty, Vincent; Crépieux, Pascale; Poupon, Anne; Clément, Frédérique; Fages, François; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Reiter, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are involved in nearly all aspects of chemical communications and represent major drug targets. 7TMRs transmit their signals not only via heterotrimeric G proteins but also through β-arrestins, whose recruitment to the activated receptor is regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this paper, we combined experimental approaches with computational modeling to decipher the molecular mechanisms as well as the hidden dynamics governing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by the angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT1AR) in human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. We built an abstracted ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based model that captured the available knowledge and experimental data. We inferred the unknown parameters by simultaneously fitting experimental data generated in both control and perturbed conditions. We demonstrate that, in addition to its well-established function in the desensitization of G-protein activation, GRK2 exerts a strong negative effect on β-arrestin-dependent signaling through its competition with GRK5 and 6 for receptor phosphorylation. Importantly, we experimentally confirmed the validity of this novel GRK2-dependent mechanism in both primary vascular smooth muscle cells naturally expressing the AT1AR, and HEK293 cells expressing other 7TMRs. PMID:22735336

  6. Discovery of three novel orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Marchese, A; Sawzdargo, M; Nguyen, T; Cheng, R; Heng, H H; Nowak, T; Im, D S; Lynch, K R; George, S R; O'dowd, B F

    1999-02-15

    We have discovered three novel human genes, GPR34, GPR44, and GPR45, encoding family A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The receptor encoded by GPR34 is most similar to the P2Y receptor subfamily, while the receptor encoded by GPR44 is most similar to chemoattractant receptors. The receptor encoded by GPR45 is the mammalian orthologue of a putative lysophosphatidic acid receptor from Xenopus laevis. Partial sequence of GPR34 was discovered during a search of the GenBank database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). This sequence information was used both to isolate the full-length translational open reading frame from a human genomic library and to assemble a contig from additional GPR34 EST cDNAs. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses revealed GPR34 mRNA transcripts in several human and rat brain regions. Also, we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify human genomic DNA using degenerate oligonucleotides designed from sequences encoding transmembrane domains 3 and 7 of opioid and somatostatin receptors. Two PCR products partially encoding novel GPCRs, named GPR44 and GPR45, were discovered and used to isolate the full-length translational open reading frames from a human genomic library. Both GPR44 and GPR45 are expressed in the central nervous system and periphery. For chromosomal localization, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was performed to assign GPR34 to chromosomes 4p12 and Xp11. 3, GPR44 to chromosome 11q12-q13.3, and GPR45 to chromosome 2q11. 1-q12. PMID:10036181

  7. Identification of novel arthropod vector G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The control of vector-borne diseases, such as malaria, dengue fever, and typhus fever is often achieved with the use of insecticides. Unfortunately, insecticide resistance is becoming common among different vector species. There are currently no chemical alternatives to these insecticides because new human-safe classes of molecules have yet to be brought to the vector-control market. The identification of novel targets offer opportunities for rational design of new chemistries to control vector populations. One target family, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has remained relatively under explored in terms of insecticide development. Methods A novel classifier, Ensemble*, for vector GPCRs was developed. Ensemble* was validated and compared to existing classifiers using a set of all known GPCRs from Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Apis Mellifera, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, and Pediculus humanus. Predictions for unidentified sequences from Ae. aegypti, An. gambiae, and Pe. humanus were validated. Quantitative RT-PCR expression analysis was performed on previously-known and newly discovered Ae. aegypti GPCR genes. Results We present a new analysis of GPCRs in the genomes of Ae, aegypti, a vector of dengue fever, An. gambiae, a primary vector of Plasmodium falciparum that causes malaria, and Pe. humanus, a vector of epidemic typhus fever, using a novel GPCR classifier, Ensemble*, designed for insect vector species. We identified 30 additional putative GPCRs, 19 of which we validated. Expression of the newly discovered Ae. aegypti GPCR genes was confirmed via quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion A novel GPCR classifier for insect vectors, Ensemble*, was developed and GPCR predictions were validated. Ensemble* and the validation pipeline were applied to the genomes of three insect vectors (Ae. aegypti, An. gambiae, and Pe. humanus), resulting in the identification of 52 GPCRs not previously identified, of which 11 are predicted GPCRs, and 19 are

  8. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  9. G protein-coupled odorant receptors underlie mechanosensitivity in mammalian olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Timothy; Yu, Yiqun; Grosmaitre, Xavier; Wang, Jue; Santarelli, Lindsey C.; Savigner, Agnes; Qiao, Xin; Wang, Zhenshan; Storm, Daniel R.; Ma, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive cells are essential for organisms to sense the external and internal environments, and a variety of molecules have been implicated as mechanical sensors. Here we report that odorant receptors (ORs), a large family of G protein-coupled receptors, underlie the responses to both chemical and mechanical stimuli in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Genetic ablation of key signaling proteins in odor transduction or disruption of OR–G protein coupling eliminates mechanical responses. Curiously, OSNs expressing different OR types display significantly different responses to mechanical stimuli. Genetic swap of putatively mechanosensitive ORs abolishes or reduces mechanical responses of OSNs. Furthermore, ectopic expression of an OR restores mechanosensitivity in loss-of-function OSNs. Lastly, heterologous expression of an OR confers mechanosensitivity to its host cells. These results indicate that certain ORs are both necessary and sufficient to cause mechanical responses, revealing a previously unidentified mechanism for mechanotransduction. PMID:25550517

  10. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  11. Detection of G Protein-selective G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Conformations in Live Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rabia U.; Ritt, Michael; DeVree, Brian T.; Neubig, Richard R.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2013-01-01

    Although several recent studies have reported that GPCRs adopt multiple conformations, it remains unclear how subtle conformational changes are translated into divergent downstream responses. In this study, we report on a novel class of FRET-based sensors that can detect the ligand/mutagenic stabilization of GPCR conformations that promote interactions with G proteins in live cells. These sensors rely on the well characterized interaction between a GPCR and the C terminus of a Gα subunit. We use these sensors to elucidate the influence of the highly conserved (E/D)RY motif on GPCR conformation. Specifically, Glu/Asp but not Arg mutants of the (E/D)RY motif are known to enhance basal GPCR signaling. Hence, it is unclear whether ionic interactions formed by the (E/D)RY motif (ionic lock) are necessary to stabilize basal GPCR states. We find that mutagenesis of the β2-AR (E/D)RY ionic lock enhances interaction with Gs. However, only Glu/Asp but not Arg mutants increase G protein activation. In contrast, mutagenesis of the opsin (E/D)RY ionic lock does not alter its interaction with transducin. Instead, opsin-specific ionic interactions centered on residue Lys-296 are both necessary and sufficient to promote interactions with transducin. Effective suppression of β2-AR basal activity by inverse agonist ICI 118,551 requires ionic interactions formed by the (E/D)RY motif. In contrast, the inverse agonist metoprolol suppresses interactions with Gs and promotes Gi binding, with concomitant pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Taken together, these studies validate the use of the new FRET sensors while revealing distinct structural mechanisms for ligand-dependent GPCR function. PMID:23629648

  12. Systematic Analysis of Essential Genes Reveals New Regulators of G protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cappell, Steven D.; Baker, Rachael; Skowyra, Dorota; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The yeast pheromone pathway consists of a canonical heterotrimeric G protein and MAP kinase cascade. To identify new signaling components we systematically evaluated 870 essential genes using a library of repressible-promoter strains. Quantitative transcription-reporter and MAPK activity assays were used to identify strains that exhibit altered pheromone sensitivity. Of the 92 newly identified essential genes required for proper G protein signaling, those involved with protein degradation were most highly-represented. Included in this group are members of the SCF (Skp-Cullin-F-Box) ubiquitin ligase complex. Further genetic and biochemical analysis reveals that SCFCdc4 acts together with the Cdc34 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme at the level of the G protein, promotes degradation of the G protein α subunit, Gpa1, in vivo and catalyzes Gpa1 ubiquitination in vitro. These new insights to the G protein signaling network reveal the essential-genome as an untapped resource for identifying new components and regulators of signal transduction pathways. PMID:20542006

  13. Bio::Homology::InterologWalk - A Perl module to build putative protein-protein interaction networks through interolog mapping

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are widely used to generate network models that aim to describe the relationships between proteins in biological systems. The fidelity and completeness of such networks is primarily limited by the paucity of protein interaction information and by the restriction of most of these data to just a few widely studied experimental organisms. In order to extend the utility of existing PPIs, computational methods can be used that exploit functional conservation between orthologous proteins across taxa to predict putative PPIs or 'interologs'. To date most interolog prediction efforts have been restricted to specific biological domains with fixed underlying data sources and there are no software tools available that provide a generalised framework for 'on-the-fly' interolog prediction. Results We introduce Bio::Homology::InterologWalk, a Perl module to retrieve, prioritise and visualise putative protein-protein interactions through an orthology-walk method. The module uses orthology and experimental interaction data to generate putative PPIs and optionally collates meta-data into an Interaction Prioritisation Index that can be used to help prioritise interologs for further analysis. We show the application of our interolog prediction method to the genomic interactome of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We analyse the resulting interaction networks and show that the method proposes new interactome members and interactions that are candidates for future experimental investigation. Conclusions Our interolog prediction tool employs the Ensembl Perl API and PSICQUIC enabled protein interaction data sources to generate up to date interologs 'on-the-fly'. This represents a significant advance on previous methods for interolog prediction as it allows the use of the latest orthology and protein interaction data for all of the genomes in Ensembl. The module outputs simple text files, making it easy to customise the results by

  14. Snapin interacts with G-protein coupled receptor PKR2.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Li, Jie; Liu, Hua-die; Liu, Wei; Feng, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Tao; Li, Jia-Da

    2016-01-15

    Mutations in Prokineticin receptor 2 (PKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome and/or idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, characterized by delayed puberty and infertility. In this study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening by using PKR2 C-terminus (amino acids 333-384) as a bait, and identified Snapin as a novel interaction partner for PKR2. The interaction of Snapin and PKR2 was confirmed in GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We further demonstrated that two α-helix domains in Snapin are required for the interaction. And the interactive motifs of PKR2 were mapped to YFK (343-345) and HWR (351-353), which shared a similar sequence of two aromatic amino acids followed by a basic amino acid. Disruption of Snapin-PKR2 interaction did not affect PKR2 signaling, but increased the ligand-induced degradation, implying a role of Snapin in the trafficking of PKR2. PMID:26687946

  15. Regulation of heartbeat by G protein-coupled ion channels.

    PubMed

    Brown, A M

    1990-12-01

    The coupling of ion channels to receptors by G proteins is the subject of this American Physiological Society Walter B. Cannon Memorial "Physiology in Perspective" Lecture. This subject is particularly appropriate because it includes a molecular explanation of a homeostatic mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system and the latter subject preoccupied Dr. Cannon during most of his career. With the use of reconstitution methods, we and others have shown that heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins couple receptors to ion channels by both membrane-delimited, direct pathways and cytoplasmic second messenger pathways. Furthermore, one set of receptors may be coupled to as many as three different sets of ion channels to form networks. Dual G protein pathways lead to the prediction of biphasic ion current responses in cell signaling, and this prediction was confirmed. In sinoatrial pacemaker cells, the pacemaking hyperpolarization-activated inward current (If) is directly regulated by the G proteins Gs and Go, and the two can act simultaneously. This could explain the classical observation that vagal inhibition of heart rate is greater during sympathetic stimulation. Because deactivation of the muscarinic response occurs much faster than the G protein alpha-subunit hydrolyzes guanosine 5'-triphosphate, we looked for accessory cellular factors. A surprising result was that the small monomeric ras G protein blocked the muscarinic pathway. The significance of this observation is unknown, but it appears that small and large G proteins may interact in ion channel signaling pathways. PMID:1701981

  16. G-protein signaling: back to the future.

    PubMed

    McCudden, C R; Hains, M D; Kimple, R J; Siderovski, D P; Willard, F S

    2005-03-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are intracellular partners of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs act on inactive Galpha.GDP/Gbetagamma heterotrimers to promote GDP release and GTP binding, resulting in liberation of Galpha from Gbetagamma. Galpha.GTP and Gbetagamma target effectors including adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases and ion channels. Signaling is terminated by intrinsic GTPase activity of Galpha and heterotrimer reformation - a cycle accelerated by 'regulators of G-protein signaling' (RGS proteins). Recent studies have identified several unconventional G-protein signaling pathways that diverge from this standard model. Whereas phospholipase C (PLC) beta is activated by Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma, novel PLC isoforms are regulated by both heterotrimeric and Ras-superfamily G-proteins. An Arabidopsis protein has been discovered containing both GPCR and RGS domains within the same protein. Most surprisingly, a receptor-independent Galpha nucleotide cycle that regulates cell division has been delineated in both Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we revisit classical heterotrimeric G-protein signaling and explore these new, non-canonical G-protein signaling pathways. PMID:15747061

  17. A spatial focusing model for G protein signals. Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) protien-mediated kinetic scaffolding.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Huailing; Wade, Susan M; Woolf, Peter J; Linderman, Jennifer J; Traynor, John R; Neubig, Richard R

    2003-02-28

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which can inhibit heterotrimeric G protein pathways. In this study, we provide experimental and theoretical evidence that high concentrations of receptors (as at a synapse) can lead to saturation of GDP-GTP exchange making GTP hydrolysis rate-limiting. This results in local depletion of inactive heterotrimeric G-GDP, which is reversed by RGS GAP activity. Thus, RGS enhances receptor-mediated G protein activation even as it deactivates the G protein. Evidence supporting this model includes a GTP-dependent enhancement of guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS) binding to G(i) by RGS. The RGS domain of RGS4 is sufficient for this, not requiring the NH(2)- or COOH-terminal extensions. Furthermore, a kinetic model including only the GAP activity of RGS replicates the GTP-dependent enhancement of GTPgammaS binding observed experimentally. Finally in a Monte Carlo model, this mechanism results in a dramatic "spatial focusing" of active G protein. Near the receptor, G protein activity is maintained even with RGS due to the ability of RGS to reduce depletion of local Galpha-GDP levels permitting rapid recoupling to receptor and maintained G protein activation near the receptor. In contrast, distant signals are suppressed by the RGS, since Galpha-GDP is not depleted there. Thus, a novel RGS-mediated "kinetic scaffolding" mechanism is proposed which narrows the spatial range of active G protein around a cluster of receptors limiting the spill-over of G protein signals to more distant effector molecules, thus enhancing the specificity of G(i) protein signals. PMID:12446706

  18. G-proteins in etiolated Avena seedlings. Possible phytochrome regulation.

    PubMed

    Romero, L C; Sommer, D; Gotor, C; Song, P S

    1991-05-01

    The molecular mechanism of light signal transduction in plants mediated by the photosensor phytochrome is not well understood. The possibility that phytochrome initiates the signal transduction chain by modulating a G-protein-like receptor is examined in the present work. Etiolated Avena seedlings contain G-proteins as examined in terms of the binding of GTP as well as by cross-reaction with mammalian G-protein antibodies. The binding of GTP was regulated in vivo by red/far-red light. The possible involvement of G-proteins in the phytochrome-mediated signal transduction in etiolated Avena seedlings has been implicated from the study of the light regulated expression of the Cab and phy genes. PMID:1903719

  19. The relationship between cell proliferation and differentiation and mapping of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells during mouse molar development by chasing BrdU-labeling.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuko; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Ohshima, Hayato

    2012-04-01

    Human dental pulp contains adult stem cells. Our recent study demonstrated the localization of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells in the rat developing molar by chasing 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling. However, there are no available data on the localization of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells in the mouse molar. This study focuses on the mapping of putative dental pulp stem/progenitor cells in addition to the relationship between cell proliferation and differentiation in the developing molar using BrdU-labeling. Numerous proliferating cells appeared in the tooth germ and the most active cell proliferation in the mesenchymal cells occurred in the prenatal stages, especially on embryonic Day 15 (E15). Cell proliferation in the pulp tissue dramatically decreased in number by postnatal Day 3 (P3) when nestin-positive odontoblasts were arranged in the cusped areas and disappeared after postnatal Week 1 (P1W). Root dental papilla included numerous proliferating cells during P5 to P2W. Three to four intraperitoneal injections of BrdU were given to pregnant ICR mice and revealed slow-cycling long-term label-retaining cells (LRCs) in the mature tissues of postnatal animals. Numerous dense LRCs postnatally decreased in number and reached a plateau after P1W when they mainly resided in the center of the dental pulp, associating with blood vessels. Furthermore, numerous dense LRCs co-expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers such as STRO-1 and CD146. Thus, dense LRCs in mature pulp tissues were believed to be dental pulp stem/progenitor cells harboring in the perivascular niche surrounding the endothelium. PMID:22370596

  20. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  1. Isolation and fine mapping of 16 novel human zinc finger-encoding cDNAs identify putative candidate genes for developmental and malignant disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Tommerup, N.; Vissing, H.

    1995-05-20

    The authors have isolated and chromosomally fine-mapped 16 novel genes belonging to the human zinc finger Krueppel family (ZNF131-140, 142, 143, 148, 151, 154, and 155), including 1 of the GLI type (ZNF143) and 3 containing a KRAB (Krueppel-associated box) segment (ZNF133, 136, and 140). Based on their map position, several of these ZNF genes are putative candidate genes for both developmental and malignant disorders: ZNF138, ZNF139, and ZNF143 were localized to 7q11.2, 7q21.3-q22.1, and 11p15.3-p15.4, regions involved in deletions and/or translocations associated with Williams syndrome, split hand and foot disease (SHFD1), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, respectively. ZNF133 was localized to 20p11.2, close to, but probably distinct from, the region deleted in Alagille syndrome. Zinc finger genes mapping to regions commonly deleted in solid tumors included ZNF132, 134, 135, 137, 154, and 155, all located on 19q13 (thyroid adenoma), and ZNF151, at 1p36.1-p36.2 (neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and other tumors). In addition, several of the ZNFs mapped to regions implicated in recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in hematological malignancies (ZNF139, 7q21.3-q22.1; ZNF148, 3q21-q22; ZNF151, 1p36.1-p36.2). The study indicates that the number of ZNF genes in human is large and that systematic isolation and mapping of ZNF genes is a straightforward approach for the identification of novel candidate disease genes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Transmission of haplotypes of microsatellite markers rather than single marker alleles in the mapping of a putative type 1 diabetes susceptibility gene (IDDM6).

    PubMed

    Merriman, T R; Eaves, I A; Twells, R C; Merriman, M E; Danoy, P A; Muxworthy, C E; Hunter, K M; Cox, R D; Cucca, F; McKinney, P A; Shield, J P; Baum, J D; Tuomilehto, J; Tuomilehto-Wolf, E; Ionesco-Tirgoviste, C; Joner, G; Thorsby, E; Undlien, D E; Pociot, F; Nerup, J; Ronningen, K S; Bain, S C; Todd, J A

    1998-03-01

    Allelic association methods based on increased transmission of marker alleles will have to be employed for the mapping of complex disease susceptibility genes. However, because the extent of association of single marker alleles with disease is a function of the relative frequency of the allele on disease-associated chromosomes versus non disease-predisposing chromosomes, the most associated marker allele in a region will not necessarily be closest to the disease locus. To overcome this problem we describe a haplotype-based approach developed for mapping of the putative type 1 diabetes susceptibility gene IDDM6. Ten microsatellite markers spanning a 550 kb segment of chromosome 18q21 in the putative IDDM6 region were genotyped in 1708 type 1 diabetic Caucasian families from seven countries. The most likely ancestral diabetogenic chromosome was reconstructed in a stepwise fashion by analysing linkage disequilibrium between a previously defined haplotype of three adjacent markers and the next marker along the chromosome. A plot of transmission from heterozygous parents to affected offspring of single marker alleles present on the ancestral chromosome versus the physical distance between them, was compared with a plot of transmission of haplotypes of groups of three adjacent markers. Analysing transmission of haplotypes largely negated apparent decreases in transmission of single marker alleles. Peak support for association of the D18S487 region with IDDM6 is P = 0.0002 (corrected P = 0.01). The results also demonstrate the utility of polymorphic microsatellite markers to trace and delineate extended and presumably ancient haplotypes in the analysis of common disease and in the search for identical-by-descent chromosome regions that carry an aetiological variant. PMID:9467012

  3. Control of Striatal Signaling by G Protein Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Keqiang; Martemyanov, Kirill A.

    2011-01-01

    Signaling via heterotrimeric G proteins plays a crucial role in modulating the responses of striatal neurons that ultimately shape core behaviors mediated by the basal ganglia circuitry, such as reward valuation, habit formation, and movement coordination. Activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by extracellular signals activates heterotrimeric G proteins by promoting the binding of GTP to their α subunits. G proteins exert their effects by influencing the activity of key effector proteins in this region, including ion channels, second messenger enzymes, and protein kinases. Striatal neurons express a staggering number of GPCRs whose activation results in the engagement of downstream signaling pathways and cellular responses with unique profiles but common molecular mechanisms. Studies over the last decade have revealed that the extent and duration of GPCR signaling are controlled by a conserved protein family named regulator of G protein signaling (RGS). RGS proteins accelerate GTP hydrolysis by the α subunits of G proteins, thus promoting deactivation of GPCR signaling. In this review, we discuss the progress made in understanding the roles of RGS proteins in controlling striatal G protein signaling and providing integration and selectivity of signal transmission. We review evidence on the formation of a macromolecular complex between RGS proteins and other components of striatal signaling pathways, their molecular regulatory mechanisms and impacts on GPCR signaling in the striatum obtained from biochemical studies and experiments involving genetic mouse models. Special emphasis is placed on RGS9-2, a member of the RGS family that is highly enriched in the striatum and plays critical roles in drug addiction and motor control. PMID:21852966

  4. Heterotrimeric G protein signaling in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hama, Taketsugu; Park, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a signalopathy of renal tubular epithelial cells caused by naturally occurring mutations in two distinct genes, polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) and 2 (PKD2). Genetic variants in PKD1, which encodes the polycystin-1 (PC-1) protein, remain the predominant factor associated with the pathogenesis of nearly two-thirds of all patients diagnosed with PKD. Although the relationship between defective PC-1 with renal cystic disease initiation and progression remains to be fully elucidated, there are numerous clinical studies that have focused upon the control of effector systems involving heterotrimeric G protein regulation. A major regulator in the activation state of heterotrimeric G proteins are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are defined by their seven transmembrane-spanning regions. PC-1 has been considered to function as an unconventional GPCR, but the mechanisms by which PC-1 controls signal processing, magnitude, or trafficking through heterotrimeric G proteins remains to be fully known. The diversity of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in PKD is further complicated by the presence of non-GPCR proteins in the membrane or cytoplasm that also modulate the functional state of heterotrimeric G proteins within the cell. Moreover, PC-1 abnormalities promote changes in hormonal systems that ultimately interact with distinct GPCRs in the kidney to potentially amplify or antagonize signaling output from PC-1. This review will focus upon the canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways that have been described in PKD with specific emphasis on which heterotrimeric G proteins are involved in the pathological reorganization of the tubular epithelial cell architecture to exacerbate renal cystogenic pathways. PMID:27199453

  5. Inhibition of receptor/G protein coupling by suramin analogues.

    PubMed

    Beindl, W; Mitterauer, T; Hohenegger, M; Ijzerman, A P; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M

    1996-08-01

    Suramin analogues act as direct antagonists of heterotrimeric G proteins because they block the rate-limiting step of G protein activation (i.e., the dissociation of GDP prebound to the G protein alpha subunit). We have used the human brain A1 adenosine receptor and the rat striatal D2 dopamine receptor, two prototypical Gi/G(o)-coupled receptors, as a model system to test whether the following analogues suppress the receptor-dependent activation of G proteins: 8-(3-nitrobenzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF007), 8-(3-(3-nitrobenzamido)-benzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF018); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene))bis-(1,3,5-naphthalenetr isulfonic acid) (NF023); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene)carbonylimino-(3,1- phenylene)) bis(1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid) (NF037); and suramin. Suramin and its analogues inhibit the formation of the agonist-specific ternary complex (agonist/receptor/G protein). This inhibition is (i) quasicompetitive with respect to agonist binding in that it can be overcome by increasing receptor occupancy but (ii) does not result from an interaction of the analogues with the ligand binding pocket of the receptors because the binding of antagonists or of agonists in the absence of functional receptor/G protein interaction is not affected. In addition to suppressing the spontaneous release of GDP from defined G protein alpha subunits, suramin and its analogues reduce receptor-catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange. The site, to which suramin analogues bind, overlaps with the docking site for the receptor on the G protein alpha subunit. The structure-activity relationships for inhibition of agonist binding to the A1 adenosine receptor (suramin > NF037 > NF023) and of agonist binding to the inhibition D2 dopamine receptor (suramin = NF037 > NF023 > NF018) differ. Thus, NF037 discriminates between the ternary complexes formed by the agonist-liganded D2 dopamine receptors and those formed by the A1 adenosine

  6. Role of regulator of G protein signaling proteins in bone

    PubMed Central

    Keinan, David; Yang, Shuying; Cohen, Robert E.; Yuan, Xue; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are a family with more than 30 proteins that all contain an RGS domain. In the past decade, increasing evidence has indicated that RGS proteins play crucial roles in the regulation of G protein coupling receptors (GPCR), G proteins, and calcium signaling during cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in a variety of tissues. In bone, those proteins modulate bone development and remodeling by influencing various signaling pathways such as GPCR-G protein signaling, Wnt, calcium oscillations and PTH. This review summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the regulation of RGS genes expression, as well as the functions and mechanisms of RGS proteins, especially in regulating GPCR-G protein signaling, Wnt signaling, calcium oscillations signaling and PTH signaling during bone development and remodeling. This review also highlights the regulation of different RGS proteins in osteoblasts, chondrocytes and osteoclasts. The knowledge from the recent advances of RGS study summarized in the review would provide the insights into new therapies for bone diseases. PMID:24389209

  7. Probing heterotrimeric G protein activation: applications to biased ligands

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Colette; Saulière, Aude; Galandrin, Ségolène; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) drive numerous signaling pathways involved in the regulation of a broad range of physiologic processes. Today, they represent the largest target for modern drugs development with potential application in all clinical fields. Recently, the concept of “ligand-directed trafficking” has led to a conceptual revolution in pharmacological theory, thus opening new avenues for drug discovery. Accordingly, GPCRs do not function as simple on-off switch but rather as filters capable of selecting activation of specific signals and thus generating textured responses to ligands, a phenomenon often referred to as ligand-biased signaling. Also, one challenging task today remains optimization of pharmacological assays with increased sensitivity so to better appreciate the inherent texture of ligand responses. However, considering that a single receptor has pleiotropic signalling properties and that each signal can crosstalk at different levels, biased activity remains thus difficult to evaluate. One strategy to overcome these limitations would be examining the initial steps following receptor activation. Even if some G protein-independent functions have been recently described, heterotrimeric G protein activation remains a general hallmark for all GPCRs families and the first cellular event subsequent to agonist binding to the receptor. Herein, we review the different methodologies classically used or recently developed to monitor G protein activation and discuss them in the context of G protein biased -ligands. PMID:22229559

  8. G protein signaling in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Dustin E; Siderovski, David P

    2013-01-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic colitis and systemic amebiasis. Among the known amebic factors contributing to pathogenesis are signaling pathways involving heterotrimeric and Ras superfamily G proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge of the roles of heterotrimeric G protein subunits, Ras, Rho and Rab GTPase families in E. histolytica pathogenesis, as well as of their downstream signaling effectors and nucleotide cycle regulators. Heterotrimeric G protein signaling likely modulates amebic motility and attachment to and killing of host cells, in part through activation of an RGS-RhoGEF (regulator of G protein signaling–Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor) effector. Rho family GTPases, as well as RhoGEFs and Rho effectors (formins and p21-activated kinases) regulate the dynamic actin cytoskeleton of E. histolytica and associated pathogenesis-related cellular processes, such as migration, invasion, phagocytosis and evasion of the host immune response by surface receptor capping. A remarkably large family of 91 Rab GTPases has multiple roles in a complex amebic vesicular trafficking system required for phagocytosis and pinocytosis and secretion of known virulence factors, such as amebapores and cysteine proteases. Although much remains to be discovered, recent studies of G protein signaling in E. histolytica have enhanced our understanding of parasitic pathogenesis and have also highlighted possible targets for pharmacological manipulation. PMID:23519208

  9. Probing heterotrimeric G protein activation: applications to biased ligands.

    PubMed

    Denis, Colette; Saulière, Aude; Galandrin, Segolene; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) drive numerous signaling pathways involved in the regulation of a broad range of physiologic processes. Today, they represent the largest target for modern drugs development with potential application in all clinical fields. Recently, the concept of "ligand-directed trafficking" has led to a conceptual revolution in pharmacological theory, thus opening new avenues for drug discovery. Accordingly, GPCRs do not function as simple on-off switch but rather as filters capable of selecting the activation of specific signals and thus generating texture responses to ligands, a phenomenon often referred to as ligand-biased signaling. Also, one challenging task today remains optimization of pharmacological assays with increased sensitivity so to better appreciate the inherent texture of ligands. However, considering that a single receptor has pleiotropic signaling properties and that each signal can crosstalk at different levels, biased activity remains thus difficult to evaluate. One strategy to overcome these limitations would be examining the initial steps following receptor activation. Even, if some G protein independent functions have been recently described, heterotrimeric G protein activation remains a general hallmark for all GPCRs families and the first cellular event subsequent to agonist binding to the receptor. Herein, we review the different methodologies classically used or recently developed to monitor G protein activation and discussed them in the context of G protein biased-ligands. PMID:22229559

  10. Nanobody stabilization of G protein coupled receptor conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Steyaert, Jan; K Kobilka, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology during the past four years. Several obstacles to generating diffraction quality crystals of GPCRs have been overcome by combining innovative methods ranging from protein engineering to lipid-based screens and microdiffraction technology. The initial GPCR structures represent energetically stable inactive-state conformations. However, GPCRs signal through different G protein isoforms or G protein-independent effectors upon ligand binding suggesting the existence of multiple ligand-specific active states. These active-state conformations are unstable in the absence of specific cytosolic signaling partners representing new challenges for structural biology. Camelid single chain antibody fragments (nanobodies) show promise for stabilizing active GPCR conformations and as chaperones for crystallogenesis. PMID:21782416

  11. Oligomeric forms of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Oligomerization is a general characteristic of cell membrane receptors that is shared by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) together with their G protein partners. Recent studies of these complexes, both in vivo and in purified reconstituted forms, unequivocally support this contention for GPCRs, perhaps with only rare exceptions. As evidence has evolved from experimental cell lines to more relevant in vivo studies and from indirect biophysical approaches to well defined isolated complexes of dimeric receptors alone and complexed with G proteins, there is an expectation that the structural basis of oligomerization and the functional consequences for membrane signaling will be elucidated. Oligomerization of cell membrane receptors is fully supported by both thermodynamic calculations and the selectivity and duration of signaling required to reach targets located in various cellular compartments. PMID:20538466

  12. Heterotrimeric G protein signalling in the plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Chen, Jin-Gui; Botella, José Ramón; Jones, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising α-, β-and γ-subunits, perceive extracellular stimuli through cell surface receptors, and transmit signals to ion channels, enzymes and other effector proteins to affect numerous cellular behaviours. In plants, G proteins have structural similarities to the corresponding molecules in animals but transmit signals by atypical mechanisms and effector proteins to control growth, cell proliferation, defence, stomate movements, channel regulation, sugar sensing and some hormonal responses. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular regulation of plant G proteins, their effectors and the physiological functions studied mainly in two model organisms: Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also look at recent progress on structural analyses, systems biology and evolutionary studies. PMID:23536550

  13. Monitoring G protein activation in cells with BRET

    PubMed Central

    Masuho, Ikuo; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Live-cell assays based on fluorescence and luminescence are now indispensable tools for the study of G protein signaling. Assays based on fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) have been particularly valuable for monitoring changes in second messengers, protein-protein interactions, and protein conformation. Here we describe a BRET assay that monitors the release of free Gβγ dimers after activation of heterotrimers containing Gα subunits from all four G protein subfamilies. This assay provides useful kinetic and pharmacological information with reasonably high throughput using standard laboratory equipment. PMID:26260597

  14. Mapping and validation of Xanthomonas citri subsp citri genes regulated by putative plant-inducible promoter box (PIP-box).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, F M S; Oliveira, J C F; Laia, M L; Jacob, T R; Ferreira, R M; Ferro, M I T; Tezza, R I D; Zingaretti, S M; Silva, C F; Ferro, J A

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp citri (Xac), is a major disease affecting citriculture worldwide, because of the susceptibility of the host and the lack of efficient control methods. Previous studies have reported that some genes of phytopathogenic bacteria possess a consensus nucleotide sequence (TTCGC...N15...TTCGC) designated the "plant-inducible-promoter box" (PIP box) located in the promoter region, which is responsible for activating the expression of pathogenicity and virulence factors when the pathogen is in contact with the host plant. In this study, we mapped and investigated the expression of 104 Xac genes associated with the PIP box sequences using a macroarray analysis. Xac gene expression was observed during in vitro (Xac grown for 12 or 20 h in XAM1 induction medium) or in vivo (bacteria grown in orange leaves for 3 to 5 days) infection conditions. Xac grown in non-induction NB liquid medium was used as the control. cDNA was isolated from bacteria grown under the different conditions and hybridized to the macroarray, and 32 genes differentially expressed during the infection period (in vitro or in vivo induction) were identified. The macroarray results were validated for some of the genes through semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and the functionality of the PIP box-containing promoter was demonstrated by activating b-glucuronidase reporter gene activity by the PIP box-containing promoter region during Xac-citrus host interaction. PMID:27173329

  15. Identification of putative candidate genes for red rot resistance in sugarcane (Saccharum species hybrid) using LD-based association mapping.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram K; Banerjee, Nandita; Khan, M S; Yadav, Sonia; Kumar, Sanjeev; Duttamajumder, S K; Lal, Ram Ji; Patel, Jinesh D; Guo, H; Zhang, Dong; Paterson, Andrew H

    2016-06-01

    Red rot is a serious disease of sugarcane caused by the fungus Colletotrichum falcatum that has a colossal damage potential. The fungus, prevalent mainly in the Indian sub-continent, keeps on producing new pathogenic strains leading to breakdown of resistance in newly released varieties and hence the deployment of linked markers for marker-assisted selection for resistance to this disease can fine tune the breeding programme. This study based on a panel of 119 sugarcane genotypes fingerprinted for 944 SSR alleles was undertaken with an aim to identify marker-trait associations (MTAs) for resistance to red rot. Mixed linear model containing population structure and kinship as co-factor detected four MTAs that were able to explain 10-16 % of the trait variation, individually. Among the four MTAs, EST sequences diagnostic of three could be BLAST searched to the sorghum genome with significant sequence homology. Several genes encoding important plant defence related proteins, viz., cytochrome P450, Glycerol-3-phosphate transporter-1, MAP Kinase-4, Serine/threonine-protein kinase, Ring finger domain protein and others were localized to the vicinity of these MTAs. These positional candidate genes are worth of further investigation and possibly these could contribute directly to red rot resistance, and may find a potential application in marker-assisted sugarcane breeding. PMID:26961118

  16. Putative Thinopyrum intermedium-derived stripe rust resistance gene Yr50 maps on wheat chromosome arm 4BL.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Chang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yang, Zujun; Li, Xin; Jia, Juqing; Zhan, Haixian; Guo, Huijuan; Wang, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    Stripe rust-resistant wheat introgression line CH223 was developed by crossing the resistant partial amphiploid TAI7047 derived from Thinopyrum intermedium with susceptible cultivars. The resistance is effective against all the existing Chinese stripe rust races, including the most widely virulent and predominant pathotypes CYR32 and CYR33. Cytological analyses using GISH detected no chromosomal segments from Th. intermedium. It was presumed that the segment was too small to be detected. Normal bivalent pairing at meiosis in CH223 and its hybrids confirmed its stability. Genetic analysis of the F(1), F(2), F(3) and BC(1) populations from crosses of CH223 with susceptible lines indicated that resistance was controlled by a single dominant gene. The resistance gene was mapped using an F(2:3) population from Taichung 29/CH223. The gene was linked to five co-dominant genomic SSR markers, Xgwm540, Xbarc1096, Xwmc47, Xwmc310 and Xgpw7272, and flanked by Xbarc1096 and Xwmc47 at 8.0 and 7.2 cM, respectively. Using the Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic and ditelosomic lines, the polymorphic markers and the resistance gene were assigned to chromosome arm 4BL. As no permanently named stripe rust resistance genes had been assigned to chromosome 4BL, this new resistance gene is designated Yr50. The gene, together with the identified closely linked markers, could be used in marker-assisted selection to combine two or more resistance genes in a single genotype. PMID:23052018

  17. Alpha-Bulges in G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    van der Kant, Rob; Vriend, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Agonist binding is related to a series of motions in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that result in the separation of transmembrane helices III and VI at their cytosolic ends and subsequent G protein binding. A large number of smaller motions also seem to be associated with activation. Most helices in GPCRs are highly irregular and often contain kinks, with extensive literature already available about the role of prolines in kink formation and the precise function of these kinks. GPCR transmembrane helices also contain many α-bulges. In this article we aim to draw attention to the role of these α-bulges in ligand and G-protein binding, as well as their role in several aspects of the mobility associated with GPCR activation. This mobility includes regularization and translation of helix III in the extracellular direction, a rotation of the entire helix VI, an inward movement of the helices near the extracellular side, and a concerted motion of the cytosolic ends of the helices that makes their orientation appear more circular and that opens up space for the G protein to bind. In several cases, α-bulges either appear or disappear as part of the activation process. PMID:24806342

  18. Wnt signalling: the case of the 'missing' G-protein.

    PubMed

    Malbon, Craig C

    2011-02-01

    Wnt signalling remains a hot topic for cell signalling sleuthhounds. The trail of signalling downstream of the seven-transmembrane segment Frizzleds, which bind Wnt ligands, is replete of clues [e.g. LPR5/6 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5/6), G-proteins or Dishevelled] and yet remains the 'final problem'. Although the heptahelical nature of Frizzleds places them well within a populous family of G-protein-coupled receptors, resistance to this theme has waxed and waned amid increasing demands for 'proof'. The Wnt Homepage (http://www.stanford.edu/group/nusselab/cgi-bin/wnt/) has acted as a dynamic real-time arbiter of the controversy, highlighted by the appearance and later the disappearance of the G-protein from its central diagramming and tabulations. A recent publication in this issue of the Biochemical Journal offers a solution to the 'final problem', demonstrating under native conditions that Frizzleds expressed in mammalian brain preparations act functionally to catalyse guanine-nucleotide exchange in response to stimulation with Wnt3a. Lensed from the fictional character of Sherlock Holmes, The Case of the Missing G-Protein is investigated. PMID:21235522

  19. G-protein coupled receptor-mediated nutrient sensing and developmental control in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Neil Andrew; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick; Caldana, Camila; Mah, Jae-Hyung; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2015-10-01

    Nutrient sensing and utilisation are fundamental for all life forms. As heterotrophs, fungi have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms for sensing and taking up various nutrients. Despite its importance, only a limited number of nutrient receptors and their corresponding ligands have been identified in fungi. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of transmembrane receptors. The Aspergillus nidulans genome encodes 16 putative GPCRs, but only a few have been functionally characterised. Our previous study showed the increased expression of an uncharacterised putative GPCR, gprH, during carbon starvation. GprH appears conserved throughout numerous filamentous fungi. Here, we reveal that GprH is a putative receptor involved in glucose and tryptophan sensing. The absence of GprH results in a reduction in cAMP levels and PKA activity upon adding glucose or tryptophan to starved cells. GprH is pre-formed in conidia and is increasingly active during carbon starvation, where it plays a role in glucose uptake and the recovery of hyphal growth. GprH also represses sexual development under conditions favouring sexual fruiting and during carbon starvation in submerged cultures. In summary, the GprH nutrient-sensing system functions upstream of the cAMP-PKA pathway, influences primary metabolism and hyphal growth, while represses sexual development in A. nidulans. PMID:26179439

  20. Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus: Putative Functional Variants Differentially Bind FOXA1 and E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kerstin B.; O’Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carlebur, Saskia; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Prathalingham, Radhika; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; de Santiago, Ines; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias, Jose I.; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dur, Christina C.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Ditsch, Nina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Dörk, Thilo; Helbig, Sonja; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har; Phuah, Sze-Yee; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hartef; Eriksson, Kimael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Lim, Wei-Yen; Buhari, Shaik A.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Fostira, Florentia; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ERα to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease. PMID:24290378

  1. The Role of Inhibitory G Proteins and Regulators of G Protein Signaling in the in vivo Control of Heart Rate and Predisposition to Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Richard; Opel, Aaisha; Tinker, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins and the control of heart rate. The activation of cell signaling pathways involving inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins acts to slow the heart rate via modulation of ion channels. A large number of Regulators of G protein signalings (RGSs) can act as GTPase accelerating proteins to inhibitory G proteins and thus it is important to understand the network of RGS\\G-protein interaction. We will review our recent findings on in vivo heart rate control in mice with global genetic deletion of various inhibitory G protein alpha subunits. We will discuss potential central and peripheral contributions to the phenotype and the controversies in the literature. PMID:22783193

  2. The Role of Inhibitory G Proteins and Regulators of G Protein Signaling in the in vivo Control of Heart Rate and Predisposition to Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ang, Richard; Opel, Aaisha; Tinker, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins and the control of heart rate. The activation of cell signaling pathways involving inhibitory heterotrimeric G proteins acts to slow the heart rate via modulation of ion channels. A large number of Regulators of G protein signalings (RGSs) can act as GTPase accelerating proteins to inhibitory G proteins and thus it is important to understand the network of RGS\\G-protein interaction. We will review our recent findings on in vivo heart rate control in mice with global genetic deletion of various inhibitory G protein alpha subunits. We will discuss potential central and peripheral contributions to the phenotype and the controversies in the literature. PMID:22783193

  3. G Protein Activation without a GEF in the Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Matthews, Melissa; Bradford, William; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Jones, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Animal heterotrimeric G proteins are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF), typically seven transmembrane receptors that trigger GDP release and subsequent GTP binding. In contrast, the Arabidopsis thaliana G protein (AtGPA1) rapidly activates itself without a GEF and is instead regulated by a seven transmembrane Regulator of G protein Signaling (7TM-RGS) protein that promotes GTP hydrolysis to reset the inactive (GDP-bound) state. It is not known if this unusual activation is a major and constraining part of the evolutionary history of G signaling in eukaryotes. In particular, it is not known if this is an ancestral form or if this mechanism is maintained, and therefore constrained, within the plant kingdom. To determine if this mode of signal regulation is conserved throughout the plant kingdom, we analyzed available plant genomes for G protein signaling components, and we purified individually the plant components encoded in an informative set of plant genomes in order to determine their activation properties in vitro. While the subunits of the heterotrimeric G protein complex are encoded in vascular plant genomes, the 7TM-RGS genes were lost in all investigated grasses. Despite the absence of a Gα-inactivating protein in grasses, all vascular plant Gα proteins examined rapidly released GDP without a receptor and slowly hydrolyzed GTP, indicating that these Gα are self-activating. We showed further that a single amino acid substitution found naturally in grass Gα proteins reduced the Gα-RGS interaction, and this amino acid substitution occurred before the loss of the RGS gene in the grass lineage. Like grasses, non-vascular plants also appear to lack RGS proteins. However, unlike grasses, one representative non-vascular plant Gα showed rapid GTP hydrolysis, likely compensating for the loss of the RGS gene. Our findings, the loss of a regulatory gene and the retention of the “self-activating” trait, indicate the existence of divergent

  4. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E.; Milner, Matthew J.; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling. PMID:26157115

  5. Integration of G Protein α (Gα) Signaling by the Regulator of G Protein Signaling 14 (RGS14)*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nicole E.; Goswami, Devrishi; Branch, Mary Rose; Ramineni, Suneela; Ortlund, Eric A.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Hepler, John R.

    2015-01-01

    RGS14 contains distinct binding sites for both active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) forms of Gα subunits. The N-terminal regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain binds active Gαi/o-GTP, whereas the C-terminal G protein regulatory (GPR) motif binds inactive Gαi1/3-GDP. The molecular basis for how RGS14 binds different activation states of Gα proteins to integrate G protein signaling is unknown. Here we explored the intramolecular communication between the GPR motif and the RGS domain upon G protein binding and examined whether RGS14 can functionally interact with two distinct forms of Gα subunits simultaneously. Using complementary cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that RGS14 forms a stable complex with inactive Gαi1-GDP at the plasma membrane and that free cytosolic RGS14 is recruited to the plasma membrane by activated Gαo-AlF4−. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer studies showed that RGS14 adopts different conformations in live cells when bound to Gα in different activation states. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry revealed that RGS14 is a very dynamic protein that undergoes allosteric conformational changes when inactive Gαi1-GDP binds the GPR motif. Pure RGS14 forms a ternary complex with Gαo-AlF4− and an AlF4−-insensitive mutant (G42R) of Gαi1-GDP, as observed by size exclusion chromatography and differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange. Finally, a preformed RGS14·Gαi1-GDP complex exhibits full capacity to stimulate the GTPase activity of Gαo-GTP, demonstrating that RGS14 can functionally engage two distinct forms of Gα subunits simultaneously. Based on these findings, we propose a working model for how RGS14 integrates multiple G protein signals in host CA2 hippocampal neurons to modulate synaptic plasticity. PMID:25666614

  6. Identification of an Ascaris G protein-coupled acetylcholine receptor with atypical muscarinic pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Michael J; Sayegh, Laura; El-Shehabi, Fouad; Song, Chuanzhe; Zamanian, Mostafa; Woods, Debra J; Day, Tim A; Ribeiro, Paula

    2009-09-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the nematode nervous system and induces its effects through interaction with both ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The structure, pharmacology and physiological importance of LGICs have been appreciably elucidated in model nematodes, including parasitic species where they are targets for anthelmintic drugs. Significantly less, however, is understood about nematode ACh GPCRs, termed GARs (G protein-linked ACh receptors). What is known comes from the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans as no GARs have been characterized from parasitic species. Here we clone a putative GAR from the pig gastrointestinal nematode Ascaris suum with high structural homology to the C. elegans receptor GAR-1. Our GPCR, dubbed AsGAR-1, is alternatively spliced and expressed in the head and tail of adult worms but not in dorsal or ventral body wall muscle, or the ovijector. ACh activated AsGAR-1 in a concentration-dependent manner but the receptor was not activated by other small neurotransmitters. The classical muscarinic agonists carbachol, arecoline, oxotremorine M and bethanechol were also AsGAR-1 agonists but pilocarpine was ineffective. AsGAR-1 activation by ACh was partially antagonized by the muscarinic blocker atropine but pirenzepine and scopolamine were largely ineffective. Certain biogenic amine GPCR antagonists were also found to block AsGAR-1. Our conclusion is that Ascaris possesses G protein-coupled ACh receptors that are homologous in structure to those present in C. elegans, and that although they have some sequence homology to vertebrate muscarinic receptors, their pharmacology is atypically muscarinic. PMID:19327362

  7. Identification of an Ascaris G protein-coupled acetylcholine receptor with atypical muscarinic pharmacology★

    PubMed Central

    Kimber, Michael J.; Sayegh, Laura; El-Shehabi, Fouad; Song, Chuanzhe; Zamanian, Mostafa; Woods, Debra J.; Day, Tim A.; Ribeiro, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the nematode nervous system and induces its effects through interaction with both ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The structure, pharmacology and physiological importance of LGICs have been appreciably elucidated in model nematodes, including parasitic species where they are targets for anthelmintic drugs. Significantly less, however, is understood about nematode ACh GPCRs, termed GARs (G protein-linked ACh receptors). What is known comes from the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans as no GARs have been characterized from parasitic species. Here we clone a putative GAR from the pig gastrointestinal nematode Ascaris suum with high structural homology to the C. elegans receptor GAR-1. Our GPCR, dubbed AsGAR-1, isalternatively spliced and expressed in the head and tail of adult worms but not in dorsal or ventralbody wall muscle, or the ovijector. ACh activated AsGAR-1 in a concentration-dependent manner but the receptor was not activated by other small neurotransmitters. The classical muscarinic agonists carbachol, arecoline, oxotremorine M and bethanechol were also AsGAR-1 agonists but pilocarpine was ineffective. AsGAR-1 activation by ACh was partially antagonized by the muscarinic blocker atropine but pirenzepine and scopolamine were largely ineffective. Certain biogenic amine GPCR antagonists were also found to block AsGAR-1. Our conclusion is that Ascaris possesses G protein-coupled ACh receptors that are homologous in structure to thosepresent in C. elegans, and that although they have some sequence homology to vertebrate muscarinic receptors, their pharmacology is atypically muscarinic. PMID:19327362

  8. Allosteric Modulation of G Protein Coupled Receptors by Cytoplasmic, Transmembrane and Extracellular Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) bind diverse classes of ligands, and depending on the receptor, these may bind in their transmembrane or the extracellular domains, demonstrating the principal ability of GPCRs to bind ligand in either domains. Most recently, it was also observed that small molecule ligands can bind in the cytoplasmic domain, and modulate binding and response to extracellular or transmembrane ligands. Thus, all three domains in GPCRs are potential sites for allosteric ligands, and whether a ligand is allosteric or orthosteric depends on the receptor. Here, we will review the evidence supporting the presence of putative binding pockets in all three domains of GPCRs and discuss possible pathways of communication between these pockets. PMID:24009470

  9. G protein-coupled receptor heteromers as new targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    We now have a significant amount of experimental evidence that indicates that G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization, including homo- and heteromerization, is a general phenomenon. Receptor heteromers possess unique biochemical characteristics that are demonstrably different from those of its individual units. These properties include allosteric modulation(s) between units, changes in ligand recognition, G protein-coupling and trafficking. The discovery of GPCR oligomers have been related to the parallel discovery and application of a variety of resonance energy transfer (RET) techniques, such as bioluminescence, fluorescence and sequential RET (BRET, FRET and SRET, respectively), time-resolved FRET (T-FRET) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) microscopy. However, RET techniques are difficult to implement in native tissues. For receptor heteromers, indirect approaches, such as the determination of a unique biochemical characteristic ("biochemical fingerprint"), permit their identification in native tissues and their use as targets for drug development. Dopamine and opioid receptor heteromers are the focus of intense research which is related to the possible multiple applications of their putative ligands in pathological conditions, which include basal ganglia disorders, schizophrenia and drug addiction. PMID:20691958

  10. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Exchange in Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Ron O.; Mildorf, Thomas J.; Hilger, Daniel; Manglik, Aashish; Borhani, David W.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Philippsen, Ansgar; Villanueva, Nicolas; Yang, Zhongyu; Lerch, Michael T.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Shaw, David E.

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) relay diverse extracellular signals into cells by catalyzing nucleotide release from heterotrimeric G proteins, but the mechanism underlying this quintessential molecular signaling event has remained unclear. Here we use atomic-level simulations to elucidate the nucleotide-release mechanism. We find that the G protein α subunit Ras and helical domains—previously observed to separate widely upon receptor binding to expose the nucleotide-binding site—separate spontaneously and frequently even in the absence of a receptor. Domain separation is necessary but not sufficient for rapid nucleotide release. Rather, receptors catalyze nucleotide release by favoring an internal structural rearrangement of the Ras domain that weakens its nucleotide affinity. We use double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy and protein engineering to confirm predictions of our computationally determined mechanism. PMID:26089515

  11. G-protein coupled receptor kinases in inflammation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Packiriswamy, Nandakumar; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) are serine/threonine protein kinases originally discovered for their role in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) phosphorylation. Recent studies have demonstrated a much broader function for this kinase family including phosphorylation of cytosolic substrates involved in cell signaling pathways stimulated by GPCRs as well as non-GPCRs. In addition, GRKs modulate signaling via phosphorylation-independent functions. Because of these various biochemical functions, GRKs have been shown to affect critical physiological and pathophysiological processes and thus are considered as drug targets in diseases such as heart failure. Role of GRKs in inflammation and inflammatory diseases is an evolving area of research and several studies including work from our lab in the recent years have demonstrated critical role of GRKs in the immune system. In this review we discuss the classical and the newly emerging functions of GRKs in the immune system and their role in inflammation and disease processes. PMID:26226012

  12. Applications of molecular replacement to G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Kobilka, Brian K.; Weis, William I.

    2013-11-01

    The use of molecular replacement in solving the structures of G protein-coupled receptors is discussed, with specific examples being described in detail. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large class of integral membrane proteins involved in regulating virtually every aspect of human physiology. Despite their profound importance in human health and disease, structural information regarding GPCRs has been extremely limited until recently. With the advent of a variety of new biochemical and crystallographic techniques, the structural biology of GPCRs has advanced rapidly, offering key molecular insights into GPCR activation and signal transduction. To date, almost all GPCR structures have been solved using molecular-replacement techniques. Here, the unique aspects of molecular replacement as applied to individual GPCRs and to signaling complexes of these important proteins are discussed.

  13. Conformational Fluctuations in G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael F.

    2014-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise almost 50% of pharmaceutical drug targets, where rhodopsin is an important prototype and occurs naturally in a lipid membrane. Rhodopsin photoactivation entails 11-cis to all-trans isomerization of the retinal cofactor, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Two important questions are: (1) Is rhodopsin is a simple two-state switch? Or (2) does isomerization of retinal unlock an activated conformational ensemble? For an ensemble-based activation mechanism (EAM) a role for conformational fluctuations is clearly indicated. Solid-state NMR data together with theoretical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations detect increased local mobility of retinal after light activation. Resultant changes in local dynamics of the cofactor initiate large-scale fluctuations of transmembrane helices that expose recognition sites for the signal-transducing G-protein. Time-resolved FTIR studies and electronic spectroscopy further show the conformational ensemble is strongly biased by the membrane lipid composition, as well as pH and osmotic pressure. A new flexible surface model (FSM) describes how the curvature stress field of the membrane governs the energetics of active rhodopsin, due to the spontaneous monolayer curvature of the lipids. Furthermore, influences of osmotic pressure dictate that a large number of bulk water molecules are implicated in rhodopsin activation. Around 60 bulk water molecules activate rhodopsin, which is much larger than the number of structural waters seen in X-ray crystallography, or inferred from studies of bulk hydrostatic pressure. Conformational selection and promoting vibrational motions of rhodopsin lead to activation of the G-protein (transducin). Our biophysical data give a paradigm shift in understanding GPCR activation. The new view is: dynamics and conformational fluctuations involve an ensemble of substates that activate the cognate G-protein in the amplified visual

  14. Benzimidazole analogs inhibit respiratory syncytial virus G protein function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carrie W; Atkins, Colm; Pathak, Ashish; Gilbert, Brian E; Noah, James W

    2015-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a highly contagious Paramyxovirus that infects most children by age two, generating an estimated 75,000-125,000 hospitalizations in the U.S. annually. hRSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants and children under 1year of age, with significant mortality among high-risk groups. A regulatory agency-approved vaccine is not available, and existing prophylaxis and therapies are limited to use in high-risk pediatric patients; thus additional therapies are sorely needed. Here, we identify a series of benzimidazole analogs that inhibit hRSV infection in vitro with high potency, using a previously-reported high-throughput screening assay. The lead compound, SRI 29365 (1-[6-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl]methyl-1H-benzimidazole), has an EC50 of 66μM and a selectivity >50. We identified additional compounds with varying potencies by testing commercially-available chemical analogs. Time-of-addition experiments indicated that SRI 29365 effectively inhibits viral replication only if present during the early stages of viral infection. We isolated a virus with resistance to SRI 29365 and identified mutations in the transmembrane domain of the viral G protein genomic sequence that suggested that the compound inhibits G-protein mediated attachment of hRSV to cells. Additional experiments with multiple cell types indicated that SRI 29365 antiviral activity correlates with the binding of cell surface heparin by full-length G protein. Lastly, SRI 29365 did not reduce hRSV titers or morbidity/mortality in efficacy studies using a cotton rat model. Although SRI 29365 and analogs inhibit hRSV replication in vitro, this work suggests that the G-protein may not be a valid drug target in vivo. PMID:26116756

  15. G Protein Activation Stimulates Phospholipase D Signaling in Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Munnik, T.; Arisz, S. A.; De Vrije, T.; Musgrave, A.

    1995-01-01

    We provide direct evidence for phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in plants by showing that this enzyme is stimulated by the G protein activators mastoparan, ethanol, and cholera toxin. An in vivo assay for PLD activity in plant cells was developed based on the use of a "reporter alcohol" rather than water as a transphosphatidylation substrate. The product was a phosphatidyl alcohol, which, in contrast to the normal product phosphatidic acid, is a specific measure of PLD activity. When 32P-labeled cells were treated with 0.1% n-butanol, 32P-phosphatidyl butanol (32P-PtdBut) was formed in a time-dependent manner. In cells treated with any of the three G protein activators, the production of 32P-PtdBut was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The G protein involved was pertussis toxin insensitive. Ethanol could activate PLD but was itself consumed by PLD as transphosphatidylation substrate. In contrast, secondary alcohols (e.g., sec-butyl alcohol) activated PLD but did not function as substrate, whereas tertiary alcohols did neither. Although most of the experiments were performed with the green alga Chlamydomonas eugametos, the relevance for higher plants was demonstrated by showing that PLD in carnation petals could also be activated by mastoparan. The results indicate that PLD activation must be considered as a potential signal transduction mechanism in plants, just as in animals. PMID:12242371

  16. G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Surface Display and Biosensor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurchie, Edward; Leifert, Wayne

    Signal transduction by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) underpins a multitude of physiological processes. Ligand recognition by the receptor leads to the activation of a generic molecular switch involving heterotrimeric G-proteins and guanine nucleotides. With growing interest and commercial investment in GPCRs in areas such as drug targets, orphan receptors, high-throughput screening of drugs and biosensors, greater attention will focus on assay development to allow for miniaturization, ultrahigh-throughput and, eventually, microarray/biochip assay formats that will require nanotechnology-based approaches. Stable, robust, cell-free signaling assemblies comprising receptor and appropriate molecular switching components will form the basis of future GPCR/G-protein platforms, which should be able to be adapted to such applications as microarrays and biosensors. This chapter focuses on cell-free GPCR assay nanotechnologies and describes some molecular biological approaches for the construction of more sophisticated, surface-immobilized, homogeneous, functional GPCR sensors. The latter points should greatly extend the range of applications to which technologies based on GPCRs could be applied.

  17. Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors and neuronal functions.

    PubMed

    Gainetdinov, Raul R; Premont, Richard T; Bohn, Laura M; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Caron, Marc G

    2004-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have proven to be the most highly favorable class of drug targets in modern pharmacology. Over 90% of nonsensory GPCRs are expressed in the brain, where they play important roles in numerous neuronal functions. GPCRs can be desensitized following activation by agonists by becoming phosphorylated by members of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Phosphorylated receptors are then bound by arrestins, which prevent further stimulation of G proteins and downstream signaling pathways. Discussed in this review are recent progress in understanding basics of GPCR desensitization, novel functional roles, patterns of brain expression, and receptor specificity of GRKs and beta arrestins in major brain functions. In particular, screening of genetically modified mice lacking individual GRKs or beta arrestins for alterations in behavioral and biochemical responses to cocaine and morphine has revealed a functional specificity in dopamine and mu-opioid receptor regulation of locomotion and analgesia. An important and specific role of GRKs and beta arrestins in regulating physiological responsiveness to psychostimulants and morphine suggests potential involvement of these molecules in certain brain disorders, such as addiction, Parkinson's disease, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, the utility of a pharmacological strategy aimed at targeting this GPCR desensitization machinery to regulate brain functions can be envisaged. PMID:15217328

  18. Using melanopsin to study G protein signaling in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    McGregor, K M; Bécamel, C; Marin, P; Andrade, R

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the central nervous system (CNS) has been hampered by the limited availability of tools allowing for the study of their signaling with precise temporal control. To overcome this, we tested the utility of the bistable mammalian opsin melanopsin to examine G protein signaling in CNS neurons. Specifically, we used biolistic (gene gun) approaches to transfect melanopsin into cortical pyramidal cells maintained in organotypic slice culture. Whole cell recordings from transfected neurons indicated that application of blue light effectively activated the transfected melanopsin to elicit the canonical biphasic modulation of membrane excitability previously associated with the activation of GPCRs coupling to Gαq-11 Remarkably, full mimicry of exogenous agonist concentration could be obtained with pulses as short as a few milliseconds, suggesting that their triggering required a single melanopsin activation-deactivation cycle. The resulting temporal control over melanopsin activation allowed us to compare the activation kinetics of different components of the electrophysiological response. We also replaced the intracellular loops of melanopsin with those of the 5-HT2A receptor to create a light-activated GPCR capable of interacting with the 5-HT2A receptor interacting proteins. The resulting chimera expressed weak activity but validated the potential usefulness of melanopsin as a tool for the study of G protein signaling in CNS neurons. PMID:27306679

  19. Surface plasmon resonance applied to G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus; Gorshkova, Inna

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are integral membrane proteins that transmit signals from external stimuli to the cell interior via activation of GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) thereby mediating key sensorial, hormonal, metabolic, immunological, and neurotransmission processes. Elucidating their structure and mechanism of interaction with extracellular and intracellular binding partners is of fundamental importance and highly relevant to rational design of new effective drugs. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a method of choice for studying biomolecular interactions at interfaces because measurements take place in real-time and do not require labeling of any of the interactants. However, due to the particular challenges imposed by the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins and the great diversity of receptor-stimulating ligands, the application of this technique to characterize interactions of GPCR is still in the developmental phase. Here we give an overview of the principle of SPR and analyze current approaches for the preparation of the sensor chip surface, capture and stabilization of GPCR, and experimental design to characterize their interaction with ligands, G proteins and specific antibodies. PMID:24466506

  20. G-protein-dependency of orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2016-08-01

    Multiple signalling pathways for orexin receptors have been discovered, and most thoroughly mapped in Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells. It is also known that orexin receptors can couple to the G-protein families Gi, Gs and Gq. However, the connection between the G-proteins and the downstream signals is only vaguely established, and we now set out to resolve this for human orexin receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells. Adenylyl cyclase (AC), phospholipase A2, C and D, and diacylglycerol lipase activities were assessed by precursor radiolabelling and chromatographic separation, and calcium by fluorescent methods. Pertussis toxin, cholera toxin and the cyclic depsipeptide, UBO-QIC a.k.a. FR900359, were used to assess the involvement of Gi-, Gs- and Gq-family G-proteins, respectively. Calcium elevations as well as activation of the phospholipases and diacylglycerol lipase were dependent on Gq, as they were fully blocked by UBO-QIC. The low-potency AC activation fully depended on Gs. Surprisingly, the assumed Gi-dependent inhibition of AC was (fully or partially) inhibited by UBO-QIC, in opposition to the previous findings of no sensitivity of Gi proteins to UBO-QIC. Orexin receptor signalling is indeed mostly Gq-driven in CHO-K1 cells, even with respect to the less clearly mapped cascades such as phospholipase A2 and C and calcium influx, underlining the importance of Gq even under physiological conditions. AC regulation warrants more studies. PMID:27237973

  1. Heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gγ13 is critical to olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Ponissery-Saidu, Samsudeen; Yee, Karen; Wang, Hong; Chen, Meng-Ling; Iguchi, Naoko; Zhang, Genhua; Jiang, Ping; Reisert, Johannes; Huang, Liquan

    2013-01-01

    The activation of G-protein-coupled olfactory receptors on the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) triggers a signaling cascade, which is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein consisting of α, β and γ subunits. Although its α subunit, Gαolf, has been identified and well characterized, the identities of its β and γ subunits and their function in olfactory signal transduction, however, have not been well established yet. We and others have found the expression of Gγ13 in the olfactory epithelium, particularly in the cilia of the OSNs. In this study, we generated a conditional gene knockout mouse line to specifically nullify Gγ13 expression in the olfactory marker protein-expressing OSNs. Immunohistochemical and Western blot results showed that Gγ13 subunit was indeed eliminated in the mutant mice’s olfactory epithelium. Intriguingly, Gαolf, β1 subunits, Ric-8B and CEP290 proteins were also absent in the epithelium whereas the presence of the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase III remained largely unaltered. Electro-olfactogram studies showed that the mutant animals had greatly reduced responses to a battery of odorants including three presumable pheromones. Behavioral tests indicated that the mutant mice had a remarkably reduced ability to perform an odor-guided search task although their motivation and agility seemed normal. Our results indicate that Gαolf exclusively forms a functional heterotrimeric G protein with Gβ1 and Gγ13 in OSNs, mediating olfactory signal transduction. The identification of the olfactory G protein’s βγ moiety has provided a novel approach to understanding the feedback regulation of olfactory signal transduction pathways as well as the control of subcellular structures of OSNs. PMID:23637188

  2. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation. PMID:24646224

  3. G protein-coupled receptors in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Nambi, Ponnal; Aiyar, Nambi

    2003-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important drug discovery targets such that compounds targeted against GPCRs represent the single largest drug class currently on the market. With the revolutionary advances in human genome sciences and the identification of numerous orphan GPCRs, it is even more important to identify ligands for these orphan GPCRs so that their physiological and pathological roles can be delineated. To this end, major pharmaceutical industries are investing enormous amounts of time and money to achieve this object. This review is a bird's eye view on the various aspects of GPCRs in drug discovery. PMID:15090195

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Major Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Lisa A.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2007-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying psychiatric illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia remain incompletely understood, there is increasing clinical, pharmacologic, and genetic evidence that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play critical roles in these disorders and their treatments. This perspectives paper reviews and synthesizes the available data. Dysfunction of multiple neurotransmitter and neuropeptide GPCRs in frontal cortex and limbic-related regions, such as the hippocampus, hypothalamus and brainstem, likely underlies the complex clinical picture that includes cognitive, perceptual, affective and motoric symptoms. The future development of novel agents targeting GPCR signaling cascades remains an exciting prospect for patients refractory to existing therapeutics. PMID:17078926

  5. Covalent agonists for studying G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Dietmar; Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Hiller, Christine; Zhang, Cheng; Hübner, Harald; Kobilka, Brian K.; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide important insights into the architecture and function of these important drug targets. However, the crystallization of GPCRs in active states is particularly challenging, requiring the formation of stable and conformationally homogeneous ligand-receptor complexes. Native hormones, neurotransmitters, and synthetic agonists that bind with low affinity are ineffective at stabilizing an active state for crystallogenesis. To promote structural studies on the pharmacologically highly relevant class of aminergic GPCRs, we here present the development of covalently binding molecular tools activating Gs-, Gi-, and Gq-coupled receptors. The covalent agonists are derived from the monoamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, and histamine, and they were accessed using a general and versatile synthetic strategy. We demonstrate that the tool compounds presented herein display an efficient covalent binding mode and that the respective covalent ligand-receptor complexes activate G proteins comparable to the natural neurotransmitters. A crystal structure of the β2-adrenoreceptor in complex with a covalent noradrenaline analog and a conformationally selective antibody (nanobody) verified that these agonists can be used to facilitate crystallogenesis. PMID:25006259

  6. Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor export trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chunmin; Filipeanu, Catalin M.; Duvernay, Matthew T.; Wu, Guangyu

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a superfamily of cell-surface receptors which share a common topology of seven transmembrane domains and modulate a variety of cell functions through coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins by responding to a vast array of stimuli. The magnitude of cellular response elicited by a given signal is dictated by the level of GPCR expression at the plasma membrane, which is the balance of elaborately regulated endocytic and exocytic trafficking. This review will cover recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanism underlying anterograde transport of the newly synthesized GPCRs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. We will focus on recently identified motifs involved in GPCR exit from the ER and the Golgi, GPCR folding in the ER and the rescue of misfolded receptors from within, GPCR-interacting proteins that modulate receptor cell-surface targeting, pathways that mediate GPCR traffic, and the functional role of export in controlling GPCR signaling. PMID:17074298

  7. Oncotargeting G proteins: The Hippo in the room.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaodong; Chen, Qianming; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2014-11-30

    The core components of the Hippo pathway are conserved from flies to mammals. In humans, these include a kinase cascade initiated by the Hippo kinase MST1/2 associated with the adaptor protein WW45/SAV1, and LATS1/2 in complex with MOB1, which in turn, phosphorylates and inhibits the mammalian transcription co-activator YAP and its related protein TAZ. YAP plays a critical role in organ size control during development, and its persistent nuclear localization and activation contributes to multiple human malignancies. The mechanisms driving YAP activation in most cancers, however, are often not clearly understood. In recent studies, we and Guan's team found that YAP activation represents a key molecular event contributing to uveal melanoma, the most frequent ocular malignancy in adults. Uveal melanoma growth is driven by gain-of-function mutations in GNAQ or GNA11 oncogenes, encoding persistently active G protein α subunits of the Gq family. As the signaling capacity of G proteins and their coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been extensively investigated, these findings provided an opportunity to identify cancer-associated mechanisms resulting in YAP activation, and to explore whether YAP represents a suitable oncotarget for cancer treatment. PMID:25526026

  8. Model Organisms in G Protein-Coupled Receptor Research.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, Tobias; Barr, Maureen M; Bruchas, Michael R; Ewer, John; Griffith, Leslie C; Maiellaro, Isabella; Taghert, Paul H; White, Benjamin H; Monk, Kelly R

    2015-09-01

    The study of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has benefited greatly from experimental approaches that interrogate their functions in controlled, artificial environments. Working in vitro, GPCR receptorologists discovered the basic biologic mechanisms by which GPCRs operate, including their eponymous capacity to couple to G proteins; their molecular makeup, including the famed serpentine transmembrane unit; and ultimately, their three-dimensional structure. Although the insights gained from working outside the native environments of GPCRs have allowed for the collection of low-noise data, such approaches cannot directly address a receptor's native (in vivo) functions. An in vivo approach can complement the rigor of in vitro approaches: as studied in model organisms, it imposes physiologic constraints on receptor action and thus allows investigators to deduce the most salient features of receptor function. Here, we briefly discuss specific examples in which model organisms have successfully contributed to the elucidation of signals controlled through GPCRs and other surface receptor systems. We list recent examples that have served either in the initial discovery of GPCR signaling concepts or in their fuller definition. Furthermore, we selectively highlight experimental advantages, shortcomings, and tools of each model organism. PMID:25979002

  9. Computational methods for studying G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Bartuzi, Damian; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The functioning of GPCRs is classically described by the ternary complex model as the interplay of three basic components: a receptor, an agonist, and a G protein. According to this model, receptor activation results from an interaction with an agonist, which translates into the activation of a particular G protein in the intracellular compartment that, in turn, is able to initiate particular signaling cascades. Extensive studies on GPCRs have led to new findings which open unexplored and exciting possibilities for drug design and safer and more effective treatments with GPCR targeting drugs. These include discovery of novel signaling mechanisms such as ligand promiscuity resulting in multitarget ligands and signaling cross-talks, allosteric modulation, biased agonism, and formation of receptor homo- and heterodimers and oligomers which can be efficiently studied with computational methods. Computer-aided drug design techniques can reduce the cost of drug development by up to 50%. In particular structure- and ligand-based virtual screening techniques are a valuable tool for identifying new leads and have been shown to be especially efficient for GPCRs in comparison to water-soluble proteins. Modern computer-aided approaches can be helpful for the discovery of compounds with designed affinity profiles. Furthermore, homology modeling facilitated by a growing number of available templates as well as molecular docking supported by sophisticated techniques of molecular dynamics and quantitative structure-activity relationship models are an excellent source of information about drug-receptor interactions at the molecular level. PMID:26928552

  10. GPCRDB: an information system for G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Vignir; Vroling, Bas; van der Kant, Rob; Li, Kang; Vriend, Gert; Gloriam, David

    2014-01-01

    For the past 20 years, the GPCRDB (G protein-coupled receptors database; http://www.gpcr.org/7tm/) has been a 'one-stop shop' for G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-related data. The GPCRDB contains experimental data on sequences, ligand-binding constants, mutations and oligomers, as well as many different types of computationally derived data, such as multiple sequence alignments and homology models. The GPCRDB also provides visualization and analysis tools, plus a number of query systems. In the latest GPCRDB release, all multiple sequence alignments, and >65,000 homology models, have been significantly improved, thanks to a recent flurry of GPCR X-ray structure data. Tools were introduced to browse X-ray structures, compare binding sites, profile similar receptors and generate amino acid conservation statistics. Snake plots and helix box diagrams can now be custom coloured (e.g. by chemical properties or mutation data) and saved as figures. A series of sequence alignment visualization tools has been added, and sequence alignments can now be created for subsets of sequences and sequence positions, and alignment statistics can be produced for any of these subsets. PMID:24304901

  11. G protein-coupled receptors as promising cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; An, Su; Ward, Richard; Yang, Yang; Guo, Xiao-Xi; Li, Wei; Xu, Tian-Rui

    2016-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate an array of fundamental biological processes, such as growth, metabolism and homeostasis. Specifically, GPCRs are involved in cancer initiation and progression. However, compared with the involvement of the epidermal growth factor receptor in cancer, that of GPCRs have been largely ignored. Recent findings have implicated many GPCRs in tumorigenesis, tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. Moreover, GPCRs contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a microenvironment which is permissive for tumor formation and growth, including effects upon surrounding blood vessels, signaling molecules and the extracellular matrix. Thus, GPCRs are considered to be among the most useful drug targets against many solid cancers. Development of selective ligands targeting GPCRs may provide novel and effective treatment strategies against cancer and some anticancer compounds are now in clinical trials. Here, we focus on tumor related GPCRs, such as G protein-coupled receptor 30, the lysophosphatidic acid receptor, angiotensin receptors 1 and 2, the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and gastrin releasing peptide receptor. We also summarize their tissue distributions, activation and roles in tumorigenesis and discuss the potential use of GPCR agonists and antagonists in cancer therapy. PMID:27000991

  12. A knockout mutation of a constitutive GPCR in Tetrahymena decreases both G-protein activity and chemoattraction.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Thomas J; Coleman, Kevin D; Hennessey, Todd M

    2011-01-01

    Although G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a common element in many chemosensory transduction pathways in eukaryotic cells, no GPCR or regulated G-protein activity has yet been shown in any ciliate. To study the possible role for a GPCR in the chemoresponses of the ciliate Tetrahymena, we have generated a number of macronuclear gene knockouts of putative GPCRs found in the Tetrahymena Genome database. One of these knockout mutants, called G6, is a complete knockout of a gene that we call GPCR6 (TTHERM_00925490). Based on sequence comparisons, the Gpcr6p protein belongs to the Rhodopsin Family of GPCRs. Notably, Gpcr6p shares highest amino acid sequence homologies to GPCRs from Paramecium and several plants. One of the phenotypes of the G6 mutant is a decreased responsiveness to the depolarizing ions Ba²⁺ and K⁺, suggesting a decrease in basal excitability (decrease in Ca²⁺ channel activity). The other major phenotype of G6 is a loss of chemoattraction to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and proteose peptone (PP), two known chemoattractants in Tetrahymena. Using microsomal [³⁵S]GTPγS binding assays, we found that wild-type (CU427) have a prominent basal G-protein activity. This activity is decreased to the same level by pertussis toxin (a G-protein inhibitor), addition of chemoattractants, or the G6 mutant. Since the basal G-protein activity is decreased by the GPCR6 knockout, it is likely that this gene codes for a constitutively active GPCR in Tetrahymena. We propose that chemoattractants like LPA and PP cause attraction in Tetrahymena by decreasing the basal G-protein stimulating activity of Gpcr6p. This leads to decreased excitability in wild-type and longer runs of smooth forward swimming (less interrupted by direction changes) towards the attractant. Therefore, these attractants may work as inverse agonists through the constitutively active Gpcr6p coupled to a pertussis-sensitive G-protein. PMID:22140501

  13. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin: A Prospectus

    PubMed Central

    Filipek, Sławomir; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Teller, David C.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a retinal photoreceptor protein of bipartite structure consisting of the transmembrane protein opsin and a light-sensitive chromophore 11-cis-retinal, linked to opsin via a protonated Schiff base. Studies on rhodopsin have unveiled many structural and functional features that are common to a large and pharmacologically important group of proteins from the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, of which rhodopsin is the best-studied member. In this work, we focus on structural features of rhodopsin as revealed by many biochemical and structural investigations. In particular, the high-resolution structure of bovine rhodopsin provides a template for understanding how GPCRs work. We describe the sensitivity and complexity of rhodopsin that lead to its important role in vision. PMID:12471166

  14. A Usual G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Unusual Membranes.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Udeep; Jiang, Yunjiang; Zheng, Wan; Kuang, Liangju; Perera, Suchithranga M D C; Pitman, Michael C; Brown, Michael F; Liang, Hongjun

    2016-01-11

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of membrane-bound receptors and constitute about 50% of all known drug targets. They offer great potential for membrane protein nanotechnologies. We report here a charge-interaction-directed reconstitution mechanism that induces spontaneous insertion of bovine rhodopsin, the eukaryotic GPCR, into both lipid- and polymer-based artificial membranes. We reveal a new allosteric mode of rhodopsin activation incurred by the non-biological membranes: the cationic membrane drives a transition from the inactive MI to the activated MII state in the absence of high [H(+)] or negative spontaneous curvature. We attribute this activation to the attractive charge interaction between the membrane surface and the deprotonated Glu134 residue of the rhodopsin-conserved ERY sequence motif that helps break the cytoplasmic "ionic lock". This study unveils a novel design concept of non-biological membranes to reconstitute and harness GPCR functions in synthetic systems. PMID:26633591

  15. Crystal Structure of a Lipid G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Jo, Euijung; Griffith, Mark T; Scott, Fiona L; Reinhart, Greg; Desale, Hans; Clemons, Bryan; Cahalan, Stuart M; Schuerer, Stephan C; Sanna, M Germana; Han, Gye Won; Kuhn, Peter; Rosen, Hugh; Stevens, Raymond C

    2012-03-01

    The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P1-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P1, resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.

  16. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wacker, Daniel; Gati, Cornelius; Han, Gye Won; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Weierstall, Uwe; Katritch, Vsevolod; Barty, Anton; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Li, Dianfan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Wang, Chong; Shah, Syed T.A.; Basu, Shibom; Fromme, Raimund; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley N.; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Petra; Kirian, Richard A.; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; White, Thomas A.; Chapman, Henry N.; Caffrey, Martin; Spence, John C.H.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography of G protein-coupled receptors and other membrane proteins is hampered by difficulties associated with growing sufficiently large crystals that withstand radiation damage and yield high-resolution data at synchrotron sources. Here we used an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) with individual 50-fs duration x-ray pulses to minimize radiation damage and obtained a high-resolution room temperature structure of a human serotonin receptor using sub-10 µm microcrystals grown in a membrane mimetic matrix known as lipidic cubic phase. Compared to the structure solved by traditional microcrystallography from cryo-cooled crystals of about two orders of magnitude larger volume, the room temperature XFEL structure displays a distinct distribution of thermal motions and conformations of residues that likely more accurately represent the receptor structure and dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:24357322

  17. Lysophospholipids and their G protein-coupled receptors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Feng; Li, Rong-Shan; Samuel, Sonia B; Cueto, Ramon; Li, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are bioactive lipid-derived signaling molecules generated by the enzymatic and chemical processes of regiospecific phospholipases on substrates such as membrane phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs). They play a major role as extracellular mediators by activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and stimulating diverse cellular responses from their signaling pathways. LPLs are involved in various pathologies of the vasculature system including coronary heart disease and hypertension. Many studies suggest the importance of LPLs in their association with the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic and severe vascular disease. This paper focuses on the pathophysiological effects of different lysophospholipids on atherosclerosis, which may promote the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and strokes. Their atherogenic biological activities take place in vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages, dendritic cells, T-lymphocytes, platelets, etc. PMID:26709762

  18. Serial femtosecond crystallography datasets from G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Zhang, Haitao; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Basu, Shibom; Oberthür, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Yoon, Chun Hong; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Messerschmidt, Marc; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Weierstall, Uwe; Cherezov, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    We describe the deposition of four datasets consisting of X-ray diffraction images acquired using serial femtosecond crystallography experiments on microcrystals of human G protein-coupled receptors, grown and delivered in lipidic cubic phase, at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The receptors are: the human serotonin receptor 2B in complex with an agonist ergotamine, the human δ-opioid receptor in complex with a bi-functional peptide ligand DIPP-NH2, the human smoothened receptor in complex with an antagonist cyclopamine, and finally the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in complex with the selective antagonist ZD7155. All four datasets have been deposited, with minimal processing, in an HDF5-based file format, which can be used directly for crystallographic processing with CrystFEL or other software. We have provided processing scripts and supporting files for recent versions of CrystFEL, which can be used to validate the data. PMID:27479354

  19. Function and Regulation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins during Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Marjon E.; Liu, Youtao; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis, or directional movement towards an extracellular gradient of chemicals, is necessary for processes as diverse as finding nutrients, the immune response, metastasis and wound healing. Activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is at the very base of the chemotactic signaling pathway. Chemotaxis starts with binding of the chemoattractant to GPCRs at the cell-surface, which finally leads to major changes in the cytoskeleton and directional cell movement towards the chemoattractant. Many chemotaxis pathways that are directly regulated by Gβγ have been identified and studied extensively; however, whether Gα is just a handle that regulates the release of Gβγ or whether Gα has its own set of distinct chemotactic effectors, is only beginning to be understood. In this review, we will discuss the different levels of regulation in GPCR signaling and the downstream pathways that are essential for proper chemotaxis. PMID:26784171

  20. Serial femtosecond crystallography datasets from G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Zhang, Haitao; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Basu, Shibom; Oberthür, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Yoon, Chun Hong; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Messerschmidt, Marc; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Weierstall, Uwe; Cherezov, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    We describe the deposition of four datasets consisting of X-ray diffraction images acquired using serial femtosecond crystallography experiments on microcrystals of human G protein-coupled receptors, grown and delivered in lipidic cubic phase, at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The receptors are: the human serotonin receptor 2B in complex with an agonist ergotamine, the human δ-opioid receptor in complex with a bi-functional peptide ligand DIPP-NH2, the human smoothened receptor in complex with an antagonist cyclopamine, and finally the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor in complex with the selective antagonist ZD7155. All four datasets have been deposited, with minimal processing, in an HDF5-based file format, which can be used directly for crystallographic processing with CrystFEL or other software. We have provided processing scripts and supporting files for recent versions of CrystFEL, which can be used to validate the data. PMID:27479354

  1. GPCRdb: an information system for G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Isberg, Vignir; Mordalski, Stefan; Munk, Christian; Rataj, Krzysztof; Harpsøe, Kasper; Hauser, Alexander S.; Vroling, Bas; Bojarski, Andrzej J.; Vriend, Gert; Gloriam, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology and pharmacology have greatly enhanced our knowledge of receptor structure-function relations, and have helped improve the scientific foundation for drug design studies. The GPCR database, GPCRdb, serves a dual role in disseminating and enabling new scientific developments by providing reference data, analysis tools and interactive diagrams. This paper highlights new features in the fifth major GPCRdb release: (i) GPCR crystal structure browsing, superposition and display of ligand interactions; (ii) direct deposition by users of point mutations and their effects on ligand binding; (iii) refined snake and helix box residue diagram looks; and (iii) phylogenetic trees with receptor classification colour schemes. Under the hood, the entire GPCRdb front- and back-ends have been re-coded within one infrastructure, ensuring a smooth browsing experience and development. GPCRdb is available at http://www.gpcrdb.org/ and it's open source code at https://bitbucket.org/gpcr/protwis. PMID:26582914

  2. GPCRDB: an information system for G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, F; Weare, J; Beukers, M W; Hörsch, S; Bairoch, A; Chen, W; Edvardsen, O; Campagne, F; Vriend, G

    1998-01-01

    The GPCRDB is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) database system aimed at the collection and dissemination of GPCR related data. It holds sequences, mutant data and ligand binding constants as primary (experimental) data. Computationally derived data such as multiple sequence alignments, three dimensional models, phylogenetic trees and two dimensional visualization tools are added to enhance the database's usefulness. The GPCRDB is an EU sponsored project aimed at building a generic molecular class specific database capable of dealing with highly heterogeneous data. GPCRs were chosen as test molecules because of their enormous importance for medical sciences and due to the availability of so much highly heterogeneous data. The GPCRDB is available via the WWW at http://www.gpcr.org/7tm PMID:9399852

  3. Therapeutic antibodies directed at G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Catherine J; Koglin, Markus

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most important classes of targets for small molecule drug discovery, but many current GPCRs of interest are proving intractable to small molecule discovery and may be better approached with bio-therapeutics. GPCRs are implicated in a wide variety of diseases where antibody therapeutics are currently used. These include inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn disease, as well as metabolic disease and cancer. Raising antibodies to GPCRs has been difficult due to problems in obtaining suitable antigen because GPCRs are often expressed at low levels in cells and are very unstable when purified. A number of new developments in overexpressing receptors, as well as formulating stable pure protein, are contributing to the growing interest in targeting GPCRs with antibodies. This review discusses the opportunities for targeting GPCRs with antibodies using these approaches and describes the therapeutic antibodies that are currently in clinical development. PMID:20864805

  4. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Allosteric Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Topographically distinct, druggable, allosteric sites may be present on all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As such, targeting these sites with synthetic small molecules offers an attractive approach to develop receptor-subtype selective chemical leads for the development of novel therapies. A crucial part of drug development is to understand the acute and chronic effects of such allosteric modulators at their corresponding GPCR target. Key regulatory processes including cell-surface delivery, endocytosis, recycling, and down-regulation tightly control the number of receptors at the surface of the cell. As many GPCR therapeutics will be administered chronically, understanding how such ligands modulate these regulatory pathways forms an essential part of the characterization of novel GPCR ligands. This is true for both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of GPCR regulatory processes with a particular focus on the effects and implications of allosteric targeting of GPCRs. PMID:23398684

  5. G protein-coupled receptors and the regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wauson, Eric M.; Dbouk, Hashem A.; Ghosh, Anwesha B.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is an important catabolic cellular process that eliminates damaged and unnecessary cytoplasmic proteins and organelles. Basal autophagy occurs during normal physiological conditions, but the activity of this process can be significantly altered in human diseases. Thus, defining the regulatory inputs and signals that control autophagy is essential. Nutrients are key modulators of autophagy. While autophagy is generally accepted to be regulated in a cell autonomous fashion, recent studies suggest nutrients can modulate autophagy in a systemic manner by inducing the secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters that regulate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Emerging studies show that GPCRs also regulate autophagy by directly detecting extracellular nutrients. We review the role of GPCRs in autophagy regulation, highlighting their potential as therapeutic drug targets. PMID:24751357

  6. Human G protein-coupled receptor studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; Wong, Winsy; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest families of membrane proteins, with approximately 800 different GPCRs in the human genome. Signaling via GPCRs regulates many biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. In addition, many receptors have a pivotal role in immunophysiology. Many hormones and neurotransmitters are ligands for these receptors, and hence it is not surprising that many drugs, either mimicking or blocking the action of the bodily substances, have been developed. It is estimated that 30-40% of current drugs on the market target GPCRs. Further identifying and elucidating the functions of GPCRs will provide opportunities for novel drug discovery, including for immunotherapy. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a very important and useful platform in this respect. There are many advantages of using a yeast assay system, as it is cheap, safe and stable; it is also convenient for rapid feasibility and optimization studies. Moreover, it offers a "null" background when studying human GPCRs. New developments regarding human GPCRs expressed in a yeast platform are providing insight into GPCR activation and signaling, and facilitate agonist and antagonist identification. In this review we summarize the latest findings regarding human G-protein-coupled receptors in studies using S. cerevisiae, ever since the year 2005 when we last published a review on this topic. We describe 11 families of GPCRs in detail, while including the principles and developments of each yeast system applied to these different GPCRs and highlight and generalize the experimental findings of GPCR function in these systems. PMID:26920251

  7. Topology assessment, G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) prediction, and in vivo interaction assays to identify plant candidate GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Timothy E; Bendtsen, Jannick D

    2013-01-01

    Genomic sequencing has provided a vast resource for identifying interesting genes, but often an exact "gene-of-interest" is unknown and is only described as putatively present in a genome by an observed phenotype, or by the known presence of a conserved signaling cascade, such as that facilitated by the heterotrimeric G-protein. The low sequence similarity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and the absence of a known ligand with an associated high-throughput screening system in plants hampers their identification by simple BLAST queries or brute force experimental assays. Combinatorial bioinformatic analysis is useful in that it can reduce a large pool of possible candidates to a number manageable by medium or even low-throughput methods. Here we describe a method for the bioinformatic identification of candidate GPCRs from whole proteomes and their subsequent in vivo analysis for G-protein coupling using a membrane based yeast two-hybrid variant (Gookin et al., Genome Biol 9:R120, 2008). Rather than present the bioinformatic process in a format requiring scripts or computer programming knowledge, we describe procedures here in a simple, biologist-friendly outline that only utilizes the basic syntax of regular expressions. PMID:23913030

  8. Trichoderma G protein-coupled receptors: functional characterisation of a cAMP receptor-like protein from Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gα subunits act to regulate vegetative growth, conidiation, and the mycoparasitic response in Trichoderma atroviride. To extend our knowledge on G protein signalling, we analysed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As the genome sequence of T. atroviride is not publicly available yet, we carried out an in silico exploration of the genome database of the close relative T. reesei. Twenty genes encoding putative GPCRs distributed over eight classes and additional 35 proteins similar to the Magnaporthe grisea PTH11 receptor were identified. Subsequently, four T. atroviride GPCR-encoding genes were isolated and affliated to the cAMP receptor-like family by phylogenetic and topological analyses. All four genes showed lowest expression on glycerol and highest mRNA levels upon carbon starvation. Transcription of gpr3 and gpr4 responded to exogenously added cAMP and the shift from liquid to solid media. gpr3 mRNA levels also responded to the presence of fungal hyphae or cellulose membranes. Further characterisation of mutants bearing a gpr1-silencing construct revealed that Gpr1 is essential for vegetative growth, conidiation and conidial germination. Four genes encoding the first GPCRs described in Trichoderma were isolated and their expression characterized. At least one of these GPCRs is important for several cellular processes, supporting the fundamental role of G protein signalling in this fungus. PMID:18836726

  9. Yeast Irc6p is a novel type of conserved clathrin coat accessory factor related to small G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gorynia, Sabine; Lorenz, Todd C.; Costaguta, Giancarlo; Daboussi, Lydia; Cascio, Duilio; Payne, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin coat accessory proteins play key roles in transport mediated by clathrin-coated vesicles. Yeast Irc6p and the related mammalian p34 are putative clathrin accessory proteins that interact with clathrin adaptor complexes. We present evidence that Irc6p functions in clathrin-mediated traffic between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, linking clathrin adaptor complex AP-1 and the Rab GTPase Ypt31p. The crystal structure of the Irc6p N-terminal domain revealed a G-protein fold most related to small G proteins of the Rab and Arf families. However, Irc6p lacks G-protein signature motifs and high-affinity GTP binding. Also, mutant Irc6p lacking candidate GTP-binding residues retained function. Mammalian p34 rescued growth defects in irc6∆ cells, indicating functional conservation, and modeling predicted a similar N-terminal fold in p34. Irc6p and p34 also contain functionally conserved C-terminal regions. Irc6p/p34-related proteins with the same two-part architecture are encoded in genomes of species as diverse as plants and humans. Together these results define Irc6p/p34 as a novel type of conserved clathrin accessory protein and founding members of a new G protein–like family. PMID:22993212

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal heterotrimeric G protein-encoding genes and their expression during dimorphism in Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Valle-Maldonado, Marco Iván; Jácome-Galarza, Irvin Eduardo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Martínez-Cadena, Guadalupe; Campos-García, Jesús; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha Isela; Reyes-De la Cruz, Homero; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Díaz-Pérez, César; Meza-Carmen, Víctor

    2015-12-01

    In fungi, heterotrimeric G proteins are key regulators of biological processes such as mating, virulence, morphology, among others. Mucor circinelloides is a model organism for many biological processes, and its genome contains the largest known repertoire of genes that encode putative heterotrimeric G protein subunits in the fungal kingdom: twelve Gα (McGpa1-12), three Gβ (McGpb1-3), and three Gγ (McGpg1-3). Phylogenetic analysis of fungal Gα showed that they are divided into four distinct groups as reported previously. Fungal Gβ and Gγ are also divided into four phylogenetic groups, and to our understanding this is the first report of a phylogenetic classification for fungal Gβ and Gγ subunits. Almost all genes that encode putative heterotrimeric G subunits in M. circinelloides are differentially expressed during dimorphic growth, except for McGpg1 (Gγ) that showed very low mRNA levels at all developmental stages. Moreover, several of the subunits are expressed in a similar pattern and at the same level, suggesting that they constitute discrete complexes. For example, McGpb3 (Gβ), and McGpg2 (Gγ), are co-expressed during mycelium growth, and McGpa1, McGpb2, and McGpg2, are co-expressed during yeast development. These findings provide the conceptual framework to study the biological role of these genes during M. circinelloides morphogenesis. PMID:26615741

  11. Visualization of arrestin recruitment by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rosana I.; Huang, Li-Yin; Tripathi-Shukla, Prachi; Qian, Jiang; Li, Sheng; Blanc, Adi; Oleskie, Austin N.; Dosey, Anne M.; Su, Min; Liang, Cui-Rong; Gu, Ling-Ling; Shan, Jin-Ming; Chen, Xin; Hanna, Rachel; Choi, Minjung; Yao, Xiao Jie; Klink, Bjoern U.; Kahsai, Alem W.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Koide, Shohei; Penczek, Pawel A.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Jr, Virgil L. Woods; Kobilka, Brian K.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are critically regulated by β-arrestins (βarrs), which not only desensitize G protein signaling but also initiate a G protein independent wave of signaling1-5. A recent surge of structural data on a number of GPCRs, including the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR)-G protein complex, has provided novel insights into the structural basis of receptor activation6-11. Lacking however has been complementary information on recruitment of βarrs to activated GPCRs primarily due to challenges in obtaining stable receptor-βarr complexes for structural studies. Here, we devised a strategy for forming and purifying a functional β2AR-βarr1 complex that allowed us to visualize its architecture by single particle negative stain electron microscopy (EM) and to characterize the interactions between β2AR and βarr1 using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) and chemical cross-linking. EM 2D averages and 3D reconstructions reveal bimodal binding of βarr1 to the β2AR, involving two separate sets of interactions, one with the phosphorylated carboxy-terminus of the receptor and the other with its seven-transmembrane core. Areas of reduced HDX together with identification of cross-linked residues suggest engagement of the finger loop of βarr1 with the seven-transmembrane core of the receptor. In contrast, focal areas of increased HDX indicate regions of increased dynamics in both N and C domains of βarr1 when coupled to the β2AR. A molecular model of the β2AR-βarr signaling complex was made by docking activated βarr1 and β2AR crystal structures into the EM map densities with constraints provided by HDXMS and cross-linking, allowing us to obtain valuable insights into the overall architecture of a receptor-arrestin complex. The dynamic and structural information presented herein provides a framework for better understanding the basis of GPCR regulation by arrestins. PMID:25043026

  12. Structural determinants of G-protein alpha subunit selectivity by regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2).

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Soundararajan, Meera; Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Roos, Annette K; Urban, Daniel J; Setola, Vincent; Temple, Brenda R S; Roth, Bryan L; Knapp, Stefan; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2009-07-17

    "Regulator of G-protein signaling" (RGS) proteins facilitate the termination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling via their ability to increase the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate of Galpha subunits (known as GTPase-accelerating protein or "GAP" activity). RGS2 is unique in its in vitro potency and selectivity as a GAP for Galpha(q) subunits. As many vasoconstrictive hormones signal via G(q) heterotrimer-coupled receptors, it is perhaps not surprising that RGS2-deficient mice exhibit constitutive hypertension. However, to date the particular structural features within RGS2 determining its selectivity for Galpha(q) over Galpha(i/o) substrates have not been completely characterized. Here, we examine a trio of point mutations to RGS2 that elicits Galpha(i)-directed binding and GAP activities without perturbing its association with Galpha(q). Using x-ray crystallography, we determined a model of the triple mutant RGS2 in complex with a transition state mimetic form of Galpha(i) at 2.8-A resolution. Structural comparison with unliganded, wild type RGS2 and of other RGS domain/Galpha complexes highlighted the roles of these residues in wild type RGS2 that weaken Galpha(i) subunit association. Moreover, these three amino acids are seen to be evolutionarily conserved among organisms with modern cardiovascular systems, suggesting that RGS2 arose from the R4-subfamily of RGS proteins to have specialized activity as a potent and selective Galpha(q) GAP that modulates cardiovascular function. PMID:19478087

  13. ROLE OF ANTIBODIES IN DEVELOPING DRUGS THAT TARGET G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR DIMERS

    PubMed Central

    Hipser, Chris; Bushlin, Ittai; Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important molecular targets in drug discovery. These receptors play a pivotal role in physiological signaling pathways and are targeted by nearly 50% of currently available drugs. Mounting evidence suggests that GPCRs form dimers and various studies have shown that dimerization is necessary for receptor maturation, signaling and trafficking. However, the physiological implications of dimerization in vivo have not been well explored since detection of GPCR dimers in endogenous systems has been a challenging task. One exciting new approach to this challenge is the generation of antibodies against specific GPCR dimers. Such antibodies could be used as tools for characterization of heteromer-specific function, as reagents for their purification, tissue localization and regulation in vivo and as probes for mapping their functional domains. In addition, such antibodies could serve as alternative ligands for GPCR heteromers. Thus, heteromer-specific antibodies represent novel tools for the exploration and manipulation of GPCR dimer pharmacology. PMID:20687183

  14. Portraying G Protein-Coupled Receptors with Fluorescent Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamics of ligand–receptor interactions at the surface of living cells represents a fundamental aspect of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) biology; thus, its detailed elucidation constitutes a challenge for modern pharmacology. Interestingly, fluorescent ligands have been developed for a variety of GPCRs in order to monitor ligand–receptor binding in living cells. Accordingly, new methodological strategies derived from noninvasive fluorescence-based approaches, especially fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), have been successfully developed to characterize ligand–receptor interactions. Importantly, these technologies are supplanting more hazardous and expensive radioactive binding assays. In addition, FRET-based tools have also become extremely powerful approaches for visualizing receptor–receptor interactions (i.e., GPCR oligomerization) in living cells. Thus, by means of the synthesis of compatible fluorescent ligands these novel techniques can be implemented to demonstrate the existence of GPCR oligomerization not only in heterologous systems but also in native tissues. Finally, there is no doubt that these methodologies would also be relevant in drug discovery in order to develop new high-throughput screening approaches or to identify new therapeutic targets. Overall, herein, we provide a thorough assessment of all technical and biological aspects, including strengths and weaknesses, of these fluorescence-based methodologies when applied to the study of GPCR biology at the plasma membrane of living cells. PMID:25010291

  15. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D.; Lahvic, Jamie L.; Ranheim, Erik A.; Zon, Leonard I.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  16. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D; Lahvic, Jamie L; Ranheim, Erik A; Zon, Leonard I; Bresnick, Emery H

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5(-/-) AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  17. Rap G protein signal in normal and disordered lymphohematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Minato, Nagahiro

    2013-09-10

    Rap proteins (Rap1, Rap2a, b, c) are small molecular weight GTPases of the Ras family. Rap G proteins mediate diverse cellular events such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and gene activation through various signaling pathways. Activation of Rap signal is regulated tightly by several specific regulatory proteins including guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins. Beyond cell biological studies, increasing attempts have been made in the past decade to define the roles of Rap signal in specific functions of normal tissue systems as well as in cancer. In the immune and hematopoietic systems, Rap signal plays crucial roles in the development and function of essentially all lineages of lymphocytes and hematopoietic cells, and importantly, deregulated Rap signal may lead to unique pathological conditions depending on the affected cell types, including various types of leukemia and autoimmunity. The phenotypical studies have unveiled novel, even unexpected functional aspects of Rap signal in cells from a variety of tissues, providing potentially important clues for controlling human diseases, including malignancy.

  18. G-Protein-Coupled Receptors in Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Doze, Van A.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of adult neurogenesis has only recently been accepted, resulting in a completely new field of investigation within stem cell biology. The regulation and functional significance of adult neurogenesis is currently an area of highly active research. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have emerged as potential modulators of adult neurogenesis. GPCRs represent a class of proteins with significant clinical importance, because approximately 30% of all modern therapeutic treatments target these receptors. GPCRs bind to a large class of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators such as norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. Besides their typical role in cellular communication, GPCRs are expressed on adult neural stem cells and their progenitors that relay specific signals to regulate the neurogenic process. This review summarizes the field of adult neurogenesis and its methods and specifies the roles of various GPCRs and their signal transduction pathways that are involved in the regulation of adult neural stem cells and their progenitors. Current evidence supporting adult neurogenesis as a model for self-repair in neuropathologic conditions, adult neural stem cell therapeutic strategies, and potential avenues for GPCR-based therapeutics are also discussed. PMID:22611178

  19. Minireview: Nutrient Sensing by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wauson, Eric M.; Lorente-Rodríguez, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that recognize molecules in the extracellular milieu and transmit signals inside cells to regulate their behaviors. Ligands for many GPCRs are hormones or neurotransmitters that direct coordinated, stereotyped adaptive responses. Ligands for other GPCRs provide information to cells about the extracellular environment. Such information facilitates context-specific decision making that may be cell autonomous. Among ligands that are important for cellular decisions are amino acids, required for continued protein synthesis, as metabolic starting materials and energy sources. Amino acids are detected by a number of class C GPCRs. One cluster of amino acid-sensing class C GPCRs includes umami and sweet taste receptors, GPRC6A, and the calcium-sensing receptor. We have recently found that the umami taste receptor heterodimer T1R1/T1R3 is a sensor of amino acid availability that regulates the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin. This review focuses on an array of findings on sensing amino acids and sweet molecules outside of neurons by this cluster of class C GPCRs and some of the physiologic processes regulated by them. PMID:23820899

  20. Structure and function of serotonin G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    McCorvy, John D; Roth, Bryan L

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  1. G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Protects from Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthias R.; Fredette, Natalie C.; Howard, Tamara A.; Hu, Chelin; Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction in postmenopausal women have been linked to inflammation and reduced nitric oxide (NO) formation. Natural estrogen exerts protective effects on both processes, yet also displays uterotrophic activity. Here, we used genetic and pharmacologic approaches to investigate the role of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) in atherosclerosis. In ovary-intact mice, deletion of gper increased atherosclerosis progression, total and LDL cholesterol levels and inflammation while reducing vascular NO bioactivity, effects that were in some cases aggravated by surgical menopause. In human endothelial cells, GPER was expressed on intracellular membranes and mediated eNOS activation and NO formation, partially accounting for estrogen-mediated effects. Chronic treatment with G-1, a synthetic, highly selective small molecule agonist of GPER, reduced postmenopausal atherosclerosis and inflammation without uterotrophic effects. In summary, this study reveals an atheroprotective function of GPER and introduces selective GPER activation as a novel therapeutic approach to inhibit postmenopausal atherosclerosis and inflammation in the absence of uterotrophic activity. PMID:25532911

  2. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  3. G-protein from Medicago sativa: functional association to photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Muschietti, J P; Martinetto, H E; Coso, O A; Farber, M D; Torres, H N; Flawia, M M

    1993-01-01

    G-protein subunits were characterized from Medicago sativa (alfalfa) seedlings. Crude membranes and GTP-Sepharose-purified fractions were electrophoresed on SDS/polyacrylamide gels and analysed by Western blotting with 9193 (anti-alpha common) and AS/7 (anti-alpha t, anti-alpha i1 and anti-alpha i2) polyclonal antibodies. These procedures led to the identification of a specific polypeptide band of about 43 kDa. Another polypeptide reacting with the SW/1 (anti-beta) antibody, of about 37 kDa, was also detected. The 43 kDa polypeptide bound specifically [alpha-32P]GTP by a photoaffinity reaction and was ADP-ribosylated by activated cholera toxin, but not by pertussis toxin. Irradiation of etiolated Medicago sativa protoplast preparations at 660 nm for 1 min produced a maximal increase in the guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[35S])-binding rate. After this period of irradiation, the binding rate tended to decrease. The effect of a red-light (660 nm) pulse on the binding rate was reversed when it was immediately followed by a period of far-red (> 730 nm) illumination. These results may suggest that activation of GTP[S]-binding rate was a consequence of conversion of phytochrome Pr into the Ptr form. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8484719

  4. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes. PMID:26237676

  5. In silico prediction of the G-protein coupled receptors expressed during the metamorphic molt of Sagmariasus verreauxi (Crustacea: Decapoda) by mining transcriptomic data: RNA-seq to repertoire.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sean J; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Smith, Gregory G; Ventura, Tomer

    2016-03-01

    Against a backdrop of food insecurity, the farming of decapod crustaceans is a rapidly expanding and globally significant source of food protein. Sagmariasus verreauxi spiny lobster, the subject of this study, are decapods of underdeveloped aquaculture potential. Crustacean neuropeptide G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate endocrine pathways that are integral to animal fecundity, growth and survival. The potential use of novel biotechnologies to enhance GPCR-mediated physiology may assist in improving the health and productivity of farmed decapod populations. This study catalogues the GPCRs expressed in the early developmental stages, as well as adult tissues, with a view to illuminating key neuropeptide receptors. De novo assembled contiguous sequences generated from transcriptomic reads of metamorphic and post metamorphic S. verreauxi were filtered for seven transmembrane domains, and used as a reference for iterative re-mapping. Subsequent putative GPCR open reading frames (ORFs) were BLAST annotated, categorised, and compared to published orthologues based on phylogenetic analysis. A total of 85 GPCRs were digitally predicted, that represented each of the four arthropod subfamilies. They generally displayed low-level and non-differential metamorphic expression with few exceptions that we examined using RT-PCR and qPCR. Two putative CHH-like neuropeptide receptors were annotated. Three dimensional structural modelling suggests that these receptors exhibit a conserved extracellular ligand binding pocket, providing support to the notion that these receptors co-evolved with their ligands across Decapoda. This perhaps narrows the search for means to increase productivity of farmed decapod populations. PMID:26850661

  6. G-protein-coupled glucocorticoid receptors on the pituitary cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Maier, Christina; Rünzler, Dominik; Schindelar, Julia; Grabner, Gottfried; Waldhäusl, Werner; Köhler, Gottfried; Luger, Anton

    2005-08-01

    Rapid, nongenomic actions of glucocorticoids (GCs) have been well documented, but information about putative membrane receptors that mediate them is scarce. We used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to search for membrane GC-binding on the mouse pituitary cell line AtT-20. A slowly diffusing fraction (tau3; diffusion constant 3x10(-10) cm2 s-1) of fluorescein-labeled dexamethasone on the cell membrane corresponds to fluorescein-dexamethasone binding. Preincubation experiments were performed to test binding specificity: a 500-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone abolished subsequent fluorescein-dexamethasone membrane binding from 58+/-2 (control) to 8+/-1 (% of tau3, mean+/-s.e.m.), the natural ligand corticosterone prevented it partially (29+/-2), while the sex steroids estradiol (56+/-4) and progesterone (50+/-4) and the GC-receptor antagonist RU486 (56+/-2) had no effect. Preincubation with pertussis toxin resulted in disappearance of the slowest diffusion component (11+/-4) suggesting association of the receptor with a G-protein. Varying the concentration of fluorescein-dexamethasone showed that membrane binding is highly cooperative with an apparent Kd of 180 nM and Bmax of 230 nM. Taken together, these results demonstrate high-affinity GC-binding on the cell membrane of AtT-20 cells with characteristics distinct from intracellular binding. PMID:16079279

  7. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-selective ligands modulate endometrial tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Whitney K; Dennis, Megan K; Hu, Chelin; Dai, Donghai; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Smith, Harriet O; Hathaway, Helen J; Prossnitz, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common cancer of the female reproductive tract. GPER/GPR30 is a 7-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled receptor that has been identified as the third estrogen receptor, in addition to ERα and ERβ. High GPER expression is predictive of poor survival in endometrial and ovarian cancer, but despite this, the estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and specific estrogen receptors involved in endometrial cancer remain unclear. Here, employing ERα-negative Hec50 endometrial cancer cells, we demonstrate that GPER mediates estrogen-stimulated activation of ERK and PI3K via matrix metalloproteinase activation and subsequent transactivation of the EGFR and that ER-targeted therapeutic agents (4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI182,780/fulvestrant, and Raloxifene), the phytoestrogen genistein, and the "ERα-selective" agonist propylpyrazole triol also function as GPER agonists. Furthermore, xenograft tumors of Hec50 cells yield enhanced growth with G-1 and estrogen, the latter being inhibited by GPER-selective pharmacologic antagonism with G36. These results have important implications with respect to the use of putatively ER-selective ligands and particularly for the widespread long-term use of "ER-targeted" therapeutics. Moreover, our findings shed light on the potential mechanisms of SERM/SERD side effects reported in many clinical studies. Finally, our results provide the first demonstration that pharmacological inhibition of GPER activity in vivo prevents estrogen-mediated tumor growth. PMID:24379833

  8. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Selective Ligands Modulate Endometrial Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Whitney K.; Dennis, Megan K.; Dai, Donghai; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.; Smith, Harriet O.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common cancer of the female reproductive tract. GPER/GPR30 is a 7-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled receptor that has been identified as the third estrogen receptor, in addition to ERα and ERβ. High GPER expression is predictive of poor survival in endometrial and ovarian cancer, but despite this, the estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and specific estrogen receptors involved in endometrial cancer remain unclear. Here, employing ERα-negative Hec50 endometrial cancer cells, we demonstrate that GPER mediates estrogen-stimulated activation of ERK and PI3K via matrix metalloproteinase activation and subsequent transactivation of the EGFR and that ER-targeted therapeutic agents (4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI182,780/fulvestrant, and Raloxifene), the phytoestrogen genistein, and the “ERα-selective” agonist propylpyrazole triol also function as GPER agonists. Furthermore, xenograft tumors of Hec50 cells yield enhanced growth with G-1 and estrogen, the latter being inhibited by GPER-selective pharmacologic antagonism with G36. These results have important implications with respect to the use of putatively ER-selective ligands and particularly for the widespread long-term use of “ER-targeted” therapeutics. Moreover, our findings shed light on the potential mechanisms of SERM/SERD side effects reported in many clinical studies. Finally, our results provide the first demonstration that pharmacological inhibition of GPER activity in vivo prevents estrogen-mediated tumor growth. PMID:24379833

  9. Scotopic vision in the monkey is modulated by the G protein-coupled receptor 55.

    PubMed

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ohyama, Jyunpei; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system plays important roles in the retina of mice and monkeys via their classic CB1 and CB2 receptors. We have previously reported that the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a putative cannabinoid receptor, is exclusively expressed in rod photoreceptors in the monkey retina, suggesting its possible role in scotopic vision. To test this hypothesis, we recorded full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) after the intravitreal injection of the GPR55 agonist lysophosphatidylglucoside (LPG) or the selective GPR55 antagonist CID16020046 (CID), under light- and dark-adapted conditions. Thirteen vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus) were used in this study: four controls (injected with the vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO), four injected with LPG and five with CID. We analyzed amplitudes and latencies of the a-wave (photoreceptor responses) and the b-wave (rod and cone system responses) of the ERG. Our results showed that after injection of LPG, the amplitude of the scotopic b-wave was significantly higher, whereas after the injection of CID, it was significantly decreased, compared to the vehicle (DMSO). On the other hand, the a-wave amplitude, and the a-wave and b-wave latencies, of the scotopic ERG responses were not significantly affected by the injection of either compound. Furthermore, the photopic ERG waveforms were not affected by either drug. These results support the hypothesis that GPR55 plays an instrumental role in mediating scotopic vision. PMID:27485069

  10. Crystal structure of the Bacillus-conserved MazG protein, a nucleotide pyrophosphohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Meong Il; Hong, Minsun

    2016-03-25

    BA1544 from Bacillus anthracis was previously annotated as a transcription factor for the gene cluster ba1554 - ba1558, but has not been experimentally characterized. B. anthracis is an obligate pathogen causing fatal inhalational anthrax, and BA1544 is absolutely conserved in Bacillus species, including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus mycoides, with 100% sequence identity. To address the function of BA1544, we performed structural and biochemical studies, which revealed that BA1544 is a MazG protein. Thus, herein, the protein is defined as Bacillus-conserved MazG (BcMazG). Like other MazG structures, BcMazG assembles into a tetrameric architecture. Each monomer adopts a four-α-helix bundle that accommodates a metal ion using four acidic residues, and presents one putative substrate-binding site. Enzymatic characterization demonstrated that BcMazG is a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) pyrophosphohydrolase and prefers adenosine triphosphate as a substrate among canonical NTPs. Moreover, structural comparison of BcMazG with its homologues revealed a potential regulation mechanism whereby the enzymatic activity of BcMazG is regulated by its C-terminal region. PMID:26920050

  11. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1. PMID:27235398

  12. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 terminates G-protein-coupled receptor function in steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Wang, Di; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals across the cell membrane. GPCR kinases (GRKs) desensitize GPCR signals in the cell membrane. However, the role and mechanism of GRKs in the desensitization of steroid hormone signaling are unclear. In this study, we propose that GRK2 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) in response to induction by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), which determines its translocation to the cell membrane of the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. GRK2 protein expression is increased during the metamorphic stage because of induction by 20E. Knockdown of GRK2 in larvae causes accelerated pupation, an increase in 20E-response gene expression, and advanced apoptosis and metamorphosis. 20E induces translocation of GRK2 from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane via steroid hormone ecdysone-responsive GPCR (ErGPCR-2). GRK2 is phosphorylated by PKC on serine 680 after induction by 20E, which leads to the translocation of GRK2 to the cell membrane. GRK2 interacts with ErGPCR-2. These data indicate that GRK2 terminates the ErGPCR-2 function in 20E signaling in the cell membrane by a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:27412951

  13. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 terminates G-protein-coupled receptor function in steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Wang, Di; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals across the cell membrane. GPCR kinases (GRKs) desensitize GPCR signals in the cell membrane. However, the role and mechanism of GRKs in the desensitization of steroid hormone signaling are unclear. In this study, we propose that GRK2 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) in response to induction by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), which determines its translocation to the cell membrane of the lepidopteran Helicoverpa armigera. GRK2 protein expression is increased during the metamorphic stage because of induction by 20E. Knockdown of GRK2 in larvae causes accelerated pupation, an increase in 20E-response gene expression, and advanced apoptosis and metamorphosis. 20E induces translocation of GRK2 from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane via steroid hormone ecdysone-responsive GPCR (ErGPCR-2). GRK2 is phosphorylated by PKC on serine 680 after induction by 20E, which leads to the translocation of GRK2 to the cell membrane. GRK2 interacts with ErGPCR-2. These data indicate that GRK2 terminates the ErGPCR-2 function in 20E signaling in the cell membrane by a negative feedback mechanism. PMID:27412951

  14. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs. PMID:27108066

  15. Towards predictive docking at aminergic G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Doležal, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are hard to crystallize. However, attempts to predict their structure have boomed as a result of advancements in crystallographic techniques. This trend has allowed computer-aided molecular modeling of GPCRs. We analyzed the performance of four molecular modeling programs in pose evaluation of re-docked antagonists / inverse agonists to 11 original crystal structures of aminergic GPCRs using an induced fit-docking procedure. AutoDock and Glide were used for docking. AutoDock binding energy function, GlideXP, Prime MM-GB/SA, and YASARA binding function were used for pose scoring. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the best pose ranged from 0.09 to 1.58 Å, and median RMSD of the top 60 poses ranged from 1.47 to 3.83 Å. However, RMSD of the top pose ranged from 0.13 to 7.33 Å and ranking of the best pose ranged from the 1st to 60th out of 60 poses. Moreover, analysis of ligand-receptor interactions of top poses revealed substantial differences from interactions found in crystallographic structures. Bad ranking of top poses and discrepancies between top docked poses and crystal structures render current simple docking methods unsuitable for predictive modeling of receptor-ligand interactions. Prime MM-GB/SA optimized for 3NY9 by multiple linear regression did not work well at 3NY8 and 3NYA, structures of the same receptor with different ligands. However, 9 of 11 trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations by Desmond of top poses converged with trajectories of crystal structures. Key interactions were properly detected for all structures. This procedure also worked well for cross-docking of tested β2-adrenergic antagonists. Thus, this procedure represents a possible way to predict interactions of antagonists with aminergic GPCRs. PMID:26453085

  16. Erythrocyte G Protein as a Novel Target for Malarial Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean C; Harrison, Travis; Hamm, Heidi E; Lomasney, Jon W; Mohandas, Narla; Haldar, Kasturi

    2006-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a serious health problem because resistance develops to all currently used drugs when their parasite targets mutate. Novel antimalarial drug targets are urgently needed to reduce global morbidity and mortality. Our prior results suggested that inhibiting erythrocyte Gs signaling blocked invasion by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Methods and Findings We investigated the erythrocyte guanine nucleotide regulatory protein Gs as a novel antimalarial target. Erythrocyte “ghosts” loaded with a Gs peptide designed to block Gs interaction with its receptors, were blocked in β-adrenergic agonist-induced signaling. This finding directly demonstrates that erythrocyte Gs is functional and that propranolol, an antagonist of G protein–coupled β-adrenergic receptors, dampens Gs activity in erythrocytes. We subsequently used the ghost system to directly link inhibition of host Gs to parasite entry. In addition, we discovered that ghosts loaded with the peptide were inhibited in intracellular parasite maturation. Propranolol also inhibited blood-stage parasite growth, as did other β2-antagonists. β-blocker growth inhibition appeared to be due to delay in the terminal schizont stage. When used in combination with existing antimalarials in cell culture, propranolol reduced the 50% and 90% inhibitory concentrations for existing drugs against P. falciparum by 5- to 10-fold and was also effective in reducing drug dose in animal models of infection. Conclusions Together these data establish that, in addition to invasion, erythrocyte G protein signaling is needed for intracellular parasite proliferation and thus may present a novel antimalarial target. The results provide proof of the concept that erythrocyte Gs antagonism offers a novel strategy to fight infection and that it has potential to be used to develop combination therapies with existing antimalarials. PMID:17194200

  17. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  18. G-Protein/β-Arrestin-Linked Fluctuating Network of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors for Predicting Drug Efficacy and Bias Using Short-Term Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Osamu; Fujimoto, Kazushi; Yamada, Atsushi; Okazaki, Susumu; Yamazaki, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and bias of signal transduction induced by a drug at a target protein are closely associated with the benefits and side effects of the drug. In particular, partial agonist activity and G-protein/β-arrestin-biased agonist activity for the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, the family with the most target proteins of launched drugs, are key issues in drug discovery. However, designing GPCR drugs with appropriate efficacy and bias is challenging because the dynamic mechanism of signal transduction induced by ligand—receptor interactions is complicated. Here, we identified the G-protein/β-arrestin-linked fluctuating network, which initiates large-scale conformational changes, using sub-microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) with a diverse collection of ligands and correlation analysis of their G protein/β-arrestin efficacy. The G-protein-linked fluctuating network extends from the ligand-binding site to the G-protein-binding site through the connector region, and the β-arrestin-linked fluctuating network consists of the NPxxY motif and adjacent regions. We confirmed that the averaged values of fluctuation in the fluctuating network detected are good quantitative indexes for explaining G protein/β-arrestin efficacy. These results indicate that short-term MD simulation is a practical method to predict the efficacy and bias of any compound for GPCRs. PMID:27187591

  19. G-Protein/β-Arrestin-Linked Fluctuating Network of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors for Predicting Drug Efficacy and Bias Using Short-Term Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Osamu; Fujimoto, Kazushi; Yamada, Atsushi; Okazaki, Susumu; Yamazaki, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and bias of signal transduction induced by a drug at a target protein are closely associated with the benefits and side effects of the drug. In particular, partial agonist activity and G-protein/β-arrestin-biased agonist activity for the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, the family with the most target proteins of launched drugs, are key issues in drug discovery. However, designing GPCR drugs with appropriate efficacy and bias is challenging because the dynamic mechanism of signal transduction induced by ligand-receptor interactions is complicated. Here, we identified the G-protein/β-arrestin-linked fluctuating network, which initiates large-scale conformational changes, using sub-microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) with a diverse collection of ligands and correlation analysis of their G protein/β-arrestin efficacy. The G-protein-linked fluctuating network extends from the ligand-binding site to the G-protein-binding site through the connector region, and the β-arrestin-linked fluctuating network consists of the NPxxY motif and adjacent regions. We confirmed that the averaged values of fluctuation in the fluctuating network detected are good quantitative indexes for explaining G protein/β-arrestin efficacy. These results indicate that short-term MD simulation is a practical method to predict the efficacy and bias of any compound for GPCRs. PMID:27187591

  20. Activation and conformational dynamics of a class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sun, Jixue; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2016-05-14

    The human glucagon receptor (GCGR) is a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The GCGR can be activated by glucagon and regulates the release of glucose. The GCGR has been proposed to be an important drug target for type 2 diabetes. Based on the structural model of a full-length glucagon-bound GCGR (glu-GCGR), we performed accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations, potential of mean force (PMF) calculations, cross-correlation analysis and community network analysis to study the activation mechanism and the conformational dynamics during the activation process. The PMF map depicts three different conformational states of the GCGR: the inactive, intermediate and active states. The activation of the GCGR is characterized by the outward movement of the intracellular side of helix VI. In the active state of the GCGR, the Arg173(2.46)-Ser350(6.41) and Glu245(3.50)-Thr351(6.42) hydrogen bonds break, and the χ1 rotamer of Phe322(5.54) changes from perpendicular to parallel to helix VI. The binding of the agonist glucagon decreases the correlated motions of the extracellular loops (ELCs) and the helices around the glucagon-binding site. During the activation of the GCGR, the connections between the intracellular sides of helices become weaker, and the connections between glucagon and ECLs and the extracellular sides of helices become stronger. These facilitate G-protein coupling on the intracellular side and glucagon binding on the extracellular side, and stabilize the GCGR in the active state. We expect that this study can provide useful information on the activation mechanism of the GCGR and facilitate the future design of GCGR inhibitors. PMID:27094704

  1. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling in Stem Cells and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Jennifer R.; Wang, Jenny Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of cell-surface signaling proteins that bind extracellular ligands and transduce signals into cells via heterotrimeric G proteins. GPCRs are highly tractable drug targets. Aberrant expression of GPCRs and G proteins has been observed in various cancers and their importance in cancer stem cells has begun to be appreciated. We have recently reported essential roles for G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and G protein subunit Gαq in the maintenance of cancer stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia. This review will discuss how GPCRs and G proteins regulate stem cells with a focus on cancer stem cells, as well as their implications for the development of novel targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27187360

  2. Macromolecular Composition Dictates Receptor and G Protein Selectivity of Regulator of G Protein Signaling (RGS) 7 and 9-2 Protein Complexes in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Masuho, Ikuo; Xie, Keqiang; Martemyanov, Kirill A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins play essential roles in the regulation of signaling via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). With hundreds of GPCRs and dozens of G proteins, it is important to understand how RGS regulates selective GPCR-G protein signaling. In neurons of the striatum, two RGS proteins, RGS7 and RGS9-2, regulate signaling by μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and are implicated in drug addiction, movement disorders, and nociception. Both proteins form trimeric complexes with the atypical G protein β subunit Gβ5 and a membrane anchor, R7BP. In this study, we examined GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity as well as Gα and GPCR selectivity of RGS7 and RGS9-2 complexes in live cells using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay that monitors dissociation of G protein subunits. We showed that RGS9-2/Gβ5 regulated both Gi and Go with a bias toward Go, but RGS7/Gβ5 could serve as a GAP only for Go. Interestingly, R7BP enhanced GAP activity of RGS7 and RGS9-2 toward Go and Gi and enabled RGS7 to regulate Gi signaling. Neither RGS7 nor RGS9-2 had any activity toward Gz, Gs, or Gq in the absence or presence of R7BP. We also observed no effect of GPCRs (MOR and D2R) on the G protein bias of R7 RGS proteins. However, the GAP activity of RGS9-2 showed a strong receptor preference for D2R over MOR. Finally, RGS7 displayed an four times greater GAP activity relative to RGS9-2. These findings illustrate the principles involved in establishing G protein and GPCR selectivity of striatal RGS proteins. PMID:23857581

  3. G protein coupled receptors as targets for next generation pesticides.

    PubMed

    Audsley, Neil; Down, Rachel E

    2015-12-01

    There is an on-going need for the discovery and development of new pesticides due to the loss of existing products through the continuing development of resistance, the desire for products with more favourable environmental and toxicological profiles and the need to implement the principles of integrated pest management. Insect G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in modulating biology, physiology and behaviour, including reproduction, osmoregulation, growth and development. Modifying normal receptor function by blocking or over stimulating its actions may either result in the death of a pest or disrupt its normal fitness or reproductive capacity to reduce pest populations. Hence GPCRs offer potential targets for the development of next generation pesticides providing opportunities to discover new chemistries for invertebrate pest control. Such receptors are important targets for pharmaceutical drugs, but are under-exploited by the agro-chemical industry. The octopamine receptor agonists are the only pesticides with a recognized mode of action, as described in the classification scheme developed by the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee, that act via a GPCR. The availability of sequenced insect genomes has facilitated the characterization of insect GPCRs, but the development and utilization of screening assays to identify lead compounds has been slow. Various studies using knock-down technologies or applying the native ligands and/or neuropeptide analogues to pest insects in vivo, have however demonstrated that modifying normal receptor function can have an insecticidal effect. This review presents examples of potential insect neuropeptide receptors that are potential targets for lead compound development, using case studies from three representative pest species, Tribolium castaneum, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and Drosophila suzukii. Functional analysis studies on T. castaneum suggest that GPCRs involved in growth and development (eclosion

  4. A Monte Carlo study of the dynamics of G-protein activation.

    PubMed Central

    Mahama, P A; Linderman, J J

    1994-01-01

    To link quantitatively the cell surface binding of ligand to receptor with the production of cellular responses, it may be necessary to explore early events in signal transduction such as G-protein activation. Two different model frameworks relating receptor/ligand binding to G-protein activation are examined. In the first framework, a simple ordinary differential equation model is used to describe receptor/ligand binding and G-protein activation. In the second framework, the events leading to G-protein activation are simulated using a dynamic Monte Carlo model. In both models, reactions between ligand-bound receptors and G-proteins are assumed to be diffusion-limited. The Monte Carlo model predicts two regimes of G-protein activation, depending upon whether the lifetime of a receptor/ligand complex is long or short compared with the time needed for diffusional encounters of complexes and G-proteins. When the lifetime of a complex is relatively short compared with the diffusion time, the movement of ligand among free receptors by binding and unbinding ("switching") significantly enhances G-protein activation. Receptor antagonists dramatically reduce G-protein activation and, thus, signal transduction in this case, and significant clustering of active G-proteins near receptor/ligand complexes results. The simple ordinary differential equation model poorly predicts G-protein activation for this situation. In the alternative case, when diffusion is relatively fast, ligand movement among receptors is less important and the simple ordinary differential equation model and Monte Carlo model results are similar. In this case, there is little clustering of active G-proteins near receptor/ligand complexes. Results also indicate that as the GTPase activity of the alpha-subunit decreases, the steady-state level of alpha-GTP increases, although temporal sensitivity is compromised. PMID:7811949

  5. Comprehensive analysis of heterotrimeric G-protein complex diversity and their interactions with GPCRs in solution

    PubMed Central

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Schori, Christian; Schöppe, Jendrik; Plückthun, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Agonist binding to G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) triggers signal transduction cascades involving heterotrimeric G proteins as key players. A major obstacle for drug design is the limited knowledge of conformational changes upon agonist binding, the details of interaction with the different G proteins, and the transmission to movements within the G protein. Although a variety of different GPCR/G protein complex structures would be needed, the transient nature of this complex and the intrinsic instability against dissociation make this endeavor very challenging. We have previously evolved GPCR mutants that display higher stability and retain their interaction with G proteins. We aimed at finding all G-protein combinations that preferentially interact with neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) and our stabilized mutants. We first systematically analyzed by coimmunoprecipitation the capability of 120 different G-protein combinations consisting of αi1 or αsL and all possible βγ-dimers to form a heterotrimeric complex. This analysis revealed a surprisingly unrestricted ability of the G-protein subunits to form heterotrimeric complexes, including βγ-dimers previously thought to be nonexistent, except for combinations containing β5. A second screen on coupling preference of all G-protein heterotrimers to NTR1 wild type and a stabilized mutant indicated a preference for those Gαi1βγ combinations containing γ1 and γ11. Heterotrimeric G proteins, including combinations believed to be nonexistent, were purified, and complexes with the GPCR were prepared. Our results shed new light on the combinatorial diversity of G proteins and their coupling to GPCRs and open new approaches to improve the stability of GPCR/G-protein complexes. PMID:25733868

  6. Boolean modeling of transcriptome data reveals novel modes of heterotrimeric G-protein action.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sona; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Wilson, Liza; Li, Song; Zhao, Zhixin; Gookin, Timothy E; Assmann, Sarah M; Albert, Réka

    2010-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate crucial and diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Here, we generate and analyze microarray data from guard cells and leaves of G-protein subunit mutants of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with or without treatment with the stress hormone, abscisic acid. Although G-protein control of the transcriptome has received little attention to date in any system, transcriptome analysis allows us to search for potentially uncommon yet significant signaling mechanisms. We describe the theoretical Boolean mechanisms of G-protein x hormone regulation, and then apply a pattern matching approach to associate gene expression profiles with Boolean models. We find that (1) classical mechanisms of G-protein signaling are well represented. Conversely, some theoretical regulatory modes of the G-protein are not supported; (2) a new mechanism of G-protein signaling is revealed, in which Gbeta regulates gene expression identically in the presence or absence of Galpha; (3) guard cells and leaves favor different G-protein modes in transcriptome regulation, supporting system specificity of G-protein signaling. Our method holds significant promise for analyzing analogous 'switch-like' signal transduction events in any organism. PMID:20531402

  7. Boolean modeling of transcriptome data reveals novel modes of heterotrimeric G-protein action

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sona; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Wilson, Liza; Li, Song; Zhao, Zhixin; Gookin, Timothy E; Assmann, Sarah M; Albert, Réka

    2010-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate crucial and diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Here, we generate and analyze microarray data from guard cells and leaves of G-protein subunit mutants of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with or without treatment with the stress hormone, abscisic acid. Although G-protein control of the transcriptome has received little attention to date in any system, transcriptome analysis allows us to search for potentially uncommon yet significant signaling mechanisms. We describe the theoretical Boolean mechanisms of G-protein × hormone regulation, and then apply a pattern matching approach to associate gene expression profiles with Boolean models. We find that (1) classical mechanisms of G-protein signaling are well represented. Conversely, some theoretical regulatory modes of the G-protein are not supported; (2) a new mechanism of G-protein signaling is revealed, in which Gβ regulates gene expression identically in the presence or absence of Gα; (3) guard cells and leaves favor different G-protein modes in transcriptome regulation, supporting system specificity of G-protein signaling. Our method holds significant promise for analyzing analogous ‘switch-like' signal transduction events in any organism. PMID:20531402

  8. Polycomb Group (PcG) Proteins and Human Cancers: Multifaceted Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Nag, Subhasree; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors that regulate several crucial developmental and physiological processes in the cell. More recently, they have been found to play important roles in human carcinogenesis and cancer development and progression. The deregulation and dysfunction of PcG proteins often lead to blocking or inappropriate activation of developmental pathways, enhancing cellular proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, and increasing the cancer stem cell population. Genetic and molecular investigations of PcG proteins have long been focused on their PcG functions. However, PcG proteins have recently been shown to exert non-polycomb functions, contributing to the regulation of diverse cellular functions. We and others have demonstrated that PcG proteins regulate the expression and function of several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a PcG-independent manner, and PcG proteins are associated with the survival of patients with cancer. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the research on PcG proteins, including both the polycomb-repressive and non-polycomb functions. We specifically focus on the mechanisms by which PcG proteins play roles in cancer initiation, development, and progression. Finally, we discuss the potential value of PcG proteins as molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer, and as molecular targets for cancer therapy. PMID:26227500

  9. Lipid G Protein-coupled Receptor Ligand Identification Using β-Arrestin PathHunter™ Assay

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong; Chu, Alan; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Shelton, Fabiola; Otero, Francella; Nguyen, Deborah G.; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Chen, Yu Alice

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of orphan G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been reported to be activated by lipid ligands, such as lysophosphatidic acid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and cannabinoids, for which there are already well established receptors. These new ligand claims are controversial due to either lack of independent confirmations or conflicting reports. We used the β-arrestin PathHunter™ assay system, a newly developed, generic GPCR assay format that measures β-arrestin binding to GPCRs, to evaluate lipid receptor and ligand pairing. This assay eliminates interference from endogenous receptors on the parental cells because it measures a signal that is specifically generated by the tagged receptor and is immediately downstream of receptor activation. We screened a large number of newly “deorphaned” receptors (GPR23, GPR92, GPR55, G2A, GPR18, GPR3, GPR6, GPR12, and GPR63) and control receptors against a collection of ∼400 lipid molecules to try to identify the receptor ligand in an unbiased fashion. GPR92 was confirmed to be a lysophosphatidic acid receptor with weaker responses to farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate. The putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55 responded strongly to AM251, rimonabant, and lysophosphatidylinositol but only very weakly to endocannabinoids. G2A receptor was confirmed to be an oxidized free fatty acid receptor. In addition, we discovered that 3,3′-diindolylmethane, a dietary molecule from cruciferous vegetables, which has known anti-cancer properties, to be a CB2 receptor partial agonist, with binding affinity around 1 μm. The anti-inflammatory effect of 3,3′-diindolylmethane in RAW264.7 cells was shown to be partially mediated by CB2. PMID:19286662

  10. Activation of family C G-protein-coupled receptors by the tripeptide glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghua; Yao, Yi; Kuang, Donghui; Hampson, David R

    2006-03-31

    The Family C G-protein-coupled receptors include the metabotropic glutamate receptors, the gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the body, and a diverse group of sensory receptors that encompass the amino acid-activated fish 5.24 chemosensory receptor, the mammalian T1R taste receptors, and the V2R pheromone receptors. A common feature of Family C receptors is the presence of an amino acid binding site. In this study, a preliminary in silico analysis of the size and shape of the amino acid binding pocket in selected Family C receptors suggested that some members of this family could accommodate larger ligands such as peptides. Subsequent screening and docking experiments identified GSH as a potential ligand or co-ligand at the fish 5.24 receptor and the rat CaSR. These in silico predictions were confirmed using an [3H]GSH radioligand binding assay and a fluorescence-based functional assay performed on wild-type and chimeric receptors. Glutathione was shown to act as an orthosteric agonist at the 5.24 receptor and as a potent enhancer of calcium-induced activation of the CaSR. Within the mammalian receptors, this effect was specific to the CaSR because GSH neither directly activated nor potentiated other Family C receptors including GPRC6A (the putative mammalian homolog of the fish 5.24 receptor), the metabotropic glutamate receptors, or the GABAB receptor. Our findings reveal a potential new role for GSH and suggest that this peptide may act as an endogenous modulator of the CaSR in the parathyroid gland where this receptor is known to control the release of parathyroid hormone, and in other tissues such as the brain and gastrointestinal tract where the role of the calcium receptor appears to subserve other, as yet unknown, physiological functions. PMID:16455645

  11. The G protein-coupled receptor GPR157 regulates neuronal differentiation of radial glial progenitors through the Gq-IP3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Takeo, Yutaka; Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Sanada, Kamon

    2016-01-01

    The ability of radial glial progenitors (RGPs) to generate cortical neurons is determined by local extracellular factors and signaling pathways intrinsic to RGPs. Here we find that GPR157, an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, localizes to RGPs’ primary cilia exposed to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). GPR157 couples with Gq-class of the heterotrimeric G-proteins and signals through IP3-mediated Ca2+ cascade. Activation of GPR157-Gq signaling enhances neuronal differentiation of RGPs whereas interfering with GPR157-Gq-IP3 cascade in RGPs suppresses neurogenesis. We also detect the presence of putative ligand(s) for GPR157 in the CSF, and demonstrate the increased ability of the CSF to activate GPR157 at neurogenic phase. Thus, GPR157-Gq signaling at the primary cilia of RGPs is activated by the CSF and contributes to neurogenesis. PMID:27142930

  12. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Phan, Nguyen; Chen, Jay; Panstruga, Ralph; Uhrig, Joachim; Jones, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of G{alpha}, G{beta}, and G{gamma} subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification.

  13. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, Jimmy; Trusov, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  14. Plant G-Proteins Come of Age: Breaking the Bond with Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Trusov, Yuri; Botella, José R.

    2016-01-01

    G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs from the accepted animal paradigm. PMID:27252940

  15. Characterization of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex and its regulator from the green alga Chara braunii expands the evolutionary breadth of plant G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Pandey, Sona

    2013-12-01

    The lack of heterotrimeric G-protein homologs in the sequenced genomes of green algae has led to the hypothesis that, in plants, this signaling mechanism coevolved with the embryophytic life cycle and the acquisition of terrestrial habitat. Given the large evolutionary gap that exists between the chlorophyte green algae and most basal land plants, the bryophytes, we evaluated the presence of this signaling complex in a charophyte green alga, Chara braunii, proposed to be the closest living relative of land plants. The C. braunii genome encodes for the entire G-protein complex, the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, and the REGULATOR OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING (RGS) protein. The biochemical properties of these proteins and their cross-species functionality show that they are functional homologs of canonical G-proteins. The subunit-specific interactions between CbGα and CbGβ, CbGβ and CbGγ, and CbGα and CbRGS are also conserved, establishing the existence of functional G-protein complex-based signaling mechanisms in green algae. PMID:24179134

  16. Conformational flexibility and structural dynamics in GPCR-mediated G protein activation: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Preininger, Anita M.; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of G proteins and their cognate receptors, both alone and in complex, are becoming increasingly accessible to experimental techniques. Understanding the conformational changes and timelines which govern these changes can lead to new insights into the processes of ligand binding and associated G protein activation. Experimental systems may involve the use of, or otherwise stabilize, non-native environments. This can complicate our understanding of structural and dynamical features of processes such as the ionic lock, Tryptophan toggle, and G protein flexibility. While elements in the receptor’s transmembrane helices and the C-terminal α5 helix of Gα undergo well defined structural changes, regions subject to conformational flexibility may be important in fine-tuning the interactions between activated receptors and G proteins. The pairing of computational and experimental approaches will continue to provide powerful tools to probe the conformation and dynamics of receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:23602809

  17. Signalling functions and biochemical properties of pertussis toxin-resistant G-proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, T A; Casey, P J

    1997-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) has been widely used as a reagent to characterize the involvement of heterotrimeric G-proteins in signalling. This toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of specific G-protein alpha subunits of the Gi family, and this modification prevents the occurrence of the receptor-G-protein interaction. This review focuses on the biochemical properties and signalling of those G-proteins historically classified as 'PTX-resistant' due to the inability of the toxin to influence signalling through them. These G-proteins include members of the Gq and G12 families and one Gi family member, i.e. Gz. Signalling pathways controlled by these G-proteins are well characterized only for Gq family members, which activate specific isoforms of phospholipase C, resulting in increases in intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), among other responses. While members of the G12 family have been implicated in processes that regulate cell growth, and Gz has been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase, the specific downstream targets to these G-proteins in vivo have not been clearly established. Since two of these proteins, G12 alpha and Gz alpha, are excellent substrates for PKC, there is the potential for cross-talk between their signalling and Gq-dependent processes leading to activation of PKC. In tissues that express these G-proteins, a number of guanine-nucleotide-dependent, PTX-resistant, signalling pathways have been defined for which the G-protein involved has not been identified. This review summarizes these pathways and discusses the evidence both for the participation of specific PTX-resistant G-proteins in them and for the regulation of these processes by PKC. PMID:9032437

  18. Surface density of the Hendra G protein modulates Hendra F protein-promoted membrane fusion: Role for Hendra G protein trafficking and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, Shannon D.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2007-07-05

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels of glycoproteins expressed in transfected cells. Using two different fusion assays, we found a marked increase in fusion when expression of the Hendra G protein was increased, with a 1:1 molar ratio of Hendra F:G on the cell surface resulting in optimal membrane fusion. Our results also showed that Hendra G protein levels are modulated by both more rapid protein turnover and slower protein trafficking than is seen for Hendra F.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of neuropeptides and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) for neuropeptides in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-01

    The genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors were identified in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) by transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Forty-eight candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or peptide hormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of neuropeptide-like precursor 2 (NPLP2) and trissin. The gene coding for prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) was first identified from hemimetabolous insect. A total of 57 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were identified and phylogenetic analysis showed most of them to be closely related to insect GPCRs. A notable finding was the occurrence of vertebrate hormone receptors, thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR)-like GPCR and parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR)-like GPCRs. These results suggest that N. lugens possesses the most comprehensive neuropeptide system yet found in insects. Moreover, our findings demonstrate the power of RNA-seq as a tool for analyzing the neuropeptide-related genes in the absence of whole genome sequence information. PMID:23932938

  20. Domain Organization and Conformational Plasticity of the G Protein Effector, PDE6*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhixian; He, Feng; Constantine, Ryan; Baker, Matthew L.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Schmid, Michael F.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Agosto, Melina A.

    2015-01-01

    The cGMP phosphodiesterase of rod photoreceptor cells, PDE6, is the key effector enzyme in phototransduction. Two large catalytic subunits, PDE6α and -β, each contain one catalytic domain and two non-catalytic GAF domains, whereas two small inhibitory PDE6γ subunits allow tight regulation by the G protein transducin. The structure of holo-PDE6 in complex with the ROS-1 antibody Fab fragment was determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The ∼11 Å map revealed previously unseen features of PDE6, and each domain was readily fit with high resolution structures. A structure of PDE6 in complex with prenyl-binding protein (PrBP/δ) indicated the location of the PDE6 C-terminal prenylations. Reconstructions of complexes with Fab fragments bound to N or C termini of PDE6γ revealed that PDE6γ stretches from the catalytic domain at one end of the holoenzyme to the GAF-A domain at the other. Removal of PDE6γ caused dramatic structural rearrangements, which were reversed upon its restoration. PMID:25809480

  1. RTA, a candidate G protein-coupled receptor: cloning, sequencing, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P C; Figler, R A; Corjay, M H; Barber, C M; Adam, N; Harcus, D R; Lynch, K R

    1990-01-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones, encoding a protein that is a member of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor superfamily, were isolated by screening rat genomic and thoracic aorta cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Sequence analyses of these clones showed that they encode a 343-amino acid protein (named RTA). The RTA gene is single copy, as demonstrated by restriction mapping and Southern blotting of genomic clones and rat genomic DNA. Sequence analysis of the genomic clone further showed that the RTA gene has an intron interrupting the region encoding the amino terminus of the protein. RTA RNA sequences are relatively abundant throughout the gut, vas deferens, uterus, and aorta but are only barely detectable (on Northern blots) in liver, kidney, lung, and salivary gland. In the rat brain, RTA sequences are markedly abundant in the cerebellum. RTA is most closely related to the mas oncogene (34% identity), which has been suggested to be a forebrain angiotensin receptor. We cannot detect angiotensin binding to the RTA protein after introducing the cognate cDNA or mRNA into COS cells or Xenopus oocytes, respectively, nor can we detect an electrophysiologic response in the oocyte after application of angiotensin peptides. We conclude that RTA is not an angiotensin receptor; to date, we have been unable to identify its ligand. Images PMID:2109324

  2. Molecular Genetic Maps in Wild Emmer Wheat, Triticum dicoccoides: Genome-Wide Coverage, Massive Negative Interference, and Putative Quasi-Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junhua; Korol, Abraham B.; Fahima, Tzion; Röder, Marion S.; Ronin, Yefim I.; Li, Youchun C.; Nevo, Eviatar

    2000-01-01

    The main objectives of the study reported here were to construct a molecular map of wild emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccoides, to characterize the marker-related anatomy of the genome, and to evaluate segregation and recombination patterns upon crossing T. dicoccoides with its domesticated descendant Triticum durum (cultivar Langdon). The total map length exceeded 3000 cM and possibly covered the entire tetraploid genome (AABB). Clusters of molecular markers were observed on most of the 14 chromosomes. AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers manifested a random distribution among homologous groups, but not among genomes and chromosomes. Genetic differentiation between T. dicoccoides and T. durum was attributed mainly to the B genome as revealed by AFLP markers. The segregation-distorted markers were mainly clustered on 4A, 5A, and 5B chromosomes. Homeoalleles, differentially conferring the vigor of gametes, might be responsible for the distortion on 5A and 5B chromosomes. Quasilinkage, deviation from free recombination between markers of nonhomologous chromosomes, was discovered. Massive negative interference was observed in most of the chromosomes (an excess of double crossovers in adjacent intervals relative to the expected rates on the assumption of no interference). The general pattern of distribution of islands of negative interference included near-centromeric location, spanning the centromere, and median/subterminal location. [An appendix describing the molecular marker loci is available as an online supplement at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11042150

  3. Physical mapping of chromosome 17p13.3 in the region of a putative tumor suppressor gene important in medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.D.; Daneshvar, L.; Willert, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Deletion mapping of a medulloblastoma tumor panel revealed loss of distal chromosome 17p13.3 sequences in tumors from 14 of 32 patients (44%). Of the 14 tumors showing loss of heterozygosity by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, 14 of 14 (100%) displayed loss of the telomeric marker p144-D6 (D17S34), while a probe for the ABR gene on 17p13.3 was lost in 7 of 8 (88%) informative cases. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we localized the polymorphic marker (VNTR-A) of the ABR gene locus to within 220 kb of the p144-D6 locus. A cosmid contig constructed in this region was used to demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the ABR gene is oriented transcriptionally 5{prime} to 3{prime} toward the telomere. This report provides new physical mapping data for the ABR gene, which has not been previously shown to be deleted in medulloblastoma. These results provide further evidence for the existence of a second tumor suppressor gene distinct from p53 on distal chromosome 17p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Multimodular biosensors reveal a novel platform for activation of G proteins by growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Krishna K.; Aznar, Nicolas; Laederich, Melanie B.; Ma, Gary S.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Newton, Alexandra C.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Environmental cues are transmitted to the interior of the cell via a complex network of signaling hubs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two such major signaling hubs in eukaryotes. Conventionally, canonical signal transduction via trimeric G proteins is thought to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors. Here we used molecular engineering to develop modular fluorescent biosensors that exploit the remarkable specificity of bimolecular recognition, i.e., of both G proteins and RTKs, and reveal the workings of a novel platform for activation of G proteins by RTKs in single living cells. Comprised of the unique modular makeup of guanidine exchange factor Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/girdin, a guanidine exchange factor that links G proteins to a variety of RTKs, these biosensors provide direct evidence that RTK–GIV–Gαi ternary complexes are formed in living cells and that Gαi is transactivated within minutes after growth factor stimulation at the plasma membrane. Thus, GIV-derived biosensors provide a versatile strategy for visualizing, monitoring, and manipulating the dynamic association of Gαi with RTKs for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins in cells and illuminate a fundamental signaling event regulated by GIV during diverse cellular processes and pathophysiologic states. PMID:25713130

  5. G-protein activation, identification and immunolocalization in pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea of moths.

    PubMed

    Laue, M; Maida, R; Redkozubov, A

    1997-04-01

    Electrophysiological in situ recordings from pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea of Bombyx mori males with a recording pipette which contained G-protein-activating fluoride, showed receptor cell activity similar to that evoked by pheromone stimulation. This suggests that G-proteins might be physiologically active in olfactory sensilla of insects in situ. Biochemical experiments using specific antibodies revealed the presence of G-protein, belonging to the Gq family, in antennal preparations. Similar G-protein was identified in sensory hair preparations of Antheraea pernyi which contained only cuticle, sensillum lymph and dendritic material. Moreover, the absence of this G-protein in pure sensillum lymph preparations indicates its association with the receptive dendrites. This particular association could be shown by immunolabelling studies at the ultrastructural level. Strong specific labelling of membranes of receptor-cell dendrites was found in all types of olfactory sensilla present on the antenna of the silkmoths. Additional specific labelling of apical membranes of auxiliary cells, epidermal cells and membranes forming the axon/glia interface demonstrated that this G-protein is not restricted to the sensory dendrites and that other signal-transduction pathways could be present at these membranes. In summary, the experiments imply a participation of G-protein of the Gq family in signal transduction of olfactory receptor cells in moths. PMID:9042782

  6. How much do we know about the coupling of G-proteins to serotonin receptors?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involved in a variety of psychiatric disorders. G-proteins, heterotrimeric complexes that couple to multiple receptors, are activated when their receptor is bound by the appropriate ligand. Activation triggers a cascade of further signalling events that ultimately result in cell function changes. Each of the several known G-protein types can activate multiple pathways. Interestingly, since several G-proteins can couple to the same serotonin receptor type, receptor activation can result in induction of different pathways. To reach a better understanding of the role, interactions and expression of G-proteins a literature search was performed in order to list all the known heterotrimeric combinations and serotonin receptor complexes. Public databases were analysed to collect transcript and protein expression data relating to G-proteins in neural tissues. Only a very small number of heterotrimeric combinations and G-protein-receptor complexes out of the possible thousands suggested by expression data analysis have been examined experimentally. In addition this has mostly been obtained using insect, hamster, rat and, to a lesser extent, human cell lines. Besides highlighting which interactions have not been explored, our findings suggest additional possible interactions that should be examined based on our expression data analysis. PMID:25011628

  7. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:24614119

  8. Functional gene group analysis indicates no role for heterotrimeric G proteins in cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Hill, W David; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Davies, Gail; Liewald, David Cherry McLachlan; Payton, Anthony; Craig, Leone C A; Whalley, Lawrence J; Horan, Mike; Ollier, William; Starr, John M; Pendleton, Neil; Posthuma, Danielle; Bates, Timothy C; Deary, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Previous functional gene group analyses implicated common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in heterotrimeric G protein coding genes as being associated with differences in human intelligence. Here, we sought to replicate this finding using five independent cohorts of older adults including current IQ and childhood IQ, and using both gene- and SNP-based analytic strategies. No significant associations were found between variation in heterotrimeric G protein genes and intelligence in any cohort at either of the two time points. These results indicate that, whereas G protein systems are important in cognition, common genetic variation in these genes is unlikely to be a substantial influence on human intelligence differences. PMID:24626473

  9. G-protein diseases furnish a model for the turn-on switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iiri, Taroh; Farfel, Zvi; Bourne, Henry R.

    1998-07-01

    How does a trimeric G protein on the inside of a cell membrane respond to activation by a transmembrane receptor? G-protein mutations in patients with hypertension and inherited endocrine disorders enhance or block signals from stimulated receptors. In combination with three-dimensional crystal structures and results from biochemical experiments, the phenotypes produced by these mutations suggest a model for the molecular activation mechanism that relays hormonal and sensory signals transmitted by many transmembrane receptors.

  10. β-Arrestin recruitment and G protein signaling by the atypical human chemokine decoy receptor CCX-CKR.

    PubMed

    Watts, Anne O; Verkaar, Folkert; van der Lee, Miranda M C; Timmerman, Claudia A W; Kuijer, Martien; van Offenbeek, Jody; van Lith, Lambertus H C J; Smit, Martine J; Leurs, Rob; Zaman, Guido J R; Vischer, Henry F

    2013-03-01

    Chemokine receptors form a large subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors that predominantly activate heterotrimeric Gi proteins and are involved in immune cell migration. CCX-CKR is an atypical chemokine receptor with high affinity for CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 chemokines, but is not known to activate intracellular signaling pathways. However, CCX-CKR acts as decoy receptor and efficiently internalizes these chemokines, thereby preventing their interaction with other chemokine receptors, like CCR7 and CCR9. Internalization of fluorescently labeled CCL19 correlated with β-arrestin2-GFP translocation. Moreover, recruitment of β-arrestins to CCX-CKR in response to CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 was demonstrated using enzyme-fragment complementation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methods. To unravel why CCX-CKR is unable to activate Gi signaling, CCX-CKR chimeras were constructed by substituting its intracellular loops with the corresponding CCR7 or CCR9 domains. The signaling properties of chimeric CCX-CKR receptors were characterized using a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-driven reporter gene assay. Unexpectedly, wild type CCX-CKR and a subset of the chimeras induced an increase in CRE activity in response to CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 in the presence of the Gi inhibitor pertussis toxin. CCX-CKR signaling to CRE required an intact DRY motif. These data suggest that inactive Gi proteins impair CCX-CKR signaling most likely by hindering the interaction of this receptor with pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins that transduce signaling to CRE. On the other hand, recruitment of the putative signaling scaffold β-arrestin to CCX-CKR in response to chemokines might allow activation of yet to be identified signal transduction pathways. PMID:23341447

  11. Cell surface localization and processing of the ComG proteins, required for DNA binding during transformation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y S; Breidt, F; Dubnau, D

    1998-08-01

    The comG operon of Bacillus subtilis encodes seven proteins essential for the binding of transforming DNA to the competent cell surface. We have explored the processing of the ComG proteins and the cellular localization of six of them. All of the proteins were found to be membrane associated. The four proteins with N-terminal sequence motifs typical of type 4 pre-pilins (ComGC, GD, GE and GG) are processed by a pathway that requires the product of comC, also an essential competence gene. The unprocessed forms of ComGC and GD behave like integral membrane proteins. Pre-ComGG differs from pre-ComGC and pre-ComGD, in that it is accessible to proteolysis only from the cytoplasmic face of the membrane and at least a portion of it behaves like a peripheral membrane protein. The mature forms of these proteins are translocated to the outer face of the membrane and are liberated when peptidoglycan is hydrolysed by lysozyme or mutanolysin. ComGG exists in part as a disulphide-cross-linked homodimer in vivo. ComGC was found to possess an intramolecular disulphide bond. The previously identified homodimer form of this protein is not stabilized by disulphide bond formation. ComGF behaves as an integral membrane protein, while ComGA, a putative ATPase, is located on the inner face of the membrane as a peripheral membrane protein. Possible roles of the ComG proteins in DNA binding to the competent cell surface are discussed in the light of these and other results. PMID:9723928

  12. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E; Pelicci, P G; Pouysségur, J; Van Obberghen-Schilling, E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have recently been elucidated biochemically and genetically. The present study was undertaken to determine whether common signaling components are used by these two distinct classes of receptors. Here we report that the adaptor protein Shc, is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following stimulation of the thrombin receptor in growth-responsive CCL39 fibroblasts. Shc phosphorylation by thrombin or the thrombin receptor agonist peptide is maximal by 15 min and persists for > or = 2 h. Following thrombin stimulation, phosphorylated Shc is recruited to Grb2 complexes. One or more pertussis toxin-insensitive proteins appear to mediate this effect, since (i) pertussis toxin pre-treatment of cells does not blunt the action of thrombin and (ii) Shc phosphorylation on tyrosine can be stimulated by the muscarinic m1 receptor. Shc phosphorylation does not appear to involve protein kinase C, since the addition of 4-beta-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate has no effect. Rather, thrombin-induced Shc phosphorylation is enhanced in cells depleted of phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C isoforms. Expression of mutant Shc proteins defective in Grb2 binding displays a dominant-negative effect on thrombin-stimulated p44 MAP kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. Images PMID:8605873

  13. Diverse activation pathways in class A GPCRs converge near the G-protein-coupling region.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, A J; Deupi, Xavier; Lebon, Guillaume; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Flock, Tilman; Miljus, Tamara; Balaji, Santhanam; Bouvier, Michel; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Tate, Christopher G; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-25

    Class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large family of membrane proteins that mediate a wide variety of physiological functions, including vision, neurotransmission and immune responses. They are the targets of nearly one-third of all prescribed medicinal drugs such as beta blockers and antipsychotics. GPCR activation is facilitated by extracellular ligands and leads to the recruitment of intracellular G proteins. Structural rearrangements of residue contacts in the transmembrane domain serve as 'activation pathways' that connect the ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein-coupling region within the receptor. In order to investigate the similarities in activation pathways across class A GPCRs, we analysed 27 GPCRs from diverse subgroups for which structures of active, inactive or both states were available. Here we show that, despite the diversity in activation pathways between receptors, the pathways converge near the G-protein-coupling region. This convergence is mediated by a highly conserved structural rearrangement of residue contacts between transmembrane helices 3, 6 and 7 that releases G-protein-contacting residues. The convergence of activation pathways may explain how the activation steps initiated by diverse ligands enable GPCRs to bind a common repertoire of G proteins. PMID:27525504

  14. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  15. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of G-Protein Cycle during Nodule Formation in Soybean[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein complexes comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits and their regulatory RGS (Regulator of G-protein Signaling) protein are conserved in all eukaryotes. We have shown that the specific Gβ and Gγ proteins of a soybean (Glycine max) heterotrimeric G-protein complex are involved in regulation of nodulation. We now demonstrate the role of Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1)-mediated phosphorylation in regulation of the G-protein cycle during nodulation in soybean. We also show that during nodulation, the G-protein cycle is regulated by the activity of RGS proteins. Lower or higher expression of RGS proteins results in fewer or more nodules, respectively. NFR1 interacts with RGS proteins and phosphorylates them. Analysis of phosphorylated RGS protein identifies specific amino acids that, when phosphorylated, result in significantly higher GTPase accelerating activity. These data point to phosphorylation-based regulation of G-protein signaling during nodule development. We propose that active NFR1 receptors phosphorylate and activate RGS proteins, which help maintain the Gα proteins in their inactive, trimeric conformation, resulting in successful nodule development. Alternatively, RGS proteins might also have a direct role in regulating nodulation because overexpression of their phospho-mimic version leads to partial restoration of nodule formation in nod49 mutants. PMID:26498905

  16. X-ray structure of the mammalian GIRK2 – βγ G protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Whorton, Matthew R.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2015-01-01

    G protein-gated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels allow neurotransmitters, via G protein-coupled receptor stimulation, to control cellular electrical excitability. In cardiac and neuronal cells this control regulates heart rate and neural circuit activity. We present the 3.5 Å resolution crystal structure of the mammalian GIRK2 channel in complex with βγ G protein subunits, the central signaling complex that links G protein-coupled receptor stimulation to K+ channel activity. Short-range atomic and long-range electrostatic interactions stabilize four βγ G protein subunits at the interfaces between four K+ channel subunits, inducing a pre-open state of the channel. The pre-open state exhibits a conformation that is intermediate between the closed and constitutively active mutant, open conformations. The resultant structural picture is compatible with “membrane delimited” activation of GIRK channels by G proteins and the characteristic burst kinetics of channel gating. The structures also permit a conceptual understanding of how the signaling lipid PIP2 and intracellular Na+ ions participate in multi-ligand regulation of GIRK channels. PMID:23739333

  17. Retinal Cone Photoreceptors Require Phosducin-Like Protein 1 for G Protein Complex Assembly and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Christopher M.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Blake, Devon R.; Chen, Ching-Kang; Baehr, Wolfgang; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Willardson, Barry M.

    2015-01-01

    G protein β subunits (Gβ) play essential roles in phototransduction as part of G protein βγ (Gβγ) and regulator of G protein signaling 9 (RGS9)-Gβ5 heterodimers. Both are obligate dimers that rely on the cytosolic chaperone CCT and its co-chaperone PhLP1 to form complexes from their nascent polypeptides. The importance of PhLP1 in the assembly process was recently demonstrated in vivo in a retinal rod-specific deletion of the Phlp1 gene. To test whether this is a general mechanism that also applies to other cell types, we disrupted the Phlp1 gene specifically in mouse cones and measured the effects on G protein expression and cone visual signal transduction. In PhLP1-deficient cones, expression of cone transducin (Gt2) and RGS9-Gβ5 subunits was dramatically reduced, resulting in a 27-fold decrease in sensitivity and a 38-fold delay in cone photoresponse recovery. These results demonstrate the essential role of PhLP1 in cone G protein complex formation. Our findings reveal a common mechanism of Gβγ and RGS9-Gβ5 assembly in rods and cones, highlighting the importance of PhLP1 and CCT-mediated Gβ complex formation in G protein signaling. PMID:25659125

  18. X-ray structure of the mammalian GIRK2-βγ G-protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Whorton, Matthew R.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2013-07-30

    G-protein-gated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels allow neurotransmitters, through G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation, to control cellular electrical excitability. In cardiac and neuronal cells this control regulates heart rate and neural circuit activity, respectively. Here we present the 3.5Å resolution crystal structure of the mammalian GIRK2 channel in complex with βγ G-protein subunits, the central signalling complex that links G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation to K+ channel activity. Short-range atomic and long-range electrostatic interactions stabilize four βγ G-protein subunits at the interfaces between four K+ channel subunits, inducing a pre-open state of the channel. The pre-open state exhibits a conformation that is intermediate between the closed conformation and the open conformation of the constitutively active mutant. The resultant structural picture is compatible with ‘membrane delimited’ activation of GIRK channels by G proteins and the characteristic burst kinetics of channel gating. The structures also permit a conceptual understanding of how the signalling lipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and intracellular Na+ ions participate in multi-ligand regulation of GIRK channels.

  19. Small G proteins as key regulators of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John A.; Chen, Xuequn; Sabbatini, Maria E.

    2009-01-01

    Small GTP-binding (G) proteins act as molecular switches to regulate a number of cellular processes, including vesicular transport. Emerging evidence indicates that small G proteins regulate a number of steps in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Diverse small G proteins have been localized at discrete compartments along the secretory pathway and particularly on the secretory granule. Rab3D, Rab27B, and Rap1 are present on the granule membrane and play a role in the steps leading up to exocytosis. Whether the function of these G proteins is simply to ensure appropriate targeting or if they are involved as regulatory molecules is discussed. Most evidence suggests that Rab3D and Rab27B play a role in tethering the secretory granule to its target membrane. Other Rabs have been identified on the secretory granule that are associated with different steps in the secretory pathway. The Rho family small G proteins RhoA and Rac1 also regulate secretion through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Possible mechanisms for regulation of these G proteins and their effector molecules are considered. PMID:19088252

  20. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells.

    PubMed

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L; Grunddal, Kaare V; Zhao, Mirabella; Barir-Jensen, Dominique; Nygaard, Eva B; Petersen, Natalia; Holst, Jens J; Schwartz, Thue W

    2015-11-01

    In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we have characterized the G protein-coupled receptors expressed in gastric Sst-RFP-positive cells and probed their effects on SST secretion in primary cell cultures. Surprisingly, besides SST, amylin and PYY were also highly enriched in the SST cells. Several receptors found to regulate SST secretion were highly expressed and/or enriched. 1) The metabolite receptors calcium-sensing receptor and free fatty acid receptor 4 (GPR120) functioned as positive and negative regulators, respectively. 2) Among the neurotransmitter receptors, adrenergic receptors α1a, α2a, α2b, and β1 were all highly expressed, with norepinephrine and isoproterenol acting as positive regulators. The muscarinic receptor M3 acted as a positive regulator, whereas M4 was conceivably a negative regulator. 3) Of the hormone receptors, the GLP-1 and GIP receptors, CCKb (stimulated by both CCK and gastrin) and surprisingly the melanocortin MC1 receptor were all positive regulators. 4) The neuropeptide receptors for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide acted as positive regulators, no effect was observed using galanin and nociceptin although transcripts for the corresponding receptors appeared highly expressed. 5) The SST receptors 1 and 2 functioned in an autocrine negative feedback loop. Thus, the article provides a comprehensive map of receptors through which SST secretion is regulated by hormones, neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and metabolites that act directly on the SST cells in the gastric mucosa. PMID:26181106

  1. A Broadly Conserved G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Phosphorylation Mechanism Controls Drosophila Smoothened Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Dominic; Cheng, Shuofei; Faubert, Denis; Hipfner, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is essential for normal growth, patterning, and homeostasis of many tissues in diverse organisms, and is misregulated in a variety of diseases including cancer. Cytoplasmic Hedgehog signaling is activated by multisite phosphorylation of the seven-pass transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo) in its cytoplasmic C-terminus. Aside from a short membrane-proximal stretch, the sequence of the C-terminus is highly divergent in different phyla, and the evidence suggests that the precise mechanism of Smo activation and transduction of the signal to downstream effectors also differs. To clarify the conserved role of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in Smo regulation, we mapped four clusters of phosphorylation sites in the membrane-proximal C-terminus of Drosophila Smo that are phosphorylated by Gprk2, one of the two fly GRKs. Phosphorylation at these sites enhances Smo dimerization and increases but is not essential for Smo activity. Three of these clusters overlap with regulatory phosphorylation sites in mouse Smo and are highly conserved throughout the bilaterian lineages, suggesting that they serve a common function. Consistent with this, we find that a C-terminally truncated form of Drosophila Smo consisting of just the highly conserved core, including Gprk2 regulatory sites, can recruit the downstream effector Costal-2 and activate target gene expression, in a Gprk2-dependent manner. These results indicate that GRK phosphorylation in the membrane proximal C-terminus is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism of Smo regulation, and point to a higher degree of similarity in the regulation and signaling mechanisms of bilaterian Smo proteins than has previously been recognized. PMID:25009998

  2. G protein beta gamma subunits stimulate phosphorylation of Shc adapter protein.

    PubMed Central

    Touhara, K; Hawes, B E; van Biesen, T; Lefkowitz, R J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation by pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi-coupled receptors is known to involve the beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (G beta gamma), p21ras activation, and an as-yet-unidentified tyrosine kinase. To investigate the mechanism of G beta gamma-stimulated p21ras activation, G beta gamma-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation was examined by overexpressing G beta gamma or alpha 2-C10 adrenergic receptors (ARs) that couple to Gi in COS-7 cells. Immunoprecipitation of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins revealed a 2- to 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation of two proteins of approximately 50 kDa (designated as p52) in G beta gamma-transfected cells or in alpha 2-C10 AR-transfected cells stimulated with the agonist UK-14304. The latter response was pertussis toxin sensitive. These proteins (p52) were also specifically immunoprecipitated with anti-Shc antibodies and comigrated with two Shc proteins, 46 and 52 kDa. The G beta gamma- or alpha 2-C10 AR-stimulated p52 (Shc) phosphorylation was inhibited by coexpression of the carboxyl terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (a G beta gamma-binding pleckstrin homology domain peptide) or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, but not by a dominant negative mutant of p21ras. Worthmannin, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibited phosphorylation of p52 (Shc), implying involvement of PI3K. These results suggest that G beta gamma-stimulated Shc phosphorylation represents an early step in the pathway leading to p21ras activation, similar to the mechanism utilized by growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7568118

  3. The G protein β subunit controls virulence and multiple growth- and development-related traits in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Tzima, Aliki K; Paplomatas, Epaminondas J; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Kang, Seogchan

    2012-04-01

    To gain insight into the role of G protein-mediated signaling in virulence and development of the soilborne, wilt causing fungus Verticillium dahliae, the G protein β subunit gene (named as VGB) was disrupted in tomato race 1 strain of V. dahliae. A resulting mutant strain, 70ΔGb15, displayed drastic reduction in virulence, increased microsclerotia formation and conidiation, and decreased ethylene production compared to the corresponding wild type (wt) strain 70wt-r1. Moreover, 70ΔGb15 exhibited an elongated rather than radial growth pattern on agar media. A transformant of 70ΔGb15 (named as 70ΔGbPKAC1) that carries an extra copy of VdPKAC1, a V. dahliae gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A, exhibited wt growth pattern and conidiation, was unable to form microsclerotia, produced high amounts of ethylene, and exhibited virulence between that of 70ΔGb15 and 70wt-r1 on tomato plants. Phenotypical changes observed in 70ΔGb15 and 70ΔGbPKAC1 correlated with transcriptional changes in several genes involved in signaling (MAP kinase VMK1) and development (hydrophobin VDH1 and ACC synthase ACS1) of V. dahliae. Results from the present work suggest a linkage between VGB and VdPKAC1 signaling pathways in regulating virulence, hormone production and development in V. dahliae. PMID:22387367

  4. Comparison of Class A and D G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Common Features in Structure and Activation†

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Markus; Hornak, Viktor; Smith, Steven O.; Konopka, James B.

    2005-01-01

    All G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) share a common seven TM helix architecture and the ability to activate heterotrimeric G proteins. Nevertheless, these receptors have widely divergent sequences with no significant homology. We present a detailed structure–function comparison of the very divergent Class A and D receptors to address whether there is a common activation mechanism across the GPCR superfamily. The Class A and D receptors are represented by the vertebrate visual pigment rhodopsin and the yeast α-factor pheromone receptor Ste2, respectively. Conserved amino acids within each specific receptor class and amino acids where mutation alters receptor function were located in the structures of rhodopsin and Ste2 to assess whether there are functionally equivalent positions or regions within these receptors. We find several general similarities that are quite striking. First, strongly polar amino acids mediate helix interactions. Their mutation generally leads to loss of function or constitutive activity. Second, small and weakly polar amino acids facilitate tight helix packing. Third, proline is essential at similar positions in transmembrane helices 6 and 7 of both receptors. Mapping the specific location of the conserved amino acids and sites of constitutively active mutations identified conserved microdomains on transmembrane helices H3, H6, and H7, suggesting that there are underlying similarities in the mechanism of the widely divergent Class A and Class D receptors. PMID:15966721

  5. Regulator of G protein signaling 8 inhibits protease-activated receptor 1/Gi/o signaling by forming a distinct G protein-dependent complex in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Ghil, Sungho

    2016-05-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane-domain-possessing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by extracellular stimuli elicits intracellular responses. One class of GPCRs-protease-activated receptors (PARs)-is activated by endogenous proteases, such as thrombin and trypsin. Members of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family stimulate GTP hydrolysis of G protein alpha (Gα) subunits, thereby inhibiting GPCR/Gα-mediated signaling. We previously reported that RGS2 and RGS4 inhibit PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling by interacting with PAR1 in a Gα-dependent manner. Here, employing the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technique, we identified RGS8 as a novel PAR1-interacting protein. Very little BRET activity was observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven) and RGS8-Luciferase (RGS8-Luc) in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of Gαo, BRET activity was specifically and significantly increased. This interaction was confirmed by biochemical and immunofluorescence assays. Notably, RGS8 inhibited PAR1/Gαi/o-mediated adenylyl cyclase and ERK activation, and prevented Gαo-induced neurite outgrowth and activation of Necdin protein, a downstream target of Gαo. Our findings suggest a novel function of RGS8 and reveal cellular mechanisms by which RGS8 mediates PAR1 inhibition. PMID:26829215

  6. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Brantley D.; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S.; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T.; Koelle, Michael R.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA–G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  7. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Brantley D; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T; Koelle, Michael R; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-03-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA-G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  8. Induction of RAGE Shedding by Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Verena V.; Kojro, Elzbieta; Rat, Dorothea; Postina, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The multiligand Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is involved in various pathophysiological processes, including diabetic inflammatory conditions and Alzheimes disease. Full-length RAGE, a cell surface-located type I membrane protein, can proteolytically be converted by metalloproteinases ADAM10 and MMP9 into a soluble RAGE form. Moreover, administration of recombinant soluble RAGE suppresses activation of cell surface-located RAGE by trapping RAGE ligands. Therefore stimulation of RAGE shedding might have a therapeutic value regarding inflammatory diseases. We aimed to investigate whether RAGE shedding is inducible via ligand-induced activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We chose three different GPCRs coupled to distinct signaling cascades: the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) activating adenylyl cyclase, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) linked to phospholipase Cβ, and the PACAP receptor (subtype PAC1) coupled to adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase Cβ, calcium signaling and MAP kinases. We generated HEK cell lines stably coexpressing an individual GPCR and full-length RAGE and then investigated GPCR ligand-induced activation of RAGE shedding. We found metalloproteinase-mediated RAGE shedding on the cell surface to be inducible via ligand-specific activation of all analyzed GPCRs. By using specific inhibitors we have identified Ca2+ signaling, PKCα/PKCβI, CaMKII, PI3 kinases and MAP kinases to be involved in PAC1 receptor-induced RAGE shedding. We detected an induction of calcium signaling in all our cell lines coexpressing RAGE and different GPCRs after agonist treatment. However, we did not disclose a contribution of adenylyl cyclase in RAGE shedding induction. Furthermore, by using a selective metalloproteinase inhibitor and siRNA-mediated knock-down approaches, we show that ADAM10 and/or MMP9 are playing important roles in constitutive and PACAP-induced RAGE shedding. We also found that treatment of mice with PACAP increases the amount of

  9. Distinct roles for two Galpha-Gbeta interfaces in cell polarity control by a yeast heterotrimeric G protein.

    PubMed

    Strickfaden, Shelly C; Pryciak, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones trigger dissociation of a heterotrimeric G protein (Galphabetagamma) into Galpha-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and Gbetagamma. The Gbetagamma dimer regulates both mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade signaling and cell polarization. Here, by independently activating the MAP kinase pathway, we studied the polarity role of Gbetagamma in isolation from its signaling role. MAP kinase signaling alone could induce cell asymmetry but not directional growth. Surprisingly, active Gbetagamma, either alone or with Galpha-GTP, could not organize a persistent polarization axis. Instead, following pheromone gradients (chemotropism) or directional growth without pheromone gradients (de novo polarization) required an intact receptor-Galphabetagamma module and GTP hydrolysis by Galpha. Our results indicate that chemoattractant-induced cell polarization requires continuous receptor-Galphabetagamma communication but not modulation of MAP kinase signaling. To explore regulation of Gbetagamma by Galpha, we mutated Gbeta residues in two structurally distinct Galpha-Gbeta binding interfaces. Polarity control was disrupted only by mutations in the N-terminal interface, and not the Switch interface. Incorporation of these mutations into a Gbeta-Galpha fusion protein, which enforces subunit proximity, revealed that Switch interface dissociation regulates signaling, whereas the N-terminal interface may govern receptor-Galphabetagamma coupling. These findings raise the possibility that the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer can function in a partially dissociated state, tethered by the N-terminal interface. PMID:17978098

  10. Distinct Roles for Two Gα–Gβ Interfaces in Cell Polarity Control by a Yeast Heterotrimeric G Protein

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones trigger dissociation of a heterotrimeric G protein (Gαβγ) into Gα-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and Gβγ. The Gβγ dimer regulates both mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade signaling and cell polarization. Here, by independently activating the MAP kinase pathway, we studied the polarity role of Gβγ in isolation from its signaling role. MAP kinase signaling alone could induce cell asymmetry but not directional growth. Surprisingly, active Gβγ, either alone or with Gα-GTP, could not organize a persistent polarization axis. Instead, following pheromone gradients (chemotropism) or directional growth without pheromone gradients (de novo polarization) required an intact receptor–Gαβγ module and GTP hydrolysis by Gα. Our results indicate that chemoattractant-induced cell polarization requires continuous receptor–Gαβγ communication but not modulation of MAP kinase signaling. To explore regulation of Gβγ by Gα, we mutated Gβ residues in two structurally distinct Gα–Gβ binding interfaces. Polarity control was disrupted only by mutations in the N-terminal interface, and not the Switch interface. Incorporation of these mutations into a Gβ–Gα fusion protein, which enforces subunit proximity, revealed that Switch interface dissociation regulates signaling, whereas the N-terminal interface may govern receptor–Gαβγ coupling. These findings raise the possibility that the Gαβγ heterotrimer can function in a partially dissociated state, tethered by the N-terminal interface. PMID:17978098

  11. delta-Opioid receptors exhibit high efficiency when activating trimeric G proteins in membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Bourova, Lenka; Kostrnova, Alexandra; Hejnova, Lucie; Moravcova, Zuzana; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Novotny, Jiri; Milligan, Graeme; Svoboda, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Low-density membrane fragments (domains) were separated from the bulk of plasma membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells expressing a delta-opioid (DOP) receptor-Gi1alpha fusion protein by drastic homogenization and flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients. The functional activity of trimeric G proteins and capacity of the DOP receptor to stimulate both the fusion protein-linked Gi1alpha and endogenous pertussis-toxin sensitive G proteins was measured as d-Ala2, d-Leu5-enkephalin stimulated high-affinity GTPase or guanosine-5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The maximum d-Ala2-d-Leu5 enkephalin (DADLE)-stimulated GTPase was two times higher in low-density membrane fragments than in bulk of plasma membranes; 58 and 27 pmol/mg/min, respectively. The same difference was obtained for [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Contrarily, the low-density domains contained no more than half the DOP receptor binding sites (Bmax = 6.6 pmol/mg versus 13.6 pmol/mg). Thus, when corrected for expression levels of the receptor, low-density domains exhibited four times higher agonist-stimulated GTPase and [35S]GTPgammaS binding than the bulk plasma membranes. The regulator of G protein signaling RGS1, enhanced further the G protein functional activity but did not remove the difference between domain-bound and plasma membrane pools of G protein. The potency of the agonist in functional studies and the affinity of specific [3H]DADLE binding to the receptor were, however, the same in both types of membranes - EC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-8) and 3.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-8) m for GTPase; Kd = 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nm for [3H]DADLE radioligand binding assay. Similar results were obtained when sodium bicarbonate was used for alkaline isolation of membrane domains. By contrast, detergent-insensitive membrane domains isolated following treatment of cells with Triton X100 exhibited no DADLE-stimulated GTPase or GTPgammaS binding. Functional coupling between the DOP receptor

  12. Distinct sequence elements control the specificity of G protein activation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Lechleiter, J; Hellmiss, R; Duerson, K; Ennulat, D; David, N; Clapham, D; Peralta, E

    1990-01-01

    Relatively little is understood concerning the mechanisms by which subtypes of receptors, G proteins and effector enzymes interact to transduce specific signals. Through expression of normal, hybrid and deletion mutant receptors in Xenopus oocytes, we determined the G protein coupling characteristics of the functionally distinct m2 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes and identified the critical receptor sequences responsible for G protein specificity. Activation of a pertussis toxin insensitive G protein pathway, leading to a rapid and transient release of intracellular Ca2+ characteristic of the m3 receptor, could be specified by the transfer of as few as nine amino acids from the m3 to the m2 receptor. In a reciprocal manner, transfer of no more than 21 residues from the m2 to the m3 receptor was sufficient to specify activation of a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein coupled to a slow and oscillatory Ca2+ release pathway typical of the m2 subtype. Notably, these critical residues occur within the same region of the third cytoplasmic domain of functionally distinct mAChR subtypes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2124972

  13. Visualization of a radical B12 enzyme with its G-protein chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Marco; Cracan, Valentin; Hubbard, Paul A.; Banerjee, Ruma; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein metallochaperones ensure fidelity during cofactor assembly for a variety of metalloproteins, including adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and hydrogenase, and thus have both medical and biofuel development applications. Here, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein of AdoCbl-dependent isobutyryl-CoA mutase and its corresponding G-protein chaperone, which reveal the molecular architecture of a G-protein metallochaperone in complex with its target protein. These structures show that conserved G-protein elements become ordered upon target protein association, creating the molecular pathways that both sense and report on the cofactor loading state. Structures determined of both apo- and holo-forms of IcmF depict both open and closed enzyme states, in which the cofactor-binding domain is alternatively positioned for cofactor loading and for catalysis. Notably, the G protein moves as a unit with the cofactor-binding domain, providing a visualization of how a chaperone assists in the sequestering of a precious cofactor inside an enzyme active site. PMID:25675500

  14. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  15. Lamin A/C sustains PcG protein architecture, maintaining transcriptional repression at target genes

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Elisa; Mozzetta, Chiara; Marullo, Fabrizia; Gregoretti, Francesco; Gargiulo, Annagiusi; Columbaro, Marta; Cortesi, Alice; Antonelli, Laura; Di Pelino, Simona; Squarzoni, Stefano; Palacios, Daniela; Zippo, Alessio; Bodega, Beatrice; Oliva, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Beyond its role in providing structure to the nuclear envelope, lamin A/C is involved in transcriptional regulation. However, its cross talk with epigenetic factors—and how this cross talk influences physiological processes—is still unexplored. Key epigenetic regulators of development and differentiation are the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, organized in the nucleus as microscopically visible foci. Here, we show that lamin A/C is evolutionarily required for correct PcG protein nuclear compartmentalization. Confocal microscopy supported by new algorithms for image analysis reveals that lamin A/C knock-down leads to PcG protein foci disassembly and PcG protein dispersion. This causes detachment from chromatin and defects in PcG protein–mediated higher-order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG protein repressive functions. Using myogenic differentiation as a model, we found that reduced levels of lamin A/C at the onset of differentiation led to an anticipation of the myogenic program because of an alteration of PcG protein–mediated transcriptional repression. Collectively, our results indicate that lamin A/C can modulate transcription through the regulation of PcG protein epigenetic factors. PMID:26553927

  16. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A.; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Dawson, Philip E.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein β-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as ‘ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced β-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  17. Exon capture analysis of G protein-coupled receptors identifies activating mutations in GRM3 in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, Todd D; Wei, Xiaomu; Cardenas-Navia, Isabel; Teer, Jamie K; Lin, Jimmy C; Walia, Vijay; Gartner, Jared; Jiang, Jiji; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Molinolo, Alfredo; Davies, Michael A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Rosenberg, Steven A; Margulies, Elliott H; Samuels, Yardena

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest human gene family, are important regulators of signaling pathways. However, knowledge of their genetic alterations is limited. In this study, we used exon capture and massively parallel sequencing methods to analyze the mutational status of 734 GPCRs in melanoma. This investigation revealed that one family member, GRM3, was frequently mutated and that one of its mutations clustered within one position. Biochemical analysis of GRM3 alterations revealed that mutant GRM3 selectively regulated the phosphorylation of MEK, leading to increased anchorage-independent growth and migration. Melanoma cells expressing mutant GRM3 had reduced cell growth and cellular migration after short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown of GRM3 or treatment with a selective MEK inhibitor, AZD-6244, which is currently being used in phase 2 clinical trials. Our study yields the most comprehensive map of genetic alterations in the GPCR gene family. PMID:21946352

  18. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  19. An evolutionary comparison of leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors reveals a novel LGR subtype.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Van Loy, Tom; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2012-03-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors or LGRs are receptors with important functions in development and reproduction. Belonging to this evolutionarily conserved group of receptors are the well-studied glycoprotein hormone receptors and relaxin receptors in mammals, as well as the bursicon receptor, which triggers cuticle hardening and tanning in freshly enclosed insects. In this study, the numerous LGR sequences in different animal phyla are analyzed and compared. Based on these data a phylogenetic tree was generated. This information sheds new light on structural and evolutionary aspects regarding this receptor group. Apart from vertebrates and insects, LGRs are also present in early chordates (Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Hyperoartia) and other arthropods (Arachnida and Branchiopoda) as well as in Mollusca, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Nematoda, and even in ancient animal life forms, such as Cnidaria and Placozoa. Three distinct types of LGR exist, distinguishable by their number of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), their type-specific hinge region and the presence or absence of an LDLa motif. Type C LGRs containing only one LDLa (C1 subtype) appear to be present in nearly all animal phyla. We here describe a second subtype, C2, containing multiple LDLa motifs, which was discovered in echinoderms, mollusks and in one insect species (Pediculus humanis corporis). In addition, eight putative LGRs can be predicted from the genome data of the placozoan species Trichoplax adhaerens. They may represent an ancient form of the LGRs, however, more genomic data will be required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22100731

  20. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors. PMID:27353701

  1. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors. PMID:27353701

  2. G protein signaling modulator-3: a leukocyte regulator of inflammation in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Matthew J; Gall, Bryan J; Richards, Kristy L; Siderovski, David P; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2014-01-01

    G protein signaling modulator-3 (GPSM3), also known as G18 or AGS4, is a member of a family of proteins containing one or more copies of a small regulatory motif known as the GoLoco (or GPR) motif. GPSM3 interacts directly with Gα and Gβ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream intracellular signals initiated by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated via binding to their cognate ligands. GPSM3 has a selective tissue distribution and is highly expressed in immune system cells; genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have recently revealed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GPSM3 are associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. This review highlights the current knowledge of GPSM3 function in normal and pathologic immune-mediated conditions. PMID:25143870

  3. Strategies for Investigating G-Protein Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor modulation of voltage-gated ion channels is a common means of fine-tuning the response of channels to changes in membrane potential. Such modulation impacts physiological processes such as synaptic transmission, and hence therapeutic strategies often directly or indirectly target these pathways. As an exemplar of channel modulation, we examine strategies for investigating G-protein modulation of CaV2.2 or N-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. We focus on biochemical and genetic tools for defining the molecular mechanisms underlying the various forms of CaV2.2 channel modulation initiated following ligand binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:27140924

  4. A G protein alpha null mutation confers prolificacy potential in maize.

    PubMed

    Urano, Daisuke; Jackson, David; Jones, Alan M

    2015-08-01

    Plasticity in plant development is controlled by environmental signals through largely unknown signalling networks. Signalling coupled by the heterotrimeric G protein complex underlies various developmental pathways in plants. The morphology of two plastic developmental pathways, root system architecture and female inflorescence formation, was quantitatively assessed in a mutant compact plant 2 (ct2) lacking the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex in maize. The ct2 mutant partially compensated for a reduced shoot height by increased total leaf number, and had far more ears, even in the presence of pollination signals. The maize heterotrimeric G protein complex is important in some plastic developmental traits in maize. In particular, the maize Gα subunit is required to dampen the overproduction of female inflorescences. PMID:25948706

  5. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 2: A Versatile Regulator of Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Blumer, Kendall J.

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins of the B/R4 family are widely expressed in the cardiovascular system where their role in fine tuning G protein signaling is critical to maintaining homeostasis. Among members of this family, RGS2 and RGS5 have been shown to play key roles in cardiac and smooth muscle function by tightly regulating signaling pathways that are activated through Gq/11 and Gi/o classes of heterotrimeric G proteins. This chapter reviews accumulating evidence supporting a key role for RGS2 in vascular function and the implication of changes in RGS2 function and/or expression in the pathogenesis of blood pressure disorders, particularly hypertension. With such understanding, RGS2 and the signaling pathways it controls may emerge as novel targets for developing next-generation anti-hypertensive drugs/agents. PMID:26123303

  6. A G protein alpha null mutation confers prolificacy potential in maize

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Jackson, David; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity in plant development is controlled by environmental signals through largely unknown signalling networks. Signalling coupled by the heterotrimeric G protein complex underlies various developmental pathways in plants. The morphology of two plastic developmental pathways, root system architecture and female inflorescence formation, was quantitatively assessed in a mutant compact plant 2 (ct2) lacking the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex in maize. The ct2 mutant partially compensated for a reduced shoot height by increased total leaf number, and had far more ears, even in the presence of pollination signals. The maize heterotrimeric G protein complex is important in some plastic developmental traits in maize. In particular, the maize Gα subunit is required to dampen the overproduction of female inflorescences. PMID:25948706

  7. Cooperative regulation by G proteins and Na+ of neuronal GIRK2 K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Touhara, Kouki K; Weir, Keiko; Bean, Bruce P; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    G protein gated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels open and thereby silence cellular electrical activity when inhibitory G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are stimulated. Here we describe an assay to measure neuronal GIRK2 activity as a function of membrane-anchored G protein concentration. Using this assay we show that four Gβγ subunits bind cooperatively to open GIRK2, and that intracellular Na+ – which enters neurons during action potentials – further amplifies opening mostly by increasing Gβγ affinity. A Na+ amplification function is characterized and used to estimate the concentration of Gβγ subunits that appear in the membrane of mouse dopamine neurons when GABAB receptors are stimulated. We conclude that GIRK2, through its dual responsiveness to Gβγ and Na+, mediates a form of neuronal inhibition that is amplifiable in the setting of excess electrical activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15751.001 PMID:27074662

  8. Human G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1) gene (KCNJ3): Localization to chromosome 2 and identification of a simple tandem repeat polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Powell, K.L.; Espinosa, R. III; Philipson, L.H.; Le Beau, M.M.; Bell, G.I. )

    1994-05-01

    The gene encoding the human G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel designated GIRK1 (gene symbol, KCNJ3) was mapped to chromosome 2 by analyzing its segregation in a panel of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. This assignment was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes, and the gene was further localized to band 2q24.1. A highly informative simple tandem repeat DNA polymorphism of the form (CA)[sub n] was identified and used to localize KCNJ3 within the genetic map of the long arm of chromosome 2. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Activation of the A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptor by conformational selection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Libin; Van Eps, Ned; Zimmer, Marco; Ernst, Oliver P; Prosser, R Scott

    2016-05-12

    Conformational selection and induced fit are two prevailing mechanisms to explain the molecular basis for ligand-based activation of receptors. G-protein-coupled receptors are the largest class of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets. A molecular understanding of their activation mechanism is critical for drug discovery and design. However, direct evidence that addresses how agonist binding leads to the formation of an active receptor state is scarce. Here we use (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance to quantify the conformational landscape occupied by the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), a prototypical class A G-protein-coupled receptor. We find an ensemble of four states in equilibrium: (1) two inactive states in millisecond exchange, consistent with a formed (state S1) and a broken (state S2) salt bridge (known as 'ionic lock') between transmembrane helices 3 and 6; and (2) two active states, S3 and S3', as identified by binding of a G-protein-derived peptide. In contrast to a recent study of the β2-adrenergic receptor, the present approach allowed identification of a second active state for A2AR. Addition of inverse agonist (ZM241385) increases the population of the inactive states, while full agonists (UK432097 or NECA) stabilize the active state, S3', in a manner consistent with conformational selection. In contrast, partial agonist (LUF5834) and an allosteric modulator (HMA) exclusively increase the population of the S3 state. Thus, partial agonism is achieved here by conformational selection of a distinct active state which we predict will have compromised coupling to the G protein. Direct observation of the conformational equilibria of ligand-dependent G-protein-coupled receptor and deduction of the underlying mechanisms of receptor activation will have wide-reaching implications for our understanding of the function of G-protein-coupled receptor in health and disease. PMID:27144352

  10. Using constitutive activity to define appropriate high-throughput screening assays for orphan g protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tony; Coleman, James L J; Smith, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Orphan G protein-coupled receptors represent an underexploited resource for drug discovery but pose a considerable challenge for assay development because their cognate G protein signaling pathways are often unknown. In this methodological chapter, we describe the use of constitutive activity, that is, the inherent ability of receptors to couple to their cognate G proteins in the absence of ligand, to inform the development of high-throughput screening assays for a particular orphan receptor. We specifically focus on a two-step process, whereby constitutive G protein coupling is first determined using yeast Gpa1/human G protein chimeras linked to growth and β-galactosidase generation. Coupling selectivity is then confirmed in mammalian cells expressing endogenous G proteins and driving accumulation of transcription factor-fused luciferase reporters specific to each of the classes of G protein. Based on these findings, high-throughput screening campaigns can be performed on the already miniaturized mammalian reporter system. PMID:25563179

  11. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  12. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2–mediated Phosphorylation of Ezrin Is Required for G Protein-coupled Receptor–dependent Reorganization of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Sarah H.; Pitcher, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates and desensitizes activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we identify ezrin as a novel non-GPCR substrate of GRK2. GRK2 phosphorylates glutathione S-transferase (GST)-ezrin, but not an ezrin fusion protein lacking threonine 567 (T567), in vitro. These results suggest that T567, the regulatory phosphorylation site responsible for maintaining ezrin in its active conformation, represents the principle site of GRK2-mediated phosphorylation. Two lines of evidence indicate that GRK2-mediated ezrin-radixinmoesin (ERM) phosphorylation serves to link GPCR activation to cytoskeletal reorganization. First, in Hep2 cells muscarinic M1 receptor (M1MR) activation causes membrane ruffling. This ruffling response is ERM dependent and is accompanied by ERM phosphorylation. Inhibition of GRK2, but not rho kinase or protein kinase C, prevents ERM phosphorylation and membrane ruffling. Second, agonist-induced internalization of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and M1MR is accompanied by ERM phosphorylation and localization of phosphorylated ERM to receptor-containing endocytic vesicles. The colocalization of internalized β2AR and phosphorylated ERM is not dependent on Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor binding to the β2AR. Inhibition of ezrin function impedes β2AR internalization, further linking GPCR activation, GRK activity, and ezrin function. Overall, our results suggest that GRK2 serves not only to attenuate but also to transduce GPCR-mediated signals. PMID:15843435

  13. G protein-coupled receptors: extranuclear mediators for the non-genomic actions of steroids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yi; Cao, Ji-Min

    2014-01-01

    Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G protein and corresponding downstream signaling, have led to identification of physiologically relevant GPCRs as steroid extranuclear receptors. Examples include G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) for estrogen, membrane progestin receptor for progesterone, G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A) and zinc transporter member 9 (ZIP9) for androgen, and trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) for thyroid hormone. These receptor-mediated biological effects have been extended to reproductive development, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrinology and cancer pathophysiology. However, although great progress have been achieved, there are still important questions that need to be answered, including the identities of GPCRs responsible for the remaining steroids (e.g., glucocorticoid), the structural basis of steroids and GPCRs' interaction and the integration of extranuclear and nuclear signaling to the final physiological function. Here, we reviewed the several significant developments in this field and highlighted a hypothesis that attempts to explain the general interaction between steroids and GPCRs. PMID:25257522

  14. MECHANISTIC PATHWAYS AND BIOLOGICAL ROLES FOR RECEPTOR-INDEPENDENT ACTIVATORS OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Blumer, Joe B.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Lanier, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Signal processing via heterotrimeric G-proteins in response to cell surface receptors is a central and much investigated aspect of how cells integrate cellular stimuli to produce coordinated biological responses. The system is a target of numerous therapeutic agents, plays an important role in adaptive processes of organs, and aberrant processing of signals through these transducing systems is a component of various disease states. In addition to GPCR-mediated activation of G-protein signaling, nature has evolved creative ways to manipulate and utilize the Gαβγ heterotrimer or Gα and Gαβγ subunits independent of the cell surface receptor stimuli. In such situations, the G-protein subunits (Gα and Gαβγ) may actually be complexed with alternative binding partners independent of the typical heterotrimeric Gαβγ. Such regulatory accessory proteins include the family of RGS proteins that accelerate the GTPase activity of Gα and various entities that influence nucleotide binding properties and/or subunit interaction. The latter group of proteins includes receptor independent activators of G-protein signaling or AGS proteins that play surprising roles in signal processing. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge regarding AGS proteins. AGS proteins are indicative of a growing number of accessory proteins that influence signal propagation, facilitate cross talk between various types of signaling pathways and provide a platform for diverse functions of both the heterotrimeric Gαβγ and the individual Gα and Gαβγ subunits. PMID:17240454

  15. Use of Designer G Protein-Coupled Receptors to Dissect Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wess, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate virtually all metabolic processes, including glucose and energy homeostasis. Recently, the use of designer GPCRs referred to as designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADDs) has made it possible to dissect metabolically relevant GPCR signaling pathways in a temporally and spatially controlled fashion in vivo. PMID:27381463

  16. Possible Mechanism of Action of the Electromagnetic Fields of Ultralow Frequency on G-protein

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez; Garcia, M. N. Jimenez; Cadena, M. S. Reyes

    2008-08-11

    Based in several clinical achievements and mathematical simulation of the immune sytem, previously studied, permit us to establish that a possible Mechanism of Action of ultralow frequency Electromagnetic Fields (ELF) is on G-protein as it has been proposed in specialized literature.

  17. Heterotrimeric G-protein signaling is critical to pathogenic processes in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Dustin E; Kimple, Adam J; Muller, Robin E; Giguère, Patrick M; Machius, Mischa; Willard, Francis S; Temple, Brenda R S; Siderovski, David P

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-protein signaling pathways are vital components of physiology, and many are amenable to pharmacologic manipulation. Here, we identify functional heterotrimeric G-protein subunits in Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebic colitis. The E. histolytica Gα subunit EhGα1 exhibits conventional nucleotide cycling properties and is seen to interact with EhGβγ dimers and a candidate effector, EhRGS-RhoGEF, in typical, nucleotide-state-selective fashions. In contrast, a crystal structure of EhGα1 highlights unique features and classification outside of conventional mammalian Gα subfamilies. E. histolytica trophozoites overexpressing wildtype EhGα1 in an inducible manner exhibit an enhanced ability to kill host cells that may be wholly or partially due to enhanced host cell attachment. EhGα1-overexpressing trophozoites also display enhanced transmigration across a Matrigel barrier, an effect that may result from altered baseline migration. Inducible expression of a dominant negative EhGα1 variant engenders the converse phenotypes. Transcriptomic studies reveal that modulation of pathogenesis-related trophozoite behaviors by perturbed heterotrimeric G-protein expression includes transcriptional regulation of virulence factors and altered trafficking of cysteine proteases. Collectively, our studies suggest that E. histolytica possesses a divergent heterotrimeric G-protein signaling axis that modulates key aspects of cellular processes related to the pathogenesis of this infectious organism. PMID:23166501

  18. Heterotrimeric G-protein Signaling Is Critical to Pathogenic Processes in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Robin E.; Giguère, Patrick M.; Machius, Mischa; Willard, Francis S.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Siderovski, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-protein signaling pathways are vital components of physiology, and many are amenable to pharmacologic manipulation. Here, we identify functional heterotrimeric G-protein subunits in Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebic colitis. The E. histolytica Gα subunit EhGα1 exhibits conventional nucleotide cycling properties and is seen to interact with EhGβγ dimers and a candidate effector, EhRGS-RhoGEF, in typical, nucleotide-state-selective fashions. In contrast, a crystal structure of EhGα1 highlights unique features and classification outside of conventional mammalian Gα subfamilies. E. histolytica trophozoites overexpressing wildtype EhGα1 in an inducible manner exhibit an enhanced ability to kill host cells that may be wholly or partially due to enhanced host cell attachment. EhGα1-overexpressing trophozoites also display enhanced transmigration across a Matrigel barrier, an effect that may result from altered baseline migration. Inducible expression of a dominant negative EhGα1 variant engenders the converse phenotypes. Transcriptomic studies reveal that modulation of pathogenesis-related trophozoite behaviors by perturbed heterotrimeric G-protein expression includes transcriptional regulation of virulence factors and altered trafficking of cysteine proteases. Collectively, our studies suggest that E. histolytica possesses a divergent heterotrimeric G-protein signaling axis that modulates key aspects of cellular processes related to the pathogenesis of this infectious organism. PMID:23166501

  19. Heterotrimeric G protein signaling via GIV/Girdin: Breaking the rules of engagement, space, and time.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2016-04-01

    Canonical signal transduction via heterotrimeric G proteins is spatially and temporally restricted, that is, triggered exclusively at the plasma membrane (PM), only by agonist activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) via a process that completes within a few hundred milliseconds. Recently, a rapidly emerging paradigm has revealed a non-canonical pathway for activation of heterotrimeric G proteins by the non-receptor guanidine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), GIV/Girdin. This pathway has distinctive temporal and spatial features and an unusual profile of receptor engagement: diverse classes of receptors, not just GPCRs can engage with GIV to trigger such activation. Such activation is spatially and temporally unrestricted, that is, can occur both at the PM and on internal membranes discontinuous with the PM, and can continue for prolonged periods of time. Here, we provide the most complete up-to-date review of the molecular mechanisms that govern the unique spatiotemporal aspects of non-canonical G protein activation by GIV and the relevance of this new paradigm in health and disease. PMID:26879989

  20. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits differentially respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yueh; Yu, Chao-Yuan; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Kanehara, Kazue

    2015-01-01

    Canonical heterotrimeric G proteins in eukaryotes are major components that localize at plasma membrane and transmit extracellular stimuli into the cell. Genome of a seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana encodes at least one Gα (GPA1), one Gβ (AGB1), and 3 Gγ (AGG1, AGG2 and AGG3) subunits. The loss-of-function mutations of G protein subunit(s) cause multiple defects in development as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, it remains elusive how these subunits differentially express these defects. Here, we report that Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein subunits differentially respond to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. An isolated homozygous mutant of AGB1, agb1-3, was more sensitive to the tunicamycin-induced ER stress compared to the wild type and the other loss-of-function mutants of G protein subunits. Moreover, ER stress responsive genes were highly expressed in the agb1-3 plant. Our results indicate that AGB1 positively contributes to ER stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:26237103

  1. Identification of peptides that inhibit regulator of G protein signaling 4 function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuren; Lee, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Young, Kathleen H

    2008-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) are a family of GTPase-activating proteins (GAP) that interact with heterotrimeric G proteins in the negative regulation of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. RGS4, the first identified mammalian member of the RGS family, has been implicated in many GPCR signaling pathways involved in disease states. We report herein the identification of a 16-amino-acid peptide (P17) as an inhibitor of RGS4. The peptide was found by screening a random peptide library using RGS4 as 'bait' in a yeast two-hybrid system. This peptide inhibited RGS4 GAP activity on Galpha(i1)in a GTPase assay, and blocked the interaction between RGS4 and Galpha(i1)in a pull-down assay. The peptide displayed dose-dependent inhibition of RGS4 and Galpha-interacting protein (GAIP) GAP activities, yet showed no substantial effect on RGS7. Electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes demonstrated that P17 attenuates RGS4 modulation of M(2) muscarinic receptor stimulation of GIRK (G-protein-mediated inwardly rectifying potassium) channels. Deletion of an arginine at the N terminus of P17 abolished its ability to inhibit RGS4 GAP activity, as did deletions of C-terminal residues. The P17 peptide showed no similarity to any known peptide sequence. Further investigation and optimization of the peptide may provide unique information for the development of RGS4 inhibitors for future therapeutic application. PMID:18547979

  2. Deletion of G-protein-coupled receptor 55 promotes obesity by reducing physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the best-characterized cannabinoid receptor, and CB1 antagonists are used in clinical trials to treat obesity. Because of the wide range of CB1 functions, the side effects of CB1 antagonists pose serious concerns. G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is an atypical c...

  3. [RGS proteins (regulators of G protein signaling) and their roles in regulation of immune response].

    PubMed

    Lewandowicz, Anna M; Kowalski, Marek L; Pawliczak, Rafał

    2004-01-01

    RGS proteins (Regulators of G-protein Signaling) comprise a protein family responsible for regulating G proteins. By enhancing the GTPase activity of the a subunit, they speed up the reconstruction of the heterotrimeric structure of G protein, thus inhibiting its signal transduction. Sst2 protein in yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae, FlbA in fungus Aspergillus nidulans, and Egl-10 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are the first native G regulators with GTPase activity (GAPs:--GTPase-activating proteins). The existence of over 30 RGS human proteins has been confirmed thus far, and they have been grouped and classified into six subfamilies. In immunocompetent cells, RGS proteins are entangled in a complicate net of different interrelating signal pathways. They are connected with B- and T-cell chemokine susceptibility, efficient T cell proliferation, and the regulation of B cell maturation. They also take an essential part in inflammation. High hopes are held for drugs, which handle would be RGS proteins and which would further provide the possibility of modifying the pharmacokinetics of drugs acting through G protein- coupled receptors. The aim of this review is to discuss the new RGS protein family and explain the potential involvement of RGS proteins in the modulation of the immune response PMID:15459549

  4. Activation of G proteins mediates flow-induced prostaglandin E2 production in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, K. M.; McAllister, T. N.; Gudi, S.; Frangos, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow may play a role in load-induced bone remodeling. Previously, we have shown that fluid flow stimulates osteoblast production of cAMP inositol trisphosphate (IP3), and PGE2. Flow-induced increases in cAMP and IP3 were shown to be a result of PG production. Thus, PGE2 production appears to be an important component in fluid flow induced signal transduction. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of flow-induced PGE2 synthesis. Flow-induced a 20-fold increase in PGE2 production in osteoblasts. Increases were also observed with ALF4-(10mM) (98-fold), an activator of guanidine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), and calcium ionophore A23187 (2 microM) (100-fold) in stationary cells. We then investigated whether flow stimulation is mediated by G proteins and increases in intracellular calcium. Flow-induced PGE2 production was inhibited by the G protein inhibitors GDP beta S (100 microM) and pertussis toxin (1 microgram/ml) by 83% and 72%, respectively. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA (2 mM) and intracellular calcium by quin-2/AM (30 microM) blocked flow stimulation by 87% and 67%, respectively. These results suggest that G proteins and calcium play an important role in mediating mechanochemical signal transduction in osteoblasts.

  5. Rhizobium nod factor signaling. Evidence for a g protein-mediated transduction mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pingret, JL; Journet, EP; Barker, DG

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobium nodulation (Nod) factors are lipochitooligosaccharide signals that elicit key symbiotic developmental responses in the host legume root. In this study, we have investigated Nod factor signal transduction in the Medicago root epidermis by using a pharmacological approach in conjunction with transgenic plants expressing the Nod factor-responsive reporter construct pMtENOD12-GUS. Evidence for the participation of heterotrimeric G proteins in Nod factor signaling has come from three complementary observations: (1) the amphiphilic peptides mastoparan and Mas7, known G protein agonists, are able to mimic Nod factor-induced epidermal MtENOD12 expression; (2) growth of plants in nodulation-inhibiting conditions (10 mM NH4NO3) leads to a dramatic reduction in both Nod factor- and mastoparan-elicited gene expression; and (3) bacterial pertussis toxin, a well-characterized G protein antagonist, blocks the activities of both the Nod factor and mastoparan. In addition, we have found that antagonists that interfere with phospholipase C activity (neomycin and U73122) and Ca2+ influx/release (EGTA, La3+, and ruthenium red) block Nod factor/mastoparan activity. Taken together, these results are consistent with a Nod factor signal transduction mechanism involving G protein mediation coupled to the activation of both phosphoinositide and Ca2+ second messenger pathways. PMID:9596628

  6. Transcription factor YY1 functions as a PcG protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Atchison, Lakshmi; Ghias, Ayesha; Wilkinson, Frank; Bonini, Nancy; Atchison, Michael L

    2003-03-17

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins function as high molecular weight complexes that maintain transcriptional repression patterns during embryogenesis. The vertebrate DNA binding protein and transcriptional repressor, YY1, shows sequence homology with the Drosophila PcG protein, pleiohomeotic (PHO). YY1 might therefore be a vertebrate PcG protein. We used Drosophila embryo and larval/imaginal disc transcriptional repression systems to determine whether YY1 repressed transcription in a manner consistent with PcG function in vivo. YY1 repressed transcription in Drosophila, and this repression was stable on a PcG-responsive promoter, but not on a PcG-non-responsive promoter. PcG mutants ablated YY1 repression, and YY1 could substitute for PHO in repressing transcription in wing imaginal discs. YY1 functionally compensated for loss of PHO in pho mutant flies and partially corrected mutant phenotypes. Taken together, these results indicate that YY1 functions as a PcG protein. Finally, we found that YY1, as well as Polycomb, required the co-repressor protein CtBP for repression in vivo. These results provide a mechanism for recruitment of vertebrate PcG complexes to DNA and demonstrate new functions for YY1. PMID:12628927

  7. Deciphering and modulating G protein signalling in C. elegans using the DREADD technology

    PubMed Central

    Prömel, Simone; Fiedler, Franziska; Binder, Claudia; Winkler, Jana; Schöneberg, Torsten; Thor, Doreen

    2016-01-01

    G-protein signalling is an evolutionary conserved concept highlighting its fundamental impact on developmental and functional processes. Studies on the effects of G protein signals on tissues as well as an entire organism are often conducted in Caenorhabditis elegans. To understand and control dynamics and kinetics of the processes involved, pharmacological modulation of specific G protein pathways would be advantageous, but is difficult due to a lack in accessibility and regulation. To provide this option, we designed G protein-coupled receptor-based designer receptors (DREADDs) for C. elegans. Initially described in mammalian systems, these modified muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are activated by the inert drug clozapine-N-oxide, but not by their endogenous agonists. We report a novel C. elegans-specific DREADD, functionally expressed and specifically activating Gq-protein signalling in vitro and in vivo which we used for modulating mating behaviour. Therefore, this novel designer receptor demonstrates the possibility to pharmacologically control physiological functions in C. elegans. PMID:27461895

  8. Heterotrimeric G Proteins Directly Regulate MMP14/Membrane Type-1 Matrix Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Overland, Aaron C.; Insel, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Agonist stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can transactivate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), but the precise mechanisms for this transactivation have not been defined. Key to this process is the protease-mediated “shedding” of membrane-tethered ligands, which then activate EGFRs. The specific proteases and the events involved in GPCR-EGFR transactivation are not fully understood. We have tested the hypothesis that transactivation can occur by a membrane-delimited process: direct increase in the activity of membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease (MMP14, MT1-MMP) by heterotrimeric G proteins, and in turn, the generation of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) and activation of EGFR. Using membranes prepared from adult rat cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts, we found that MMP14 activity is increased by angiotensin II, phenylephrine, GTP, and guanosine 5′-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate (GTPγS). MMP14 activation by GTPγS occurs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, does not occur in response to GMP or adenosine 5′-[γ-thio]triphosphate (ATPγS), and is not blunted by inhibitors of Src, PKC, phospholipase C (PLC), PI3K, or soluble MMPs. This activation is specific to MMP14 as it is inhibited by a specific MMP14 peptide inhibitor and siRNA knockdown. MMP14 activation by GTPγS is pertussis toxin-sensitive. A role for heterotrimeric G protein βγ subunits was shown by using the Gβγ inhibitor gallein and the direct activation of recombinant MMP14 by purified βγ subunits. GTPγS-stimulated activation of MMP14 also results in membrane release of HB-EGF and the activation of EGFR. These results define a previously unrecognized, membrane-delimited mechanism for EGFR transactivation via direct G protein activation of MMP14 and identify MMP14 as a heterotrimeric G protein-regulated effector. PMID:25759388

  9. Structure and Function of Vps15 in the Endosomal G Protein Signaling Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Heenan, Erin J.; Vanhooke, Janeen L.; Temple, Brenda R.; Betts, Laurie; Sondek, John E.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2009-09-11

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate cellular responses to a wide variety of stimuli, including taste, light, and neurotransmitters. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, activation of the pheromone pathway triggers events leading to mating. The view had long been held that the G protein-mediated signal occurs principally at the plasma membrane. Recently, it has been shown that the G protein {alpha} subunit Gpa1 can promote signaling at endosomes and requires two components of the sole phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase in yeast, Vps15 and Vps34. Vps15 contains multiple WD repeats and also binds to Gpa1 preferentially in the GDP-bound state; these observations led us to hypothesize that Vps15 may function as a G protein {beta} subunit at the endosome. Here we show an X-ray crystal structure of the Vps15 WD domain that reveals a seven-bladed propeller resembling that of typical G{beta} subunits. We show further that the WD domain is sufficient to bind Gpa1 as well as to Atg14, a potential G{gamma} protein that exists in a complex with Vps15. The Vps15 kinase domain together with the intermediate domain (linking the kinase and WD domains) also contributes to Gpa1 binding and is necessary for Vps15 to sustain G protein signaling. These findings reveal that the Vps15 G{beta}-like domain serves as a scaffold to assemble Gpa1 and Atg14, whereas the kinase and intermediate domains are required for proper signaling at the endosome.

  10. Role of G-proteins in the effects of leptin on pedunculopontine nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paige; Mahaffey, Susan; Urbano, Francisco J; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2013-09-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, regulates waking and rapid eye movement sleep. Here, we demonstrate immunohistochemical labeling of the leptin receptor signaling isoform in PPN neurons, and investigated the effects of G-protein modulation and the leptin triple antagonist (TA) on the action of leptin in the PPN. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat brainstem slices from 9 to 17 day old pups. Previous results showed that leptin caused a partial blockade of sodium (I(Na)) and h-current (I(H)) in PPN neurons. TA (100 nM) reduced the blockade of I(Na) (~ 50% reduction) and I(H) (~ 93% reduction) caused by leptin. Intracellular guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt (a G-protein inhibitor) significantly reduced the effect of leptin on I(Na) (~ 60% reduction) but not on I(H) (~ 25% reduction). Intracellular GTPγS (a G-protein activator) reduced the effect of leptin on both I(Na) (~ 80% reduction) and I(H) (~ 90% reduction). These results suggest that the effects of leptin on the intrinsic properties of PPN neurons are leptin receptor- and G-protein dependent. We also found that leptin enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated responses in single neurons and in the PPN population as a whole, an effect blocked by TA. These experiments further strengthen the association between leptin dysregulation and sleep disturbances. Beck et al. investigated the effects of leptin on the intrinsic properties of neurons from the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). Leptin reduced the amplitude of voltage-gated sodium (I(Na)) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated HCN (I(H)) channels. These effects were antagonized by a leptin receptor (OB-R) antagonist and by the G-protein antagonist GDPβ. PMID:23692342

  11. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders. PMID:26302653

  12. Functional Importance of a Structurally Distinct Homodimeric Complex of the Family B G Protein-Coupled Secretin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fan; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Dong, Maoqing; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Bordner, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Miller, Laurence J.

    2009-01-01

    Oligomerization of G protein-coupled receptors has been described, but its structural basis and functional importance have been inconsistent. Here, we demonstrate that the agonist occupied wild-type secretin receptor is predominantly in a guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity state and exhibits negative cooperativity, whereas the monomeric receptor is primarily in a guanine nucleotide-insensitive lower affinity state. We previously demonstrated constitutive homodimerization of this receptor through the lipid-exposed face of transmembrane (TM) IV. We now use cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of 14 TM IV residues, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), and functional analysis to map spatial approximations and functional importance of specific residues in this complex. All, except for three helix-facing mutants, trafficked to the cell surface, where secretin was shown to bind and elicit cAMP production. Cells expressing complementary-tagged receptors were treated with cuprous phenanthroline to establish disulfide bonds between spatially approximated cysteines. BRET was measured as an indication of receptor oligomerization and was repeated after competitive disruption of oligomers with TM IV peptide to distinguish covalent from noncovalent associations. Although all constructs generated a significant BRET signal, this was disrupted by peptide in all except for single-site mutants replacing five residues with cysteine. Of these, covalent stabilization of receptor homodimers through positions of Gly243, Ile247, and Ala250 resulted in a GTP-sensitive high-affinity state of the receptor, whereas the same procedure with Ala246 and Phe240 mutants resulted in a GTP-insensitive lower affinity state. We propose the existence of a functionally important, structurally specific high-affinity dimeric state of the secretin receptor, which may be typical of family B G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:19429716

  13. Regulator of G-protein signaling 2 repression exacerbates airway hyper-responsiveness and remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haihong; Xie, Yan; Abel, Peter W; Wolff, Dennis W; Toews, Myron L; Panettieri, Reynold A; Casale, Thomas B; Tu, Yaping

    2015-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators of cell functions in asthma. We recently reported that regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) 2, a selective modulator of Gq-coupled GPCRs, is a key regulator of airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), the pathophysiologic hallmark of asthma. Because RGS2 protein levels in airway cells were significantly lower in patients with asthma compared with patients without asthma, we further investigated the potential pathological importance of RGS2 repression in asthma. The human RGS2 gene maps to chromosome 1q31. We first screened patients with asthma for RGS2 gene promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and found significant differences in the distribution of two RGS2 SNPs (A638G, rs2746071 and C395G, rs2746072) between patients with asthma and nonasthmatic subjects. These two SNPs are always associated with each other and have the same higher prevalence in patients with asthma (65%) as compared with nonasthmatic subjects (35%). Point mutations corresponding to these SNPs decrease RGS2 promoter activity by 44%. The importance of RGS2 down-regulation was then determined in an acute IL-13 mouse model of asthma. Intranasal administration of IL-13 in mice also decreased RGS2 expression in lungs by ∼50% and caused AHR. Although naive RGS2 knockout (KO) mice exhibit spontaneous AHR, acute IL-13 exposure further increased AHR in RGS2 KO mice. Loss of RGS2 also significantly enhanced IL-13-induced mouse airway remodeling, including peribronchial smooth muscle thickening and fibrosis, without effects on goblet cell hyperplasia or airway inflammation in mice. Thus, genetic variations and increased inflammatory cytokines can lead to RGS2 repression, which exacerbates AHR and airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:25368964

  14. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6/β-arrestin 2 system in a rat model of dopamine supersensitivity psychosis.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yasunori; Tadokoro, Shigenori; Takase, Masayuki; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi

    2015-12-01

    In humans, long-term antipsychotic treatment is known to induce movement disorders and a psychosis, called dopamine supersensitivity psychosis (DSP). The mechanism by which chronic administration of antipsychotic(s) causes DSP may be the treatment-induced up-regulation of dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2). G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) and beta-arrestin 2 (ARRB2) play important roles in the trafficking of DRD2 by phosphorylation and internalization. We investigated the effects of chronic continuous treatment with mini-pump-administered haloperidol (HAL) on the sensitivity of Wistar rats to dopamine, as measured by the locomotor response to methamphetamine (MAP) and the density of striatal DRD2. Chronic continuous treatment with HAL resulted in significantly higher locomotor response to MAP and significantly higher striatal DRD2 density compared with those in rats administered vehicle (VEH). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that striatal ARRB2 in DSP model rats tended to decrease in comparison with that in the VEH group. In addition, the ratio of GRK6/ARRB2 in DSP model rats was significantly higher than that in controls. Our results suggest that alterations of the GRK6 and ARRB2 system could induce both DRD2 up-regulation and impairment of the dopamine signaling pathway, resulting potentially in the development of DSP. PMID:26174132

  15. Pluto's Putative Cryovolcanic Constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, K. N.; White, O. L.; Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.; Spencer, J. R.; McKinnon, W. B.; Howard, A. D.; Stern, A. S.; Cook, J. C.; Grundy, W. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Beyer, R. A.; Umurhan, O.; Howett, C. J. A.; Parker, A. H.; Protopapa, S.; Lauer, T. R.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K.

    2016-06-01

    New Horizons imaged two large mounds with deep central depressions on Pluto. Both features appear constructional, and have relatively young surfaces. This mapping is part of effort to characterize and assess the age and origin of the mounds.

  16. Signal Activation and Inactivation by the Gα Helical Domain: A Long-Neglected Partner in G Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Henrik G.; Jones, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) are positioned at the top of many signal transduction pathways. The G protein α subunit is composed of two domains, one that resembles Ras and another that is composed entirely of α helices. Historically, most attention has focused on the Ras-like domain, but emerging evidence reveals that the helical domain is an active participant in G protein signaling. PMID:22649098

  17. New insights into structural determinants for prostanoid thromboxane A2 receptor- and prostacyclin receptor-G protein coupling.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Raja; Pydi, Sai Prasad; Gleim, Scott; Bhullar, Rajinder Pal; Hwa, John; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Chelikani, Prashen

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with heterotrimeric G proteins and initiate a wide variety of signaling pathways. The molecular nature of GPCR-G protein interactions in the clinically important thromboxane A2 (TxA(2)) receptor (TP) and prostacyclin (PGI(2)) receptor (IP) is poorly understood. The TP activates its cognate G protein (Gαq) in response to the binding of thromboxane, while the IP signals through Gαs in response to the binding of prostacyclin. Here, we utilized a combination of approaches consisting of chimeric receptors, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to precisely study the specificity of G protein coupling. Multiple chimeric receptors were constructed by replacing the TP intracellular loops (ICLs) with the ICL regions of the IP. Our results demonstrate that both the sequences and lengths of ICL2 and ICL3 influenced G protein specificity. Importantly, we identified a precise ICL region on the prostanoid receptors TP and IP that can switch G protein specificities. The validities of the chimeric technique and the derived molecular model were confirmed by introducing clinically relevant naturally occurring mutations (R60L in the TP and R212C in the IP). Our findings provide new molecular insights into prostanoid receptor-G protein interactions, which are of general significance for understanding the structural basis of G protein activation by GPCRs in basic health and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23109431

  18. New Insights into Structural Determinants for Prostanoid Thromboxane A2 Receptor- and Prostacyclin Receptor-G Protein Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Raja; Pydi, Sai Prasad; Gleim, Scott; Bhullar, Rajinder Pal; Hwa, John; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with heterotrimeric G proteins and initiate a wide variety of signaling pathways. The molecular nature of GPCR-G protein interactions in the clinically important thromboxane A2 (TxA2) receptor (TP) and prostacyclin (PGI2) receptor (IP) is poorly understood. The TP activates its cognate G protein (Gαq) in response to the binding of thromboxane, while the IP signals through Gαs in response to the binding of prostacyclin. Here, we utilized a combination of approaches consisting of chimeric receptors, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to precisely study the specificity of G protein coupling. Multiple chimeric receptors were constructed by replacing the TP intracellular loops (ICLs) with the ICL regions of the IP. Our results demonstrate that both the sequences and lengths of ICL2 and ICL3 influenced G protein specificity. Importantly, we identified a precise ICL region on the prostanoid receptors TP and IP that can switch G protein specificities. The validities of the chimeric technique and the derived molecular model were confirmed by introducing clinically relevant naturally occurring mutations (R60L in the TP and R212C in the IP). Our findings provide new molecular insights into prostanoid receptor-G protein interactions, which are of general significance for understanding the structural basis of G protein activation by GPCRs in basic health and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23109431

  19. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  20. Spatial and Temporal Aspects of Signaling by G-Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Martin J; Hofmann, Klaus Peter

    2015-09-01

    Signaling by G-protein-coupled receptors is often considered a uniform process, whereby a homogeneously activated proportion of randomly distributed receptors are activated under equilibrium conditions and produce homogeneous, steady-state intracellular signals. While this may be the case in some biologic systems, the example of rhodopsin with its strictly local single-quantum mode of function shows that homogeneity in space and time cannot be a general property of G-protein-coupled systems. Recent work has now revealed many other systems where such simplicity does not prevail. Instead, a plethora of mechanisms allows much more complex patterns of receptor activation and signaling: different mechanisms of protein-protein interaction; temporal changes under nonequilibrium conditions; localized receptor activation; and localized second messenger generation and degradation-all of which shape receptor-generated signals and permit the creation of multiple signal types. Here, we review the evidence for such pleiotropic receptor signaling in space and time. PMID:26184590

  1. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J.; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  2. The GoLoco motif: heralding a new tango between G protein signaling and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2002-04-01

    The Galpha and Gbetagamma components of heterotrimeric G proteins, typically associated with cell-surface receptor signaling, also partake in the macromolecular interactions that underlie cell polarity and cell division. Proteins with Galpha-binding GoLoco motifs, such as Drosophila melanogaster Pins (for Partner of Inscuteable) and its mammalian counterpart LGN, participate in multi-protein complexes that maintain cellular asymmetry and orderly segregation of chromosomal content and daughter cell bodies. The GoLoco motif was recently identified as a selective Galpha-binding partner: the GoLoco-Galpha interaction can displace Gbetagamma and inhibit guanine nucleotide release from the bound Galpha subunit. Recent x-ray crystallographic studies suggest ways in which GoLoco-motif peptides may modulate heterotrimeric G protein signaling. Such peptides could be exploited to help dissect the signals that underpin cell polarity and cell division processes. PMID:14993354

  3. Touch induces ATP release in Arabidopsis roots that is modulated by the heterotrimeric G protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Weerasinghe, Ravisha R.; Swanson, Sarah J.; Okada, Seiko F.; Garrett, Michele B.; Kim, Sung-Yong; Stacey, Gary; Boucher, Richard C.; Gilroy, Simon; Jones, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Amongst the many stimuli orienting the growth of plant roots, of critical importance are the touch signals generated as roots explore the mechanically complex soil environment. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these sensory events remain poorly defined. We report an impaired obstacle-avoiding response of roots in Arabidopsis lacking a heterotrimeric G protein. Obstacle avoidance may utilize a touch-induced release of ATP to the extracellular space. While sequential touch stimulation revealed a strong refractory period for ATP release in response to mechanostimulation in wild-type plants, the refractory period in mutants was attenuated, resulting in extracellular ATP accumulation. We propose that ATP acts as an extracellular signal released by mechanostimulation and that the G-protein complex is needed for fine-tuning this response. PMID:19596005

  4. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-09-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  5. The Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein Signaling Then and Now: A Tribute to Alfred G. Gilman.

    PubMed

    Sunahara, Roger K; Insel, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    The recent, unfortunate death of Alfred G. ("Al") Gilman, M.D., Ph.D., represents a sad signpost for an era spanning over 40 years in molecular pharmacology. Gilman's discoveries, influence, and persona were dominant forces in research and training in pharmacology. Here, we review the progression of ideas and knowledge that spawned early work by Gilman and collaborators (among them, one of the authors) and later efforts (including those of the other author) that have recently yielded a comprehensive and precise structural understanding of fundamental topics in pharmacology: the binding of ligands to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and the interaction of GPCRs with heterotrimeric G proteins and effector molecules. Those data provide new and important insights into the molecular basis that underlies affinity and efficacy, two of the most important features of drug action, which represent the latest chapter in the saga that Al Gilman's work helped launch. PMID:26984025

  6. Bioinformatics approaches for the classification of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Anna; Attwood, Teresa K

    2003-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are found abundantly in the human genome, and are the targets of numerous prescribed drugs. However, many receptors remain orphaned (i.e. with unknown ligand specificity), and others remain poorly characterised, with little structural information available. Consequently, there is often a gulf between sequence data and structural and functional knowledge of a receptor. Bioinformatics approaches may offer one approach to bridging this gap. In particular, protein family databases, which distil information from multiple sequence alignments into characteristic signatures, could be used to identify the families to which orphan receptors belong, and might facilitate discovery of novel motifs associated with ligand binding and G-protein-coupling. PMID:12681231

  7. Structure-based drug design for G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Congreve, Miles; Dias, João M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the structural biology of G protein-coupled receptors has undergone a transformation over the past 5 years. New protein-ligand complexes are described almost monthly in high profile journals. Appreciation of how small molecules and natural ligands bind to their receptors has the potential to impact enormously how medicinal chemists approach this major class of receptor targets. An outline of the key topics in this field and some recent examples of structure- and fragment-based drug design are described. A table is presented with example views of each G protein-coupled receptor for which there is a published X-ray structure, including interactions with small molecule antagonists, partial and full agonists. The possible implications of these new data for drug design are discussed. PMID:24418607

  8. Toward multivalent signaling across G protein-coupled receptors from poly(amidoamine) dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonkyung; Hechler, Béatrice; Klutz, Athena M; Gachet, Christian; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2008-02-01

    Activation of the A2A receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), by extracellular adenosine, is antiaggregatory in platelets and anti-inflammatory. Multiple copies of an A2A agonist, the nucleoside CGS21680, were coupled covalently to PAMAM dendrimers and characterized spectroscopically. A fluorescent PAMAM-CGS21680 conjugate 5 inhibited aggregation of washed human platelets and was internalized. We envision that our multivalent dendrimer conjugates may improve overall pharmacological profiles compared to the monovalent GPCR ligands. PMID:18176997

  9. Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling in Yeast Mating Pheromone Response*

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Christopher G.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The DNAs encoding the receptors that respond to the peptide mating pheromones of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated in 1985, and were the very first genes for agonist-binding heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to be cloned in any organism. Now, over 30 years later, this yeast and its receptors continue to provide a pathfinding experimental paradigm for investigating GPCR-initiated signaling and its regulation, as described in this retrospective overview. PMID:26907689

  10. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein regulates cell wall defense and resistance to necrotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Escudero, Viviana; Miedes, Eva; Fernández, Paula Virginia; Jordá, Lucía; Hernández-Blanco, Camilo; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Bednarek, Pawel; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Somerville, Shauna; Estevez, José Manuel; Persson, Staffan; Molina, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-protein controls defense responses to necrotrophic and vascular fungi. The agb1 mutant impaired in the Gβ subunit displays enhanced susceptibility to these pathogens. Gβ/AGB1 forms an obligate dimer with either one of the Arabidopsis Gγ subunits (γ1/AGG1 and γ2/AGG2). Accordingly, we now demonstrate that the agg1 agg2 double mutant is as susceptible as agb1 plants to the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. To elucidate the molecular basis of heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated resistance, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of agb1-1 mutant and wild-type plants upon inoculation with P. cucumerina. This analysis, together with metabolomic studies, demonstrated that G-protein-mediated resistance was independent of defensive pathways required for resistance to necrotrophic fungi, such as the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, abscisic acid, and tryptophan-derived metabolites signaling, as these pathways were not impaired in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants. Notably, many mis-regulated genes in agb1 plants were related with cell wall functions, which was also the case in agg1 agg2 mutant. Biochemical analyses and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy of cell walls from G-protein mutants revealed that the xylose content was lower in agb1 and agg1 agg2 mutants than in wild-type plants, and that mutant walls had similar FTIR spectratypes, which differed from that of wild-type plants. The data presented here suggest a canonical functionality of the Gβ and Gγ1/γ2 subunits in the control of Arabidopsis immune responses and the regulation of cell wall composition. PMID:21980142

  11. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gary S.; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K.; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV’s C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV’s GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions. PMID:25926659

  12. Ligand-Based Peptide Design and Combinatorial Peptide Libraries to Target G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian W.; Muttenthaler, Markus; Freissmuth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are considered to represent the most promising drug targets; it has been repeatedly said that a large fraction of the currently marketed drugs elicit their actions by binding to GPCRs (with cited numbers varying from 30–50%). Closer scrutiny, however, shows that only a modest fraction of (~60) GPCRs are, in fact, exploited as drug targets, only ~20 of which are peptide-binding receptors. The vast majority of receptors in the humane genome have not yet been explored as sites of action for drugs. Given the drugability of this receptor class, it appears that opportunities for drug discovery abound. In addition, GPCRs provide for binding sites other than the ligand binding sites (referred to as the “orthosteric site”). These additional sites include (i) binding sites for ligands (referred to as “allosteric ligands”) that modulate the affinity and efficacy of orthosteric ligands, (ii) the interaction surface that recruits G proteins and arrestins, (iii) the interaction sites of additional proteins (GIPs, GPCR interacting proteins that regulate G protein signaling or give rise to G protein-independent signals). These sites can also be targeted by peptides. Combinatorial and natural peptide libraries are therefore likely to play a major role in identifying new GPCR ligands at each of these sites. In particular the diverse natural peptide libraries such as the venom peptides from marine cone-snails and plant cyclotides have been established as a rich source of drug leads. High-throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry approaches allow for progressing from these starting points to potential drug candidates. This will be illustrated by focusing on the ligand-based drug design of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) receptor ligands using natural peptide leads as starting points. PMID:20687879

  13. G protein-linked signaling pathways in bipolar and major depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroaki; Ziegler, Mary E; Kim, Helen B; Evans, Simon J; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Li, Jun Z; Meng, Fan; Dai, Manhong; Myers, Richard M; Neal, Charles R; Speed, Terry P; Barchas, Jack D; Schatzberg, Alan F; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E; Vawter, Marquis P

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein linked signaling system (GPLS) comprises a large number of G-proteins, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), GPCR ligands, and downstream effector molecules. G-proteins interact with both GPCRs and downstream effectors such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), phosphatidylinositols, and ion channels. The GPLS is implicated in the pathophysiology and pharmacology of both major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD). This study evaluated whether GPLS is altered at the transcript level. The gene expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate (ACC) were compared from MDD, BPD, and control subjects using Affymetrix Gene Chips and real time quantitative PCR. High quality brain tissue was used in the study to control for confounding effects of agonal events, tissue pH, RNA integrity, gender, and age. GPLS signaling transcripts were altered especially in the ACC of BPD and MDD subjects. Transcript levels of molecules which repress cAMP activity were increased in BPD and decreased in MDD. Two orphan GPCRs, GPRC5B and GPR37, showed significantly decreased expression levels in MDD, and significantly increased expression levels in BPD. Our results suggest opposite changes in BPD and MDD in the GPLS, "activated" cAMP signaling activity in BPD and "blunted" cAMP signaling activity in MDD. GPRC5B and GPR37 both appear to have behavioral effects, and are also candidate genes for neurodegenerative disorders. In the context of the opposite changes observed in BPD and MDD, these GPCRs warrant further study of their brain effects. PMID:24391664

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in G protein signaling pathway genes in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kvehaugen, Anne Stine; Melien, Oyvind; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Laivuori, Hannele; Oian, Pål; Andersgaard, Alice Beathe; Dechend, Ralf; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2013-03-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy specific disorder and a risk factor for later cardiovascular disease. The cause and detailed pathophysiology remains unknown. G protein signaling is involved in a variety of physiological processes, including blood pressure regulation. We assessed whether distributions of 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes coding for components of G protein signaling pathways that have been associated with hypertension differ between women with preeclampsia and normotensive pregnant women; the G protein β3 subunit gene (GNB3) C825T polymorphism (rs5443), the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene (AGTR1) 3'UTR A1166C polymorphism (rs5186), and the regulator of G protein signaling 2 gene (RGS2) 3'UTR C1114G polymorphism (rs4606). Two separate Norwegian study populations were used; a large population based study and a smaller, but clinically well-described pregnancy biobank. A descriptive study of 43 women with eclampsia was additionally included. In the population-based study, an increased odds of preeclampsia (odds ratio, 1.21; [95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.40]; P=0.009) and recurrent preeclampsia (odds ratio, 1.43; [95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.92];, P=0.017) was found in women carrying the rs4606 CG or GG genotype. In early-onset preeclamptic patients with decidual spiral artery biopsies available (n=24), the rs4606 CG or GG genotype was more frequent in those with acute atherosis (resembling early stage of atherosclerosis) compared with those without: odds ratio, 15.0; (95% confidence interval, 2.02-111.2); P=0.004. No association was found between preeclampsia and the rs5443 or the rs5186. The genotype distribution in eclamptic women was not different from preeclamptic women. In conclusion, RGS2 rs4606 may affect the risk and progression of preeclampsia. PMID:23339167

  15. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  16. Fulfilling the Promise of "Biased" G Protein-Coupled Receptor Agonism.

    PubMed

    Luttrell, Louis M; Maudsley, Stuart; Bohn, Laura M

    2015-09-01

    The fact that over 30% of current pharmaceuticals target heptahelical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) attests to their tractability as drug targets. Although GPCR drug development has traditionally focused on conventional agonists and antagonists, the growing appreciation that GPCRs mediate physiologically relevant effects via both G protein and non-G protein effectors has prompted the search for ligands that can "bias" downstream signaling in favor of one or the other process. Biased ligands are novel entities with distinct signaling profiles dictated by ligand structure, and the potential prospect of biased ligands as better drugs has been pleonastically proclaimed. Indeed, preclinical proof-of-concept studies have demonstrated that both G protein and arrestin pathway-selective ligands can promote beneficial effects in vivo while simultaneously antagonizing deleterious ones. But along with opportunity comes added complexity and new challenges for drug discovery. If ligands can be biased, then ligand classification becomes assay dependent, and more nuanced screening approaches are needed to capture ligand efficacy across several dimensions of signaling. Moreover, because the signaling repertoire of biased ligands differs from that of the native agonist, unpredicted responses may arise in vivo as these unbalanced signals propagate. For any given GPCR target, establishing a framework relating in vitro efficacy to in vivo biologic response is crucial to biased drug discovery. This review discusses approaches to describing ligand efficacy in vitro, translating ligand bias into biologic response, and developing a systems-level understanding of biased agonism in vivo, with the overall goal of overcoming current barriers to developing biased GPCR therapeutics. PMID:26134495

  17. Coupling of G Proteins to Reconstituted Monomers and Tetramers of the M2 Muscarinic Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Redka, Dar'ya S.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Elmslie, Gwendolynne; Paranthaman, Pranavan; Shivnaraine, Rabindra V.; Ellis, John; Ernst, Oliver P.; Wells, James W.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors can be reconstituted as monomers in nanodiscs and as tetramers in liposomes. When reconstituted with G proteins, both forms enable an allosteric interaction between agonists and guanylyl nucleotides. Both forms, therefore, are candidates for the complex that controls signaling at the level of the receptor. To identify the biologically relevant form, reconstituted monomers and tetramers of the purified M2 muscarinic receptor were compared with muscarinic receptors in sarcolemmal membranes for the effect of guanosine 5′-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate (GMP-PNP) on the inhibition of N-[3H]methylscopolamine by the agonist oxotremorine-M. With monomers, a stepwise increase in the concentration of GMP-PNP effected a lateral, rightward shift in the semilogarithmic binding profile (i.e. a progressive decrease in the apparent affinity of oxotremorine-M). With tetramers and receptors in sarcolemmal membranes, GMP-PNP effected a vertical, upward shift (i.e. an apparent redistribution of sites from a state of high affinity to one of low affinity with no change in affinity per se). The data were analyzed in terms of a mechanistic scheme based on a ligand-regulated equilibrium between uncoupled and G protein-coupled receptors (the “ternary complex model”). The model predicts a rightward shift in the presence of GMP-PNP and could not account for the effects at tetramers in vesicles or receptors in sarcolemmal membranes. Monomers present a special case of the model in which agonists and guanylyl nucleotides interact within a complex that is both constitutive and stable. The results favor oligomers of the M2 receptor over monomers as the biologically relevant state for coupling to G proteins. PMID:25023280

  18. Blunted apoptosis of erythrocytes in mice deficient in the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2

    PubMed Central

    Bissinger, Rosi; Lang, Elisabeth; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Fehrenbacher, Birgit; Honisch, Sabina; Chen, Hong; Fakhri, Hajar; Umbach, Anja T.; Liu, Guilai; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Liu, Guoxing; Schaller, Martin; Mack, Andreas F.; Lupescu, Adrian; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M.

    2016-01-01

    Putative functions of the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2-dependent signaling include ion channel regulation, cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Erythrocytes may, similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, undergo eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Eryptosis may be triggered by increased cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ceramide. In the present study, we show that Gαi2 is expressed in both murine and human erythrocytes and further examined the survival of erythrocytes drawn from Gαi2-deficient mice (Gαi2−/−) and corresponding wild-type mice (Gαi2+/+). Our data show that plasma erythropoietin levels, erythrocyte maturation markers, erythrocyte counts, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were similar in Gαi2−/− and Gαi2+/+ mice but the mean corpuscular volume was significantly larger in Gαi2−/− mice. Spontaneous PS exposure of circulating Gαi2−/− erythrocytes was significantly lower than that of circulating Gαi2+/+ erythrocytes. PS exposure was significantly lower in Gαi2−/− than in Gαi2+/+ erythrocytes following ex vivo exposure to hyperosmotic shock, bacterial sphingomyelinase or C6 ceramide. Erythrocyte Gαi2 deficiency further attenuated hyperosmotic shock-induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Gαi2−/− erythrocytes were more resistant to osmosensitive hemolysis as compared to Gαi2+/+ erythrocytes. In conclusion, Gαi2 deficiency in erythrocytes confers partial protection against suicidal cell death. PMID:27499046

  19. Blunted apoptosis of erythrocytes in mice deficient in the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, Rosi; Lang, Elisabeth; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Fehrenbacher, Birgit; Honisch, Sabina; Chen, Hong; Fakhri, Hajar; Umbach, Anja T; Liu, Guilai; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Liu, Guoxing; Schaller, Martin; Mack, Andreas F; Lupescu, Adrian; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M

    2016-01-01

    Putative functions of the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2-dependent signaling include ion channel regulation, cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Erythrocytes may, similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, undergo eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Eryptosis may be triggered by increased cytosolic Ca(2+) activity and ceramide. In the present study, we show that Gαi2 is expressed in both murine and human erythrocytes and further examined the survival of erythrocytes drawn from Gαi2-deficient mice (Gαi2(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (Gαi2(+/+)). Our data show that plasma erythropoietin levels, erythrocyte maturation markers, erythrocyte counts, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were similar in Gαi2(-/-) and Gαi2(+/+) mice but the mean corpuscular volume was significantly larger in Gαi2(-/-) mice. Spontaneous PS exposure of circulating Gαi2(-/-) erythrocytes was significantly lower than that of circulating Gαi2(+/+) erythrocytes. PS exposure was significantly lower in Gαi2(-/-) than in Gαi2(+/+) erythrocytes following ex vivo exposure to hyperosmotic shock, bacterial sphingomyelinase or C6 ceramide. Erythrocyte Gαi2 deficiency further attenuated hyperosmotic shock-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) activity and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Gαi2(-/-) erythrocytes were more resistant to osmosensitive hemolysis as compared to Gαi2(+/+) erythrocytes. In conclusion, Gαi2 deficiency in erythrocytes confers partial protection against suicidal cell death. PMID:27499046

  20. Receptor- and age-selective effects of dopamine oxidation on receptor-G protein interactions in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J A; Erat, S; Denisova, N; Villalobos-Molina, R

    1998-03-15

    The striatum contains a high concentration of oxidizable dopamine (DA), and the aged organism shows a decreased ability to respond to oxidative stress (OS), making this area extremely vulnerable to free radical insult. To determine the receptor specificity of this putative increase in OS sensitivity, striatal slices from 6- and 24-month-old animals were incubated (30 min, 37 degrees C) in a modified Krebs medium containing 0 to 500 microM DA with or without a preincubation (15 min) in a nitrone trapping agent, 1 or 5 mM alpha-phenyl-n-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), and changes in low Km GTPase activity (an index of receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling) assessed in muscarinic, 5-HT1A D1, and D2 receptors stimulated with carbachol, 8 OH-DPAT-HBr, SKF 38393, or quinelorane, respectively. DA exposure induced selective decreases in the stimulated activity in all of these receptor systems, and an overall increase in conjugated dienes (56%) of the young. In the case of carbachol and 8 OH-DPAT-HBr, the DA-induced deficits in GTPase stimulation were seen primarily in the young (61 and 32%, respectively), while DA-induced deficits in quinelorane (D2) stimulation were seen in both age groups. In the case of SKF 38393-stimulation (D1) the DA-induced deficits were higher in the striatal tissue from the old. The DA-induced decreases in carbachol stimulated GTPase activity in the tissue from the young could be prevented by pretreatment with PBN or the DA uptake inhibitor, nomifensin. No effect of nomifensin was seen in the old, because their DA uptake mechanisms were already compromised. These results suggest that although age-related declines in DA uptake may provide some protection against the OS effects in muscarinic or 5-HT1A receptors, other factors may increase the vulnerability of DA neurons to OS, even with reductions in DA uptake. PMID:9586813

  1. Allosteric and Biased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling Regulation: Potentials for New Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Etienne; Clément, Stéphanie; Laporte, Stéphane A.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that participate in many aspects of the endocrine function and are important targets for drug development. They transduce signals mainly, but not exclusively, via hetero-trimeric G proteins, leading to a diversity of intracellular signaling cascades. Ligands binding at the hormone orthosteric sites of receptors have been classified as agonists, antagonists, and/or inverse agonists based on their ability to mainly modulate G protein signaling. Accumulating evidence also indicates that such ligands, alone or in combination with other ones such as those acting outside the orthosteric hormone binding sites (e.g., allosteric modulators), have the ability to selectively engage subsets of signaling responses as compared to the natural endogenous ligands. Such modes of functioning have been variously referred to as “functional selectivity” or “ligand-biased signaling.” In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding GPCR-biased signaling and their functional regulation with a focus on the evolving concept that receptor domains can also be targeted to allosterically bias signaling, and discuss the usefulness of such modes of regulation for the design of more efficient therapeutics. PMID:24847311

  2. Current and future G protein-coupled receptor signaling targets for heart failure therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siryk-Bathgate, Ashley; Dabul, Samalia; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2013-01-01

    Although there have been significant advances in the therapy of heart failure in recent decades, such as the introduction of β-blockers and antagonists of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, this devastating disease still carries tremendous morbidity and mortality in the western world. G protein-coupled receptors, such as β-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, ie, myocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulation of cardiac function in health and disease. Their importance is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over one-third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart failure therapy. Here, we review these possible targets for heart failure therapy that have emerged from studies of cardiac G protein-coupled receptor signaling in health and disease, with a particular focus on the main cardiac G protein-coupled receptor types, ie, the β-adrenergic and the angiotensin II type 1 receptors. We also highlight key issues that need to be addressed to improve the chances of success of novel therapies directed against these targets. PMID:24143078

  3. The inhibitory G protein G(i) identified as pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Katada, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) produced by Bordetella pertussis was first introduced by Ui and his colleagues in research on signal transduction under the name islet-activating protein in 1979, when the mechanism of toxin-induced stimulation of insulin release from pancreatic islets was reported in the rat. The stimulatory effect of PTX in vivo results from the blockage of α(2)-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of insulin release. The receptor-induced inhibition of cAMP formation was also abolished in pancreatic islets isolated from PTX-treated rats, suggesting that the toxin caused uncoupling of adenylyl cyclase inhibition from receptor stimulation. The action of PTX on isolated membranes required a cytosolic factor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), and the uncoupling induced by PTX was shown to be due to the toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa protein with NAD as another substrate. The 41-kDa PTX substrate was soon identified and purified as the α-subunit of the inhibitory G protein that transmits an inhibitory signal from membrane receptors to adenylyl cyclase. After demonstration of the molecular mechanism of PTX, the toxin was widely utilized as a probe for identifying and analyzing major αβγ-trimeric G proteins. Thus, PTX-sensitive G proteins appeared to carry positive and negative signals from many membrane receptors to a variety of effectors other than adenylyl cyclase. PMID:23207763

  4. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  5. Inhibitory G proteins and their receptors: emerging therapeutic targets for obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Michelle E; Neuman, Joshua C; Linnemann, Amelia K; Casey, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity is steadily increasing, nearly doubling between 1980 and 2008. Obesity is often associated with insulin resistance, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM): a costly chronic disease and serious public health problem. The underlying cause of T2DM is a failure of the beta cells of the pancreas to continue to produce enough insulin to counteract insulin resistance. Most current T2DM therapeutics do not prevent continued loss of insulin secretion capacity, and those that do have the potential to preserve beta cell mass and function are not effective in all patients. Therefore, developing new methods for preventing and treating obesity and T2DM is very timely and of great significance. There is now considerable literature demonstrating a link between inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in insulin-responsive tissues and the pathogenesis of obesity and T2DM. These studies are suggesting new and emerging therapeutic targets for these conditions. In this review, we will discuss inhibitory G proteins and GPCRs that have primary actions in the beta cell and other peripheral sites as therapeutic targets for obesity and T2DM, improving satiety, insulin resistance and/or beta cell biology. PMID:24946790

  6. Inhibitory G proteins and their receptors: emerging therapeutic targets for obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Neuman, Joshua C; Linnemann, Amelia K; Casey, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity is steadily increasing, nearly doubling between 1980 and 2008. Obesity is often associated with insulin resistance, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM): a costly chronic disease and serious public health problem. The underlying cause of T2DM is a failure of the beta cells of the pancreas to continue to produce enough insulin to counteract insulin resistance. Most current T2DM therapeutics do not prevent continued loss of insulin secretion capacity, and those that do have the potential to preserve beta cell mass and function are not effective in all patients. Therefore, developing new methods for preventing and treating obesity and T2DM is very timely and of great significance. There is now considerable literature demonstrating a link between inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in insulin-responsive tissues and the pathogenesis of obesity and T2DM. These studies are suggesting new and emerging therapeutic targets for these conditions. In this review, we will discuss inhibitory G proteins and GPCRs that have primary actions in the beta cell and other peripheral sites as therapeutic targets for obesity and T2DM, improving satiety, insulin resistance and/or beta cell biology. PMID:24946790

  7. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  8. Role of Regulators of G Protein Signaling Proteins in Bone Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jules, Joel; Yang, Shuying; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins enhance the intrinsic GTPase activity of α subunits of the heterotrimeric G protein complex of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and thereby inactivate signal transduction initiated by GPCRs. The RGS family consists of nearly 37 members with a conserved RGS homology domain which is critical for their GTPase accelerating activity. RGS proteins are expressed in most tissues, including heart, lung, brain, kidney, and bone and play essential roles in many physiological and pathological processes. In skeletal development and bone homeostasis as well as in many bone disorders, RGS proteins control the functions of various GPCRs, including the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 and calcium-sensing receptor and also regulate various critical signaling pathways, such as Wnt and calcium oscillations. This chapter will discuss the current findings on the roles of RGS proteins in regulating signaling of key GPCRs in skeletal development and bone homeostasis. We also will examine the current updates of RGS proteins’ regulation of calcium oscillations in bone physiology and highlight the roles of RGS proteins in selected bone pathological disorders. Despite the recent advances in bone and mineral research, RGS proteins remain understudied in the skeletal system. Further understanding of the roles of RGS proteins in bone should not only provide great insights into the molecular basis of various bone diseases but also generate great therapeutic drug targets for many bone diseases. PMID:26123302

  9. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist withmore » residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.« less

  10. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-07-24

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist with residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1.

  11. Structural insights into biased G protein-coupled receptor signaling revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rahmeh, Rita; Damian, Marjorie; Cottet, Martin; Orcel, Hélène; Mendre, Christiane; Durroux, Thierry; Sharma, K. Shivaji; Durand, Grégory; Pucci, Bernard; Trinquet, Eric; Zwier, Jurriaan M.; Deupi, Xavier; Bron, Patrick; Banères, Jean-Louis; Mouillac, Bernard; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, representing the largest group of therapeutic targets. Recent studies show that some GPCRs signal through both G protein and arrestin pathways in a ligand-specific manner. Ligands that direct signaling through a specific pathway are known as biased ligands. The arginine-vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R), a prototypical peptide-activated GPCR, is an ideal model system to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling. Although the native hormone arginine-vasopressin leads to activation of both the stimulatory G protein (Gs) for the adenylyl cyclase and arrestin pathways, synthetic ligands exhibit highly biased signaling through either Gs alone or arrestin alone. We used purified V2R stabilized in neutral amphipols and developed fluorescence-based assays to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling for the V2R. Our studies demonstrate that the Gs-biased agonist stabilizes a conformation that is distinct from that stabilized by the arrestin-biased agonists. This study provides unique insights into the structural mechanisms of GPCR activation by biased ligands that may be relevant to the design of pathway-biased drugs. PMID:22493271

  12. G-protein alpha subunits distribution in the cyprid of Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite) (Cirripedia, Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Gallus, Lorenzo; Ferrando, Sara; Gambardella, Chiara; Amaroli, Andrea; Faimali, Marco; Piazza, Veronica; Masini, Maria Angela

    2012-12-01

    The acorn barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a marine crustacean with six nauplius and one cyprid larval stages and a sessile adult, that represent one of the main constituents of sea biofouling. The cyprid is the last larval stage, specialized for settlement, and the study of its biology is interesting also in the frame of antifouling strategies. In this study, a novel approach to the neurobiology of B. amphitrite cyprid has undertaken, studying immunohistochemically the distribution of some G-protein α subunits (Gαs, Gαo Gαi, and Gαq) on B. amphitrite cyprid. Gαs-like immunoreactivity was observed in the intestinal mucosa, oral cone, epithelial cells along the outer face of the mantle and thorax; Gαo into the fibers of the neuropile of the central nervous system; Gαi in oil cells, epithelial cells, and limbs and thorax muscles; Gαq was not detected. The results suggest the involvement of the G-protein α subunits in different tissues and functions that seem to be in agreement with the distribution of the ones from the same class of G-proteins in vertebrates. PMID:22833248

  13. Increased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase (GRK) Expression in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Adam J.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors. Ligand bound GPCRs are regulated by a family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), members of which uncouple the receptor from heterotrimeric G proteins, desensitize the receptor, and induce receptor internalization via the arrestin family of scaffolding and signaling molecules. GRKs initiate the activation of downstream signaling pathways, can regulate receptors and signaling molecules independent of GPCR phosphorylation, and modulate epigenetic regulators like histone deacetylases (HDACs). We hypothesize that expression of GRK proteins are altered in schizophrenia, consistent with previous findings of alterations up and downstream from this family of molecules that facilitate intracellular signaling processes. Methods In this study we measured protein expression via Western blot analysis for GRKs 2, 3, 5, and 6 in the anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia (N = 36) and a comparison group (N = 33). To control for antipsychotic treatment we measured these same targets in haloperidol treated vs. untreated rats (N = 10 for both). Results We found increased levels of GRK5 in schizophrenia. No changes were detected in GRK protein expression in rats treated with haloperidol decanoate for 9 months. Conclusion These data suggest that increased GRK5 expression may contribute the the pathophysiology of schizophrenia via abnormal regulation of the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, signaling, GPCRs, and histone modification. PMID:25153362

  14. Activator of G Protein Signaling 3 Promotes Epithelial Cell Proliferation in PKD

    PubMed Central

    Nadella, Rama; Blumer, Joe B.; Jia, Guangfu; Kwon, Michelle; Akbulut, Talha; Qian, Feng; Sedlic, Filip; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro; Sweeney, William E.; Wilson, Patricia D.; Lanier, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    The activation of heterotrimeric G protein signaling is a key feature in the pathophysiology of polycystic kidney diseases (PKD). In this study, we report abnormal overexpression of activator of G protein signaling 3 (AGS3), a receptor-independent regulator of heterotrimeric G proteins, in rodents and humans with both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant PKD. Increased AGS3 expression correlated with kidney size, which is an index of severity of cystic kidney disease. AGS3 expression localized exclusively to distal tubular segments in both normal and cystic kidneys. Short hairpin RNA–induced knockdown of endogenous AGS3 protein significantly reduced proliferation of cystic renal epithelial cells by 26 ± 2% (P < 0.001) compared with vehicle-treated and control short hairpin RNA–expressing epithelial cells. In summary, this study suggests a relationship between aberrantly increased AGS3 expression in renal tubular epithelia affected by PKD and epithelial cell proliferation. AGS3 may play a receptor-independent role to regulate Gα subunit function and control epithelial cell function in PKD. PMID:20488951

  15. From GTP and G proteins to TRPC channels: a personal account.

    PubMed

    Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2015-09-01

    By serendipity and good fortune, as a postdoctoral fellow in 1967, I landed at the right place at the right time, as I was allowed to investigate the mechanism by which hormones activate the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (then adenyl cyclase) in Martin Rodbell's Laboratory at the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. The work uncovered first, the existence of receptors separate from the enzyme and then, the existence of transduction mechanisms requiring guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP) and Mg(2+). With my laboratory colleagues first and postdoctoral fellows after leaving NIH, I participated in the development of the field "signal transduction by G proteins," uncovered by molecular cloning several G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and became interested in both the molecular makeup of voltage-gated Ca channels and Ca2+ homeostasis downstream of activation of phospholipase C (PLC) by the Gq/11 signaling pathway. We were able to confirm the hypothesis that there would be mammalian homologues of the Drosophila "transient receptor potential" channel and discovered the existence of six of the seven mammalian genes, now called transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. In the present article, I summarize from a bird's eye view of what I feel were key findings along this path, not only from my laboratory but also from many others, that allowed for the present knowledge of cell signaling involving G proteins to evolve. Towards the end, I summarize roles of TRPC channels in health and disease. PMID:26377676

  16. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5) is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, William M; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Daum, Guenter; Dong, Xiu Rong; Majesky, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo). Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS) proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh)-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases. PMID:23637832

  17. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric binding mode produces active receptors. Each agonist forms a distinct ligand binding ensemble, and different agonist efficacies depend on the fraction of purely allosteric (i.e. inactive) versus dualsteric (i.e. active) binding modes. We propose that this concept may explain why agonist·receptor complexes can be inactive and that adopting multiple binding modes may be generalized also to small agonists where binding modes will be only subtly different and confined to only one binding site. PMID:27298318

  18. Buried ionizable networks are an ancient hallmark of G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Isom, Daniel G.; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2015-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) have evolved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes over hundreds of millions of years. Comparative structural analysis suggests that these receptors may share a remote evolutionary origin, despite their lack of sequence similarity. Here we used structure-based computations to compare 221 7TMRs from all domains of life. Unexpectedly, we discovered that these receptors contain spatially conserved networks of buried ionizable groups. In microbial 7TMRs these networks are used to pump ions across the cell membrane in response to light. In animal 7TMRs, which include light- and ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), homologous networks were found to be characteristic of activated receptor conformations. These networks are likely relevant to receptor function because they connect the ligand-binding pocket of the receptor to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein. We propose that agonist and G protein binding facilitate the formation of these electrostatic networks and promote important structural rearrangements such as the displacement of transmembrane helix-6. We anticipate that robust classification of activated GPCR structures will aid the identification of ligands that target activated GPCR structural states. PMID:25902551

  19. A G-protein subunit translocation embedded network motif underlies GPCR regulation of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K; Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K V; Gautam, N

    2014-07-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  20. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the Gα subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens. PMID:26667172

  1. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  2. Structural prerequisites for G-protein activation by the neurotensin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Brian E.; White, Jim F.; Shah, Priyanka; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    We previously determined the structure of neurotensin receptor NTSR1 in an active-like conformation with six thermostabilizing mutations bound to the peptide agonist neurotensin. This receptor was unable to activate G proteins, indicating that the mutations restricted NTSR1 to relate agonist binding to G-protein activation. Here we analyse the effect of three of those mutations (E166A3.49, L310A6.37, F358A7.42) and present two structures of NTSR1 able to catalyse nucleotide exchange at Gα. The presence of F3587.42 causes the conserved W3216.48 to adopt a side chain orientation parallel to the lipid bilayer sealing the collapsed Na+ ion pocket and linking the agonist with residues in the lower receptor part implicated in GPCR activation. In the intracellular receptor half, the bulkier L3106.37 side chain dictates the position of R1673.50 of the highly conserved D/ERY motif. These residues, together with the presence of E1663.49 provide determinants for G-protein activation by NTSR1. PMID:26205105

  3. Characterization, localization and function of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in the nervous systems of Aplysia and Loligo

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    The author has characterized pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in the nervous systems of the gastropod mollusc Aplysia and the cephalopod Loligo using ({sup 32}P)ADP-ribosylation and immunoblotting with G protein specific antisera. As in vertebrates, this class of G protein is associated with membranes and enriched in nervous tissue in Aplysia. Analysis of dissected Aplysia ganglia reveal that it is enriched in neuropil, a region containing most of the central nervous system synapses. Because both Aplysia and Loligo synaptosomes are enriched in pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins, it is likely that they are found in synaptic terminals. Fractionation of Aplysia synaptosomes into membrane and vesicle fractions reveals that, although the majority of G protein is recovered in the plasma membrane fraction, a small proportion is recovered in the vesicle fraction. He shows that G proteins are on intracellular membranes by ADP-ribosylating extruded axoplasm with pertussis toxin. A plausible explanation for vesicular localization of G protein in axoplasm is that G proteins are transported to terminals on vesicles. He has shown, using ligature experiments with Aplysia connectives and temperature block experiments in the giant axon of Loligo, that G proteins move by anterograde fast axonal transport. Injection of pertussis toxin into the identified Aplysia neuron L10 blocks histamine-induced presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release. This suggests that pertussis toxin sensitive G proteins play a role in modulating transmitter release at synaptic terminals. In the giant synapse of Loligo, he presents preliminary data that demonstrates that the activation of G proteins in the presynaptic terminal results in decreased transmitter release.

  4. Putative Excitatory and Putative Inhibitory Inputs Localize to Different Dendritic Domains in a Drosophila Flight Motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Claudia; Duch, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Input-output computations of individual neurons may be affected by the three-dimensional structure of their dendrites and by the targeting of input synapses to specific parts of their dendrites. However, only few examples exist where dendritic architecture can be related to behaviorally relevant computations of a neuron. By combining genetic, immunohistochemical, and confocal laser scanning methods this study estimates the location of the spike initiating zone and the dendritic distribution patterns of putative synaptic inputs on an individually identified Drosophila flight motorneuron, MN5. MN5 is a monopolar neuron with more than 4000 dendritic branches. The site of spike initiation was estimated by mapping sodium channel immunolabel onto geometric reconstructions of MN5. Maps of putative excitatory cholinergic and of putative inhibitory GABAergic inputs on MN5 dendrites were created by charting tagged Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Rdl GABAA receptors onto MN5 dendritic surface reconstructions. Although these methods provided only an estimate of putative input synapse distributions, the data indicated that inhibitory and excitatory synapses were targeted preferentially to different dendritic domains of MN5, and thus, computed mostly separately. Most putative inhibitory inputs were close to spike initiation, which was consistent with sharp inhibition, as predicted previously based on recordings of motoneuron firing patterns during flight. By contrast, highest densities of putative excitatory inputs at more distant dendritic regions were consistent with the prediction that in response to different power demands during flight, tonic excitatory drive to flight motoneuron dendrites must be smoothly translated into different tonic firing frequencies. PMID:23279094

  5. Specific Subunits of Heterotrimeric G Proteins Play Important Roles during Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling. PMID:23569109

  6. In vivo stoichiometry monitoring of G protein coupled receptor oligomers using spectrally resolved two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, M. R.; Singh, D. R.; Raicu, V.

    2010-02-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) between a donor molecule in an electronically excited state and an acceptor molecule in close proximity has been frequently utilized for studies of protein-protein interactions in living cells. Typically, the cell under study is scanned a number of times in order to accumulate enough spectral information to accurately determine the RET efficiency for each region of interest within the cell. However, the composition of these regions may change during the course of the acquisition period, limiting the spatial determination of the RET efficiency to an average over entire cells. By means of a novel spectrally resolved two-photon microscope, we were able to obtain a full set of spectrally resolved images after only one complete excitation scan of the sample of interest. From this pixel-level spectral data, a map of RET efficiencies throughout the cell is calculated. By applying a simple theory of RET in oligomeric complexes to the experimentally obtained distribution of RET efficiencies throughout the cell, a single spectrally resolved scan reveals stoichiometric and structural information about the oligomer complex under study. This presentation will describe our experimental setup and data analysis procedure, as well as an application of the method to the determination of RET efficiencies throughout yeast cells (S. cerevisiae) expressing a G-protein-coupled receptor, Sterile 2 α factor protein (Ste2p), in the presence and absence of α-factor - a yeast mating pheromone.

  7. Influence of G-protein β-Polypeptide 3 C825T Polymorphism on Antihypertensive Response to Telmisartan and Amlodipine in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zan-Lin; Li, Hui-Lan; Wen, Zhi-Peng; Yang, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: G-protein β-polypeptide 3 (GNB3) is a β subunit isoform of G-protein that plays important role in signal transduction of membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The GNB3 splice variant C825T (rs5443) is associated with risk for essential hypertension (EH) and efficacy of therapeutic drugs targeting GPCRs. It is unknown whether the polymorphism is associated with blood pressure (BP) response to telmisartan or amlodipine, two widely prescribed antihypertensive drugs. Methods: A total of 93 subjects initially diagnosed as EH were recruited and underwent a 4-week treatment with telmisartan (42 patients) or amlodipine (51 patients) monotherapy. Both baseline and after-treatment BP were measured. GNB3 C825T polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: Baseline systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were comparable among C825T genotypes in both telmisartan and amlodipine treatment groups. Patients with the CT or TT genotypes showed significantly lower body mass index (BMI) as compared with CC homozygotes in both groups (P < 0.05, respectively). GNB3 825TT homozygotes showed significantly higher after-treatment DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP) than those carrying at least one 825C allele (P < 0.01) in the telmisartan treatment group. No difference in after-treatment SBP, DBP, and MAP levels among C825T genotypes was observed in the amlodipine treatment group. No significant difference in absolute changes in BP levels was observed among the genotypes in either treatment group. Conclusion: The GNB3 C825T splice variant is associated with the DBP-lowering effect of telmisartan but not amlodipine in Chinese EH patients. PMID:26712426

  8. G protein in stimulation of PI hydrolysis by CCK (cholecystokinin) in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matozaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Nagao, Munehiko; Nishizaki, Hogara; Baba, Shigeaki )

    1988-11-01

    To clarify the possible role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) in the signal transducing system activated by cholecystokinin (CCK), actions of CCK on rat pancreatic acini were compared with those of fluoride, a well-known activator of stimulatory (G{sub s}) or inhibitory (G{sub i}) G protein. When acini were incubated with increasing concentrations of either CCK-octapeptide (CCK8) or NaF, a maximal stimulation of amylase release from acini occurred at 100 pM CCK8 or 10 mM NaF, respectively; this secretory rate decreased as CCK8 or NaF concentration was increased. NaF caused an increase in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} concentration from the internal Ca{sup 2+} store and stimulated accumulation of inositol phosphates in acini, as observed with CCK. Guanylimidodiphosphate activated the generation of inositol phosphates in the ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled pancreatic acinar cell membrane preparation, with half-maximal and maximal stimulation at 1 and 10 {mu}M, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of submaximal CCK concentrations on inositol phosphate accumulation in membranes were markedly potentiated in the presence of 100 {mu}M GTP, which alone was ineffective. Combined findings of the present study strongly suggest that pancreatic CCK receptors are probably coupled to the activation of polyphosphoinositide (PI) breakdown by a G protein, which appears to be fluoride sensitive but is other than G{sub s}- or G{sub i}-like protein.

  9. G-protein-coupled receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids: C-terminal tails, crowded signalosomes.

    PubMed Central

    El Far, Oussama; Betz, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a superfamily of highly diverse integral membrane proteins that transduce external signals to different subcellular compartments, including nuclei, via trimeric G-proteins. By differential activation of diffusible G(alpha) and membrane-bound G(beta)gamma subunits, GPCRs might act on both cytoplasmic/intracellular and plasma-membrane-bound effector systems. The coupling efficiency and the plasma membrane localization of GPCRs are regulated by a variety of interacting proteins. In this review, we discuss recently disclosed protein interactions found with the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail regions of two types of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors, the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-B receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Calmodulin binding to mGluR7 and other group III mGluRs may provide a Ca(2+)-dependent switch for unidirectional (G(alpha)) versus bidirectional (G(alpha) and G(beta)gamma) signalling to downstream effector proteins. In addition, clustering of mGluR7 by PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1), a polyspecific PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg1/ZO-1) domain containing synaptic organizer protein, sheds light on how higher-order receptor complexes with regulatory enzymes (or 'signalosomes') could be formed. The interaction of GABA(B)Rs with the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and the transcription factor ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) suggests novel regulatory pathways for G-protein signalling, cytoskeletal reorganization and nuclear gene expression: processes that may all contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:12006104

  10. Synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 is a modulator of multiple G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Yadav, Manisha; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Kumar, Harish; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Gurjar, Anagha; Manhas, Amit; Chandra, Sharat; Yadav, Prem Narayan; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sanyal, Sabyasachi

    2014-05-01

    The synthetic nuclear bile acid receptor (farnesoid X receptor [FXR]) agonist GW4064 is extensively used as a specific pharmacological tool to illustrate FXR functions. We noticed that GW4064 activated empty luciferase reporters in FXR-deficient HEK-293T cells. We postulated that this activity of GW4064 might be routed through as yet unknown cellular targets and undertook an unbiased exploratory approach to identify these targets. Investigations revealed that GW4064 activated cAMP and nuclear factor for activated T-cell response elements (CRE and NFAT-RE, respectively) present on these empty reporters. Whereas GW4064-induced NFAT-RE activation involved rapid intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and NFAT nuclear translocation, CRE activation involved soluble adenylyl cyclase-dependent cAMP accumulation and Ca(2+)-calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of transducers of regulated CRE-binding protein 2. Use of dominant negative heterotrimeric G-protein minigenes revealed that GW4064 caused activation of Gαi/o and Gq/11 G proteins. Sequential pharmacological inhibitor-based screening and radioligand-binding studies revealed that GW4064 interacted with multiple G protein-coupled receptors. Functional studies demonstrated that GW4064 robustly activated H1 and H4 and inhibited H2 histamine receptor signaling events. We also found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells, reported to undergo GW4064-induced apoptosis in an FXR-dependent manner, did not express FXR, and the GW4064-mediated apoptosis, also apparent in HEK-293T cells, could be blocked by selective histamine receptor regulators. Taken together, our results demonstrate identification of histamine receptors as alternate targets for GW4064, which not only necessitates cautious interpretation of the biological functions attributed to FXR using GW4064 as a pharmacological tool but also provides a basis for the rational designing of new pharmacophores for histamine receptor modulation. PMID:24597548

  11. Engineered G protein coupled receptors reveal independent regulation of internalization, desensitization and acute signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lieberman, Michael D; Elliott, Heather H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, through desensitization and internalization, modulates the length of the receptor signal and may influence the development of tolerance and dependence in response to chronic drug treatment. To explore the importance of receptor regulation, we engineered a series of Gi-coupled receptors that differ in signal length, degree of agonist-induced internalization, and ability to induce adenylyl cyclase superactivation. All of these receptors, based on the kappa opioid receptor, were modified to be receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs). This modification allows us to compare receptors that have the same ligands and effectors, but differ only in desensitization and internalization. Results Removal of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of the RASSL resulted in a mutant that was resistant to internalization and less prone to desensitization. Replacement of the C-terminus of the RASSL with the corresponding portion of the mu opioid receptor eliminated the induction of AC superactivation, without disrupting agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. Surprisingly, removal of phosphorylation sites from this chimera resulted in a receptor that is constitutively internalized, even in the absence of agonist. However, the receptor still signals and desensitizes in response to agonist, indicating normal G-protein coupling and partial membrane expression. Conclusions These studies reveal that internalization, desensitization and adenylyl cyclase superactivation, all processes that decrease chronic Gi-receptor signals, are independently regulated. Furthermore, specific mutations can radically alter superactivation or internalization without affecting the efficacy of acute Gi signaling. These mutant RASSLs will be useful for further elucidating the temporal dynamics of the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15707483

  12. Mutations in G protein β subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L; Elpek, Kutlu G; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L; Rodig, Scott J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Marto, Jarrod A; Weinstock, David M; Lane, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in genes encoding G protein α (Gα) subunits occur in 4-5% of all human cancers, but oncogenic alterations in Gβ subunits have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors and disrupt Gα interactions with the Gβγ dimer. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered partly on the basis of lineage; for example, all 11 GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms, and seven of eight GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 variants in Cdkn2a-deficient mouse bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, mutations in the gene encoding GNB1 co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including the BCR-ABL fusion protein, the V617F substitution in JAK2 and the V600K substitution in BRAF. Coexpression of patient-derived GNB1 variants with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 alterations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  13. Dihydromunduletone Is a Small-Molecule Selective Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Stoveken, Hannah M; Bahr, Laura L; Anders, M W; Wojtovich, Andrew P; Smrcka, Alan V; Tall, Gregory G

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) have emerging roles in development and tissue maintenance and is the most prevalent GPCR subclass mutated in human cancers, but to date, no drugs have been developed to target them in any disease. aGPCR extracellular domains contain a conserved subdomain that mediates self-cleavage proximal to the start of the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM). The two receptor protomers, extracellular domain and amino terminal fragment (NTF), and the 7TM or C-terminal fragment remain noncovalently bound at the plasma membrane in a low-activity state. We recently demonstrated that NTF dissociation liberates the 7TM N-terminal stalk, which acts as a tethered-peptide agonist permitting receptor-dependent heterotrimeric G protein activation. In many cases, natural aGPCR ligands are extracellular matrix proteins that dissociate the NTF to reveal the tethered agonist. Given the perceived difficulty in modifying extracellular matrix proteins to create aGPCR probes, we developed a serum response element (SRE)-luciferase-based screening approach to identify GPR56/ADGRG1 small-molecule inhibitors. A 2000-compound library comprising known drugs and natural products was screened for GPR56-dependent SRE activation inhibitors that did not inhibit constitutively active Gα13-dependent SRE activation. Dihydromunduletone (DHM), a rotenoid derivative, was validated using cell-free aGPCR/heterotrimeric G protein guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding reconstitution assays. DHM inhibited GPR56 and GPR114/ADGRG5, which have similar tethered agonists, but not the aGPCR GPR110/ADGRF1, M3 muscarinic acetylcholine, or β2 adrenergic GPCRs. DHM inhibited tethered peptide agonist-stimulated and synthetic peptide agonist-stimulated GPR56 but did not inhibit basal activity, demonstrating that it antagonizes the peptide agonist. DHM is a novel aGPCR antagonist and potentially useful chemical probe that may be developed as a future aGPCR therapeutic. PMID:27338081

  14. Role of Structural Dynamics at the Receptor G Protein Interface for Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Alexander S.; Zachariae, Ulrich; Grubmüller, Helmut; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    GPCRs catalyze GDP/GTP exchange in the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαßγ) through displacement of the Gα C-terminal α5 helix, which directly connects the interface of the active receptor (R*) to the nucleotide binding pocket of G. Hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and kinetic analysis of R* catalysed G protein activation have suggested that displacement of α5 starts from an intermediate GDP bound complex (R*•GGDP). To elucidate the structural basis of receptor-catalysed displacement of α5, we modelled the structure of R*•GGDP. A flexible docking protocol yielded an intermediate R*•GGDP complex, with a similar overall arrangement as in the X-ray structure of the nucleotide free complex (R*•Gempty), however with the α5 C-terminus (GαCT) forming different polar contacts with R*. Starting molecular dynamics simulations of GαCT bound to R* in the intermediate position, we observe a screw-like motion, which restores the specific interactions of α5 with R* in R*•Gempty. The observed rotation of α5 by 60° is in line with experimental data. Reformation of hydrogen bonds, water expulsion and formation of hydrophobic interactions are driving forces of the α5 displacement. We conclude that the identified interactions between R* and G protein define a structural framework in which the α5 displacement promotes direct transmission of the signal from R* to the GDP binding pocket. PMID:26606751

  15. Role of Structural Dynamics at the Receptor G Protein Interface for Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Rose, Alexander S; Zachariae, Ulrich; Grubmüller, Helmut; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    GPCRs catalyze GDP/GTP exchange in the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαßγ) through displacement of the Gα C-terminal α5 helix, which directly connects the interface of the active receptor (R*) to the nucleotide binding pocket of G. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and kinetic analysis of R* catalysed G protein activation have suggested that displacement of α5 starts from an intermediate GDP bound complex (R*•GGDP). To elucidate the structural basis of receptor-catalysed displacement of α5, we modelled the structure of R*•GGDP. A flexible docking protocol yielded an intermediate R*•GGDP complex, with a similar overall arrangement as in the X-ray structure of the nucleotide free complex (R*•Gempty), however with the α5 C-terminus (GαCT) forming different polar contacts with R*. Starting molecular dynamics simulations of GαCT bound to R* in the intermediate position, we observe a screw-like motion, which restores the specific interactions of α5 with R* in R*•Gempty. The observed rotation of α5 by 60° is in line with experimental data. Reformation of hydrogen bonds, water expulsion and formation of hydrophobic interactions are driving forces of the α5 displacement. We conclude that the identified interactions between R* and G protein define a structural framework in which the α5 displacement promotes direct transmission of the signal from R* to the GDP binding pocket. PMID:26606751

  16. Visualizing G protein-coupled receptors in action through confocal microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Cabrera-Wrooman, Alejandro; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute one of the most abundant entities in cellular communication. Elucidation of their structure and function as well as of their regulation began 30-40 years ago and the advance has markedly increased during the last 15 years. They participate in a plethora of cell functions such as regulation of metabolic fluxes, contraction, secretion, differentiation, or proliferation, and in essentially all activities of our organism; these receptors are targets of a large proportion of prescribed and illegal drugs. Fluorescence techniques have been used to study receptors for many years. The experimental result was usually a two-dimensional (2D) micrograph. Today, the result can be a spatiotemporal (four-dimensional, 4D) movie. Advances in microscopy, fluorescent protein design, and computer-assisted analysis have been of great importance to increase our knowledge on receptor regulation and function and create opportunities for future research. In this review we briefly depict the state of the art of the G protein-coupled receptor field and the methodologies used to study G protein-coupled receptor location, trafficking, dimerization, and other types of receptor-protein interaction. Fluorescence techniques now permit the capture of receptor images with high resolution and, together with a variety of fluorescent dyes that color organelles (such as the plasma membrane or the nucleus) or the cytoskeleton, allow researchers to obtain a much clearer idea of what is taking place at the cellular level. These developments are changing the way we explore cell communication and signal transduction, permitting deeper understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:24751328

  17. β-Arrestin-Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Agonists Engender Unique Biological Efficacy in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gesty-Palmer, Diane; Yuan, Ling; Martin, Bronwen; Wood, William H.; Lee, Mi-Hye; Janech, Michael G.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Zheng, W. Jim; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Biased G protein-coupled receptor agonists are orthosteric ligands that possess pathway-selective efficacy, activating or inhibiting only a subset of the signaling repertoire of their cognate receptors. In vitro, d-Trp12,Tyr34-bPTH(7–34) [bPTH(7–34)], a biased agonist for the type 1 PTH receptor, antagonizes receptor-G protein coupling but activates arrestin-dependent signaling. In vivo, both bPTH(7–34) and the conventional agonist hPTH(1–34) stimulate anabolic bone formation. To understand how two PTH receptor ligands with markedly different in vitro efficacy could elicit similar in vivo responses, we analyzed transcriptional profiles from calvarial bone of mice treated for 8 wk with vehicle, bPTH(7–34) or hPTH(1–34). Treatment of wild-type mice with bPTH(7–34) primarily affected pathways that promote expansion of the osteoblast pool, notably cell cycle regulation, cell survival, and migration. These responses were absent in β-arrestin2-null mice, identifying them as downstream targets of β-arrestin2-mediated signaling. In contrast, hPTH(1–34) primarily affected pathways classically associated with enhanced bone formation, including collagen synthesis and matrix mineralization. hPTH(1–34) actions were less dependent on β-arrestin2, as might be expected of a ligand capable of G protein activation. In vitro, bPTH(7–34) slowed the rate of preosteoblast proliferation, enhanced osteoblast survival when exposed to an apoptotic stimulus, and stimulated cell migration in wild-type, but not β-arrestin2-null, calvarial osteoblasts. These results suggest that bPTH(7–34) and hPTH(1–34) affect bone mass in vivo through predominantly separate genomic mechanisms created by largely distinct receptor-signaling networks and demonstrate that functional selectivity can be exploited to change the quality of G protein-coupled receptor efficacy. PMID:23315939

  18. Alternative Splicing of G-protein Coupled Receptors: Relevance to Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Oladosu, Folabomi A.; Maixner, William; Nackley, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Drugs that target G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the primary treatment strategy for patients with acute and chronic pain; however, there is substantial individual variability in both the efficacy and adverse side effects associated with these drugs. Variability in drug responses is, in part, due to individuals’ diversity in alternative splicing of pain-relevant GPCRs. GPCR alternative splice variants often exhibit distinct tissue distribution patterns, drug binding properties, and signaling characteristics that may impact disease pathology as well as the size and direction of analgesic effects. Here, we review the importance of GPCRs and their known splice variants to the management of pain. PMID:26250730

  19. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection

    PubMed Central

    Rosero, Rebecca A.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors, both of which are GPCRs, are central to the metastatic melanoma phenotype and may serve as potential targets in novel therapies against melanoma and other cancers. PMID:27379162

  20. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae. An early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:25764428

  1. Computational Simulation of the Activation Cycle of Gα Subunit in the G Protein Cycle Using an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Ryung; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jae Boong; Chung, Ka Young; Kim, Moon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with GDP-bound G protein heterotrimers (Gαβγ) promoting GDP/GTP exchange, which results in dissociation of Gα from the receptor and Gβγ. The GTPase activity of Gα hydrolyzes GTP to GDP, and the GDP-bound Gα interacts with Gβγ, forming a GDP-bound G protein heterotrimer. The G protein cycle is allosterically modulated by conformational changes of the Gα subunit. Although biochemical and biophysical methods have elucidated the structure and dynamics of Gα, the precise conformational mechanisms underlying the G protein cycle are not fully understood yet. Simulation methods could help to provide additional details to gain further insight into G protein signal transduction mechanisms. In this study, using the available X-ray crystal structures of Gα, we simulated the entire G protein cycle and described not only the steric features of the Gα structure, but also conformational changes at each step. Each reference structure in the G protein cycle was modeled as an elastic network model and subjected to normal mode analysis. Our simulation data suggests that activated receptors trigger conformational changes of the Gα subunit that are thermodynamically favorable for opening of the nucleotide-binding pocket and GDP release. Furthermore, the effects of GTP binding and hydrolysis on mobility changes of the C and N termini and switch regions are elucidated. In summary, our simulation results enabled us to provide detailed descriptions of the structural and dynamic features of the G protein cycle. PMID:27483005

  2. R4 regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) identify an ancient MHC-linked synteny group

    PubMed Central

    Suurväli, Jaanus; Robert, Jacques; Boudinot, Pierre; Boudinot, Sirje Rüütel

    2012-01-01

    Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) are key regulators of G protein signaling. RGS proteins of the R4 RGS group are composed of a mere RGS domain and are mainly involved in immune response modulation. In both human and mouse, most genes encoding the R4 RGS proteins are located in the same region of chromosome 1. We show here that the RGS1/RGS16 neighborhood constitutes a synteny group well conserved across tetrapods, and closely linked to the MHC paralogon of chromosome 1. Genes located in the RGS1/RGS16 region have paralogs close to the MHC on chromosome 6 or close to the other MHC paralogons. In amphioxus, a cephalochordate, these genes possess orthologs that are located in the same scaffolds as a number of markers defining the proto-MHC in this species (Abi-Rached et al. 2002). We therefore propose that the RGS1/RGS16 region provides useful markers to investigate the origins and the evolution of the MHC. In addition, we show that some genes of the region appear to have immune functions not only in human, but also in Xenopus. PMID:23129146

  3. The Significance of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Crystallography for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Salon, John A.; Lodowski, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Crucial as molecular sensors for many vital physiological processes, seven-transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of proteins targeted by drug discovery. Together with structures of the prototypical GPCR rhodopsin, solved structures of other liganded GPCRs promise to provide insights into the structural basis of the superfamily's biochemical functions and assist in the development of new therapeutic modalities and drugs. One of the greatest technical and theoretical challenges to elucidating and exploiting structure-function relationships in these systems is the emerging concept of GPCR conformational flexibility and its cause-effect relationship for receptor-receptor and receptor-effector interactions. Such conformational changes can be subtle and triggered by relatively small binding energy effects, leading to full or partial efficacy in the activation or inactivation of the receptor system at large. Pharmacological dogma generally dictates that these changes manifest themselves through kinetic modulation of the receptor's G protein partners. Atomic resolution information derived from increasingly available receptor structures provides an entrée to the understanding of these events and practically applying it to drug design. Supported by structure-activity relationship information arising from empirical screening, a unified structural model of GPCR activation/inactivation promises to both accelerate drug discovery in this field and improve our fundamental understanding of structure-based drug design in general. This review discusses fundamental problems that persist in drug design and GPCR structural determination. PMID:21969326

  4. Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Jackson, Michael F.; MacDonald, John F.

    2014-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs), which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity. PMID:24562329

  5. A high temperature transfer procedure for detection of G protein gamma subunits by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Robishaw, J D; Balcueva, E A

    1993-02-01

    The production of antibodies against synthetic peptides derived from amino acid sequences common or unique to a particular protein(s) is an important tool in the identification of structurally related members of an ever-increasing number of protein families. The successful use of anti-peptide antibodies requires that the protein(s) of interest be properly transferred and fully denatured prior to detection by Western-type immunoblotting. In this paper, we demonstrate that conventional transfer procedures are not successful in presenting the G protein gamma subunits in a suitable state for immunodetection. We describe a high temperature (70 degrees C) transfer procedure that results in a more than 20-fold enhancement in the sensitivity of immunodetection of the various G protein gamma subunits. The effect of high temperature transfer could not be duplicated by including 0.2% SDS in the buffer during transfer to nitrocellulose, or by baking or autoclaving the nitrocellulose after transfer. Thus, high temperature transfer is a powerful procedure for enhancing immunoblot detection of protein(s) that may be resistant to denaturation and/or subject to renaturation during the transfer and/or binding to nitrocellulose. PMID:7680843

  6. G Protein-Coupled Receptors Directly Bind Filamin A with High Affinity and Promote Filamin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although interaction of a few G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with Filamin A, a key actin cross-linking and biomechanical signal transducer protein, has been observed, a comprehensive structure–function analysis of this interaction is lacking. Through a systematic sequence-based analysis, we found that a conserved filamin binding motif is present in the cytoplasmic domains of >20% of the 824 GPCRs encoded in the human genome. Direct high-affinity interaction of filamin binding motif peptides of select GPCRs with the Ig domain of Filamin A was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetric experiments. Engagement of the filamin binding motif with the Filamin A Ig domain induced the phosphorylation of filamin by protein kinase A in vitro. In transfected cells, agonist activation as well as constitutive activation of representative GPCRs dramatically elicited recruitment and phosphorylation of cellular Filamin A, a phenomenon long known to be crucial for regulating the structure and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. Our data suggest a molecular mechanism for direct GPCR–cytoskeleton coupling via filamin. Until now, GPCR signaling to the cytoskeleton was predominantly thought to be indirect, through canonical G protein-mediated signaling cascades involving GTPases, adenylyl cyclases, phospholipases, ion channels, and protein kinases. We propose that the GPCR-induced filamin phosphorylation pathway is a conserved, novel biochemical signaling paradigm. PMID:26460884

  7. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  8. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), GPR68 (OGR1), and GPR132 (G2A), regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:24367336

  9. Acidic tumor microenvironment and pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Dong, Lixue; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), GPR68 (OGR1), and GPR132 (G2A), regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:24367336

  10. Activators of G-protein Signaling 3: A drug addiction molecular gateway

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, M. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Drug addiction is marked by continued drug-seeking behavior despite deleterious consequences and a heightened propensity to relapse notwithstanding long, drug-free periods. The enduring nature of addiction has been hypothesized to arise from perturbations in intracellular signaling, gene expression, and brain circuitry induced by substance abuse. Ameliorating some of these aberrations should abate behavioral and neurochemical markers associated with an “addiction phenotype”. This review summarizes data showing that protein expression and signaling through the non-receptor Activator of heterotrimeric G-protein Signaling 3 (AGS3) is altered by commonly abused substances in rat and in vitro addiction models. AGS3 structure and function are unrelated to the more broadly studied Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) family. Thus, the unique role of AGS3 is the focus of this review. Intriguingly, AGS3 protein changes persist into drug abstinence. Accordingly, studies probing the role of AGS3 in the neurochemistry of drug-seeking behavior and relapse are reviewed in detail. To illuminate this work, AGS3 structure, cellular localization, and function are covered so that an idealized AGS3-targeted pharmacotherapy can be proposed. PMID:20700046

  11. Structural diversity in the RGS domain and its interaction with heterotrimeric G protein alpha-subunits.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Meera; Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Adam J; Turnbull, Andrew P; Ball, Linda J; Schoch, Guillaume A; Gileadi, Carina; Fedorov, Oleg Y; Dowler, Elizabeth F; Higman, Victoria A; Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Sundström, Michael; Doyle, Declan A; Siderovski, David P

    2008-04-29

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate GTP hydrolysis by Galpha subunits and thus facilitate termination of signaling initiated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). RGS proteins hold great promise as disease intervention points, given their signature role as negative regulators of GPCRs-receptors to which the largest fraction of approved medications are currently directed. RGS proteins share a hallmark RGS domain that interacts most avidly with Galpha when in its transition state for GTP hydrolysis; by binding and stabilizing switch regions I and II of Galpha, RGS domain binding consequently accelerates Galpha-mediated GTP hydrolysis. The human genome encodes more than three dozen RGS domain-containing proteins with varied Galpha substrate specificities. To facilitate their exploitation as drug-discovery targets, we have taken a systematic structural biology approach toward cataloging the structural diversity present among RGS domains and identifying molecular determinants of their differential Galpha selectivities. Here, we determined 14 structures derived from NMR and x-ray crystallography of members of the R4, R7, R12, and RZ subfamilies of RGS proteins, including 10 uncomplexed RGS domains and 4 RGS domain/Galpha complexes. Heterogeneity observed in the structural architecture of the RGS domain, as well as in engagement of switch III and the all-helical domain of the Galpha substrate, suggests that unique structural determinants specific to particular RGS protein/Galpha pairings exist and could be used to achieve selective inhibition by small molecules. PMID:18434541

  12. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. G protein-coupled receptors are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24517644

  13. Photosynthate Regulation of the Root System Architecture Mediated by the Heterotrimeric G Protein Complex in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Karve, Abhijit; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; Jiang, Kun; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Assimilate partitioning to the root system is a desirable developmental trait to control but little is known of the signaling pathway underlying partitioning. A null mutation in the gene encoding the Gβ subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, a nexus for a variety of signaling pathways, confers altered sugar partitioning in roots. While fixed carbon rapidly reached the roots of wild type and agb1-2 mutant seedlings, agb1 roots had more of this fixed carbon in the form of glucose, fructose, and sucrose which manifested as a higher lateral root density. Upon glucose treatment, the agb1-2 mutant had abnormal gene expression in the root tip validated by transcriptome analysis. In addition, PIN2 membrane localization was altered in the agb1-2 mutant. The heterotrimeric G protein complex integrates photosynthesis-derived sugar signaling incorporating both membrane-and transcriptional-based mechanisms. The time constants for these signaling mechanisms are in the same range as photosynthate delivery to the root, raising the possibility that root cells are able to use changes in carbon fixation in real time to adjust growth behavior. PMID:27610112

  14. Oxytocic plant cyclotides as templates for peptide G protein-coupled receptor ligand design

    PubMed Central

    Koehbach, Johannes; O’Brien, Margaret; Muttenthaler, Markus; Miazzo, Marion; Akcan, Muharrem; Elliott, Alysha G.; Daly, Norelle L.; Harvey, Peta J.; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Gunasekera, Sunithi; Smith, Terry J.; Wray, Susan; Göransson, Ulf; Dawson, Philip E.; Craik, David J.; Freissmuth, Michael; Gruber, Christian W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotides are plant peptides comprising a circular backbone and three conserved disulfide bonds that confer them with exceptional stability. They were originally discovered in Oldenlandia affinis based on their use in traditional African medicine to accelerate labor. Recently, cyclotides have been identified in numerous plant species of the coffee, violet, cucurbit, pea, potato, and grass families. Their unique structural topology, high stability, and tolerance to sequence variation make them promising templates for the development of peptide-based pharmaceuticals. However, the mechanisms underlying their biological activities remain largely unknown; specifically, a receptor for a native cyclotide has not been reported hitherto. Using bioactivity-guided fractionation of an herbal peptide extract known to indigenous healers as “kalata-kalata,” the cyclotide kalata B7 was found to induce strong contractility on human uterine smooth muscle cells. Radioligand displacement and second messenger-based reporter assays confirmed the oxytocin and vasopressin V1a receptors, members of the G protein-coupled receptor family, as molecular targets for this cyclotide. Furthermore, we show that cyclotides can serve as templates for the design of selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands by generating an oxytocin-like peptide with nanomolar affinity. This nonapeptide elicited dose-dependent contractions on human myometrium. These observations provide a proof of concept for the development of cyclotide-based peptide ligands. PMID:24248349

  15. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Philip, Finly; Sahu, Shriya; Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ) is activated by G protein subunits in response to environmental stimuli to increase intracellular calcium. In cells, a significant portion of PLCβ is cytosolic, where it binds a protein complex required for efficient RNA-induced silencing called C3PO (component 3 promoter of RISC). Binding between C3PO and PLCβ raises the possibility that RNA silencing activity can affect the ability of PLCβ to mediate calcium signals. By use of human and rat neuronal cell lines (SK-N-SH and PC12), we show that overexpression of one of the main components of C3PO diminishes Ca(2+) release in response to Gαq/PLCβ stimulation by 30 to 40%. In untransfected SK-N-SH or PC12 cells, the introduction of siRNA(GAPDH) [small interfering RNA(glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase)] reduces PLCβ-mediated calcium signals by ∼30%, but addition of siRNA(Hsp90) (heat shock protein 90) had little effect. Fluorescence imaging studies suggest an increase in PLCβ-C3PO association in cells treated with siRNA(GAPDH) but not siRNA(Hsp90). Taken together, our studies raise the possibility that Ca(2+) responses to extracellular stimuli can be modulated by components of the RNA silencing machinery.-Philip, F., Sahu, S., Golebiewska, U., Scarlata, S. RNA-induced silencing attenuates G protein-mediated calcium signals. PMID:26862135

  16. Nonradioactive GTP binding assay to monitor activation of g protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Frang, Heini; Mukkala, Veli-Matti; Syystö, Rita; Ollikka, Pia; Hurskainen, Pertti; Scheinin, Mika; Hemmilä, Ilkka

    2003-04-01

    GPCRs represent important targets for drug discovery because GPCRs participate in a wide range of cellular signaling pathways that play a role in a variety of pathological conditions. A large number of screening assays have been developed in HTS laboratories for the identification of hits or lead compounds acting on GPCRs. One type of assay that has found relatively widespread application, due to its at least in part generic nature, relies on the use of a radioactive GTP analogue, [(35)S]GTPgammaS. The G-protein alpha subunit is an essential part of the interaction between receptor and G proteins in transmembrane signaling, where the activated receptor catalyzes the release of GDP from Galpha, thereby enabling the subsequent binding of GTP or a GTP analogue. [(35)S]GTPgammaS allows the extent of this interaction to be followed quantitatively by determining the amount of radioactivity associated with cell membranes. However, with the increased desire to move assays to nonradioactive formats, there is a considerable need to develop a nonradioactive GTP binding assay to monitor ligand-induced changes in GPCR activity. The Eu-GTP binding assay described here is based on TRF that exploits the unique fluorescence properties of lanthanide chelates, and provides a powerful alternative to assays using radioisotopes. In this article, we have used the human alpha(2A)-AR as a model GPCR system to evaluate the usefulness of this Eu-GTP binding assay. PMID:15090192

  17. Endocytosis of Seven-Transmembrane RGS Protein Activates G- protein Coupled Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Daisuke; Phan, Nguyen; Jones, Janice C.; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jirong; Grigston, Jeffrey; Taylor, J. Philip; Jones, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction typically begins by ligand-dependent activation of a concomitant partner which is otherwise in its resting state. However, in cases where signal activation is constitutive by default, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric Gα protein self-activates without accessory proteins, and is kept in its resting state by the negative regulator, AtRGS1 (Regulator of G protein Signaling 1), which is the prototype of a seven transmembrane receptor fused with an RGS domain. Endocytosis of AtRGS1 by ligand-dependent endocytosis physically uncouples the GTPase accelerating activity of AtRGS1 from the Gα protein, permitting sustained activation. Phosphorylation of AtRGS1 by AtWNK8 kinase causes AtRGS1 endocytosis, required both for G protein-mediated sugar signaling and cell proliferation. In animals, receptor endocytosis results in signal desensitization, whereas in plants, endocytosis results in signal activation. These findings reveal how different organisms rearrange a regulatory system to result in opposite outcomes using similar phosphorylation-dependent endocytosis. PMID:22940907

  18. Analysis of G Protein and β-Arrestin Activation in Chemokine Receptors Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vacchini, Alessandro; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice; Locati, Massimo; Borroni, Elena Monica

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are key regulators of leukocyte migration and play fundamental roles in immune responses. The chemokine system includes a set of over 40 ligands which engage in a promiscuous fashion a panel of over 25 receptors belonging to a distinct family of 7 transmembrane-domain receptors (7TM) widely expressed on a variety of cells. Although responses evoked by chemokine receptors have long been considered the result of balanced activation of the G protein- and β-arrestin-dependent signaling modules, evidence is accumulating showing that these receptors are capable, as other 7TMs, to activate different signaling modules in a ligand- and cell/tissue-specific manner. This biased signaling, or functional selectivity, confers a hitherto largely uncharacterized level of complexity to the chemokine system and challenges our present understanding of its redundancy. At the same time, it also provides new insights of relevance for chemokine receptors targeting drug development plans. Here, we provide current methods to study biased signaling of chemokine receptors by dissecting G proteins and β-arrestins activation upon chemokine stimulation. PMID:26921957

  19. Activator of G protein signaling 3: a gatekeeper of cocaine sensitization and drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Bowers, M Scott; McFarland, Krista; Lake, Russell W; Peterson, Yuri K; Lapish, Christopher C; Gregory, Mary Lee; Lanier, Stephen M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2004-04-22

    Chronic cocaine administration reduces G protein signaling efficacy. Here, we report that the expression of AGS3, which binds to GialphaGDP and inhibits GDP dissociation, was upregulated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during late withdrawal from repeated cocaine administration. Increased AGS3 was mimicked in the PFC of drug-naive rats by microinjecting a peptide containing the Gialpha binding domain (GPR) of AGS3 fused to the cell permeability domain of HIV-Tat. Infusion of Tat-GPR mimicked the phenotype of chronic cocaine-treated rats by manifesting sensitized locomotor behavior and drug seeking and by increasing glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens. By preventing cocaine withdrawal-induced AGS3 expression with antisense oligonucleotides, signaling through Gialpha was normalized, and both cocaine-induced relapse to drug seeking and locomotor sensitization were prevented. When antisense oligonucleotide infusion was discontinued, drug seeking and sensitization were restored. It is proposed that AGS3 gates the expression of cocaine-induced plasticity by regulating G protein signaling in the PFC. PMID:15091342

  20. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. II. Magnetic resonance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    This article continues our review of spectroscopic studies of G-protein-coupled receptors. Magnetic resonance methods including electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide specific structural and dynamical data for the protein in conjunction with optical methods (vibrational, electronic spectroscopy) as discussed in the accompanying article. An additional advantage is the opportunity to explore the receptor proteins in the natural membrane lipid environment. Solid-state 2H and 13C NMR methods yield information about both the local structure and dynamics of the cofactor bound to the protein and its light-induced changes. Complementary site-directed spin-labeling studies monitor the structural alterations over larger distances and correspondingly longer time scales. A multiscale reaction mechanism describes how local changes of the retinal cofactor unlock the receptor to initiate large-scale conformational changes of rhodopsin. Activation of the G-protein-coupled receptor involves an ensemble of conformational substates within the rhodopsin manifold that characterize the dynamically active receptor.

  1. Biased ligands for better cardiovascular drugs: dissecting G-protein-coupled receptor pharmacology.

    PubMed

    DeWire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D

    2011-07-01

    Drug discovery efforts targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) have been immensely successful in creating new cardiovascular medicines. Currently marketed GPCR drugs are broadly classified as either agonists that activate receptors or antagonists that prevent receptor activation by endogenous stimuli. However, GPCR couple to a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways beyond classical G-protein signals, and these signals can be independently activated by biased ligands to vastly expand the potential for new drugs at these classic targets. By selectively engaging only a subset of a receptor's potential intracellular partners, biased ligands may deliver more precise therapeutic benefit with fewer side effects than current GPCR-targeted drugs. In this review, we discuss the history of biased ligand research, the current understanding of how biased ligands exert their unique pharmacology, and how research into GPCR signaling has uncovered previously unappreciated capabilities of receptor pharmacology. We focus on several receptors to illustrate the approaches taken and discoveries made, and how these are steadily illuminating the intricacies of GPCR pharmacology. Discoveries of biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and of separable pharmacology suggesting the potential value of biased ligands targeting the β-adrenergic receptors and nicotinic acid receptor GPR109a highlight the powerful clinical promise of this new category of potential therapeutics. PMID:21737816

  2. Latest development in drug discovery on G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2006-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the family of proteins with the highest impact from social, therapeutic and economic point of view. Today, more than 50% of drug targets are based on GPCRs and the annual worldwide sales exceeds 50 billion dollars. GPCRs are involved in all major disease areas such as cardiovascular, metabolic, neurodegenerative, psychiatric, cancer and infectious diseases. The classical drug discovery process has relied on screening compounds, which interact favorably with the GPCR of interest followed by further chemical engineering as a mean of improving efficacy and selectivity. In this review, methods for sophisticated chemical library screening procedures will be presented. Furthermore, development of cell-based assays for functional coupling of GPCRs to G proteins will be discussed. Finally, the possibility of applying structure-based drug design will be summarized. This includes the application of bioinformatics knowledge and molecular modeling approaches in drug development programs. The major efforts established through large networks of structural genomics on GPCRs, where recombinantly expressed GPCRs are subjected to purification and crystallization attempts with the intention of obtaining high-resolution structures, are presented as a promising future approach for tailor-made drug development. PMID:17073697

  3. Structural conservation among the rhodopsin-like and other G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Mikitaka; Okada, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Intramolecular remote coupling within the polypeptide backbones of membrane proteins is difficult to analyze owing to the limited structural information available at the atomic level. Nonetheless, recent progress in the crystallographic study of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding the sophisticated architecture of heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) bundles. These 7TM bundles can respond to a wide range of extracellular stimuli while retaining the common function of binding trimeric G proteins. Here we have systematically analyzed select sets of inactive-like 7TM bundles to highlight the structural conservation of the receptors, in terms of intramolecular Cα-Cα distances. Distances with the highest scores were found to be dominated by the intrahelical distances of helix III, regardless of the choice of bundles in the set, indicating that the intracellular half of this helix is highly conserved. Unexpectedly, the distances between the cytoplasmic side of helix I and the extracellular region of helix VI provided the largest contribution to the high score populations among the interhelical pairs in most of the selected sets, including class B, C and frizzled receptors. These findings are expected to be valuable in further studies of GPCRs with unknown structure and of other protein families. PMID:25775952

  4. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulari, Mika T.K. Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-05-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption.

  5. The allosteric vestibule of a seven transmembrane helical receptor controls G-protein coupling

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Andreas; Merten, Nicole; Schrage, Ramona; Dallanoce, Clelia; Bätz, Julia; Klöckner, Jessica; Schmitz, Jens; Matera, Carlo; Simon, Katharina; Kebig, Anna; Peters, Lucas; Müller, Anke; Schrobang-Ley, Jasmin; Tränkle, Christian; Hoffmann, Carsten; De Amici, Marco; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Kostenis, Evi; Mohr, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Seven transmembrane helical receptors (7TMRs) modulate cell function via different types of G proteins, often in a ligand-specific manner. Class A 7TMRs harbour allosteric vestibules in the entrance of their ligand-binding cavities, which are in the focus of current drug discovery. However, their biological function remains enigmatic. Here we present a new strategy for probing and manipulating conformational transitions in the allosteric vestibule of label-free 7TMRs using the M2 acetylcholine receptor as a paradigm. We designed dualsteric agonists as 'tailor-made' chemical probes to trigger graded receptor activation from the acetylcholine-binding site while simultaneously restricting spatial flexibility of the receptor's allosteric vestibule. Our findings reveal for the first time that a 7TMR's allosteric vestibule controls the extent of receptor movement to govern a hierarchical order of G-protein coupling. This is a new concept assigning a biological role to the allosteric vestibule for controlling fidelity of 7TMR signalling. PMID:22948826

  6. Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response by Constitutive G-protein Signaling in Rod Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Jeannie

    2014-01-01

    Phototransduction is a G-protein signal transduction cascade that converts photon absorption to a change in current at the plasma membrane. Certain genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the phototransduction cascade cause blinding disorders in humans. Some of these mutations serve as a genetic source of “equivalent light” that activates the cascade, whereas other mutations lead to amplification of the light response. How constitutive phototransduction causes photoreceptor cell death is poorly understood. We showed that persistent G-protein signaling, which occurs in rod arrestin and rhodopsin kinase knock-out mice, caused a rapid and specific induction of the PERK pathway of the unfolded protein response. These changes were not observed in the cGMP-gated channel knock-out rods, an equivalent light condition that mimics light-stimulated channel closure. Thus transducin signaling, but not channel closure, triggers rapid cell death in light damage caused by constitutive phototransduction. Additionally, we show that in the albino light damage model cell death was not associated with increase in global protein ubiquitination or unfolded protein response induction. Taken together, these observations provide novel mechanistic insights into the cell death pathway caused by constitutive phototransduction and identify the unfolded protein response as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25183010

  7. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Anjum; Huang, Ying; Johansson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathway activation. LPA moieties efficiently activate AKT phosphorylation and activation in a multitude of cell types. The interplay between LPA, its receptors, the associated Gαi/o subunits, PI3K and AKT contributes to the regulation of cell survival, migration, proliferation and confers chemotherapy-resistance in certain cancers. However, detailed information on the regulation of PI3K–AKT signals induced by LPA receptors is missing from the literature. Here, some urgent issues for investigation are highlighted. PMID:26861299

  8. G-Protein-Coupled Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors and Their Regulation of AKT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Anjum; Huang, Ying; Johansson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is their ability to recognize and respond to chemically diverse ligands. Lysophospholipids constitute a relatively recent addition to these ligands and carry out their biological functions by activating G-proteins coupled to a large family of cell-surface receptors. This review aims to highlight salient features of cell signaling by one class of these receptors, known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors, in the context of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway activation. LPA moieties efficiently activate AKT phosphorylation and activation in a multitude of cell types. The interplay between LPA, its receptors, the associated Gαi/o subunits, PI3K and AKT contributes to the regulation of cell survival, migration, proliferation and confers chemotherapy-resistance in certain cancers. However, detailed information on the regulation of PI3K-AKT signals induced by LPA receptors is missing from the literature. Here, some urgent issues for investigation are highlighted. PMID:26861299

  9. Photosynthate Regulation of the Root System Architecture Mediated by the Heterotrimeric G Protein Complex in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Karve, Abhijit; Teixeira, Paulo J P L; Jiang, Kun; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Assimilate partitioning to the root system is a desirable developmental trait to control but little is known of the signaling pathway underlying partitioning. A null mutation in the gene encoding the Gβ subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, a nexus for a variety of signaling pathways, confers altered sugar partitioning in roots. While fixed carbon rapidly reached the roots of wild type and agb1-2 mutant seedlings, agb1 roots had more of this fixed carbon in the form of glucose, fructose, and sucrose which manifested as a higher lateral root density. Upon glucose treatment, the agb1-2 mutant had abnormal gene expression in the root tip validated by transcriptome analysis. In addition, PIN2 membrane localization was altered in the agb1-2 mutant. The heterotrimeric G protein complex integrates photosynthesis-derived sugar signaling incorporating both membrane-and transcriptional-based mechanisms. The time constants for these signaling mechanisms are in the same range as photosynthate delivery to the root, raising the possibility that root cells are able to use changes in carbon fixation in real time to adjust growth behavior. PMID:27610112

  10. Detergent-free Isolation of Functional G Protein-Coupled Receptors into Nanometric Lipid Particles.

    PubMed

    Logez, Christel; Damian, Marjorie; Legros, Céline; Dupré, Clémence; Guéry, Mélody; Mary, Sophie; Wagner, Renaud; M'Kadmi, Céline; Nosjean, Olivier; Fould, Benjamin; Marie, Jacky; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Ferry, Gilles; Boutin, Jean A; Banères, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-12

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are integral membrane proteins that play a pivotal role in signal transduction. Understanding their dynamics is absolutely required to get a clear picture of how signaling proceeds. Molecular characterization of GPCRs isolated in detergents nevertheless stumbles over the deleterious effect of these compounds on receptor function and stability. We explored here the potential of a styrene-maleic acid polymer to solubilize receptors directly from their lipid environment. To this end, we used two GPCRs, the melatonin and ghrelin receptors, embedded in two membrane systems of increasing complexity, liposomes and membranes from Pichia pastoris. The styrene-maleic acid polymer was able, in both cases, to extract membrane patches of a well-defined size. GPCRs in SMA-stabilized lipid discs not only recognized their ligand but also transmitted a signal, as evidenced by their ability to activate their cognate G proteins and recruit arrestins in an agonist-dependent manner. Besides, the purified receptor in lipid discs undergoes all specific changes in conformation associated with ligand-mediated activation, as demonstrated in the case of the ghrelin receptor with fluorescent conformational reporters and compounds from distinct pharmacological classes. Altogether, these data highlight the potential of styrene-maleic stabilized lipid discs for analyzing the molecular bases of GPCR-mediated signaling in a well-controlled membrane-like environment. PMID:26701065

  11. Novel bimodal effects of the G-protein tissue transglutaminase on adrenoreceptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Tucholski, J; Lesort, M; Jope, R S; Johnson, G V

    1999-11-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a novel G-protein that previous studies showed can couple ligand-bound activated alpha(1B) adrenoreceptors to phospholipase C-delta, resulting in phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis. In human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells we found that although endogenous tTG can facilitate alpha(1B) adrenoreceptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis, its contribution is minor compared with the classical heterotrimeric G-protein G(q/11). Further, we show that the alpha(1B) adrenoreceptor recruits tTG to the membrane and that this recruitment is enhanced by agonist occupancy of the receptor. In addition, the effects of tTG on signalling are bimodal. At low expression levels, tTG enhanced alpha(1B) adrenoreceptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis, whereas at higher expression levels tTG attenuated significantly this response. These findings are the first to demonstrate that a protein can both facilitate and attenuate receptor-stimulated PI hydrolysis. PMID:10527931

  12. The structural basis of arrestin-mediated regulation of G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2008-01-01

    The 4 mammalian arrestins serve as almost universal regulators of the largest known family of signaling proteins, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Arrestins terminate receptor interactions with G proteins, redirect the signaling to a variety of alternative pathways, and orchestrate receptor internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking. The elucidation of the structural basis and fine molecular mechanisms of the arrestin–receptor interaction paved the way to the targeted manipulation of this interaction from both sides to produce very stable or extremely transient complexes that helped to understand the regulation of many biologically important processes initiated by active GPCRs. The elucidation of the structural basis of arrestin interactions with numerous non-receptor-binding partners is long overdue. It will allow the construction of fully functional arrestins in which the ability to interact with individual partners is specifically disrupted or enhanced by targeted mutagenesis. These “custom-designed” arrestin mutants will be valuable tools in defining the role of various interactions in the intricate interplay of multiple signaling pathways in the living cell. The identification of arrestin-binding sites for various signaling molecules will also set the stage for designing molecular tools for therapeutic intervention that may prove useful in numerous disorders associated with congenital or acquired disregulation of GPCR signaling. PMID:16460808

  13. The Transporter-Opsin-G protein-coupled receptor (TOG) Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Daniel C.; Shlykov, Maksim A.; Västermark, Åke; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Arora, Sumit; Sun, Eric I.; Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    Visual Rhodopsins (VR) are recognized members of the large and diverse family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but their evolutionary origin and relationships to other proteins, are not known. In an earlier publication (Shlykov et al., 2012), we characterized the 4-Toulene Sulfonate Uptake Permease (TSUP) family of transmembrane proteins, showing that these 7 or 8 TMS proteins arose by intragenic duplication of a 4 TMS-encoding gene, sometimes followed by loss of a terminal TMS. In this study, we show that the TSUP, GPCR and Microbial Rhodopsin (MR) families are related to each other and to six other currently recognized transport protein families. We designate this superfamily the Transporter-Opsin-G protein-coupled receptor (TOG) Superfamily. Despite their 8 TMS origins, members of most constituent families exhibit 7 TMS topologies that are well conserved, and these arose by loss of either the N-terminal (more frequent) or the C-terminal (less frequent) TMS, depending on the family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed familial relationships within the superfamily and protein relationships within each of the nine families. The statistical analyses leading to the conclusion of homology were confirmed using HMMs, Pfam, and 3D superimpositions. Proteins functioning by dissimilar mechanisms (channels, primary active transporters, secondary active transporters, group translocators and receptors) are interspersed on a phylogenetic tree of the TOG superfamily, suggesting that changes in the transport and energy-coupling mechanisms occurred multiple times during the evolution of this superfamily. PMID:23981446

  14. Different subtypes of opioid receptors have different affinities for G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Polastron, J; Jauzac, P

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we have characterized the opioid receptor expressed by the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE and compared its hydrodynamic behaviour with those of well known opioid receptors: mu-opioid receptor of rabbit cerebellum and delta-opioid receptor of the hybrid cell line NG 108-15. Human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE expresses a substantial amount of opioid receptors (200-300 fmoles/mg of protein). Pharmacological characterization suggests an heterogenous population of receptors and the presence of two delta subtypes which are, at least partially, negatively coupled with adenylate cyclase via a Gi protein. These receptors exist under two different molecular forms and, in this respect, strikingly contrast with the archetypic delta receptors of NG 108-15 hybrid cell line which show only a high molecular weight form and appear more tightly coupled with the G protein. Hydrodynamic behaviour of SK-N-BE opioid receptors is reminiscent of the profile observed with the rabbit cerebellum mu-opioid receptor. This observation is consistent with the presence of two delta-opioid receptors subtypes, one of which exhibiting properties close to those of mu opioid receptors. Taken overall, our results suggest that different types and subtypes of opioid receptors, even if they are coupled to the same inhibitory G protein, are more or less tightly coupled with their transduction proteins and that closely related opioid receptors can form allosterically interacting complexes. PMID:7920183

  15. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G proteins regulate immunity by directly coupling to the FLS2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangxiu; Ding, Pingtao; Lian, Kehui; Wang, Jinlong; Ma, Miaomiao; Li, Lin; Li, Lei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Chen, She; Zhang, Yuelin; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis immune receptor FLS2 perceives bacterial flagellin epitope flg22 to activate defenses through the central cytoplasmic kinase BIK1. The heterotrimeric G proteins composed of the non-canonical Gα protein XLG2, the Gβ protein AGB1, and the Gγ proteins AGG1 and AGG2 are required for FLS2-mediated immune responses through an unknown mechanism. Here we show that in the pre-activation state, XLG2 directly interacts with FLS2 and BIK1, and it functions together with AGB1 and AGG1/2 to attenuate proteasome-mediated degradation of BIK1, allowing optimum immune activation. Following the activation by flg22, XLG2 dissociates from AGB1 and is phosphorylated by BIK1 in the N terminus. The phosphorylated XLG2 enhances the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) likely by modulating the NADPH oxidase RbohD. The study demonstrates that the G proteins are directly coupled to the FLS2 receptor complex and regulate immune signaling through both pre-activation and post-activation mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13568.001 PMID:27043937

  16. Heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) subunit promotes oral cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chai Phei; Patel, Vyomesh; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a propensity to spread to the cervical lymph nodes (LN). The presence of cervical LN metastases severely impacts patient survival, whereby the two-year survival for oral cancer patients with involved LN is ~30% compared to over 80% in patients with non-involved LN. Elucidation of key molecular mechanisms underlying OSCC metastasis may afford an opportunity to target specific genes, to prevent the spread of OSCC and to improve patient survival. In this study, we demonstrated that expression of the heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) is highly up-regulated in primary tumors and LN of OSCC patients, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also found that exogenous expression of the constitutively activated-form of Gα12 promoted cell migration and invasion in OSCC cell lines. Correspondingly, inhibition of Gα12 expression by shRNA consistently inhibited OSCC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Further, the inhibition of G12 signaling by regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) inhibited Gα12-mediated RhoA activation, which in turn resulted in reduced LN metastases in a tongue-orthotopic xenograft mouse model of oral cancer. This study provides a rationale for future development and evaluation of drug candidates targeting Gα12-related pathways for metastasis prevention. PMID:25275299

  17. Functional associations among G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The activity of neurons is controlled by groups of neurotransmitter receptors rather than by individual receptors. Experimental studies have investigated some receptor interactions, but currently little information is available about transcriptional associations among receptors at the whole-brain level. Results A total of 4950 correlations between 100 G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors were examined across 169 brain regions in the human brain using expression data published in the Allen Human Brain Atlas. A large number of highly significant correlations were found, many of which have not been investigated in hypothesis-driven studies. The highest positive and negative correlations of each receptor are reported, which can facilitate the construction of receptor sets likely to be affected by altered transcription of one receptor (such sets always exist, but their members are difficult to predict). A graph analysis isolated two large receptor communities, within each of which receptor mRNA levels were strongly cross-correlated. Conclusions The presented systematic analysis shows that the mRNA levels of many G protein-coupled receptors are interdependent. This finding is not unexpected, since the brain is a highly integrated complex system. However, the analysis also revealed two novel properties of global brain structure. First, receptor correlations are described by a simple statistical distribution, which suggests that receptor interactions may be guided by qualitatively similar processes. Second, receptors appear to form two large functional communities, which might be differentially affected in brain disorders. PMID:24438157

  18. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB1–2) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABAB receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1–3), a promiscuous L-α-amino acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABAB1–2 and T1R2–3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity and the initial steps in receptor activation. PMID:19298394

  19. The contribution of pathways initiated via the Gq\\11 G-protein family to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Finlay, Malcom; Nobles, Muriel; Opel, Aaisha

    2016-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia and leads to significant clinical morbidity and mortality. It has a complex pathophysiology but is often initiated by atrial ectopic beats and because of atrial remodelling once it occurs it can become established. Thus therapeutic interventions designed to prevent the initial occurrence of the arrhythmia are particularly needed. At the cellular level, these ectopic beats arise because of abnormal calcium release events from the sarcoplasmic reticulum leading to an inward current mediated by the sodium-calcium exchanger. There has been considerable interest in this over the last few years largely focused on the ryanodine receptor and related signalling pathways. However, atrial myocytes also possess a well-developed inositol trisphosphate (IP3) dependent calcium release system and this has been less studied. In this review we focus on pathways and molecules that couple via the Gq\\11 family of G-proteins including regulators of G-protein signalling that may influence IP3 mediated calcium release and atrial fibrillation. PMID:26773203

  20. Structural optimization and structure-functional selectivity relationship studies of G protein-biased EP2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Seiji; Watanabe, Toshihide; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Goto, Yoshikazu; Yamane, Shinsaku; Watanabe, Akio; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Kinoshita, Atsushi; Okada, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tani, Kousuke; Maruyama, Toru

    2016-05-15

    The modification of the novel G protein-biased EP2 agonist 1 has been investigated to improve its G protein activity and develop a better understanding of its structure-functional selectivity relationship (SFSR). The optimization of the substituents on the phenyl ring of 1, followed by the inversion of the hydroxyl group on the cyclopentane moiety led to compound 9, which showed a 100-fold increase in its G protein activity compared with 1 without any increase in β-arrestin recruitment. Furthermore, SFSR studies revealed that the combination of meta and para substituents on the phenyl moiety was crucial to the functional selectivity. PMID:27055938

  1. G-Protein Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels from Isolated Adult Rat Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons isolated from adult rat superior cervical ganglia (SCG) are a well-established model to study G-protein modulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). SCG neurons can be easily dissociated and are amendable to heterologous expression of genes, including genetic tools to study G-protein signaling pathways, within a time frame to maintain good spatial voltage-clamp control of membrane potential during electrophysiological recordings (8-36 h postdissociation). This protocol focuses on examining G-protein modulation of VGCCs; however, the procedures and experimental setup for acute application of agonists can be applied to study modulation of other ion channels (e.g., M-current, G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels). We also discuss some common sources of artifacts that can arise during acute drug application onto dissociated neurons, which can mislead interpretation of results. PMID:27140920

  2. The kappa opioid receptor agonist U-50488 blocks Ca2+ channels in a voltage-and G protein-independent manner in sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Bassil; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Kappa opioid receptor (κ-OR) activation is known to play a role in analgesia and central sedation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the κ-OR agonist, U-50488 (an arylacetamide), on Ca2+ channel currents and the signaling proteins involved in acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the putative promoter region of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na+ channel (NaV 1.8) that is known to be involved in pain transmission. Methods Acutely isolated rat DRG neurons were transfected with cDNA coding for enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), whose expression is driven by the Nav 1.8 promoter region. Thereafter, the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique was employed to record Ca2+ channel currents in neurons expressing EGFP. Results Exposure of EGFP-expressing DRG neurons to U-50488 (0.3 to 40 μM) led to voltage-independent inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. The modulation of the Ca2+ currents did not appear to be mediated by the Gα protein subfamilies: Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq/11, Gα14 and Gαz. Furthermore, dialysis of the hydrolysis-resistant GDP analog, GDP-β-S (1 mM), did not affect the U-50488-mediated blocking effect, ruling out involvement of other G protein subunits. Finally, U-50488 (20 μM) blocked Ca2+ channels heterologously expressed in HeLa cells that do not express κ-OR. Conclusion These results suggest that the antinociceptive actions mediated by U-50488 are likely due to both a direct block of Ca2+ channels in sensory neurons as well as G protein modulation of Ca2+ currents via κ-OR-expressing neurons. PMID:23222359

  3. Cannabinoid receptor 2 expression modulates Gβ(1)γ(2) protein interaction with the activator of G protein signalling 2/dynein light chain protein Tctex-1.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Marina; Palkowitsch, Lysann; Rading, Sebastian; Moepps, Barbara; Karsak, Meliha

    2016-01-01

    The activator of G protein signalling AGS2 (Tctex-1) forms protein complexes with Gβγ, and controls cell proliferation by regulating cell cycle progression. A direct interaction of Tctex-1 with various G protein-coupled receptors has been reported. Since the carboxyl terminal portion of CB2 carries a putative Tctex-1 binding motif, we investigated the potential interplay of CB2 and Tctex-1 in the absence and presence of Gβγ. The supposed interaction of cannabinoid receptor CB2 with Tctex-1 and the influence of CB2 on the formation of Tctex-1-Gβγ-complexes were studied by co- and/or immunoprecipitation experiments in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. The analysis on Tctex-1 protein was performed in the absence and presence of the ligands JWH 133, 2-AG, and AM 630, the protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide or the protein degradation blockers MG132, NH4Cl/leupeptin or bafilomycin. Our results show that CB2 neither directly nor indirectly via Gβγ interacts with Tctex-1, but competes with Tctex-1 in binding to Gβγ. The Tctex-1-Gβγ protein interaction was disrupted by CB2 receptor expression resulting in a release of Tctex-1 from the complex, and its degradation by the proteasome and partly by lysosomes. The decrease in Tctex-1 protein levels is induced by CB2 expression "dose-dependently" and is independent of stimulation by agonist or blocking by an inverse agonist treatment. The results suggest that CB2 receptor expression independent of its activation by agonists is sufficient to competitively disrupt Gβγ-Tctex-1 complexes, and to initiate Tctex-1 degradation. These findings implicate that CB2 receptor expression modifies the stability of intracellular protein complexes by a non-canonical pathway. PMID:26410677

  4. Aromatic D-amino acids act as chemoattractant factors for human leukocytes through a G protein-coupled receptor, GPR109B.

    PubMed

    Irukayama-Tomobe, Yoko; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2009-03-10

    GPR109B (HM74) is a putative G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) whose cognate ligands have yet to be characterized. GPR109B shows a high degree of sequence similarity to GPR109A, another GPCR that was identified as a high-affinity nicotinic acid (niacin) receptor. However, the affinity of nicotinic acid to GPR109B is very low. In this study, we found that certain aromatic D-amino acids, including D-phenylalanine, D-tryptophan, and the metabolite of the latter, D-kynurenine, decreased the activity of adenylate cyclase in cells transfected with GPR109B cDNA through activation of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins. These D-amino acids also elicited a transient rise of intracellular Ca(2+) level in cells expressing GPR109B in a PTX-sensitive manner. In contrast, these D-amino acids did not show any effects on cells expressing GPR109A. We found that the GPR109B mRNA is abundantly expressed in human neutrophils. D-phenylalanine and D-tryptophan induced a transient increase of intracellular Ca(2+) level and a reduction of cAMP levels in human neutrophils. Furthermore, knockdown of GPR109B by RNA interference inhibited the D-amino acids-induced decrease of cellular cAMP levels in human neutrophils. These D-amino acids induced chemotactic activity of freshly prepared human neutrophils. We also found that D-phenylalanine and D-tryptophan induced chemotactic responses in Jurkat cells transfected with the GPR109B cDNA but not in mock-transfected Jurkat cells. These results suggest that these aromatic D-amino acids elicit a chemotactic response in human neutrophils via activation of GPR109B. PMID:19237584

  5. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2) and 5 (GRK5) Exhibit Selective Phosphorylation of the Neurotensin Receptor in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) play an important role in the desensitization of G protein-mediated signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The level of interest in mapping their phosphorylation sites has increased because recent studies suggest that the differential pattern of receptor phosphorylation has distinct biological consequences. In vitro phosphorylation experiments using well-controlled systems are useful for deciphering the complexity of these physiological reactions and understanding the targeted event. Here, we report on the phosphorylation of the class A GPCR neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) by GRKs under defined experimental conditions afforded by nanodisc technology. Phosphorylation of NTSR1 by GRK2 was agonist-dependent, whereas phosphorylation by GRK5 occurred in an activation-independent manner. In addition, the negatively charged lipids in the immediate vicinity of NTSR1 directly affect phosphorylation by GRKs. Identification of phosphorylation sites in agonist-activated NTSR1 revealed that GRK2 and GRK5 target different residues located on the intracellular receptor elements. GRK2 phosphorylates only the C-terminal Ser residues, whereas GRK5 phosphorylates Ser and Thr residues located in intracellular loop 3 and the C-terminus. Interestingly, phosphorylation assays using a series of NTSR1 mutants show that GRK2 does not require acidic residues upstream of the phospho-acceptors for site-specific phosphorylation, in contrast to the β2-adrenergic and μ-opioid receptors. Differential phosphorylation of GPCRs by GRKs is thought to encode a particular signaling outcome, and our in vitro study revealed NTSR1 differential phosphorylation by GRK2 and GRK5. PMID:26120872

  6. Function of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 in Reproductive System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hongyan; Xuan, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1), also known as GPR30, is a novel estrogen receptor mediating estrogen receptor signaling in multiple cell types. The progress of estrogen-related cancer is promoted by GPER-1 activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. However, this promoting effect of GPER-1 is nonclassic estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. In addition, clinical evidences revealed that GPER-1 is associated with estrogen resistance in estrogen-related cancer patients. These give a hint that GPER-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the estrogen-related cancers. However, preclinical studies also found that GPER-1 activation of its special agonist G-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation. This review aims to summarize the characteristics and complex functions of GPER-1 in cancers. PMID:27314054

  7. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. PMID:27284048

  8. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, HHVs have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs), which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show highest homology to human chemokine receptors, which play a key role in the immune system. Importantly, vGPCRs have acquired unique properties such as constitutive activity and the ability to bind a broad range of human chemokines. This allows vGPCRs to hijack human proteins and modulate cellular signaling for the benefit of the virus, ultimately resulting in immune evasion and viral dissemination to establish a widespread and lifelong infection. Knowledge on the mechanisms by which herpesviruses reprogram cellular signaling might provide insight in the contribution of vGPCRs to viral survival and herpesvirus-associated pathologies. PMID:25805993

  9. The orphan G protein coupled receptor 161 is required for left-right patterning

    PubMed Central

    Leung, TinChung; Humbert, Jasper E.; Stauffer, Anna M.; Giger, Kathryn E.; Chen, Hui; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Wang, Chuan; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Robishaw, Janet D.

    2015-01-01

    Gpr161 (also known as RE2) is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed during embryonic development in zebrafish. Determining its biological function has proven difficult due to lack of knowledge regarding its natural or synthetic ligands. Here, we show that targeted knockdown of gpr161 disrupts asymmetric gene expression in the lateral plate mesoderm, resulting in aberrant looping of the heart tube. This is associated with elevated Ca2+ levels in cells lining the Kupffer's vesicle and normalization of Ca2+ levels, by over-expression of ncx1 or pmca RNA, is able to partially rescue the cardiac looping defect in gpr161 knockdown embryos. Taken together, these data support a model in which gpr161 plays an essential role in left-right (L-R) patterning by modulating Ca2+ levels in the cells surrounding the Kupffer's vesicle. PMID:18755178

  10. G protein-coupled receptor 37 is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun-Jeong; Vainshtein, Anna; Maik-Rachline, Galia; Peles, Elior

    2016-01-01

    While the formation of myelin by oligodendrocytes is critical for the function of the central nervous system, the molecular mechanism controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we identify G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) as an inhibitor of late-stage oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. GPR37 is enriched in oligodendrocytes and its expression increases during their differentiation into myelin forming cells. Genetic deletion of Gpr37 does not affect the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, but results in precocious oligodendrocyte differentiation and hypermyelination. The inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation by GPR37 is mediated by suppression of an exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC)-dependent activation of Raf-MAPK-ERK1/2 module and nuclear translocation of ERK1/2. Our data suggest that GPR37 regulates central nervous system myelination by controlling the transition from early-differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes. PMID:26961174

  11. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  12. Biophysical characterization of G-protein coupled receptor-peptide ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Langelaan, David N.; Ngweniform, Pascaline; Rainey, Jan K.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous membrane proteins allowing intracellular response to extracellular factors that range from photons of light to small molecules to proteins. Despite extensive exploitation of GRCRs as therapeutic targets, biophysical characterization of GPCR-ligand interactions remains challenging. In this minireview, we focus on techniques which have been successfully employed for structural and biophysical characterization of peptide ligands binding to their cognate GPCRs. The techniques reviewed include solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; solid-state NMR; X-ray diffraction; fluorescence spectroscopy and single molecule fluorescence methods; flow cytometry; surface plasmon resonance; isothermal titration calorimetry; and, atomic force microscopy. The goal herein is to provide a cohesive starting point to allow selection of techniques appropriate to the elucidation of a given GPCR-peptide interaction. PMID:21455262

  13. G protein-coupled receptor 183 facilitates endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition via Notch1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Panpan; He, Qiuping; Chen, Dongbo; Liu, Weixiao; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Chunxia; Ma, Dongyuan; Li, Wei; Liu, Bing; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, embryonic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are derived from a subset of endothelial cells, the hemogenic endothelium (HE), through the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). Notch signaling is essential for HSPC development during embryogenesis across vertebrates. However, whether and how it regulates EHT remains unclear. Here, we show that G protein-coupled receptor 183 (Gpr183) signaling serves as an indispensable switch for HSPC emergence by repressing Notch signaling before the onset of EHT. Inhibition of Gpr183 significantly upregulates Notch signaling and abolishes HSPC emergence. Upon activation by its ligand 7α-25-OHC, Gpr183 recruits β-arrestin1 and the E3 ligase Nedd4 to degrade Notch1 in specified HE cells and then facilitates the subsequent EHT. Importantly, 7α-25-OHC stimulation promotes HSPC emergence in vivo and in vitro, providing an attractive strategy for enhancing the in vitro generation of functional HSPCs. PMID:26358189

  14. Deciphering the Code to Aminergic G-Protein Coupled Receptor Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Edwin S.; Groban, Eli S.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Scanlan, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a biogenic amine G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is potently activated by 3-iodothyronamine (1, T1AM) in vitro. Compound 1 is an endogenous derivative of the thyroid hormone thyroxine that rapidly induces hypothermia, anergia, and bradycardia when administered to mice. To explore the role of TAAR1 in mediating the effects of 1, we rationally designed and synthesized rat TAAR1 superagonists and lead antagonists using the rotamer toggle switch model of aminergic GPCR activation. The functional activity of a ligand was found to be correlated to the nature of its interactions with the rotamer switch residues. Allowing the rotamer switch residues to toggle to their active conformation was associated with agonism while interfering with this conformational transition resulted in antagonism. These agonist and antagonist design principles provide a conceptual model for understanding the relationship between the molecular structure of a drug and its pharmacological properties. PMID:18420141

  15. Role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 in tumoral angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Verónica; Nogués, Laura; Reglero, Clara; Mayor, Federico; Penela, Petronila

    2014-01-01

    Downregulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in endothelial cells has recently been identified as a relevant event in the tumoral angiogenic switch. Based on the effects of altering GRK2 dosage in cell and animal models, this kinase appears to act as a hub in key signaling pathways involved in vascular stabilization and remodeling. Accordingly, decreased GRK2 expression in endothelial cells accelerates tumor growth in mice by impairing the pericytes ensheathing the vessels, thereby promoting hypoxia and macrophage infiltration. These results raise new questions regarding the mechanisms by which transformed cells trigger the decrease in GRK2 observed in human breast cancer vessels and how GRK2 modulates the interactions between different cell types that occur in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27308373

  16. EGFR Transactivation by Peptide G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Nakamura, Taichi; Jensen, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer kills approximately 1.3 million citizens in the world annually. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) erlotinib and gefitinib are effective anti-tumor agents especially in lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The goal is to increase the potency of TKI in lung cancer patients with wild type EGFR. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) transactivate the wild type EGFR in lung cancer cells. The GPCR can be activated by peptide agonists causing phosphatidylinositol turnover or stimulation of adenylylcyclase. Recently, nonpeptide antagonists were found to inhibit the EGFR transactivation caused by peptides. Nonpeptide antagonists for bombesin (BB), neurotensin (NTS) and cholecystokinin (CCK) inhibit lung cancer growth and increase the cytotoxicity of gefitinib. The results suggest that GPCR transactivation of the EGFR may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25563590

  17. Methuselah/Methuselah-like G protein-coupled receptors constitute an ancient metazoan gene family

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Alexandre; Jones, Jeffery W.; Friedrich, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent conclusions have been drawn regarding the phylogenetic age of the Methuselah/Methuselah-like (Mth/Mthl) gene family of G protein-coupled receptors, the founding member of which regulates development and lifespan in Drosophila. Here we report the results from a targeted homolog search of 39 holozoan genomes and phylogenetic analysis of the conserved seven transmembrane domain. Our findings reveal that the Mth/Mthl gene family is ancient, has experienced numerous extinction and expansion events during metazoan evolution, and acquired the current definition of the Methuselah ectodomain during its exceptional expansion in arthropods. In addition, our findings identify Mthl1, Mthl5, Mthl14, and Mthl15 as the oldest Mth/Mthl gene family paralogs in Drosophila. Future studies of these genes have the potential to define ancestral functions of the Mth/Mthl gene family. PMID:26915348

  18. Prediction of G Protein-Coupled Receptors with SVM-Prot Features and Random Forest

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest receptor superfamily. In this paper, we try to employ physical-chemical properties, which come from SVM-Prot, to represent GPCR. Random Forest was utilized as classifier for distinguishing them from other protein sequences. MEME suite was used to detect the most significant 10 conserved motifs of human GPCRs. In the testing datasets, the average accuracy was 91.61%, and the average AUC was 0.9282. MEME discovery analysis showed that many motifs aggregated in the seven hydrophobic helices transmembrane regions adapt to the characteristic of GPCRs. All of the above indicate that our machine-learning method can successfully distinguish GPCRs from non-GPCRs. PMID:27529053

  19. Regulation of epithelial morphogenesis by the G protein-coupled receptor mist and its ligand fog.

    PubMed

    Manning, Alyssa J; Peters, Kimberly A; Peifer, Mark; Rogers, Stephen L

    2013-11-12

    Epithelial morphogenesis is essential for shaping organs and tissues and for establishment of the three embryonic germ layers during gastrulation. Studies of gastrulation in Drosophila have provided insight into how epithelial morphogenesis is governed by developmental patterning mechanisms. We developed an assay to recapitulate morphogenetic shape changes in individual cultured cells and used RNA interference-based screening to identify Mist, a Drosophila G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) that transduces signals from the secreted ligand Folded gastrulation (Fog) in cultured cells. Mist functioned in Fog-dependent embryonic morphogenesis, and the transcription factor Snail regulated expression of mist in zygotes. Our data revealed how a cell fate transcriptional program acts through a ligand-GPCR pair to stimulate epithelial morphogenetic shape changes. PMID:24222713

  20. Regulation of Epithelial Morphogenesis by the G-Protein Coupled Receptor Mist and its Ligand Fog*

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Alyssa J.; Peters, Kimberly A.; Peifer, Mark; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis is essential for shaping organs and tissues and for establishment of the three embryonic germ layers during gastrulation. Studies of gastrulation in Drosophila have provided insight into how epithelial morphogenesis is governed by developmental patterning mechanisms. We developed an assay to recapitulate morphogenetic shape changes in individual cultured cells, and used RNAi-based screening to identify Mist, a Drosophila G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that transduces signals from the secreted ligand Folded gastrulation (Fog) in cultured cells. Mist functioned in Fog-dependent embryonic morphogenesis, and the transcription factor Snail regulated expression of mist in zygotes. Our data revealed how a cell fate transcriptional program acts through a ligand-GPCR pair to stimulate epithelial morphogenetic shape changes. PMID:24222713

  1. Prediction of G Protein-Coupled Receptors with SVM-Prot Features and Random Forest.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhijun; Ju, Ying; Zou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest receptor superfamily. In this paper, we try to employ physical-chemical properties, which come from SVM-Prot, to represent GPCR. Random Forest was utilized as classifier for distinguishing them from other protein sequences. MEME suite was used to detect the most significant 10 conserved motifs of human GPCRs. In the testing datasets, the average accuracy was 91.61%, and the average AUC was 0.9282. MEME discovery analysis showed that many motifs aggregated in the seven hydrophobic helices transmembrane regions adapt to the characteristic of GPCRs. All of the above indicate that our machine-learning method can successfully distinguish GPCRs from non-GPCRs. PMID:27529053

  2. Biased ligands at G-protein-coupled receptors: promise and progress.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Crombie, Aimee L; Soergel, David G; Lark, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    Drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is no longer limited to seeking agonists or antagonists to stimulate or block cellular responses associated with a particular receptor. GPCRs are now known to support a diversity of pharmacological profiles, a concept broadly referred to as functional selectivity. In particular, the concept of ligand bias, whereby a ligand stabilizes subsets of receptor conformations to engender novel pharmacological profiles, has recently gained increasing prominence. This review discusses how biased ligands may deliver safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs, and highlights several biased ligands that are in clinical development. Biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the μ opioid receptor illustrate the translation of the biased ligand concept from basic biology to clinical drug development. PMID:24878326

  3. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  4. Directed evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor for expression, stability, and binding selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Casim A.; Dodevski, Igor; Kenig, Manca; Dudli, Stefan; Mohr, Anja; Hermans, Emmanuel; Plückthun, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    We outline a powerful method for the directed evolution of integral membrane proteins in the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. For a mammalian G protein-coupled receptor, we arrived at a sequence with an order-of-magnitude increase in functional expression that still retains the biochemical properties of wild type. This mutant also shows enhanced heterologous expression in eukaryotes (12-fold in Pichia pastoris and 3-fold in HEK293T cells) and greater stability when solubilized and purified, indicating that the biophysical properties of the protein had been under the pressure of selection. These improvements arise from multiple small contributions, which would be difficult to assemble by rational design. In a second screen, we rapidly pinpointed a single amino acid substitution in wild type that abolishes antagonist binding while retaining agonist-binding affinity. These approaches may alleviate existing bottlenecks in structural studies of these targets by providing sufficient quantities of stable variants in defined conformational states. PMID:18812512

  5. Atypical regulation of G protein-coupled receptor intracellular trafficking by ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Dores, Michael R.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling is precisely regulated. After activation, GPCRs are desensitized, internalized and either recycled to the cell surface or sorted to lysosomes for degradation. The main route for GPCR lysosomal sorting requires ubiquitination and the endosomal-sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). Four distinct ESCRT adaptor protein complexes act sequentially to bind and sort ubiquitinated cargo to lysosomes. Several studies now indicate that alternate pathways exist for GPCR lysosomal sorting that require only some components of the ESCRT and autophagy machinery. While direct GPCR ubiquitination is not required for alternate lysosomal sorting, new evidence suggests that ubiquitin may function indirectly to modulate adaptor protein activity. Here, we discuss the atypical regulation of GPCR lysosomal sorting by ubiquitination. PMID:24680429

  6. Integrative bioinformatics for functional genome annotation: trawling for G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Flower, Darren R; Attwood, Teresa K

    2004-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are amongst the best studied and most functionally diverse types of cell-surface protein. The importance of GPCRs as mediates or cell function and organismal developmental underlies their involvement in key physiological roles and their prominence as targets for pharmacological therapeutics. In this review, we highlight the requirement for integrated protocols which underline the different perspectives offered by different sequence analysis methods. BLAST and FastA offer broad brush strokes. Motif-based search methods add the fine detail. Structural modelling offers another perspective which allows us to elucidate the physicochemical properties that underlie ligand binding. Together, these different views provide a more informative and a more detailed picture of GPCR structure and function. Many GPCRs remain orphan receptors with no identified ligand, yet as computer-driven functional genomics starts to elaborate their functions, a new understanding of their roles in cell and developmental biology will follow. PMID:15561589

  7. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in nervous system development and disease.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, Tobias; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R

    2016-09-01

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) class have emerged as crucial regulators of nervous system development, with important implications for human health and disease. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding of aGPCR functions during key steps in neural development, including cortical patterning, dendrite and synapse formation, and myelination. We focus on aGPCR modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and signalling to control these varied aspects of neural development, and we discuss how impaired aGPCR function leads to neurological disease. We further highlight the emerging hypothesis that aGPCRs can be mechanically activated and the implications of this property in the nervous system. PMID:27466150

  8. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2.

    PubMed

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  9. G protein-coupled receptors: walking hand-in-hand, talking hand-in-hand?

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Henry F; Watts, Anne O; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Leurs, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Most cells express a panel of different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allowing them to respond to at least a corresponding variety of extracellular ligands. In order to come to an integrative well-balanced functional response these ligand–receptor pairs can often cross-regulate each other. Although most GPCRs are fully capable to induce intracellular signalling upon agonist binding on their own, many GPCRs, if not all, appear to exist and function in homomeric and/or heteromeric assemblies for at least some time. Such heteromeric organization offers unique allosteric control of receptor pharmacology and function between the protomers and might even unmask ‘new’ features. However, it is important to realize that some functional consequences that are proposed to originate from heteromeric receptor interactions may also be observed due to intracellular crosstalk between signalling pathways of non-associated GPCRs. PMID:21244374

  10. Imaging G protein-coupled receptors while quantifying their ligand-binding free-energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Alsteens, David; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Zhang, Cheng; Spoerri, Patrizia M; Coughlin, Shaun R; Kobilka, Brian K; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Imaging native membrane receptors and testing how they interact with ligands is of fundamental interest in the life sciences but has proven remarkably difficult to accomplish. Here, we introduce an approach that uses force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy to simultaneously image single native G protein-coupled receptors in membranes and quantify their dynamic binding strength to native and synthetic ligands. We measured kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) molecules in the absence and presence of antagonists, and these measurements enabled us to describe PAR1's ligand-binding free-energy landscape with high accuracy. Our nanoscopic method opens an avenue to directly image and characterize ligand binding of native membrane receptors. PMID:26167642

  11. Basic Pharmacological and Structural Evidence for Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Rafael; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Lanciego, José L.; Navarro, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem an exception to the general rule of receptor–receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backward instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery. PMID:27065866

  12. In vivo determination of the structure of oligomers of a G protein-coupled receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Sasmita; Raicu, Valerica

    2009-03-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) is a process of nonradiative energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor molecule, which is widely used for studies of protein-protein interactions in living cells. Here we report on the results of a spectrally-resolved two-photon microscopy study of image pixel-level RET in yeast cells (S. cerevisiae) expressing a G-protein-coupled receptor called Sterile 2 α factor protein (Ste2P). The number of pixels showing RET were plotted against the RET efficiency to obtain distributions of RET efficiency in the cells. These distributions were simulated with models for plausible geometries and sizes of protein complexes (V. Raicu, 2007, J. Biol. Phys. 33:109--127). From all the models tested we found that a parallelogram-shaped tetramer is the most likely structure for the Ste2p oligomers.

  13. Allosteric Optical Control of a Class B G-Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Johnston, Natalie R; von Ohlen, Yorrick; Meyer-Berg, Helena; Jones, Ben J; Bloom, Stephen R; Rutter, Guy A; Trauner, Dirk; Hodson, David J

    2016-05-01

    Allosteric regulation promises to open up new therapeutic avenues by increasing drug specificity at G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, drug discovery efforts are at present hampered by an inability to precisely control the allosteric site. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and testing of PhotoETP, a light-activated positive allosteric modulator of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), a class B GPCR involved in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in humans. PhotoETP potentiates Ca(2+) , cAMP, and insulin responses to glucagon-like peptide-1 and its metabolites following illumination of cells with blue light. PhotoETP thus provides a blueprint for the production of small-molecule class B GPCR allosteric photoswitches, and may represent a useful tool for understanding positive cooperativity at the GLP-1R. PMID:27059784

  14. From G Protein-coupled Receptor Structure Resolution to Rational Drug Design*

    PubMed Central

    Jazayeri, Ali; Dias, Joao M.; Marshall, Fiona H.

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent technical solutions have led to significant advances in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology. Apart from a detailed mechanistic view of receptor activation, the new structures have revealed novel ligand binding sites. Together, these insights provide avenues for rational drug design to modulate the activities of these important drug targets. The application of structural data to GPCR drug discovery ushers in an exciting era with the potential to improve existing drugs and discover new ones. In this review, we focus on technical solutions that have accelerated GPCR crystallography as well as some of the salient findings from structures that are relevant to drug discovery. Finally, we outline some of the approaches used in GPCR structure based drug design. PMID:26100628

  15. Prognostic Impact of Modulators of G proteins in Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbazan, Jorge; Dunkel, Ying; Li, Hongying; Nitsche, Ulrich; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Messer, Karen; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2016-01-01

    The consequence of a loss of balance between G-protein activation and deactivation in cancers has been interrogated by studying infrequently occurring mutants of trimeric G-protein α-subunits and GPCRs. Prior studies on members of a newly identified family of non-receptor guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GIV/Girdin, Daple, NUCB1 and NUCB2 have revealed that GPCR-independent hyperactivation of trimeric G proteins can fuel metastatic progression in a variety of cancers. Here we report that elevated expression of each GEF in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolated from the peripheral circulation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer is associated with a shorter progression-free survival (PFS). The GEFs were stronger prognostic markers than two other markers of cancer progression, S100A4 and MACC1, and clustering of all GEFs together improved the prognostic accuracy of the individual family members; PFS was significantly lower in the high-GEFs versus the low-GEFs groups [H.R = 5, 20 (95% CI; 2,15–12,57)]. Because nucleotide exchange is the rate-limiting step in cyclical activation of G-proteins, the poor prognosis conferred by these GEFs in CTCs implies that hyperactivation of G-protein signaling by these GEFs is an important event during metastatic progression, and may be more frequently encountered than mutations in G-proteins and/or GPCRs. PMID:26916336

  16. Conformational dynamics of a class C G protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vafabakhsh, Reza; Levitz, Joshua; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors in eukaryotes. Crystal structures have provided insight into GPCR interaction with ligands and G-proteins1,2, but our understanding of the conformational dynamics of activation is incomplete. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are dimeric class C GPCRs that modulate neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and serve as drug targets for neurological disorders3,4. A “clamshell” ligand-binding domain (LBD), which contains the ligand binding site, is coupled to the transmembrane domain (TMD) via a cysteine rich domain, and LBD closure appears to be the first step in activation5,6. Crystal structures of isolated mGluR LBD dimers led to the suggestion that activation also involves a reorientation of the dimer interface from a “relaxed” to an “active” state7,8, but the relationship between ligand binding, LBD closure and dimer interface rearrangement in activation remains unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to probe the activation mechanism of full-length mammalian group II mGluRs. We find that the LBDs interconvert between three conformations: resting, activated and a short-lived intermediate state. Orthosteric agonists induce transitions between these conformational states with efficacy determined by occupancy of the active conformation. Unlike mGluR2, mGluR3 displays basal dynamics, which are Ca2+ dependent and lead to basal protein activation. Our results support a general mechanism for the activation of mGluRs in which agonist binding induces closure of the LBDs followed by dimer interface reorientation. Our experimental strategy should be widely applicable to study conformational dynamics in GPCRs and other membrane proteins. PMID:26258295

  17. Role of heterotrimeric G protein and calcium in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Loreto; Cea, Paola; Rocco, Paola; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejias, Pablo; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Quiroga, Clara; Criollo, Alfredo; Ibarra, Cristian; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    In the heart, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a peptide with pro-hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic actions. The pro-hypertrophic properties of IGF-1 have been attributed to the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Recently, we reported that IGF-1 also increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels through a pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G protein. Here we investigate whether this Ca(2+) signal is involved in IGF-1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our results show that the IGF-1-induced increase in Ca(2+) level is abolished by the IGF-1 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG538, PTX and the peptide inhibitor of Gβγ signaling, βARKct. Increases in the activities of Ca(2+) -dependent enzymes calcineurin, calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) were observed at 5 min after IGF-1 exposure. AG538, PTX, βARKct, and the dominant negative PKCα prevented the IGF-1-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Participation of calcineurin and CaMKII in ERK phosphorylation was discounted. IGF-1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, determined by cell size and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), was prevented by AG538, PTX, βARKct, dominant negative PKCα, and the MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Inhibition of calcineurin with CAIN did not abolish IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that IGF-1 induces hypertrophy in cultured cardiomyocytes by activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity/βγ-subunits of a PTX-sensitive G protein/Ca(2+) /PKCα/ERK pathway without the participation of calcineurin. PMID:24243530

  18. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson’s disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  19. Functional selective oxytocin-derived agonists discriminate between individual G protein family subtypes.

    PubMed

    Busnelli, Marta; Saulière, Aude; Manning, Maurice; Bouvier, Michel; Galés, Celine; Chini, Bice

    2012-02-01

    We used a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensor to screen for functional selective ligands of the human oxytocin (OT) receptor. We demonstrated that OT promoted the direct engagement and activation of G(q) and all the G(i/o) subtypes at the OT receptor. Other peptidic analogues, chosen because of specific substitutions in key OT structural/functional residues, all showed biased activation of G protein subtypes. No ligand, except OT, activated G(oA) or G(oB), and, with only one exception, all of the peptides that activated G(q) also activated G(i2) and G(i3) but not G(i1), G(oA), or G(oB), indicating a strong bias toward these subunits. Two peptides (DNalOVT and atosiban) activated only G(i1) or G(i3), failed to recruit β-arrestins, and did not induce receptor internalization, providing the first clear examples of ligands differentiating individual G(i/o) family members. Both analogs inhibited cell proliferation, showing that a single G(i) subtype-mediated pathway is sufficient to prompt this physiological response. These analogs represent unique tools for examining the contribution of G(i/o) members in complex biological responses and open the way to the development of drugs with peculiar selectivity profiles. This is of particular relevance because OT has been shown to improve symptoms in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders characterized by abnormal social behaviors, such as autism. Functional selective ligands, activating a specific G protein signaling pathway, may possess a higher efficacy and specificity on OT-based therapeutics. PMID:22069312

  20. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Eing-Mei; Wang, Yu-Chih; Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson's disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  1. Consequences of splice variation on Secretin family G protein-coupled receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Furness, Sebastian GB; Wootten, Denise; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    The Secretin family of GPCRs are endocrine peptide hormone receptors that share a common genomic organization and are the subject of a wide variety of alternative splicing. All GPCRs contain a central seven transmembrane domain responsible for transducing signals from the outside of the cell as well as extracellular amino and intracellular carboxyl termini. Members of the Secretin receptor family have a relatively large N-terminus and a variety of lines of evidence support a common mode of ligand binding and a common ligand binding fold. These receptors are best characterized as coupling to intracellular signalling pathways via Gαs and Gαq but are also reported to couple to a multitude of other signalling pathways. The intracellular loops are implicated in regulating the interaction between the receptor and heterotrimeric G protein complexes. Alternative splicing of exons encoding both the extracellular N-terminal domain as well as the extracellular loops of some family members has been reported and as expected these splice variants display altered ligand affinity as well as differential activation by endogenous ligands. Various forms of alternative splicing have also been reported to alter intracellular loops 1 and 3 as well as the C-terminus and as one might expect these display differences in signalling bias towards downstream effectors. These diverse pharmacologies require that the physiological role of these splice variants be addressed but should provide unique opportunities for drug design and development. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Secretin Family (Class B) G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-1 PMID:21718310

  2. Conformational dynamics of a class C G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Vafabakhsh, Reza; Levitz, Joshua; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2015-08-27

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors in eukaryotes. Crystal structures have provided insight into GPCR interactions with ligands and G proteins, but our understanding of the conformational dynamics of activation is incomplete. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are dimeric class C GPCRs that modulate neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and serve as drug targets for neurological disorders. A 'clamshell' ligand-binding domain (LBD), which contains the ligand-binding site, is coupled to the transmembrane domain via a cysteine-rich domain, and LBD closure seems to be the first step in activation. Crystal structures of isolated mGluR LBD dimers led to the suggestion that activation also involves a reorientation of the dimer interface from a 'relaxed' to an 'active' state, but the relationship between ligand binding, LBD closure and dimer interface rearrangement in activation remains unclear. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to probe the activation mechanism of full-length mammalian group II mGluRs. We show that the LBDs interconvert between three conformations: resting, activated and a short-lived intermediate state. Orthosteric agonists induce transitions between these conformational states, with efficacy determined by occupancy of the active conformation. Unlike mGluR2, mGluR3 displays basal dynamics, which are Ca(2+)-dependent and lead to basal protein activation. Our results support a general mechanism for the activation of mGluRs in which agonist binding induces closure of the LBDs, followed by dimer interface reorientation. Our experimental strategy should be widely applicable to study conformational dynamics in GPCRs and other membrane proteins. PMID:26258295

  3. Keeping the Balance Right: Regulator of G Protein Signaling 5 in Vascular Physiology and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ganss, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular system including the heart and intricate network of arteries, veins, and capillaries is essential for normal organ homeostasis and tightly controlled by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling cascades. Imbalances of these signaling systems can manifest in cardiovascular disease. There has been a recent surge in studies on modulators of GPCR activity, so-called regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) molecules, due to their potential as pharmacological targets. Among RGS proteins, RGS5 is prominently expressed in arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) suggesting an important role in vascular function. Although apparently dispensable for embryonic development, RGS5 has now emerged as a crucial regulator of adaptive cardiovascular processes, including remodeling of the vascular wall under stress. RGS5 has been shown to regulate signaling pathways which shape vSMC differentiation, migration, contraction, as well as tissue inflammation and fibrosis. Indeed, studies in RGS5 mutant mice have confirmed a crucial and nonredundant role as regulator of cardiac function, blood pressure homeostasis, and adult neovascularization such as angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In response to environmental cues, RGS5 is dynamically controlled at both mRNA and protein levels. This enables direct, precise, and rapid modulation of Gαq- and Gαi-coupled GPCR signaling which also integrates receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and Gαs/Gα12/13-mediated GPCR signal transduction. Although RGS5's endogenous role in a spatiotemporal context is still largely unknown, its prominence in vascular tissue makes it an important molecule to study and a prime candidate for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26123304

  4. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-30 gene polymorphisms are associated with uterine leiomyoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Kasap, Burcu; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk; Edgünlü, Tuba; Duran, Müzeyyen; Akbaba, Eren; Öner, Gökalp

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor, GPER-1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor 1 family and is expressed significantly in uterine leiomyomas. To understand the relationship between GPR30 single nucleotide polymorphisms and the risk of leiomyoma, we measured the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E2) levels of 78 perimenopausal healthy women and 111 perimenopausal women with leiomyomas. The participants’ leiomyoma number and volume were recorded. DNA was extracted from whole blood with a GeneJET Genomic DNA Purification Kit. An amplification-refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction approach was used for genotyping of the GPR30 gene (rs3808350, rs3808351, and rs11544331). The differences in genotype and allele frequencies between the leiomyoma and control groups were calculated using the chi-square (χ2) and Fischer’s exact test. The median FSH level was higher in controls (63 vs. 10 IU/L, p=0.000), whereas the median E2 level was higher in the leiomyoma group (84 vs. 9.1 pg/mL, p=0.000). The G allele of rs3808351 and the GG genotype of both the rs3808350 and rs3808351 polymorphisms and the GGC haplotype increased the risk of developing leiomyoma. There was no significant difference in genotype frequencies or leiomyoma volume. However, the GG genotype of the GPR30 rs3808351 polymorphism and G allele of the GPR30 rs3808351 polymorphism were associated with the risk of having a single leiomyoma. Our results suggest that the presence of the GG genotype of the GPR30 rs3808351 polymorphism and the G allele of the GPR30 rs3808351 polymorphism affect the characteristics and development of leiomyomas in the Turkish population. PMID:26773178

  5. G protein-coupled receptor160 regulates mycobacteria entry into macrophages by activating ERK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Haipeng; Chen, Hao; Mo, Haiping; Chen, Jianxia; Huang, Xiaocheng; Zheng, Ruijuan; Liu, Zhonghua; Feng, Yonghong; Liu, Feng; Ge, Baoxue

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, invades and replicates within susceptible hosts by disturbing host antimicrobial mechanisms. Although G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in most physiological and pathological activities of mammalian cells, the roles of GPCRs in Mtb invasion into host cell remain elusive. Here, we report that GPR160 expression is elevated at both mRNA and protein level in macrophages in response to BCG infection. Both the PiggyBac (PB) transposon-mediated mutation of gpr160 gene in mouse primary macrophages and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPR160 in the human macrophage cell line THP-1 markedly reduced the entry of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing BCG (BCG-GFP), also operative in vivo. BCG infection-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significantly reduced in gpr160 mutated (gpr160(-/-)) macrophages relative to levels observed in wild type macrophages, while inhibition of ERK by specific inhibitor or knockdown ERK1/2 by specific siRNA markedly reduced entry of BCG. Finally, lower bacteria burdens and attenuated pathological impairments were observed in the lungs of BCG-infected gpr160(-/-) mice. Furthermore, gpr160(-/-) macrophages also exhibits reduced uptake of Escherichia coli and Francisella tularensis. Taken together, these findings suggest an important role of GPR160 in regulating the entry of BCG into macrophages by targeting the ERK signaling pathway. As GPCRs have proven to be successful drug targets in pharmaceutical industry, it's tempting to speculate that compounds targeting GPR160, a G protein-coupled receptor, could intervene in Mtb infection. PMID:27259691

  6. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  7. Evolution, Expression Differentiation and Interaction Specificity of Heterotrimeric G-Protein Subunit Gene Family in the Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Gulab C.; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C.

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species. PMID

  8. Evolution, expression differentiation and interaction specificity of heterotrimeric G-protein subunit gene family in the mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Arya, Gulab C; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species. PMID

  9. Yeast-based screening to identify modulators of G-protein signaling using uncontrolled cell division cycle by overexpression of Stm1.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Won, Misun; Lee, Jung-Joon; Ahn, Jiwon; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Song, Kyung-Bin; Yoo, Hyang-Sook

    2007-05-01

    Stm1, a G-protein coupled receptor, which senses nutritional state drives cells to stop the proliferative cell cycle and enter meiosis under nutritionally deficient conditions in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. It was shown that overexpression of Stm1 led growth inhibition and uncontrolled mitotic haploidization presumably by the premature initiation of mitosis. Sty1 and Gpa2 seem to play important roles for Stm1 to deliver starvation signal to induce downstream function. Based on the observation that conversion of diploid to haploid by overexpression of Stm1 can be easily detected as pink or red colonies in the media containing low adenine, HTS drug screening system to identify modulators of GPCR was established and tested using 413 compounds. Four very potent modulators of GPCR including Biochanin A, which possess strong inhibitory activity against uncontrolled cell division, were identified in this screening. This study provides the yeast-based platform that allows robust cellular assays to identify novel modulators of G-protein signaling and MAP kinase pathway. PMID:17346842

  10. Characterization of the Heterotrimeric G-Protein Complex and Its Regulator from the Green Alga Chara braunii Expands the Evolutionary Breadth of Plant G-Protein Signaling1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    The lack of heterotrimeric G-protein homologs in the sequenced genomes of green algae has led to the hypothesis that, in plants, this signaling mechanism coevolved with the embryophytic life cycle and the acquisition of terrestrial habitat. Given the large evolutionary gap that exists between the chlorophyte green algae and most basal land plants, the bryophytes, we evaluated the presence of this signaling complex in a charophyte green alga, Chara braunii, proposed to be the closest living relative of land plants. The C. braunii genome encodes for the entire G-protein complex, the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, and the REGULATOR OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING (RGS) protein. The biochemical properties of these proteins and their cross-species functionality show that they are functional homologs of canonical G-proteins. The subunit-specific interactions between CbGα and CbGβ, CbGβ and CbGγ, and CbGα and CbRGS are also conserved, establishing the existence of functional G-protein complex-based signaling mechanisms in green algae. PMID:24179134

  11. Globin gene expression in correlation with G protein-related genes during erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. G proteins are also implicated in erythroid differentiation, and some of them are expressed principally in hematopoietic cells. GPCRs-linked NO/cGMP and p38 MAPK signaling pathways already demonstrated potency for globin gene stimulation. By analyzing erythroid progenitors, derived from hematopoietic cells through in vitro ontogeny, our study intends to determine early markers and signaling pathways of globin gene regulation and their relation to GPCR expression. Results Human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitors are isolated from fetal liver (FL), cord blood (CB), adult bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) and G-CSF stimulated mobilized PB (mPB), and then differentiated in vitro into erythroid progenitors. We find that growth capacity is most abundant in FL- and CB-derived erythroid cells. The erythroid progenitor cells are sorted as 100% CD71+, but we did not find statistical significance in the variations of CD34, CD36 and GlyA antigens and that confirms similarity in maturation of studied ontogenic periods. During ontogeny, beta-globin gene expression reaches maximum levels in cells of adult blood origin (176 fmol/μg), while gamma-globin gene expression is consistently up-regulated in CB-derived cells (60 fmol/μg). During gamma-globin induction by hydroxycarbamide, we identify stimulated GPCRs (PTGDR, PTGER1) and GPCRs-coupled genes known to be activated via the cAMP/PKA (ADIPOQ), MAPK pathway (JUN) and NO/cGMP (PRPF18) signaling pathways. During ontogeny, GPR45 and ARRDC1 genes have the most prominent expression in FL-derived erythroid progenitor cells, GNL3 and GRP65 genes in CB-derived cells (high gamma-globin gene expression), GPR110 and GNG10 in BM-derived cells, GPR89C and GPR172A in PB-derived cells, and GPR44 and GNAQ genes in mPB-derived cells (high beta-globin gene expression). Conclusions These results

  12. TDAG8 is a proton-sensing and psychosine-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju-Qiang; Kon, Junko; Mogi, Chihiro; Tobo, Masayuki; Damirin, Alatangaole; Sato, Koichi; Komachi, Mayumi; Malchinkhuu, Enkhzol; Murata, Naoya; Kimura, Takao; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Wakamatsu, Kaori; Koizumi, Hideki; Uede, Toshimitsu; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Kurose, Hitoshi; Sato, Takashi; Harada, Akihiro; Misawa, Norihiko; Tomura, Hideaki; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2004-10-29

    T cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) has been reported to be a receptor for psychosine. Ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) closely related to TDAG8, however, have recently been identified as proton-sensing or extracellular pH-responsive GPCRs that stimulate inositol phosphate and cAMP production, respectively. In the present study, we examined whether TDAG8 senses extracellular pH change. In the several cell types that were transfected with TDAG8 cDNA, cAMP was markedly accumulated in response to neutral to acidic extracellular pH, with a peak response at approximately pH 7.0-6.5. The pH effect was inhibited by copper ions and was reduced or lost in cells expressing mutated TDAG8 in which histidine residues were changed to phenylalanine. In the membrane fractions prepared from TDAG8-transfected cells, guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) binding activity and adenylyl cyclase activity were remarkably stimulated in response to neutral and acidic pH. The concentration-dependent effect of extracellular protons on cAMP accumulation was shifted to the right in the presence of psychosine. The inhibitory psychosine effect was also observed for pH-dependent actions in OGR1- and GPR4-expressing cells but not for prostaglandin E(2)- and sphingosine 1-phosphate-induced actions in any pH in native and sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-expressing cells. Glucosylsphingosine and sphingosylphosphorylcholine similarly inhibited the pH-dependent action, although to a lesser extent. Psychosine-sensitive and pH-dependent cAMP accumulation was also observed in mouse thymocytes. We concluded that TDAG8 is one of the proton-sensing GPCRs coupling to adenylyl cyclase and psychosine, and its related lysosphingolipids behave as if they were antagonists against protein-sensing receptors, including TDAG8, GPR4, and OGR1. PMID:15326175

  13. PDZ Protein Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Trafficking and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Henry A; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contribute to the regulation of every aspect of human physiology and are therapeutic targets for the treatment of numerous diseases. As a consequence, understanding the myriad of mechanisms controlling GPCR signaling and trafficking is essential for the development of new pharmacological strategies for the treatment of human pathologies. Of the many GPCR-interacting proteins, postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons, disc large, zona occludens-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins appear most abundant and have similarly been implicated in disease mechanisms. PDZ proteins play an important role in regulating receptor and channel protein localization within synapses and tight junctions and function to scaffold intracellular signaling protein complexes. In the current study, we review the known functional interactions between PDZ domain-containing proteins and GPCRs and provide insight into the potential mechanisms of action. These PDZ domain-containing proteins include the membrane-associated guanylate-like kinases [postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 97 kilodaltons; postsynaptic density protein of 93 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 102 kilodaltons; discs, large homolog 5; caspase activation and recruitment domain and membrane-associated guanylate-like kinase domain-containing protein 3; membrane protein, palmitoylated 3; calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase; membrane-associated guanylate kinase protein (MAGI)-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3], Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor proteins (NHERFs) (NHERF1, NHERF2, PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 1, and PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 2), Golgi-associated PDZ proteins (Gα-binding protein interacting protein, C-terminus and CFTR-associated ligand), PDZ domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) 1 and 2, regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-homology-RhoGEFs (PDZ domain-containing RhoGEF and

  14. Inhibition of Ebola and Marburg Virus Entry by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Johansen, Lisa; Varhegyi, Elizabeth; Chen, Zheng W.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are among the most lethal infectious threats to mankind. Infections by these viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and nonhuman primates with high mortality rates. Since there is currently no vaccine or antiviral therapy approved for humans, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic options for use during filoviral outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks. One of the ideal targets against filoviral infection and diseases is at the entry step, which is mediated by the filoviral glycoprotein (GP). In this report, we screened a chemical library of small molecules and identified numerous inhibitors, which are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs, including histamine receptors, 5-HT (serotonin) receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and adrenergic receptor. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious EBOV and MARV, indicating a broad antiviral activity of the GPCR antagonists. The time-of-addition experiment and microscopic studies suggest that GPCR antagonists block filoviral entry at a step following the initial attachment but prior to viral/cell membrane fusion. These results strongly suggest that GPCRs play a critical role in filoviral entry and GPCR antagonists can be developed as an effective anti-EBOV/MARV therapy. IMPORTANCE Infection of Ebola virus and Marburg virus can cause severe illness in humans with a high mortality rate, and currently there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic treatment available. The 2013-2015 epidemic in West Africa underscores a lack of our understanding in the infection and pathogenesis of these viruses and the urgency of drug discovery and development. In this study, we have identified numerous inhibitors that are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of

  15. PcG Proteins, DNA Methylation, and Gene Repression by Chromatin Looping

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vijay K; McGarvey, Kelly M; Licchesi, Julien D.F; Ohm, Joyce E; Herman, James G; Schübeler, Dirk; Baylin, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    Many DNA hypermethylated and epigenetically silenced genes in adult cancers are Polycomb group (PcG) marked in embryonic stem (ES) cells. We show that a large region upstream (∼30 kb) of and extending ∼60 kb around one such gene, GATA-4, is organized—in Tera-2 undifferentiated embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells—in a topologically complex multi-loop conformation that is formed by multiple internal long-range contact regions near areas enriched for EZH2, other PcG proteins, and the signature PcG histone mark, H3K27me3. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)–mediated depletion of EZH2 in undifferentiated Tera-2 cells leads to a significant reduction in the frequency of long-range associations at the GATA-4 locus, seemingly dependent on affecting the H3K27me3 enrichments around those chromatin regions, accompanied by a modest increase in GATA-4 transcription. The chromatin loops completely dissolve, accompanied by loss of PcG proteins and H3K27me3 marks, when Tera-2 cells receive differentiation signals which induce a ∼60-fold increase in GATA-4 expression. In colon cancer cells, however, the frequency of the long-range interactions are increased in a setting where GATA-4 has no basal transcription and the loops encompass multiple, abnormally DNA hypermethylated CpG islands, and the methyl-cytosine binding protein MBD2 is localized to these CpG islands, including ones near the gene promoter. Removing DNA methylation through genetic disruption of DNA methyltransferases (DKO cells) leads to loss of MBD2 occupancy and to a decrease in the frequency of long-range contacts, such that these now more resemble those in undifferentiated Tera-2 cells. Our findings reveal unexpected similarities in higher order chromatin conformation between stem/precursor cells and adult cancers. We also provide novel insight that PcG-occupied and H3K27me3-enriched regions can form chromatin loops and physically interact in cis around a single gene in mammalian cells. The loops associate with a

  16. Cardiac action of the first G protein biased small molecule apelin agonist.

    PubMed

    Read, Cai; Fitzpatrick, Christopher M; Yang, Peiran; Kuc, Rhoda E; Maguire, Janet J; Glen, Robert C; Foster, Richard E; Davenport, Anthony P

    2016-09-15

    Apelin peptide analogues displaying bias towards G protein signalling pathways have beneficial cardiovascular actions compared with the native peptide in humans in vivo. Our aim was to determine whether small molecule agonists could retain G protein bias. We have identified a biased small molecule, CMF-019, and characterised it in vitro and in vivo. In competition radioligand binding experiments in heart homogenates, CMF-019 bound to the human, rat and mouse apelin receptor with high affinity (pKi=8.58±0.04, 8.49±0.04 and 8.71±0.06 respectively). In cell-based functional assays, whereas, CMF-019 showed similar potency for the Gαi pathway to the endogenous agonist [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 (pD2=10.00±0.13 vs 9.34±0.15), in β-arrestin and internalisation assays it was less potent (pD2=6.65±0.15 vs 8.65±0.10 and pD2=6.16±0.21 vs 9.28±0.10 respectively). Analysis of these data demonstrated a bias of ∼400 for the Gαi over the β-arrestin pathway and ∼6000 over receptor internalisation. CMF-019 was tested for in vivo activity using intravenous injections into anaesthetised male Sprague-Dawley rats fitted with a pressure-volume catheter in the left ventricle. CMF-019 caused a significant increase in cardiac contractility of 606±112mmHg/s (p<0.001) at 500nmol. CMF-019 is the first biased small molecule identified at the apelin receptor and increases cardiac contractility in vivo. We have demonstrated that Gαi over β-arrestin/internalisation bias can be retained in a non-peptide analogue and predict that such bias will have the therapeutic benefit following chronic use. CMF-019 is suitable as a tool compound and provides the basis for design of biased agonists with improved pharmacokinetics for treatment of cardiovascular conditions such as pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27475715

  17. Genomic organization and promoter analysis of the human G-protein-coupled K{sup +} channel Kir3.1 (KCNJ3/HGIRK1)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoots, O.; Voskoglou, T.; Van Tol, H.H.M.

    1997-02-01

    The class of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K{sup +} channels is composed of at least four members, Kir3.1, Kir3.2, Kir3.3, and Kir3.4. Here we describe the genomic organization of human Kir3.1 (locus designated KCNJ3; cDNA previously named HGIRK1) and the characterization of its major promoter used in hippocampus. The Kir3.1 gene contains three exons separated by two introns, and its total length exceeds 45 kb. The two transmembrane domains, pore region, and part of the putative carboxyl terminus are encoded by exon 1, whereas the remainder of the tail is encoded by exons 2 and 3. The mRNA transcription initiation site was established, and the first 1520 bp upstream were sequenced; this region lacked a traditional TATA or CAAT box, but contained a GC-rich region as well as various putative transcription factor-binding elements. The 1520 bp upstream and 84 bp downstream of the transcription initiation site were tested for promoter activity in GH4-C1 cells. This sequence of 1604 bp contains a number of fragments that either stimulate or repress transcription, as tested by transient expression of various Kir3.1 promoter/luciferase fusion gene constructs in GH4-C1 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first promoter that has been isolated and characterized for an inwardly rectifying potassium channel. Additional data suggest the existence of another promoter that can drive transcription of Kir3.1 mRNA from a distinct initiation site. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  18. A GDI (AGS3) and a GEF (GIV) regulate autophagy by balancing G protein activity and growth factor signals

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Ear, Jason; Farquhar, Marilyn G.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is the major catabolic process responsible for the removal of aggregated proteins and damaged organelles. Autophagy is regulated by both G proteins and growth factors, but the underlying mechanism of how they are coordinated during initiation and reversal of autophagy is unknown. Using protein–protein interaction assays, G protein enzymology, and morphological analysis, we demonstrate here that Gα-interacting, vesicle-associated protein (GIV, a. k. a. Girdin), a nonreceptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Gαi3, plays a key role in regulating autophagy and that dynamic interplay between Gαi3, activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3, its guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor), and GIV determines whether autophagy is promoted or inhibited. We found that AGS3 directly binds light chain 3 (LC3), recruits Gαi3 to LC3-positive membranes upon starvation, and promotes autophagy by inhibiting the G protein. Upon growth factor stimulation, GIV disrupts the Gαi3–AGS3 complex, releases Gαi3 from LC3-positive membranes, enhances anti-autophagic signaling pathways, and inhibits autophagy by activating the G protein. These results provide mechanistic insights into how reversible modulation of Gαi3 activity by AGS3 and GIV maintains the delicate equilibrium between promotion and inhibition of autophagy. PMID:21209316

  19. Heterotrimeric G proteins are implicated in gibberellin induction of a-amylase gene expression in wild oat aleurone

    PubMed

    Jones; Smith; Desikan; Plakidou-Dymock; Lovegrove; Hooley

    1998-02-01

    The role of heterotrimeric G proteins in gibberellin (GA) induction of a-amylase gene expression was examined in wild oat aleurone protoplasts. Mas7, a cationic amphiphilic tetradecapeptide that stimulates GDP/GTP exchange by heterotrimeric G proteins, specifically induced alpha-amylase gene expression and enzyme secretion in a very similar manner to GA1. In addition, Mas7 stimulated expression of an alpha-Amy2/54:GUS promoter and reporter construct in transformed protoplasts. Both Mas7 and GA1 induction of alpha-amylase mRNA were insensitive to pertussis toxin. Hydrolysis-resistant nucleotides were introduced into aleurone protoplasts during transfection with reporter gene constructs. GDP-beta-S, which inhibits GDP/GTP exchange by heterotrimeric G proteins, completely prevented GA1 induction of alpha-Amy2/54:GUS expression, whereas GTP-gamma-S, which activates heterotrimeric G proteins, stimulated expression very slightly. Novel cDNA sequences from Galpha and Gbeta subunits were cloned from wild oat aleurone cells. By using RNA gel blot analysis, we found that the transcripts were expressed at a low level. Heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated in several events during plant growth and development, and these data suggest that they may be involved in GA regulation of alpha-amylase gene expression in aleurone. PMID:9490747

  20. Interferonβ-1b Induces the Expression of RGS1 a Negative Regulator of G-Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tiffany; Paz, Pedro; Velichko, Sharlene; Cifrese, Jill; Belur, Praveen; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Ku, Karin; Mirshahpanah, Parham; Reder, Anthony T.; Croze, Ed

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence of a link between interferonβ-1b (IFN-β) and G-protein signaling by demonstrating that IFN-β can induce the expression of the negative regulator of G-protein signaling 1 (RGS1). RGS1 reduces G-protein activation and immune cell migration by interacting with heterotrimeric G-proteins and enhancing their intrinsic GTPase activity. In this study, IFN-β treatment resulted in the induction of RGS1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), monocytes, T cells, and B cells. Induction of RGS1 by IFN-β was concentration dependent and observed at both the RNA and protein level. Other members of the RGS family were not induced by IFN-β, and induction of RGS1 required the activation of the IFN receptor. In addition, RGS1 induction was observed in PBMCs obtained from IFN-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients suggesting a possible, as yet unexplored, involvement of G-protein regulation in disease treatment. The upregulation of RGS1 by IFN-β has not been previously reported. PMID:21274427

  1. GPCR-Bench: A Benchmarking Set and Practitioners' Guide for G Protein-Coupled Receptor Docking.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dahlia R; Bortolato, Andrea; Tehan, Benjamin; Mason, Jonathan S

    2016-04-25

    Virtual screening is routinely used to discover new ligands and in particular new ligand chemotypes for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). To prepare for a virtual screen, we often tailor a docking protocol that will enable us to select the best candidates for further screening. To aid this, we created GPCR-Bench, a publically available docking benchmarking set in the spirit of the DUD and DUD-E reference data sets for validation studies, containing 25 nonredundant high-resolution GPCR costructures with an accompanying set of diverse ligands and computational decoy molecules for each target. Benchmarking sets are often used to compare docking protocols; however, it is important to evaluate docking methods not by "retrospective" hit rates but by the actual likelihood that they will produce novel prospective hits. Therefore, docking protocols must not only rank active molecules highly but also produce good poses that a chemist will select for purchase and screening. Currently, no simple objective machine-scriptable function exists that can do this; instead, docking hit lists must be subjectively examined in a consistent way to compare between docking methods. We present here a case study highlighting considerations we feel are of importance when evaluating a method, intended to be useful as a practitioners' guide. PMID:26958710

  2. Photomodulation of G Protein-Coupled Adenosine Receptors by a Novel Light-Switchable Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N6 substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities. PMID:25248077

  3. GPCR-ModSim: A comprehensive web based solution for modeling G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Mauricio; Siretskiy, Alexey; Bello, Xabier; Sallander, Jessica; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo

    2016-07-01

    GPCR-ModSim (http://open.gpcr-modsim.org) is a centralized and easy to use service dedicated to the structural modeling of G-protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). 3D molecular models can be generated from amino acid sequence by homology-modeling techniques, considering different receptor conformations. GPCR-ModSim includes a membrane insertion and molecular dynamics (MD) equilibration protocol, which can be used to refine the generated model or any GPCR structure uploaded to the server, including if desired non-protein elements such as orthosteric or allosteric ligands, structural waters or ions. We herein revise the main characteristics of GPCR-ModSim and present new functionalities. The templates used for homology modeling have been updated considering the latest structural data, with separate profile structural alignments built for inactive, partially-active and active groups of templates. We have also added the possibility to perform multiple-template homology modeling in a unique and flexible way. Finally, our new MD protocol considers a series of distance restraints derived from a recently identified conserved network of helical contacts, allowing for a smoother refinement of the generated models which is particularly advised when there is low homology to the available templates. GPCR- ModSim has been tested on the GPCR Dock 2013 competition with satisfactory results. PMID:27166369

  4. Immunohistochemical analysis for G protein in the olfactory organs of soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Nakamuta, Shoko; Yokosuka, Makoto; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nakamuta, Nobuaki

    2016-02-01

    In turtles, the epithelia lining the upper and lower chambers of the nasal cavity project axons to the ventral and dorsal parts of the olfactory bulbs, respectively. In a semi-aquatic soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, more than 1,000 odorant receptor genes have been found, but it is not known where they are expressed. In this study, we aimed to clarify the distribution of cells expressing these genes in the olfactory organs of soft-shelled turtles. Immunoreactions for the Gαolf, the α subunit of G protein coupled to the odorant receptors, were detected on the surface of epithelia lining both the upper and lower chambers of the nasal cavity. The receptor cells in the epithelium of both chambers possessed cilia on the tip of their dendrites, whereas microvillous, non-ciliated, receptor cells were not found. These data suggest that the odorant receptor genes are expressed by the ciliated receptor cells in the upper and lower chamber epithelia. Precise location of the vomeronasal epithelium is not known at present. PMID:26440778

  5. G Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 3 Regulates Breast Cancer Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Matthew J.; Fitzhugh, David J.; Parker, Joel S.; Brozowski, Jaime M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Lininger, Ruth; Klauber-Demore, Nancy; Sahagian, Gary; Truong, Young K.; Sassano, Maria F.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that has a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Chemokine receptor interactions are important modulators of breast cancer metastasis; however, it is now recognized that quantitative surface expression of one important chemokine receptor, CXCR4, may not directly correlate with metastasis and that its functional activity in breast cancer may better inform tumor pathogenicity. G protein coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3) is a negative regulator of CXCR4 activity, and we show that GRK expression correlates with tumorigenicity, molecular subtype, and metastatic potential in human tumor microarray analysis. Using established human breast cancer cell lines and an immunocompetent in vivo mouse model, we further demonstrate that alterations in GRK3 expression levels in tumor cells directly affect migration and invasion in vitro and the establishment of distant metastasis in vivo. The effects of GRK3 modulation appear to be specific to chemokine-mediated migration behaviors without influencing tumor cell proliferation or survival. These data demonstrate that GRK3 dysregulation may play an important part in TNBC metastasis. PMID:27049755

  6. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling. PMID:26928539

  7. A Molecular Pharmacologist's Guide to G Protein-Coupled Receptor Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Kean, James; de Graaf, Chris; Deupi, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology has progressed dramatically in the last decade. There are now over 120 GPCR crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank of 32 different receptors from families scattered across the phylogenetic tree, including class B, C, and Frizzled GPCRs. These structures have been obtained in combination with a wide variety of ligands and captured in a range of conformational states. This surge in structural knowledge has enlightened research into the molecular recognition of biologically active molecules, the mechanisms of receptor activation, the dynamics of functional selectivity, and fueled structure-based drug design efforts for GPCRs. Here we summarize the innovations in both protein engineering/molecular biology and crystallography techniques that have led to these advances in GPCR structural biology and discuss how they may influence the resulting structural models. We also provide a brief molecular pharmacologist's guide to GPCR X-ray crystallography, outlining some key aspects in the process of structure determination, with the goal to encourage noncrystallographers to interrogate structures at the molecular level. Finally, we show how chemogenomics approaches can be used to marry the wealth of existing receptor pharmacology data with the expanding repertoire of structures, providing a deeper understanding of the mechanistic details of GPCR function. PMID:26152196

  8. The structural evolution of a P2Y-like G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Angela; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2003-09-12

    Based on the now available crystallographic data of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) prototype rhodopsin, many studies have been undertaken to build or verify models of other GPCRs. Here, we mined evolution as an additional source of structural information that may guide GPCR model generation as well as mutagenesis studies. The sequence information of 61 cloned orthologs of a P2Y-like receptor (GPR34) enabled us to identify motifs and residues that are important for maintaining the receptor function. The sequence data were compared with available sequences of 77 rhodopsin orthologs. Under a negative selection mode, only 17% of amino acid residues were preserved during 450 million years of GPR34 evolution. On the contrary, in rhodopsin evolution approximately 43% residues were absolutely conserved between fish and mammals. Despite major differences in their structural conservation, a comparison of structural data suggests that the global arrangement of the transmembrane core of GPR34 orthologs is similar to rhodopsin. The evolutionary approach was further applied to functionally analyze the relevance of common scaffold residues and motifs found in most of the rhodopsin-like GPCRs. Our analysis indicates that, in contrast to other GPCRs, maintaining the unique function of rhodopsin requires a more stringent network of relevant intramolecular constrains. PMID:12835326

  9. G Protein Coupled Receptors in Embryonic Stem Cells: A Role for Gs-Alpha Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Layden, Brian T.; Newman, Marsha; Chen, Fei; Fisher, Amanda; Lowe, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of receptor mediated signaling pathways in embryonic stem (ES) cells is needed to facilitate strategies for cell replacement using ES cells. One large receptor family, largely uninvestigated in ES cells, is G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). An important role for these receptors in embryonic development has been described, but little is known about GPCR expression in ES cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We have examined the expression profile of 343 different GPCRs in mouse ES cells demonstrating for the first time that a large number of GPCRs are expressed in undifferentiated and differentiating ES cells, and in many cases at high levels. To begin to define a role for GPCR signaling in ES cells, the impact of activating Gs-alpha, one of the major alpha subunits that couples to GPCRs, was investigated. Gs-alpha activation resulted in larger embryoid bodies (EBs), due, in part, to increased cell proliferation and prevented the time-related decline in expression of transcription factors important for maintaining ES cell pluripotency. Significance/Conclusions These studies suggest that Gs-alpha signaling contributes to ES cell proliferation and pluripotency and provide a framework for further investigation of GPCRs in ES cells. PMID:20161705

  10. Genomic and supragenomic structure of the nucleotide-like G-protein-coupled receptor GPR34.

    PubMed

    Engemaier, Eva; Römpler, Holger; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schulz, Angela

    2006-02-01

    Directed cloning approaches and large-scale sequencing of several vertebrate genomes unveiled many new members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, among them GPR34. Initial studies showed that GPR34 is an evolutionarily old GPCR structurally related to a group of ADP-like receptors. To gain insight into the genomic organization, regulation of expression, and supragenomic diversification of GPR34 several vertebrate species were analyzed. In contrast to the obviously intronless coding region GPR34 displays an evolutionary preserved 5' noncoding intron-exon structure. Further, an alternatively used cryptic intron was identified within the coding region, which shortens the N terminus by 47 amino acids. Ubiquitous expression of GPR34 is driven by genomic sequences upstream of at least two transcriptional start regions in mouse and rat but only one region in human. In rodents, both promoters are active in all tissues investigated, but the level of activity is tissue-specific. At the translational level, several conserved in-frame AUGs within the first 150 bp of the coding region may serve as start points for translation in human and other mammals. Combinatory mutagenesis and expression of reporter constructs confirmed these multiple translational start points and revealed a preference for the second in-frame AUG in human GPR34. Our data show that multiple translation initiation starts and alternative splicing contribute to the supragenomic diversification of GPR34. PMID:16338117

  11. Select Neuropeptides and their G-Protein Coupled Receptors in Caenorhabditis Elegans and Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bendena, William G.; Campbell, Jason; Zara, Lian; Tobe, Stephen S.; Chin-Sang, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family is comprised of seven transmembrane domain proteins and play important roles in nerve transmission, locomotion, proliferation and development, sensory perception, metabolism, and neuromodulation. GPCR research has been targeted by drug developers as a consequence of the wide variety of critical physiological functions regulated by this protein family. Neuropeptide GPCRs are the least characterized of the GPCR family as genetic systems to characterize their functions have lagged behind GPCR gene discovery. Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans are genetic model organisms that have proved useful in characterizing neuropeptide GPCRs. The strength of a genetic approach leads to an appreciation of the behavioral plasticity that can result from subtle alterations in GPCRs or regulatory proteins in the pathways that GPCRs control. Many of these invertebrate neuropeptides, GPCRs, and signaling pathway components serve as models for mammalian counterparts as they have conserved sequences and function. This review provides an overview of the methods to match neuropeptides to their cognate receptor and a state of the art account of neuropeptide GPCRs that have been characterized in D. melanogaster and C. elegans and the behaviors that have been uncovered through genetic manipulation. PMID:22908006

  12. Immunohistochemical analysis for G protein in the olfactory organs of soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMUTA, Shoko; YOKOSUKA, Makoto; TANIGUCHI, Kazumi; YAMAMOTO, Yoshio; NAKAMUTA, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    In turtles, the epithelia lining the upper and lower chambers of the nasal cavity project axons to the ventral and dorsal parts of the olfactory bulbs, respectively. In a semi-aquatic soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, more than 1,000 odorant receptor genes have been found, but it is not known where they are expressed. In this study, we aimed to clarify the distribution of cells expressing these genes in the olfactory organs of soft-shelled turtles. Immunoreactions for the Gαolf, the α subunit of G protein coupled to the odorant receptors, were detected on the surface of epithelia lining both the upper and lower chambers of the nasal cavity. The receptor cells in the epithelium of both chambers possessed cilia on the tip of their dendrites, whereas microvillous, non-ciliated, receptor cells were not found. These data suggest that the odorant receptor genes are expressed by the ciliated receptor cells in the upper and lower chamber epithelia. Precise location of the vomeronasal epithelium is not known at present. PMID:26440778

  13. G2A is a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor antagonized by lysophosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoka; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Okuno, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Takao

    2004-10-01

    G2A (from G2 accumulation) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that regulates the cell cycle, proliferation, oncogenesis, and immunity. G2A shares significant homology with three GPCRs including ovarian cancer GPCR (OGR1/GPR68), GPR4, and T cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8). Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) were reported as ligands for G2A and GPR4 and for OGR1 (SPC only), and a glycosphingolipid psychosine was reported as ligand for TDAG8. As OGR1 and GPR4 were reported as proton-sensing GPCRs (Ludwig, M. G., Vanek, M., Guerini, D., Gasser, J. A., Jones, C. E., Junker, U., Hofstetter, H., Wolf, R. M., and Seuwen, K. (2003) Nature 425, 93-98), we evaluated the proton-sensing function of G2A. Transient expression of G2A caused significant activation of the zif 268 promoter and inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation at pH 7.6, and lowering extracellular pH augmented the activation only in G2A-expressing cells. LPC inhibited the pH-dependent activation of G2A in a dose-dependent manner in these assays. Thus, G2A is another proton-sensing GPCR, and LPC functions as an antagonist, not as an agonist, and regulates the proton-dependent activation of G2A. PMID:15280385

  14. Monitoring ligand-mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptor as a novel pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Shin'ichi; Setoguchi, Shingo; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2006-12-01

    Agonist activation of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) results in the redistribution of the receptor protein away from the cell surface into internal cellular compartments through a process of endocytosis known as internalization. Visualization of receptor internalization has become experimentally practicable by using fluorescent reagents such as green fluorescent protein (GFP). In this study, we examined whether the ligand-mediated internalization of a GPCR can be exploited for pharmacological evaluations. We acquired fluorescent images of cells expressing GFP-labeled GPCRs and evaluated the ligand-mediated internalization quantitatively by image processing. Using beta2-adrenoceptor and vasopressin V1a receptor as model GPCRs that couple to Gs and Gq, respectively, we first examined whether these GFP-tagged GPCRs exhibited appropriate pharmacology. The rank order of receptor internalization potency for a variety of agonists and antagonists specific to each receptor corresponded well with that previously observed in ligand binding studies. In addition to chemical ligand-induced internalization, this cell-based fluorescence imaging system successfully monitored the internalization of the proton-sensing GPCR TDAG8, and that of the free fatty acid-sensitive GPCR GPR120. The results show that monitoring receptor internalization can be a useful approach for pharmacological characterization of GPCRs and in fishing for ligands of orphan GPCRs. PMID:16978657

  15. Not lost in translation: Emerging clinical importance of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    It has been 20years that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) was cloned as the orphan receptor GPR30 from multiple cellular sources, including vascular endothelial cells. Here, I will provide an overview of estrogen biology and the historical background leading to the discovery of rapid vascular estrogen signaling. I will also review the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying GPER function, its role in physiology and disease, some of the currently available GPER-targeting drugs approved for clinical use such as SERMs (selective estrogen receptor modulators) and SERDs (selective estrogen receptor downregulators). Many of currently used drugs such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, or faslodex™/fulvestrant were discovered targeting GPER many years after they had been introduced to the clinics for entirely different purposes. This has important implications for the clinical use of these drugs and their modes of action, which I have termed 'reverse translational medicine'. In addition, environmental pollutants known as 'endocrine disruptors' have been found to bind to GPER. This article also discusses recent evidence in these areas as well as opportunities in translational clinical medicine and GPER research, including medical genetics, personalized medicine, prevention, and its theranostic use. PMID:26921679

  16. The repertoire of G-protein-coupled receptors in fully sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2005-05-01

    The superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the largest and most studied families of proteins. We created Hidden Markov Models derived from sorted groups of GPCRs from our previous detailed phylogenetic classification of human GPCRs and added several other models derived from receptors not found in mammals. We used these models to search entire Genscan data sets from 13 species whose genomes are nearly completely sequenced. We found more than 5000 unique GPCRs that were divided into 15 main groups, and the largest one, the Rhodopsin family, was subdivided into 13 subclasses. The results show that the main families in the human genome, Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled, and Secretin, arose before the split of nematodes from the chordate lineage. Moreover, several of the subgroups of the Rhodopsin family arose before the split of the linage leading to vertebrates. We also searched expressed sequence tag (EST) databases and identified more than 20,000 sequences that match GPCRs. Although the GPCRs represent typically 1 to 2% of the Genscan predictions, the ESTs that match GPCRs are typically only 0.01 to 0.001%, indicating that GPCRs in most of the groups are expressed at low levels. We also provide searchable data sets that may be used for annotation and further detailed analysis of the GPCR family. This study provides an extensive overview of the expansion of the gene repertoire for families and subgroups of GPCRs. PMID:15687224

  17. Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) deficiency accelerates the progression of kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Noh, Mira; Rhee, Man Hee; Park, Kwon Moo

    2014-09-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) is a potent negative regulator of Gq protein signals including the angiotensin II (AngII)/AngII receptor signal, which plays a critical role in the progression of fibrosis. However, the role of RGS2 on the progression of kidney fibrosis has not been assessed. Here, we investigated the role of RGS2 in kidney fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice. UUO resulted in increased expression of RGS2 mRNA and protein in the kidney along with increases of AngII and its type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling and fibrosis. Furthermore, UUO increased the levels of F4/80, Ly6G, myeloperoxidase, and CXCR4 in the kidneys. RGS2 deficiency significantly enhanced these changes in the kidney. RGS2 deletion in the bone marrow-derived cells by transplanting the bone marrow of RGS2 knock-out mice into wild type mice enhanced UUO-induced kidney fibrosis. Overexpression of RGS2 in HEK293 cells, a human embryonic kidney cell line, and RAW264.7 cells, a monocyte/macrophage line, inhibited the AngII-induced activation of ERK and increase of CXCR4 expression. These findings provide the first evidence that RGS2 negatively regulates the progression of kidney fibrosis following UUO, likely by suppressing fibrogenic and inflammatory responses through the inhibition of AngII/AT1R signaling. PMID:24973550

  18. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  19. Synergistically acting agonists and antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors prevent photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Palczewska, Grazyna; Masuho, Ikuo; Gao, Songqi; Jin, Hui; Dong, Zhiqian; Gieser, Linn; Brooks, Matthew J; Kiser, Philip D; Kern, Timothy S; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Swaroop, Anand; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell degeneration leads to visual impairment and blindness in several types of retinal disease. However, the discovery of safe and effective therapeutic strategies conferring photoreceptor cell protection remains challenging. Targeting distinct cellular pathways with low doses of different drugs that produce a functionally synergistic effect could provide a strategy for preventing or treating retinal dystrophies. We took a systems pharmacology approach to identify potential combination therapies using a mouse model of light-induced retinal degeneration. We showed that a combination of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs that act on different G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibited synergistic activity that protected retinas from light-induced degeneration even when each drug was administered at a low dose. In functional assays, the combined effects of these drugs were stimulation of Gi/o signaling by activating the dopamine receptors D2R and D4R, as well as inhibition of Gs and Gq signaling by antagonizing D1R and the α1A-adrenergic receptor ADRA1A, respectively. Moreover, transcriptome analyses demonstrated that such combined GPCR-targeted treatments preserved patterns of retinal gene expression that were more similar to those of the normal retina than did higher-dose monotherapy. Our study thus supports a systems pharmacology approach to identify treatments for retinopathies, an approach that could extend to other complex disorders. PMID:27460988

  20. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, Kelly J.; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs. PMID:26594176

  1. Molecular recognition of parathyroid hormone by its G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Xu, H. Eric

    2008-08-07

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is central to calcium homeostasis and bone maintenance in vertebrates, and as such it has been used for treating osteoporosis. It acts primarily by binding to its receptor, PTH1R, a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family that also includes receptors for glucagon, calcitonin, and other therapeutically important peptide hormones. Despite considerable interest and much research, determining the structure of the receptor-hormone complex has been hindered by difficulties in purifying the receptor and obtaining diffraction-quality crystals. Here, we present a method for expression and purification of the extracellular domain (ECD) of human PTH1R engineered as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion that readily crystallizes. The 1.95-{angstrom} structure of PTH bound to the MBP-PTH1R-ECD fusion reveals that PTH docks as an amphipathic helix into a central hydrophobic groove formed by a three-layer {alpha}-{beta}-{beta}{alpha} fold of the PTH1R ECD, resembling a hot dog in a bun. Conservation in the ECD scaffold and the helical structure of peptide hormones emphasizes this hot dog model as a general mechanism of hormone recognition common to class B GPCRs. Our findings reveal critical insights into PTH actions and provide a rational template for drug design that targets this hormone signaling pathway.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Iodinated Tetrahydroquinolines Targeting the G Protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor GPR30

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Nayak, Tapan K.; Burai, Ritwik; Dennis, Megan K.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Sklar, Larry A.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Arterburn, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    A series of iodo-substituted tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolines was synthesized as potential targeted imaging agents for the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30. The affinity and specificity of binding to GPR30 versus the classical estrogen receptors ERα/β and functional responses associated with ligand-binding were determined. Selected iodo-substituted tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolines exhibited IC50 values lower than 20 nM in competitive binding studies with GPR30-expressing human endometrial cancer cells. These compounds functioned as antagonists of GPR30 and blocked estrogen-induced PI3K activation and calcium mobilization. The tributylstannyl precursors of selected compounds were radiolabeled with 125I using the iodogen method. In vivo biodistribution studies in female ovariectomized athymic (NCr) nu/nu mice bearing GPR30-expressing human endometrial tumors revealed GPR30-mediated uptake of the radiotracer ligands in tumor, adrenal and reproductive organs. Biodistribution and quantitative SPECT/CT studies revealed structurally-related differences in the pharmacokinetic profiles, target tissue uptake and metabolism of the radiolabeled compounds as well as differences in susceptibility to deiodination. The high lipophilicity of the compounds adversely affects the in vivo biodistribution and clearance of these radioligands, and suggests that further optimization of this parameter may lead to improved targeting characteristics. PMID:20041667

  3. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  4. Solubilization of G protein-coupled receptors: a convenient strategy to explore lipid-receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Rao, Bhagyashree D; Jafurulla, Md

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of molecules involved in signal transduction across cell membranes and are major drug targets. Since GPCRs are integral membrane proteins, their structure and function are modulated by membrane lipids. In particular, membrane cholesterol is an important lipid in the context of GPCR function. Solubilization of integral membrane proteins is a process in which the proteins and lipids in native membranes are dissociated in the presence of a suitable amphiphilic detergent. Interestingly, solubilization offers a convenient approach to monitor lipid-receptor interaction as it results in differential extents of lipid solubilization, thereby allowing to assess the role of specific lipids on receptor function. In this review, we highlight how this solubilization strategy is utilized to decipher novel information about the structural stringency of cholesterol necessary for supporting the function of the serotonin(1A) receptor. We envision that insight in GPCR-lipid interaction would result in better understanding of GPCR function in health and disease. PMID:25950962

  5. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a common second messenger that mediates numerous biological responses. Intracellular cAMP levels are increased by activation of G(s)-coupled G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and decreased by activation of G(i)-coupled GPCRs via the adenylyl cyclase. Many end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled β(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format. PMID:23374187

  6. Orphan G-protein-coupled receptors: the next generation of drug targets?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Shelagh; Bergsma, Derk J; Chambers, Jon K; Muir, Alison I; Fantom, Kenneth G M; Ellis, Catherine; Murdock, Paul R; Herrity, Nicole C; Stadel, Jeffrey M

    1998-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has readily embraced genomics to provide it with new targets for drug discovery. Large scale DNA sequencing has allowed the identification of a plethora of DNA sequences distantly related to known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), a superfamily of receptors that have a proven history of being excellent therapeutic targets. In most cases the extent of sequence homology is insufficient to assign these `orphan' receptors to a particular receptor subfamily. Consequently, reverse molecular pharmacological and functional genomic strategies are being employed to identify the activating ligands of the cloned receptors. Briefly, the reverse molecular pharmacological methodology includes cloning and expression of orphan GPCRs in mammalian cells and screening these cells for a functional response to cognate or surrogate agonists present in biological extract preparations, peptide libraries, and complex compound collections. The functional genomics approach involves the use of `humanized yeast cells, where the yeast GPCR transduction system is engineered to permit functional expression and coupling of human GPCRs to the endogenous signalling machinery. Both systems provide an excellent platform for identifying novel receptor ligands. Once activating ligands are identified they can be used as pharmacological tools to explore receptor function and relationship to disease. PMID:9884064

  7. Class II G Protein-Coupled Receptors and Their Ligands in Neuronal Function and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bronwen; de Maturana, Rakel Lopez; Brenneman, Randall; Walent, Tom; Mattson, Mark P.; Maudsley, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play pivotal roles in regulating the function and plasticity of neuronal circuits in the nervous system. Among the myriad of GPCRs expressed in neural cells, class II GPCRs which couples predominantly to the Gs–adenylate cyclase–cAMP signaling pathway, have recently received considerable attention for their involvement in regulating neuronal survival. Neuropeptides that activate class II GPCRs include secretin, glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and calcitonin-related peptides. Studies of patients and animal and cell culture models, have revealed possible roles for class II GPCRs signaling in the pathogenesis of several prominent neurodegenerative conditions including stroke, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Many of the peptides that activate class II GPCRs promote neuron survival by increasing the resistance of the cells to oxidative, metabolic, and excitotoxic injury. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which class II GPCRs signaling modulates neuronal survival and plasticity will likely lead to novel therapeutic interventions for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:16052036

  8. Complete Reversible Refolding of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor on a Solid Support.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolo, Natalie; Compton, Emma L R; Warne, Tony; Edwards, Patricia C; Tate, Christopher G; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Booth, Paula J

    2016-01-01

    The factors defining the correct folding and stability of integral membrane proteins are poorly understood. Folding of only a few select membrane proteins has been scrutinised, leaving considerable deficiencies in knowledge for large protein families, such as G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Complete reversible folding, which is problematic for any membrane protein, has eluded this dominant receptor family. Moreover, attempts to recover receptors from denatured states are inefficient, yielding at best 40-70% functional protein. We present a method for the reversible unfolding of an archetypal family member, the β1-adrenergic receptor, and attain 100% recovery of the folded, functional state, in terms of ligand binding, compared to receptor which has not been subject to any unfolding and retains its original, folded structure. We exploit refolding on a solid support, which could avoid unwanted interactions and aggregation that occur in bulk solution. We determine the changes in structure and function upon unfolding and refolding. Additionally, we employ a method that is relatively new to membrane protein folding; pulse proteolysis. Complete refolding of β1-adrenergic receptor occurs in n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (DM) micelles from a urea-denatured state, as shown by regain of its original helical structure, ligand binding and protein fluorescence. The successful refolding strategy on a solid support offers a defined method for the controlled refolding and recovery of functional GPCRs and other membrane proteins that suffer from instability and irreversible denaturation once isolated from their native membranes. PMID:26982879

  9. Developmental expression of orphan G protein-coupled receptor 50 in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Ellen; Tew, Kenneth D; Porteous, David J; Thomson, Pippa A

    2012-06-20

    Mental disorders have a complex etiology resulting from interactions between multiple genetic risk factors and stressful life events. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor 50 (GPR50) has been identified as a genetic risk factor for bipolar disorder and major depression in women, and there is additional genetic and functional evidence linking GPR50 to neurite outgrowth, lipid metabolism, and adaptive thermogenesis and torpor. However, in the absence of a ligand, a specific function has not been identified. Adult GPR50 expression has previously been reported in brain regions controlling the HPA axis, but its developmental expression is unknown. In this study, we performed extensive expression analysis of GPR50 and three protein interactors using rt-PCR and immunohistochemistry in the developing and adult mouse brain. Gpr50 is expressed at embryonic day 13 (E13), peaks at E18, and is predominantly expressed by neurons. Additionally we identified novel regions of Gpr50 expression, including brain stem nuclei involved in neurotransmitter signaling: the locus coeruleus, substantia nigra, and raphe nuclei, as well as nuclei involved in metabolic homeostasis. Gpr50 colocalizes with yeast-two-hybrid interactors Nogo-A, Abca2, and Cdh8 in the hypothalamus, amygdala, cortex, and selected brain stem nuclei at E18 and in the adult. With this study, we identify a link between GPR50 and neurotransmitter signaling and strengthen a likely role in stress response and energy homeostasis. PMID:22860215

  10. Epigenetic regulation of G protein coupled receptor signaling and its implications in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Shalini; Sona, Chandan; Kumar, Ajeet; Yadav, Prem N

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) act as a relay center through which extracellular signals, in the form of neurotransmitters or therapeutics, are converted into an intracellular response, which ultimately shapes the overall response at the tissue and behavioral level. Remarkably in similar ways, epigenetic mechanisms also modulate the expression pattern of a large number of genes in response to the dynamic environment inside and outside of the body, and consequently overall response. Emerging evidences from the pharmacogenomics and preclinical studies clearly suggest that these two distinct mechanisms criss-cross each other in several neurological disorders. At one hand such cross-talks between two distinct mechanisms make disease etiology more challenging to understand, while on the other hand if dealt appropriately, such situations might provide an opportunity to find novel druggable target and strategy for the treatment of complex diseases. In this review article, we have summarized and highlighted the main findings that tie epigenetic mechanisms to GPCR mediated signaling in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including depression, addiction and pain. PMID:27046448

  11. Multitarget-directed tricyclic pyridazinones as G protein-coupled receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pau, Amedeo; Catto, Marco; Pinna, Giovanni; Frau, Simona; Murineddu, Gabriele; Asproni, Battistina; Curzu, Maria M; Pisani, Leonardo; Leonetti, Francesco; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José; Pinna, Gérard A; Carotti, Angelo

    2015-06-01

    By following a multitarget ligand design approach, a library of 47 compounds was prepared, and they were tested as binders of selected G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and inhibitors of acetyl and/or butyryl cholinesterase. The newly designed ligands feature pyridazinone-based tricyclic scaffolds connected through alkyl chains of variable length to proper amine moieties (e.g., substituted piperazines or piperidines) for GPCR and cholinesterase (ChE) molecular recognition. The compounds were tested at three different GPCRs, namely serotoninergic 5-HT1A, adrenergic α1A, and dopaminergic D2 receptors. Our main goal was the discovery of compounds that exhibit, in addition to ChE inhibition, antagonist activity at 5-HT1A because of its involvement in neuronal deficits typical of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Ligands with nanomolar affinity for the tested GPCRs were discovered, but most of them behaved as dual antagonists of α1A and 5-HT1A receptors. Nevertheless, several compounds displaying this GPCR affinity profile also showed moderate to good inhibition of AChE and BChE, thus deserving further investigations to exploit the therapeutic potential of such unusual biological profiles. PMID:25924828

  12. Revisiting the homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: β1-adrenoceptor as an example.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Li, Minyong

    2012-06-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recognized to constitute the largest family of membrane proteins. Due to the disproportion in the quantity of crystal structures and their amino acid sequences, homology modeling contributes a reasonable and feasible approach to GPCR theoretical coordinates. With the brand new crystal structures resolved recently, herein we deliberated how to designate them as templates to carry out homology modeling in four aspects: (1) various sequence alignment methods; (2) protein weight matrix; (3) different sets of multiple templates; (4) active and inactive state of templates. The accuracy of models was evaluated by comparing the similarity of stereo conformation and molecular docking results between models and the experimental structure of Meleagris gallopavo β(1)-adrenergic receptor (Mg_Adrb1) that we desired to develop as an example. Our results proposed that: (1) Cobalt and MAFFT, two algorithms of sequence alignment, were suitable for single- and multiple-template modeling, respectively; (2) Blosum30 is applicable to align sequences in the case of low sequence identity; (3) multiple-template modeling is not always better than single-template one; (4) the state of template is an influential factor in simulating the GPCR structures as well. PMID:22454032

  13. IUPHAR-DB: the IUPHAR database of G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Harmar, Anthony J; Hills, Rebecca A; Rosser, Edward M; Jones, Martin; Buneman, O Peter; Dunbar, Donald R; Greenhill, Stuart D; Hale, Valerie A; Sharman, Joanna L; Bonner, Tom I; Catterall, William A; Davenport, Anthony P; Delagrange, Philippe; Dollery, Colin T; Foord, Steven M; Gutman, George A; Laudet, Vincent; Neubig, Richard R; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Olsen, Richard W; Peters, John; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Ruffolo, Robert R; Searls, David B; Wright, Mathew W; Spedding, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The IUPHAR database (IUPHAR-DB) integrates peer-reviewed pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and anatomical information on the 354 nonsensory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), 71 ligand-gated ion channel subunits and 141 voltage-gated-like ion channel subunits encoded by the human, rat and mouse genomes. These genes represent the targets of approximately one-third of currently approved drugs and are a major focus of drug discovery and development programs in the pharmaceutical industry. IUPHAR-DB provides a comprehensive description of the genes and their functions, with information on protein structure and interactions, ligands, expression patterns, signaling mechanisms, functional assays and biologically important receptor variants (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms and splice variants). In addition, the phenotypes resulting from altered gene expression (e.g. in genetically altered animals or in human genetic disorders) are described. The content of the database is peer reviewed by members of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR); the data are provided through manual curation of the primary literature by a network of over 60 subcommittees of NC-IUPHAR. Links to other bioinformatics resources, such as NCBI, Uniprot, HGNC and the rat and mouse genome databases are provided. IUPHAR-DB is freely available at http://www.iuphar-db.org. PMID:18948278

  14. GGA3 Interacts with a G Protein-Coupled Receptor and Modulates Its Cell Surface Export.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maoxiang; Davis, Jason E; Li, Chunman; Gao, Jie; Huang, Wei; Lambert, Nevin A; Terry, Alvin V; Wu, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms governing the anterograde trafficking of nascent G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are poorly understood. Here, we have studied the regulation of cell surface transport of α2-adrenergic receptors (α2-ARs) by GGA3 (Golgi-localized, γ-adaptin ear domain homology, ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3), a multidomain clathrin adaptor protein that sorts cargo proteins at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome/lysosome pathway. By using an inducible system, we demonstrated that GGA3 knockdown significantly inhibited the cell surface expression of newly synthesized α2B-AR without altering overall receptor synthesis and internalization. The receptors were arrested in the TGN. Furthermore, GGA3 knockdown attenuated α2B-AR-mediated signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation and cyclic AMP (cAMP) inhibition. More interestingly, GGA3 physically interacted with α2B-AR, and the interaction sites were identified as the triple Arg motif in the third intracellular loop of the receptor and the acidic motif EDWE in the VHS domain of GGA3. In contrast, α2A-AR did not interact with GGA3 and its cell surface export and signaling were not affected by GGA3 knockdown. These data reveal a novel function of GGA3 in export trafficking of a GPCR that is mediated via a specific interaction with the receptor. PMID:26811329

  15. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    PubMed Central

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B.; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala; Peisajovich, Sergio G.

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2 is a hub in a network of interactions controlling both signal transduction and signal suppression. Through laboratory evolution, we obtained 21 mutant receptors sensitive to the pheromone of a related yeast species and investigated the molecular mechanisms behind this newfound sensitivity. While some mutants show enhanced binding affinity to the foreign pheromone, others only display weakened interactions with the network's negative regulators. Importantly, the latter changes have a limited impact on overall pathway regulation, despite their considerable effect on sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that a new receptor–ligand pair can evolve through network-altering mutations independently of receptor–ligand binding, and suggest a potential role for such mutations in disease. PMID:27487915

  16. Chaperoning G Protein-Coupled Receptors: From Cell Biology to Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that traverse the plasma membrane seven times (hence, are also called 7TM receptors). The polytopic structure of GPCRs makes the folding of GPCRs difficult and complex. Indeed, many wild-type GPCRs are not folded optimally, and defects in folding are the most common cause of genetic diseases due to GPCR mutations. Both general and receptor-specific molecular chaperones aid the folding of GPCRs. Chemical chaperones have been shown to be able to correct the misfolding in mutant GPCRs, proving to be important tools for studying the structure-function relationship of GPCRs. However, their potential therapeutic value is very limited. Pharmacological chaperones (pharmacoperones) are potentially important novel therapeutics for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in GPCR genes that resulted in misfolded mutant proteins. Pharmacoperones also increase cell surface expression of wild-type GPCRs; therefore, they could be used to treat diseases that do not harbor mutations in GPCRs. Recent studies have shown that indeed pharmacoperones work in both experimental animals and patients. High-throughput assays have been developed to identify new pharmacoperones that could be used as therapeutics for a number of endocrine and other genetic diseases. PMID:24661201

  17. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  18. Expression of Mammalian G Protein-Coupled Receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Salom, David; Jin, Hui; Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Constituting the largest group of membrane proteins identified in the human genome, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) help control many physiological processes by responding to various stimuli. As targets for more than 40% of all prescribed pharmaceuticals, detailed understanding of GPCR structures is vital for the design and development of more specific medications and improved patient therapies. But structural information for membrane proteins and GPCRs, in particular, is limited despite considerable interest. The major impediment to obtaining sufficient quantities of highly purified GPCRs in their native form for crystallization lies in their low tissue levels, poor yields, and stability. The only exception is rhodopsin, which is abundantly expressed in the eye and stabilized by its covalently bound chromophore, 11-cis-retinal. Expression systems and purification protocols have yet to be developed for all other GPCRs. Here, we present a novel expression system for human GPCRs in Caenorhabditis elegans that produces sufficient amounts of recombinant proteins to allow their biochemical and structural characterization. PMID:23332703

  19. Constitutive phospholipid scramblase activity of a G protein-coupled receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, Michael A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Menon, Indu; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2014-10-01

    Opsin, the rhodopsin apoprotein, was recently shown to be an ATP-independent flippase (or scramblase) that equilibrates phospholipids across photoreceptor disc membranes in mammalian retina, a process required for disc homoeostasis. Here we show that scrambling is a constitutive activity of rhodopsin, distinct from its light-sensing function. Upon reconstitution into vesicles, discrete conformational states of the protein (rhodopsin, a metarhodopsin II-mimic, and two forms of opsin) facilitated rapid (>10,000 phospholipids per protein per second) scrambling of phospholipid probes. Our results indicate that the large conformational changes involved in converting rhodopsin to metarhodopsin II are not required for scrambling, and that the lipid translocation pathway either lies near the protein surface or involves membrane packing defects in the vicinity of the protein. In addition, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors scramble lipids, suggesting that rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors may play an unexpected moonlighting role in re-modelling cell membranes.

  20. Complete Reversible Refolding of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor on a Solid Support

    PubMed Central

    Di Bartolo, Natalie; Compton, Emma L. R.; Warne, Tony; Edwards, Patricia C.; Tate, Christopher G.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-01-01

    The factors defining the correct folding and stability of integral membrane proteins are poorly understood. Folding of only a few select membrane proteins has been scrutinised, leaving considerable deficiencies in knowledge for large protein families, such as G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Complete reversible folding, which is problematic for any membrane protein, has eluded this dominant receptor family. Moreover, attempts to recover receptors from denatured states are inefficient, yielding at best 40–70% functional protein. We present a method for the reversible unfolding of an archetypal family member, the β1-adrenergic receptor, and attain 100% recovery of the folded, functional state, in terms of ligand binding, compared to receptor which has not been subject to any unfolding and retains its original, folded structure. We exploit refolding on a solid support, which could avoid unwanted interactions and aggregation that occur in bulk solution. We determine the changes in structure and function upon unfolding and refolding. Additionally, we employ a method that is relatively new to membrane protein folding; pulse proteolysis. Complete refolding of β1-adrenergic receptor occurs in n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (DM) micelles from a urea-denatured state, as shown by regain of its original helical structure, ligand binding and protein fluorescence. The successful refolding strategy on a solid support offers a defined method for the controlled refolding and recovery of functional GPCRs and other membrane proteins that suffer from instability and irreversible denaturation once isolated from their native membranes. PMID:26982879

  1. Constitutive phospholipid scramblase activity of a G Protein-coupled receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Michael A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Menon, Indu; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2014-01-01

    Opsin, the rhodopsin apoprotein, was recently shown to be an ATP-independent flippase (or scramblase) that equilibrates phospholipids across photoreceptor disc membranes in mammalian retina, a process required for disc homeostasis. Here we show that scrambling is a constitutive activity of rhodopsin, distinct from its light-sensing function. Upon reconstitution into vesicles, discrete conformational states of the protein (rhodopsin, a metarhodopsin II-mimic, and two forms of opsin) facilitated rapid (>10,000 phospholipids per protein per second) scrambling of phospholipid probes. Our results indicate that the large conformational changes involved in converting rhodopsin to metarhodopsin II are not required for scrambling, and that the lipid translocation pathway either lies near the protein surface or involves membrane packing defects in the vicinity of the protein. Additionally, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors scramble lipids, suggesting that rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors may play an unexpected moonlighting role in re-modeling cell membranes. PMID:25296113

  2. Responsiveness of G protein-coupled odorant receptors is partially attributed to the activation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiqun; de March, Claire A.; Ni, Mengjue J.; Adipietro, Kaylin A.; Golebiowski, Jérôme; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Ma, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    Mammals detect and discriminate numerous odors via a large family of G protein-coupled odorant receptors (ORs). However, little is known about the molecular and structural basis underlying OR response properties. Using site-directed mutagenesis and computational modeling, we studied ORs sharing high sequence homology but with different response properties. When tested in heterologous cells by diverse odorants, MOR256-3 responded broadly to many odorants, whereas MOR256-8 responded weakly to a few odorants. Out of 36 mutant MOR256-3 ORs, the majority altered the responses to different odorants in a similar manner and the overall response of an OR was positively correlated with its basal activity, an indication of ligand-independent receptor activation. Strikingly, a single mutation in MOR256-8 was sufficient to confer both high basal activity and broad responsiveness to this receptor. These results suggest that broad responsiveness of an OR is at least partially attributed to its activation likelihood. PMID:26627247

  3. Fluorescent knock-in mice to decipher the physiopathological role of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ceredig, Rhian A.; Massotte, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate most physiological functions but are also critically involved in numerous pathological states. Approximately a third of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which places this family of receptors in the main arena of pharmacological pre-clinical and clinical research. The complexity of GPCR function demands comprehensive appraisal in native environment to collect in-depth knowledge of receptor physiopathological roles and assess the potential of therapeutic molecules. Identifying neurons expressing endogenous GPCRs is therefore essential to locate them within functional circuits whereas GPCR visualization with subcellular resolution is required to get insight into agonist-induced trafficking. Both remain frequently poorly investigated because direct visualization of endogenous receptors is often hampered by the lack of appropriate tools. Also, monitoring intracellular trafficking requires real-time visualization to gather in-depth knowledge. In this context, knock-in mice expressing a fluorescent protein or a fluorescent version of a GPCR under the control of the endogenous promoter not only help to decipher neuroanatomical circuits but also enable real-time monitoring with subcellular resolution thus providing invaluable information on their trafficking in response to a physiological or a pharmacological challenge. This review will present the animal models and discuss their contribution to the understanding of the physiopathological role of GPCRs. We will also address the drawbacks associated with this methodological approach and browse future directions. PMID:25610398

  4. Fluorescent Approaches for Understanding Interactions of Ligands with G Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Rajashri; Zuber, Jeffrey; Connelly, Sara M.; Mathew, Elizabeth; Dumont, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for a wide variety of signaling responses in diverse cell types. Despite major advances in the determination of structures of this class of receptors, the underlying mechanisms by which binding of different types of ligands specifically elicits particular signaling responses remains unclear. The use of fluorescence spectroscopy can provide important information about the process of ligand binding and ligand dependent conformational changes in receptors, especially kinetic aspects of these processes, that can be difficult to extract from x-ray structures. We present an overview of the extensive array of fluorescent ligands that have been used in studies of GPCRs and describe spectroscopic approaches for assaying binding and probing the environment of receptor-bound ligands with particular attention to examples involving yeast pheromone receptors. In addition, we discuss the use of fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting and characterizing conformational changes in receptors induced by the binding of ligands. Such studies have provided strong evidence for diversity of receptor conformations elicited by different ligands, consistent with the idea that GPCRs are not simple on and off switches. This diversity of states constitutes an underlying mechanistic basis for biased agonism, the observation that different stimuli can produce different responses from a single receptor. It is likely that continued technical advances will allow fluorescence spectroscopy to play an important role in continued probing of structural transitions in GPCRs. PMID:24055822

  5. Studying G protein-coupled receptors: immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, phosphorylation, surface labeling, and cross-linking protocols.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kasturi; Badgandi, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are signaling organelles that have been shown to coordinate cellular responses to extracellular cues during physiological processes ranging from organ patterning to cell cycle regulation. A variety of receptors, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), downstream effectors (adenylyl cyclases), and second messengers, such as calcium, accumulate in the ciliary compartment. Isolation of GPCRs is essential for studying posttranslational modifications, intracellular trafficking, and protein-protein interactions that are important in downstream signaling. However, the presence of multiple hydrophobic transmembrane domains, and the inherent conformational flexibility of GPCRs make their extraction from membranes and solubilization particularly challenging. Here, we describe detailed methods for immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of GPCRs from whole cell extracts. These methods are applicable for studying other multipass transmembrane proteins (such as adenylyl cyclases). We also describe methods for determining GPCR phosphorylation, surface labeling by biotinylation, and cross-linking to detect transient interactions with other proteins. These methods are amenable for studying both ciliary and nonciliary GPCRs in the context of cellular signaling pathways. PMID:25837398

  6. GPCR-ModSim: A comprehensive web based solution for modeling G-protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Esguerra, Mauricio; Siretskiy, Alexey; Bello, Xabier; Sallander, Jessica; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    GPCR-ModSim (http://open.gpcr-modsim.org) is a centralized and easy to use service dedicated to the structural modeling of G-protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). 3D molecular models can be generated from amino acid sequence by homology-modeling techniques, considering different receptor conformations. GPCR-ModSim includes a membrane insertion and molecular dynamics (MD) equilibration protocol, which can be used to refine the generated model or any GPCR structure uploaded to the server, including if desired non-protein elements such as orthosteric or allosteric ligands, structural waters or ions. We herein revise the main characteristics of GPCR-ModSim and present new functionalities. The templates used for homology modeling have been updated considering the latest structural data, with separate profile structural alignments built for inactive, partially-active and active groups of templates. We have also added the possibility to perform multiple-template homology modeling in a unique and flexible way. Finally, our new MD protocol considers a series of distance restraints derived from a recently identified conserved network of helical contacts, allowing for a smoother refinement of the generated models which is particularly advised when there is low homology to the available templates. GPCR- ModSim has been tested on the GPCR Dock 2013 competition with satisfactory results. PMID:27166369

  7. G Protein Signaling Modulator-3 Inhibits the Inflammasome Activity of NLRP3*

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Patrick M.; Gall, Bryan J.; Ezekwe, Ejiofor A. D.; Laroche, Geneviève; Buckley, Brian K.; Kebaier, Chahnaz; Wilson, Justin E.; Ting, Jenny P.; Siderovski, David P.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein complexes that regulate maturation of the interleukin 1β-related cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 through activation of the cysteine proteinase caspase-1. NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) protein is a key component of inflammasomes that assemble in response to a wide variety of endogenous and pathogen-derived danger signals. Activation of the NLRP3-inflammasome and subsequent secretion of IL-1β is highly regulated by at least three processes: transcriptional activation of both NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β genes, non-transcriptional priming of NLRP3, and final activation of NLRP3. NLRP3 is predominantly expressed in cells of the hematopoietic lineage. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the hematopoietic-restricted protein, G protein signaling modulator-3 (GPSM3), as a NLRP3-interacting protein and a negative regulator of IL-1β production triggered by NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activators. In monocytes, GPSM3 associates with the C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain of NLRP3. Bone marrow-derived macrophages lacking GPSM3 expression exhibit an increase in NLRP3-dependent IL-1β, but not TNF-α, secretion. Furthermore, GPSM3-null mice have enhanced serum and peritoneal IL-1β p